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Sample records for large scale solar

  1. Timing signatures of large scale solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Hock-Mysliwiec, Rachel; Henry, Timothy; Kirk, Michael S.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the timing signatures of large solar eruptions resulting in flares, CMEs and Solar Energetic Particle events. We probe solar active regions from the chromosphere through the corona, using data from space and ground-based observations, including ISOON, SDO, GONG, and GOES. Our studies include a number of flares and CMEs of mostly the M- and X-strengths as categorized by GOES. We find that the chromospheric signatures of these large eruptions occur 5-30 minutes in advance of coronal high temperature signatures. These timing measurements are then used as inputs to models and reconstruct the eruptive nature of these systems, and explore their utility in forecasts.

  2. Large-scale Fresnel lens solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allums, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Jensen, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Sun tracking solar collector using lightweight inexpensive acrylic lenses to concentrate sun's energy yields efficiency range of 50 percent at average fluid temperature of 125 C to 26 percent at 300 C.

  3. Large-scale velocity fields. [of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Robert F.; Kichatinov, L. L.; Bogart, Richard S.; Ribes, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    The present evaluation of recent observational results bearing on the nature and characteristics of solar rotation gives attention to the status of current understanding on such large-scale velocity-field-associated phenomena as solar supergranulation, mesogranulation, and giant-scale convection. Also noted are theoretical suggestions reconciling theory and observations of giant-scale solar convection. The photosphere's global meridional circulation is suggested by solar rotation models requiring pole-to-equator flows of a few m/sec, as well as by the observed migration of magnetic activity over the solar cycle. The solar rotation exhibits a latitude and cycle dependence which can be understood in terms of a time-dependent convective toroidal roll pattern.

  4. The large-scale structure of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the solar wind is reviewed on the basis of experimental space measurements acquired over approximately the last decade. The observations cover the fading portion of the last solar cycle up through the maximum of the present cycle. The character of the interplanetary medium is considered from the viewpoint of the temporal behavior of the solar wind over increasingly longer time intervals, the average properties of the various solar wind parameters and their interrelationships. Interplanetary-terrestrial relationships and the expected effects of heliographic lattitude and radial distance are briefly discussed.

  5. Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

    2014-03-01

    Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  6. Large-Scale periodic solar velocities: An observational study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmer, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of large-scale solar velocities were made using the mean field telescope and Babcock magnetograph of the Stanford Solar Observatory. Observations were made in the magnetically insensitive ion line at 5124 A, with light from the center (limb) of the disk right (left) circularly polarized, so that the magnetograph measures the difference in wavelength between center and limb. Computer calculations are made of the wavelength difference produced by global pulsations for spherical harmonics up to second order and of the signal produced by displacing the solar image relative to polarizing optics or diffraction grating.

  7. Large-scale nanostructured low-temperature solar selective absorber.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kequn; Yang, Liu; Liu, Zhaolang; Gao, PingQi; Ye, Jichun; He, Sailing

    2017-05-15

    A large-scale nanostructured low-temperature solar selective absorber is demonstrated experimentally. It consists of a silicon dioxide thin film coating on a rough refractory tantalum substrate, fabricated based simply on self-assembled, closely packed polystyrene nanospheres. Because of the strong light harvesting of the surface nanopatterns and constructive interference within the top silicon dioxide coating, our absorber has a much higher solar absorption (0.84) than its planar counterpart (0.78). Though its absorption is lower than that of commercial black paint with ultra-broad absorption, the greatly suppressed absorption/emission in the long range still enables a superior heat accumulation. The working temperature is as high as 196.3°C under 7-sun solar illumination in ambient conditions-much higher than those achieved by the two comparables.

  8. Large-scale Cyclic Features of Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Wang, J.

    It is well accepted that the solar cycle originates from a magnetohydrodynamics dynamo deep inside the Sun Many dynamo models have long been proposed based on a lot of observational constraints In this paper using 342 NSO Kitt Peak synoptic charts we study the large-scale solar cycle features of photospheric magnetic flux to set further constraints According to the flux behaviors we categorize each hemisphere into four typical latitudinal zones the polar region the high latitude region the activity belt and the low latitude region 1 We find the mean latitudes of the boundaries of polar regions to be near 55 35° during solar minimums and 67 61° during solar maximums 2 There is an unipolar poleward magnetic flux found in the high latitude region during solar maximums 3 For the activity belt the flux peak time or the main phase of solar cycle are steady and has a period near 11 years From the higher latitudinal strips to the lower ones the total positive or negative magnetic flux accumulates with a speed of 2 48 times10 20 Mx deg Moreover we find that the latitude migration of magnetic flux which represents the Sp o rer law starts in this belt and can be written in a formula like phi 29 02-3 150t 0 1123t 2 4 The flux peak time of the low latitude region shifts forward with an average speed of 32 2 day deg From the higher latitudinal strips to the lower ones the total magnetic flux dissipates with a speed of 3 63 times10 20 Mx deg General speaking dynamo theories are developed for

  9. Termination shock response to large-scale solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of data recorded by the Voyager 2 spacecraft indicates the presence of large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind ram pressure on the time scale of tens of days. The amplitude of the fluctuations is highly variable but often lies within a factor of 5 to 10 change from an average or mean value of the ram pressure. Since the spacecraft has presumably not encountered the termination shock yet, these fluctuations should eventually interact with the shock and thereby play a role in determining the shock location. Numerical solutions of the time-dependent gasdynamic equations are used to simulate the response of the termination shock to fluctuations in the solar wind ram pressure comparable to those observed. The primary result of this study is that the maximum shock excursion due to the fluctuations is of the order of 1 AU, which is much smaller than that predicted by other studies. Additional simulations show that the limited movement is due to the fact that the time scale for the termination shock response is substantially larger than the time scale of the fluctuations. It is also shown that the heliopause acts as a barrier for the fluctuations and confines them to the heliosphere.

  10. Termination shock response to large-scale solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of data recorded by the Voyager 2 spacecraft indicates the presence of large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind ram pressure on the time scale of tens of days. The amplitude of the fluctuations is highly variable but often lies within a factor of 5 to 10 change from an average or mean value of the ram pressure. Since the spacecraft has presumably not encountered the termination shock yet, these fluctuations should eventually interact with the shock and thereby play a role in determining the shock location. Numerical solutions of the time-dependent gas dynamic equations are used to simulate the response of the termination shock to fluctuations in the solar wind ram pressure comparable to those observed. The primary result of this study is that the maximum shock excursion due to the fluctuations is of the order of 1 AU, which is much smaller than that predicted by other studies. Additional simulations show that the limited movement is due to the fact that the time scale for the termination shock response is substantially larger than the time scale of the fluctuations. It is also shown that the heliopause acts as a barrier for the fluctuations and confines them to the heliosphere.

  11. Terminology of Large-Scale Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, Bojan

    2005-03-01

    This is the fourth in a series of essays on terms used in solar-terrestrial physics that are thought to be in need of clarification. Terms are identified and essays are commissioned by a committee chartered by Division II (Sun and Heliosphere) of the International Astronomical Union. Terminology Committee members include Ed Cliver (chair), Jean-Louis Bougeret, Hilary Cane, Takeo Kosugi, Sara Martin, Rainer Schwenn, and Lidia van Driel-Gestelyi. Authors are asked to review the origins of terms and their current usage/misusage. The goals are to inform the community and to open a discussion. The following article by Bojan Vršnak focuses on terms used to describe large-scale waves in the solar atmosphere, an area of research that has been given great impetus by the images of waves from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The committee welcomes suggestions for other terms to address in this forum.

  12. Large-scale solar magnetic field mapping: I.

    PubMed

    Schatten, Kenneth H

    2013-12-01

    This article focuses on mapping the Sun's large-scale magnetic fields. In particular, the model considers how photospheric fields evolve in time. Our solar field mapping method uses Netlogo's cellular automata software via algorithms to carry out the movement of magnetic field on the Sun via agents. This model's entities consist of two breeds: blue and red agents. The former carry a fixed amount of radially outward magnetic flux: 10(23) Mx, and the latter, the identical amount of inward directed flux. The individual agents are distinguished, for clarity, by various shades of blue and red arrows whose orientation indicates the direction the agents are moving, relative to the near-steady bulk fluid motions. The fluid motions generally advect the field with the well known meridional circulation and differential rotation. Our model predominantly focuses on spatial and temporal variations from the bulk fluid motions owing to magnetic interactions. There are but a few effects that agents have on each other: i) while at the poles, field agents are connected via the Babcock - Leighton (B - L) subsurface field to other latitudes. This allows them to undertake two duties there: A) the B - L subsurface field spawns the next generation of new magnetic field via new agents, and B) the B - L subsurface field attracts lower-latitude fields via the "long-range" magnetic stress tension; ii) nearby agents affect each other's motion by short-range interactions; and iii) through annihilation: when opposite field agents get too close to each other, they disappear in pairs. The behavior of the agents' long- and short-range magnetic forces is discussed within this paper as well as the model's use of internal boundary conditions. The workings of the model may be seen in the accompanying movies and/or by using the software available via SpringerPlus' website, or on the Netlogo (TM) community website, where help is readable available, and should all these fail, some help from the author.

  13. High-Efficiency, Multijunction Solar Cells for Large-Scale Solar Electricity Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2006-03-01

    A solar cell with an infinite number of materials (matched to the solar spectrum) has a theoretical efficiency limit of 68%. If sunlight is concentrated, this limit increases to about 87%. These theoretical limits are calculated using basic physics and are independent of the details of the materials. In practice, the challenge of achieving high efficiency depends on identifying materials that can effectively use the solar spectrum. Impressive progress has been made with the current efficiency record being 39%. Today's solar market is also showing impressive progress, but is still hindered by high prices. One strategy for reducing cost is to use lenses or mirrors to focus the light on small solar cells. In this case, the system cost is dominated by the cost of the relatively inexpensive optics. The value of the optics increases with the efficiency of the solar cell. Thus, a concentrator system made with 35%- 40%-efficient solar cells is expected to deliver 50% more power at a similar cost when compare with a system using 25%-efficient cells. Today's markets are showing an opportunity for large concentrator systems that didn't exist 5-10 years ago. Efficiencies may soon pass 40% and ultimately may reach 50%, providing a pathway to improved performance and decreased cost. Many companies are currently investigating this technology for large-scale electricity generation. The presentation will cover the basic physics and more practical considerations to achieving high efficiency as well as describing the current status of the concentrator industry. This work has been authored by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute under Contract No. DE- AC36-99GO10337 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow

  14. Computational and experimental studies on large scale solar heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, S.

    The experimental part of the work deals mainly with the experiences gained from the Kerava Solar Village (KSV) but some additional remarks are presented from international studies. The measured thermal performance of the KSV heating system indicates considerably poorer performance than original design values. Reasons for this are studied by means of computational analyses. Fundamental problems with KSV systems was too small storage size with respect both to installed collector area and connected load. From an operational point of view, the frequent heat pump failures were the most severe problem. Computational tools for large solar heating system design and analyses are presented. Numerical models developed in this work, the KERCONT and SUPERSOL, are validated with measured performance from the KSV indicating reasonably good accuracy. The tools have been applied for detecting KSV heating system problems and for finding solutions for them as well as for re-design of the system. More general analyses are presented on the applicability of the KSV system principle in other load sizes and locations. A new approach for preliminary studies on Central Solar Heating Plants with Seasonal Storage (CSHPSS) is described. The analytical model, SOLCHIPS, is shown to be a very effective tool for pre-design studies. The validity of SOLCHIPS approach is studied by comparing the results against results from validated numerical model, MINSUN. In the last part of the work, preliminary results from numerical simulations of summer time district solar heating with short term storage are presented. According to the analyses, these systems should provide heat at or below the cost achievable with seasonal storage systems.

  15. The Case for the Large Scale Development of Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Traces the history of solar energy development. Discusses global effects (temperature, particle and other pollution) of burning fossil fuels. Provides energy balance equations for solar energy distribution and discusses flat plate collectors, solar cells, photochemical and photobiological conversion of solar energy, heat pumps. (CS)

  16. The Case for the Large Scale Development of Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Traces the history of solar energy development. Discusses global effects (temperature, particle and other pollution) of burning fossil fuels. Provides energy balance equations for solar energy distribution and discusses flat plate collectors, solar cells, photochemical and photobiological conversion of solar energy, heat pumps. (CS)

  17. The large scale structure of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    The solar wind structure is reviewed based on experimental space measurements acquired over approximately the last decade. The character of the interplanetary medium is considered from the viewpoint of the temporal behavior of the solar wind over increasingly longer time intervals, the average properties of the various solar wind parameters and their interrelationships. A brief discussion is included of interplanetary-terrestrial relationships and the expected effects of heliographic latitude and radial distance.

  18. Solar large-scale positive polarity magnetic fields and geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Unlike the negative polarity solar magnetic field large-scale regular features that correlate with enhanced solar activity regions, the positive polarity regular formations formed in the weak and old background magnetic fields seem to correlate well with geomagnetically enhanced periods of time (shifted for 4 days), which means that they seem to be the source of the quiet solar wind. This behavior of the large intervals of heliographic longitude with prevailing positive polarity fields may be followed to the end of the 18th cycle, during the declining part of the 19th cycle, and during the first half of the present 20th cycle of solar activity.

  19. Large Scale Wind and Solar Integration in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Bernhard; Schreirer, Uwe; Berster, Frank; Pease, John; Scholz, Cristian; Erbring, Hans-Peter; Schlunke, Stephan; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2010-02-28

    This report provides key information concerning the German experience with integrating of 25 gigawatts of wind and 7 gigawatts of solar power capacity and mitigating its impacts on the electric power system. The report has been prepared based on information provided by the Amprion GmbH and 50Hertz Transmission GmbH managers and engineers to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory representatives during their visit to Germany in October 2009. The trip and this report have been sponsored by the BPA Technology Innovation office. Learning from the German experience could help the Bonneville Power Administration engineers to compare and evaluate potential new solutions for managing higher penetrations of wind energy resources in their control area. A broader dissemination of this experience will benefit wind and solar resource integration efforts in the United States.

  20. Tradeoffs and synergies between biofuel production and large-scale solar infrastructure in deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S.; Lobell, D. B.; Field, C. B.

    2012-12-01

    Solar energy installations in deserts are on the rise, fueled by technological advances and policy changes. Deserts, with a combination of high solar radiation and availability of large areas unusable for crop production are ideal locations for large scale solar installations. For efficient power generation, solar infrastructures require large amounts of water for operation (mostly for cleaning panels and dust suppression), leading to significant moisture additions to desert soil. A pertinent question is how to use the moisture inputs for sustainable agriculture/biofuel production. We investigated the water requirements for large solar infrastructures in North American deserts and explored the possibilities for integrating biofuel production with solar infrastructure. In co-located systems the possible decline in yields due to shading by solar panels may be offsetted by the benefits of periodic water addition to biofuel crops, simpler dust management and more efficient power generation in solar installations, and decreased impacts on natural habitats and scarce resources in deserts. In particular, we evaluated the potential to integrate solar infrastructure with biomass feedstocks that grow in arid and semi-arid lands (Agave Spp), which are found to produce high yields with minimal water inputs. To this end, we conducted detailed life cycle analysis for these coupled agave biofuel - solar energy systems to explore the tradeoffs and synergies, in the context of energy input-output, water use and carbon emissions.

  1. Solar cycle variation of large-scale coronal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Duvall, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    A green line intensity variation is associated with the interplanetary and photospheric magnetic sector structure. This effect depends on the solar cycle and occurs with the same amplitude in the latitude range 60 deg N - 60 deg S. Extended longitudinal coronal structures are suggested, which indicate the existence of closed magnetic field lines over the neutral line, separating adjacent regions of opposite polarities on the photospheric surface.

  2. Deployment dynamics and control of large-scale flexible solar array system with deployable mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Quan; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Shao-Jing; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, deployment dynamics and control of large-scale flexible solar array system with deployable mast are investigated. The adopted solar array system is introduced firstly, including system configuration, deployable mast and solar arrays with several mechanisms. Then dynamic equation of the solar array system is established by the Jourdain velocity variation principle and a method for dynamics with topology changes is introduced. In addition, a PD controller with disturbance estimation is designed to eliminate the drift of spacecraft mainbody. Finally the validity of the dynamic model is verified through a comparison with ADAMS software and the deployment process and dynamic behavior of the system are studied in detail. Simulation results indicate that the proposed model is effective to describe the deployment dynamics of the large-scale flexible solar arrays and the proposed controller is practical to eliminate the drift of spacecraft mainbody.

  3. Solar Trees: First Large-Scale Demonstration of Fully Solution Coated, Semitransparent, Flexible Organic Photovoltaic Modules.

    PubMed

    Berny, Stephane; Blouin, Nicolas; Distler, Andreas; Egelhaaf, Hans-Joachim; Krompiec, Michal; Lohr, Andreas; Lozman, Owen R; Morse, Graham E; Nanson, Lana; Pron, Agnieszka; Sauermann, Tobias; Seidler, Nico; Tierney, Steve; Tiwana, Priti; Wagner, Michael; Wilson, Henry

    2016-05-01

    The technology behind a large area array of flexible solar cells with a unique design and semitransparent blue appearance is presented. These modules are implemented in a solar tree installation at the German pavilion in the EXPO2015 in Milan/IT. The modules show power conversion efficiencies of 4.5% and are produced exclusively using standard printing techniques for large-scale production.

  4. Large-scale use of solar energy with central receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1983-12-01

    The working principles of solar central receiver power plants are outlined and applications are discussed. Heliostat arrays direct sunlight into a receiver cavity mounted on a tower, heating the working fluid in the tower to temperatures exceeding 500 C. The formulation for the image plane and the geometric concentration ratio for a heliostat field are provided, noting that commercial electric power plants will require concentration ratios of 200-1000. Automated controls consider imperfections in the mirrors, tracking errors, and seasonal insolation intensity and angular variations. Membranes may be used instead of rigid heliostat mirrors to reduce costs, while trade-offs exist between the efficiencies of cavity and exterior receivers on the tower. Sensible heat storage has proved most effective for cloudy or nighttime operations. Details of the DOE Solar One 10 MW plant, which began operation in 1982, are provided, with mention given to the 33.6 continuous hours of power generation that have been achieved. Projected costs of commercial installations are $700/kWt, and possible applications include recovering and refining oil, processing natural gas, uranium ore, and sugar cane, drying gypsum board, and manufacturing ammonia.

  5. A new framework to increase the efficiency of large-scale solar power plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohammadi, Shahrouz; Kleissl, Jan P.

    2015-11-01

    A new framework to estimate the spatio-temporal behavior of solar power is introduced, which predicts the statistical behavior of power output at utility scale Photo-Voltaic (PV) power plants. The framework is based on spatio-temporal Gaussian Processes Regression (Kriging) models, which incorporates satellite data with the UCSD version of the Weather and Research Forecasting model. This framework is designed to improve the efficiency of the large-scale solar power plants. The results are also validated from measurements of the local pyranometer sensors, and some improvements in different scenarios are observed. Solar energy.

  6. Solar total energy-large scale experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The design and development of a 7 meter diameter parabolic dish solar collector are discussed. Each of the four main subsystems of the collector: (1) reflector, (2) mount and drives, (3) receiver and (4) the controls, is discussed briefly with the major emphasis on the receiver design. To minimize development risks and production costs, a dish design based on use of stamped aluminum petals (sectors) was chosen. This design is similar to the design of a communication antenna already commercially produced. The reflective surface of the petals has a total reflectance of .86 and a specularity (dispersion) of 8 mrd. This performance is obtained by mechanical polishing and chemical brightening of the petal surface, followed by application of a clear RTV silicone protective coating. Selection of the material and weather proofing coated are discussed. Results from performance tests on an engineering development dish collector are presented and compared with pretest predictions.

  7. Observing large-scale solar surface flows with GONG: Investigation of a key element in solar activity buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, John G.; Simon, George W.; Hathaway, David H.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) solar telescope network has begun regular operations, and will provide continuous Doppler images of large-scale nearly-steady motions at the solar surface, primarily those due to supergranulation. Not only the Sun's well-known magnetic network, but also flux diffusion, dispersal, and concentration at the surface appear to be controlled by supergranulation. Through such magnetoconvective interactions, magnetic stresses develop, leading to solar activity. We show a Doppler movie made from a 45.5 hr time series obtained 1995 May 9-10 using data from three of the six GONG sites (Learmonth, Tenerife, Tucson), to demonstrate the capability of this system.

  8. Delving Deeper into the Solar Dynamo Mechanism: Alpha Effect, Parity Selection and Large Scale Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D.

    2003-05-01

    Visible manifestations of the 22 year solar magnetic cycle have been the subject of study spanning centuries starting with the telescopic observations of sunspots by Johann Fabricius, Christoph Scheiner and Galileo Galilei in the early 1600s. Coupled with these observations of magnetic features on the solar surface, the advent of the field of helioseismology in recent years has made it possible to map large scale flows in the solar interior - believed to play a crucial role in sustaining the solar cycle. However, a complete understanding of the hydromagnetic dynamo mechanism that powers this solar cycle remains elusive. Here we report studies of the solar dynamo addressing some of the important unresolved questions regarding the nature and location of the alpha effect, solar magnetic parity selection and the role of large scale flows and their variation, with a goal to understand the exact means by which the Sun generates its magnetic cycle. This study was supported by NASA through SR&T grant NAG5-6110.

  9. Large-scale terrestrial solar cell power generation cost: A preliminary assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spakowski, A. E.; Shure, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    A cost study was made to assess the potential of the large-scale use of solar cell power for terrestrial applications. The incentive is the attraction of a zero-pollution source of power for wide-scale use. Unlike many other concepts for low-pollution power generation, even thermal pollution is avoided since only the incident solar flux is utilized. To provide a basis for comparison and a perspective for evaluation, the pertinent technology was treated in two categories: current and optimistic. Factors considered were solar cells, array assembly, power conditioning, site preparation, buildings, maintenance, and operation. The capital investment was assumed to be amortized over 30 years. The useful life of the solar cell array was assumed to be 10 years, and the cases of zero and 50-percent performance deg-radation were considered. Land costs, taxes, and profits were not included in this study because it was found too difficult to provide good generalized estimates of these items. On the basis of the factors considered, it is shown that even for optimistic projections of technology, electric power from large-sclae terrestrial use of solar cells is approximately two to three orders of magnitude more costly than current electric power generation from either fossil or nuclear fuel powerplants. For solar cell power generation to be a viable competitor on a cost basis, technological breakthroughs would be required in both solar cell and array fabrication and in site preparation.

  10. Alignment and scaling of large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Wicks, R T; Mallet, A; Horbury, T S; Chen, C H K; Schekochihin, A A; Mitchell, J J

    2013-01-11

    We investigate the dependence of solar wind fluctuations measured by the Wind spacecraft on scale and on the degree of alignment between oppositely directed Elsasser fields. This alignment controls the strength of the nonlinear interactions and, therefore, the turbulence. We find that at scales larger than the outer scale of the turbulence the Elsasser fluctuations become on average more antialigned as the outer scale is approached from above. Conditioning structure functions using the alignment angle reveals turbulent scaling of unaligned fluctuations at scales previously believed to lie outside the turbulent cascade in the "1/f range." We argue that the 1/f range contains a mixture of a noninteracting antialigned population of Alfvén waves and magnetic force-free structures plus a subdominant population of unaligned cascading turbulent fluctuations.

  11. Large-scale solar magnetic fields and H-alpha patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, P. S.

    1972-01-01

    Coronal and interplanetary magnetic fields computed from measurements of large-scale photospheric magnetic fields suffer from interruptions in day-to-day observations and the limitation of using only measurements made near the solar central meridian. Procedures were devised for inferring the lines of polarity reversal from H-alpha solar patrol photographs that map the same large-scale features found on Mt. Wilson magnetograms. These features may be monitored without interruption by combining observations from the global network of observatories associated with NOAA's Space Environment Services Center. The patterns of inferred magnetic fields may be followed accurately as far as 60 deg from central meridian. Such patterns will be used to improve predictions of coronal features during the next solar eclipse.

  12. A large-scale solar dynamics observatory image dataset for computer vision applications.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Ahmet; Banda, Juan M; Angryk, Rafal A

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics Space Agency (NASA) Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission has given us unprecedented insight into the Sun's activity. By capturing approximately 70,000 images a day, this mission has created one of the richest and biggest repositories of solar image data available to mankind. With such massive amounts of information, researchers have been able to produce great advances in detecting solar events. In this resource, we compile SDO solar data into a single repository in order to provide the computer vision community with a standardized and curated large-scale dataset of several hundred thousand solar events found on high resolution solar images. This publicly available resource, along with the generation source code, will accelerate computer vision research on NASA's solar image data by reducing the amount of time spent performing data acquisition and curation from the multiple sources we have compiled. By improving the quality of the data with thorough curation, we anticipate a wider adoption and interest from the computer vision to the solar physics community.

  13. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  14. Large Scale Solar Velocities on Time Scales up to Thirty Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, John Gunther

    1997-08-01

    This work studied solar supergranulation and methods of improving solar oscillation measurements. The supergranulation size scale and lifetime were found to be independent of heliographic latitude. The observed supergranule size scales were 31.7 ± 1.6 Mm in the East-West direction and 32.0 ± 1.6 Mm in the North-South direction; the mean lifetime was 23.4 ± 1.1 hours. Persistent granules were observed with the sizes of ~60 Mm and lifetimes of up to 160 hours, these features were found to affect supergranule lifetime measurements. Improvements of solar oscillation measurements were sought through three means: active region noise modeling, simulation the GONG instrument, and merging GONG data with IRIS data. The active region noise model, MDV, was tested and found promising. A simulation revealed a transmission profile ripple in the GONG instrument which could explain the observed velocity errors. A technique for merging GONG and IRIS data was developed and tested with satisfactory results.

  15. Global Magnetic Topology and Large-Scale Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Viacheslav; Linker, Jon; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Torok, Tibor

    We consider the global topology of the coronal magnetic field in relation to the large-scale dynamics of the solar corona. Our consideration includes recent results on the structural analysis of this field determined in two different approximations, namely, potential field source surface model and solar magnetohydrodynamic model. We identify similarities and differences between structural features of the magnetic field obtained in these two models and discuss their implications for understanding various large-scale phenomena in the solar corona. The underlying magnetic topology manifests itself in a variety of observed morphological features such as streamers, pseudo-streamers or unipolar streamers, EUV dimmings, flare ribbons, coronal holes, and jets. For each of them, the related magnetic configuration has specific structural features, whose presence has to be not only identified but also verified on its independence from the used field model in order to reliably predict the impact of such features on physical processes in the corona. Among them are magnetic null points and minima, bald patches, separatrix surfaces and quasi-separatrix layers, and open and closed separator field lines. These features form a structural skeleton of the coronal magnetic field and are directly involved through the ubiquitous process of magnetic reconnection in many solar dynamic phenomena such as coronal mass ejections, solar wind, acceleration and transport of energetic particles. We will pinpoint and elucidate in our overview some of such involvements that have recently received a considerable attention in our ongoing projects at Predictive Science.

  16. Interplanetary Scintillation Observations of the Large-Scale Structure of the Solar Wind Using EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Breen, A. R.; Habbal, S. R.; Fallows, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) taken with the European Incoherent SCATter radar (EISCAT) in northern Scandinavia can be used to study the evolution of the solar wind as it expands through interplanetary space. IPS arises from changes in the apparent brightness of distant, compact radio sources due to scattering by density irregularities in the solar wind and can be used to obtain estimates of the solar wind speed. In this paper we present the results of a study of the large-scale structure of the fast solar wind under near solar minimum conditions, using data taken with the EISCAT system, and the extremely long baseline observations which combine the EISCAT and MERLIN systems. The latter are the best measurements to date of meridional components of velocity in the inner solar wind. In particular, the existence of a gradient in solar wind velocity of the fast wind over the polar crown, at latitudes corresponding to the x-ray and ultra-violet coronal hole boundary, as reported by Habbal and Woo (2001), is also explored.

  17. Investigation of the Large Scale Evolution and Topology of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with the large-scale evolution and topology of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. During this reporting period we have analyzed a series of low density intervals in the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) plasma data set that bear many similarities to CMEs. We have begun a series of 3D, MHD (Magnetohydrodynamics) coronal models to probe potential causes of these events. We also edited two manuscripts concerning the properties of CMEs in the solar wind. One was re-submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  18. Definitive design of the solar total energy large-scale experiment at Shenandoah, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunke, R. W.; Leonard, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Construction of a Solar Total Energy Large Scale Experiment at Shenandoah, Georgia, is described. The Solar Total Energy System (STES) is designed with capacity to supply electricity and thermal energy to a knitwear plant at the Shenandoah site. The system will provide 400 kilowatts electrical and 3.5 megawatts thermal energy. The STES is a cascaded total energy system configuration. It uses parabolic disch collectors and a steam turbine-generator. The electrical system will be grid connected to the Georgia Power Company system.

  19. Effects of Large-Scale Solar Installations on Dust Mobilization and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J. T.; Singh, D.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale solar projects are increasingly being developed worldwide and many of these installations are located in arid, desert regions. To examine the effects of these projects on regional dust mobilization and air quality, we analyze aerosol product data from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) at annual and seasonal time intervals near fifteen photovoltaic and solar thermal stations ranging from 5-200 MW (12-4,942 acres) in size. The stations are distributed over eight different countries and were chosen based on size, location and installation date; most of the installations are large-scale, took place in desert climates and were installed between 2006 and 2010. We also consider air quality measurements of particulate matter between 2.5 and 10 micrometers (PM10) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitoring sites near and downwind from the project installations in the U.S. We use monthly wind data from the NOAA's National Center for Atmospheric Prediction (NCEP) Global Reanalysis to select the stations downwind from the installations, and then perform statistical analysis on the data to identify any significant changes in these quantities. We find that fourteen of the fifteen regions have lower aerosol product after the start of the installations as well as all six PM10 monitoring stations showing lower particulate matter measurements after construction commenced. Results fail to show any statistically significant differences in aerosol optical index or PM10 measurements before and after the large-scale solar installations. However, many of the large installations are very recent, and there is insufficient data to fully understand the long-term effects on air quality. More data and higher resolution analysis is necessary to better understand the relationship between large-scale solar, dust and air quality.

  20. Constraining Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Field Models with Optical Coronal Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific success of the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) and Solar Orbiter (SO) missions will depend to a large extent on the accuracy of the available coronal magnetic field models describing the connectivity of plasma disturbances in the inner heliosphere with their source regions. We argue that ground based and satellite coronagraph images can provide robust geometric constraints for the next generation of improved coronal magnetic field extrapolation models. In contrast to the previously proposed loop segmentation codes designed for detecting compact closed-field structures above solar active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal regions located at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Details on the new feature detection algorithms will be presented. By applying the developed image processing methodology to high-resolution Mauna Loa Solar Observatory images, we perform an optimized 3D B-line tracing for a full Carrington rotation using the magnetic field extrapolation code presented in a companion talk by S.Jones at al. Tracing results are shown to be in a good qualitative agreement with the large-scalie configuration of the optical corona. Subsequent phases of the project and the related data products for SSP and SO missions as wwll as the supporting global heliospheric simulations will be discussed.

  1. Large-Scale Fabrication of Silicon Nanowires for Solar Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingchang; Jie, Jiansheng; Zhang, Xiujuan; Ou, Xuemei; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2017-10-11

    The development of silicon (Si) materials during past decades has boosted up the prosperity of the modern semiconductor industry. In comparison with the bulk-Si materials, Si nanowires (SiNWs) possess superior structural, optical, and electrical properties and have attracted increasing attention in solar energy applications. To achieve the practical applications of SiNWs, both large-scale synthesis of SiNWs at low cost and rational design of energy conversion devices with high efficiency are the prerequisite. This review focuses on the recent progresses in large-scale production of SiNWs, as well as the construction of high-efficiency SiNW-based solar energy conversion devices, including photovoltaic devices and photo-electrochemical cells. Finally, the outlook and challenges in this emerging field are presented.

  2. Public attitudes regarding large-scale solar energy development in the U.S.

    DOE PAGES

    Carlisle, Juliet E.; Kane, Stephanie L.; Solan, David; ...

    2015-08-01

    Using data collected from both a National sample as well as an oversample in U.S. Southwest, we examine public attitudes toward the construction of utility-scale solar facilities in the U.S. as well as development in one’s own county. Our multivariate analyses assess demographic and sociopsychological factors as well as context in terms of proximity of proposed project by considering the effect of predictors for respondents living in the Southwest versus those from a National sample.We find that the predictors, and impact of the predictors, related to support and opposition to solar development vary in terms of psychological and physical distance.more » Overall, for respondents living in the U.S. Southwest we find that environmentalism, belief that developers receive too many incentives, and trust in project developers to be significantly related to support and opposition to solar development, in general. When Southwest respondents consider large-scale solar development in their county, the influence of these variables changes so that property value, race, and age only yield influence. Differential effects occur for respondents of our National sample.We believe our findings to be relevant for those outside the U.S. due to the considerable growth PV solar has experienced in the last decade, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S.« less

  3. Public attitudes regarding large-scale solar energy development in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, Juliet E.; Kane, Stephanie L.; Solan, David; Bowman, Madelaine; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-08-01

    Using data collected from both a National sample as well as an oversample in U.S. Southwest, we examine public attitudes toward the construction of utility-scale solar facilities in the U.S. as well as development in one’s own county. Our multivariate analyses assess demographic and sociopsychological factors as well as context in terms of proximity of proposed project by considering the effect of predictors for respondents living in the Southwest versus those from a National sample.We find that the predictors, and impact of the predictors, related to support and opposition to solar development vary in terms of psychological and physical distance. Overall, for respondents living in the U.S. Southwest we find that environmentalism, belief that developers receive too many incentives, and trust in project developers to be significantly related to support and opposition to solar development, in general. When Southwest respondents consider large-scale solar development in their county, the influence of these variables changes so that property value, race, and age only yield influence. Differential effects occur for respondents of our National sample.We believe our findings to be relevant for those outside the U.S. due to the considerable growth PV solar has experienced in the last decade, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S.

  4. Large-Scale Coronal Heating from "Cool" Activity in the Solar Magnetic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    In Fe XII images from SOHO/EIT, the quiet solar corona shows structure on scales ranging from sub-supergranular (i.e., bright points and coronal network) to multi-supergranular (large-scale corona). In Falconer et al 1998 (Ap.J., 501, 386) we suppressed the large-scale background and found that the network-scale features are predominantly rooted in the magnetic network lanes at the boundaries of the supergranules. Taken together, the coronal network emission and bright point emission are only about 5% of the entire quiet solar coronal Fe XII emission. Here we investigate the relationship between the large-scale corona and the network as seen in three different EIT filters (He II, Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). Using the median-brightness contour, we divide the large-scale Fe XII corona into dim and bright halves, and find that the bright-half/dim half brightness ratio is about 1.5. We also find that the bright half relative to the dim half has 10 times greater total bright point Fe XII emission, 3 times greater Fe XII network emission, 2 times greater Fe IX-X network emission, 1.3 times greater He II network emission, and has 1.5 times more magnetic flux. Also, the cooler network (He II) radiates an order of magnitude more energy than the hotter coronal network (Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). From these results we infer that: 1) The heating of the network and the heating of the large-scale corona each increase roughly linearly with the underlying magnetic flux. 2) The production of network coronal bright points and heating of the coronal network each increase nonlinearly with the magnetic flux. 3) The heating of the large-scale corona is driven by widespread cooler network activity rather than by the exceptional network activity that produces the network coronal bright points and the coronal network. 4) The large-scale corona is heated by a nonthermal process since the driver of its heating is cooler than it is. This work was funded by the Solar Physics Branch of NASA's office of

  5. Large-Scale Coronal Heating from "Cool" Activity in the Solar Magnetic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    In Fe XII images from SOHO/EIT, the quiet solar corona shows structure on scales ranging from sub-supergranular (i.e., bright points and coronal network) to multi-supergranular (large-scale corona). In Falconer et al 1998 (Ap.J., 501, 386) we suppressed the large-scale background and found that the network-scale features are predominantly rooted in the magnetic network lanes at the boundaries of the supergranules. Taken together, the coronal network emission and bright point emission are only about 5% of the entire quiet solar coronal Fe XII emission. Here we investigate the relationship between the large-scale corona and the network as seen in three different EIT filters (He II, Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). Using the median-brightness contour, we divide the large-scale Fe XII corona into dim and bright halves, and find that the bright-half/dim half brightness ratio is about 1.5. We also find that the bright half relative to the dim half has 10 times greater total bright point Fe XII emission, 3 times greater Fe XII network emission, 2 times greater Fe IX-X network emission, 1.3 times greater He II network emission, and has 1.5 times more magnetic flux. Also, the cooler network (He II) radiates an order of magnitude more energy than the hotter coronal network (Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). From these results we infer that: 1) The heating of the network and the heating of the large-scale corona each increase roughly linearly with the underlying magnetic flux. 2) The production of network coronal bright points and heating of the coronal network each increase nonlinearly with the magnetic flux. 3) The heating of the large-scale corona is driven by widespread cooler network activity rather than by the exceptional network activity that produces the network coronal bright points and the coronal network. 4) The large-scale corona is heated by a nonthermal process since the driver of its heating is cooler than it is. This work was funded by the Solar Physics Branch of NASA's office of

  6. Beginning of the new solar cycle (cycle 24) in the large-scale open solar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2008-06-01

    It is proposed to determined minimums of the 11-year solar cycles based on a minimal flux of the large-scale open solar magnetic field. The minimal fluxes before the finished cycle 23 (Carrington rotation CR 1904) and the started cycle 24 (CR 2054, April 2007) were equal to 1.8 × 1022 and 1.2 × 1022 μs, respectively. The long-term tendency toward an approach to a deep minimum of solar activity is confirmed. On the assumption that magnetic flux variations from minimums to maximums are proportional to each other, the anticipated value of the maximal Wolf number during cycle 24 is estimated as W max = 80.

  7. Comparing the Large-Scale Magnetic Field During the Last Three Solar Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Large-scale magnetic field observations show that the current extended solar cycle minimum differs from the two previous well-observed minima in several respects. The weaker polar fields increase the relative influence of middle and low-latitude flux patterns on the configuration of the corona and heliosphere. A much larger fraction of the open flux originates in equatorial coronal holes. Even though the heliospheric field magnitude and the mean solar magnetic field are the weakest since direct measurements began, the sector structure of the interplanetary field that reflects the shape of the heliospheric current sheet continues to extend to fairly high latitude. The pattern of emergence of active regions through the cycle and the transport of flux from low to high latitudes also show quite different patterns, providing insight into the meridional flow that influences the dynamo that drives the cycle. The long records of synoptic observations that provide a rich source of information about solar activity must be maintained.

  8. Thermocline Thermal Storage Test for Large-Scale Solar Thermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    ST.LAURENT,STEVEN J.

    2000-08-14

    Solar thermal-to-electric power plants have been tested and investigated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) since the late 1970s, and thermal storage has always been an area of key study because it affords an economical method of delivering solar-electricity during non-daylight hours. This paper describes the design considerations of a new, single-tank, thermal storage system and details the benefits of employing this technology in large-scale (10MW to 100MW) solar thermal power plants. Since December 1999, solar engineers at Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) have designed and are constructing a thermal storage test called the thermocline system. This technology, which employs a single thermocline tank, has the potential to replace the traditional and more expensive two-tank storage systems. The thermocline tank approach uses a mixture of silica sand and quartzite rock to displace a significant portion of the volume in the tank. Then it is filled with the heat transfer fluid, a molten nitrate salt. A thermal gradient separates the hot and cold salt. Loading the tank with the combination of sand, rock, and molten salt instead of just molten salt dramatically reduces the system cost. The typical cost of the molten nitrate salt is $800 per ton versus the cost of the sand and rock portion at $70 per ton. Construction of the thermocline system will be completed in August 2000, and testing will run for two to three months. The testing results will be used to determine the economic viability of the single-tank (thermocline) storage technology for large-scale solar thermal power plants. Also discussed in this paper are the safety issues involving molten nitrate salts and other heat transfer fluids, such as synthetic heat transfer oils, and the impact of these issues on the system design.

  9. A Large-scale Plume in an X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.

    2017-08-01

    Ever-increasing multi-frequency imaging of solar observations suggests that solar flares often involve more than one magnetic fluxtube. Some of the fluxtubes are closed, while others can contain open fields. The relative proportion of nonthermal electrons among those distinct loops is highly important for understanding energy release, particle acceleration, and transport. The access of nonthermal electrons to the open field is also important because the open field facilitates the solar energetic particle (SEP) escape from the flaring site, and thus controls the SEP fluxes in the solar system, both directly and as seed particles for further acceleration. The large-scale fluxtubes are often filled with a tenuous plasma, which is difficult to detect in either EUV or X-ray wavelengths; however, they can dominate at low radio frequencies, where a modest component of nonthermal electrons can render the source optically thick and, thus, bright enough to be observed. Here we report the detection of a large-scale “plume” at the impulsive phase of an X-class solar flare, SOL2001-08-25T16:23, using multi-frequency radio data from Owens Valley Solar Array. To quantify the flare’s spatial structure, we employ 3D modeling utilizing force-free-field extrapolations from the line of sight SOHO/MDI magnetograms with our modeling tool GX_Simulator. We found that a significant fraction of the nonthermal electrons that accelerated at the flare site low in the corona escapes to the plume, which contains both closed and open fields. We propose that the proportion between the closed and open fields at the plume is what determines the SEP population escaping into interplanetary space.

  10. Large-scale solar wind streams: Average temporal evolution of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Yermolaev, Michael; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    In the report we describe the average temporal profiles of plasma and field parameters in the disturbed large-scale types of solar wind (SW): corotating interaction regions (CIR), interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICME) (both magnetic cloud (MC) and Ejecta), and Sheath as well as the interplanetary shock (IS) on the basis of OMNI database and our Catalog of large-scale solar wind phenomena during 1976-2000 (see website ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/ and paper [Yermolaev et al., 2009]). To consider influence of both the surrounding undisturbed solar wind, and the interaction of the disturbed types of the solar wind on the parameters, we separately analyze the following sequences of the phenomena: (1) SW/CIR/SW, (2) SW/IS/CIR/SW, (3) SW/Ejecta/SW, (4) SW/Sheath/Ejecta/SW, (5) SW/IS/Sheath/Ejecta/SW, (6) SW/MC/SW, (7) SW/Sheath/MC/SW, and (8) SW/IS/Sheath/MC/SW. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allow us to suggest that (1) the behavior of parameters in Sheath and in CIR is very similar not only qualitatively but also quantitatively, and (2) the speed angle phi in ICME changes from 2 to -2deg. while in CIR and Sheath it changes from -2 to 2 deg., i.e., the streams in CIR/Sheath and ICME deviate in the opposite side. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research, , Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 81-94. Yermolaev, Y. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Y. Yermolaev (2010), Specific interplanetary conditions for CIR

  11. Overview of Small and Large-Scale Space Solar Power Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Seth; Henley, Mark; Howell, Joe; Carrington, Connie; Fikes, John

    2006-01-01

    poles to search for water ice and other frozen volatiles. Near such craters are mountain peaks and highlands that are in near permanent sunlight. Power can be beamed from a collector on a sunlit mountain or crater rim to a rover inside a crater. Near-term applications of space solar power technology can therefore pave the way toward large-scale commercial power from space.

  12. A large-scale dataset of solar event reports from automated feature recognition modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Michael A.; Angryk, Rafal A.; Martens, Petrus C.

    2016-05-01

    The massive repository of images of the Sun captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission has ushered in the era of Big Data for Solar Physics. In this work, we investigate the entire public collection of events reported to the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) from automated solar feature recognition modules operated by the SDO Feature Finding Team (FFT). With the SDO mission recently surpassing five years of operations, and over 280,000 event reports for seven types of solar phenomena, we present the broadest and most comprehensive large-scale dataset of the SDO FFT modules to date. We also present numerous statistics on these modules, providing valuable contextual information for better understanding and validating of the individual event reports and the entire dataset as a whole. After extensive data cleaning through exploratory data analysis, we highlight several opportunities for knowledge discovery from data (KDD). Through these important prerequisite analyses presented here, the results of KDD from Solar Big Data will be overall more reliable and better understood. As the SDO mission remains operational over the coming years, these datasets will continue to grow in size and value. Future versions of this dataset will be analyzed in the general framework established in this work and maintained publicly online for easy access by the community.

  13. A Data-driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-11-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  14. PATHWAYS OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC COUPLINGS BETWEEN SOLAR CORONAL EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Yeates, Anthony R.

    2013-08-20

    The high-cadence, comprehensive view of the solar corona by SDO/AIA shows many events that are widely separated in space while occurring close together in time. In some cases, sets of coronal events are evidently causally related, while in many other instances indirect evidence can be found. We present case studies to highlight a variety of coupling processes involved in coronal events. We find that physical linkages between events do occur, but concur with earlier studies that these couplings appear to be crucial to understanding the initiation of major eruptive or explosive phenomena relatively infrequently. We note that the post-eruption reconfiguration timescale of the large-scale corona, estimated from the extreme-ultraviolet afterglow, is on average longer than the mean time between coronal mass ejections (CMEs), so that many CMEs originate from a corona that is still adjusting from a previous event. We argue that the coronal field is intrinsically global: current systems build up over days to months, the relaxation after eruptions continues over many hours, and evolving connections easily span much of a hemisphere. This needs to be reflected in our modeling of the connections from the solar surface into the heliosphere to properly model the solar wind, its perturbations, and the generation and propagation of solar energetic particles. However, the large-scale field cannot be constructed reliably by currently available observational resources. We assess the potential of high-quality observations from beyond Earth's perspective and advanced global modeling to understand the couplings between coronal events in the context of CMEs and solar energetic particle events.

  15. A Large-Scale Search for Evidence of Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inglis, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Dennis, B. R..; Hayes, L.; Gallagher, P.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in solar flares is poorly constrained, and critically the general prevalence of such signals in solar flares is unknown. Therefore, we perform a large-scale search for evidence of signals consistent with QPP in solar flares, focusing on the 1300 s timescale. We analyze 675 M- and X-class flares observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) series in 18 soft X-rays between 2011 February 1 and 2015 December 31. Additionally, over the same era we analyze Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) 1525 keV X-ray data for each of these flares associated with a Fermi/GBM solar flare trigger, a total of 261 events. Using a model comparison method, we determine whether there is evidence for a substantial enhancement in the Fourier power spectrum that may be consistent with a QPP signature, based on three tested models; a power-law plus a constant, a broken power-law plus constant, and a power-law-plus-constant with an additional QPP signature component. From this, we determine that approx. 30% of GOES events and approx. 8% of Fermi/GBM events show strong signatures consistent with classical interpretations of QPP. For the remaining events either two or more tested models cannot be strongly distinguished from each other, or the events are well-described by single power-law or broken power-law Fourier power spectra. For both instruments, a preferred characteristic time-scale of approx. 5-30 s was found in the QPP-like events, with no dependence on flare magnitude in either GOES or GBM data. We also show that individual events in the sample show similar characteristic time-scales in both GBM and GOES data sets. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of solar flares and possible QPP mechanisms.

  16. Large-scale structures of solar wind and dynamics of parameters in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Yermolaev, Michael

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI dataset and our catalog of large-scale solar wind (SW) phenomena (see web-site ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/ and paper by Yermolaev et al., 2009) we study temporal profile of interplanetary and magnetospheric parameters in following SW phenomena: interplanetary manifestation of coronal mass ejection (ICME) including magnetic cloud (MC) and Ejecta, Sheath—compression region before ICME and corotating interaction region (CIR)—compression region before high-speed stream (HSS) of solar wind. To take into account a possible influence of other SW types, following sequences of phenomena, which include all typical sequences of non-stationary SW events, are analyzed: (1) SW/ CIR/ SW, (2) SW/ IS/ CIR/ SW, (3) SW/ Ejecta/ SW, (4) SW/ Sheath/Ejecta/ SW, (5) SW/ IS/ Sheath/ Ejecta/ SW, (6) SW/ MC/ SW, (7) SW/Sheath/ MC/ SW, (8) SW/ IS/ Sheath/ MC/ SW (where SW is undisturbed solar wind, and IS is interplanetary shock) (Yermolaev et al., 2015) using the method of double superposed epoch analysis for large numbers of events (Yermolaev et al., 2010). Similarities and distinctions of different SW phenomena depending on neighboring SW types and their geoeffectiveness are discussed. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, projects 16-12-10062. References: Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research, , Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 81-94. Yermolaev, Y. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Y. Yermolaev (2010), Specific interplanetary conditions for CIR-induced, Sheath-induced, and ICME-induced geomagnetic storms obtained by double superposed epoch analysis, Ann. Geophys., 28, pp. 2177-2186. Yermolaev, Yu. I., I. G. Lodkina, N. S. Nikolaeva, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2015), Dynamics of large-scale solar wind streams obtained by the double superposed epoch analysis, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 120, doi:10.1002/2015JA021274.

  17. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [interplanetary magnetic fields/solar activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    A large-scale, three dimensional magnetic field in the interplanetary medium with an expected classical spiral pattern to zeroth order is discussed. Systematic and random deviations which are expected are treated. The sector structure which should be evident at high latitudes is examined. Interplanetary streams are discussed as determining the patterns of magnetic field intensity. It was proposed that the large-scale spiral field can induce a meridional flow which might alter the field geometry somewhat. The nonuniformities caused by streams will probably significantly influence the motion of solar and galactic particles. It was concluded that knowledge of the 3-dimensional field and its dynamical effects can be obtained by in situ measurements by a probe which goes over the sun's poles. Diagrams of the magnetic fields are given.

  18. Detection of large scale geomagnetic pulsations by MAGDAS-egypt stations during the solar minimum of the solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of different types of large-scale geomagnetic pulsation (Pc3, Pc4, Pc5 and Pi2) detected simultaneously by two MAGDAS stations located at Fayum (Geo. Coordinates 29.18 N and 30.50 E) and Aswan (Geo. Coordinates 23.59 N and 32.51 E) in Egypt. The second order butter-worth band-pass filter has been used to filter and analyze the horizontal H-component of the geomagnetic field in one-second data. The data was collected during the solar minimum of the current solar cycle 24. We list the most energetic pulsations detected by the two stations instantaneously, in addition; the average amplitude of the pulsation signals was calculated.

  19. Magnetic neutral lines of the large-scale magnetic field and solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V.I.; Tavastsherna, K.S.; Sivaraman, K.R.

    1986-06-01

    Two components in the size distribution of structures of the large-scale magnetic field are distinguished on the basis of H-alpha synoptic maps for the period 1955-1981. It is shown that the overall solar magnetic field has a latitudinal zonal structure, which is formed from elements of the first and second distributions. The boundaries of the latitude zones of the magnetic field oscillate about the mean latitudes or have only polar drift. Three types of quasiperiodic oscillations are noted, the periods of which differ in the S and N hemispheres. The most probable period of the oscillations (about 20 solar revolutions) is distinguished in the Southern Hemisphere. 14 references.

  20. Large-scale horizontal flows in the solar photosphere. III. Effects on filament destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudier, T.; Švanda, M.; Meunier, N.; Keil, S.; Rieutord, M.; Malherbe, J. M.; Rondi, S.; Molodij, G.; Bommier, V.; Schmieder, B.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:We study the influence of large-scale photospheric motions on the destabilization of an eruptive filament, observed on October 6, 7, and 8, 2004, as part of an international observing campaign (JOP 178). Methods: Large-scale horizontal flows were investigated from a series of MDI full-disc Dopplergrams and magnetograms. From the Dopplergrams, we tracked supergranular flow patterns using the local correlation tracking (LCT) technique. We used both LCT and manual tracking of isolated magnetic elements to obtain horizontal velocities from magnetograms. Results: We find that the measured flow fields obtained by the different methods are well-correlated on large scales. The topology of the flow field changed significantly during the filament eruptive phase, suggesting a possible coupling between the surface flow field and the coronal magnetic field. We measured an increase in the shear below the point where the eruption starts and a decrease in shear after the eruption. We find a pattern in the large-scale horizontal flows at the solar surface that interact with differential rotation. Conclusions: We conclude that there is probably a link between changes in surface flow and the disappearance of the eruptive filament.

  1. Association of 3He-Rich Solar Energetic Particles with Large-scale Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bučík, Radoslav; Innes, Davina E.; Mason, Glenn M.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    2016-12-01

    Small, 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events have been commonly associated with extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets and narrow coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are believed to be the signatures of magnetic reconnection, involving field lines open to interplanetary space. The elemental and isotopic fractionation in these events are thought to be caused by processes confined to the flare sites. In this study, we identify 32 3He-rich SEP events observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer, near the Earth, during the solar minimum period 2007-2010, and we examine their solar sources with the high resolution Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUV images. Leading the Earth, STEREO-A has provided, for the first time, a direct view on 3He-rich flares, which are generally located on the Sun’s western hemisphere. Surprisingly, we find that about half of the 3He-rich SEP events in this survey are associated with large-scale EUV coronal waves. An examination of the wave front propagation, the source-flare distribution, and the coronal magnetic field connections suggests that the EUV waves may affect the injection of 3He-rich SEPs into interplanetary space.

  2. A Large-scale Search for Evidence of Quasi-periodic Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Dennis, B. R.; Hayes, L.; Gallagher, P.

    2016-12-01

    The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in solar flares is poorly constrained, and critically the general prevalence of such signals in solar flares is unknown. Therefore, we perform a large-scale search for evidence of signals consistent with QPP in solar flares, focusing on the 1-300 s timescale. We analyze 675 M- and X-class flares observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) series in 1-8 Å soft X-rays between 2011 February 1 and 2015 December 31. Additionally, over the same era we analyze Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) 15-25 keV X-ray data for each of these flares associated with a Fermi/GBM solar flare trigger, a total of 261 events. Using a model comparison method, we determine whether there is evidence for a substantial enhancement in the Fourier power spectrum that may be consistent with a QPP signature, based on three tested models; a power-law plus a constant, a broken power-law plus constant, and a power-law-plus-constant with an additional QPP signature component. From this, we determine that ˜30% of GOES events and ˜8% of Fermi/GBM events show strong signatures consistent with classical interpretations of QPP. For the remaining events either two or more tested models cannot be strongly distinguished from each other, or the events are well-described by single power-law or broken power-law Fourier power spectra. For both instruments, a preferred characteristic timescale of ˜5-30 s was found in the QPP-like events, with no dependence on flare magnitude in either GOES or GBM data. We also show that individual events in the sample show similar characteristic timescales in both GBM and GOES data sets. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of solar flares and possible QPP mechanisms.

  3. Large-scale interaction of the solar wind with comets Halley and Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, John C.; Niedner, Malcolm B., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    In-situ measurements of comets Halley and Giacobini-Zinner have confirmed the accepted basic physics of comet/solar wind interaction. The solar wind magnetic field is captured by the comet through the mechanism of field-line loading by cometary ions and the field lines drape around the cometary ionosphere. With this basic model in hand, the large-scale structure of the plasma tail as revealed by submissions to the Large Scale Phenomena Network of the International Halley Watch is reviewed. The turn-on and turn-off of plasma activity seem consistent with theory. Some 16 obvious disconnection events (DEs) have been recorded. Preliminary results showed agreement with the sector-boundary model; a detailed analysis of all DEs will be required in order to make a definitive statement. A study of plasma activity around the time of the VEGA encounters provides strong support for the sector-boundary model and illustrates once again the power of simultaneous remote and in-situ measurements.

  4. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  5. Wearable Large-Scale Perovskite Solar-Power Source via Nanocellular Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaotian; Huang, Zengqi; Zhou, Xue; Li, Pengwei; Wang, Yang; Huang, Zhandong; Su, Meng; Ren, Wanjie; Li, Fengyu; Li, Mingzhu; Chen, Yiwang; Song, Yanlin

    2017-09-08

    Dramatic advances in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and the blossoming of wearable electronics have triggered tremendous demands for flexible solar-power sources. However, the fracturing of functional crystalline films and transmittance wastage from flexible substrates are critical challenges to approaching the high-performance PSCs with flexural endurance. In this work, a nanocellular scaffold is introduced to architect a mechanics buffer layer and optics resonant cavity. The nanocellular scaffold releases mechanical stresses during flexural experiences and significantly improves the crystalline quality of the perovskite films. The nanocellular optics resonant cavity optimizes light harvesting and charge transportation of devices. More importantly, these flexible PSCs, which demonstrate excellent performance and mechanical stability, are practically fabricated in modules as a wearable solar-power source. A power conversion efficiency of 12.32% for a flexible large-scale device (polyethylene terephthalate substrate, indium tin oxide-free, 1.01 cm(2) ) is achieved. This ingenious flexible structure will enable a new approach for development of wearable electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Investigation of the Large Scale Evolution and Topology of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete

    2001-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with the large-scale evolution and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. During the course of this three-year investigation, we have undertaken a number of studies that are discussed in more detail in this report. For example, we conducted an analysis of all CMEs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft during its in-ecliptic phase between 1 and 5 AU. In addition to studying the properties of the ejecta, we also analyzed the shocks that could be unambiguously associated with the fast CMEs. We also analyzed a series of 'density holes' observed in the solar wind that bear many similarities with CMEs. To complement this analysis, we conducted a series of 1-D and 2 1/2-D fluid, MHD, and hybrid simulations to address a number of specific issues related to CME evolution in the solar wind. For example, we used fluid simulations to address the interpretation of negative electron temperature-density relationships often observed within CME/cloud intervals. As part of this investigation, a number of fruitful international collaborations were forged. Finally, the results of this work were presented at nine scientific meetings and communicated in eight scientific, refereed papers.

  7. Solar Wind and IMF Control of Large-Scale Ionospheric Currents and Their Time Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juusola, L.; Kauristie, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Partamies, N.; Viljanen, A.; Andréeová, K.; van de Kamp, M.; Vanhamäki, H.; Milan, S. E.; Lester, M.; Grocott, A.; Imber, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Patterns of high-latitude ionospheric currents are a manifestation of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Rapid variations of the currents are associated with geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in technological conductor systems and displays of bright, diverse auroras. One advantage of a ground-based magnetometer network over a low-orbit satellite is the possibility to distinguish between temporal and spatial variations in the data. Although ground magnetic field data can only yield distributions of ionospheric equivalent currents instead of the full horizontal and field-aligned current density, estimates for these can be obtained, under certain assumptions. We use data (1994-2013) from the ground-based IMAGE magnetometer network to derive statistical distributions of the large-scale ionospheric equivalent current density and its time-derivative as well as estimates for the field-aligned current density. These are compared with and validated against horizontal and field-aligned current density distributions obtained from low-orbit CHAMP satellite magnetic field data (2000-2010) and convection maps obtained from SuperDARN radar data (2000-2010). The ground-based distributions reveal a strong dependence of the dayside variations on radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation and solar wind speed. The spatial distribution of enhanced nightside activity agrees with that of the average substorm bulge and depends on solar wind energy input into the magnetosphere. The most intense time variation events are related to substorm activity and occur on the nightside.

  8. Large-Scale Activity in the Bastille Day 2000 Solar Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertok, I. M.; Grechnev, V. V.

    2005-06-01

    We have analyzed dimmings, i.e., regions of temporarily reduced brightness, and manifestations of a coronal wave in the famous event of 14 July 2000 using images produced with the EUV telescope SOHO/EIT. Our analysis was inspired by a paper by Andrews (2001, Solar Phys. 204, 181 (Paper I)), in which this event was studied using running-difference EIT images at 195 Å formed by subtraction of a previous image from each current one. Such images emphasize changes of the brightness, location, and configuration of observed structures occurring during the 12-min interval between two subsequent heliograms. However, they distort the picture of large-scale disturbances caused by a CME, particularly, dimmings. A real picture of dimmings can be obtained from fixed-base difference ‘de-rotated’ images. The latter are formed in two stages: first, the solar rotation is compensated using three-dimensional rotation of all images (‘de-rotation’) to the time of a pre-event heliogram, here 10:00 UT, and then the base heliogram is subtracted from all others. We show real dimmings to be essentially different from those described by Andrews (Paper I). The restructuring of large-scale magnetic fields in the corona in connection with the CME was accompanied by the appearance and growth of two large dimmings. One of them was located along the central meridian, southward of the eruption center, at the place of the pre-eruption arcade. Another dimming occupied the space between the flare region and a remote western active region. Several smaller dimmings were observed virtually over the whole solar disk, especially, within the northwest quadrant. We have also revealed a propagating disturbance with properties of a coronal wave in the northern polar sector, where no dimmings were observed. This fact is discussed in the context of probable association between dimmings and coronal waves. Having suppressed the ‘snowstorm’ produced in the EIT images by energetic particles, we have

  9. Rapid optimization of large-scale luminescent solar concentrators: evaluation for adoption in the built environment.

    PubMed

    Merkx, E P J; Ten Kate, O M; van der Kolk, E

    2017-06-12

    The phenomenon of self-absorption is by far the largest influential factor in the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs), but also the most challenging one to capture computationally. In this work we present a model using a multiple-generation light transport (MGLT) approach to quantify light transport through single-layer luminescent solar concentrators of arbitrary shape and size. We demonstrate that MGLT offers a significant speed increase over Monte Carlo (raytracing) when optimizing the luminophore concentration in large LSCs and more insight into light transport processes. Our results show that optimizing luminophore concentration in a lab-scale device does not yield an optimal optical efficiency after scaling up to realistically sized windows. Each differently sized LSC therefore has to be optimized individually to obtain maximal efficiency. We show that, for strongly self-absorbing LSCs with a high quantum yield, parasitic self-absorption can turn into a positive effect at very high absorption coefficients. This is due to a combination of increased light trapping and stronger absorption of the incoming sunlight. We conclude that, except for scattering losses, MGLT can compute all aspects in light transport through an LSC accurately and can be used as a design tool for building-integrated photovoltaic elements. This design tool is therefore used to calculate many building-integrated LSC power conversion efficiencies.

  10. EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE NON-AXISYMMETRIC PERTURBATIONS IN THE MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2015-11-10

    We explore the response of a nonlinear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation that is anchored at 0.9 R{sub ⊙} has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric, with respect to the equator, perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fields depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number R{sub m}. In the range of R{sub m} = 10{sup 4}–10{sup 6} the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a nonlinear α-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state, the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of “active longitudes” with cyclic 180° “flip-flop” changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However, this effect disappears in the model, which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period and carries important information about the dynamo process.

  11. Large-scale variations of solar wind elemental composition and charge states with heliospheric latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woch, J.; Wilken, B.; Livi, S.; von Steiger, R.; Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) onboard Ulysses allows determination of the elemental composition of the solar wind and the charge states of all major solar wind ion species. Ulysses left the ecliptic plane in early 1992, crossed the Sun's south polar region in late 1994 and made a fast approach back towards the ecliptic in the first half of 1995. Data from this period were investigated for long-term variations in the solar wind composition. At midlatitudes Ulysses encountered periodically the fast solar wind stream emerging from the south coronal hole. As a consequence, dramatic variations in the charge-states arise, between high charge-states dominating in the current sheet solar wind and low charge states in the coronal hole stream. However, the initial analysis indicates that from midlatitudes onwards, with Ulysses permanently immersed in the coronal hole stream, the charge state and elemental abundance ratios of the major solar wind ion species stayed essentially constant. This implies that the temperature profile in the coronal hole at solar wind source altitudes exhibit no variation with solar latitude. It confirms that the south coronal hole is essentially unstructured down to scale lengths of several degrees in solar latitude.

  12. CORONAL AND CHROMOSPHERIC SIGNATURES OF LARGE-SCALE DISTURBANCES ASSOCIATED WITH A MAJOR SOLAR ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, Weiguo; Dai, Yu

    2015-08-20

    We present both coronal and chromospheric observations of large-scale disturbances associated with a major solar eruption on 2005 September 7. In the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites/Solar X-ray Imager (SXI), arclike coronal brightenings are recorded propagating in the southern hemisphere. The SXI front shows an initially constant speed of 730 km s{sup −1} and decelerates later on, and its center is near the central position angle of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) but away from the flare site. Chromospheric signatures of the disturbances are observed in both Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO)/Polarimeter for Inner Coronal Studies Hα and MLSO/Chromospheric Helium I Imaging Photometer He i λ10830 and can be divided into two parts. The southern signatures occur in regions where the SXI front sweeps over, with the Hα bright front coincident with the SXI front, while the He i dark front lags the SXI front but shows a similar kinematics. Ahead of the path of the southern signatures, oscillations of a filament are observed. The northern signatures occur near the equator, with the Hα and He i fronts coincident with each other. They first propagate westward and then deflect to the north at the boundary of an equatorial coronal hole. Based on these observational facts, we suggest that the global disturbances are associated with the CME lift-off and show a hybrid nature: a mainly non-wave CME flank nature for the SXI signatures and the corresponding southern chromospheric signatures, and a shocked fast-mode coronal MHD wave nature for the northern chromospheric signatures.

  13. Coronal and Chromospheric Signatures of Large-scale Disturbances Associated with a Major Solar Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Weiguo; Dai, Yu

    2015-08-01

    We present both coronal and chromospheric observations of large-scale disturbances associated with a major solar eruption on 2005 September 7. In the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites/Solar X-ray Imager (SXI), arclike coronal brightenings are recorded propagating in the southern hemisphere. The SXI front shows an initially constant speed of 730 km s-1 and decelerates later on, and its center is near the central position angle of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) but away from the flare site. Chromospheric signatures of the disturbances are observed in both Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO)/Polarimeter for Inner Coronal Studies Hα and MLSO/Chromospheric Helium I Imaging Photometer He i λ10830 and can be divided into two parts. The southern signatures occur in regions where the SXI front sweeps over, with the Hα bright front coincident with the SXI front, while the He i dark front lags the SXI front but shows a similar kinematics. Ahead of the path of the southern signatures, oscillations of a filament are observed. The northern signatures occur near the equator, with the Hα and He i fronts coincident with each other. They first propagate westward and then deflect to the north at the boundary of an equatorial coronal hole. Based on these observational facts, we suggest that the global disturbances are associated with the CME lift-off and show a hybrid nature: a mainly non-wave CME flank nature for the SXI signatures and the corresponding southern chromospheric signatures, and a shocked fast-mode coronal MHD wave nature for the northern chromospheric signatures.

  14. Association of Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle Events With Large-Scale Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucik, R.; Innes, D.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Impulsive or 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events have been commonly associated with EUV jets and narrow CMEs which are believed to be the signatures of magnetic reconnection involving field lines open to interplanetary space. The elemental and isotopic fractionation in these events are thought to be caused by processes confined to the flare sites. In addition to their anomalous abundances, 3He-rich SEPs show puzzling energy spectral shapes varying from rounded forms to power laws where the later are characteristics of shock acceleration. In this study we identify 32 impulsive SEP events observed by the ACE near the Earth during the solar minimum period 2007-2010 and examine their solar sources with the high resolution STEREO EUV images. Leading the Earth, STEREO-A provided for the first time a direct view on impulsive SEP event sources, which are generally located on the Sun's western hemisphere. Surprisingly, we find that about half of the impulsive SEP events in this survey are associated with large-scale EUV coronal waves. An examination of the wave front propagation and the coronal magnetic field connections suggests that the EUV waves may affect the injection of 3He-rich SEPs into interplanetary space. We found the events with jets tend to be associated with rounded spectra and the events with coronal waves with power laws. This suggests that coronal waves may be related to the unknown second stage mechanism commonly used to interpret spectral forms of 3He-rich SEPs. R. Bucik is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under grant BU 3115/2-1.

  15. Large-scale G W -BSE calculations with N3 scaling: Excitonic effects in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsili, Margherita; Mosconi, Edoardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Umari, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Excitonic effects due to electron-hole coupling play a fundamental role in renormalizing energy levels in dye sensitized and organic solar cells determining the driving force for electron extraction. We show that first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory within the G W -BSE approach provide a quantitative picture of interfacial excited state energetics in organic dye-sensitized TiO2, delivering a general rule for evaluating relevant energy levels. To perform G W -BSE calculations in such large systems we introduce a scheme based on maximally localized Wannier' s functions. With this method the overall scaling of G W -BSE calculations is reduced from O (N4 ) to O (N3 ).

  16. CALAS, A Camera for the Large-scale of the Solar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, N.; Rondi, S.; Tkaczuk, R.; Rieutord, M.; Beigbeder, F.

    2005-12-01

    The origin of supergranulation (convective or not) is still much debated. Among various possible approaches, one way to study supergranulation is to observe the horizontal motions of granules. A combination of a very large field-of-view (in order to see as many supergranules as possible), a very high spatial resolution (to sample granules with a high accuracy, even the small ones) and a high cadence is necessary to study this pattern in detail. We plan to implement a 4k×4k CMOS camera at the Lunette Jean Rösch (previously Coupole Tourelle) at the Pic du Midi Observatory (a 50 cm diameter refractor). The main objective of the camera, CALAS (Camera for the Large Scale of the Solar Surface), is the study of supergranulation. This will allow to sample granules with a high spatial resolution on a 10'×10' field-of-view (˜ 100 supergranules). We present our objectives, the instrumental set-up and organization, and the status of the instrument.

  17. Formation and Evolution of Large-Scale Magnetic Funnels in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, Olga; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The existence of open coronal magnetic fields with peculiar geometry - large-scale magnetic funnels - can be attributed to three factors: (i) the presence of two or more corona holes of the same polarity (or pseudostreamers - PSs), (ii) specific configurations of closed magnetic field in the low corona up to 1.3 Rs (filament channels) and (iii) the presence of strong active regions in the vicinity of the pseudostreamer. The important property of magnetic funnels is their strongly non-monotonic expansion factor below 2 Rs. The case study presented here is a pseudostreamer near the equator, formed between two isolated coronal holes of the same polarity, and harboring a pair of twin filaments in its base. Following the evolution of these coronal holes we find that the PS topology changes when two coronal holes merged together. Using a potential field source-surface (PFSS) extrapolation to compute the coronal field from photospheric maps (SDO/HMI), we show that the funnel-like geometry of the open magnetic field changes to a regular one with monotonic expansion factor after the merging of coronal holes. The presence of coronal magnetic funnels becomes directly visible when sufficient plasma accumulates inside them: when the plasma density grows to become observable coronal cloud prominences appear in the corona. The plasma suspension at heights of 0.3 Rs coincides with the largest gradients in the field which naturally leads to a diamagnetic hypothesis for the force counteracting gravity. We study the evolution of the funnel-like open fields during several solar rotations and find a direct relation between funnels and the presence of coronal clouds at great heights in the solar corona.

  18. Heating of the solar middle chromosphere by large-scale electric currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    A global resistive, two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is used to introduce and support the hypothesis that the quiet solar middle chromosphere is heated by resistive dissipation of large-scale electric currents which fill most of its volume. The scale height and maximum magnitude of the current density are 400 km and 31.3 m/sq m, respectively. The associated magnetic field is almost horizontal, has the same scale height as the current density, and has a maximum magnitude of 153 G. The current is carried by electrons flowing across magnetic field lines at 1 m/s. The resistivity is the electron contribution to the Pedersen resitivity for a weakly ionized, strongly magnetized, hydrogen gas. The model does not include a driving mechanism. Most of the physical quantities in the model decrease exponentially with time on a resistive timescale of 41.3 minutes. However, the initial values and spatial; dependence of these quantities are expected to be essentially the same as they would be if the correct driving mechanism were included in a more general model. The heating rate per unit mass is found to be 4.5 x 10(exp 9) ergs/g/s, independent of height and latitude. The electron density scale height is found to be 800 km. The model predicts that 90% of the thermal energy required to heat the middle chromosphere is deposited in the height range 300-760 km above the temperature minimum. It is shown to be consistent to assume that the radiation rate per unit volume is proportional to the magnetic energy density, and then it follows that the heating rate per unit volume is also proportional to the energy from the photosphere into the overlying chromosphere are briefly discussed as possible driving mechanisms for establishing and maintaining the current system. The case in which part of or all of the current is carried by protons and metal ions, and the contribution of electron-proton scattering to the current are also considered, with the conclusion

  19. An Investigation of the Large Scale Evolution and Topology of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Peter

    2000-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with the large-scale evolution and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. During this reporting period we have focused on several aspects of CME properties, their identification and their evolution in the solar wind. The work included both analysis of Ulysses and ACE observations as well as fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In addition, we analyzed a series of "density holes" observed in the solar wind, that bear many similarities with CMEs. Finally, this work was communicated to the scientific community at three meetings and has led to three scientific papers that are in various stages of review.

  20. Large-scale properties of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga; Obridko, Vladimir; Zharkova, Valentina; Veselov, Mikhail

    Since the solar wind phenomenon has been revealed and confirmed, one of the most intriguing problems was to understand processes in the solar atmosphere and their relation with the solar wind characteristics at different distances from the Sun. Analysis of multi-spacecraft measurements of plasma parameters and the interplanetary magnetic field provides us with knowledge about the heliosphere from global to small scales. Comparisons of observations with models, describing small-scale processes, usually give more positive results than in the case of models comparison with the solar wind properties at the scales larger than several proton gyroradii. For example, Parker-like models face with big problems in their attempts to predict the solar wind plasma and, especially, the behaviour of the interplanetary magnetic field. Observations show that the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field depends on heliolatitude and radially decreases with a slope of -5/3 instead of the predicted slope of -2 (Khabarova, Obridko, ApJ, 2012; Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013). This may be determined by small-scale processes occurring in some vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet and related to the magnetic reconnection (Zharkova, Khabarova, ApJ, 2012). In this report we present results of data analysis of eight spacecraft to study variations of plasma, the electric and magnetic field with distance and heliolatitude. begin{enumerate} Zharkova V., Khabarova O., Particle Acceleration in the Reconnecting Heliospheric Current Sheet: Solar Wind Data Versus 3D PIC Simulations, Astrophysical Journal, 2012, V.752, 1, 35 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/35 begin{enumerate} Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82 begin{enumerate} Khabarova Olga V., The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences. Astronomy Reports, 2013

  1. Organic solar cells for large-scale fossil-competitive power production: science fiction? Perhaps no!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiman, David

    2004-11-01

    The most widespread expectations for the future role of organic solar cells are probably as an extremely low-cost, easily-replaceable, power-producing medium for a wide variety of portable applications. This picture has come about owing to the present-day relatively low efficiency and stability of organic solar cells compared to their far more mature inorganic counterparts. However, even with the highest-efficiency and most stable inorganic solar cells there are still serious questions as to whether such technology could ever be cost-competitive with fossil-fuelled power generation, except for special niche situations. We have recently proposed that very large parabolic dishes, if used to illuminate inorganic solar cells at solar intensities several hundred times larger than normal, could lead to fossil-competitive solar power generation. The paper will review the technical details and economic projections of such systems and will discuss the conditions under which it might be possible for them to employ organic solar cells.

  2. Effects of large scale integration of wind and solar energy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Miguel; Zhang, Qi; Utama, Agya; Tezuka, Tetsuo; Ishihara, Keiichi

    2010-05-01

    results for the country as a whole are considered it is still substantial. The results are greatly dependant on the mix between the proposed renewables (solar and wind), and by comparing different distributions and mixes, the optimum composition for the target country can be established. The methodology proposed is able to obtain the optimum mix of solar and wind power for a given system, provided that adequate storage capacity exists to allow for excess capacity to be used at times of low electricity production (at the comparatively rare times when there is neither enough sun nor wind throughout the country). This highlights the challenges of large-scale integration of renewable technologies into the electricity grid, and the necessity to combine such a system with other renewables such as hydro or ocean energy to further even out the peaks and lows in the demand.

  3. Witnessing a Large-scale Slipping Magnetic Reconnection along a Dimming Channel during a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Liu, Rui; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Xu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Chunming; Wang, Haimin

    2017-06-01

    We report the intriguing large-scale dynamic phenomena associated with the M6.5 flare (SOL2015-06-22T18:23) in NOAA active region 12371, observed by RHESSI, Fermi, and the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The most interesting feature of this event is a third ribbon (R3) arising in the decay phase, propagating along a dimming channel (seen in EUV passbands) toward a neighboring sunspot. The propagation of R3 occurs in the presence of hard X-ray footpoint emission and is broadly visible at temperatures from 0.6 MK to over 10 MK through the differential emission measure analysis. The coronal loops then undergo an apparent slipping motion following the same path of R3, after a ∼80 minute delay. To understand the underlying physics, we investigate the magnetic configuration and the thermal structure of the flaring region. Our results are in favor of a slipping-type reconnection followed by the thermodynamic evolution of coronal loops. In comparison with those previously reported slipping reconnection events, this one proceeds across a particularly long distance (∼60 Mm) over a long period of time (∼50 minutes) and shows two clearly distinguished phases: the propagation of the footpoint brightening driven by nonthermal particle injection and the apparent slippage of loops governed by plasma heating and subsequent cooling.

  4. Witnessing a Large-scale Slipping Magnetic Reconnection along a Dimming Channel during a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Liu, Rui; Cheung, Mark; Lee, Jeongwoo; Xu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Chunming; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    We report the intriguing large-scale dynamic phenomena associated with the M6.5 flare~(SOL2015-06-22T18:23) in NOAA active region 12371, observed by RHESSI, Fermi, and the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The most interesting feature of this event is a third ribbon (R3) arising in the decay phase, propagating along a dimming channel (seen in EUV passbands) towards a neighboring sunspot. The propagation of R3 occurs in the presence of hard X-ray footpoint emission, and is broadly visible at temperatures from 0.6 MK to over 10 MK through the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis. The coronal loops then undergo an apparent slipping motion following the same path of R3, after a ~80 min delay. To understand the underlying physics, we investigate the magnetic configuration and the thermal structure of the flaring region. Our results are in favor of a slipping-type reconnection followed by the thermodynamic evolution of coronal loops. In comparison with those previously reported slipping reconnection events, this one proceeds across a particularly long distance (~60 Mm) over a long period of time ~50 min), and shows two clearly distinguished phases: the propagation of the footpoint brightening driven by nonthermal particle injection and the apparent slippage of loops governed by plasma heating and subsequent cooling.

  5. Large Scale Thermal Events in the Solar Nebula Recorded in FeNi Metal Condensates in CH Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meibom, A.; Desch, S. J.; Krot, A. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Petaev, M. I.; Wilson, L.; Keil, K.

    2000-01-01

    Some FeNi metal grains in CHs formed by gas-solid condensation from a gas of solar composition cooling at approx. 0.2 K/h from approx. 1370 K to approx. 1270 K. An astrophysical setting is proposed, which involves large scale convective updrafts from the disk midplane.

  6. Global Scale Solar Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, A. M.; Schrijver, C. J.; DeRosa, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The combination of the STEREO and SDO missions have allowed for the first time imagery of the entire Sun. This coupled with the high cadence, broad thermal coverage, and the large dynamic range of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO has allowed discovery of impulsive solar disturbances that can significantly affect a hemisphere or more of the solar volume. Such events are often, but not always, associated with M and X class flares. GOES C and even B class flares are also associated with these large scale disturbances. Key to the recognition of the large scale disturbances was the creation of log difference movies. By taking the log of images before differencing events in the corona become much more evident. Because such events cover such a large portion of the solar volume their passage can effect the dynamics of the entire corona as it adjusts to and recovers from their passage. In some cases this may lead to a another flare or filament ejection, but in general direct causal evidence of 'sympathetic' behavior is lacking. However, evidence is accumulating these large scale events create an environment that encourages other solar instabilities to occur. Understanding the source of these events and how the energy that drives them is built up, stored, and suddenly released is critical to understanding the origins of space weather. Example events and comments of their relevance will be presented.

  7. The beginning of observations of large-scale solar magnetic fields at the Sayan Observatory - Instrument, plans, preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, V. M.; Peshcherov, V. S.; Demidov, M. L.

    A telescope and a system for measuring large-scale magnetic fields and the large-scale field of line-of-sight velocities in the sun photosphere have been constructed at the Sayan Observatory (USSR). The instrument permits the following synoptic observations of large-scale structures: (1) magnetograms of a large-scale magnetic field with a 3-arcmin resolution and 0.1-0.2 Gs sensitivity; (2) solar disk magnetograms in the form of half-tone images of the magnetic field distribution with 15 Gs sensitivity and 8 x 8 arcsec resolution; and (3) measurement of the mean magnetic field of the sun as a star with about 0.1 Gs sensitivity. Preliminary results of toroidal magnetic field observations are briefly discussed.

  8. High-efficiency nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large scale realized through the suppression of recombination channels.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Sihua; Huang, Zengguang; Lin, Xingxing; Zeng, Yang; Ma, Yechi; Shen, Wenzhong

    2015-01-21

    Nanostructured silicon solar cells show great potential for new-generation photovoltaics due to their ability to approach ideal light-trapping. However, the nanofeatured morphology that brings about the optical benefits also introduces new recombination channels, and severe deterioration in the electrical performance even outweighs the gain in optics in most attempts. This Research News article aims to review the recent progress in the suppression of carrier recombination in silicon nanostructures, with the emphasis on the optimization of surface morphology and controllable nanostructure height and emitter doping concentration, as well as application of dielectric passivation coatings, providing design rules to realize high-efficiency nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large scale.

  9. Large-scale flows and magnetic fields in solar-like stars from global simulation with and without tachocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, G.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The large-scale flows patterns like differential rotation and meridional circulation as well as the mean-field dynamo action in the Sun and solar-like stars are thought to have their origin in helical turbulent motions in the stellar convection zones. In this work we will present recent results of HD and MHD global simulations of stars whose stratification resemble that of the solar interior. The simulations are performed with the EULAG code (Smolarkiewicz et al. 2001). They include implicit modeling of the large-eddy contribution from the turbulent scales to the resolved scales, thus, allowing higher turbulent levels (e.g., Guerrero et al. 2013). In the HD regime, the value of the Rossby (Ro) number defines large-scale flow patterns. Large values of Ro result in an anti-solar differential rotation and a meridional circulation consistent with a single circulation cell per hemisphere. Lower values of Ro result in a solar-type differential rotation and a meridional flow with multiple cells in radius and latitude. Due to the low dissipation of the numerical scheme, the models are also able to reproduce the tachocline and sustain it over a longer time scale. In the MHD regime, both solutions are still allowed, however, the shift from anti-solar to the solar-like rotation happens at a larger value or Ro. A wide range of dynamo solutions is obtained for the magnetic field, including steady and oscillating modes (see e.g., Fig. 1). We also compare models with and without a stable stratified layer at the bottom of the convection zone. We notice that the presence of a naturally developed tachocline plays an important role in the dynamo solution, modifying the morphology of the magnetic field, the cycles period and influencing the large-scale flows.References:Smolarkiewicz, P. K., Margolin, L. G., & Wyszogrodzki, A. A. 2001, JAtS, 58, 349; Guerrero, G., Smolarkiewicz, P. K., Kosovichev, A.K., Mansour, N.N. 2013, ApJ, 779, 176.

  10. Correlations at large scales and the onset of turbulence in the fast solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, R. T.; Roberts, D. A.; Mallet, A.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Horbury, T. S.; Chen, C. H. K.

    2013-12-01

    We show that the scaling of structure functions of magnetic and velocity fields in a mostly highly Alfvénic fast solar wind stream depends strongly on the joint distribution of the dimensionless measures of cross helicity and residual energy. Already at very low frequencies, fluctuations that are both more balanced (cross helicity ∼0) and equipartitioned (residual energy ∼0) have steep structure functions reminiscent of 'turbulent' scalings usually associated with the inertial range. Fluctuations that are magnetically dominated (residual energy ∼–1), and so have closely anti-aligned Elsasser-field vectors, or are imbalanced (cross helicity ∼1), and so have closely aligned magnetic and velocity vectors, have wide '1/f' ranges typical of fast solar wind. We conclude that the strength of nonlinear interactions of individual fluctuations within a stream, diagnosed by the degree of correlation in direction and magnitude of magnetic and velocity fluctuations, determines the extent of the 1/f region observed, and thus the onset scale for the turbulent cascade.

  11. ERRATUM: Correlations at Large Scales and the Onset of Turbulence in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicks, R. T.; Roberts, D. A.; Mallet, A.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Horbury, T. S.; Chen, C. H. K.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the scaling of structure functions of magnetic and velocity fields in a mostly highly Alfvenic fast solar wind stream depends strongly on the joint distribution of the dimensionless measures of cross helicity and residual energy. Already at very low frequencies, fluctuations that are both more balanced (cross helicity approx. 0) and equipartitioned (residual energy approx.0) have steep structure functions reminiscent of "turbulent" scalings usually associated with the inertial range. Fluctuations that are magnetically dominated (residual energy approx. –1), and so have closely anti-aligned Elsasser-field vectors, or are imbalanced (cross helicity approx. 1), and so have closely aligned magnetic and velocity vectors, have wide "1/f" ranges typical of fast solar wind. We conclude that the strength of nonlinear interactions of individual fluctuations within a stream, diagnosed by the degree of correlation in direction and magnitude of magnetic and velocity fluctuations, determines the extent of the 1/f region observed, and thus the onset scale for the turbulent cascade.

  12. High-latitude F region large-scale ionospheric irregularities under different solar wind and zenith angle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova, R. Yu.; Uvarov, V. M.; Coïsson, P.

    2017-01-01

    A numerical model is used to study systematically the evolution of large scale irregularities depending on the IMF Bz and By components, solar zenith angle (seasonal and daily variation), solar and geomagnetic activity. The model enables to reproduce the 3-D distribution of electron density over the high-latitude F region ionosphere in the altitude range between 130 and 640 km. Since the convection electric field driven by changes in solar wind conditions has an important effect on the high-latitude ionosphere, the rotation of the IMF vector in the Y-Z plane causes a significant redistribution of the ionospheric plasma. Under the southward IMF conditions the plasma density is enhanced over a large portion of the near-pole ionosphere as a tongue of ionization, while the northward IMF leads to a considerable depletion and occurrence of the polar hole. The IMF By polarity is crucial for the shift and extension of the tongue of ionization to the dusk or dawn side. Particle precipitation also plays a role through a localized increase of the electron density mostly within the auroral oval and more pronounced auroral peak. The solar zenith angle, especially its seasonal variation, is the strongest regular factor influencing the electron density magnitude and spatial distribution. In winter, when the polar ionosphere is in darkness, large variations associated with different solar wind condition are more prominent. The daily variation of the zenith angle considerably modifies the Ne within a particular pattern. At a given time, the combined action of the IMF, solar zenith angle, level of solar and geomagnetic activity produces a complicated ionospheric response which can be considered as a superposition of different effects. Quantitative estimates of the ionospheric response to each factor are presented.

  13. SWAP OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-TERM, LARGE-SCALE EVOLUTION OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Berghmans, David; Nicula, Bogdan; Shearer, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 spacecraft has been regularly observing the solar corona in a bandpass near 17.4 nm since 2010 February. With a field of view of 54 × 54 arcmin, SWAP provides the widest-field images of the EUV corona available from the perspective of the Earth. By carefully processing and combining multiple SWAP images, it is possible to produce low-noise composites that reveal the structure of the EUV corona to relatively large heights. A particularly important step in this processing was to remove instrumental stray light from the images by determining and deconvolving SWAP's point-spread function from the observations. In this paper, we use the resulting images to conduct the first-ever study of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the corona observed in the EUV over a three year period that includes the complete rise phase of solar cycle 24. Of particular note is the persistence over many solar rotations of bright, diffuse features composed of open magnetic fields that overlie polar crown filaments and extend to large heights above the solar surface. These features appear to be related to coronal fans, which have previously been observed in white-light coronagraph images and, at low heights, in the EUV. We also discuss the evolution of the corona at different heights above the solar surface and the evolution of the corona over the course of the solar cycle by hemisphere.

  14. Radial variations of large-scale magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    Two time periods are studied for which comprehensive data coverage is available at both 1 AU using IMP-8 and ISEE-3 and beyond using Voyager 1. One of these periods is characterized by the predominance of corotating stream interactions. Relatively small scale transient flows characterize the second period. The evolution of these flows with heliocentric distance is studied using power spectral techniques. The evolution of the transient dominated period is consistent with the hypothesis of turbulent evolution including an inverse cascade of large scales. The evolution of the corotating period is consistent with the entrainment of slow streams by faster streams in a deterministic model.

  15. Low-Temperature Soft-Cover Deposition of Uniform Large-Scale Perovskite Films for High-Performance Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Tang, Wentao; Xie, Fengxian; Yin, Maoshu; He, Jinjin; Wang, Yanbo; Chen, Han; Qiang, Yinghuai; Yang, Xudong; Han, Liyuan

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale high-quality perovskite thin films are crucial to produce high-performance perovskite solar cells. However, for perovskite films fabricated by solvent-rich processes, film uniformity can be prevented by convection during thermal evaporation of the solvent. Here, a scalable low-temperature soft-cover deposition (LT-SCD) method is presented, where the thermal convection-induced defects in perovskite films are eliminated through a strategy of surface tension relaxation. Compact, homogeneous, and convection-induced-defects-free perovskite films are obtained on an area of 12 cm(2) , which enables a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.5% on a solar cell with an area of 5 cm(2) . This is the highest efficiency at this large cell area. A PCE of 15.3% is also obtained on a flexible perovskite solar cell deposited on the polyethylene terephthalate substrate owing to the advantage of presented low-temperature processing. Hence, the present LT-SCD technology provides a new non-spin-coating route to the deposition of large-area uniform perovskite films for both rigid and flexible perovskite devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [astronomical models of interplanetary magnetics and the solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review is presented of theoretical models of the interaction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic fields. Observations of interplanetary magnetic fields by the IMP and OSO spacecraft are discussed. The causes for cosmic ray variations (Forbush decreases) by the solar wind are examined. The model of Parker is emphasized. This model shows the three dimensional magnetic field lines of the solar wind to have the form of spirals wrapped on cones. It is concluded that an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission would allow the testing and verification of the various theoretical models examined. Diagrams of the various models are shown.

  17. Large-scale thermal events in the solar nebula: evidence from Fe,Ni metal grains in primitive meteorites

    PubMed

    Meibom; Desch; Krot; Cuzzi; Petaev; Wilson; Keil

    2000-05-05

    Chemical zoning patterns in some iron, nickel metal grains from CH carbonaceous chondrites imply formation at temperatures from 1370 to 1270 kelvin by condensation from a solar nebular gas cooling at a rate of approximately 0.2 kelvin per hour. This cooling rate requires a large-scale thermal event in the nebula, in contrast to the localized, transient heating events inferred for chondrule formation. In our model, mass accretion through the protoplanetary disk caused large-scale evaporation of precursor dust near its midplane inside of a few astronomical units. Gas convectively moved from the midplane to cooler regions above it, and the metal grains condensed in these parcels of rising gas.

  18. Coronal mass ejection and solar flare initiation processes without appreciable changes of the large-scale magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, I. S.; Panasenco, O. A.

    We demonstrate that spurious three-dimensional re-constructions from two-dimensional images and movies of solar flares and coronal mass ejections can arise as a result of viewing conditions and projection effects, which are not always properly taken into account in the current literature. Theory and observations indicate that eruptions can proceed with or without large-scale topological changes of prominences and coronal magnetic fields. Electric currents and plasma drifts in crossed electric and magnetic fields play not negligible, but important role. This means that large-scale magnetic reconnections understood as topological transitions in the magnetic field are not always necessary for eruptions. The scenario of expanding and rising non-planar systems of preexisting loops and arcades, which are deforming when shearing at bottom parts, twisting and rotating at summits, satisfactory fits available observations. Movies are presented demonstrating this type of behavior with a preserved magnetic connectivity.

  19. Contrasting Large Solar Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2010-10-01

    After an unusually long solar minimum, solar cycle 24 is slowly beginning. A large coronal mass ejection (CME) from sunspot 1092 occurred on 1 August 2010, with effects reaching Earth on 3 August and 4 August, nearly 38 years to the day after the huge solar event of 4 August 1972. The prior event, which those of us engaged in space research at the time remember well, recorded some of the highest intensities of solar particles and rapid changes of the geomagnetic field measured to date. What can we learn from the comparisons of these two events, other than their essentially coincident dates? One lesson I took away from reading press coverage and Web reports of the August 2010 event is that the scientific community and the press are much more aware than they were nearly 4 decades ago that solar events can wreak havoc on space-based technologies.

  20. Continuous Flow Polymer Synthesis toward Reproducible Large-Scale Production for Efficient Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pirotte, Geert; Kesters, Jurgen; Verstappen, Pieter; Govaerts, Sanne; Manca, Jean; Lutsen, Laurence; Vanderzande, Dirk; Maes, Wouter

    2015-10-12

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) have attracted great interest as a solar cell technology with appealing mechanical, aesthetical, and economies-of-scale features. To drive OPV toward economic viability, low-cost, large-scale module production has to be realized in combination with increased top-quality material availability and minimal batch-to-batch variation. To this extent, continuous flow chemistry can serve as a powerful tool. In this contribution, a flow protocol is optimized for the high performance benzodithiophene-thienopyrroledione copolymer PBDTTPD and the material quality is probed through systematic solar-cell evaluation. A stepwise approach is adopted to turn the batch process into a reproducible and scalable continuous flow procedure. Solar cell devices fabricated using the obtained polymer batches deliver an average power conversion efficiency of 7.2 %. Upon incorporation of an ionic polythiophene-based cathodic interlayer, the photovoltaic performance could be enhanced to a maximum efficiency of 9.1 %. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High-Efficiency Solar Cells for Large-Scale Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Olson, J.; Geisz, J.; Friedman, D.; McMahon, W.; Ptak, A.; Wanlass, M.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Bertness, K.; Ward, S.; Duda, A.; Young, M.; Carapella, J.; Steiner, M.

    2008-09-26

    One strategy for helping the solar industry to grow faster is to use very high efficiency cells under concentrating optics. By using lenses or mirrors to concentrate the light, very small solar cells can be used, reducing the amount of semiconductor material and allowing use of higher efficiency cells, which are now >40% efficient.

  2. LARGE-SCALE CORONAL PROPAGATING FRONTS IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS AS OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY—AN ENSEMBLE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-10

    This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 Å channel. Here we focus on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.

  3. Large-scale and Long-duration Simulation of a Multi-stage Eruptive Solar Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, chaowei; Hu, Qiang; Wu, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    We employ a data-driven 3D MHD active region evolution model by using the Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) numerical method. This newly developed model retains the full MHD effects, allowing time-dependent boundary conditions and time evolution studies. The time-dependent simulation is driven by measured vector magnetograms and the method of MHD characteristics on the bottom boundary. We have applied the model to investigate the coronal magnetic field evolution of AR11283 which was characterized by a pre-existing sigmoid structure in the core region and multiple eruptions, both in relatively small and large scales. We have succeeded in producing the core magnetic field structure and the subsequent eruptions of flux-rope structures (see https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/96898685/large.mp4 for an animation) as the measured vector magnetograms on the bottom boundary evolve in time with constant flux emergence. The whole process, lasting for about an hour in real time, compares well with the corresponding SDO/AIA and coronagraph imaging observations. From these results, we show the capability of the model, largely data-driven, that is able to simulate complex, topological, and highly dynamic active region evolutions. (We acknowledge partial support of NSF grants AGS 1153323 and AGS 1062050, and data support from SDO/HMI and AIA teams).

  4. The transport of turbulence in large-scale inhomogeneous flows with application to the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Laxman

    Turbulence is an ubiquitous process in the magnetized solar wind plasma, and is thought to be integral to multiple important phenomena in the solar wind, such as coronal and solar wind heating, acceleration of the solar wind, the transport of energetic particles, and so forth. To explain these phenomena, it is necessary to understand the transport of low-frequency turbulence in the solar wind. This thesis investigates several sets of turbulence transport model equations in the context of turbulence in different regions of the heliosphere. This includes investigating turbulence in sub-Alfvenic and super-Alfvenic flows. Solar wind properties vary with solar cycle, and hence the solar cycle may affect solar wind turbulence. This thesis investigates the temporal solar wind - its variable velocity and the variability in the source of turbulence, and studies the dependence of solar wind turbulence with solar cycle beyond 1 astronomical unit (AU). We find that the temporal solar wind introduces a periodic variability, particularly beyond 10 AU, in the fluctuating magnetic energy density, the correlation length, and the solar wind temperature. The variability is insufficient to account for the full observed variability in these quantities, but we find that the time-dependent solutions trace the steady-state solutions quite well, suggesting that the steady-state models are a reasonable first approximations. Shocks are intrinsic to the solar wind. This thesis studies the interaction of turbulence with simplified parallel and perpendicular shock waves. The generation of turbulent kinetic and magnetic energy by the shock is investigated together with the related residual energy and cross helicity. We find that the shock is responsible for generating backward propagating modes. The transport of solar wind turbulence in the supersonic solar wind has been an active area of study over the past decade. We apply the most general and detailed model of turbulence transport [the six

  5. Evidence for the interaction of large scale magnetic structures in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Demoulin, P.; Henoux, J. C.; Machado, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    By modeling the observed vertical magnetic field of an active region AR 2372 by the potential field of an ensemble of magnetic dipoles, the likely location of the separatrices, surfaces that separates cells of different field line connectivities, and of the separator which is the intersection of the separatrices, is derived. Four of the five off-band H-alpha kernels of a flare that occurred less than 20 minutes before obtaining the magnetogram are shown to have taken place near or at the separatrices. These H-alpha kernels are connected by field lines that pass near the separator. This indicates that the flare may have resulted from the interaction in the separator region of large scale magnetic structures.

  6. Evidence for the interaction of large scale magnetic structures in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Demoulin, P.; Henoux, J. C.; Machado, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    By modeling the observed vertical magnetic field of an active region AR 2372 by the potential field of an ensemble of magnetic dipoles, the likely location of the separatrices, surfaces that separates cells of different field line connectivities, and of the separator which is the intersection of the separatrices, is derived. Four of the five off-band H-alpha kernels of a flare that occurred less than 20 minutes before obtaining the magnetogram are shown to have taken place near or at the separatrices. These H-alpha kernels are connected by field lines that pass near the separator. This indicates that the flare may have resulted from the interaction in the separator region of large scale magnetic structures.

  7. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  8. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  9. Global structure and dynamics of large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind: Voyager 2 observations during 2005 and 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Acũna, M. H.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Wang, C.; Richardson, J. D.

    2008-02-01

    The Voyager 2 (V2) observations of daily averages of the solar wind during 2005 and 2006 from 75.3 AU to 81.6 AU between ~25.7°S and 27.1°S show both a step-like trend in the speed V(t) and ``large-scale fluctuations'' of the magnetic field strength B, speed V, density N and temperature T. The distribution functions of B, N, and NV2 observed by V2 are lognormal and that of V is approximately Gaussian. We introduce a method for specifying the boundary conditions at all latitudes (except near the poles) on a Sun-centered surface of radius of 1 AU, based on solar magnetic field observations. This paper uses only the boundary conditions at the latitude of V2 and a 1-D time-dependent MHD model to calculate the radial evolution of the large-scale fluctuations of B(t), V(t) and N(t) at distances between 1 and 90 AU. This model explains the V2 observations of a lognormal distribution of B and the Gaussian distribution of V, but not the observed lognormal distributions of N and NV2. The lognormal distribution of B observed by V2 was produced primarily by dynamical processes beyond 1 AU.

  10. Large Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2003-01-01

    This article summarizes the scientific aim, design considerations and observatory site of a large optical solar telescope. The day time "seeing" is better on the islands, surrounded by large body of water, compared to the mountain sites. Therefore, in order to obtain the solar images with sub-arcsec resolution, the observatory site should be preferably located on an island. A list of potential sites on Himalayas and surrounding region is given. A brief description of the telescope design, enclosure and back-end instruments are also presented.

  11. Comparing the extractable power and climatic impacts of very large-scale deployment of solar, wind, and biomass technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. M.; Gans, F.; Pavlick, R.; Kleidon, A.

    2010-12-01

    The world is faced with two difficult problems: ever-increasing energy demands and climate change due primarily to the burning of fossil fuels. Overcoming these challenges will require the large-scale deployment of power technologies with low or zero greenhouse gas emissions. No power technology, however, will have zero climatic impact. Here, we compare the climatic impacts of the large-scale deployment of several such renewable power technologies (near-surface wind, photovoltaic solar, and second-generation biofuels) using an earth system model of intermediate complexity. All power technologies have an impact on the climate and alter the generation of power within the Earth system. For instance, we find that the maximum power that can be extracted from atmospheric motion is much less than previous estimates of the availability of wind power and this extraction reduces the ability of the atmosphere to generate motion, since the natural efficiency of the atmosphere to generate motion is already maximized. Solar power, in contrast, can convert incoming shortwave radiation into electric energy that would otherwise be "wasted" by the conversion into heat. Hence, solar power has the ability to enhance power generation within the Earth system, while large-scale extraction of wind power appears to weaken power generation. We provide estimates of the maximum realizable power potential for each resource along with its climate impacts in terms of standard metrics such as changes in 2-meter air temperature, surface heat flux partitioning, and precipitation. This understanding is then extended to include less-conventional metrics relating renewable power extraction to its impact on power generation in the Earth System (eg. atmospheric wind dissipation, terrestrial biosphere productivity, and the work done by the hydrologic cycle). Many previous assessments of large-scale renewable power technologies fail to consider the removal of power from the Earth System and its sometimes

  12. The 40 KW of Solar Cell Modules for the Large Scale Production Task a Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    Forty kilowatts of solar cell modules was produced in this program. This is equivalent to 4123 modules. The average power output per module was 9.7 watts at 16.5 volts, 60 C and 100 mW/sq cm. The peak production rate was 200 modules per week which is equal to 1.9 kW per week. This rate was sustained for over four and one-half months and is equivalent to 100 kW per year. This final report covers the solar cell module design, electrical and power performance, module preproduction environmental test results, production and shipping schedule, program summary, and delivery. A cost analysis section is written. Particular emphasis on the percentage of labor and material utilized in constructing a solar cell module is presented. Also included are cost reduction recommendations.

  13. Very Large-Scale Deployment of Grid-Connected Solar Photovoltaics in the United States: Challenges and Opportunities; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2006-04-01

    This paper analyzes the potential for solar photovoltaics (PV) to be deployed on a very large scale and provide a large fraction of a system's electricity. It explicitly examines how the hourly availability of PV interacts with the limited flexibility of traditional electricity generation plants. The authors found that, under high penetration levels and existing grid-operation procedures and rules, the system will have excess PV generation during certain periods of the year. This excess PV generation results in increased costs, which can increase dramatically when PV provides on the order of 10%-15% of total electricity demand in systems that are heavily dependent on inflexible baseload steam plants. Measures to increase penetration of PV are also discussed, including increased system flexibility, increased dispatchable load, and energy storage.

  14. Toward large-scale solar energy systems with peak concentrations of 20,000 suns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kribus, Abraham

    1997-10-01

    The heliostat field plays a crucial role in defining the achievable limits for central receiver system efficiency and cost. Increasing system efficiency, thus reducing the reflective area and system cost, can be achieved by increasing the concentration and the receiver temperature. The concentration achievable in central receiver plants, however, is constrained by current heliostat technology and design practices. The factors affecting field performance are surface and tracking errors, astigmatism, shadowing, blocking and dilution. These are geometric factors that can be systematically treated and reduced. We present improvements in collection optics and technology that may boost concentration (up to 20,000 peak), achievable temperature (2,000 K), and efficiency in solar central receiver plants. The increased performance may significantly reduce the cost of solar energy in existing applications, and enable solar access to new ultra-high-temperature applications, such as: future gas turbines approaching 60% combined cycle efficiency; high-temperature thermo-chemical processes; and gas-dynamic processes.

  15. Solar voltaic generator requirements for large-scale central-station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canada, A. H.

    A solar voltaic generation (SVG) reference system is examined in terms of engineering and manufacturing requirements and solar voltaic generator characteristics. The SVG system proposed here is composed of four subsystems chosen to conform to existing sectors of the utility engineering and manufacturing industry and the emerging SVG unit supply industry. The four subsystems are: the SVG subsystem, the transmission and station structure system, the power apparatus subsystem, and the monitoring and control subsystem. The material and engineering requirements for the SVG reference system are compared with those for a typical nuclear power plant.

  16. New Techniques Used in Modeling the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse: Energizing and Heating the Large-Scale Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Cooper; Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.; Caplan, Ronald M.; Lionello, Roberto; Torok, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav; Riley, Pete; Mackay, Duncan; Upton, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    Over the past two decades, our group has used a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the corona to predict the appearance of total solar eclipses. In this presentation we detail recent innovations and new techniques applied to our prediction model for the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. First, we have developed a method for capturing the large-scale energized fields typical of the corona, namely the sheared/twisted fields built up through long-term processes of differential rotation and flux-emergence/cancellation. Using inferences of the location and chirality of filament channels (deduced from a magnetofrictional model driven by the evolving photospheric field produced by the Advective Flux Transport model), we tailor a customized boundary electric field profile that will emerge shear along the desired portions of polarity inversion lines (PILs) and cancel flux to create long twisted flux systems low in the corona. This method has the potential to improve the morphological shape of streamers in the low solar corona. Second, we apply, for the first time in our eclipse prediction simulations, a new wave-turbulence-dissipation (WTD) based model for coronal heating. This model has substantially fewer free parameters than previous empirical heating models, but is inherently sensitive to the 3D geometry and connectivity of the coronal field---a key property for modeling/predicting the thermal-magnetic structure of the solar corona. Overall, we will examine the effect of these considerations on white-light and EUV observables from the simulations, and present them in the context of our final 2017 eclipse prediction model.Research supported by NASA's Heliophysics Supporting Research and Living With a Star Programs.

  17. Link between local scale BC emissions in the Indo-Gangetic Plains and large scale atmospheric solar absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, P. S.; Ahmed, T.; Kar, A.; Rehman, I. H.; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Project Surya has documented indoor and outdoor concentrations of black carbon (BC) from traditional biomass burning cook stoves in a rural village located in the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) region of N. India from November 2009-September 2010. In this paper, we systematically document the link between local scale aerosol properties and column averaged regional aerosol optical properties and atmospheric radiative forcing. We document observations from the first phase of Project Surya and estimate the source dependent (biomass and fossil fuels) aerosol optical properties from local to regional scale. Data were collected using surface based observations of BC, organic carbon (OC), aerosol light absorption, scattering coefficient at the Surya village (SVI_1) located in IGP region and integrated with satellite and AERONET observations at the regional scale (IGP). The daily mean BC concentrations at SVI1 showed a large increase of BC during the dry season (December to February) with values reaching 35 μg m-3. Space based LIDAR data revealed how the biomass smoke was trapped within the first kilometer during the dry season and extended to above 5 km during the pre-monsoon season. As a result, during the dry season, the variance in the daily mean single scattering albedo (SSA), the ratio of scattering to extinction coefficient, and column aerosol optical properties at the local IGP site correlated (with slopes in the range of 0.85 to 1.06 and R2>0.4) well with the "IGP_AERONET" (mean of six AERONET sites). The statistically significant correlation suggested that in-situ observations can be used to derive spatial mean forcing, at least for the dry season. The atmospheric forcing due to BC and OC exceeded 20 Wm-2 during all months from November to May, supporting the deduction that elimination of cook stove smoke emissions through clean cooking technologies will likely have a major positive impact not only on human health but also on regional climate.

  18. Large scale single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high efficiency solar cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chin-Hung; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Chen, Szu-Ying; Yen, Yu-Ting; Kuo, Wei-Chen; Liao, Yu-Kuang; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lai, Chih-Huang; Chen, Lih-Juann; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2011-10-12

    In this paper, we demonstrated direct formation of large area Cu(In,Ga)Se(2) nanotip arrays (CIGS NTRs) by using one step Ar(+) milling process without template. By controlling milling time and incident angles, the length of CIGS NTRs with adjustable tilting orientations can be precisely controlled. Formation criteria of these CIGS NTRs have been discussed in terms of surface curvature, multiple components, and crystal quality, resulting in a highly anisotropic milling effect. The CIGS NTRs have very low reflectance <0.1% at incident wavelengths between 300 to 1200 nm. Open circuit voltage and short circuit current of CIGS NTRs solar cell were measured to be ∼390 mV and ∼22.56 mA/cm(2), yielding the filling factor and the efficiency of 59 and 5.2%, respectively. In contrast to CIGS thin film solar cell with efficiency of 3.2%, the nanostructured CIGS NTRs can have efficiency enhancement of ∼160% due to the higher light absorption ability because of the nanostructure. The merits of current approach include the latest way via template-free direct creating process of nanostructured CIGS NTRs with controllable dimensionality and large scale production without postselenization process.

  19. Barriers to commercialization of large-scale solar electricity: Lessions learned from the LUZ experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lotker, M.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the economic and policy factors leading to the initial successful introduction of Luz International Limited`s Solar Electric Generating Systems (SEGS). It then addresses the wide range of barriers to continued SEGS commercialization, including state and federal tax policy, avoided cost energy pricing, artificial size limitations under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), the loss of effectiveness of PURPA itself, the lack of incentives available to utilities as owners of solar electric plants, and the limited ways in which the environmental benefits of this technology have been recognized. The way in which each of these barriers contributed to the suspension of new LUZ projects is highlighted. In addition, mitigation approaches to each of these barriers are suggested.

  20. A large-scale view of Space Technology 5 magnetometer response to solar wind drivers.

    PubMed

    Knipp, D J; Kilcommons, L M; Gjerloev, J; Redmon, R J; Slavin, J; Le, G

    2015-04-01

    In this data report we discuss reprocessing of the Space Technology 5 (ST5) magnetometer database for inclusion in NASA's Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) virtual observatory. The mission consisted of three spacecraft flying in elliptical orbits, from 27 March to 27 June 2006. Reprocessing includes (1) transforming the data into the Modified Apex Coordinate System for projection to a common reference altitude of 110 km, (2) correcting gain jumps, and (3) validating the results. We display the averaged magnetic perturbations as a keogram, which allows direct comparison of the full-mission data with the solar wind values and geomagnetic indices. With the data referenced to a common altitude, we find the following: (1) Magnetic perturbations that track the passage of corotating interaction regions and high-speed solar wind; (2) unexpectedly strong dayside perturbations during a solstice magnetospheric sawtooth oscillation interval characterized by a radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component that may have enhanced the accompanying modest southward IMF; and (3) intervals of reduced magnetic perturbations or "calms," associated with periods of slow solar wind, interspersed among variable-length episodic enhancements. These calms are most evident when the IMF is northward or projects with a northward component onto the geomagnetic dipole. The reprocessed ST5 data are in very good agreement with magnetic perturbations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, which we also map to 110 km. We briefly discuss the methods used to remap the ST5 data and the means of validating the results against DMSP. Our methods form the basis for future intermission comparisons of space-based magnetometer data.

  1. The solar wind structure that caused a large-scale disturbance of the plasma tail of comet Austin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozuka, Yukio; Konno, Ichishiro; Saito, Takao; Numazawa, Shigemi

    1992-01-01

    The plasma tail of Comet Austin (1989c1) showed remarkable disturbances because of the solar maximum periods and its orbit. Figure 1 shows photographs of Comet Austin taken in Shibata, Japan, on 29 Apr. 1990 UT, during about 20 minutes with the exposure times of 90 to 120 s. There are two main features in the disturbance; one is many bowed structures, which seem to move tailwards; and the other is a large-scale wavy structure. The bowed structures can be interpreted as arcade structures brushing the surface of both sides of the cometary plasma surrounding the nucleus. We identified thirteen structures of the arcades from each of the five photographs and calculated the relation between the distance of each structure from the cometary nucleus, chi, and the velocity, upsilon. The result is shown. This indicates that the velocity of the structures increases with distance. This is consistent with the result obtained from the observation at the Kiso Observatory.

  2. Solar voltaic generator requirements for large-scale central-station

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    Solar Voltaic Generation (SVG) is ready to take its place alongside Coal Fired Generation (CFG) and Boiling Water Reactor Generation (BWRG) as a world strategic energy option in this century. In the U.S. National Energy Policy Plan, selection of an alternative SVG option, providing 10 Quads of prime energy electric generation, would ensure the U.S. as an oil exporting country and consume less capital and materials than the NEPP's coal-nuclear direction. The power engineering of SVG is comprised of four Subsystems, three of which are shown to be outside the photovoltaics industry but well within current utility industry engineering and manufacturing, and current utilities procurement and installation . . . requiring no turn-key contractor. Engineering and manufacturing requirements on the SVG Unit Subsystem and on the fuel (isolation) based plant availability and generation, the only concerns of the photovoltaic industry, are examined in the context of meeting this Solar Voltaic Generation-2000 goal for Energy Decency: Abundant, Affordable, Amicable in the Environment.

  3. Helioseismic Constraints on the Depth Dependence of Large-Scale Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Martin F.

    2017-08-01

    A recent helioseismic statistical waveform analysis of subsurface flow based on a 720-day time series of SOHO/MDI Medium-l spherical-harmonic coefficients has been extended to cover a greater range of subphotospheric depths. The latest analysis provides estimates of flow-dependent oscillation-mode coupling-strength coefficients b(s,t;n,l) over the range l = 30 to 150 of mode degree (angular wavenumber) for solar p-modes in the approximate frequency range 2 to 4 mHz. The range of penetration depths of this mode set covers most of the solar convection zone. The most recent analysis measures spherical harmonic (s,t) components of the flow velocity for odd s in the angular wavenumber range 1 to 19 for t not much smaller than s at a given s. The odd-s b(s,t;n,l) coefficients are interpreted as averages over depth of the depth-dependent amplitude of one spherical-harmonic (s,t) component of the toroidal part of the flow velocity field. The depth-dependent weighting function defining the average velocity is the fractional kinetic energy density in radius of modes of the (n,l) multiplet. The b coefficients have been converted to estimates of root velocity power as a function of l0 = nu0*l/nu(n,l), which is a measure of mode penetration depth. (nu(n,l) is mode frequency and nu0 is a reference frequency equal to 3 mHz.) A comparison of the observational results with simple convection models will be presented.

  4. Large-Scale Velocity Fields and Small-Scale Magnetic Fields During the Maximum of Solar Cycle 22

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Peak Observatory) of the formation of a filament during an observing run from 28 Aug. to 1 Sep. 1991; the development of a new conceptual model for...NETWORK AS RELATED TO 11 YEAR VARIATION IN THE TOTAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE . . . . . . . . . ................ 15 3.3 AN OBSERVATIONAL- CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF...emission sources and the magnetic field than is considered within the scope of this study. 15 3.3 AN OBSERVATIONAL- CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF THE FORMATION OF

  5. Ultra-high efficiency photovoltaic cells for large scale solar power generation.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The primary targets of our project are to drastically improve the photovoltaic conversion efficiency and to develop new energy storage and delivery technologies. Our approach to obtain an efficiency over 40% starts from the improvement of III-V multi-junction solar cells by introducing a novel material for each cell realizing an ideal combination of bandgaps and lattice-matching. Further improvement incorporates quantum structures such as stacked quantum wells and quantum dots, which allow higher degree of freedom in the design of the bandgap and the lattice strain. Highly controlled arrangement of either quantum dots or quantum wells permits the coupling of the wavefunctions, and thus forms intermediate bands in the bandgap of a host material, which allows multiple photon absorption theoretically leading to a conversion efficiency exceeding 50%. In addition to such improvements, microfabrication technology for the integrated high-efficiency cells and the development of novel material systems that realizes high efficiency and low cost at the same time are investigated.

  6. Large solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabtree, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A spectrophotovoltaic converter, a thermophotovoltaic converter, a cassegrainian concentrator, a large silicon cell blanket, and a high flux approach are among the concepts being investigated as part of the multihundred kW solar array program for reducing the cost of photovoltaic energy in space. These concepts involve a range of technology risks, the highest risk being represented by the thermophotovoltaics and spectrophotovoltaics approaches which involve manipulation to of the incoming spectrum to enhance system efficiency. The planar array (solar blanket) has no technology risk and a moderate payback. The primary characteristics, components, and technology concerns of each of these concepts are summarized. An orbital power platform mission in the late 1980's is being used to allow a coherent technology advancement program in order to achieve a ten year life with maintenance at a capital recurring cost of $30/watt based on 1978 dollars.

  7. Storm generated large scale TIDs (LSTIDs): local, regional and global observations during solar cycles 23-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katamzi, Zama; Bosco Habarulema, John

    2017-04-01

    Large scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) are a key dynamic ionospheric process that transports energy and momentum vertically and horizontally during storms. These disturbances are observed as electron density irregularities in total electron content and other ionospheric parameters. This study reports on various explorations of LSTIDs characteristics, in particular horizontal and vertical propagation, during some major/severe storms of solar cycles 23-24. We have employed GNSS TEC to estimate horizontal propagation and radio occultation data from COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 and SWARM satellites to estimate vertical motion. The work presented here reveals the evolution of the characterisation efficiency from using sparsely populated stations, resulting in limited spatial resolution through rudimentary analysis to more densely populated GNSS network leading to more accurate temporal and spatial determinations. For example, early observations of LSTIDs largely revealed unidirectional propagation whereas later studies have showed that one storm can induce multi-directional propagation, e.g. Halloween 2003 storm induced equatorward LSTIDs on a local scale whereas the 9 March 2012 storm induced simultaneous equatorward and poleward LSTIDs on a global scale. This later study, i.e. 9 March 2012 storm, revealed for the first time that ionospheric electrodynamics, specifically variations in ExB drift, is also an efficient generator of LSTIDs. Results from these studies also revealed constructive and destructive interference pattern of storm induced LSTIDs. Constellations of LEO satellites such as COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 and SWARM have given sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to study vertical propagation of LSTIDs in addition to the meridional propagation given by GNSS TEC; the former (i.e. vertical velocities) were found to fall below 100 m/s.

  8. One-Pot Large-Scale Synthesis of Carbon Quantum Dots: Efficient Cathode Interlayers for Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuzhao; Lin, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenlang; Ou, Jiemei; Yuan, Zhongke; Xie, Fangyan; Hong, Wei; Yu, Dingshan; Ma, Yuguang; Chi, Zhenguo; Chen, Xudong

    2017-05-03

    Cathode interlayers (CILs) with low-cost, low-toxicity, and excellent cathode modification ability are necessary for the large-scale industrialization of polymer solar cells (PSCs). In this contribution, we demonstrated one-pot synthesized carbon quantum dots (C-dots) with high production to serve as efficient CIL for inverted PSCs. The C-dots were synthesized by a facile, economical microwave pyrolysis in a household microwave oven within 7 min. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) studies showed that the C-dots possessed the ability to form a dipole at the interface, resulting in the decrease of the work function (WF) of cathode. External quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements and 2D excitation-emission topographical maps revealed that the C-dots down-shifted the high energy near-ultraviolet light to low energy visible light to generate more photocurrent. Remarkably improvement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) was attained by incorporation of C-dots as CIL. The PCE was boosted up from 4.14% to 8.13% with C-dots as CIL, which is one of the best efficiency for i-PSCs used carbon based materials as interlayers. These results demonstrated that C-dots can be a potential candidate for future low cost and large area PSCs producing.

  9. The relationship of the large-scale solar field to the interplanetary magnetic field - What will Ulysses find?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Using photospheric magnetic field observations obtained at the Stanford Wilcox Solar Observatory, results from a potential field model for the present solar cycle are given, and qualitative predictions of the IMF that Ulysses may encounter are presented. Results indicate that the IMF consists of large regions of opposite polarity separated by a neutral sheet (NS) (extended to at least 50 deg) and a four-sector structure near solar minimum (produced by small quadripolar NS warps). The latitudinal extent of the NS increases following minimum and the structure near maximum includes multiple NSs, while a simplified IMF is found during the declining phase.

  10. Heating of the Solar Middle Chromospheric Network and Internetwork by Large-Scale Electric Currents in Weakly Ionized Magnetic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Michael L.

    1996-06-01

    A two-dimensional, dissipative magnetohydrodynamic model is used to argue that a major source of in situ heating for the solar middle chromosphere is the resistive dissipation of large-scale electric currents flowing in magnetic elements. A magnetic element is an arch-shaped magnetic field configuration consisting of a central region of horizontally localized, mainly vertical magnetic field based in the photosphere, with field lines that diverge horizontally with increasing height, extend into the middle chromosphere, and then return to the photo sphere as a relatively diffuse, weaker field. The currents that flow in these elements are carried by protons, and are large scale in that their scale height is hundreds of kilometers in the network and thousands of kilometers in the internetwork. Solutions to the model demonstrate that the resistive dissipation of large-scale electric currents flowing orthogonal to the magnetic field in magnetic elements embedded in a weakly ionized, strongly magnetized hydrogen gas may generate all of the thermal energy necessary to heat the middle chromosphere. The magnetic field is computed self-consistently with the electric field, pressure, and hydrogen and proton densities. Solutions to the model suggest that magnetic elements with horizontal extents up to several arcseconds may be confined to, and heat, the chromospheric network, while elements with the largest horizontal extents may span and heat the internetwork and be the building blocks of the chromospheric magnetic canopy. The model predicts that the heating rate per unit mass (q) is independent of height, peaked near but horizontally displaced from the center of a magnetic element, and for realistic model input parameters has an average value computed over the base area of the element dose to the value 4.5 x 109 ergs g-1 s-1 predicted by semiempirical models of the chromosphere that also predict that q is independent of height in the middle chromosphere. The model predicts

  11. A facile chemical-mechanical polishing lift-off transfer process toward large scale Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells on arbitrary substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Kuan-Chun; Yen, Yu-Ting; Thomas, Stuart R.; Tsai, Hung-Wei; Hsu, Cheng-Hung; Tsai, Wen-Chi; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Min; Wang, Zhiming M.; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells on flexible substrates is a non-trivial task due to thermal and ion diffusion related issues. In order to circumvent these issues, we have developed a chemical-mechanical polishing lift-off (CMPL) transfer process, enabling the direct transfer of CIGS solar cells from conventional soda-lime glass (SLG) onto arbitrary flexible substrates up to 4 cm2 in size. The structural and compositional nature of the pre- and post-transferred films is examined using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. We demonstrate the fabrication of solar cells on a range of flexible substrates while being able to maintain 75% cell efficiency (η) when compared to pre-transferred solar cells. The results obtained in this work suggest that our transfer process offers a highly promising approach toward large scale fabrication of CIGS-based solar cells on a wide variety of flexible substrates, suitable for use in the large scale CIGS photovoltaic industry.The fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells on flexible substrates is a non-trivial task due to thermal and ion diffusion related issues. In order to circumvent these issues, we have developed a chemical-mechanical polishing lift-off (CMPL) transfer process, enabling the direct transfer of CIGS solar cells from conventional soda-lime glass (SLG) onto arbitrary flexible substrates up to 4 cm2 in size. The structural and compositional nature of the pre- and post-transferred films is examined using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. We demonstrate the fabrication of solar cells on a range of flexible substrates while being able to maintain 75% cell efficiency (η) when compared to pre-transferred solar cells. The results obtained in this work suggest that our transfer process offers a highly promising approach toward large scale fabrication of CIGS-based solar cells on a wide

  12. Solar powered oxygen systems in remote health centers in Papua New Guinea: a large scale implementation effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Hwaihwanje, Ilomo; Kaupa, Magdalynn; Karubi, Jonah; Panauwe, Doreen; Sa'avu, Martin; Pulsan, Francis; Prasad, Peter; Maru, Freddy; Tenambo, Henry; Kwaramb, Ambrose; Neal, Eleanor; Graham, Hamish; Izadnegahdar, Rasa

    2017-06-01

    Pneumonia is the largest cause of child deaths in Papua New Guinea (PNG), and hypoxaemia is the major complication causing death in childhood pneumonia, and hypoxaemia is a major factor in deaths from many other common conditions, including bronchiolitis, asthma, sepsis, malaria, trauma, perinatal problems, and obstetric emergencies. A reliable source of oxygen therapy can reduce mortality from pneumonia by up to 35%. However, in low and middle income countries throughout the world, improved oxygen systems have not been implemented at large scale in remote, difficult to access health care settings, and oxygen is often unavailable at smaller rural hospitals or district health centers which serve as the first point of referral for childhood illnesses. These hospitals are hampered by lack of reliable power, staff training and other basic services. We report the methodology of a large implementation effectiveness trial involving sustainable and renewable oxygen and power systems in 36 health facilities in remote rural areas of PNG. The methodology is a before-and after evaluation involving continuous quality improvement, and a health systems approach. We describe this model of implementation as the considerations and steps involved have wider implications in health systems in other countries. The implementation steps include: defining the criteria for where such an intervention is appropriate, assessment of power supplies and power requirements, the optimal design of a solar power system, specifications for oxygen concentrators and other oxygen equipment that will function in remote environments, installation logistics in remote settings, the role of oxygen analyzers in monitoring oxygen concentrator performance, the engineering capacity required to sustain a program at scale, clinical guidelines and training on oxygen equipment and the treatment of children with severe respiratory infection and other critical illnesses, program costs, and measurement of processes and

  13. Solar powered oxygen systems in remote health centers in Papua New Guinea: a large scale implementation effectiveness trial

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Trevor; Hwaihwanje, Ilomo; Kaupa, Magdalynn; Karubi, Jonah; Panauwe, Doreen; Sa’avu, Martin; Pulsan, Francis; Prasad, Peter; Maru, Freddy; Tenambo, Henry; Kwaramb, Ambrose; Neal, Eleanor; Graham, Hamish; Izadnegahdar, Rasa

    2017-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is the largest cause of child deaths in Papua New Guinea (PNG), and hypoxaemia is the major complication causing death in childhood pneumonia, and hypoxaemia is a major factor in deaths from many other common conditions, including bronchiolitis, asthma, sepsis, malaria, trauma, perinatal problems, and obstetric emergencies. A reliable source of oxygen therapy can reduce mortality from pneumonia by up to 35%. However, in low and middle income countries throughout the world, improved oxygen systems have not been implemented at large scale in remote, difficult to access health care settings, and oxygen is often unavailable at smaller rural hospitals or district health centers which serve as the first point of referral for childhood illnesses. These hospitals are hampered by lack of reliable power, staff training and other basic services. Methods We report the methodology of a large implementation effectiveness trial involving sustainable and renewable oxygen and power systems in 36 health facilities in remote rural areas of PNG. The methodology is a before–and after evaluation involving continuous quality improvement, and a health systems approach. We describe this model of implementation as the considerations and steps involved have wider implications in health systems in other countries. Results The implementation steps include: defining the criteria for where such an intervention is appropriate, assessment of power supplies and power requirements, the optimal design of a solar power system, specifications for oxygen concentrators and other oxygen equipment that will function in remote environments, installation logistics in remote settings, the role of oxygen analyzers in monitoring oxygen concentrator performance, the engineering capacity required to sustain a program at scale, clinical guidelines and training on oxygen equipment and the treatment of children with severe respiratory infection and other critical illnesses, program costs, and

  14. A Technique for Incorporating Large-scale Magnetic Fields Within Stellar Models: Implications for the Variability of the Solar Radius, Luminosity, and Pulsation Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydon, T. J.; Sofia, S.

    1994-12-01

    A set of physically consistent approximations are employed to include the effects of magnetic fields within the equations of stellar structure. A series of solar models are then constructed with large-scale (~0.1R_sun), intense (~10(6) gauss) magnetic fields. The results of such models are then compared to measurements of changes in the solar radius (from the Solar Disk Sextant Experiment) and changes in the solar p-mode frequencies in order to determine if such fields are associated with the solar cycle. This work was supported in part by an appointment to the Global Change Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health and Enviromental Research, and administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

  15. On the Coexistence of a Radial Magnetic Field with the Large Scale Field in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, S. R.; Woo, R.; Arnaud, J.

    2001-05-01

    Polarimetric measurements of the corona out to 2 Rs in the Fe XIII 10747 A line, the strongest of the iron forbidden lines, are placed for the first time in the context of spatially resolved images of coronal density structures. These measurements, which are the only tool currently available to yield the direction of the magnetic field, date to 1980, the only year when they were available with polarized brightness images of the corona. Through this comparison, the observed predominance of the radial component of the coronal magnetic field, discovered over three decades ago from eclipse observations, and established systematically by Arnaud (1982), is shown to point to the existence of two components of the coronal magnetic field: a non-radial component associated with the large scale structures known as streamers, and the second, more dominant one, a pervasive radial magnetic field. The coexistence of these two components provides new information for the distribution of open and closed magnetic flux in the solar corona.

  16. Large Scale Coordination of Small Scale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelski, Adam; Tarr, Lucas A.; Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Savage, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    Transient brightenings are ubiquitous features of the solar atmosphere across many length and energy scales, the most energetic of which manifest as large-class solar flares. Often, transient brightenings originate in regions of strong magnetic activity and create strong observable enhancements across wavelengths from X-ray to radio, with notable dynamics on timescales of seconds to hours.The coronal aspects of these brightenings have often been studied by way of EUV and X-ray imaging and spectra. These events are likely driven by photospheric activity (such as flux emergence) with the coronal brightenings originating largely from chromospheric ablation (evaporation). Until recently, chromospheric and transition region observations of these events have been limited. However, new observational capabilities have become available which significantly enhance our ability to understand the bi-directional flow of energy through the chromosphere between the photosphere and the corona.We have recently obtained a unique data set with which to study this flow of energy through the chromosphere via the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT), Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuStar), Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), and Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter (IBIS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). This data set targets a small active area near disk center which was tracked simultaneously for approximately four hours. Within this region, many transient brightenings detected through multiple layers of the solar atmosphere. In this study, we combine the imaging data and use the spectra from EIS and IRIS to track flows from the photosphere (HMI, SOT) through the chromosphere and transition region (AIA, IBIS, IRIS, ALMA) into the corona

  17. On the variation of the ionospheric potential due to large-scale radioactivity enhancement and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slyunyaev, Nikolay N.; Mareev, Evgeny A.; Zhidkov, Artem A.

    2015-08-01

    Sensitivity of the global electric circuit (GEC) to variations of atmospheric conductivity and current sources is analyzed and discussed. When the undisturbed exponential conductivity profile is assumed all over the Earth, the most substantial changes in the ionospheric potential (IP) are caused by conductivity perturbations inside thunderstorms; if, in addition, conductivity reduction inside thunderstorms and nonelectrified clouds is assumed, the IP becomes less sensitive to conductivity perturbations; besides, the IP is even more sensitive to source current variations than to conductivity. Current source and voltage source descriptions of GEC generators are compared; it is shown that the IP variation may critically depend on the chosen description. As an application, the IP variation due to nuclear weapons testing is studied; it is shown that neither local nor global increase of conductivity in the stratosphere could alone explain the observed 40% IP increase in the 1960s; at the same time this increase might be accounted for by a 40% increase in the source current density or a 46% reduction of the conductivity inside thunderstorms, provided that it was not reduced initially. The IP variation due to solar activity and, in particular, due to solar modulation of galactic cosmic ray flux is also discussed and modeled, which required an adequate parameterization of the rate of atmospheric ion pair production over the solar cycle. It is estimated that the maximum IP variation on the scale of the solar cycle does not exceed 5% of the mean value, unless source current perturbations are taken into account.

  18. A facile chemical-mechanical polishing lift-off transfer process toward large scale Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells on arbitrary substrates.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuan-Chun; Yen, Yu-Ting; Thomas, Stuart R; Tsai, Hung-Wei; Hsu, Cheng-Hung; Tsai, Wen-Chi; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Min; Wang, Zhiming M; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2016-03-07

    The fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells on flexible substrates is a non-trivial task due to thermal and ion diffusion related issues. In order to circumvent these issues, we have developed a chemical-mechanical polishing lift-off (CMPL) transfer process, enabling the direct transfer of CIGS solar cells from conventional soda-lime glass (SLG) onto arbitrary flexible substrates up to 4 cm(2) in size. The structural and compositional nature of the pre- and post-transferred films is examined using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. We demonstrate the fabrication of solar cells on a range of flexible substrates while being able to maintain 75% cell efficiency (η) when compared to pre-transferred solar cells. The results obtained in this work suggest that our transfer process offers a highly promising approach toward large scale fabrication of CIGS-based solar cells on a wide variety of flexible substrates, suitable for use in the large scale CIGS photovoltaic industry.

  19. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  20. Nitrogen isotopes in the recent solar wind from the analysis of genesis targets: evidence for large scale isotope heterogeneity in the nascent solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, Roger C; Marty, Bernard; Zimmermann, Laurent; Burnard, Peter G; Burnett, Donald L; Heber, Veronika S; Wieler, Rainer; Bochsler, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen, the fifth most abundant element in the universe, displays the largest stable isotope variations in the solar system reservoirs after hydrogen. Yet the value of isotopic composition of solar nitrogen, presumably the best proxy of the protosolar nebula composition, is not known. Nitrogen isotopes trapped in Genesis spacecraft target material indicate a 40 % depletion of {sup 15}N in solar wind N relative to inner planets and meteorites, and define a composition for the present-day Sun undistinguishable from that of Jupiter's atmosphere. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of of nitrogen in the outer convective zone of the Sun (OCZ) has not changed through time, and is representative of the protosolar nebula. Large {sup 15}N enrichments during e.g., irradiation, or contributions from {sup 15}N-rich presolar components, are required to account for planetary values.

  1. Variations over time in latitudinal distribution of the large-scale magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere at heights from the photosphere to the source surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtemov, Z. S.; Andreyeva, O. A.; Rudenko, G. V.; Stepanian, N. N.; Fainshtein, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    Calculations of magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and the "potential field-source surface" model have been used to study time variations in several parameters of the large-scale magnetic field at various heights during the last four solar cycles. At ten heights from the solar surface (R = Ro) to the source surface (R = 2.5Ro), we have constructed synoptic charts (SC) of the radial component Br of the estimated magnetic field. For these SC, we have identified 10-degree latitudinal zones. Within these zones, we found values of Sp (positive Br values averaged within the latitudinal zone over latitude and longitude), Sm (averaged modulus of negative Br values) and S + fields (a part of the latitudinal zone area (in %) occupied by positive Br values). At lower latitudes, cyclic variations in the Sp + Sm parameter are demonstrated to be similar (but not in detail) to time variations in Wolf numbers. Latitudes of 55° and higher exhibited virtually no cyclic peculiarities of time variations in this parameter. The authors believe that this indicates the diverse nature of the large-scale magnetic field in the near-equatorial and polar regions of the solar atmosphere. At R = 2.5Ro, Sp + Sm cyclic variations are almost invisible at all latitudes and only slightly apparent near the equator. The analysis of S + fields variations revealed that at low latitudes at R = 2.5Ro during solar cycles 21, 22 and ascending phase of cycle 23 there were almost no mixed-polarity periods. However, beginning from the maximum of cycle 23, in the near-equatorial region the mixed polarity was observed until the end of the long solar activity minimum. An assumption has been made that this might have been one of the forerunners and manifestations of the prolonged minimum between cycles 23 and 24. It has been found that during solar activity minima poleward there appears motion of magnetic fields with polarity opposite to that of the field at the pole. We have estimated the velocity of such a

  2. Lab to Large Scale Transition for Non-Vacuum Thin Film CIGS Solar Cells: Phase II--Annual Technical Report, August 2003-July 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Kapur, V. K.; Bansal, A.; Asenio, O. I.; Shigeoka, M. K.; Le, P.; Gergen, B.; Rasmussen, M.; Zuniga, R.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this subcontract, as part of the R&D Partners category is to: (i) identify the challenges that International Solar Electric Technology, Inc. (ISET) may face in the process of making a ''Lab to Large Scale'' transition for its ink-based non-vacuum process in production of thin-film CIGS solar cells and modules, and (ii) develop workable solutions for these challenges such that they can readily be implemented in a large-scale processing line for CIGS modules. The primary objective of this research is to streamline ISET's ink-based non-vacuum process for fabricating efficient CIGS modules to lower the cost of module production << $1.0/watt. To achieve this objective, ISET has focused R&D efforts on investigating topics that directly impact the ultimate cost of processing CIGS modules. These topics of concern include (i) module output, and therefore, the solar cell and the module efficiency, (ii) overall process yield which requires developing a process that offers a very high degree of repeatability for every manufacturing step, and (iii) a process approach that maximizes the utilization of the materials used. In accordance with the above, this report will cover activity during Phase II in the investigation of methods for low-cost manufacturing and process development. Specific tasks cover four broad areas: (1) solar cell efficiency, (2) process control, (3) module integration, and (4) enhanced material utilization by reduction of waste stream.

  3. An Assessment of Water Demand and Availability to meet Construction and Operational Needs for Large Utility-Scale Solar Projects in the Southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, G. T.; Tidwell, V. C.; Macknick, J.; Reno, M. D.; Moreland, B. D.; Zemlick, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the Southwestern United States, there are many large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities currently in operation, with even more under construction and planned for future development. These are locations with high solar insolation and access to large metropolitan areas and existing grid infrastructure. The Bureau of Land Management, under a reasonably foreseeable development scenario, projects a total of almost 32 GW of installed utility-scale solar project capacity in the Southwest by 2030. To determine the potential impacts to water resources and the potential limitations water resources may have on development, we utilized methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine potential water use in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance (O&M), which is then evaluated according to water availability in six Southwestern states. Our results indicate that PV facilities overall use less water, however water for construction is high compared to lifetime operational water needs. There is a transition underway from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities and larger PV facilities due to water use concerns, though some water is still necessary for construction, operations, and maintenance. Overall, ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability. Understanding the location of potentially available water sources can help the solar industry determine locations that minimize impacts to existing water resources, and help understand potential costs when utilizing non-potable water sources or purchasing existing appropriated water. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract

  4. Solar system to scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwig López, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important successes in astronomical observations has been to determine the limit of the Solar System. It is said that the first man able to measure the distance Earth-Sun with only a very slight mistake, in the second century BC, was the wise Greek man Aristarco de Samos. Thanks to Newtońs law of universal gravitation, it was possible to measure, with a little margin of error, the distances between the Sun and the planets. Twelve-year old students are very interested in everything related to the universe. However, it seems too difficult to imagine and understand the real distances among the different celestial bodies. To learn the differences among the inner and outer planets and how far away the outer ones are, I have considered to make my pupils work on the sizes and the distances in our solar system constructing it to scale. The purpose is to reproduce our solar system to scale on a cardboard. The procedure is very easy and simple. Students of first year of ESO (12 year-old) receive the instructions in a sheet of paper (things they need: a black cardboard, a pair of scissors, colored pencils, a ruler, adhesive tape, glue, the photocopies of the planets and satellites, the measurements they have to use). In another photocopy they get the pictures of the edge of the sun, the planets, dwarf planets and some satellites, which they have to color, cut and stick on the cardboard. This activity is planned for both Spanish and bilingual learning students as a science project. Depending on the group, they will receive these instructions in Spanish or in English. When the time is over, the students bring their works on their cardboard to the class. They obtain a final mark: passing, good or excellent, depending on the accuracy of the measurements, the position of all the celestial bodies, the asteroids belts, personal contributions, etc. If any of the students has not followed the instructions they get the chance to remake it again properly, in order not

  5. Large scale scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Deuflhard, P. ); Engquist, B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on large scale scientific computing. It includes: Initial value problems of ODE's and parabolic PDE's; Boundary value problems of ODE's and elliptic PDE's; Hyperbolic PDE's; Inverse problems; Optimization and optimal control problems; and Algorithm adaptation on supercomputers.

  6. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  7. Evolution of Large-scale Solar Magnetic Fields in a Flux-Transport Model Including a Multi-cell Meridional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, E.; Dikpati, M.

    2003-12-01

    Advances in helioseismology over the past decade have enabled us to detect subsurface meridional flows in the Sun. Some recent helioseismological analysis (Giles 1999, Haber et al. 2002) has indicated a submerged, reverse flow cell occurring at high latitudes of the Sun's northern hemisphere between 1998 and 2001. Meridional circulation plays an important role in the operation of a class of large-scale solar dynamo, the so-called "flux-transport" dynamo. In such dynamo models, the poleward drift of the large-scale solar magnetic fields and the polar reversal process are explained by the advective-diffusive transport of magnetic flux by a meridional circulation with a poleward surface flow component. Any temporal and spatial variations in the meridional flow pattern are expected to greatly influence the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in a flux-transport dynamo. The aim of this paper is to explore the implications of a steady, multi-cell flow on the advection of weak, large-scale, magnetic flux. We present a simple, two-cell flux transport model operating in an r-theta cross-section of the northern hemisphere. Azimuthal symmetry is assumed. Performing numerical flux-transport simulations with a reverse flow cell at various latitudes, we demonstrate the effect of this cell on the evolutionary pattern of the large-scale diffuse fields. We also show how a flux concentration may occur at the latitude where the radial flows of the two cells are sinking downward. This work is supported by NASA grants W-19752, W-10107, and W-10175. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  8. Large area monolithic organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hui; Tao, Cheng; Hambsch, Mike; Pivrikas, Almantas; Velusamy, Marappan; Aljada, Muhsen; Zhang, Yuliang; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Although efficiencies of > 10% have recently been achieved in laboratory-scale organic solar cells, these competitive performance figures are yet to be translated to large active areas and geometries relevant for viable manufacturing. One of the factors hindering scale-up is a lack of knowledge of device physics at the sub-module level, particularly cell architecture, electrode geometry and current collection pathways. A more in depth understanding of how photocurrent and photovoltage extraction can be optimised over large active areas is urgently needed. Another key factor suppressing conversion efficiencies in large area cells is the relatively high sheet resistance of the transparent conducting anode - typically indium tin oxide. Hence, to replace ITO with alternative transparent conducting anodes is also a high priority on the pathway to viable module-level organic solar cells. In our paper we will focus on large area devices relevant to sub-module scales - 5 cm × 5 cm monolithic geometry. We have applied a range of experimental techniques to create a more comprehensive understanding of the true device physics that could help make large area, monolithic organic solar cells more viable. By employing this knowledge, a novel transparent anode consisting of molybdenum oxide (MoOx) and silver (Ag) is developed to replace ITO and PEDOT-free large area solar cell sub-modules, acting as both a transparent window and hole-collecting electrode. The proposed architecture and anode materials are well suited to high throughput, low cost all-solution processing.

  9. Science with Large Solar Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, G.; Tritschler, A.; Deng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    With several large aperture optical/IR telescopes coming on-line, and scheduled for the near future, solar physics is on the verge of a quantum leap in observational capabilities. An efficient use of such facilities will require new and innovative approaches to both observatory operations and data handling. This two-days long Special Session will discuss the science expected with large solar telescopes, and start addressing the strategies necessary to optimize their scientific return. Cutting edge solar science as derived from state of the art observations and numerical simulations will be presented, and discussions will be held on the role of large facilities in satisfying the demanding requirements of spatial and temporal resolution, stray-light, and spectro-polarimetric accuracy. Building on the experience of recently commissioned telescopes, we will then discuss critical issues for the development of future facilities including operational issues peculiar to large telecopes, and strategies for their best use.

  10. The dynamics of large-scale meridional flows in the solar interior, and their role in establishing the observed rotational balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, P.

    2009-12-01

    The rotation profile of the solar interior, as observed by helioseismology, exhibits a sharp transition at the base of the convection zone. Above the radiative-convective interface, strong differential rotation is observed while the radiative zone itself is in near-uniform rotation. To date, the only self-consistent published model of the dynamics of the transition region, the solar tachocline, is the one proposed by Gough & McIntyre (1998). In this model, large-scale meridional flows are "gyroscopically pumped" by the differential rotation in the convection zone, down-well into the radiative zone where they encounter a large-scale primordial magnetic field. The magnetic field is thereby confined by the down-welling flows within the radiative zone only, and imposes the observed differential rotation. In this talk, I review a series of new results inspired by this original idea, each of which provides insight into a different aspect of the problem. The new picture which emerges from these related explorations clarifies many outstanding issues, and provides guidance for future investigations. These results begin with a study of the angular-momentum balance of the radiative interior (Garaud & Guervilly 2009), assuming the presence of a confined magnetic field and neglecting the role of meridional flows (a model which is identical to the one originally proposed by Ruediger & Kitchatinov, 1997). We show analytically that this model systematically fails to explain the observed value of the rotation rate of the radiative zone. This implies that, within the Gough & McIntyre model framework, the dynamics of the convection zone flows in the tachocline are crucial not only for field confinement but also for angular-momentum transport. We then present an exhaustive study of a toy model for gyroscopic pumping of large-scale meridional flows by the solar convection zone (Garaud & Acevedo-Arreguin 2009), which 1. illustrates the phenomenon pedagogically 2. quantifies the

  11. The Peculiar Behavior of the Large-Scale Components of the Solar Magnetic Field as a Result of Rossby Vortex Excitation beneath the Convection Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomolov, E. M.; Mordvinov, V. I.

    1996-11-01

    To interpret the dynamical features of large-scale magnetic fields, Rossby vortices are considered. Rossby vortices are assumed to be excited and sustained within a thin layer beneath the convection zone as a result of heating from the solar interior and deformation of the covection zone lower boundary. Numerical calculations show that a Rossby cyclone generates a large-scale magnetic structure, whose horizontal size compares with the solar radius. The distribution of the vertical component of the magnetic field bears a resemblance in this case to the cloud distribution in the cyclones that are observed in the Earth's atmosphere. A magnetic field with the sign of trailing polarity flux of the local bipolar magnetic regions and a field with the sign of leading polarity are generated, respectively, at the center of the Rossby cyclone and at the periphery. The drift of the cyclone toward the Sun's pole, caused by the Rossby wave emission, leads to a corresponding drift of the large-scale magnetic structure. Longitudinally averaged magnetic field distribution also drifts poleward and has a form of "double surge." The leading polarity is the first to reach the pole. The rotation of the first Fourier components of magnetic field calculated for the low- and midlatitude belts resembles in this case the real picture during the threefold polar field reversal in solar activity cycle. Rossby cyclones are used also to simulate some other situations on the Sun when, according to observational data, there are weak drifts of the longitudinally averaged component and corotation of the first Fourier components of the low- and midlatitude belts.

  12. Dynamics of the large-scale open solar magnetic field and its specific features in the zone of the main active longitudes in 2006-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of the absolute global values (Φ) of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) fluxes at an interval of one solar rotation in 2006-2012 has been studied based on the Wilcox Solar Observatory data and using the ISOPAK original package for modeling the solar magnetic field. The reference points and the duration of the final quasi-biennial interval in cycle 23 (January 2006-May 2007; 17 months) and the phases of the cycle 24 minimum (May 2007-November 2009; 30 months), growth (November 2009-May 2012; 30 months), and the beginning of the maximum (May 2012-January 2013) have been determined. It has been indicated that the absolute values (Φ) decreased sharply at the beginning of the minimum, growth, and the maximum phases to ˜(2, 1.25, 0.75) × 1022 Mx, respectively. During the entire minimum phase, LOSMF corotated super-quasi-rigidly westward in the direction of solar rotation; at the beginning of the growth phase, this field started corotating mostly eastward. The LOSMF polarity reversal in the current cycle 24 started in May-June 2012 (CR 2123-2124), when fields of southern polarity rushed from the Sun's southern hemisphere toward the north. The statement that the solar cycle is a continuous series of quasi-biennial LOSMF intervals is confirmed. In particular, the minimum and growth phases are characterized by opposite LOSMF rotation directions, i.e., super-quasi-rigid corotation (twisting) and detwisting, with identical duration at least in cycle 24.

  13. Large area pulsed solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruer, Mark A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An advanced solar simulator illuminates the surface a very large solar array, such as one twenty feet by twenty feet in area, from a distance of about twenty-six feet with an essentially uniform intensity field of pulsed light of an intensity of one AMO, enabling the solar array to be efficiently tested with light that emulates the sun. Light modifiers sculpt a portion of the light generated by an electrically powered high power Xenon lamp and together with direct light from the lamp provide uniform intensity illumination throughout the solar array, compensating for the square law and cosine law reduction in direct light intensity, particularly at the corner locations of the array. At any location within the array the sum of the direct light and reflected light is essentially constant.

  14. Large Scale Nonlinear Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-15

    KEY WORDS (Conhinu. as, t.n.t.. aid. if nic••iary aid ld.ntify by block n,a,b.r) L. In,~~~ IP!CIE LARGE SCALE OPTIMIZATION APPLICATIONS OF NONLINEAR ... NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING by Garth P. McCormick 1. Introduction The general mathematical programming ( optimization ) problem can be stated in the following form...because the difficulty in solving a general nonlinear optimization problem has a~ much to do with the nature of the functions involved as it does with the

  15. Rapid Conversion from Carbohydrates to Large-Scale Carbon Quantum Dots for All-Weather Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qunwei; Zhu, Wanlu; He, Benlin; Yang, Peizhi

    2017-02-28

    A great challenge for state-of-the-art solar cells is to generate electricity in all weather. We present here the rapid conversion of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) from carbohydrates (including glucose, maltol, sucrose) for an all-weather solar cell, which comprises a CQD-sensitized mesoscopic titanium dioxide/long-persistence phosphor (m-TiO2/LPP) photoanode, a I(-)/I3(-) redox electrolyte, and a platinum counter electrode. In virtue of the light storing and luminescent behaviors of LPP phosphors, the generated all-weather solar cells can not only convert sunlight into electricity on sunny days but persistently realize electricity output in all dark-light conditions. The maximized photoelectric conversion efficiency is as high as 15.1% for so-called all-weather CQD solar cells in dark conditions.

  16. Application of Satellite Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence to Understanding Large-Scale Variations in Vegetation Phenology and Function Over Northern High Latitude Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Su-Jong; Schimel, David; Frankenberg, Christian; Drewry, Darren T.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Verma, Manish; Berry, Joseph A.; Lee, Jung-Eun; Joiner, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the large-scale seasonal phenology and physiology of vegetation over northern high latitude forests (40 deg - 55 deg N) during spring and fall by using remote sensing of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and observation-based estimate of gross primary productivity (GPP) from 2009 to 2011. Based on GPP phenology estimation in GPP, the growing season determined by SIF time-series is shorter in length than the growing season length determined solely using NDVI. This is mainly due to the extended period of high NDVI values, as compared to SIF, by about 46 days (+/-11 days), indicating a large-scale seasonal decoupling of physiological activity and changes in greenness in the fall. In addition to phenological timing, mean seasonal NDVI and SIF have different responses to temperature changes throughout the growing season. We observed that both NDVI and SIF linearly increased with temperature increases throughout the spring. However, in the fall, although NDVI linearly responded to temperature increases, SIF and GPP did not linearly increase with temperature increases, implying a seasonal hysteresis of SIF and GPP in response to temperature changes across boreal ecosystems throughout their growing season. Seasonal hysteresis of vegetation at large-scales is consistent with the known phenomena that light limits boreal forest ecosystem productivity in the fall. Our results suggest that continuing measurements from satellite remote sensing of both SIF and NDVI can help to understand the differences between, and information carried by, seasonal variations vegetation structure and greenness and physiology at large-scales across the critical boreal regions.

  17. Application of Satellite Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence to Understanding Large-Scale Variations in Vegetation Phenology and Function Over Northern High Latitude Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Su-Jong; Schimel, David; Frankenberg, Christian; Drewry, Darren T.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Verma, Manish; Berry, Joseph A.; Lee, Jung-Eun; Joiner, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the large-scale seasonal phenology and physiology of vegetation over northern high latitude forests (40 deg - 55 deg N) during spring and fall by using remote sensing of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and observation-based estimate of gross primary productivity (GPP) from 2009 to 2011. Based on GPP phenology estimation in GPP, the growing season determined by SIF time-series is shorter in length than the growing season length determined solely using NDVI. This is mainly due to the extended period of high NDVI values, as compared to SIF, by about 46 days (+/-11 days), indicating a large-scale seasonal decoupling of physiological activity and changes in greenness in the fall. In addition to phenological timing, mean seasonal NDVI and SIF have different responses to temperature changes throughout the growing season. We observed that both NDVI and SIF linearly increased with temperature increases throughout the spring. However, in the fall, although NDVI linearly responded to temperature increases, SIF and GPP did not linearly increase with temperature increases, implying a seasonal hysteresis of SIF and GPP in response to temperature changes across boreal ecosystems throughout their growing season. Seasonal hysteresis of vegetation at large-scales is consistent with the known phenomena that light limits boreal forest ecosystem productivity in the fall. Our results suggest that continuing measurements from satellite remote sensing of both SIF and NDVI can help to understand the differences between, and information carried by, seasonal variations vegetation structure and greenness and physiology at large-scales across the critical boreal regions.

  18. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF A CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE SUPPORTING A LARGE-SCALE SOLAR FILAMENT FROM A PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang; Feng, Xueshang E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2014-05-10

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength ≲ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  19. Large scale tracking algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  20. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L. |; Rickert, M. |

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effects of the scatter in sunspot group tilt angles on the large-scale magnetic field at the solar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-08-10

    The tilt angles of sunspot groups represent the poloidal field source in Babcock-Leighton-type models of the solar dynamo and are crucial for the build-up and reversals of the polar fields in surface flux transport (SFT) simulations. The evolution of the polar field is a consequence of Hale's polarity rules, together with the tilt angle distribution which has a systematic component (Joy's law) and a random component (tilt-angle scatter). We determine the scatter using the observed tilt angle data and study the effects of this scatter on the evolution of the solar surface field using SFT simulations with flux input based upon the recorded sunspot groups. The tilt angle scatter is described in our simulations by a random component according to the observed distributions for different ranges of sunspot group size (total umbral area). By performing simulations with a number of different realizations of the scatter we study the effect of the tilt angle scatter on the global magnetic field, especially on the evolution of the axial dipole moment. The average axial dipole moment at the end of cycle 17 (a medium-amplitude cycle) from our simulations was 2.73 G. The tilt angle scatter leads to an uncertainty of 0.78 G (standard deviation). We also considered cycle 14 (a weak cycle) and cycle 19 (a strong cycle) and show that the standard deviation of the axial dipole moment is similar for all three cycles. The uncertainty mainly results from the big sunspot groups which emerge near the equator. In the framework of Babcock-Leighton dynamo models, the tilt angle scatter therefore constitutes a significant random factor in the cycle-to-cycle amplitude variability, which strongly limits the predictability of solar activity.

  2. Hydrothermal growth of large-scale macroporous TiO2 nanowires and its application in 3D dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai; Liu, Yong; Li, Ming; Huang, Hong; Zhong, Minyi; Shen, Hui

    2009-10-01

    Large-scale macroporous TiO2 nanowires (MTN) were directly grown on spiral-shaped titanium wires as photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) via a facile hydrothermal reaction without any seeds, templates, and TiO2 powder. The MTN thin film was characterized by SEM, XRD and TEM. The studies revealed that the MTN thin film had better mechanical properties and provided an efficient pathway for the diffusion of liquid electrolyte. The efficiency of 0.86% for the 3D DSSC was obtained with a J sc of 2.30 mA/cm2, V oc of 616 mV, and FF of 0.61. This MNT-based mini 3D DSSC is a promising photovoltaic device for applications in the fields of high-integrated micro-electronic equipment.

  3. Economic analysis of large solar power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiss, Helmut; Nitsch, Joachim; Geyer, Michael

    1987-11-01

    The current status and future potential of solar-tower, parabolic-reflector/Stirling-engine, channel-collector, and photovoltaic solar power plants of capacity 10 MWe or more are discussed. Consideration is given to the geographic and technological limitations, initial investment and operating costs, presently operating facilities, market openings, and critical technological challenges controlling future expansion. Numerical data are presented in tables and graphs, and it is concluded that solar power production will soon become economically competitive. It is suggested that the channel collector, at present the most mature and cost-efficient technology, has the least potential for further improvement, and that parabolic/Stirling and photovoltaic systems are probably better suited to smaller applications than to large-scale commercial power production.

  4. ARGO-YBJ OBSERVATION OF THE LARGE-SCALE COSMIC RAY ANISOTROPY DURING THE SOLAR MINIMUM BETWEEN CYCLES 23 AND 24

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; Piazzoli, B. D’Ettorre; Girolamo, T. Di; Bernardini, P.; D’Amone, A.; Mitri, I. De; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Gou, Q. B.; Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu; Cui, S. W.; Gao, W.; Dai, B. Z.; Sciascio, G. Di; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhenyong; Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2015-08-10

    This paper reports on the measurement of the large-scale anisotropy in the distribution of cosmic-ray arrival directions using the data collected by the air shower detector ARGO-YBJ from 2008 January to 2009 December, during the minimum of solar activity between cycles 23 and 24. In this period, more than 2 × 10{sup 11} showers were recorded with energies between ∼1 and 30 TeV. The observed two-dimensional distribution of cosmic rays is characterized by two wide regions of excess and deficit, respectively, both of relative intensity ∼10{sup −3} with respect to a uniform flux, superimposed on smaller size structures. The harmonic analysis shows that the large-scale cosmic-ray relative intensity as a function of R.A. can be described by the first and second terms of a Fouries series. The high event statistics allow the study of the energy dependence of the anistropy, showing that the amplitude increases with energy, with a maximum intensity at ∼10 TeV, and then decreases while the phase slowly shifts toward lower values of R.A. with increasing energy. The ARGO-YBJ data provide accurate observations over more than a decade of energy around this feature of the anisotropy spectrum.

  5. Gram-scale synthesis of catalytic Co9S8 nanocrystal ink as a cathode material for spray-deposited, large-area dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Hao; Lu, Ming-De; Tung, Yung-Liang; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2013-10-22

    We report the development of Co9S8 nanocrystals as a cost-effective cathode material that can be readily combined with spraying techniques to fabricate large-area dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) devices and can be further connected with series or parallel cell architectures to obtain a relatively high output voltage or current. A gram-scale synthesis of Co9S8 nanocrystal is carried out via a noninjection reaction by mixing anhydrous CoCl2 with trioctylphosphine (TOP), dodecanethiol and oleylamine (OLA) at 250 °C. The Co9S8 nanocrystals possess excellent catalytic ability with respect to I(-)/I3(-) redox reactions. The Co9S8 nanocrystals are prepared as nanoinks to fabricate uniform, crack-free Co9S8 thin films on different substrates by using a spray deposition technique. These Co9S8 films are used as counter electrodes assembled with dye-adsorbed TiO2 photoanodes to fabricate DSSC devices having a working area of 2 cm(2) and an average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.02 ± 0.18% under AM 1.5 solar illumination, which is comparable with the PCE of 7.2 ± 0.12% obtained using a Pt cathode. Furthermore, six 2 cm(2)-sized DSSC devices connected in series output an open-circuit voltage of 4.2 V that can power a wide range of electronic devices such as LED arrays and can charge commercial lithium ion batteries.

  6. Electro-spray deposition of a mesoporous TiO2 charge collection layer: toward large scale and continuous production of high efficiency perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-cheol; Kim, Byeong Jo; Yoon, Jungjin; Lee, Jin-wook; Suh, Dongchul; Park, Nam-gyu; Choi, Mansoo; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-12-28

    The spin-coating method, which is widely used for thin film device fabrication, is incapable of large-area deposition or being performed continuously. In perovskite hybrid solar cells using CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3) (MAPbI(3)), large-area deposition is essential for their potential use in mass production. Prior to replacing all the spin-coating process for fabrication of perovskite solar cells, herein, a mesoporous TiO(2) electron-collection layer is fabricated by using the electro-spray deposition (ESD) system. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy and transient photocurrent and photovoltage measurements reveal that the electro-sprayed mesoscopic TiO(2) film facilitates charge collection from the perovskite. The series resistance of the perovskite solar cell is also reduced owing to the highly porous nature of, and the low density of point defects in, the film. An optimized power conversion efficiency of 15.11% is achieved under an illumination of 1 sun; this efficiency is higher than that (13.67%) of the perovskite solar cell with the conventional spin-coated TiO(2) films. Furthermore, the large-area coating capability of the ESD process is verified through the coating of uniform 10 × 10 cm(2) TiO(2) films. This study clearly shows that ESD constitutes therefore a viable alternative for the fabrication of high-throughput, large-area perovskite solar cells.

  7. Very Large Scale Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garrett; Townsend, James C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research under the NASA Small Business Innovative Research program was to develop algorithms and associated software to solve very large nonlinear, constrained optimization tasks. Key issues included efficiency, reliability, memory, and gradient calculation requirements. This report describes the general optimization problem, ten candidate methods, and detailed evaluations of four candidates. The algorithm chosen for final development is a modern recreation of a 1960s external penalty function method that uses very limited computer memory and computational time. Although of lower efficiency, the new method can solve problems orders of magnitude larger than current methods. The resulting BIGDOT software has been demonstrated on problems with 50,000 variables and about 50,000 active constraints. For unconstrained optimization, it has solved a problem in excess of 135,000 variables. The method includes a technique for solving discrete variable problems that finds a "good" design, although a theoretical optimum cannot be guaranteed. It is very scalable in that the number of function and gradient evaluations does not change significantly with increased problem size. Test cases are provided to demonstrate the efficiency and reliability of the methods and software.

  8. Large Solar-Rejection Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William; Sheikh, David; Patrick, Brian

    2007-01-01

    NASA utilized Image Intensified Video Cameras for ATV data acquisition from a jet flying at 12.8 km. Afterwards the video was digitized and then analyzed with a modified commercial software package, Image Systems Trackeye. Astrometric results were limited by saturation, plate scale, and imposed linear plate solution based on field reference stars. Time-dependent fragment angular trajectories, velocities, accelerations, and luminosities were derived in each video segment. It was evident that individual fragments behave differently. Photometric accuracy was insufficient to confidently assess correlations between luminosity and fragment spatial behavior (velocity, deceleration). Use of high resolution digital video cameras in future should remedy this shortcoming. A scenically accurate description of matter interpreted as a substance made up of corpuscular constituents was established during the course of the 19th century. In this description, atoms--the building blocks of the matter--form molecules. The properties of the molecules were described by chemistry or thermodynamics depending on what characteristics of the matter were investigated. In both theories, the molecules can dissociate to atoms when the kinetic energies of the atoms exceed the strength of the chemical bonds. The number of atoms is always preserved in a closed system. This is not true, however, when the matter takes up much higher energies at relativistic scales. New particles can be produced at the expense of the kinetic energy. The number of particles is no longer preserved. There are other conserved quantities, however, these quantities, the charge, baryon number, lepton number, are associated with particles that are considered elementary today. The properties and behavior of these elementary particles is the subject of Particle Physics or High Energy Physics. Practice Page: A crewmember touching a positively charged surface was thought to be galvanically isolated from the vehicle ground

  9. Cross-Scale Coupling in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2011-01-01

    For understanding and eventually predicting solar activity, the fundamental question that Solar-C must answer is: How does energy transfer from the large-scales at which it is injected into the solar atmosphere to the small scales at which it is dissipated? We show that this question of cross-scale coupling is fundamental to all activity, ranging from the smallest nanoflares that are postulated to power coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, to the largest coronal mass ejections and eruptive flares. For the solar atmosphere, the most important process that actually dissipates the energy is believed to be magnetic reconnection. We present results on recent calculations of reconnection in a variety of solar contexts and focus on the coupling between kinetic and MHD scales during reconnection. We discuss the implications of our results for present data and for future observations from Solar-C.

  10. Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI), the state-of-the-art production techniques for computer chips, promises such powerful, inexpensive computing that, in the future, people will be able to communicate with computer devices in natural language or even speech. However, before full-scale VLSI implementation can occur, certain salient factors must be…

  11. Schottky solar cell using few-layered transition metal dichalcogenides toward large-scale fabrication of semitransparent and flexible power generator.

    PubMed

    Akama, Toshiki; Okita, Wakana; Nagai, Reito; Li, Chao; Kaneko, Toshiro; Kato, Toshiaki

    2017-09-20

    Few-layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are known as true two-dimensional materials, with excellent semiconducting properties and strong light-matter interaction. Thus, TMDs are attractive materials for semitransparent and flexible solar cells for use in various applications. Hoewver, despite the recent progress, the development of a scalable method to fabricate semitransparent and flexible solar cells with mono- or few-layered TMDs remains a crucial challenge. Here, we show easy and scalable fabrication of a few-layered TMD solar cell using a Schottky-type configuration to obtain a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of approximately 0.7%, which is the highest value reported with few-layered TMDs. Clear power generation was also observed for a device fabricated on a large SiO2 and flexible substrate, demonstrating that our method has high potential for scalable production. In addition, systematic investigation revealed that the PCE and external quantum efficiency (EQE) strongly depended on the type of photogenerated excitons (A, B, and C) because of different carrier dynamics. Because high solar cell performance along with excellent scalability can be achieved through the proposed process, our fabrication method will contribute to accelerating the industrial use of TMDs as semitransparent and flexible solar cells.

  12. Similarity Rules for Scaling Solar Sail Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen L.; Beard, James W., III; Peddieson, John; Ewing, Anthony; Garbe, Greg

    2004-01-01

    Future science missions will require solar sails on the order 10,000 sq m (or larger). However, ground and flight demonstrations must be conducted at significantly smaller Sizes (400 sq m for ground demo) due to limitations of ground-based facilities and cost and availability of flight opportunities. For this reason, the ability to understand the process of scalability, as it applies to solar sail system models and test data, is crucial to the advancement of this technology. This report will address issues of scaling in solar sail systems, focusing on structural characteristics, by developing a set of similarity or similitude functions that will guide the scaling process. The primary goal of these similarity functions (process invariants) that collectively form a set of scaling rules or guidelines is to establish valid relationships between models and experiments that are performed at different orders of scale. In the near term, such an effort will help guide the size and properties of a flight validation sail that will need to be flown to accurately represent a large, mission-level sail.

  13. Ultra-Large Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Rodney; Coverstone, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    UltraSail is a next-generation ultra-large (km2 class) sail system. Analysis of the launch, deployment, stabilization, and control of these sails shows that high-payload-mass fractions for interplanetary and deep-space missions are possible. UltraSail combines propulsion and control systems developed for formation-flying microsatellites with a solar sail architecture to achieve controllable sail areas approaching 1 km2. Electrically conductive CP-1 polyimide film results in sail subsystem area densities as low as 5 g/m2. UltraSail produces thrust levels many times those of ion thrusters used for comparable deep-space missions. The primary innovation involves the near-elimination of sail-supporting structures by attaching each blade tip to a formation- flying microsatellite, which deploys the sail and then articulates the sail to provide attitude control, including spin stabilization and precession of the spin axis. These microsatellite tips are controlled by microthrusters for sail-film deployment and mission operations. UltraSail also avoids the problems inherent in folded sail film, namely stressing, yielding, or perforating, by storing the film in a roll for launch and deployment. A 5-km long by 2 micrometer thick film roll on a mandrel with a 1 m circumference (32 cm diameter) has a stored thickness of 5 cm. A 5 m-long mandrel can store a film area of 25,000 m2, and a four-blade system has an area of 0.1 sq km.

  14. High-performance large-scale flexible dye-sensitized solar cells based on anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Jen, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Meng-Hung; Li, Lu-Lin; Wu, Hui-Ping; Huang, Wei-Kai; Cheng, Po-Jen; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2013-10-23

    A simple strategy to fabricate flexible dye-sensitized solar cells involves the use of photoanodes based on TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays with rear illumination. The TNT films (tube length ∼35 μm) were produced via anodization, and sensitized with N719 dye for photovoltaic characterization. Pt counter electrodes of two types were used: a conventional FTO/glass substrate for a device of rigid type and an ITO/PEN substrate for a device of flexible type. These DSSC devices were fabricated into either a single-cell structure (active area 3.6×0.5 cm2) or a parallel module containing three single cells (total active area 5.4 cm2). The flexible devices exhibit remarkable performance with efficiencies η=5.40% (single cell) and 4.77% (parallel module) of power conversion, which outperformed their rigid counterparts with η=4.87% (single cell) and 4.50% (parallel model) under standard one-sun irradiation. The flexible device had a greater efficiency of conversion of incident photons to current and a broader spectral range than the rigid device; a thinner electrolyte layer for the flexible device than for the rigid device is a key factor to improve the light-harvesting ability for the TNT-DSSC device with rear illumination. Measurements of electrochemical impedance spectra show excellent catalytic activity and superior diffusion characteristics for the flexible device. This technique thus provides a new option to construct flexible photovoltaic devices with large-scale, light-weight, and cost-effective advantages for imminent applications in consumer electronics.

  15. Predicting large solar flares with data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Solar and stellar flares are magnetically-driven, scale-invariant energy release events spanning over 8 orders of magnitude in energy. The prediction of the largest solar flares, of class X, is a particularly hard task due the scarcity of such events. The detailed 3D modelling of flaring active regions still requires today too much numerical resources to be routinely used for near real-time predictions. Alternative, empirical models hence have to be designed to perform such predictions. Among the models that adequately reproduce the power-law distribution in flare sizes, avalanche models have the advantage of being numerically cheap to operate. However, they usually rely on a stochastic driver, which can be expected to degrade their predictive capabilities. Building on the pioneering work of Lu and Hamilton, we develop a class of avalanche models which succeed in minimizing the built-in stochastic ingredients while retaining the solar flares power-law distribution. We show that the largest avalanches occurring in these models are robust with respect to the stochastic realization, which opens new perspectives for the prediction of the largest (and most dangerous) solar flares.We further combine data assimilation of the GOES X-ray flux with our avalanche models to carry out actual predictions. The GOES X-ray flux is transformed into a series of peaks that is fed to the model, which automatically finds an initial condition that is compatible with the observed series of events. We then test our prediction model against past GOES large events and discuss the possibility to use our data assimilation package in near real-time applications.

  16. Large-scale structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1983-01-01

    Problems encountered by aerospace designers in attempting to optimize whole aircraft are discussed, along with possible solutions. Large scale optimization, as opposed to component-by-component optimization, is hindered by computational costs, software inflexibility, concentration on a single, rather than trade-off, design methodology and the incompatibility of large-scale optimization with single program, single computer methods. The software problem can be approached by placing the full analysis outside of the optimization loop. Full analysis is then performed only periodically. Problem-dependent software can be removed from the generic code using a systems programming technique, and then embody the definitions of design variables, objective function and design constraints. Trade-off algorithms can be used at the design points to obtain quantitative answers. Finally, decomposing the large-scale problem into independent subproblems allows systematic optimization of the problems by an organization of people and machines.

  17. Large-scale circuit simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. P.

    1982-12-01

    The simulation of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) circuits falls beyond the capabilities of conventional circuit simulators like SPICE. On the other hand, conventional logic simulators can only give the results of logic levels 1 and 0 with the attendent loss of detail in the waveforms. The aim of developing large-scale circuit simulation is to bridge the gap between conventional circuit simulation and logic simulation. This research is to investigate new approaches for fast and relatively accurate time-domain simulation of MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductors), LSI (Large Scale Integration) and VLSI circuits. New techniques and new algorithms are studied in the following areas: (1) analysis sequencing (2) nonlinear iteration (3) modified Gauss-Seidel method (4) latency criteria and timestep control scheme. The developed methods have been implemented into a simulation program PREMOS which could be used as a design verification tool for MOS circuits.

  18. Large Scale Dynamos in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2015-01-01

    We show that a differentially rotating conducting fluid automatically creates a magnetic helicity flux with components along the rotation axis and in the direction of the local vorticity. This drives a rapid growth in the local density of current helicity, which in turn drives a large scale dynamo. The dynamo growth rate derived from this process is not constant, but depends inversely on the large scale magnetic field strength. This dynamo saturates when buoyant losses of magnetic flux compete with the large scale dynamo, providing a simple prediction for magnetic field strength as a function of Rossby number in stars. Increasing anisotropy in the turbulence produces a decreasing magnetic helicity flux, which explains the flattening of the B/Rossby number relation at low Rossby numbers. We also show that the kinetic helicity is always a subdominant effect. There is no kinematic dynamo in real stars.

  19. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-01-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  20. Large-scale brightenings associated with flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that large-scale brightenings (LSBs) associated with solar flares, similar to the 'giant arches' discovered by Svestka et al. (1982) in images obtained by the SSM HXIS hours after the onset of two-ribbon flares, can also occur in association with confined flares in complex active regions. For these events, a clear link between the LSB and the underlying flare is clearly evident from the active-region magnetic field topology. The implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of the interacting loops of flares and the giant arch phenomenology.

  1. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jesper S; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg; Groth, Jesper S; Vissing, Thomas; Larsen, Marianne S; Geschke, Oliver; Emneús, Jenny; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus H

    2009-10-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO(2) laser micro-structured 8 x 8 aperture partition arrays with average aperture diameters of 301 +/- 5 microm. We addressed the electro-physical properties of the lipid bilayers established across the micro-structured scaffold arrays by controllable reconstitution of biotechnological and physiological relevant membrane peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays, and furthermore demonstrate that the design can conveniently be scaled up to support planar lipid bilayers in large square-centimeter partition arrays.

  2. Chinese large solar telescopes site survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2017-04-01

    In order to observe the solar surface with unprecedentedly higher resolution, Chinse solar physics society decided to launch their solar site survey project in 2010 as the first step to look for the best candidate sites for the Chinese next-generation large-aperture solar telescopes, i.e., the 5-8 meter Chinese Giant Solar Telescope, and the 1 meter level coronagraph. We have built two long-term monitoring sites in Daocheng, with altitudes of around 4800 meters above the sea level located in the large Shangri-La mountain area, and we have collected systematic site data since 2014. Clear evidence, including the key parameters of seeing factor, sky brightness and water vapor content, has indicated that the large Shangri-La area owns the potential conditions of excellent seeing level and sufficient amount of clear-sky hours suitable for developing large solar telescopes. We will review the site survey progress and present the preliminary statistical results in this talk.

  3. Challenges for Large Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    With computational approaches becoming ubiquitous the growing impact of large scale computing on research influences both theoretical and experimental work. I will review a few examples in condensed matter physics and quantum optics, including the impact of computer simulations in the search for supersolidity, thermometry in ultracold quantum gases, and the challenging search for novel phases in strongly correlated electron systems. While only a decade ago such simulations needed the fastest supercomputers, many simulations can now be performed on small workstation clusters or even a laptop: what was previously restricted to a few experts can now potentially be used by many. Only part of the gain in computational capabilities is due to Moore's law and improvement in hardware. Equally impressive is the performance gain due to new algorithms - as I will illustrate using some recently developed algorithms. At the same time modern peta-scale supercomputers offer unprecedented computational power and allow us to tackle new problems and address questions that were impossible to solve numerically only a few years ago. While there is a roadmap for future hardware developments to exascale and beyond, the main challenges are on the algorithmic and software infrastructure side. Among the problems that face the computational physicist are: the development of new algorithms that scale to thousands of cores and beyond, a software infrastructure that lifts code development to a higher level and speeds up the development of new simulation programs for large scale computing machines, tools to analyze the large volume of data obtained from such simulations, and as an emerging field provenance-aware software that aims for reproducibility of the complete computational workflow from model parameters to the final figures. Interdisciplinary collaborations and collective efforts will be required, in contrast to the cottage-industry culture currently present in many areas of computational

  4. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves.

    PubMed

    Warmuth, Alexander

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  5. Relation of large-scale coronal X-ray structure and cosmic rays. I - Sources of solar wind streams as defined by X-ray emission and H-alpha absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, A. S.; Nolte, J. T.; Sullivan, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Mcintosh, P. S.; Gold, R. E.; Roelof, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the corona and the interplanetary medium during Carrington rotations 1601-1607 is discussed relative to recurrent high-speed solar wind streams and their coronal sources. Only streams A, C, D, and F recur on more than one rotation. Streams A and D are associated with coronal holes, while C and F originate in the high corona (20-50 solar radii) over faint X-ray emissions. The association of the streams with holes is confirmed by earlier findings that there are no large equatorial holes without an associated high-speed stream and that the area of the equatorial region of coronal holes is highly correlated with the maximum velocity observed in the associated stream near 1 AU.

  6. Large scale cluster computing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dane Skow; Alan Silverman

    2002-12-23

    Recent revolutions in computer hardware and software technologies have paved the way for the large-scale deployment of clusters of commodity computers to address problems heretofore the domain of tightly coupled SMP processors. Near term projects within High Energy Physics and other computing communities will deploy clusters of scale 1000s of processors and be used by 100s to 1000s of independent users. This will expand the reach in both dimensions by an order of magnitude from the current successful production facilities. The goals of this workshop were: (1) to determine what tools exist which can scale up to the cluster sizes foreseen for the next generation of HENP experiments (several thousand nodes) and by implication to identify areas where some investment of money or effort is likely to be needed. (2) To compare and record experimences gained with such tools. (3) To produce a practical guide to all stages of planning, installing, building and operating a large computing cluster in HENP. (4) To identify and connect groups with similar interest within HENP and the larger clustering community.

  7. X6.9-CLASS FLARE-INDUCED VERTICAL KINK OSCILLATIONS IN A LARGE-SCALE PLASMA CURTAIN AS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A. K.; Goossens, M.

    2013-11-01

    We present rare observational evidence of vertical kink oscillations in a laminar and diffused large-scale plasma curtain as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The X6.9-class flare in active region 11263 on 2011 August 9 induces a global large-scale disturbance that propagates in a narrow lane above the plasma curtain and creates a low density region that appears as a dimming in the observational image data. This large-scale propagating disturbance acts as a non-periodic driver that interacts asymmetrically and obliquely with the top of the plasma curtain and triggers the observed oscillations. In the deeper layers of the curtain, we find evidence of vertical kink oscillations with two periods (795 s and 530 s). On the magnetic surface of the curtain where the density is inhomogeneous due to coronal dimming, non-decaying vertical oscillations are also observed (period ≈ 763-896 s). We infer that the global large-scale disturbance triggers vertical kink oscillations in the deeper layers as well as on the surface of the large-scale plasma curtain. The properties of the excited waves strongly depend on the local plasma and magnetic field conditions.

  8. Displacement of large-scale open solar magnetic fields from the zone of active longitudes and the heliospheric storm of November 3-10, 2004: 2. "Explosion" of singularity and dynamics of sunspot formation and energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.

    2010-12-01

    A more detailed scenario of one stage (August-November 2004) of the quasibiennial MHD process "Origination ... and dissipation of the four-sector structure of the solar magnetic field" during the decline phase of cycle 23 has been constructed. It has been indicated that the following working hypothesis on the propagation of an MHD disturbance westward (in the direction of solar rotation) and eastward (toward the zone of active longitudes) with the displacement of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) from this zone can be constructed based on LOSMF model representations and data on sunspot formation, flares, active filaments, and coronal ejections as well as on the estimated contribution of sporadic energy release to the flare luminosity and kinetic energy of ejections: (1) The "explosion" of the LOSMF singularity and the formation in the explosion zone of an anemone active region (AR), which produced the satellite sunspot formation that continued west and east of the "anemone," represented a powerful and energy-intensive source of MHD processes at this stage. (2) This resulted in the origination of two "governing" large-scale MHD processes, which regulated various usual manifestations of solar activity: the fast LOSMF along the neutral line in the solar atmosphere, strongly affecting the zone of active longitudes, and the slow LOSMF in the outer layers of the convection zone. The fronts of these processes were identified by powerful (about 1031 erg) coronal ejections. (3) The collision of a wave reflected from the zone of active longitudes with the eastern front of the hydromagnetic impulse of the convection zone resulted in an increase in LOSMF magnetic fluxes, origination of an active sector boundary in the zone of active longitudes, shear-convergent motions, and generation and destabilization of the flare-productive AR 10696 responsible for the heliospheric storm of November 3-10, 2004.

  9. Cosmology with Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, A.; Ross, A.; Seo, H.; DePutter, R.; Padmanabhan, N.; White, M.; Myers, A.; Bovy, J.; Blanton, M.; Hernandez, C.; Mena, O.; Percival, W.; Prada, F.; Ross, N. P.; Saito, S.; Schneider, D.; Skibba, R.; Smith, K.; Slosar, A.; Strauss, M.; Verde, L.; Weinberg, D.; Bachall, N.; Brinkmann, J.; da Costa, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey I-III surveyed 14,000 square degrees, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. I present cosmological results from this unprecedented data set which contains over a million galaxies distributed between redshift of 0.45 to 0.70. With such a large volume of data set, high precision cosmological constraints can be obtained given a careful control and understanding of observational systematics. I present a novel treatment of observational systematics and its application to the clustering signals from the data set. I will present cosmological constraints on dark components of the Universe and tightest constraints of the non-gaussianity of early Universe to date utilizing Large Scale Structure.

  10. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  11. Methane emissions on large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beswick, K. M.; Simpson, T. W.; Fowler, D.; Choularton, T. W.; Gallagher, M. W.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Sutton, M. A.; Kaye, A.

    Two separate studies have been undertaken to improve estimates of methane emissions on a landscape scale. The first study took place over a palsa mire in northern Finland in August 1995. A tethered balloon and a tunable diode laser were used to measure profiles of methane in the nocturnal boundary layer. Using a simple box method or the flux gradient technique fluxes ranging from 18.5 to 658 μmol m -2 h -1 were calculated. The large fluxes may be caused by advection of methane pockets across the measurement site, reflecting the heterogeneous nature of methane source strengths in the surrounding area. Under suitable conditions, comparison with nearby ground-based eddy-correlation results suggested that the balloon techniques could successfully measure fluxes on field scales. The second study was carried out by the NERC Scientific Services Atmospheric Research Airborne Support Facility using the Hercules C130 operated by the United Kingdom Meteorological Research Flight. A flight path around the northern coastline of Britain under steady West-East wind conditions enabled the measurement of methane concentrations up- and down-wind of northern Britain. Using a simple one-dimensional, constant-source diffusion model, the difference between the upwind and downwind concentrations was accounted for by methane emission from the surface. The contribution to methane emissions from livestock was also modelled. Modelled non-agricultural methane emissions decreased with increasing latitude with fluxes in northern England being a factor of 4 greater than those in northern Scotland. Since the only major methane source in northern Scotland was peat bogs, these results indicated that emissions over northern England were dominated by anthropogenic sources. Emissions from livestock accounted for 12% of the total flux over northern England, decreasing to 4% in southern Scotland and becoming negligible in northern Scotland. The total methane flux over northern Scotland was consistent

  12. Scaling Laws of Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Stern, Robert A.; Güdel, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In this study we compile for the first time comprehensive data sets of solar and stellar flare parameters, including flare peak temperatures Tp, flare peak volume emission measures EMp, and flare durations τf from both solar and stellar data, as well as flare length scales L from solar data. Key results are that both the solar and stellar data are consistent with a common scaling law of EMp propto T4.7p, but the stellar flares exhibit ≈250 times higher emission measures (at the same flare peak temperature). For solar flares we observe also systematic trends for the flare length scale L(Tp) propto T0.9p and the flare duration τF(Tp) propto T0.9p as a function of the flare peak temperature. Using the theoretical RTV scaling law and the fractal volume scaling observed for solar flares, i.e., V(L) propto L2.4, we predict a scaling law of EMp propto T4.3p, which is consistent with observations, and a scaling law for electron densities in flare loops, np propto T2p/L propto T1.1p. The RTV-predicted electron densities were also found to be consistent with densities inferred from total emission measures, np = (EMp/qVV)1/2, using volume filling factors of qV = 0.03-0.08 constrained by fractal dimensions measured in solar flares. Solar and stellar flares are expected to have similar electron densities for equal flare peak temperatures Tp, but the higher emission measures of detected stellar flares most likely represent a selection bias of larger flare volumes and higher volume filling factors, due to low detector sensitivity at higher temperatures. Our results affect also the determination of radiative and conductive cooling times, thermal energies, and frequency distributions of solar and stellar flare energies.

  13. Large area space solar cell assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Nowlan, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a large area space solar cell assembly is presented. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are (1) use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and (2) integration of coverglass application and call fabrication.

  14. Large gradual solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Giacalone, Joe

    2016-09-01

    Solar energetic particles, or SEPs, from suprathermal (few keV) up to relativistic (˜ few GeV) energies are accelerated near the Sun in at least two ways: (1) by magnetic reconnection-driven processes during solar flares resulting in impulsive SEPs, and (2) at fast coronal-mass-ejection-driven shock waves that produce large gradual SEP events. Large gradual SEP events are of particular interest because the accompanying high-energy ({>}10s MeV) protons pose serious radiation threats to human explorers living and working beyond low-Earth orbit and to technological assets such as communications and scientific satellites in space. However, a complete understanding of these large SEP events has eluded us primarily because their properties, as observed in Earth orbit, are smeared due to mixing and contributions from many important physical effects. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge of these important phenomena, and summarizes some of the key questions that will be addressed by two upcoming missions—NASA's Solar Probe Plus and ESA's Solar Orbiter. Both of these missions are designed to directly and repeatedly sample the near-Sun environments where interplanetary scattering and transport effects are significantly reduced, allowing us to discriminate between different acceleration sites and mechanisms and to isolate the contributions of numerous physical processes occurring during large SEP events.

  15. Large-Scale Sequence Comparison.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi

    2017-01-01

    There are millions of sequences deposited in genomic databases, and it is an important task to categorize them according to their structural and functional roles. Sequence comparison is a prerequisite for proper categorization of both DNA and protein sequences, and helps in assigning a putative or hypothetical structure and function to a given sequence. There are various methods available for comparing sequences, alignment being first and foremost for sequences with a small number of base pairs as well as for large-scale genome comparison. Various tools are available for performing pairwise large sequence comparison. The best known tools either perform global alignment or generate local alignments between the two sequences. In this chapter we first provide basic information regarding sequence comparison. This is followed by the description of the PAM and BLOSUM matrices that form the basis of sequence comparison. We also give a practical overview of currently available methods such as BLAST and FASTA, followed by a description and overview of tools available for genome comparison including LAGAN, MumMER, BLASTZ, and AVID.

  16. Jovian large-scale stratospheric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.; Friedson, A. J.; Appleby, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to diagnose the annual-average mean meridional residual Jovian large-scale stratospheric circulation from observations of the temperature and reflected sunlight that reveal the morphology of the aerosol heating. The annual mean solar heating, total radiative flux divergence, mass stream function, and Eliassen-Palm flux divergence are shown. The stratospheric radiative flux divergence is dominated the high latitudes by aerosol absorption. Between the 270 and 100 mbar pressure levels, where there is no aerosol heating in the model, the structure of the circulation at low- to midlatitudes is governed by the meridional variation of infrared cooling in association with the variation of zonal mean temperatures observed by IRIS. The principal features of the vertical velocity profile found by Gierasch et al. (1986) are recovered in the present calculation.

  17. Large area flexible solar array design for Space Shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    A large area flexible solar array has been designed for Shuttle power augmentation. The solar array utilizes large area, low cost, weldable solar cells. The paper addresses how the unique requirements of this system are implemented into the design. Economic and reliability issues relating to the optimization of a large area, foldable solar array concomitant to the Shuttle/Orbiter system are reviewed.

  18. Large-scale PACS implementation.

    PubMed

    Carrino, J A; Unkel, P J; Miller, I D; Bowser, C L; Freckleton, M W; Johnson, T G

    1998-08-01

    The transition to filmless radiology is a much more formidable task than making the request for proposal to purchase a (Picture Archiving and Communications System) PACS. The Department of Defense and the Veterans Administration have been pioneers in the transformation of medical diagnostic imaging to the electronic environment. Many civilian sites are expected to implement large-scale PACS in the next five to ten years. This presentation will related the empirical insights gleaned at our institution from a large-scale PACS implementation. Our PACS integration was introduced into a fully operational department (not a new hospital) in which work flow had to continue with minimal impact. Impediments to user acceptance will be addressed. The critical components of this enormous task will be discussed. The topics covered during this session will include issues such as phased implementation, DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) standard-based interaction of devices, hospital information system (HIS)/radiology information system (RIS) interface, user approval, networking, workstation deployment and backup procedures. The presentation will make specific suggestions regarding the implementation team, operating instructions, quality control (QC), training and education. The concept of identifying key functional areas is relevant to transitioning the facility to be entirely on line. Special attention must be paid to specific functional areas such as the operating rooms and trauma rooms where the clinical requirements may not match the PACS capabilities. The printing of films may be necessary for certain circumstances. The integration of teleradiology and remote clinics into a PACS is a salient topic with respect to the overall role of the radiologists providing rapid consultation. A Web-based server allows a clinician to review images and reports on a desk-top (personal) computer and thus reduce the number of dedicated PACS review workstations. This session

  19. Similarity Rules for Scaling Solar Sail Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen L.; Peddieson, John; Garbe, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Future science missions will require solar sails on the order of 200 square meters (or larger). However, ground demonstrations and flight demonstrations must be conducted at significantly smaller sizes, due to limitations of ground-based facilities and cost and availability of flight opportunities. For this reason, the ability to understand the process of scalability, as it applies to solar sail system models and test data, is crucial to the advancement of this technology. This paper will approach the problem of scaling in solar sail models by developing a set of scaling laws or similarity criteria that will provide constraints in the sail design process. These scaling laws establish functional relationships between design parameters of a prototype and model sail that are created at different geometric sizes. This work is applied to a specific solar sail configuration and results in three (four) similarity criteria for static (dynamic) sail models. Further, it is demonstrated that even in the context of unique sail material requirements and gravitational load of earth-bound experiments, it is possible to develop appropriate scaled sail experiments. In the longer term, these scaling laws can be used in the design of scaled experimental tests for solar sails and in analyzing the results from such tests.

  20. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  1. Large Scale Homing in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Mario; Zhu, Hong; Tautz, Jürgen; Zhang, Shaowu

    2011-01-01

    Honeybee foragers frequently fly several kilometres to and from vital resources, and communicate those locations to their nest mates by a symbolic dance language. Research has shown that they achieve this feat by memorizing landmarks and the skyline panorama, using the sun and polarized skylight as compasses and by integrating their outbound flight paths. In order to investigate the capacity of the honeybees' homing abilities, we artificially displaced foragers to novel release spots at various distances up to 13 km in the four cardinal directions. Returning bees were individually registered by a radio frequency identification (RFID) system at the hive entrance. We found that homing rate, homing speed and the maximum homing distance depend on the release direction. Bees released in the east were more likely to find their way back home, and returned faster than bees released in any other direction, due to the familiarity of global landmarks seen from the hive. Our findings suggest that such large scale homing is facilitated by global landmarks acting as beacons, and possibly the entire skyline panorama. PMID:21602920

  2. Large Scale Magnetostrictive Valve Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.; Holleman, Elizabeth; Eddleman, David

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Valves, Actuators and Ducts Design and Development Branch developed a large scale magnetostrictive valve actuator. The potential advantages of this technology are faster, more efficient valve actuators that consume less power and provide precise position control and deliver higher flow rates than conventional solenoid valves. Magnetostrictive materials change dimensions when a magnetic field is applied; this property is referred to as magnetostriction. Magnetostriction is caused by the alignment of the magnetic domains in the material s crystalline structure and the applied magnetic field lines. Typically, the material changes shape by elongating in the axial direction and constricting in the radial direction, resulting in no net change in volume. All hardware and testing is complete. This paper will discuss: the potential applications of the technology; overview of the as built actuator design; discuss problems that were uncovered during the development testing; review test data and evaluate weaknesses of the design; and discuss areas for improvement for future work. This actuator holds promises of a low power, high load, proportionally controlled actuator for valves requiring 440 to 1500 newtons load.

  3. Large area perovskite solar cell module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Longhua; Liang, Lusheng; Wu, Jifeng; Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Fan, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The recent dramatic rise in power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of perovskite solar cells has triggered intense research worldwide. However, their practical development is hampered by poor stability and low PCE values with large areas devices. Here, we developed a gas-pumping method to avoid pinholes and eliminate local structural defects over large areas of perovskite film, even for 5 × 5 cm2 modules, the PCE reached 10.6% and no significant degradation was found after 140 days of outdoor testing. Our approach enables the realization of high performance large-area PSCs for practical application.

  4. The feasibility of large refracting telescopes for solar coronal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Elmore, David F.; Kolinski, Donald J.

    2008-07-01

    Measuring magnetic fields in the solar corona requires a large aperture telescope with exceptionally low levels of scattered light. For internally-occulted coronagraphs the main source is scattering from dust or microroughness on the primary lens or mirror. We show refracting primaries offer significantly lower levels for both sources. To observe magnetic fields in the solar corona with scientifically interesting spatial and temporal resolutions, a 1 meter aperture or larger is required. For a long time such large-scale refractors have been deemed impractical or impossible to construct due to gravitational deformation of the lens. We present the results of finite-element and optical analyses of the gravitational deformation, stress-induced birefringence, and absorptive heating of a (see manuscript)1.5 meter f/5 fused silica lens. These studies demonstrate the traditional objections to large refractors are unfounded and large refracting primaries have unique capabilities.

  5. Siting Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.; Owens, B.

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, Congress asked the U.S. Department of Energy to develop and scope out an initiative to fulfill the goal of having 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new parabolic trough, power tower, and dish engine solar capacity supplying the southwestern United States. In this paper, we present a review of the solar resource for Arizona, California, Nevada, and New Mexico. These four states have the greatest number of ''premium'' solar sites in the country and each has a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). We present information on the generation potential of the solar resources in these states. We also present regions within New Mexico that may be ideally suited for developing large-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants because of their proximity to load and their access to unconstrained transmission.

  6. Solar Wind Variability: from Macro to Micro Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, R.

    2015-12-01

    Several decades of in-situ observations by spacecraft unraveled the complex nature of the variability of solar wind magnetic field and plasma parameters. These fluctuations range from scales of the order of the solar rotation period to the smallest scales of the order of the ion and electron characteristic scale lengths. Some of these fluctuations belong to coronal transients, others to propagating modes and others are simply due to inhomogeneities and structures advected by the wind across the observer. In this talk I'll provide a short overview of the state of art of our current interpretation of the complex phenomenology observed so far, also in view of the next solar missions Solar Orbiter and SPP. I will start describing the solar wind large scale structure and its connection to the low corona. I will continue through the MHD regime, where turbulence energy is nonlinearly transferred to smaller and smaller scales, to end up at kinetic scales where this energy eventually is dissipated.

  7. LEMUR: Large European Module for Solar Ultraviolet Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teriaca, Luca; Vincenzo, Andretta; Auchere, Frederic; Brown, Charles M.; Buchlin, Eric; Cauzzi, Gianna; Culhane, J. Len; Curdt, Werner; Davila, Joseph M.; Del Zanna, Giulio; hide

    2012-01-01

    The solar outer atmosphere is an extremely dynamic environment characterized by the continuous interplay between the plasma and the magnetic field that generates and permeates it. Such interactions play a fundamental role in hugely diverse astrophysical systems, but occur at scales that cannot be studied outside the solar system. Understanding this complex system requires concerted, simultaneous solar observations from the visible to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-rays, at high spatial resolution (between 0.1'' and 0.3''), at high temporal resolution (on the order of 10 s, i.e., the time scale of chromospheric dynamics), with a wide temperature coverage (0.01 MK to 20 MK, from the chromosphere to the flaring corona), and the capability of measuring magnetic fields through spectropolarimetry at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements sampling the entire temperature range are particularly important. These requirements are fulfilled by the Japanese Solar-C mission (Plan B), composed of a spacecraft in a geosynchronous orbit with a payload providing a significant improvement of imaging and spectropolarimetric capabilities in the UV, visible, and near-infrared with respect to what is available today and foreseen in the near future. The Large European Module for solar Ultraviolet Research (LEMUR), described in this paper, is a large VUV telescope feeding a scientific payload of high-resolution imaging spectrographs and cameras. LEMUR consists of two major components: a VUV solar telescope with a 30 cm diameter mirror and a focal length of 3.6 m, and a focal-plane package composed of VUV spectrometers covering six carefully chosen wavelength ranges between 170 Angstrom and 1270 Angstrom. The LEMUR slit covers 280'' on the Sun with 0.14'' per pixel sampling. In addition, LEMUR is capable of measuring mass flows velocities (line shifts) down to 2 km s - 1 or better. LEMUR has been proposed to ESA as the European contribution

  8. Transient flows of the solar wind associated with small-scale solar activity in solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor; Kuzin, Sergey; Gburek, Szymon; Ulyanov, Artyom; Kirichenko, Alexey; Shugay, Yulia; Goryaev, Farid

    The data obtained by the modern high sensitive EUV-XUV telescopes and photometers such as CORONAS-Photon/TESIS and SPHINX, STEREO/EUVI, PROBA2/SWAP, SDO/AIA provide good possibilities for studying small-scale solar activity (SSA), which is supposed to play an important role in heating of the corona and producing transient flows of the solar wind. During the recent unusually weak solar minimum, a large number of SSA events, such as week solar flares, small CMEs and CME-like flows were observed and recorded in the databases of flares (STEREO, SWAP, SPHINX) and CMEs (LASCO, CACTUS). On the other hand, the solar wind data obtained in this period by ACE, Wind, STEREO contain signatures of transient ICME-like structures which have shorter duration (<10h), weaker magnetic field strength (<10 nT) and lower proton temperature than usual ICMEs. To verify the assumption that ICME-like transients may be associated with the SSA events we investigated the number of weak flares of C-class and lower detected by SPHINX in 2009 and STEREO/EUVI in 2010. The flares were classified on temperature and emission measure using the diagnostic means of SPHINX and Hinode/EIS and were confronted with the parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density, ion composition and temperature, magnetic field, pitch angle distribution of the suprathermal electrons). The outflows of plasma associated with the flares were identified by their coronal signatures - CMEs (only in few cases) and dimmings. It was found that the mean parameters of the solar wind projected to the source surface for the times of the studied flares were typical for the ICME-like transients. The results support the suggestion that weak flares can be indicators of sources of transient plasma flows contributing to the slow solar wind at solar minimum, although these flows may be too weak to be considered as separate CMEs and ICMEs. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme

  9. NLST: the Indian National Large Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Soltau, D.; Kärcher, H.; Süss, M.; Berkefeld, T.

    2010-07-01

    India is planning a new solar telescope with an aperture of 2-m for carrying out high resolution studies of the Sun. Site characterization is underway at high altitude locations in the Himalayan mountains. A detailed concept design for NLST (National Large Solar Telescope) has been completed. The optical design of the telescope is optimized for high optical throughput and uses a minimum number of optical elements. A high order AO system is integrated part of the design that works with a modest Fried's parameter of 7-cm to give diffraction limited performance. The telescope will be equipped with a suite of post-focus instruments including a high resolution spectrograph and a polarimeter. NLST will also be used for carrying out stellar observations during the night. The mechanical design of the telescope, building, and the innovative dome is optimized to take advantage of the natural air flush which will help to keep the open telescope in temperature equilibrium. After its completion (planned for 2014), NLST will fill a gap in longitude between the major solar facilities in USA and Europe, and it will be for years the largest solar telescope in the world

  10. Large-scale negative polarity magnetic fields on the sun and particle-emitting flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Some observational facts about the large-scale patterns formed by solar negative polarity magnetic fields during the 19th and 20th cycles of solar activity are presented. The close relation of the position of occurrence of very large flares accompanied by cosmic ray and PCA events as well as other phenomena of solar activity during the declining part of the 19th cycle of the regularities in the internal structure of large scale negative polarity features are demonstrated.

  11. PROBING THE HALO FROM THE SOLAR VICINITY TO THE OUTER GALAXY: CONNECTING STARS IN LOCAL VELOCITY STRUCTURES TO LARGE-SCALE CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sheffield, Allyson A.; Majewski, Steven R.; Sharma, Sanjib; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.

    2012-11-20

    This paper presents the first potential connections made between two local features in velocity space found in a survey of M giant stars and stellar spatial inhomogeneities on global scales. Comparison to cosmological, chemodynamical stellar halo models confirms that the M giant population is particularly sensitive to rare, recent and massive accretion events. These events can give rise to locally observed velocity sequences-each made from a small fraction of debris from a massive progenitor, passing at high velocity through the survey volume, near the pericenter of the eccentric orbit of the system. The majority of the debris is found in much larger structures, whose morphologies are more cloud-like than stream-like and which lie at the orbital apocenters. Adopting this interpretation, the full-space motions represented by the observed M giant velocity features are derived under the assumption that the members within each sequence share a common space velocity. Orbit integrations are then used to trace the past and future trajectories of these stars across the sky revealing plausible associations with large, previously discovered, cloud-like structures. The connections made between nearby velocity structures and these distant clouds represent preliminary steps toward developing coherent maps of such giant debris systems. These maps promise to provide new insights into the origin of debris clouds, new probes of Galactic history and structure, and new constraints on the high-velocity tails of the local dark matter distribution that are essential for interpreting direct dark matter particle detection experiments.

  12. Stowable large area solar power module

    SciTech Connect

    Hanak, J.J.

    1987-12-15

    A stowable, deployable large area solar module is described comprising: discrete, interconnected, flexible, large area solar panels; hinge means operatively disposed on the panels so as to provide for the relative planar displacement of the folded panels of the module when the panels are folded in overlying sandwiched relationship; the hinge means also operatively disposed so as to provide for the folded panels to be rolled into a stowable, substantially cylindrical configuration. The hinge means comprise: hinge knuckles associated with at least one edge of each large area panel, each of the knuckles including a passage therethrough adapted to receive pintle means, the knuckles of adjacent panels disposed in a spaced apart, generally coplanar, interdigitating relationship; and, flexible pintle means disposed so as to sequentially pass through the interdigitating knuckles, whereby the spaced apart knuckles allow for a degree of planar displacement of adjoining large area panels relative to one another, as well as allowing for the folding of the panels in a sandwiched relationship and the flexible pintle means allows for the panels to be rolled into the substantially cylindrical configuration.

  13. The Colorado Scale-Model Solar System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jeffrey O.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Colorado Scale-Model Solar System, a display illustrating the sizes and distances to the Sun and the nine planets on the campus of Colorado University. Discusses the model's educational value and uses for the classroom and the community. (MDH)

  14. Attitude control of large solar power satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglevie, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Satellite power systems are a promising future source of electrical energy. However, the very large size solar power satellites (relative to contemporary spacecraft) requires investigation of the resulting attitude control problems and of appropriate control techniques. The principal effects of the large size are a great increase in sensitivity to gravity-gradient torques and a great reduction in structural bending frequencies with the attendant likelihood of undesirable control system interaction. A wide variety of control techniques are investigated to define approaches that minimize implementation penalties. These techniques include space-constructed momentum wheels, gravity-gradient stabilization, quasi-inertial free-drift modes, and various reaction control thruster types, some of which reduce the implementation penalties to a few percent of the spacecraft mass. The control system/structural dynamic interaction problem is found to have a tractable solution. Some of the results can be applied to other large space structure spacecraft.

  15. Why are there fewer large SEP events this solar cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacalone, J.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    There have been fewer large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events seen during the current solar cycle compared to the previous one. To understand this, we use a model for the acceleration of energetic protons at (individual) fast and strong interplanetary shocks, combined with remote observations of the speed of coronal mass ejections (CME) near the Sun, to estimate the total integrated flux of large SEP events at Earth throughout the past two solar cycles. Our results are compared with NOAA/GOES observations of large SEP events during this period. We find that the dearth of large SEP events in the current solar cycle is caused partly by there being fewer fast CMEs, and partly because the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude is weaker. A weaker magnetic field causes the particles to be accelerated more slowly; and during the time over which the shock moves from the Sun to 1 AU, the slower acceleration rate results in a lower intensity of high-energy particles. Our model is based on a solution to the diffusive shock acceleration theory applied to a spherically propagating shock. We use a diffusion coefficient that scales with the square of the heliocentric distance, so that it is very small near the Sun. Its value at 1AU is determined from observations of one particular large SEP event (DOY 302, 2003) seen during the well-known Halloween storm period of 2003. Comparison with this one event is also used to normalize our results. When convolved with the remotely observed speed distribution of many thousands of CMEs during the past two solar cycles, our model gives a reasonably close estimate of the observed total integrated flux of high-energy (>10 MeV) SEPs, despite its rather simple assumptions.

  16. High Efficiency Large Area Polysilicon Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S. M.; Winter, C.

    1985-01-01

    Large area (100 sq cm) polysilicon solar cells having efficiencies of up to 14.1% (100 mW/sq cm, 25 C) were fabricated and a detailed analysis was performed to identify the efficiency loss mechanisms. The 1-5 characteristics of the best cell were dominated by recombination in the quasi-neutral base due to the combination of minority carrier diffusion length and base resistivity. An analysis of the microstructural defects present in the material and their effect on the electrical properties is presented.

  17. Probing Solar Wind Turbulence with the Jansky Very Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelski, A.; Bastian, T. S.; Betti, S.

    2016-04-01

    The solar wind offers an extraordinary laboratory for studying MHD turbulence, turbulent dissipation, and heating. Radio propagation phenomena can be exploited as probes of the solar wind in regions that are generally inaccessible to in situ spacecraft measurements. Here, we have undertaken a study with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to observe point-like sources drawn from the JVAS catalog, and 3 VLA calibrator sources, to trans-illuminate the outer corona/inner solar wind. In doing so, we will exploit angular broadening and refractive scintillation to deduce properties of the solar wind along ≍23 lines of sight within 7 solar radii of the Sun and a wide range of position angles. By fitting the complex visibilities using well-known techniques we can deduce or constrain a number of key parameters. In particular, we fit the visibilities to a function of the known source flux, displacement of the source due to refraction, source broadening due to an elliptical structure function, spectral slope of the turbulence, and the coherence scale. Of particular interest is α, the spectral slope of the turbulence which we probe at both small (km to 10s of km) and large (thousands of km) scales. This will help us determine the presence and evolution of an inner scale, measure the degree of anisotropy, and constrain the topology of the global coronal magnetic field. The inner scale is of particular interest for constraining current theories of turbulence dissipation and heating. Initial analysis show the visibilities vary notably on timescales of individual integrations (2 seconds) and that the source is not uniformly broadened. All sources appear to preferentially broaden perpendicular to the magnetic field, consistent with theories of kinetic Alfvén waves. This type of observation will also help to interpret data from the upcoming Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions. A full set of results and analysis is forthcoming. More details on previous results can be found

  18. Large-scale micro- and nanopatterns of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells by mold-assisted chemical-etching process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chung; Cheng, Hsiang-Ying; Yen, Yu-Ting; Wu, Tsung-Ta; Hsu, Cheng-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Wei; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Min; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-04-28

    A reactive mold-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process through an easy-to-make agarose stamp soaked in bromine methanol etchant to rapidly imprint larger area micro- and nanoarrays on CIGS substrates was demonstrated. Interestingly, by using the agarose stamp during the MACE process with and without additive containing oil and triton, CIGS microdome and microhole arrays can be formed on the CIGS substrate. Detailed formation mechanisms of microstructures and the chemical composition variation after the etching process were investigated. In addition, various microand nanostructures were also demonstrated by this universal approach. The microstructure arrays integrated into standard CIGS solar cells with thinner thickness can still achieve an efficiency of 11.22%, yielding an enhanced efficiency of ∼18% compared with that of their planar counterpart due to an excellent absorption behavior confirmed by the simulation results, which opens up a promising way for the realization of high-efficiency micro- or nanostructured thin-film solar cells. Finally, the complete dissolution of agarose stamp into hot water demonstrates an environmentally friendly method by the mold-assisted chemical etching process through an easy-to-make agarose stamp.

  19. Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2002--28 February 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Narayanan, M.

    2006-07-01

    The major objectives of this program were to continue advances of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The Program included work in the following areas. (1) Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations. (2) Developing wire saws to slice 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers on 290-..mu..m-centers. (3) Developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers. (4) Developing cell processes using 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%. (5) Expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control. (6) Establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology. (7) Facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock..

  20. AMC EN-1038: Reduced scale solar simulator supplementary test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biering, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    The reduced scale solar simulator program conducted by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University in 1992 provided sufficient data to support the selection of the uniform magnification solar simulator module for the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstrator Program (SDGTD) at NASA LeRC. In 1993, additional testing of the reduced scale solar simulator was conducted to provide information to refine and improve the design of the full scale solar simulator. This report presents the results of these additional tests.

  1. LEMUR: Large European module for solar Ultraviolet Research. European contribution to JAXA's Solar-C mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teriaca, Luca; Andretta, Vincenzo; Auchère, Frédéric; Brown, Charles M.; Buchlin, Eric; Cauzzi, Gianna; Culhane, J. Len; Curdt, Werner; Davila, Joseph M.; Del Zanna, Giulio; Doschek, George A.; Fineschi, Silvano; Fludra, Andrzej; Gallagher, Peter T.; Green, Lucie; Harra, Louise K.; Imada, Shinsuke; Innes, Davina; Kliem, Bernhard; Korendyke, Clarence; Mariska, John T.; Martínez-Pillet, Valentin; Parenti, Susanna; Patsourakos, Spiros; Peter, Hardi; Poletto, Luca; Rutten, Robert J.; Schühle, Udo; Siemer, Martin; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Socas-Navarro, Hector; Solanki, Sami K.; Spadaro, Daniele; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier; Tsuneta, Saku; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Vial, Jean-Claude; Walsh, Robert; Warren, Harry P.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Winter, Berend; Young, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The solar outer atmosphere is an extremely dynamic environment characterized by the continuous interplay between the plasma and the magnetic field that generates and permeates it. Such interactions play a fundamental role in hugely diverse astrophysical systems, but occur at scales that cannot be studied outside the solar system. Understanding this complex system requires concerted, simultaneous solar observations from the visible to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-rays, at high spatial resolution (between 0.1'' and 0.3''), at high temporal resolution (on the order of 10 s, i.e., the time scale of chromospheric dynamics), with a wide temperature coverage (0.01 MK to 20 MK, from the chromosphere to the flaring corona), and the capability of measuring magnetic fields through spectropolarimetry at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements sampling the entire temperature range are particularly important. These requirements are fulfilled by the Japanese Solar-C mission (Plan B), composed of a spacecraft in a geosynchronous orbit with a payload providing a significant improvement of imaging and spectropolarimetric capabilities in the UV, visible, and near-infrared with respect to what is available today and foreseen in the near future. The Large European Module for solar Ultraviolet Research (LEMUR), described in this paper, is a large VUV telescope feeding a scientific payload of high-resolution imaging spectrographs and cameras. LEMUR consists of two major components: a VUV solar telescope with a 30 cm diameter mirror and a focal length of 3.6 m, and a focal-plane package composed of VUV spectrometers covering six carefully chosen wavelength ranges between 170 Å and 1270 Å. The LEMUR slit covers 280'' on the Sun with 0.14'' per pixel sampling. In addition, LEMUR is capable of measuring mass flows velocities (line shifts) down to 2 km s - 1 or better. LEMUR has been proposed to ESA as the European contribution to the Solar

  2. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Miller, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    The Sunflower large solar concentrator, developed in the early 1970's, is a salient example of a high-efficiency concentrator. The newly emphasized needs for solar dynamic power on the Space Station and for large, lightweight thermal sources are outlined. Existing concepts for high efficiency reflector surfaces are examined with attention to accuracy needs for concentration rates of 1000 to 3000. Concepts using stiff reflector panels are deemed most likely to exhibit the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation, particularly for the higher concentration ratios. Quantitative results are shown of the effects of surface errors for various concentration and focal-length diameter ratios. Cost effectiveness is discussed. Principal sources of high cost include the need for various dished panels for paraboloidal reflectors and the expense of ground testing and adjustment. A new configuration is presented addressing both problems, i.e., a deployable Pactruss backup structure with identical panels installed on the structure after deployment in space. Analytical results show that with reasonable pointing errors, this new concept is capable of concentration ratios greater than 2000.

  3. The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) has been installed at JPL. It is primarily intended to be used to illuminate and measure the electrical performance of photovoltaic devices. The simulator, originally manufactured by Spectrolab, Sylmar, CA, occupies an area measuring about 3 m wide x 12 m long. The data acquisition and data processing subsystems have been modernized. Tests on the LAPSS performance resulted in better than plus or minus 2 percent uniformity of irradiance at the test plane and better than plus or minus 0.3 percent measurement repeatability after warm-up. Glass absorption filters reduce the ultraviolet light emitted from the xenon flash lamps. This results in a close match to three different standard airmass zero and airmass 1.5 spectral irradiances. The 2-ms light pulse prevents heating of the device under test, resulting in more reliable temperature measurements. Overall, excellent electrical performance measurements have been made of many different types and sizes of photovoltaic devices. Since the original printing of this publication, in 1993, the LAPSS has been operational and new capabilities have been added. This revision includes a new section relating to the installation of a method to measure the I-V curve of a solar cell or array exhibiting a large effective capacitance. Another new section has been added relating to new capabilities for plotting single and multiple I-V curves, and for archiving the I-V data and test parameters. Finally, a section has been added regarding the data acquisition electronics calibration.

  4. Large scale structure of the sun's corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Mukul R.

    Results concerning the large-scale structure of the solar corona obtained by observations at meter-decameter wavelengths are reviewed. Coronal holes observed on the disk at multiple frequencies show the radial and azimuthal geometry of the hole. At the base of the hole there is good correspondence to the chromospheric signature in He I 10,830 A, but at greater heights the hole may show departures from symmetry. Two-dimensional imaging of weak-type III bursts simultaneously with the HAO SMM coronagraph/polarimeter measurements indicate that these bursts occur along elongated features emanating from the quiet sun, corresponding in position angle to the bright coronal streamers. It is shown that the densest regions of streamers and the regions of maximum intensity of type II bursts coincide closely. Non-flare-associated type II/type IV bursts associated with coronal streamer disruption events are studied along with correlated type II burst emissions originating from distant centers on the sun.

  5. New world record for commercial-scale solar electricity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    A potentially low-cost solar energy technology has established a new world record for commercial-scale electrical energy conversion from sunlight. The system, called Integrated High-Concentration Photovoltaics (IHCPV), achieved a solar conversion efficiency greater than 20% in a 2,000 watt test-bed array installed at the Shenandoah Environment and Education Center of Georgia Power Company, near Atlanta, Georgia. This performance is significant because it establishes the viability of a technology that promises cost-effective electricity generation in a utility scale system. High volume production could put IHCPV on the fast track toward cost-competitiveness with conventional electrical generation. The IHCPV system was built by AMONIX, Inc., of Torrance, California, which recently shared a coveted 1994 R and D 100 Award with EPRI and others for developing the advanced high-concentration solar cell that forms the heart of the IHCPV device. Unlike flat-plate solar modules that use large areas of solar cells and operate at a fixed tilt toward the sun, the IHCPV system uses low-cost plastic concentrating lenses that track and focus sunlight onto small-area solar cells. By concentrating sunlight 200--500 times, such systems can substantially reduce the amount of costly silicon cell material needed to generate a given amount of electricity.

  6. Stratospheric effects of solar ultraviolet variations on the solar rotation time scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    A summary is presented of some current work on measurement and interpretation of stratospheric ozone and temperature responses to observed short term solar ultraviolet variations. Although some studies have yielded provisional evidence for a nearly in-phase ozone-solar cycle relationship, they extend at most over only one or two 11 year cycles so the statistical significance of the correlations is not large. Similarly, the relatively short lengths of individual satellite data sets combined with the problem of estimating the effect of changes in instrument sensitivity (drift) during the observing period have complicated attempts to infer long term or solar cycle ozone trends. The solar rotation and active region development time scale provides an alternate time scale for which detailed studies of middle atmospheric ozone and temperature responses to solar ultraviolet variability are currently possible using available satellite data sets. At tropical latitudes where planetary wave amplitudes are relatively small, clear correlative evidence for the existence of middle atmospheric ozone and temperature responses to short term solar ultraviolet variations has been obtained in recent years. These measurements will ultimately allow improved empirical and theoretical calculations of longer term solar induced ozone and temperature variations at low and middle latitudes.

  7. Large-scale Digitoxin Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Lely, A. H.; Van Enter, C. H. J.

    1970-01-01

    Because of an error in the manufacture of digoxin tablets a large number of patients took tablets that contained 0·20 mg. of digitoxin and 0·05 mg. of digoxin instead of the prescribed 0·25 mg. of digoxin. The symptoms are described of 179 patients who took these tablets and suffered from digitalis intoxication. Of these patients, 125 had taken the faultily composed tablets for more than three weeks. In 48 patients 105 separate disturbances in rhythm or in atrioventricular conduction were observed on the electrocardiogram. Extreme fatigue and serious eye conditions were observed in 95% of the patients. Twelve patients had a transient psychosis. Extensive ophthalmological observations indicated that the visual complaints were most probably caused by a transient retrobulbar neuritis. PMID:5273245

  8. Large-Scale Reform Comes of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the history of large-scale education reform and makes the case that large-scale or whole system reform policies and strategies are becoming increasingly evident. The review briefly addresses the pre 1997 period concluding that while the pressure for reform was mounting that there were very few examples of deliberate or…

  9. Automating large-scale reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper conveys a philosophy for developing automated large-scale control systems that behave in an integrated, intelligent, flexible manner. Methods for operating large-scale systems under varying degrees of equipment degradation are discussed, and a design approach that separates the effort into phases is suggested. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Large Scale Metal Additive Techniques Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nycz, Andrzej; Adediran, Adeola I; Noakes, Mark W; Love, Lonnie J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years additive manufacturing made long strides toward becoming a main stream production technology. Particularly strong progress has been made in large-scale polymer deposition. However, large scale metal additive has not yet reached parity with large scale polymer. This paper is a review study of the metal additive techniques in the context of building large structures. Current commercial devices are capable of printing metal parts on the order of several cubic feet compared to hundreds of cubic feet for the polymer side. In order to follow the polymer progress path several factors are considered: potential to scale, economy, environment friendliness, material properties, feedstock availability, robustness of the process, quality and accuracy, potential for defects, and post processing as well as potential applications. This paper focuses on current state of art of large scale metal additive technology with a focus on expanding the geometric limits.

  11. ANALYSIS OF CHARACTERISTIC PARAMETERS OF LARGE-SCALE CORONAL WAVES OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RELATIONS OBSERVATORY/EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Muhr, N.; Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.

    2011-10-01

    The kinematical evolution of four extreme ultraviolet waves, well observed by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on board the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), is studied by visually tracking wave fronts as well as by a semi-automatized perturbation profile method, which leads to results matching each other within the error limits. The derived mean velocities of the events under study lie in the range of 220-350 km s{sup -1}. The fastest of the events (2007 May 19) reveals a significant deceleration of {approx} - 190 m s{sup -2}, while the others are consistent with a constant velocity during wave propagation. The evolution of maximum-intensity values reveals initial intensification of 20%-70% and decays to original levels within 40-60 minutes, while the widths at half-maximum and full-maximum of the perturbation profiles broaden by a factor of two to four. The integral below the perturbation profile remains basically constant in two cases, while it shows a decrease by a factor of three to four in the other two cases. From the peak perturbation amplitudes, we estimate the corresponding magnetosonic Mach numbers M{sub ms}, which range from 1.08-1.21. The perturbation profiles reveal three distinct features behind the propagating wave fronts: coronal dimmings, stationary brightenings, and rarefaction regions. All features appear after the wave passage and only slowly fade away. Our findings indicate that the events under study are weak-shock fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic waves initiated by the CME lateral expansion.

  12. The Large -scale Distribution of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flin, Piotr

    A review of the Large-scale structure of the Universe is given. A connection is made with the titanic work by Johannes Kepler in many areas of astronomy and cosmology. A special concern is made to spatial distribution of Galaxies, voids and walls (cellular structure of the Universe). Finaly, the author is concluding that the large scale structure of the Universe can be observed in much greater scale that it was thought twenty years ago.

  13. What is a large-scale dynamo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, G.; Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in a sheared helical flow at moderate to high values of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). We find exponentially growing solutions which, for large enough shear, take the form of a coherent part embedded in incoherent fluctuations. We argue that at large Rm large-scale dynamo action should be identified by the presence of structures coherent in time, rather than those at large spatial scales. We further argue that although the growth rate is determined by small-scale processes, the period of the coherent structures is set by mean-field considerations.

  14. Solar neutrino oscillation from large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, A.; Ramond, P.; Romanino, A.; Ross, G. G.

    2000-12-01

    A plausible explanation for the existence of additional light sterile neutrinos is that they correspond to modulini, fermionic partners of moduli, which propagate in new large dimensions. We discuss the phenomenological implications of such states and show that solar neutrino oscillation is well described by small angle MSW oscillation to the tower of Kaluza-Klein states associated with the modulini. In the optimal case the recoil electron energy spectrum agrees precisely with the measured one, in contrast to the single sterile neutrino case which is disfavoured. We also consider how all oscillation phenomena can be explained in a model including bulk neutrino states. In particular, we show that a naturally maximal mixing for atmospheric neutrinos can be easily obtained.

  15. The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    A Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) has been installed at JPL. It is primarily intended to be used to illuminate and measure the electrical performance of photovoltaic devices. The simulator, originally manufactured by Spectrolab, Sylmar, California, occupies an area measuring about 3 meters wide by 12 meters long. The data acquisition and data processing subsystems have been modernized. Tests on the LAPSS performance resulted in better than +/- 2 percent uniformity of irradiance at the test plane and better than +/- 0.3 percent measurement repeatability after warm-up. Glass absorption filters are used to reduce the level of ultraviolet light emitted from the xenon flash lamps. This provides a close match to standard airmass zero and airmass 1.5 spectral irradiance distributions. The 2 millisecond light pulse prevents heating of the device under test, resulting in more reliable temperature measurements. Overall, excellent electrical performance measurements have been made of many different types and sizes of photovoltaic devices.

  16. Persistence of shocks to large distances in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, S.E.

    1985-05-01

    Present hydrodynamic models of solar wind streams predict that interactions will cause interplanetary shocks to decay and large-scale structures to coalesce and smooth out, with a decay length of 10-15 AU for moderate or small-amplitude shocks. The Pioneer 10 plasma data, extending 1-30 AU, are examined in the light of such predictions. It is found that coalescence of streams into a single stream per solar rotation does occur, in general, but that considerable structure remains by 30 AU. The leading edge of a stream often exhibits a velocity jump of greater than 20 km/s; many of these may be shocks. There is a characteristic velocity-density-temperature signature of these distant streams which differs from the close-in double-shock signature. A unique transient was seen in July 1982, at 28 AU, with a velocity jump of about 235 km/s. 11 references.

  17. Persistence of shocks to large distances in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Present hydrodynamic models of solar wind streams predict that interactions will cause interplanetary shocks to decay and large-scale structures to coalesce and smooth out, with a decay length of 10-15 AU for moderate or small-amplitude shocks. The Pioneer 10 plasma data, extending 1-30 AU, are examined in the light of such predictions. It is found that coalescence of streams into a single stream per solar rotation does occur, in general, but that considerable structure remains by 30 AU. The leading edge of a stream often exhibits a velocity jump of greater than 20 km/s; many of these may be shocks. There is a characteristic velocity-density-temperature signature of these distant streams which differs from the close-in double-shock signature. A unique transient was seen in July 1982, at 28 AU, with a velocity jump of about 235 km/s.

  18. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  19. Solar Rejection Filter for Large Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James

    2009-01-01

    To reject solar radiation photons at the front aperture for large telescopes, a mosaic of large transmission mode filters is placed in front of the telescope or at the aperture of the dome. Filtering options for effective rejection of sunlight include a smaller filter down-path near the focus of the telescope, and a large-diameter filter located in the front of the main aperture. Two types of large filters are viable: reflectance mode and transmittance mode. In the case of reflectance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (e.g. a low-thermal-expansion glass) is arranged to reflect only a single, narrow wavelength and to efficiently transmit all other wavelengths. These coatings are commonly referred to as notch filter. In this case, the large mirror located in front of the telescope aperture reflects the received (signal and background) light into the telescope. In the case of transmittance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (glass, sapphire, clear plastic, membrane, and the like) is arranged to transmit only a single wavelength and to reject all other wavelengths (visible and near IR) of light. The substrate of the large filter will determine its mass. At first glance, a large optical filter with a diameter of up to 10 m, located in front of the main aperture, would require a significant thickness to avoid sagging. However, a segmented filter supported by a structurally rugged grid can support smaller filters. The obscuration introduced by the grid is minimal because the total area can be made insignificant. This configuration can be detrimental to a diffraction- limited telescope due to diffraction effects at the edges of each sub-panel. However, no discernable degradation would result for a 20 diffraction-limit telescope (a photon bucket). Even the small amount of sagging in each subpanel should have minimal effect in the performance of a non-diffraction limited telescope because the part has no appreciable optical power. If the

  20. Survey on large scale system control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    The problem inherent to large scale systems such as power network, communication network and economic or ecological systems were studied. The increase in size and flexibility of future spacecraft has put those dynamical systems into the category of large scale systems, and tools specific to the class of large systems are being sought to design control systems that can guarantee more stability and better performance. Among several survey papers, reference was found to a thorough investigation on decentralized control methods. Especially helpful was the classification made of the different existing approaches to deal with large scale systems. A very similar classification is used, even though the papers surveyed are somehow different from the ones reviewed in other papers. Special attention is brought to the applicability of the existing methods to controlling large mechanical systems like large space structures. Some recent developments are added to this survey.

  1. Large-cell acanthoma is a solar lentigo.

    PubMed

    Roewert, H J; Ackerman, A B

    1992-04-01

    On the basis of a study of 54 specimens each of large-cell acanthoma, solar lentigo, reticulated seborrheic keratosis, and lichen planus-like keratosis, it is concluded that clinically, histopathologically, and biologically, large-cell acanthoma is a variant of solar lentigo, and solar lentigo (including the large-cell variant) is a stage in the evolution of reticulated seborrheic keratosis and of lichen planus-like keratosis.

  2. Large-scale instabilities of helical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Alexandre; Alexakis, Alexandros; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities of periodic helical flows of a given wave number K are investigated using three-dimensional Floquet numerical computations. In the Floquet formalism the unstable field is expanded in modes of different spacial periodicity. This allows us (i) to clearly distinguish large from small scale instabilities and (ii) to study modes of wave number q of arbitrarily large-scale separation q ≪K . Different flows are examined including flows that exhibit small-scale turbulence. The growth rate σ of the most unstable mode is measured as a function of the scale separation q /K ≪1 and the Reynolds number Re. It is shown that the growth rate follows the scaling σ ∝q if an AKA effect [Frisch et al., Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena 28, 382 (1987), 10.1016/0167-2789(87)90026-1] is present or a negative eddy viscosity scaling σ ∝q2 in its absence. This holds both for the Re≪1 regime where previously derived asymptotic results are verified but also for Re=O (1 ) that is beyond their range of validity. Furthermore, for values of Re above a critical value ReSc beyond which small-scale instabilities are present, the growth rate becomes independent of q and the energy of the perturbation at large scales decreases with scale separation. The nonlinear behavior of these large-scale instabilities is also examined in the nonlinear regime where the largest scales of the system are found to be the most dominant energetically. These results are interpreted by low-order models.

  3. Solar wind compressible structures at ion scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Rocoto, V.; Pantellini, F. G. E.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Mangeney, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar wind turbulent cascade, the energy partition between fluid and kinetic degrees of freedom, in the vicinity of plasma characteristic scales, i.e. ion and electron Larmor radius and inertial lengths, is still under debate. In a neighborhood of the ion scales, it has been observed that the spectral shape changes and fluctuations become more compressible. Nowadays, a huge scientific effort is directed to the comprehension of the link between macroscopic and microscopic scales and to disclose the nature of compressive fluctuations, meaning that if space plasma turbulence is a mixture of quasi-linear waves (as whistler or kinetic Alfvèn waves) or if turbulence is strong with formation of coherent structures responsible for dissipation. Here we present an automatic method to identify compressible coherent structures around the ion spectral break, using Morlet wavelet decomposition of magnetic signal from Cluster spacecraft and reconstruction of magnetic fluctuations in a selected scale range. Different kind of coherent structures have been detected: from soliton-like one-dimensional structures to current sheet- or wave-like two-dimensional structures. Using a multi-satellite analysis, in order to characterize 3D geometry and propagation in plasma rest frame, we recover that these structures propagate quasi-perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, with finite velocity. Moreover, without using the Taylor hypothesis, the spatial scales of coherent structures have been estimated. Our observations in the solar wind can provide constraints on theoretical modeling of small scale turbulence and dissipation in collisionless magnetized plasmas.

  4. Large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Dallas, Vassilios

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a nonlocal inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic field. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  5. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  6. Design boundaries of large-scale falling particle receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Kumar, Apurv; Corsi, Clotilde

    2017-06-01

    A free falling particle receiver has been studied to investigate the design boundary of large-scale falling particle receivers. Preliminary receiver geometry and condition of falling particle curtain were scoped according to the nominal receiver capacity (135 MWth), receiver outlet temperature (800 °C) and temperature difference (147 °C) recommended by the research program. Particle volume fraction and solar energy absorptivity were analyzed for two particle sizes (280 µm and 697 µm) in different flow range. The results were then converted to part load efficiency of the receiver. Ray tracing with a scoped receiver design provided the amount of spillage and overall performance of the receiver which comprises multiple cavities with different solar energy inputs. The study revealed and quantified some inherent problems in designing falling particle receivers such as, transmission energy loss caused by low solar energy absorption, efficiency decrease in part load operation, and uneven temperature distribution across falling particle curtain.

  7. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  8. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  9. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  10. Large-scale solar thermal collector concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal collector could be used ultimately to power steamplant to produce electricity. Collector would consist of two major subsystems: (1) series of segmented tracking mirrors with two axes of rotation and (2) absorber mounted on centrally located tower.

  11. Large-scale cortical networks and cognition.

    PubMed

    Bressler, S L

    1995-03-01

    The well-known parcellation of the mammalian cerebral cortex into a large number of functionally distinct cytoarchitectonic areas presents a problem for understanding the complex cortical integrative functions that underlie cognition. How do cortical areas having unique individual functional properties cooperate to accomplish these complex operations? Do neurons distributed throughout the cerebral cortex act together in large-scale functional assemblages? This review examines the substantial body of evidence supporting the view that complex integrative functions are carried out by large-scale networks of cortical areas. Pathway tracing studies in non-human primates have revealed widely distributed networks of interconnected cortical areas, providing an anatomical substrate for large-scale parallel processing of information in the cerebral cortex. Functional coactivation of multiple cortical areas has been demonstrated by neurophysiological studies in non-human primates and several different cognitive functions have been shown to depend on multiple distributed areas by human neuropsychological studies. Electrophysiological studies on interareal synchronization have provided evidence that active neurons in different cortical areas may become not only coactive, but also functionally interdependent. The computational advantages of synchronization between cortical areas in large-scale networks have been elucidated by studies using artificial neural network models. Recent observations of time-varying multi-areal cortical synchronization suggest that the functional topology of a large-scale cortical network is dynamically reorganized during visuomotor behavior.

  12. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  13. Solar potential scaling and the urban road network topology.

    PubMed

    Najem, Sara

    2017-01-01

    We explore the scaling of cities' solar potentials with their number of buildings and reveal a latent dependence between the solar potential and the length of the corresponding city's road network. This scaling is shown to be valid at the grid and block levels and is attributed to a common street length distribution. Additionally, we compute the buildings' solar potential correlation function and length in order to determine the set of critical exponents typifying the urban solar potential universality class.

  14. Solar potential scaling and the urban road network topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, Sara

    2017-01-01

    We explore the scaling of cities' solar potentials with their number of buildings and reveal a latent dependence between the solar potential and the length of the corresponding city's road network. This scaling is shown to be valid at the grid and block levels and is attributed to a common street length distribution. Additionally, we compute the buildings' solar potential correlation function and length in order to determine the set of critical exponents typifying the urban solar potential universality class.

  15. Scaling nominal solar cell impedances for array design

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.L.; Wallace, M.T.; Iles, P.

    1994-12-31

    A methodology for estimating the AC impedance of solar arrays and in particular the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) spacecraft cruise stage and lander solar arrays is presented. During an early stage in the spacecraft design, the MPF mission, cost and mass constraints resulted in a proposal to use a gallium arsenide on germanium (GaAs/Ge) cell solar array for the cruise stage and a silicon, back surface field/reflector (Si BSFR) cell solar array for the Mars lander. Previous work had shown that the AC impedance of Si BSFR cells was very different from that of GaAs/Ge cells. There was concern over how the difference in AC impedance would influence the design of the power bus voltage control circuitry and the stability of the power bus in general. The results presented in this paper are based on AC impedance measurements made on single cells and small solar cell arrays. Those measurements were then scaled to the larger spacecraft arrays. In each case, a generic AC model was used to construct impedance equations which were then correlated to test results to find the resistive and capacitive components of the cell impedance between 100 Hz and 100 Khz. The data was obtained using dark forward biasing to simulate different load points and intensities. Cell impedance tests show a large difference between Si BSFR and either Si non-BSF or GaAs/Ge cells, mainly because of the inherently high effective capacitance of the BSFR cells.

  16. Scale Dependence of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k approximately equal to 2AU(sup -1) (or frequency nu approximately equal to 2 microHz) at distances below 2.8AU and at k approximately equal to 30AU(sup -1) (or nu approximately equal to 25 microHz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10(sup 45) Mx(sup 2) cycle(sup -1) at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  17. Scale Dependence of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k approximately equal to 2AU(sup -1) (or frequency nu approximately equal to 2 microHz) at distances below 2.8AU and at k approximately equal to 30AU(sup -1) (or nu approximately equal to 25 microHz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10(sup 45) Mx(sup 2) cycle(sup -1) at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  18. SCALE DEPENDENCE OF MAGNETIC HELICITY IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L. E-mail: kandu@iucaa.ernet.in E-mail: melvyn.l.goldstein@nasa.gov

    2011-06-10

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k {approx} 2 AU{sup -1} (or frequency {nu} {approx} 2 {mu}Hz) at distances below 2.8 AU and at k {approx} 30 AU{sup -1} (or {nu} {approx} 25 {mu}Hz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10{sup 45} Mx{sup 2} cycle{sup -1} at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  19. The National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Indian National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) will be a state-of-the-art 2-m class telescope for carrying out high-resolution studies in the solar atmosphere. Recent numerical simulations suggest that crucial physical processes like vortex flow, dissipation of magnetic fields and the generation of MHD waves can occur efficiently over length scales of tens of kilometers. Current telescopes are unable to resolve solar feature to this level at visible wavelengths. NLST will not only achieve good spatial resolution, but will also have a high photon throughput in order to carry out spectropolarimetric observations to accurately measure vector magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere with a good signal to noise ratio. The main science goals of NLST include: a) Magnetic field generation and the solar cycle; b) Dynamics of magnetized regions; c) Helioseismology; d) Long term variability; e) Energetic phenomena and Activity; and f) Night time astronomy. The optical design of the telescope is optimized for high optical throughput and uses a minimum number of optical elements. A high order adaptive optics system is integrated as part of the design that works with a modest Fried's parameter of 7-cm to give diffraction limited performance. The telescope will be equipped with a suite of post-focus instruments including a high resolution spectrograph and a polarimeter. NLST will also be used for carrying out stellar observations during the night. The mechanical design of the telescope, building, and the innovative dome takes advantage of the natural air flush which will help to keep the open telescope in temperature equilibrium. Critical to the successful implementation of NLST is the selection of a site with optimum atmospheric properties, such as the number of sunshine hours and good "seeing" over long periods. A site characterization programme carried over several years has established the existence of suitable sites in the Ladakh region. After its completion, currently

  20. Large-scale Fractal Motion of Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    waters surrounding the island.) The “swallowed” gulps of clear island air get carried along within the vortices, but these are soon mixed into the surrounding clouds. Landsat is unique in its ability to image both the small-scale eddies that mix clear and cloudy air, down to the 30 meter pixel size of Landsat, but also having a wide enough field-of-view, 180 km, to reveal the connection of the turbulence to large-scale flows such as the subtropical oceanic gyres. Landsat 7, with its new onboard digital recorder, has extended this capability away from the few Landsat ground stations to remote areas such as Alejandro Island, and thus is gradually providing a global dynamic picture of evolving human-scale phenomena. For more details on von Karman vortices, refer to climate.gsfc.nasa.gov/~cahalan. Image and caption courtesy Bob Cahalan, NASA GSFC Instrument: Landsat 7 - ETM+ Credit: NASA/GSFC/Landsat NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  1. A model of plasma heating by large-scale flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Boldyrev, S.; Mason, J.; Perez, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we study the process of energy dissipation triggered by a slow large-scale motion of a magnetized conducting fluid. Our consideration is motivated by the problem of heating the solar corona, which is believed to be governed by fast reconnection events set off by the slow motion of magnetic field lines anchored in the photospheric plasma. To elucidate the physics governing the disruption of the imposed laminar motion and the energy transfer to small scales, we propose a simplified model where the large-scale motion of magnetic field lines is prescribed not at the footpoints but rather imposed volumetrically. As a result, the problem can be treated numerically with an efficient, highly accurate spectral method, allowing us to use a resolution and statistical ensemble exceeding those of the previous work. We find that, even though the large-scale deformations are slow, they eventually lead to reconnection events that drive a turbulent state at smaller scales. The small-scale turbulence displays many of the universal features of field-guided magnetohydrodynamic turbulence like a well-developed inertial range spectrum. Based on these observations, we construct a phenomenological model that gives the scalings of the amplitude of the fluctuations and the energy-dissipation rate as functions of the input parameters. We find good agreement between the numerical results and the predictions of the model.

  2. White-Light Polarization and Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalyan, O. G.; Livshits, M. A.; Sýkora, J.

    1997-06-01

    The results of the white-light polarization measurements performed during three solar eclipses (1973, 1980, 1991) are presented. The eclipse images were processed and analysed by the same technique and method and, consequently, the distributions of the polarization and coronal intensity around the Sun were obtained in unified form for all three solar eclipses. The mutual comparisons of our results, and their comparison with the distributions found by other authors, allowed the real accuracy of the current measurements of the white-light corona polarization, which is not worse than +/-5%, to be estimated. We have investigated the behaviour of the polarization in dependence on heliocentric distance in helmet streamers and coronal holes. Simultaneous interpretation of the data on polarization and intensity in white-light helmet streamers is only possible if a considerable concentration of coronal matter (plasma) towards the plane of the sky is assumed. The values obtained for the coronal hole regions can be understood within the framework of a spherically symmetrical model of the low density solar atmosphere. A tendency towards increasing polarization in coronal holes, connected with the decrease of the hole's size and with the transition from the minimum to the maximum of the solar cycle, was noticed. The problem of how the peculiarities of the large-scale coronal structures are related to the orientation of the global (dipole) solar magnetic field and to the degree of the goffer character of the coronal and interplanetary current sheet is discussed briefly.

  3. Triggering of Solar Magnetic Eruptions on Various Size Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2010-01-01

    Solar eruptions occur on many different scales. (Schrijver 2010: bipole eruptions more frequent as size decreases.) Trigger might be any of several different candidates, working independently or in tandem. How about larger scales than (solar) CMEs? (Stellar eruptions.) How about smaller scales than X-ray jets? (Spicules? Moore 1989)

  4. "Cosmological Parameters from Large Scale Structure"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2005-01-01

    This grant has provided primary support for graduate student Mark Neyrinck, and some support for the PI and for colleague Nick Gnedin, who helped co-supervise Neyrinck. This award had two major goals. First, to continue to develop and apply methods for measuring galaxy power spectra on large, linear scales, with a view to constraining cosmological parameters. And second, to begin try to understand galaxy clustering at smaller. nonlinear scales well enough to constrain cosmology from those scales also. Under this grant, the PI and collaborators, notably Max Tegmark. continued to improve their technology for measuring power spectra from galaxy surveys at large, linear scales. and to apply the technology to surveys as the data become available. We believe that our methods are best in the world. These measurements become the foundation from which we and other groups measure cosmological parameters.

  5. Nearly incompressible fluids: hydrodynamics and large scale inhomogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hunana, P; Zank, G P; Shaikh, D

    2006-08-01

    A system of hydrodynamic equations in the presence of large-scale inhomogeneities for a high plasma beta solar wind is derived. The theory is derived under the assumption of low turbulent Mach number and is developed for the flows where the usual incompressible description is not satisfactory and a full compressible treatment is too complex for any analytical studies. When the effects of compressibility are incorporated only weakly, a new description, referred to as "nearly incompressible hydrodynamics," is obtained. The nearly incompressible theory, was originally applied to homogeneous flows. However, large-scale gradients in density, pressure, temperature, etc., are typical in the solar wind and it was unclear how inhomogeneities would affect the usual incompressible and nearly incompressible descriptions. In the homogeneous case, the lowest order expansion of the fully compressible equations leads to the usual incompressible equations, followed at higher orders by the nearly incompressible equations, as introduced by Zank and Matthaeus. With this work we show that the inclusion of large-scale inhomogeneities (in this case time-independent and radially symmetric background solar wind) modifies the leading-order incompressible description of solar wind flow. We find, for example, that the divergence of velocity fluctuations is nonsolenoidal and that density fluctuations can be described to leading order as a passive scalar. Locally (for small lengthscales), this system of equations converges to the usual incompressible equations and we therefore use the term "locally incompressible" to describe the equations. This term should be distinguished from the term "nearly incompressible," which is reserved for higher-order corrections. Furthermore, we find that density fluctuations scale with Mach number linearly, in contrast to the original homogeneous nearly incompressible theory, in which density fluctuations scale with the square of Mach number. Inhomogeneous nearly

  6. The large-scale distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies in the universe is characterized on the basis of the six completed strips of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics redshift-survey extension. The design of the survey is briefly reviewed, and the results are presented graphically. Vast low-density voids similar to the void in Bootes are found, almost completely surrounded by thin sheets of galaxies. Also discussed are the implications of the results for the survey sampling problem, the two-point correlation function of the galaxy distribution, the possibility of detecting large-scale coherent flows, theoretical models of large-scale structure, and the identification of groups and clusters of galaxies.

  7. NST: Thermal Modeling for a Large Aperture Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, Roy

    2011-05-01

    Late in the 1990s the Dutch Open Telescope demonstrated that internal seeing in open, large aperture solar telescopes can be controlled by flushing air across the primary mirror and other telescope structures exposed to sunlight. In that system natural wind provides a uniform air temperature throughout the imaging volume, while efficiently sweeping heated air away from the optics and mechanical structure. Big Bear Solar Observatory's New Solar Telescope (NST) was designed to realize that same performance in an enclosed system by using both natural wind through the dome and forced air circulation around the primary mirror to provide the uniform air temperatures required within the telescope volume. The NST is housed in a conventional, ventilated dome with a circular opening, in place of the standard dome slit, that allows sunlight to fall only on an aperture stop and the primary mirror. The primary mirror is housed deep inside a cylindrical cell with only minimal openings in the side at the level of the mirror. To date, the forced air and cooling systems designed for the NST primary mirror have not been implemented, yet the telescope regularly produces solar images indicative of the absence of mirror seeing. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of the NST primary mirror system along with measurements of air flows within the dome, around the telescope structure, and internal to the mirror cell are used to explain the origin of this seemingly incongruent result. The CFD analysis is also extended to hypothetical systems of various scales. We will discuss the results of these investigations.

  8. Large-scale multimedia modeling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Castleton, K.J.; Gelston, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies have faced increasing scrutiny for a wide range of environmental issues related to past and current practices. A number of large-scale applications have been undertaken that required analysis of large numbers of potential environmental issues over a wide range of environmental conditions and contaminants. Several of these applications, referred to here as large-scale applications, have addressed long-term public health risks using a holistic approach for assessing impacts from potential waterborne and airborne transport pathways. Multimedia models such as the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were designed for use in such applications. MEPAS integrates radioactive and hazardous contaminants impact computations for major exposure routes via air, surface water, ground water, and overland flow transport. A number of large-scale applications of MEPAS have been conducted to assess various endpoints for environmental and human health impacts. These applications are described in terms of lessons learned in the development of an effective approach for large-scale applications.

  9. Large-scale synthesis of peptides.

    PubMed

    Andersson, L; Blomberg, L; Flegel, M; Lepsa, L; Nilsson, B; Verlander, M

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in the areas of formulation and delivery have rekindled the interest of the pharmaceutical community in peptides as drug candidates, which, in turn, has provided a challenge to the peptide industry to develop efficient methods for the manufacture of relatively complex peptides on scales of up to metric tons per year. This article focuses on chemical synthesis approaches for peptides, and presents an overview of the methods available and in use currently, together with a discussion of scale-up strategies. Examples of the different methods are discussed, together with solutions to some specific problems encountered during scale-up development. Finally, an overview is presented of issues common to all manufacturing methods, i.e., methods used for the large-scale purification and isolation of final bulk products and regulatory considerations to be addressed during scale-up of processes to commercial levels. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 55: 227-250, 2000

  10. Large-scale quantization from local correlations in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George; McComas, David J.

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the large-scale quantization that can characterize the phase space of certain physical systems. Plasmas are such systems where large-scale quantization, ħ*, is caused by Debye shielding that structures correlations between particles. The value of ħ* is constant—some 12 orders of magnitude larger than the Planck constant—across a wide range of space plasmas, from the solar wind in the inner heliosphere to the distant plasma in the inner heliosheath and the local interstellar medium. This paper develops the foundation and advances the understanding of the concept of plasma quantization; in particular, we (i) show the analogy of plasma to Planck quantization, (ii) show the key points of plasma quantization, (iii) construct some basic quantum mechanical concepts for the large-scale plasma quantization, (iv) investigate the correlation between plasma parameters that implies plasma quantization, when it is approximated by a relation between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency, (v) analyze typical space plasmas throughout the heliosphere and show the constancy of plasma quantization over many orders of magnitude in plasma parameters, (vi) analyze Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) solar wind measurements to develop another measurement of the value of ħ*, and (vii) apply plasma quantization to derive unknown plasma parameters when some key observable is missing.

  11. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Very Large Array observations at 20 cm wavelength can detect the hot coronal plasma previously observed at soft x ray wavelengths. Thermal cyclotron line emission was detected at the apex of coronal loops where the magnetic field strength is relatively constant. Detailed comparison of simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Satellite and VLA data indicate that physical parameters such as electron temperature, electron density, and magnetic field strength can be obtained, but that some coronal loops remain invisible in either spectral domain. The unprecedent spatial resolution of the VLA at 20 cm wavelength showed that the precursor, impulsive, and post-flare components of solar bursts originate in nearby, but separate loops or systems of loops.. In some cases preburst heating and magnetic changes are observed from loops tens of minutes prior to the impulsive phase. Comparisons with soft x ray images and spectra and with hard x ray data specify the magnetic field strength and emission mechanism of flaring coronal loops. At the longer 91 cm wavelength, the VLA detected extensive emission interpreted as a hot 10(exp 5) K interface between cool, dense H alpha filaments and the surrounding hotter, rarefield corona. Observations at 91 cm also provide evidence for time-correlated bursts in active regions on opposite sides of the solar equator; they are attributed to flare triggering by relativistic particles that move along large-scale, otherwise-invisible, magnetic conduits that link active regions in opposite hemispheres of the Sun.

  12. Transparent Luminescent Solar Concentrators for Large-area Solar Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yimu; Lunt, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) have recently regained attention as a route for integration into the building envelope. To date, however, these systems have been limited to absorption and emission (glow) in the visible part of spectrum. We have designed and fabricated novel transparent luminescent solar concentrators devices composed of synthesized metal halide nanocrystal phosphorescent luminophores that allow for efficient and selective harvesting of ultraviolet (UV) photons with a near perfect absorption cutoff at the edge of the visible spectrum (430nm) while efficiently down-converting emitted light with a massive stoke shift to the near-infrared (800nm). We have demonstrated transparent LSCs with power efficiency of 0.8% +/- 0.5%, system external quantum efficiency exceeding 35%, and an average transmittance of 82% +/- 1%. We show through experiments and modeling that this architecture has the potential to exhibit up to 1-2% power conversion over module areas > 1 m2. These concentrators present new opportunities for non-tinted and highly-adoptable solar- windows that can translate into improved building efficiency, enhanced UV-barrier layers, and lower cost solar harvesting systems.

  13. Large-Scale Structures of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2015-12-01

    A class of solar system analogs has yet to be identified among the large crop of planetary systems now observed. However, since most observed worlds are more easily detectable than direct analogs of the Sun's planets, the frequency of systems with structures similar to our own remains unknown. Identifying the range of possible planetary system architectures is complicated by the large number of physical processes that affect the formation and dynamical evolution of planets. I will present two ways of organizing planetary system structures. First, I will suggest that relatively few physical parameters are likely to differentiate the qualitative architectures of different systems. Solid mass in a protoplanetary disk is perhaps the most obvious possible controlling parameter, and I will give predictions for correlations between planetary system properties that we would expect to be present if this is the case. In particular, I will suggest that the solar system's structure is representative of low-metallicity systems that nevertheless host giant planets. Second, the disk structures produced as young stars are fed by their host clouds may play a crucial role. Using the observed distribution of RV giant planets as a function of stellar mass, I will demonstrate that invoking ice lines to determine where gas giants can form requires fine tuning. I will suggest that instead, disk structures built during early accretion have lasting impacts on giant planet distributions, and disk clean-up differentially affects the orbital distributions of giant and lower-mass planets. These two organizational hypotheses have different implications for the solar system's context, and I will suggest observational tests that may allow them to be validated or falsified.

  14. Design Rules and Scaling for Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.

    2005-01-01

    Useful design rules and simple scaling models have been developed for solar sails. Chief among the conclusions are: 1. Sail distortions contribute to the thrust and moments primarily though the mean squared value of their derivatives (slopes), and the sail behaves like a flat sheet if the value is small. The RMS slope is therefore an important figure of merit, and sail distortion effects on the spacecraft can generally be disregarded if the RMS slope is less than about 10% or so. 2. The characteristic slope of the sail distortion varies inversely with the tension in the sail, and it is the tension that produces the principle loading on the support booms. The tension is not arbitrary, but rather is the value needed to maintain the allowable RMS slope. That corresponds to a halyard force about equal to three times the normal force on the supported sail area. 3. Both the AEC/SRS and L Garde concepts appear to be structurally capable of supporting sail sizes up to a kilometer or more with 1AU solar flux, but select transverse dimensions must be changed to do so. Operational issues such as fabrication, handling, storage and deployment will be the limiting factors.

  15. Scaling studies of solar pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Chang, J.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report of scaling studies of solar pumped lasers is presented. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser light has been demonstrated in this study. Parametric studies of the variation of laser mixture composition and laser gas temperature were carried out for CO2 and N2O gases. Theoretical analysis and modeling of the system have been performed. Reasonable agreement between predictions in the parameter variation and the experimental results have been obtained. Almost 200 mW of laser output at 10.6 micron was achieved by placing a small sapphire laser tube inside an oven at 1500 K the tube was filled with CO2 laser gas mixture and cooled by longitudinal nitrogen gas flow.

  16. Scaling studies of solar pumped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Chang, J.

    1985-08-01

    A progress report of scaling studies of solar pumped lasers is presented. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser light has been demonstrated in this study. Parametric studies of the variation of laser mixture composition and laser gas temperature were carried out for CO2 and N2O gases. Theoretical analysis and modeling of the system have been performed. Reasonable agreement between predictions in the parameter variation and the experimental results have been obtained. Almost 200 mW of laser output at 10.6 micron was achieved by placing a small sapphire laser tube inside an oven at 1500 K the tube was filled with CO2 laser gas mixture and cooled by longitudinal nitrogen gas flow.

  17. Large-scale neuromorphic computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furber, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Neuromorphic computing covers a diverse range of approaches to information processing all of which demonstrate some degree of neurobiological inspiration that differentiates them from mainstream conventional computing systems. The philosophy behind neuromorphic computing has its origins in the seminal work carried out by Carver Mead at Caltech in the late 1980s. This early work influenced others to carry developments forward, and advances in VLSI technology supported steady growth in the scale and capability of neuromorphic devices. Recently, a number of large-scale neuromorphic projects have emerged, taking the approach to unprecedented scales and capabilities. These large-scale projects are associated with major new funding initiatives for brain-related research, creating a sense that the time and circumstances are right for progress in our understanding of information processing in the brain. In this review we present a brief history of neuromorphic engineering then focus on some of the principal current large-scale projects, their main features, how their approaches are complementary and distinct, their advantages and drawbacks, and highlight the sorts of capabilities that each can deliver to neural modellers.

  18. Solar chromospheric fine scale structures: dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2012-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer of the solar atmosphere that exhibits several phenomena on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution and long-duration observations, employing mostly lines, such as Halpha, the Ca II infrared lines and the Ca II H and K lines, obtained both from ground-based telescope facilities (e.g. DST, VTT, THEMIS, SST, DOT), as well as state-of-the-art satellites (e.g. SOHO, TRACE, HINODE) reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured chromospheric environment. What is known in literature as the chromospheric fine-scale structure mainly consists of small fibrilar-like features that connect various parts of quiet/active regions or span across the chromospheric network cell interiors, showing a large diversity of both physical and dynamic characteristics. The highly dynamic, fine-scale chromospheric structures are mostly governed by flows which reflect the complex geometry and dynamics of the local magnetic field and play an important role in the propagation and dissipation of waves. A comprehensive study of these structures requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved and investigation of their intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric levels. Furthermore, due to their large number present on the solar surface, it is essential to investigate their impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through processes such as magnetic reconnection and propagation of waves. The in-depth study of all aforementioned characteristics and processes, with the further addition of non-LTE physics, as well as the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations poses a fascinating challenge for both theory and numerical modeling of chromospheric fine-scale structures.

  19. Management of large-scale technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two major themes are addressed in this assessment of the management of large-scale NASA programs: (1) how a high technology agency was a decade marked by a rapid expansion of funds and manpower in the first half and almost as rapid contraction in the second; and (2) how NASA combined central planning and control with decentralized project execution.

  20. Experimental Simulations of Large-Scale Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the effects of target porosity on the mechanics of impact cratering. Impact experiments conducted on a centrifuge provide direct simulations of large-scale cratering on porous asteroids. The experiments show that large craters in porous materials form mostly by compaction, with essentially no deposition of material into the ejecta blanket that is a signature of cratering in less-porous materials. The ratio of ejecta mass to crater mass is shown to decrease with increasing crater size or target porosity. These results are consistent with the observation that large closely-packed craters on asteroid Mathilde appear to have formed without degradation to earlier craters.

  1. ON THE OCCURRENCE OF THE THIRD-ORDER SCALING IN HIGH LATITUDE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Bruno, R.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Carbone, V.; Veltri, P.

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence and nature of a nonlinear energy cascade within the intermediate scales of solar wind Alfvenic turbulence represents an important open issue. Using in situ measurements of fast, high latitude solar wind taken by the Ulysses spacecraft at solar minima, it is possible to show that a nonlinear energy cascade of imbalanced turbulence is only observed when the solar wind owns peculiar properties. These are the reduction of the local correlation between velocity and magnetic field (weak cross-helicity); the presence of large-scale velocity shears; and the steepening and extension down to low frequencies of the turbulent spectra. Our observations suggest the important role of both large-scale velocity and Alfvenicity of the field fluctuations for the validation of the Yaglom law in solar wind turbulence.

  2. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Ludemann, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The propfan is an advanced propeller concept which maintains the high efficiencies traditionally associated with conventional propellers at the higher aircraft cruise speeds associated with jet transports. The large-scale advanced propfan (LAP) program extends the research done on 2 ft diameter propfan models to a 9 ft diameter article. The program includes design, fabrication, and testing of both an eight bladed, 9 ft diameter propfan, designated SR-7L, and a 2 ft diameter aeroelastically scaled model, SR-7A. The LAP program is complemented by the propfan test assessment (PTA) program, which takes the large-scale propfan and mates it with a gas generator and gearbox to form a propfan propulsion system and then flight tests this system on the wing of a Gulfstream 2 testbed aircraft.

  3. Study of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) Using Largely Separated Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-31

    waves, flares and CMEs. From spacecraft largely separated, we observe SEPs and related solar activities with multiple points of view. The major results...missions. SEPs are accelerated by flare reconnections and CME-driven shocks. The characteristics of SEPs depend on their solar sources (Reames 1999... solar EUV waves, which is considered as the lateral expansions of CME-driven shocks. We also all sources of sympathetic flaring that may produce the

  4. Linking fluid and kinetic scales in solar wind turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telloni, Daniele; Bruno, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    We investigate possible links between the large-scale and small-scale features of solar wind fluctuations across the frequency break separating fluid and kinetic regimes. The aim is to correlate the magnetic field fluctuations polarization at dissipative scales with the particular state of turbulence within the inertial range of fluctuations. We found clear correlations between each type of polarization within the kinetic regime and fluid parameters within the inertial range. Moreover, for the first time in literature, we showed that left-handed and right-handed polarized fluctuations occupy different areas of the plasma instabilities-temperature anisotropy plot, as expected for Alfvén ion cyclotron and kinetic Alfvén waves, respectively.

  5. Large area Czochralski silicon for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed model of a typical Czochralski silicon crystal puller is utilized to predict maximum crystal growth rate as a function of various furnace parameters. Results of this analysis, when combined with multiblade slurry sawing, indicate that the Czochralski process is highly attractive for achieving near-term cost reduction of solar cell silicon.

  6. Large area Czochralski silicon for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed model of a typical Czochralski silicon crystal puller is utilized to predict maximum crystal growth rate as a function of various furnace parameters. Results of this analysis, when combined with multiblade slurry sawing, indicate that the Czochralski process is highly attractive for achieving near-term cost reduction of solar cell silicon.

  7. Neutrino footprint in large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, Carlos Peña; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2017-03-01

    Recent constrains on the sum of neutrino masses inferred by analyzing cosmological data, show that detecting a non-zero neutrino mass is within reach of forthcoming cosmological surveys. Such a measurement will imply a direct determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale. Physically, the measurement relies on constraining the shape of the matter power spectrum below the neutrino free streaming scale: massive neutrinos erase power at these scales. However, detection of a lack of small-scale power from cosmological data could also be due to a host of other effects. It is therefore of paramount importance to validate neutrinos as the source of power suppression at small scales. We show that, independent on hierarchy, neutrinos always show a footprint on large, linear scales; the exact location and properties are fully specified by the measured power suppression (an astrophysical measurement) and atmospheric neutrinos mass splitting (a neutrino oscillation experiment measurement). This feature cannot be easily mimicked by systematic uncertainties in the cosmological data analysis or modifications in the cosmological model. Therefore the measurement of such a feature, up to 1% relative change in the power spectrum for extreme differences in the mass eigenstates mass ratios, is a smoking gun for confirming the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale from cosmological observations. It also demonstrates the synergy between astrophysics and particle physics experiments.

  8. Scale-free texture of the fast solar wind.

    PubMed

    Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Gogoberidze, G; Wicks, R T

    2011-12-01

    The higher-order statistics of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations in the fast quiet solar wind are quantified systematically, scale by scale. We find a single global non-Gaussian scale-free behavior from minutes to over 5 h. This spans the signature of an inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and a ~1/f range in magnetic field components. This global scaling in field magnitude fluctuations is an intrinsic component of the underlying texture of the solar wind and puts a strong constraint on any theory of solar corona and the heliosphere. Intriguingly, the magnetic field and velocity components show scale-dependent dynamic alignment outside of the inertial range.

  9. Large-Scale Activity Initiated BY Halo CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertok, I.; Grechnev, V.

    We summarize results of our recent studies of CME-associated EUV dimmings and coronal waves by `derotated' fixed-difference SOHO/EIT heliograms at 195 Å with 12-min intervals and at 171, 195, 284, 304 Å with 6-h intervals. Correctness of the derotated fixed-difference technique is confirmed by the consideration of the Bastille Day 2000 event. We also demonstrate that long narrow channeled dimmings and anisotropic coronal waves are typical of the complex global solar magnetosphere near the solar cycle maximum. Homology of large-scale dimmings and coronal waves takes place in a series of recurrent eruptive events. Along with dimmings coinciding entirely or partially in all four EIT bands, there exist dimmings that appear different, mainly in the transition-region line of 304 Å and high-temperature coronal line of 284 Å.

  10. Scale up of large ALON windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Kashalikar, Uday; Foti, Robyn; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALON® Optical Ceramic) combines broadband transparency with excellent mechanical properties. ALON's cubic structure means that it is transparent in its polycrystalline form, allowing it to be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques. Surmet has established a robust manufacturing process, beginning with synthesis of ALON® powder, continuing through forming/heat treatment of blanks, and ending with optical fabrication of ALON® windows. Surmet has made significant progress in our production capability in recent years. Additional scale up of Surmet's manufacturing capability, for larger sizes and higher quantities, is currently underway. ALON® transparent armor represents the state of the art in protection against armor piercing threats, offering a factor of two in weight and thickness savings over conventional glass laminates. Tiled and monolithic windows have been successfully produced and tested against a range of threats. Large ALON® window are also of interest to a range of visible to Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) sensor applications. These applications often have stressing imaging requirements which in turn require that these large windows have optical characteristics including excellent homogeneity of index of refraction and very low stress birefringence. Surmet is currently scaling up its production facility to be able to make and deliver ALON® monolithic windows as large as ~19x36-in. Additionally, Surmet has plans to scale up to windows ~3ftx3ft in size in the coming years. Recent results with scale up and characterization of the resulting blanks will be presented.

  11. Large-Scale Magnetic Connectivity in CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzong; Wang, Jingxiu; Attrill, Gemma; Harra, Louise K.

    Five flare/CME events were selected in this study. One is on May 12, 1997, for which there is only two active regions on the visible solar disc, and the magnetic configuration is rather simple. For other cases, many active regions were visible. They are the flare/CME events that occurred on Bastille Day of 2000, Oct. 28, 2003, Nov. 7, 2004 and Jan. 20, 2005. By tracing the spread of EUV dimming, which was obtained by SOHO/EIT 195 Å fixed-difference images, we studied the CME initiation and development on the solar disc. At the same time we reconstructed the 3D magnetic structure of coronal magnetic fields, extrapolated from the observed photospheric magnetograms by SOHO/MDI. In scrutinizing the EUV brightening and dimming propagation from CME initiation sites to large areas with different magnetic connectivities, we determine the overall coupling and interacting of multiple flux systems in the CME processes. Several typical patterns of magnetic connectivity are described and discussed in the view of CME initiation mechanism or mechanisms.

  12. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Jim; Knight, Tawnie

    2014-01-30

    Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

  13. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  14. EXTREMELY LARGE EUV LATE PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin

    2015-03-20

    The second peak in the Fe xvi 33.5 nm line irradiance observed during solar flares by the Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is known as the EUV late phase. Our previous paper in 2013 by Liu et al. found that the main emissions in the late phase are originated from large-scale loop arcades that are closely connected to but different from the post-flare loops (PFLs), and we also proposed that a long cooling process without additional heating could explain the late phase. In this paper, we define the extremely large late phase because it not only has a bigger peak in the warm 33.5 irradiance profile, but also releases more EUV radiative energy than the main phase. Through detailed inspection of the EUV images from three points of view, it was discovered that aside from the later-phase loop arcades, the main contributor of the extremely large late phase is a hot structure that fails to erupt. This hot structure is identified as a flux rope, which is quickly energized by the flare reconnection and later on continuously produces the thermal energy during the gradual phase. Together with the late-phase loop arcades, the flux rope failing to erupt with the additional heating create the extremely large EUV late phase.

  15. Extremely Large EUV Late Phase of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong

    2015-04-01

    The second peak in the Fe XVI 33.5 nm line irradiance observed during solar flares by Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is known as Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) late phase. Our previous paper found that the main emissions in the late phase are originated from large-scale loop arcades that are closely connected to but different from the post flare loops (PFLs), and we also proposed that a long cooling process without additional heating could explain the late phase. In this paper, we define the extremely large late phase because it not only has a bigger peak in the warm 33.5 irradiance profile, but also releases more EUV radiative energy than the main phase. Through detailedly inspecting the EUV images from three point-of-view, it is found that, besides the later phase loop arcades, the more contribution of the extremely large late phase is from a hot structure that fails to erupt. This hot structure is identified as a flux rope, which is quickly energized by the flare reconnection and later on continuously produces the thermal energy during the gradual phase. Together with the late-phase loop arcades, the fail to erupt flux rope with the additional heating creates the extremely large EUV late phase.

  16. Extremely Large EUV Late Phase of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong

    2015-03-01

    The second peak in the Fe xvi 33.5 nm line irradiance observed during solar flares by the Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is known as the EUV late phase. Our previous paper in 2013 by Liu et al. found that the main emissions in the late phase are originated from large-scale loop arcades that are closely connected to but different from the post-flare loops (PFLs), and we also proposed that a long cooling process without additional heating could explain the late phase. In this paper, we define the extremely large late phase because it not only has a bigger peak in the warm 33.5 irradiance profile, but also releases more EUV radiative energy than the main phase. Through detailed inspection of the EUV images from three points of view, it was discovered that aside from the later-phase loop arcades, the main contributor of the extremely large late phase is a hot structure that fails to erupt. This hot structure is identified as a flux rope, which is quickly energized by the flare reconnection and later on continuously produces the thermal energy during the gradual phase. Together with the late-phase loop arcades, the flux rope failing to erupt with the additional heating create the extremely large EUV late phase.

  17. Global Energetics of Large Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Emslie, A. G.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moore, C. S.; Share, G. H.; Shih, A. Y.; Vourlidas, A.; Welsch, B.

    2012-01-01

    We have evaluated the energetics of the larger solar eruptive events recorded with a variety of spacecraft instruments between February 2002 and December 2006. All of the energetically important components of the flares and of the accompanying coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles have been evaluated as accurately as the observations allow. These components include the following : (1) the total energy in the high temperature plasma determined from the RHESSI thermal X-ray observations; (2) the total energies in accelerated electrons above 20 keV and ions above 1 MeV from RHESSI hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations, respectively; (3) the potential and kinetic energies of the CME from SOHO/LASCO observations; (4) the solar energetic particle (SEP) energy estimates from in situ measurements on ACE, GOES, and SOHO; (5) the total radiated energy from the SORCEITSI measurements where available, and otherwise from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). The results are assimilated and discussed relative to the probable amount of non potential magnetic energy estimated to be available in the flaring active regions from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms.

  18. Condition Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted for the NASA Ames Research Center under grant NAG2-1182 (Condition-Based Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities). The information includes copies of view graphs presented at NASA Ames in the final Workshop (held during December of 1998), as well as a copy of a technical report provided to the COTR (Dr. Anne Patterson-Hine) subsequent to the workshop. The material describes the experimental design, collection of data, and analysis results associated with monitoring the health of large-scale facilities. In addition to this material, a copy of the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory data fusion visual programming tool kit was also provided to NASA Ames researchers.

  19. Characterization testing of large area solar cell assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Jay S.; Gelb, Steven W.; Goldhammer, Leland J.; Goodelle, George S.; Judson, Audrey L.

    A complete characterization program has been performed on two large area (7 cm x 6 cm) solar cell types which will be used on the Hughes HS 393 satellite solar arrays. Each type was subjected to a series of tests which provided the data needed to accurately predict the solar array performance at end of life and demonstrated the mechanical integrity of the device. Characterization data presented include optical properties of the devices, cell current-voltage characteristics as a function of temperature and angle of light incidence, and solar cell performance after electron irradiation. Mechanical data presented include the results of cell strength tests, contact solderability tests, and coupon thermal cycling tests. The results indicate that the large-area solar cells are mechanically equivalent and electrically superior to cells of conventional size previously characterized.

  20. Subgrid Scale Modeling in Solar Convection Simulations using the ASH Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Y.-N.; Miesch, M.; Mansour, N. N.

    2003-01-01

    The turbulent solar convection zone has remained one of the most challenging and important subjects in physics. Understanding the complex dynamics in the solar con- vection zone is crucial for gaining insight into the solar dynamo problem. Many solar observatories have generated revealing data with great details of large scale motions in the solar convection zone. For example, a strong di erential rotation is observed: the angular rotation is observed to be faster at the equator than near the poles not only near the solar surface, but also deep in the convection zone. On the other hand, due to the wide range of dynamical scales of turbulence in the solar convection zone, both theory and simulation have limited success. Thus, cutting edge solar models and numerical simulations of the solar convection zone have focused more narrowly on a few key features of the solar convection zone, such as the time-averaged di erential rotation. For example, Brun & Toomre (2002) report computational finding of differential rotation in an anelastic model for solar convection. A critical shortcoming in this model is that the viscous dissipation is based on application of mixing length theory to stellar dynamics with some ad hoc parameter tuning. The goal of our work is to implement the subgrid scale model developed at CTR into the solar simulation code and examine how the differential rotation will be a affected as a result. Specifically, we implement a Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid scale model into the ASH (anelastic spherical harmonic) code developed over the years by various authors. This paper is organized as follows. In x2 we briefly formulate the anelastic system that describes the solar convection. In x3 we formulate the Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid scale model for unstably stratifed convection. We then present some preliminary results in x4, where we also provide some conclusions and future directions.

  1. Numerically modelling the large scale coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Mayukh; Nandi, Dibyendu

    2016-07-01

    The solar corona spews out vast amounts of magnetized plasma into the heliosphere which has a direct impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. Thus it is important that we develop an understanding of the dynamics of the solar corona. With our present technology it has not been possible to generate 3D magnetic maps of the solar corona; this warrants the use of numerical simulations to study the coronal magnetic field. A very popular method of doing this, is to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field using NLFF or PFSS codes. However the extrapolations at different time intervals are completely independent of each other and do not capture the temporal evolution of magnetic fields. On the other hand full MHD simulations of the global coronal field, apart from being computationally very expensive would be physically less transparent, owing to the large number of free parameters that are typically used in such codes. This brings us to the Magneto-frictional model which is relatively simpler and computationally more economic. We have developed a Magnetofrictional Model, in 3D spherical polar co-ordinates to study the large scale global coronal field. Here we present studies of changing connectivities between active regions, in response to photospheric motions.

  2. Large-scale fibre-array multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Cheremiskin, I V; Chekhlova, T K

    2001-05-31

    The possibility of creating a fibre multiplexer/demultiplexer with large-scale multiplexing without any basic restrictions on the number of channels and the spectral spacing between them is shown. The operating capacity of a fibre multiplexer based on a four-fibre array ensuring a spectral spacing of 0.7 pm ({approx} 10 GHz) between channels is demonstrated. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Modeling Human Behavior at a Large Scale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Discerning intentions in dynamic human action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences , 5(4):171 – 178, 2001. Shirli Bar-David, Israel Bar-David, Paul C. Cross, Sadie...Limits of predictability in human mobility. Science , 327(5968):1018, 2010. S.A. Stouffer. Intervening opportunities: a theory relating mobility and...Modeling Human Behavior at a Large Scale by Adam Sadilek Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy

  4. Large-Scale Aerosol Modeling and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    aerosol species up to six days in advance anywhere on the globe. NAAPS and COAMPS are particularly useful for forecasts of dust storms in areas...impact cloud processes globally. With increasing dust storms due to climate change and land use changes in desert regions, the impact of the...bacteria in large-scale dust storms is expected to significantly impact warm ice cloud formation, human health, and ecosystems globally. In Niemi et al

  5. Economically viable large-scale hydrogen liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, U.; Decker, L.; Klein, H.

    2017-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen demand, particularly driven by clean energy applications, will rise in the near future. As industrial large scale liquefiers will play a major role within the hydrogen supply chain, production capacity will have to increase by a multiple of today’s typical sizes. The main goal is to reduce the total cost of ownership for these plants by increasing energy efficiency with innovative and simple process designs, optimized in capital expenditure. New concepts must ensure a manageable plant complexity and flexible operability. In the phase of process development and selection, a dimensioning of key equipment for large scale liquefiers, such as turbines and compressors as well as heat exchangers, must be performed iteratively to ensure technological feasibility and maturity. Further critical aspects related to hydrogen liquefaction, e.g. fluid properties, ortho-para hydrogen conversion, and coldbox configuration, must be analysed in detail. This paper provides an overview on the approach, challenges and preliminary results in the development of efficient as well as economically viable concepts for large-scale hydrogen liquefaction.

  6. Large-Scale Visual Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Modern high performance computers have speeds measured in petaflops and handle data set sizes measured in terabytes and petabytes. Although these machines offer enormous potential for solving very large-scale realistic computational problems, their effectiveness will hinge upon the ability of human experts to interact with their simulation results and extract useful information. One of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century is to effectively understand and make use of the vast amount of information being produced. Visual data analysis will be among our most most important tools in helping to understand such large-scale information. Our research at the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute at the University of Utah has focused on innovative, scalable techniques for large-scale 3D visual data analysis. In this talk, I will present state- of-the-art visualization techniques, including scalable visualization algorithms and software, cluster-based visualization methods and innovate visualization techniques applied to problems in computational science, engineering, and medicine. I will conclude with an outline for a future high performance visualization research challenges and opportunities.

  7. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Miller, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Solar collectors for space use are examined, including both early designs and current concepts. In particular, attention is given to stiff sandwich panels and aluminum dishes as well as inflated and umbrella-type membrane configurations. The Sunflower concentrator is described as an example of a high-efficiency collector. It is concluded that stiff reflector panels are most likely to provide the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation. A new configuration consisting of a Pactruss backup structure, with identical panels installed after deployment in space, is presented. It is estimated that concentration ratios in excess of 2000 can be achieved with this concept.

  8. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Miller, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Solar collectors for space use are examined, including both early designs and current concepts. In particular, attention is given to stiff sandwich panels and aluminum dishes as well as inflated and umbrella-type membrane configurations. The Sunflower concentrator is described as an example of a high-efficiency collector. It is concluded that stiff reflector panels are most likely to provide the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation. A new configuration consisting of a Pactruss backup structure, with identical panels installed after deployment in space, is presented. It is estimated that concentration ratios in excess of 2000 can be achieved with this concept.

  9. Large scale preparation of pure phycobiliproteins.

    PubMed

    Padgett, M P; Krogmann, D W

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes simple procedures for the purification of large amounts of phycocyanin and allophycocyanin from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. A homogeneous natural bloom of this organism provided hundreds of kilograms of cells. Large samples of cells were broken by freezing and thawing. Repeated extraction of the broken cells with distilled water released phycocyanin first, then allophycocyanin, and provides supporting evidence for the current models of phycobilisome structure. The very low ionic strength of the aqueous extracts allowed allophycocyanin release in a particulate form so that this protein could be easily concentrated by centrifugation. Other proteins in the extract were enriched and concentrated by large scale membrane filtration. The biliproteins were purified to homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE cellulose. Purity was established by HPLC and by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The proteins were examined for stability at various pHs and exposures to visible light.

  10. Heat extraction from a large solar pond

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, L.J.; Etter, D.E.

    1982-08-01

    The largest operational, salt-gradient solar pond in the United States, occupying 2000 m/sup 2/, was constructed during 1978 in Miamisburg, Ohio. The heat from this solar pond, nearly 1055 GJ/y (1000 million Btu/y) is used to heat an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreation building during part of the winter. A new heat exchanger system has been installed externally to the pond and operated successfully to deliver 391 GJ (371 million Btu) of heat during May-June. Hot brine water is drawn through a diffuser by a self-priming pump fabricated from fiberglass reinforced plastic. The brine water passes through copper-10% nickel tubes of a tube-and-shell heat exchanger and is then returned to the bottom of the pond. Cooling water from the swimming pool circulates through the shell side of the heat exchanger. Several designs and flow velocities of the brine inlet and outlet diffusers into the pond have been tested in order to minimize the effect of turbulence upon the salt gradient zone.

  11. Heat extraction from a large solar pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, L. J.; Etter, D. E.

    1982-08-01

    The largest operational, salt-gradient solar pond in the United States, occupying 2000 squares meters, was constructed during 1978 in Miamisburg, Ohio. The heat from this solar pond, nearly 1055 GJ/y (1000 million Btu/y) is used to heat an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreation building during part of the winter. A new heat exchanger system was installed externally to the pond and operated successfully to deliver 391 GJ (271 million Btu) of heat during May to June. Hot brine water is drawn through a diffuser by a self-priming pump fabricated from fiberglass reinforced plastic. The brine water passes through copper 10% nickel tubes of a tube-and-shell heat exchanger and is then returned to the bottom of the pond. Cooling water from the swimming pool circulates through the shell side of the heat exchanger. Several designs and flow velocities of the brine inlet and outlet diffusers into the pond were tested in order to minimize the effect of turbulence upon the salt gradient zone.

  12. Solar cells. High-efficiency solution-processed perovskite solar cells with millimeter-scale grains.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wanyi; Tsai, Hsinhan; Asadpour, Reza; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Neukirch, Amanda J; Gupta, Gautam; Crochet, Jared J; Chhowalla, Manish; Tretiak, Sergei; Alam, Muhammad A; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mohite, Aditya D

    2015-01-30

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics use high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high-temperature crystal growth processes. We demonstrate a solution-based hot-casting technique to grow continuous, pinhole-free thin films of organometallic perovskites with millimeter-scale crystalline grains. We fabricated planar solar cells with efficiencies approaching 18%, with little cell-to-cell variability. The devices show hysteresis-free photovoltaic response, which had been a fundamental bottleneck for the stable operation of perovskite devices. Characterization and modeling attribute the improved performance to reduced bulk defects and improved charge carrier mobility in large-grain devices. We anticipate that this technique will lead the field toward synthesis of wafer-scale crystalline perovskites, necessary for the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells, and will be applicable to several other material systems plagued by polydispersity, defects, and grain boundary recombination in solution-processed thin films. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  14. Bio-Inspired Wooden Actuators for Large Scale Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Burgert, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing programmable actuation into materials and structures is a major topic in the field of smart materials. In particular the bilayer principle has been employed to develop actuators that respond to various kinds of stimuli. A multitude of small scale applications down to micrometer size have been developed, but up-scaling remains challenging due to either limitations in mechanical stiffness of the material or in the manufacturing processes. Here, we demonstrate the actuation of wooden bilayers in response to changes in relative humidity, making use of the high material stiffness and a good machinability to reach large scale actuation and application. Amplitude and response time of the actuation were measured and can be predicted and controlled by adapting the geometry and the constitution of the bilayers. Field tests in full weathering conditions revealed long-term stability of the actuation. The potential of the concept is shown by a first demonstrator. With the sensor and actuator intrinsically incorporated in the wooden bilayers, the daily change in relative humidity is exploited for an autonomous and solar powered movement of a tracker for solar modules. PMID:25835386

  15. Bio-inspired wooden actuators for large scale applications.

    PubMed

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Burgert, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing programmable actuation into materials and structures is a major topic in the field of smart materials. In particular the bilayer principle has been employed to develop actuators that respond to various kinds of stimuli. A multitude of small scale applications down to micrometer size have been developed, but up-scaling remains challenging due to either limitations in mechanical stiffness of the material or in the manufacturing processes. Here, we demonstrate the actuation of wooden bilayers in response to changes in relative humidity, making use of the high material stiffness and a good machinability to reach large scale actuation and application. Amplitude and response time of the actuation were measured and can be predicted and controlled by adapting the geometry and the constitution of the bilayers. Field tests in full weathering conditions revealed long-term stability of the actuation. The potential of the concept is shown by a first demonstrator. With the sensor and actuator intrinsically incorporated in the wooden bilayers, the daily change in relative humidity is exploited for an autonomous and solar powered movement of a tracker for solar modules.

  16. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Dahal, Sumit; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fluxa, Pedro; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Iuliano, Jeffrey; Karakla, John; Marriage, Tobias; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H.; Palma, Gonzalo; Parker, Lucas; Petroff, Matthew; Pradenas, Bastián; Rostem, Karwan; Sagliocca, Marco; Valle, Deniz; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2017-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveryor (CLASS) is a ground based telescope array designed to measure the large-angular scale polarization signal of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The large-angular scale CMB polarization measurement is essential for a precise determination of the optical depth to reionization (from the E-mode polarization) and a characterization of inflation from the predicted polarization pattern imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves in the early universe (from the B-mode polarization). CLASS will characterize the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, to 0.01 (95% CL).CLASS is uniquely designed to be sensitive to the primordial B-mode signal across the entire range of angular scales where it could possibly dominate over the lensing signal that converts E-modes to B-modes while also making multi-frequency observations both high and low of the frequency where the CMB-to-foreground signal ratio is at its maximum. The design enables CLASS to make a definitive cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to scattering from reionization.CLASS is an array of 4 telescopes operating at approximately 40, 90, 150, and 220 GHz. CLASS is located high in the Andes mountains in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The location of the CLASS site at high altitude near the equator minimizes atmospheric emission while allowing for daily mapping of ~70% of the sky.A rapid front end Variable-delay Polarization Modulator (VPM) and low noise Transition Edge Sensor (TES) detectors allow for a high sensitivity and low systematic error mapping of the CMB polarization at large angular scales. The VPM, detectors and their coupling structures were all uniquely designed and built for CLASS.We present here an overview of the CLASS scientific strategy, instrument design, and current progress. Particular attention is given to the development and status of the Q-band receiver currently surveying the sky from the Atacama Desert and the development of

  17. Local and Regional Impacts of Large Scale Wind Energy Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalakes, J.; Hammond, S.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P.; Robinson, M.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. is currently on a path to produce 20% of its electricity from wind energy by 2030, almost a 10-fold increase over present levels of electricity generated from wind. Such high-penetration wind energy deployment will entail extracting elevated energy levels from the planetary boundary layer and preliminary studies indicate that this will have significant but uncertain impacts on the local and regional environment. State and federal regulators have raised serious concerns regarding potential agricultural impacts from large farms deployed throughout the Midwest where agriculture is the basis of the local economy. The effects of large wind farms have been proposed to be both beneficial (drying crops to reduce occurrences of fungal diseases, avoiding late spring freezes, enhancing pollen viability, reducing dew duration) and detrimental (accelerating moisture loss during drought) with no conclusive investigations thus far. As both wind and solar technologies are deployed at scales required to replace conventional technologies, there must be reasonable certainty that the potential environmental impacts at the micro, macro, regional and global scale do not exceed those anticipated from carbon emissions. Largely because of computational limits, the role of large wind farms in affecting regional-scale weather patterns has only been investigated in coarse simulations and modeling tools do not yet exist which are capable of assessing the downwind affects of large wind farms may have on microclimatology. In this presentation, we will outline the vision for and discuss technical and scientific challenges in developing a multi-model high-performance simulation capability covering the range of mesoscale to sub-millimeter scales appropriate for assessing local, regional, and ultimately global environmental impacts and quantifying uncertainties of large scale wind energy deployment scenarios. Such a system will allow continuous downscaling of atmospheric processes on wind

  18. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriage, Tobias; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Dahal, Sumit; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fluxa, Pedro; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Iuliano, Jeffrey; Karakla, John; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Nathan T.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Palma, Gonzalo; Parker, Lucas; Petroff, Matthew; Pradenas, Bastián.; Rostem, Karwan; Sagliocca, Marco; Valle, Deniz; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  19. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  20. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  1. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriage, Tobias; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John; Bennett, Charles; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from inflation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  2. Statistical Measures of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogeley, Michael; Geller, Margaret; Huchra, John; Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard

    1993-12-01

    \\inv Mpc} To quantify clustering in the large-scale distribution of galaxies and to test theories for the formation of structure in the universe, we apply statistical measures to the CfA Redshift Survey. This survey is complete to m_{B(0)}=15.5 over two contiguous regions which cover one-quarter of the sky and include ~ 11,000 galaxies. The salient features of these data are voids with diameter 30-50\\hmpc and coherent dense structures with a scale ~ 100\\hmpc. Comparison with N-body simulations rules out the ``standard" CDM model (Omega =1, b=1.5, sigma_8 =1) at the 99% confidence level because this model has insufficient power on scales lambda >30\\hmpc. An unbiased open universe CDM model (Omega h =0.2) and a biased CDM model with non-zero cosmological constant (Omega h =0.24, lambda_0 =0.6) match the observed power spectrum. The amplitude of the power spectrum depends on the luminosity of galaxies in the sample; bright (L>L(*) ) galaxies are more strongly clustered than faint galaxies. The paucity of bright galaxies in low-density regions may explain this dependence. To measure the topology of large-scale structure, we compute the genus of isodensity surfaces of the smoothed density field. On scales in the ``non-linear" regime, <= 10\\hmpc, the high- and low-density regions are multiply-connected over a broad range of density threshold, as in a filamentary net. On smoothing scales >10\\hmpc, the topology is consistent with statistics of a Gaussian random field. Simulations of CDM models fail to produce the observed coherence of structure on non-linear scales (>95% confidence level). The underdensity probability (the frequency of regions with density contrast delta rho //lineρ=-0.8) depends strongly on the luminosity of galaxies; underdense regions are significantly more common (>2sigma ) in bright (L>L(*) ) galaxy samples than in samples which include fainter galaxies.

  3. Perovskite Solar Cells with Large-Area CVD-Graphene for Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Felix; Gluba, Marc A; Albrecht, Steve; Rappich, Jörg; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Nickel, Norbert H

    2015-07-16

    Perovskite solar cells with transparent contacts may be used to compensate for thermalization losses of silicon solar cells in tandem devices. This offers a way to outreach stagnating efficiencies. However, perovskite top cells in tandem structures require contact layers with high electrical conductivity and optimal transparency. We address this challenge by implementing large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition as a highly transparent electrode in perovskite solar cells, leading to identical charge collection efficiencies. Electrical performance of solar cells with a graphene-based contact reached those of solar cells with standard gold contacts. The optical transmission by far exceeds that of reference devices and amounts to 64.3% below the perovskite band gap. Finally, we demonstrate a four-terminal tandem device combining a high band gap graphene-contacted perovskite top solar cell (Eg = 1.6 eV) with an amorphous/crystalline silicon bottom solar cell (Eg = 1.12 eV).

  4. Large-scale quasi-geostrophic magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of a shallow fluid layer on a rapidly rotating planet or star. The presence of a background toroidal magnetic field is assumed, and the 'shallow water' beta-plane approximation is used. We derive a single equation for the slow large length scale dynamics. The range of validity of this equation fits the MHD of the lighter fluid at the top of Earth's outer core. The form of this equation is similar to the quasi-geostrophic (Q-G) equation (for usual ocean or atmosphere), but the parameters are essentially different. Our equation also implies the inverse cascade; but contrary to the usual Q-G situation, the energy cascades to smaller length scales, while the enstrophy cascades to the larger scales. We find the Kolmogorov-type spectrum for the inverse cascade. The spectrum indicates the energy accumulation in larger scales. In addition to the energy and enstrophy, the obtained equation possesses an extra (adiabatic-type) invariant. Its presence implies energy accumulation in the 30° sector around zonal direction. With some special energy input, the extra invariant can lead to the accumulation of energy in zonal magnetic field; this happens if the input of the extra invariant is small, while the energy input is considerable.

  5. Attitude Dynamics and Controls for Large Solar Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bo

    This dissertation enriches our knowledge of attitude control methodologies that are suitable for solar sails, and in particularly large solar sails. In chapter 1, the fundamental physics of solar sails and existing solar sail attitude control methodologies are reviewed. In chapter 2, an attitude control methodology (Tip Displacement Method) that is suitable for large solar sail is presented. In the proposed method, the sail wing-boom attachment points are allowed to move, and under solar radiation pressure, the sail membrane sags into a curved profile. A mathematical model of this curved profile is built, and analytical solutions of solar radiation body torque based on the curved wing is derived. It is shown that this methodology along can generate enough body toque in all three body axis directions for attitude control of large solar sails. In chapter 3, the propose method is further investigated, and the effect of incident solar radiation direction on solar radiation pressure body torque generation is studied. The effect of sail shape is also studied a step further, mainly by relaxing previously made cylindrical assumption on the shape of the wing. Based on an optimization process, algorithms for determining the shape of the wing are given, and solar radiation body torques are developed for the shape of the wing. One finding is that for small tip displacements, the cylindrical sail wing model is sufficient in estimating the solar radiation body torque. In chapters 2 and 3, the analyses are carried out based on the assumption that the wing shape is of a generalized cylinder. In chapter 4 a theoretical basis is provided for this assumption. Using the mathematical model of the single wing for the proposed tip displacement attitude control strategy, in chapter 5 a whole square solar sail model is built, and the system controllability is studied for linearized system states. The system is found to be robust because of the many actuators used, and is controllable even

  6. Area-scaling of organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seungkeun; Potscavage, William J.; Kippelen, Bernard

    2009-09-01

    We report on the performance of organic solar cells based on pentacene/C60 heterojunctions as a function of active area. Devices with areas of 0.13 and 7 cm2 were fabricated on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass. Degradation of the performance with increased area is observed and analyzed in terms of the power loss density concept. The various power loss contributions to the total series resistance (RSA) are measured independently and compared to the values of the series resistance extracted from the current-voltage characteristics using a Shockley equivalent circuit model. The limited sheet resistance of ITO is found to be one of the major limiting factors when the area of the cell is increased. To reduce the effects of series resistance, thick, electroplated, metal grid electrodes were integrated with ITO in large-area cells. The metal grids were fabricated directly onto ITO and passivated with an insulator to prevent electrical shorts during the deposition of the top Al electrode. By integrating metal grids onto ITO, the series resistance could be reduced significantly yielding improved performance. Design guidelines for metal grids are described and tradeoffs are discussed.

  7. Large-scale optimization of neuron arbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Christopher; Changizi, Mark; Won Kang, Du

    1999-05-01

    At the global as well as local scales, some of the geometry of types of neuron arbors-both dendrites and axons-appears to be self-organizing: Their morphogenesis behaves like flowing water, that is, fluid dynamically; waterflow in branching networks in turn acts like a tree composed of cords under tension, that is, vector mechanically. Branch diameters and angles and junction sites conform significantly to this model. The result is that such neuron tree samples globally minimize their total volume-rather than, for example, surface area or branch length. In addition, the arbors perform well at generating the cheapest topology interconnecting their terminals: their large-scale layouts are among the best of all such possible connecting patterns, approaching 5% of optimum. This model also applies comparably to arterial and river networks.

  8. Prominences in SDO/EVE spectra: contributions from large solar structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrosse, Nicolas; Hudson, Hugh; Kazachenko, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The EVE instrument on SDO is making accurate measurements of the solar spectral irradiance in the EUV between 30 and 1069 Å, with 1 Å spectral resolution and 10 s sampling rate. These data define solar variability in the ``Sun-as-a-star'' mode and reveal many interesting kinds of variation. Its high sensitivity also makes it suitable for spectroscopic diagnostics of solar features such as flares. Here we present EVE's potential contribution to the diagnostics of large-scale, slowly evolving features such as prominences and active regions, and what we can learn from this.

  9. Voids in the Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ad, Hagai; Piran, Tsvi

    1997-12-01

    Voids are the most prominent feature of the large-scale structure of the universe. Still, their incorporation into quantitative analysis of it has been relatively recent, owing essentially to the lack of an objective tool to identify the voids and to quantify them. To overcome this, we present here the VOID FINDER algorithm, a novel tool for objectively quantifying voids in the galaxy distribution. The algorithm first classifies galaxies as either wall galaxies or field galaxies. Then, it identifies voids in the wall-galaxy distribution. Voids are defined as continuous volumes that do not contain any wall galaxies. The voids must be thicker than an adjustable limit, which is refined in successive iterations. In this way, we identify the same regions that would be recognized as voids by the eye. Small breaches in the walls are ignored, avoiding artificial connections between neighboring voids. We test the algorithm using Voronoi tesselations. By appropriate scaling of the parameters with the selection function, we apply it to two redshift surveys, the dense SSRS2 and the full-sky IRAS 1.2 Jy. Both surveys show similar properties: ~50% of the volume is filled by voids. The voids have a scale of at least 40 h-1 Mpc and an average -0.9 underdensity. Faint galaxies do not fill the voids, but they do populate them more than bright ones. These results suggest that both optically and IRAS-selected galaxies delineate the same large-scale structure. Comparison with the recovered mass distribution further suggests that the observed voids in the galaxy distribution correspond well to underdense regions in the mass distribution. This confirms the gravitational origin of the voids.

  10. Large scale phononic metamaterials for seismic isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, N.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we numerically examine structures that could be characterized as large scale phononic metamaterials. These novel structures could have band gaps in the frequency spectrum of seismic waves when their dimensions are chosen appropriately, thus raising the belief that they could be serious candidates for seismic isolation structures. Different and easy to fabricate structures were examined made from construction materials such as concrete and steel. The well-known finite difference time domain method is used in our calculations in order to calculate the band structures of the proposed metamaterials.

  11. Large-scale planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidnyk, Serge; Zhang, Hua; Pearson, Matt; Balakrishnan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging advanced wafer processing and flip-chip bonding techniques, we have succeeded in hybrid integrating a myriad of active optical components, including photodetectors and laser diodes, with our planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. We have combined hybrid integration of active components with monolithic integration of other critical functions, such as diffraction gratings, on-chip mirrors, mode-converters, and thermo-optic elements. Further process development has led to the integration of polarization controlling functionality. Most recently, all these technological advancements have been combined to create large-scale planar lightwave circuits that comprise hundreds of optical elements integrated on chips less than a square inch in size.

  12. Colloquium: Large scale simulations on GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Bisson, Mauro; Fatica, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    Graphics processing units (GPU) are currently used as a cost-effective platform for computer simulations and big-data processing. Large scale applications require that multiple GPUs work together but the efficiency obtained with cluster of GPUs is, at times, sub-optimal because the GPU features are not exploited at their best. We describe how it is possible to achieve an excellent efficiency for applications in statistical mechanics, particle dynamics and networks analysis by using suitable memory access patterns and mechanisms like CUDA streams, profiling tools, etc. Similar concepts and techniques may be applied also to other problems like the solution of Partial Differential Equations.

  13. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  14. Large-scale Heterogeneous Network Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-31

    Data for Multi-Player Influence Maximization on Social Networks.” KDD 2012 (Demo).  Po-Tzu Chang , Yen-Chieh Huang, Cheng-Lun Yang, Shou-De Lin, Pu...Jen Cheng. “Learning-Based Time-Sensitive Re-Ranking for Web Search.” SIGIR 2012 (poster)  Hung -Che Lai, Cheng-Te Li, Yi-Chen Lo, and Shou-De Lin...Exploiting and Evaluating MapReduce for Large-Scale Graph Mining.” ASONAM 2012 (Full, 16% acceptance ratio).  Hsun-Ping Hsieh , Cheng-Te Li, and Shou

  15. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-01-01

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects. PMID:9611248

  16. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  17. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-06-15

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects.

  18. Large-scale ATLAS production on EGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinal, X.; Campana, S.; Walker, R.

    2008-07-01

    In preparation for first data at the LHC, a series of Data Challenges, of increasing scale and complexity, have been performed. Large quantities of simulated data have been produced on three different Grids, integrated into the ATLAS production system. During 2006, the emphasis moved towards providing stable continuous production, as is required in the immediate run-up to first data, and thereafter. Here, we discuss the experience of the production done on EGEE resources, using submission based on the gLite WMS, CondorG and a system using Condor Glide-ins. The overall wall time efficiency of around 90% is largely independent of the submission method, and the dominant source of wasted cpu comes from data handling issues. The efficiency of grid job submission is significantly worse than this, and the glide-in method benefits greatly from factorising this out.

  19. Large scale study of tooth enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Martin, M.Th.

    1981-04-01

    Human tooth enamel contains traces of foreign elements. The presence of these elements is related to the history and the environment of the human body and can be considered as the signature of perturbations which occur during the growth of a tooth. A map of the distribution of these traces on a large scale sample of the population will constitute a reference for further investigations of environmental effects. One hundred eighty samples of teeth were first analysed using PIXE, backscattering and nuclear reaction techniques. The results were analysed using statistical methods. Correlations between O, F, Na, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sr were observed and cluster analysis was in progress. The techniques described in the present work have been developed in order to establish a method for the exploration of very large samples of the Belgian population.

  20. Large-scale impact cratering on the terrestrial planets

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, R.A.F.

    1982-01-01

    The crater densities on the earth and moon form the basis for a standard flux-time curve that can be used in dating unsampled planetary surfaces and constraining the temporal history of endogenic geologic processes. Abundant evidence is seen not only that impact cratering was an important surface process in planetary history but also that large imapact events produced effects that were crucial in scale. By way of example, it is noted that the formation of multiring basins on the early moon was as important in defining the planetary tectonic framework as plate tectonics is on the earth. Evidence from several planets suggests that the effects of very-large-scale impacts go beyond the simple formation of an impact structure and serve to localize increased endogenic activity over an extended period of geologic time. Even though no longer occurring with the frequency and magnitude of early solar system history, it is noted that large scale impact events continue to affect the local geology of the planets. 92 references.

  1. Investigation of Coronal Large Scale Structures Utilizing Spartan 201 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    1998-01-01

    Two telescopes aboard Spartan 201, a small satellite has been launched from the Space Shuttles, on April 8th, 1993, September 8th, 1994, September 7th, 1995 and November 20th, 1997. The main objective of the mission was to answer some of the most fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics-What accelerates the solar wind and what heats the corona? The two telescopes are 1) Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory which uses ultraviolet emissions from neutral hydrogen and ions in the corona to determine velocities of the coronal plasma within the solar wind source region, and the temperature and density distributions of protons and 2) White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center which measures visible light to determine the density distribution of coronal electrons within the same region. The PI has had the primary responsibility in the development and application of computer codes necessary for scientific data analysis activities, end instrument calibration for the white-light coronagraph for the entire Spartan mission. The PI was responsible for the science output from the WLC instrument. PI has also been involved in the investigation of coronal density distributions in large-scale structures by use of numerical models which are (mathematically) sufficient to reproduce the details of the observed brightness and polarized brightness distributions found in SPARTAN 201 data.

  2. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  3. Scaling and Criticality in Large-Scale Neuronal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkenkaer-Hansen, K.

    The human brain during wakeful rest spontaneously generates large-scale neuronal network oscillations at around 10 and 20 Hz that can be measured non-invasively using magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). In this chapter, spontaneous oscillations are viewed as the outcome of a self-organizing stochastic process. The aim is to introduce the general prerequisites for stochastic systems to evolve to the critical state and to explain their neurophysiological equivalents. I review the recent evidence that the theory of self-organized criticality (SOC) may provide a unifying explanation for the large variability in amplitude, duration, and recurrence of spontaneous network oscillations, as well as the high susceptibility to perturbations and the long-range power-law temporal correlations in their amplitude envelope.

  4. Internationalization Measures in Large Scale Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soeding, Emanuel; Smith, Nancy

    2017-04-01

    Internationalization measures in Large Scale Research Projects Large scale research projects (LSRP) often serve as flagships used by universities or research institutions to demonstrate their performance and capability to stakeholders and other interested parties. As the global competition among universities for the recruitment of the brightest brains has increased, effective internationalization measures have become hot topics for universities and LSRP alike. Nevertheless, most projects and universities are challenged with little experience on how to conduct these measures and make internationalization an cost efficient and useful activity. Furthermore, those undertakings permanently have to be justified with the Project PIs as important, valuable tools to improve the capacity of the project and the research location. There are a variety of measures, suited to support universities in international recruitment. These include e.g. institutional partnerships, research marketing, a welcome culture, support for science mobility and an effective alumni strategy. These activities, although often conducted by different university entities, are interlocked and can be very powerful measures if interfaced in an effective way. On this poster we display a number of internationalization measures for various target groups, identify interfaces between project management, university administration, researchers and international partners to work together, exchange information and improve processes in order to be able to recruit, support and keep the brightest heads to your project.

  5. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  6. Large-scale Intelligent Transporation Systems simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Canfield, T.; Hannebutte, U.; Levine, D.; Tentner, A.

    1995-06-01

    A prototype computer system has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) capable of running on massively parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems. The prototype includes the modelling of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of our design is that vehicles will be represented by autonomus computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  7. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  8. Territorial Polymers and Large Scale Genome Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosberg, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Chromatin fiber in interphase nucleus represents effectively a very long polymer packed in a restricted volume. Although polymer models of chromatin organization were considered, most of them disregard the fact that DNA has to stay not too entangled in order to function properly. One polymer model with no entanglements is the melt of unknotted unconcatenated rings. Extensive simulations indicate that rings in the melt at large length (monomer numbers) N approach the compact state, with gyration radius scaling as N^1/3, suggesting every ring being compact and segregated from the surrounding rings. The segregation is consistent with the known phenomenon of chromosome territories. Surface exponent β (describing the number of contacts between neighboring rings scaling as N^β) appears only slightly below unity, β 0.95. This suggests that the loop factor (probability to meet for two monomers linear distance s apart) should decay as s^-γ, where γ= 2 - β is slightly above one. The later result is consistent with HiC data on real human interphase chromosomes, and does not contradict to the older FISH data. The dynamics of rings in the melt indicates that the motion of one ring remains subdiffusive on the time scale well above the stress relaxation time.

  9. How does geographic scale alter the utilization of wind and solar power in the USA?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    A significant obstacle to the widespread use of wind and solar energy is the high variability. While this obstacle is significant for a small area, because of the possibility of low wind and solar energy production for a significant period every year, over larger areas renewable energy production can make use of the fact that there will always be wind or solar energy available somewhere in the domain. A key scientific question is how large does an area have to be such that wind and solar can supply significant electricity production without large shortages? Results will be presented from a study that exams whether the continental US has enough areal scale such that the weather can drive large-scale wind and solar deployment? The study uses assimilated hourly weather data for 2006-8 and hourly electric load projected from 2006-8 to 2030. An optimization model developed for this study evaluates the cost of the national system when taking into account not only the cost of wind turbines and solar panels but also the costs of building the electricity producing stations, building the transmission lines, allowing for transmission losses and the fuel burned in the dispatch-able generation. While some results from this study are intuitive, others give surprising insights relevant to planning energy systems of the future. We show that wind and solar energy utilization increases with domain size, while the total atmospheric carbon release and total system costs are subsequently reduced. We show that transmission constraints do not significantly alter the utilization of wind and solar deployment, however, transmission dramatically affect the areal locations of the wind and solar generation plants. A similar scaling for global land and adjacent coastal areas, with no transmission constraints, shows that wind and solar energy systems are most effective on large geographic areas. The optimization model will be explained in greater detail and key results will be shared.

  10. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-08-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  11. Improving Recent Large-Scale Pulsar Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rogerio Fernando; Ransom, S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsars are unique in that they act as celestial laboratories for precise tests of gravity and other extreme physics (Kramer 2004). There are approximately 2000 known pulsars today, which is less than ten percent of pulsars in the Milky Way according to theoretical models (Lorimer 2004). Out of these 2000 known pulsars, approximately ten percent are known millisecond pulsars, objects used for their period stability for detailed physics tests and searches for gravitational radiation (Lorimer 2008). As the field and instrumentation progress, pulsar astronomers attempt to overcome observational biases and detect new pulsars, consequently discovering new millisecond pulsars. We attempt to improve large scale pulsar surveys by examining three recent pulsar surveys. The first, the Green Bank Telescope 350MHz Drift Scan, a low frequency isotropic survey of the northern sky, has yielded a large number of candidates that were visually inspected and identified, resulting in over 34.000 thousands candidates viewed, dozens of detections of known pulsars, and the discovery of a new low-flux pulsar, PSRJ1911+22. The second, the PALFA survey, is a high frequency survey of the galactic plane with the Arecibo telescope. We created a processing pipeline for the PALFA survey at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville- VA, in addition to making needed modifications upon advice from the PALFA consortium. The third survey examined is a new GBT 820MHz survey devoted to find new millisecond pulsars by observing the target-rich environment of unidentified sources in the FERMI LAT catalogue. By approaching these three pulsar surveys at different stages, we seek to improve the success rates of large scale surveys, and hence the possibility for ground-breaking work in both basic physics and astrophysics.

  12. NEA Scout Solar Sail: Half-scale Fold Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In this time lapse, the Near-Earth Asteroid Scout (NEA Scout) CubeSat team rolls a half-scale prototype of the small satellite's solar sail in preparation for a deployment test. During its mission,...

  13. Support for solar energy: Examining sense of place and utility-scale development in California

    SciTech Connect

    Juliet E. Carlisle; Stephanie L. Kane; David Solan; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2015-07-01

    As solar costs have declined PV systems have experienced considerable growth since 2003, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S. Thus, a more nuanced understanding of a particular public's attitudes toward utility-scale solar development, as it arrives in a market and region, is warranted and will likely be instructive for other areas in the world where this type of development will occur in the near future. Using data collected from a 2013 telephone survey (N = 594) from the six Southern Californian counties selected based on existing and proposed solar developments and available suitable land, we examine public attitudes toward solar energy and construction of large-scale solar facilities, testing whether attitudes toward such developments are the result of sense of place and attachment to place. Overall, we have mixed results. Place attachment and sense of place fail to produce significant effects except in terms of perceived positive benefits. That is, respondents interpret the change resulting from large-scale solar development in a positive way insofar as perceived positive economic impacts are positively related to support for nearby large-scale construction.

  14. Support for solar energy: Examining sense of place and utility-scale development in California

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, Juliet E.; Kane, Stephanie L.; Solan, David; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2014-08-20

    As solar costs have declined PV systems have experienced considerable growth since 2003, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S. Thus, a more nuanced understanding of a particular public's attitudes toward utility-scale solar development, as it arrives in a market and region, is warranted and will likely be instructive for other areas in the world where this type of development will occur in the near future. Using data collected from a 2013 telephone survey (N=594) from the six Southern Californian counties selected based on existing and proposed solar developments and available suitable land, we examine public attitudes toward solar energy and construction of large-scale solar facilities, testing whether attitudes toward such developments are the result of sense of place and attachment to place. Overall, we have mixed results. Place attachment and sense of place fail to produce significant effects except in terms of perceived positive benefits. That is, respondents interpret the change resulting from large-scale solar development in a positive way insofar as perceived positive economic impacts are positively related to support for nearby large-scale construction.

  15. On Electron-Scale Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narita, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.; Giles, B.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, the dispersion relation for turbulence magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is determined directly on small scales of the order of the electron inertial length, using four-point magnetometer observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. The data are analyzed using the high-resolution adaptive wave telescope technique. Small-scale solar wind turbulence is primarily composed of highly obliquely propagating waves, with dispersion consistent with that of the whistler mode.

  16. On Electron-Scale Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narita, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.; Giles, B.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, the dispersion relation for turbulence magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is determined directly on small scales of the order of the electron inertial length, using four-point magnetometer observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. The data are analyzed using the high-resolution adaptive wave telescope technique. Small-scale solar wind turbulence is primarily composed of highly obliquely propagating waves, with dispersion consistent with that of the whistler mode.

  17. Utility-Scale Solar 2013: An empirical analysis of project cost, performance, and pricing trends in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Weaver, Samantha

    2014-09-17

    Other than the SEGS I-IX parabolic trough projects built in the 1980s, virtually no large-scale or "utility-scale" solar projects-defined here to include any ground-mounted photovoltaic ("PV"), concentrating photovoltaic ("CPV"), or concentrating solar power ("CSP" or solar thermal) project larger than 5 MWAC-existed in the United States prior to 2007.

  18. Large DHW solar systems with distributed storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Prapas, D.E.; Veliannis, I.; Evangelopoulos, A.; Sotiropoulos, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    The thermal behaviour of a central DHW solar system, the design of which is based on a new Central Collection-Separate Storing (CCSS) approach, has been investigated theoretically. The common practice for large DHW solar systems, of employing a central storage and delivery facility, has been shown in the past to exhibit a rather poor performance and considerable heat losses. This is due to the extensive lengths of pipework required for both the transfer of solar energy and the delivery of hot water. The CCSS solar system presented can overcome the above problems by employing separate storage tanks for each family, thus being best suited for multistory buildings. The simulation analysis has revealed a number of interesting features for the system performance: (i) the collected energy is distributed to all users in a fair manner, irrespective of their distance from the collector field and the daily hot water consumption profiles; (ii) an energy saving behaviour is most likely to evolve by most users, since the auxiliary energy consumptions are charged individually (unlike in large DHW solar systems with central water storage and delivery); and (iii) high values of solar fractions, comparable with those attained by thermosiphon systems, have been derived. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Efficient, large scale separation of coal macerals

    SciTech Connect

    Dyrkacz, G.R.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors believe that the separation of macerals by continuous flow centrifugation offers a simple technique for the large scale separation of macerals. With relatively little cost (/approximately/ $10K), it provides an opportunity for obtaining quite pure maceral fractions. Although they have not completely worked out all the nuances of this separation system, they believe that the problems they have indicated can be minimized to pose only minor inconvenience. It cannot be said that this system completely bypasses the disagreeable tedium or time involved in separating macerals, nor will it by itself overcome the mental inertia required to make maceral separation an accepted necessary fact in fundamental coal science. However, they find their particular brand of continuous flow centrifugation is considerably faster than sink/float separation, can provide a good quality product with even one separation cycle, and permits the handling of more material than a conventional sink/float centrifuge separation.

  20. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  1. Engineering management of large scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Serita; Gill, Tepper L.; Paul, Arthur S.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of high technology and engineering problem solving, has given rise to an emerging concept. Reasoning principles for integrating traditional engineering problem solving with system theory, management sciences, behavioral decision theory, and planning and design approaches can be incorporated into a methodological approach to solving problems with a long range perspective. Long range planning has a great potential to improve productivity by using a systematic and organized approach. Thus, efficiency and cost effectiveness are the driving forces in promoting the organization of engineering problems. Aspects of systems engineering that provide an understanding of management of large scale systems are broadly covered here. Due to the focus and application of research, other significant factors (e.g., human behavior, decision making, etc.) are not emphasized but are considered.

  2. Large scale cryogenic fluid systems testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Cryogenic Fluid Systems Branch (CFSB) within the Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) has the ultimate goal of enabling the long term storage and in-space fueling/resupply operations for spacecraft and reusable vehicles in support of space exploration. Using analytical modeling, ground based testing, and on-orbit experimentation, the CFSB is studying three primary categories of fluid technology: storage, supply, and transfer. The CFSB is also investigating fluid handling, advanced instrumentation, and tank structures and materials. Ground based testing of large-scale systems is done using liquid hydrogen as a test fluid at the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Facility (K-site) at Lewis' Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. A general overview of tests involving liquid transfer, thermal control, pressure control, and pressurization is given.

  3. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05

  4. Large-scale parametric survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sushil; Madigan, David; Cheng, Jerry Q; Burd, Randall S

    2013-10-15

    Survival analysis has been a topic of active statistical research in the past few decades with applications spread across several areas. Traditional applications usually consider data with only a small numbers of predictors with a few hundreds or thousands of observations. Recent advances in data acquisition techniques and computation power have led to considerable interest in analyzing very-high-dimensional data where the number of predictor variables and the number of observations range between 10(4) and 10(6). In this paper, we present a tool for performing large-scale regularized parametric survival analysis using a variant of the cyclic coordinate descent method. Through our experiments on two real data sets, we show that application of regularized models to high-dimensional data avoids overfitting and can provide improved predictive performance and calibration over corresponding low-dimensional models.

  5. Large-Scale Parametric Survival Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sushil; Madigan, David; Cheng, Jerry; Burd, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Survival analysis has been a topic of active statistical research in the past few decades with applications spread across several areas. Traditional applications usually consider data with only small numbers of predictors with a few hundreds or thousands of observations. Recent advances in data acquisition techniques and computation power has led to considerable interest in analyzing very high-dimensional data where the number of predictor variables and the number of observations range between 104 – 106. In this paper, we present a tool for performing large-scale regularized parametric survival analysis using a variant of cyclic coordinate descent method. Through our experiments on two real data sets, we show that application of regularized models to high-dimensional data avoids overfitting and can provide improved predictive performance and calibration over corresponding low-dimensional models. PMID:23625862

  6. The challenge of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The tasks that I have assumed for myself in this presentation include three separate parts. The first, appropriate to the particular setting of this meeting, is to review the basic work of the founding of this field; the appropriateness comes from the fact that W. G. Tifft made immense contributions that are not often realized by the astronomical community. The second task is to outline the general tone of the observational evidence for large scale structures. (Here, in particular, I cannot claim to be complete. I beg forgiveness from any workers who are left out by my oversight for lack of space and time.) The third task is to point out some of the major aspects of the field that may represent the clues by which some brilliant sleuth will ultimately figure out how galaxies formed.

  7. Modeling the Internet's large-scale topology

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Soon-Hyung; Jeong, Hawoong; Barabási, Albert-László

    2002-01-01

    Network generators that capture the Internet's large-scale topology are crucial for the development of efficient routing protocols and modeling Internet traffic. Our ability to design realistic generators is limited by the incomplete understanding of the fundamental driving forces that affect the Internet's evolution. By combining several independent databases capturing the time evolution, topology, and physical layout of the Internet, we identify the universal mechanisms that shape the Internet's router and autonomous system level topology. We find that the physical layout of nodes form a fractal set, determined by population density patterns around the globe. The placement of links is driven by competition between preferential attachment and linear distance dependence, a marked departure from the currently used exponential laws. The universal parameters that we extract significantly restrict the class of potentially correct Internet models and indicate that the networks created by all available topology generators are fundamentally different from the current Internet. PMID:12368484

  8. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  9. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R., LLNL

    1998-02-19

    Business needs have driven the development of commercial database systems since their inception. As a result, there has been a strong focus on supporting many users, minimizing the potential corruption or loss of data, and maximizing performance metrics like transactions per second, or TPC-C and TPC-D results. It turns out that these optimizations have little to do with the needs of the scientific community, and in particular have little impact on improving the management and use of large-scale high-dimensional data. At the same time, there is an unanswered need in the scientific community for many of the benefits offered by a robust DBMS. For example, tying an ad-hoc query language such as SQL together with a visualization toolkit would be a powerful enhancement to current capabilities. Unfortunately, there has been little emphasis or discussion in the VLDB community on this mismatch over the last decade. The goal of the paper is to identify the specific issues that need to be resolved before large-scale scientific applications can make use of DBMS products. This topic is addressed in the context of an evaluation of commercial DBMS technology applied to the exploration of data generated by the Department of Energy`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The paper describes the data being generated for ASCI as well as current capabilities for interacting with and exploring this data. The attraction of applying standard DBMS technology to this domain is discussed, as well as the technical and business issues that currently make this an infeasible solution.

  10. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  11. Large Scale EOF Analysis of Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhat, M.; Gittens, A.; Kashinath, K.; Cavanaugh, N. R.; Mahoney, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a distributed approach towards extracting EOFs from 3D climate data. We implement the method in Apache Spark, and process multi-TB sized datasets on O(1000-10,000) cores. We apply this method to latitude-weighted ocean temperature data from CSFR, a 2.2 terabyte-sized data set comprising ocean and subsurface reanalysis measurements collected at 41 levels in the ocean, at 6 hour intervals over 31 years. We extract the first 100 EOFs of this full data set and compare to the EOFs computed simply on the surface temperature field. Our analyses provide evidence of Kelvin and Rossy waves and components of large-scale modes of oscillation including the ENSO and PDO that are not visible in the usual SST EOFs. Further, they provide information on the the most influential parts of the ocean, such as the thermocline, that exist below the surface. Work is ongoing to understand the factors determining the depth-varying spatial patterns observed in the EOFs. We will experiment with weighting schemes to appropriately account for the differing depths of the observations. We also plan to apply the same distributed approach to analysis of analysis of 3D atmospheric climatic data sets, including multiple variables. Because the atmosphere changes on a quicker time-scale than the ocean, we expect that the results will demonstrate an even greater advantage to computing 3D EOFs in lieu of 2D EOFs.

  12. Implementation of a large solar collector for electric charge generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, Skye; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Hirsch, Michael P.; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper evaluates use of solar flux concentrator systems with photovoltaic cells, it provides analysis on overall economic feasibility based on cost/benefit considerations. Properties evaluated include launch volume/mass, efficiency once in a functioning configuration and service life. Production time will also be discussed considering research on existing technology to expedite integration. Solar energy is primarily harvested via solar panels. With the utilization of a large mirrored dish, solar energy can be concentrated to maximize the efficiency of photovoltaic systems form a cost/benefit standpoint. The design concepts for these systems include fully rigid, tensioned over frame, and inflatable approaches. The efficiency of such systems will be discussed. Pre-existing systems, such as the photovoltaic blanket arrays on the international space station, will be considered. Areas of consideration include cost/output ratio, the efficiency of the array, and the system's service life. Prior work on ridged, tensioned, and inflatable mirrored systems will be presented.

  13. Interconnnect and bonding technologies for large flexible solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Thermocompression bonding and conductive adhesive bonding are developed and evaluated as alternate methods of joining solar cells to their interconnect assemblies. Bonding materials and process controls applicable to fabrication of large, flexible substrate solar cell arrays are studied. The primary potential use of the techniques developed is on the solar array developed by NASA/MSFC and LMSC for solar electric propulsion (SEP) and shuttle payload applications. This array is made up of flexible panels approximately 0.7 by 3.4 meters. It is required to operate in space between 0.3 and 6 AU for 5 years with limited degradation. Materials selected must be capable of enduring this space environment, including outgassing and radiation.

  14. Scaling Laws of Turbulence and Heating of Fast Solar Wind: The Role of Density Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, V.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Bruno, R.

    2009-08-07

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvenic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind.

  15. Scaling laws of turbulence and heating of fast solar wind: the role of density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Carbone, V; Marino, R; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Noullez, A; Bruno, R

    2009-08-07

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvénic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind.

  16. SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE FROM MHD TO SUB-ION SCALES: HIGH-RESOLUTION HYBRID SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Franci, Luca; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone; Matteini, Lorenzo; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-05-10

    We present results from a high-resolution and large-scale hybrid (fluid electrons and particle-in-cell protons) two-dimensional numerical simulation of decaying turbulence. Two distinct spectral regions (separated by a smooth break at proton scales) develop with clear power-law scaling, each one occupying about a decade in wavenumbers. The simulation results simultaneously exhibit several properties of the observed solar wind fluctuations: spectral indices of the magnetic, kinetic, and residual energy spectra in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) inertial range along with a flattening of the electric field spectrum, an increase in magnetic compressibility, and a strong coupling of the cascade with the density and the parallel component of the magnetic fluctuations at sub-proton scales. Our findings support the interpretation that in the solar wind, large-scale MHD fluctuations naturally evolve beyond proton scales into a turbulent regime that is governed by the generalized Ohm’s law.

  17. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  18. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  19. Printable nanostructured silicon solar cells for high-performance, large-area flexible photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Biswas, Roshni; Li, Weigu; Kang, Dongseok; Chan, Lesley; Yoon, Jongseung

    2014-10-28

    Nanostructured forms of crystalline silicon represent an attractive materials building block for photovoltaics due to their potential benefits to significantly reduce the consumption of active materials, relax the requirement of materials purity for high performance, and hence achieve greatly improved levelized cost of energy. Despite successful demonstrations for their concepts over the past decade, however, the practical application of nanostructured silicon solar cells for large-scale implementation has been hampered by many existing challenges associated with the consumption of the entire wafer or expensive source materials, difficulties to precisely control materials properties and doping characteristics, or restrictions on substrate materials and scalability. Here we present a highly integrable materials platform of nanostructured silicon solar cells that can overcome these limitations. Ultrathin silicon solar microcells integrated with engineered photonic nanostructures are fabricated directly from wafer-based source materials in configurations that can lower the materials cost and can be compatible with deterministic assembly procedures to allow programmable, large-scale distribution, unlimited choices of module substrates, as well as lightweight, mechanically compliant constructions. Systematic studies on optical and electrical properties, photovoltaic performance in experiments, as well as numerical modeling elucidate important design rules for nanoscale photon management with ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells and their interconnected, mechanically flexible modules, where we demonstrate 12.4% solar-to-electric energy conversion efficiency for printed ultrathin (∼ 8 μm) nanostructured silicon solar cells when configured with near-optimal designs of rear-surface nanoposts, antireflection coating, and back-surface reflector.

  20. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; hide

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  1. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  2. Large-angular-scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1981-03-01

    Results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3-K cosmic background radiation are reported. A dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz flown aboard a U-2 aircraft to 20-km altitude on 11 flights between December 1976 and May 1978 measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the Northern Hemisphere. Measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fitted by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 3.6 + or - 0.5 mK, corresponding to a velocity of 360 + or - 50 km/s toward the direction 11.2 + or - 0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 deg + or - 8 deg declination.

  3. The large scale dust distribution in the inner galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, M. G.; Dwek, E.; Gezari, D.; Silverberg, R.; Kelsall, T.; Stier, M.; Cheung, L.

    1983-01-01

    Initial results are presented from a new large-scale survey of the first quadrant of the galactic plane at wavelengths of 160, 260, and 300 microns. The submillimeter wavelength emission, interpreted as thermal radiation by dust grains, reveals an optically thin disk of angular width about 0.09 deg (FWHM) with a mean dust temperature of 23 K and significant variation of the dust mass column density. Comparison of the dust column density with the gas column density inferred from CO survey data shows a striking spatial correlation. The mean luminosity per hydrogen atom is found to be 2.5 x 10 to the -30th W/H, implying a radiant energy density in the vicinity of the dust an order of magnitude larger than in the solar neighborhood. The data favor dust in molecular clouds as the dominant submillimeter radiation source.

  4. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce large-area (5.9 x 5.9 cm) space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/watt is descibed. Five cell types under investigation include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm-cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover-glass simultaneously is being developed. A description of cell developments by Applied Solar Energy Corp., Spectrolab and Spire is included. Results are given for cell and array tests, performed by Lockheed, TRW and NASA. Future large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  5. Environmental impacts of utility-scale solar energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez, R.R.; Easter, S.B.; Murphy-Mariscal, M. L.; Maestre, F.T.; Tavassoli, M.; Allen, E.B.; Barrows, C.W.; Belnap, J.; Ochoa-Hueso, R.; Ravi, S.; Allen, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Renewable energy is a promising alternative to fossil fuel-based energy, but its development can require a complex set of environmental tradeoffs. A recent increase in solar energy systems, especially large, centralized installations, underscores the urgency of understanding their environmental interactions. Synthesizing literature across numerous disciplines, we review direct and indirect environmental impacts – both beneficial and adverse – of utility-scale solar energy (USSE) development, including impacts on biodiversity, land-use and land-cover change, soils, water resources, and human health. Additionally, we review feedbacks between USSE infrastructure and land-atmosphere interactions and the potential for USSE systems to mitigate climate change. Several characteristics and development strategies of USSE systems have low environmental impacts relative to other energy systems, including other renewables. We show opportunities to increase USSE environmental co-benefits, the permitting and regulatory constraints and opportunities of USSE, and highlight future research directions to better understand the nexus between USSE and the environment. Increasing the environmental compatibility of USSE systems will maximize the efficacy of this key renewable energy source in mitigating climatic and global environmental change.

  6. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Synthesis Approaches Towards Large-Scale Industrial Production for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Michael Z.; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  7. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Synthesis Approaches Towards Large-Scale Industrial Production for Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Michael Z; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  8. Semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dot synthesis approaches towards large-scale industrial production for energy applications

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Michael Z.; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-04

    This study reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  9. Large area, low cost solar cell development and production readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, D.

    1982-01-01

    A process sequence for a large area ( or = 25 sq. cm) silicon solar cell was investigated. Generic cell choice was guided by the expected electron fluence, by the packing factors of various cell envelope designs onto each panel to provide needed voltage as well as current, by the weight constraints on the system, and by the cost goals of the contract.

  10. Large scale simulations of Brownian suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viera, Marc Nathaniel

    Particle suspensions occur in a wide variety of natural and engineering materials. Some examples are colloids, polymers, paints, and slurries. These materials exhibit complex behavior owing to the forces which act among the particles and are transmitted through the fluid medium. Depending on the application, particle sizes range from large macroscopic molecules of 100mum to smaller colloidal particles in the range of 10nm to 1mum. Particles of this size interact though interparticle forces such as electrostatic and van der Waals, as well as hydrodynamic forces transmitted through the fluid medium. Additionally, the particles are subjected to random thermal fluctuations in the fluid giving rise to Brownian motion. The central objective of our research is to develop efficient numerical algorithms for the large scale dynamic simulation of particle suspensions. While previous methods have incurred a computational cost of O(N3), where N is the number of particles, we have developed a novel algorithm capable of solving this problem in O(N ln N) operations. This has allowed us to perform dynamic simulations with up to 64,000 particles and Monte Carlo realizations of up to 1 million particles. Our algorithm follows a Stokesian dynamics formulation by evaluating many-body hydrodynamic interactions using a far-field multipole expansion combined with a near-field lubrication correction. The breakthrough O(N ln N) scaling is obtained by employing a Particle-Mesh-Ewald (PME) approach whereby near-field interactions are evaluated directly and far-field interactions are evaluated using a grid based velocity computed with FFT's. This approach is readily extended to include the effects of Brownian motion. For interacting particles, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem requires that the individual Brownian forces satisfy a correlation based on the N body resistance tensor R. The accurate modeling of these forces requires the computation of a matrix square root R 1/2 for matrices up

  11. Formation and evolution of small-scale solar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. A.

    2008-06-01

    In this thesis I investigate the formation and evolution of small-scale magnetic fields on the surface of the Sun. I observe the magnetic field in quiet sun regions in an effort to further understand the baseline magnetic field that exists throughout the photosphere at all phases of the solar cycle. An automated feature tracking algorithm that I helped develop allows me to systematically analyze datasets containing over 10 5 evolving magnetic features. In 1.2"-resolution Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetograms, I find that 30% of features identified by our algorithm originate without other detectable flux within 2.2 Mm. These features having an apparent unipolar origin account for 94% of the flux newly detected by the algorithm. I infer from their ensemble average that these features are actually previously existing flux, coalesced by surface flows into concentrations large and strong enough to detect. Flux coalescence is at least as important as bipolar ephemeral region emergence for introducing detectable flux into the photosphere, underscoring the importance of small-scale fields to the overall photospheric flux budget. Using 0.3"-resolution magnetograms from the Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) on the recently-launched Hinode spacecraft, I confirm that apparent unipolar emergence seen with MDI is indeed flux coalescence. I then demonstrate that apparent unipolar emergence seen in NFI magnetograms also corresponds to coalescence of previously existing weak field. The uncoalesced flux, detectable only in the ensemble average of hundreds of these events, accounts for 30-50% of the total flux within 3 Mm of the detected features. Finally, I study small-scale fields around intermediate-scale supergranular network concentrations. This is motivated by simulations and observations showing suppression of flux production by background magnetic fields at small and large scales. Within 12 Mm of the network concentrations, I find no evidence that the concentrations

  12. Population generation for large-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Andrew C.; King, Gary; Morrison, Clayton; Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Computer simulation is used to research phenomena ranging from the structure of the space-time continuum to population genetics and future combat.1-3 Multi-agent simulations in particular are now commonplace in many fields.4, 5 By modeling populations whose complex behavior emerges from individual interactions, these simulations help to answer questions about effects where closed form solutions are difficult to solve or impossible to derive.6 To be useful, simulations must accurately model the relevant aspects of the underlying domain. In multi-agent simulation, this means that the modeling must include both the agents and their relationships. Typically, each agent can be modeled as a set of attributes drawn from various distributions (e.g., height, morale, intelligence and so forth). Though these can interact - for example, agent height is related to agent weight - they are usually independent. Modeling relations between agents, on the other hand, adds a new layer of complexity, and tools from graph theory and social network analysis are finding increasing application.7, 8 Recognizing the role and proper use of these techniques, however, remains the subject of ongoing research. We recently encountered these complexities while building large scale social simulations.9-11 One of these, the Hats Simulator, is designed to be a lightweight proxy for intelligence analysis problems. Hats models a "society in a box" consisting of many simple agents, called hats. Hats gets its name from the classic spaghetti western, in which the heroes and villains are known by the color of the hats they wear. The Hats society also has its heroes and villains, but the challenge is to identify which color hat they should be wearing based on how they behave. There are three types of hats: benign hats, known terrorists, and covert terrorists. Covert terrorists look just like benign hats but act like terrorists. Population structure can make covert hat identification significantly more

  13. What is the horizontal scale of the 5-min oscillations. [in solar photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Solar oscillations with periods near 5 min were discovered in the photosphere by Leighton et al. (1962) on Doppler photographs which showed the sun to be covered with small velocity cells a few thousand km in diameter. If wrong, all the early reports of a small horizontal scale (about 2000 km) for the 5-min oscillations may be due to unfortunate similarities between the velocity and overturning time of the solar granule convection and the corresponding velocity and period typical of the oscillations. A large horizontal scale (about 30,000 km) for the oscillations seems consistent with the old data and almost required by more recent measurements. The large scales recently measured would imply that a sizable fraction of the solar volume is involved in the oscillation and would cast some doubt on all the old theories of the 5-min oscillations which were based on plane parallel atmospheres.

  14. Extended Scaling Factors for Estimating Solar UV Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLand, M. T.; Tiruchirapalli, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate characterization of solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance variations is important for understanding solar behavior and for proper forcing of terrestrial atmospheric models. Determining long-term irradiance variations from satellite measurements is challenging because of the complex effects of instrument response changes and the limited lifetime of any single instrument. An alternative method of tracking long-term solar UV variations is to observe a proxy index of UV activity, and parameterize its variations to represent spectral irradiance changes. Examples of this approach using the Mg II core-to-wing ratio solar activity proxy and solar rotational irradiance variations have been developed for mid-UV wavelengths (170-300 nm) using Nimbus-7 SBUV, NOAA-9 SBUV/2, and NOAA-11 SBUV/2 irradiance data, and for far-UV wavelengths (120-180 nm) using UARS SOLSTICE irradiance data. Each of these results gives predicted long-term irradiance changes in good agreement with independent observations. However, current scaling factors are only based on data from a portion of a single solar cycle. If the scaling between proxy index variations and solar UV irradiance changes with solar cycle phase or overall activity, then the usefulness of these approaches is reduced. Numerous additional data sets (UARS SUSIM; NOAA-16, NOAA-17, NOAA-18 SBUV/2; SORCE SOLSTICE, SORCE SIM) are now available to supplement the original scaling factor studies. These measurements cover all activity phases for multiple solar cycles, and the overlapping data sets provide many opportunities for validation. We will present comparisons of these new scale factor values with previous results.

  15. Ion kinetic scale in the solar wind observed.

    PubMed

    Śafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk; Přech, Lubomír; Zastenker, Georgy N

    2013-01-11

    This Letter shows the first results from the solar wind monitor onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft which measures plasma moments with a time resolution of 31 ms. This high-time resolution allows us to make direct observations of solar wind turbulence below ion kinetic length scales. We present examples of the frequency spectra of the density, velocity, and thermal velocity. Our study reveals that although these parameters exhibit the same behavior at the magnetohydrodynamic scale, their spectra are remarkably different at the kinetic scale.

  16. Solar small-scale dynamo and polarity of sunspot groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, D.; Khlystova, A.; Abramenko, V.

    2015-08-01

    In order to clarify a possible role of small-scale dynamo in formation of solar magnetic field, we suggest an observational test for small-scale dynamo action based on statistics of anti-Hale sunspot groups. As we have shown, according to theoretical expectations the small-scale dynamo action has to provide a population of sunspot groups which do not follow the Hale polarity law, and the density of such groups on the time-latitude diagram is expected to be independent on the phase of the solar cycle. Correspondingly, a percentage of the anti-Hale groups is expected to reach its maximum values during solar minima. For several solar cycles, we considered statistics of anti-Hale groups obtained by several scientific teams, including ours, to find that the percentage of anti-Hale groups becomes indeed maximal during a solar minimum. Our interpretation is that this fact may be explained by the small-scale dynamo action inside the solar convective zone.

  17. Scale Height variations with solar cycle in the ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Lester, Mark; Witasse, Olivier; Milan, Stephen E.; Hall, Benjamin E. S.; Cartacci, Marco; Radicella, Sandro M.; Blelly, Pierre-Louis

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on board the Mars Express spacecraft has been probing the topside of the ionosphere of Mars since June 2005, covering currently almost one solar cycle. A good knowledge of the behaviour of the ionospheric variability for a whole solar period is essential since the ionosphere is strongly dependent on solar activity. Using part of this dataset, covering the years 2005 - 2012, differences in the shape of the topside electron density profiles have been observed. These variations seem to be linked to changes in the ionospheric temperature due to the solar cycle variation. In particular, Mars' ionospheric response to the extreme solar minimum between end-2007 and end-2009 followed a similar pattern to the response observed in the Earth's ionosphere, despite the large differences related to internal origin of the magnetic field between both planets. Plasma parameters such as the scale height as a function of altitude, the main peak characteristics (altitude, density), the total electron content (TEC), the temperatures, and the ionospheric thermal pressures show variations related to the solar cycle. The main changes in the topside ionosphere are detected during the period of very low solar minimum, when ionospheric cooling occurs. The effect on the scale height is analysed in detail. In contrast, a clear increase of the scale height is observed during the high solar activity period due to enhanced ionospheric heating. The scale height variation during the solar cycle has been empirically modelled. The results have been compared with other datasets such as radio-occultation and retarding potential analyser data from old missions, especially in low solar activity periods (e.g. Mariner 4, Viking 1 and 2 landers), as well as with numerical modelling.

  18. Management of large-scale multimedia conferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cidon, Israel; Nachum, Youval

    1998-12-01

    The goal of this work is to explore management strategies and algorithms for large-scale multimedia conferencing over a communication network. Since the use of multimedia conferencing is still limited, the management of such systems has not yet been studied in depth. A well organized and human friendly multimedia conference management should utilize efficiently and fairly its limited resources as well as take into account the requirements of the conference participants. The ability of the management to enforce fair policies and to quickly take into account the participants preferences may even lead to a conference environment that is more pleasant and more effective than a similar face to face meeting. We suggest several principles for defining and solving resource sharing problems in this context. The conference resources which are addressed in this paper are the bandwidth (conference network capacity), time (participants' scheduling) and limitations of audio and visual equipment. The participants' requirements for these resources are defined and translated in terms of Quality of Service requirements and the fairness criteria.

  19. Large-scale tides in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Hiu Yan; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-02-01

    Density perturbations in cosmology, i.e. spherically symmetric adiabatic perturbations of a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime, are locally exactly equivalent to a different FLRW solution, as long as their wavelength is much larger than the sound horizon of all fluid components. This fact is known as the "separate universe" paradigm. However, no such relation is known for anisotropic adiabatic perturbations, which correspond to an FLRW spacetime with large-scale tidal fields. Here, we provide a closed, fully relativistic set of evolutionary equations for the nonlinear evolution of such modes, based on the conformal Fermi (CFC) frame. We show explicitly that the tidal effects are encoded by the Weyl tensor, and are hence entirely different from an anisotropic Bianchi I spacetime, where the anisotropy is sourced by the Ricci tensor. In order to close the system, certain higher derivative terms have to be dropped. We show that this approximation is equivalent to the local tidal approximation of Hui and Bertschinger [1]. We also show that this very simple set of equations matches the exact evolution of the density field at second order, but fails at third and higher order. This provides a useful, easy-to-use framework for computing the fully relativistic growth of structure at second order.

  20. Food appropriation through large scale land acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand for agricultural products and the uncertainty of international food markets has recently drawn the attention of governments and agribusiness firms toward investments in productive agricultural land, mostly in the developing world. The targeted countries are typically located in regions that have remained only marginally utilized because of lack of modern technology. It is expected that in the long run large scale land acquisitions (LSLAs) for commercial farming will bring the technology required to close the existing crops yield gaps. While the extent of the acquired land and the associated appropriation of freshwater resources have been investigated in detail, the amount of food this land can produce and the number of people it could feed still need to be quantified. Here we use a unique dataset of land deals to provide a global quantitative assessment of the rates of crop and food appropriation potentially associated with LSLAs. We show how up to 300-550 million people could be fed by crops grown in the acquired land, should these investments in agriculture improve crop production and close the yield gap. In contrast, about 190-370 million people could be supported by this land without closing of the yield gap. These numbers raise some concern because the food produced in the acquired land is typically exported to other regions, while the target countries exhibit high levels of malnourishment. Conversely, if used for domestic consumption, the crops harvested in the acquired land could ensure food security to the local populations.

  1. Large-scale carbon fiber tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A realistic release of carbon fibers was established by burning a minimum of 45 kg of carbon fiber composite aircraft structural components in each of five large scale, outdoor aviation jet fuel fire tests. This release was quantified by several independent assessments with various instruments developed specifically for these tests. The most likely values for the mass of single carbon fibers released ranged from 0.2 percent of the initial mass of carbon fiber for the source tests (zero wind velocity) to a maximum of 0.6 percent of the initial carbon fiber mass for dissemination tests (5 to 6 m/s wind velocity). Mean fiber lengths for fibers greater than 1 mm in length ranged from 2.5 to 3.5 mm. Mean diameters ranged from 3.6 to 5.3 micrometers which was indicative of significant oxidation. Footprints of downwind dissemination of the fire released fibers were measured to 19.1 km from the fire.

  2. Large-scale clustering of cosmic voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwan Chuen; Hamaus, Nico; Desjacques, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    We study the clustering of voids using N -body simulations and simple theoretical models. The excursion-set formalism describes fairly well the abundance of voids identified with the watershed algorithm, although the void formation threshold required is quite different from the spherical collapse value. The void cross bias bc is measured and its large-scale value is found to be consistent with the peak background split results. A simple fitting formula for bc is found. We model the void auto-power spectrum taking into account the void biasing and exclusion effect. A good fit to the simulation data is obtained for voids with radii ≳30 Mpc h-1 , especially when the void biasing model is extended to 1-loop order. However, the best-fit bias parameters do not agree well with the peak-background results. Being able to fit the void auto-power spectrum is particularly important not only because it is the direct observable in galaxy surveys, but also our method enables us to treat the bias parameters as nuisance parameters, which are sensitive to the techniques used to identify voids.

  3. Large-scale autostereoscopic outdoor display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitterer, Jörg; Fidler, Franz; Saint Julien-Wallsee, Ferdinand; Schmid, Gerhard; Gartner, Wolfgang; Leeb, Walter; Schmid, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    State-of-the-art autostereoscopic displays are often limited in size, effective brightness, number of 3D viewing zones, and maximum 3D viewing distances, all of which are mandatory requirements for large-scale outdoor displays. Conventional autostereoscopic indoor concepts like lenticular lenses or parallax barriers cannot simply be adapted for these screens due to the inherent loss of effective resolution and brightness, which would reduce both image quality and sunlight readability. We have developed a modular autostereoscopic multi-view laser display concept with sunlight readable effective brightness, theoretically up to several thousand 3D viewing zones, and maximum 3D viewing distances of up to 60 meters. For proof-of-concept purposes a prototype display with two pixels was realized. Due to various manufacturing tolerances each individual pixel has slightly different optical properties, and hence the 3D image quality of the display has to be calculated stochastically. In this paper we present the corresponding stochastic model, we evaluate the simulation and measurement results of the prototype display, and we calculate the achievable autostereoscopic image quality to be expected for our concept.

  4. Numerical Modeling for Large Scale Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Malvoisin, Benjamin; Mazzini, Adriano; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    Moderate-to-high enthalpy systems are driven by multiphase and multicomponent processes, fluid and rock mechanics, and heat transport processes, all of which present challenges in developing realistic numerical models of the underlying physics. The objective of this work is to present an approach, and some initial results, for modeling and understanding dynamics of the birth of large scale hydrothermal systems. Numerical modeling of such complex systems must take into account a variety of coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes, which is numerically challenging. To provide first estimates of the behavior of this deep complex systems, geological structures must be constrained, and the fluid dynamics, mechanics and the heat transport need to be investigated in three dimensions. Modeling these processes numerically at adequate resolution and reasonable computation times requires a suite of tools that we are developing and/or utilizing to investigate such systems. Our long-term goal is to develop 3D numerical models, based on a geological models, which couples mechanics with the hydraulics and thermal processes driving hydrothermal system. Our first results from the Lusi hydrothermal system in East Java, Indonesia provide a basis for more sophisticated studies, eventually in 3D, and we introduce a workflow necessary to achieve these objectives. Future work focuses with the aim and parallelization suitable for High Performance Computing (HPC). Such developments are necessary to achieve high-resolution simulations to more fully understand the complex dynamics of hydrothermal systems.

  5. Large scale digital atlases in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawrylycz, M.; Feng, D.; Lau, C.; Kuan, C.; Miller, J.; Dang, C.; Ng, L.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging in neuroscience has revolutionized our current understanding of brain structure, architecture and increasingly its function. Many characteristics of morphology, cell type, and neuronal circuitry have been elucidated through methods of neuroimaging. Combining this data in a meaningful, standardized, and accessible manner is the scope and goal of the digital brain atlas. Digital brain atlases are used today in neuroscience to characterize the spatial organization of neuronal structures, for planning and guidance during neurosurgery, and as a reference for interpreting other data modalities such as gene expression and connectivity data. The field of digital atlases is extensive and in addition to atlases of the human includes high quality brain atlases of the mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and other model organisms. Using techniques based on histology, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as gene expression data, modern digital atlases use probabilistic and multimodal techniques, as well as sophisticated visualization software to form an integrated product. Toward this goal, brain atlases form a common coordinate framework for summarizing, accessing, and organizing this knowledge and will undoubtedly remain a key technology in neuroscience in the future. Since the development of its flagship project of a genome wide image-based atlas of the mouse brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has used imaging as a primary data modality for many of its large scale atlas projects. We present an overview of Allen Institute digital atlases in neuroscience, with a focus on the challenges and opportunities for image processing and computation.

  6. Support for solar energy: Examining sense of place and utility-scale development in California

    DOE PAGES

    Carlisle, Juliet E.; Kane, Stephanie L.; Solan, David; ...

    2014-08-20

    As solar costs have declined PV systems have experienced considerable growth since 2003, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S. Thus, a more nuanced understanding of a particular public's attitudes toward utility-scale solar development, as it arrives in a market and region, is warranted and will likely be instructive for other areas in the world where this type of development will occur in the near future. Using data collected from a 2013 telephone survey (N=594) from the six Southern Californian counties selected based on existing and proposed solar developments and available suitable land, we examine public attitudes toward solarmore » energy and construction of large-scale solar facilities, testing whether attitudes toward such developments are the result of sense of place and attachment to place. Overall, we have mixed results. Place attachment and sense of place fail to produce significant effects except in terms of perceived positive benefits. That is, respondents interpret the change resulting from large-scale solar development in a positive way insofar as perceived positive economic impacts are positively related to support for nearby large-scale construction.« less

  7. Intermittency of solar wind on scale 0.01-16 Hz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riazantseva, Maria; Zastenker, Georgy; Chernyshov, Alexander; Petrosyan, Arakel

    Magnetosphere of the Earth is formed in the process of solar wind flow around earth's magnetic field. Solar wind is a flow of turbulent plasma that displays a multifractal structure and an intermittent character. That is why the study of the characteristics of solar wind turbulence is very important part of the solution of the problem of the energy transport from the solar wind to magnetosphere. A large degree of intermittency is observed in the solar wind ion flux and magnetic field time rows. We investigated the intermittency of solar wind fluctuations under large statistics of high time resolution measurements onboard Interball-1 spacecraft on scale from 0.01 to 16 Hz. Especially it is important that these investigation is carry out for the first time for the earlier unexplored (by plasma data) region of comparatively fast variations (frequency up to 16 Hz), so we significantly extend the range of intermittency observations for solar wind plasma. The intermittency practically absent on scale more then 1000 s and it grows to the small scales right up till t 30-60 s. The behavior of the intermittency for the scale less then 30-60 s is rather changeable. The boundary between these two rates of intermittency is quantitatively near to the well-known boundary between the dissipation and inertial scales of fluctuations, what may point to their possible relation. Special attention is given to a comparison of intermittency for solar wind observation intervals containing SCIF (Sudden Changes of Ion Flux) to ones for intervals without SCIF. Such a comparison allows one to reveal the fundamental turbulent properties of the solar wind regions in which SCIF is observed more frequently. We use nearly incompressible model of the solar wind turbulence for obtained data interpretation. The regime when density fluctuations are passive scalar in a hydrodynamic field of velocity is realized in turbulent solar wind flows according to this model. This hypothesis can be verified

  8. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce 5.9 x 5.9 cm space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/W is described. Cell types investigated include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm/cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover glass simultaneously is being developed. Results for cell and array tests are given. Large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  9. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce 5.9 x 5.9 cm space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/W is described. Cell types investigated include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm/cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover glass simultaneously is being developed. Results for cell and array tests are given. Large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  10. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  11. Reconstructions of solar irradiance on centennial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria; Kok Leng, Yeo

    Solar irradiance is the main external source of energy to Earth's climate system. The record of direct measurements covering less than 40 years is too short to study solar influence on Earth's climate, which calls for reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past with the help of appropriate models. An obvious requirement to a competitive model is its ability to reproduce observed irradiance changes, and a successful example of such a model is presented by the SATIRE family of models. As most state-of-the-art models, SATIRE assumes that irradiance changes on time scales longer than approximately a day are caused by the evolving distribution of dark and bright magnetic features on the solar surface. The surface coverage by such features as a function of time is derived from solar observations. The choice of these depends on the time scale in question. Most accurate is the version of the model that employs full-disc spatially-resolved solar magnetograms and reproduces over 90% of the measured irradiance variation, including the overall decreasing trend in the total solar irradiance over the last four cycles. Since such magnetograms are only available for about four decades, reconstructions on time scales of centuries have to rely on disc-integrated proxies of solar magnetic activity, such as sunspot areas and numbers. Employing a surface flux transport model and sunspot observations as input, we have being able to produce synthetic magnetograms since 1700. This improves the temporal resolution of the irradiance reconstructions on centennial time scales. The most critical aspect of such reconstructions remains the uncertainty in the magnitude of the secular change.

  12. Open Principle for Large High-Resolution Solar Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sliepen, Guus

    2009-04-01

    Vacuum solar telescopes solve the problem of image deterioration inside the telescope due to refractive index fluctuations of the air heated by the solar light. However, such telescopes have a practical diameter limit somewhat over 1 m. The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) was the pioneering demonstrator of the open-telescope technology without need of vacuum, now pursued in the German GREGOR. Important ingredients for this technology are primary beam completely open to natural wind flow, stiff but still open design by principal stiff overall geometries in combination with carefully designed joints and completely open-foldable dome constructions based on tensioned strong cloth. Further developments to large sizes are made within the framework of the design study for a European Solar Telescope (EST).

  13. Heat-rejection design for large concentrating solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of heat rejection devices (radiators) on the performance and cost of large concentrating solar arrays for space application. Overall array characteristics are derived from the weight, cost, and performance of four major components; namely primary structure, optics/secondary structure, radiator, and solar panel. An ideal concentrator analysis is used to establish general cost and performance trends independent of specific array design. Both passive and heat-pipe radiation are evaluated, with an incremental cost-of-power approach used in the evaluation. Passive radiators are found to be more cost effective with silicon than with gallium arsenide (GaAs) arrays. Representative concentrating arrays have been evaluated for both near-term and advanced solar cell technology. Minimum cost of power is achieved at geometric concentration ratios in the range 2 to 6.

  14. TURBULENT SMALL-SCALE DYNAMO ACTION IN SOLAR SURFACE SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Jonathan Pietarila; Cameron, Robert; Schuessler, Manfred

    2010-05-10

    We demonstrate that a magneto-convection simulation incorporating essential physical processes governing solar surface convection exhibits turbulent small-scale dynamo action. By presenting a derivation of the energy balance equation and transfer functions for compressible magnetohydrodynamics, we quantify the source of magnetic energy on a scale-by-scale basis. We rule out the two alternative mechanisms for the generation of the small-scale magnetic field in the simulations: the tangling of magnetic field lines associated with the turbulent cascade and Alfvenization of small-scale velocity fluctuations ('turbulent induction'). Instead, we find that the dominant source of small-scale magnetic energy is stretching by inertial-range fluid motions of small-scale magnetic field lines against the magnetic tension force to produce (against Ohmic dissipation) more small-scale magnetic field. The scales involved become smaller with increasing Reynolds number, which identifies the dynamo as a small-scale turbulent dynamo.

  15. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Wilcox, Lucas C.; Hill, Judith C.; Ghattas, Omar; Berggren, Martin Olof; Akcelik, Volkan; Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  16. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  17. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  18. Intermittent structures at ion scales in the turbulent solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Denise; Alexandrova, Olga; Lion, Sonny; Roberts, Owen W.; Maksimovic, Milan; Escoubet, Philippe C.; Zouganelis, Yannis

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the physical mechanisms of dissipation, and the related heating, in turbulent collisionless plasmas (such as the solar wind) represents nowadays one of the key issues of plasma physics. Although the complex behavior of the solar wind has been matter of investigation of many years, some of the primary problems still remain a puzzle for the scientific community. Here, we study coherent structures responsible for solar wind intermittency around ion characteristic scales. We find that, in fast solar wind, intermittency is due to current sheets and Alfvén vortex-like structures. In slow solar wind, we observe as well compressive structures like magnetic solitons, holes and shocks. By using high-time resolution magnetic field data of multi-point measurements of Cluster spacecraft, we characterize the observed coherent structures in terms of topology and propagation speed. We show that all structures, both in fast and slow solar wind, are characterized by a strong wave-vector anisotropy in the perpendicular direction with respect to the local magnetic field and typical scales around ion characteristic scales. Moreover, some of them propagate in the plasma rest frame. Moreover, a further analysis on the ion velocity distribution shows a high variability; in particular, close to coherent structures the proton distribution function appears strongly deformed and far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. We discuss possible interpretation of the observed structures and their role in the heating process of the plasma.

  19. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  20. The School Principal's Role in Large-Scale Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Paul; Tunison, Scott; Viczko, Melody

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an interpretive study in which 25 elementary principals were asked about their assessment knowledge, the use of large-scale assessments in their schools, and principals' perceptions on their roles with respect to large-scale assessments. Principals in this study suggested that the current context of large-scale assessment and…

  1. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  2. Speckle imaging of solar small scale structure. 2: Study of small scale structure in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Luehe, O.

    1994-01-01

    The speckle imaging technique which is described in the first paper of this series (von der Luehe 1993) was used to analyze time series of high angular resolution images of solar small scale structure at a wavelength of 585 nm in active regions with the 76 cm diameter vacuum tower telescope at National Solar Observatory (NSO)/Sac Peak. Two sets of reconstructed images with a field of 4 by 4 arcsec which cover a period of 36 min and 83 min were generated and analyzed. The image reconstructions are supplemented with simultaneous large field photographs taken within a 15 A passband centered on the Ca II K (3933) line. The prime objective of the observing program was the study of the structure and the dynamics of the continuum wavelength counterpart of facular points which appear with high contrast in the Ca pictures, i.e., continuum bright points (CBPs). In addition to CBPs, the reconstructions allow studying other small scale phenomena. Results of the studies are given.

  3. SOLAR WIND MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS TURBULENCE: ANOMALOUS SCALING AND ROLE OF INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, C.; Bale, S. D.; Mangeney, A.; Veltri, P.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we present a study of the scaling properties and intermittency of solar wind MHD turbulence based on the use of wavelet transforms. More specifically, we use the Haar Wavelet transform on simultaneous 3 s resolution particle and magnetic field data from the Wind spacecraft, to investigate anomalous scaling and intermittency effects of both magnetic field and solar wind velocity fluctuations in the inertial range. For this purpose, we calculated spectra, structure functions, and probability distribution functions. We show that this powerful wavelet technique allows for a systematic elimination of intermittency effects on spectra and structure functions and thus for a clear determination of the actual scaling properties in the inertial range. The scaling of the magnetic field and the velocity fluctuations are found to be fundamentally different. Moreover, when the most intermittent structures superposed to the standard fluctuations are removed, simple statistics are recovered. The magnetic field and the velocity fluctuations exhibit a well-defined, although different, monofractal behavior, following a Kolmogorov -5/3 scaling and a Iroshnikov-Kraichnan -3/2 scaling, respectively. The multifractal properties of solar wind turbulence appear to be determined by the presence of those most intermittent structures. Finally, our wavelet technique also allows for a direct and systematic identification of the most active, singular structures responsible for the intermittency in the solar wind.

  4. Solar Observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer, Sven

    2015-08-01

    The interferometric Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has already demonstrated its impressive capabilities by observing a large variety of targets ranging from protoplanetary disks to galactic nuclei. ALMA is also capable of observing the Sun and has been used for five solar test campaigns so far. The technically challenging solar observing modes are currently under development and regular observations are expected to begin in late 2016.ALMA consists of 66 antennas located in the Chilean Andes at an altitude of 5000 m and is a true leap forward in terms of spatial resolution at millimeter wavelengths. The resolution of reconstructed interferometric images of the Sun is anticipated to be close to what current optical solar telescopes can achieve. In combination with the high temporal and spectral resolution, these new capabilities open up new parameter spaces for solar millimeter observations.The solar radiation at wavelengths observed by ALMA originates from the chromosphere, where the height of the sampled layer increases with selected wavelength. The continuum intensity is linearly correlated to the local gas temperature in the probed layer, which makes ALMA essentially a linear thermometer. During flares, ALMA can detect additional non-thermal emission contributions. Measurements of the polarization state facilitate the valuable determination of the chromospheric magnetic field. In addition, spectrally resolved observations of radio recombination and molecular lines may yield great diagnostic potential, which has yet to be investigated and developed.Many different scientific applications for a large range of targets from quiet Sun to active regions and prominences are possible, ranging from ultra-high cadence wave studies to flare observations. ALMA, in particular in combination with other ground-based and space-borne instruments, will certainly lead to fascinating new findings, which will advance our understanding of the atmosphere of our Sun

  5. Solar wind compressible turbulence near proton scales: Cluster observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tieyan Cao, Jinbin; Fu, Huishan; Yang, Jian

    2016-03-25

    The solar wind compressible turbulence attracts more attention recently due to its possible role in plasma heating. Using the plasma density and magnetic field measured simultaneously by the Cluster C1 probe, we statistically investigate the wave characteristics of the proton-scale compressible turbulence. In most cases, the density and magnetic field strength fluctuations almost show no positive correlation, suggesting the absence of fast mode waves. Moreover, the magnetic compressibility C{sub b} as measured by the level of magnetic fluctuations parallel to the background field, is enhanced continuously around proton scales and is consistent with kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) prediction. Interestingly, kinetic slow mode waves (KSW) are identified in a few cases through large values of C{sub b} and plasma compressibility C{sub p}, together with the the anti-correlation between n and B. We suggest that both KAW and KSW can account for the compressible fluctuations energy, while their relative proportions under certain plasma condition require further studies.

  6. Multitree Algorithms for Large-Scale Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, William B.; Ozakin, Arkadas; Lee, Dongryeol; Riegel, Ryan; Gray, Alexander G.

    2012-03-01

    Common astrostatistical operations. A number of common "subroutines" occur over and over again in the statistical analysis of astronomical data. Some of the most powerful, and computationally expensive, of these additionally share the common trait that they involve distance comparisons between all pairs of data points—or in some cases, all triplets or worse. These include: * All Nearest Neighbors (AllNN): For each query point in a dataset, find the k-nearest neighbors among the points in another dataset—naively O(N2) to compute, for O(N) data points. * n-Point Correlation Functions: The main spatial statistic used for comparing two datasets in various ways—naively O(N2) for the 2-point correlation, O(N3) for the 3-point correlation, etc. * Euclidean Minimum Spanning Tree (EMST): The basis for "single-linkage hierarchical clustering,"the main procedure for generating a hierarchical grouping of the data points at all scales, aka "friends-of-friends"—naively O(N2). * Kernel Density Estimation (KDE): The main method for estimating the probability density function of the data, nonparametrically (i.e., with virtually no assumptions on the functional form of the pdf)—naively O(N2). * Kernel Regression: A powerful nonparametric method for regression, or predicting a continuous target value—naively O(N2). * Kernel Discriminant Analysis (KDA): A powerful nonparametric method for classification, or predicting a discrete class label—naively O(N2). (Note that the "two datasets" may in fact be the same dataset, as in two-point autocorrelations, or the so-called monochromatic AllNN problem, or the leave-one-out cross-validation needed in kernel estimation.) The need for fast algorithms for such analysis subroutines is particularly acute in the modern age of exploding dataset sizes in astronomy. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey yielded hundreds of millions of objects, and the next generation of instruments such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will yield roughly

  7. Large scale dynamics of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William

    2017-08-01

    Planets form in the gaseous and dusty disks orbiting young stars. These protoplanetary disks are dispersed in a few million years, being accreted onto the central star or evaporated into the interstellar medium. To explain the observed accretion rates, it is commonly assumed that matter is transported through the disk by turbulence, although the mechanism sustaining turbulence is uncertain. On the other side, irradiation by the central star could heat up the disk surface and trigger a photoevaporative wind, but thermal effects cannot account for the observed acceleration and collimation of the wind into a narrow jet perpendicular to the disk plane. Both issues can be solved if the disk is sensitive to magnetic fields. Weak fields lead to the magnetorotational instability, whose outcome is a state of sustained turbulence. Strong fields can slow down the disk, causing it to accrete while launching a collimated wind. However, the coupling between the disk and the neutral gas is done via electric charges, each of which is outnumbered by several billion neutral molecules. The imperfect coupling between the magnetic field and the neutral gas is described in terms of "non-ideal" effects, introducing new dynamical behaviors. This thesis is devoted to the transport processes happening inside weakly ionized and weakly magnetized accretion disks; the role of microphysical effects on the large-scale dynamics of the disk is of primary importance. As a first step, I exclude the wind and examine the impact of non-ideal effects on the turbulent properties near the disk midplane. I show that the flow can spontaneously organize itself if the ionization fraction is low enough; in this case, accretion is halted and the disk exhibits axisymmetric structures, with possible consequences on planetary formation. As a second step, I study the launching of disk winds via a global model of stratified disk embedded in a warm atmosphere. This model is the first to compute non-ideal effects from

  8. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  9. Multi-scale statistical analysis of coronal solar activity

    DOE PAGES

    Gamborino, Diana; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Martinell, Julio J.

    2016-07-08

    Multi-filter images from the solar corona are used to obtain temperature maps that are analyzed using techniques based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to extract dynamical and structural information at various scales. Exploring active regions before and after a solar flare and comparing them with quiet regions, we show that the multi-scale behavior presents distinct statistical properties for each case that can be used to characterize the level of activity in a region. Information about the nature of heat transport is also to be extracted from the analysis.

  10. Validating Large Scale Networks Using Temporary Local Scale Networks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA NRCS Soil Climate Analysis Network and NOAA Climate Reference Networks are nationwide meteorological and land surface data networks with soil moisture measurements in the top layers of soil. There is considerable interest in scaling these point measurements to larger scales for validating ...

  11. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  12. Large-Scale Processing of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John; Sridhar, K. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scale-up difficulties and high energy costs are two of the more important factors that limit the availability of various types of nanotube carbon. While several approaches are known for producing nanotube carbon, the high-powered reactors typically produce nanotubes at rates measured in only grams per hour and operate at temperatures in excess of 1000 C. These scale-up and energy challenges must be overcome before nanotube carbon can become practical for high-consumption structural and mechanical applications. This presentation examines the issues associated with using various nanotube production methods at larger scales, and discusses research being performed at NASA Ames Research Center on carbon nanotube reactor technology.

  13. Magnetic Properties of Solar Active Regions that Govern Large Solar Flares and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Harra, Louise; Hudson, Hugh S.; Nagashima, Kaori

    2017-08-01

    Strong flares and CMEs are often produced from active regions (ARs). In order to better understand the magnetic properties and evolutions of such ARs, we conducted statistical investigations on the SDO/HMI and AIA data of all flare events with GOES levels >M5.0 within 45 deg from the disk center for 6 years from May 2010 (from the beginning to the declining phase of solar cycle 24). Out of the total of 51 flares from 29 ARs, more than 80% have delta-sunspots and about 15% violate Hale’s polarity rule. We obtained several key findings including (1) the flare duration is linearly proportional to the separation of the flare ribbons (i.e., scale of reconnecting magnetic fields) and (2) CME-eruptive events have smaller sunspot areas. Depending on the magnetic properties, flaring ARs can be categorized into several groups, such as spot-spot, in which a highly-sheared polarity inversion line is formed between two large sunspots, and spot-satellite, where a newly-emerging flux next to a mature sunspot triggers a compact flare event. These results point to the possibility that magnetic structures of the ARs determine the characteristics of flares and CMEs. In the presentation, we will also show new results from the systematic flux emergence simulations of delta-sunspot formation and discuss the evolution processes of flaring ARs.

  14. MAGNETIC CYCLES IN GLOBAL LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizaru, Mihai; Charbonneau, Paul; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2010-06-01

    We report on a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the solar convection zone, which succeeds in generating a large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component, antisymmetric about the equatorial plane and undergoing regular polarity reversals on decadal timescales. We focus on a specific simulation run covering 255 years, during which 8 polarity reversals are observed, with a mean period of 30 years. Time-latitude slices of the zonally averaged toroidal magnetic component at the base of the convecting envelope show a well-organized toroidal flux system building up in each solar hemisphere, peaking at mid-latitudes and migrating toward the equator in the course of each cycle, in remarkable agreement with inferences based on the sunspot butterfly diagram. The simulation also produces a large-scale dipole moment, varying in phase with the internal toroidal component, suggesting that the simulation may be operating as what is known in mean-field theory as an {alpha}{Omega} dynamo.

  15. Large scale structure from viscous dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Blas, Diego; Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim E-mail: stefan.floerchinger@cern.ch E-mail: ntetrad@phys.uoa.gr

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations of sufficiently long wavelength admit a fluid dynamic description. We consider modes with wavevectors below a scale k{sub m} for which the dynamics is only mildly non-linear. The leading effect of modes above that scale can be accounted for by effective non-equilibrium viscosity and pressure terms. For mildly non-linear scales, these mainly arise from momentum transport within the ideal and cold but inhomogeneous fluid, while momentum transport due to more microscopic degrees of freedom is suppressed. As a consequence, concrete expressions with no free parameters, except the matching scale k{sub m}, can be derived from matching evolution equations to standard cosmological perturbation theory. Two-loop calculations of the matter power spectrum in the viscous theory lead to excellent agreement with N-body simulations up to scales k=0.2 h/Mpc. The convergence properties in the ultraviolet are better than for standard perturbation theory and the results are robust with respect to variations of the matching scale.

  16. Large scale structure from viscous dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations of sufficiently long wavelength admit a fluid dynamic description. We consider modes with wavevectors below a scale km for which the dynamics is only mildly non-linear. The leading effect of modes above that scale can be accounted for by effective non-equilibrium viscosity and pressure terms. For mildly non-linear scales, these mainly arise from momentum transport within the ideal and cold but inhomogeneous fluid, while momentum transport due to more microscopic degrees of freedom is suppressed. As a consequence, concrete expressions with no free parameters, except the matching scale km, can be derived from matching evolution equations to standard cosmological perturbation theory. Two-loop calculations of the matter power spectrum in the viscous theory lead to excellent agreement with N-body simulations up to scales k=0.2 h/Mpc. The convergence properties in the ultraviolet are better than for standard perturbation theory and the results are robust with respect to variations of the matching scale.

  17. Large Scale Testing and Development of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Vagine

    2007-09-18

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have begun to investigate the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This large-scale investigation, conducted in the one kiloton water Cherenkov detector built for the K2K long-baseline experiment, follows up on highly promising benchtop-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of a 2003 Advanced Detector Research Program grant.

  18. Large-scale density structures in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Lazarus, A. J.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.; Gordon, G. S., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Plasma Science experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft has measured the solar wind density from 1 to 38 AU. Over this distance, the solar wind density decreases as the inverse square of the heliocentric distance. However, there are large variations in this density at a given radius. Such changes in density are the dominant cause of changes in the solar wind ram pressure in the outer heliosphere and can cause large perturbations in the location of the termination shock of the solar wind. Following a simple model suggested by Suess, we study the non-equilibrium, dynamic location of the termination shock as it responds to these pressure changes. The results of this study suggest that the termination shock is rarely if ever at its equilibrium distance and may depart from that distance by as much as 50 AU at times.

  19. How large-scale subsidence affects stratocumulus transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Dussen, J. J.; de Roode, S. R.; Siebesma, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Some climate modeling results suggest that the Hadley circulation might weaken in a future climate, causing a subsequent reduction in the large-scale subsidence velocity in the subtropics. In this study we analyze the cloud liquid water path (LWP) budget from large-eddy simulation (LES) results of three idealized stratocumulus transition cases, each with a different subsidence rate. As shown in previous studies a reduced subsidence is found to lead to a deeper stratocumulus-topped boundary layer, an enhanced cloud-top entrainment rate and a delay in the transition of stratocumulus clouds into shallow cumulus clouds during its equatorwards advection by the prevailing trade winds. The effect of a reduction of the subsidence rate can be summarized as follows. The initial deepening of the stratocumulus layer is partly counteracted by an enhanced absorption of solar radiation. After some hours the deepening of the boundary layer is accelerated by an enhancement of the entrainment rate. Because this is accompanied by a change in the cloud-base turbulent fluxes of moisture and heat, the net change in the LWP due to changes in the turbulent flux profiles is negligibly small.

  20. Simulation and experiment for large scale space structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongbo; Zhou, Jian; Zha, Zuoliang

    2013-04-01

    The future space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a large scale space structure. A new design of transient temperature field analysis method of the developable reflector on orbit environment is presented, which simulates physical characteristic of developable antenna reflector with a high precision. The different kinds of analysis denote that different thermal elastic characteristics of different materials. The three-dimension multi-physics coupling transient thermal distortion equations for the antenna are founded based on the Galerkins method. For a reflector on geosynchronous orbit, the transient temperature field results from this method are compared with these from NASA. It follows from the analysis that the precision of this method is high. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with IEBIS and thermal sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing developable tube. Results reveal that the temperature levels of the developable antenna reflector alternate greatly in the orbital period, which is about ±120° when considering solar flux ,earth radiating flux and albedo scattering flux.

  1. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or PNL noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10 exp 6 based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  2. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    1992-05-01

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or perceived noise level (PNL) noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10(exp 6) based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using a small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  3. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or PNL noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10 exp 6 based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  4. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or perceived noise level (PNL) noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10(exp 6) based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using a small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  5. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or perceived noise level (PNL) noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10(exp 6) based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using a small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  6. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or PNL noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10 exp 6 based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  7. Nature of Kinetic Scale Fluctuations in Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, C. S.; Chen, C. H.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Bale, S. D.; Mozer, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present an investigation of the nature of small-scale turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind. The nature of the dissipation range fluctuations of solar wind turbulence remains a major open question in heliospheric physics. The steepening of the observed (magnetic field) spectra at ion scales was originally attributed to ion cyclotron damping, but it was later suggested that it could well be due to the dispersive nature of fluctuations at these scales. The nature of the dispersive cascade at and below the ion scales is still debated, two leading hypothesis being that these fluctuations have characteristics of Kinetic Alfven Waves (KAW) or whistler waves. Other possible contributions from current sheets and/or kinetic instabilities have been suggested. There is mounting evidence that the fluctuations at these scales are KAW-like. In this study, we analyze several carefully selected unperturbed solar wind intervals, using magnetic field, electric field as well as density measurements from the Cluster spacecraft in order to identify the nature of the wave modes present, how frequent they are and try to determine whether one or more wave modes at different times. We examine the electric to magnetic field fluctuation ratio (δ E/δd B), the magnetic compressibility (δ B∥ /δ B) as well as density fluctuations using newly developed diagnostic techniques by Salem et al (2012) and Chen et al (2012). We look for variations of the nature and properties of these kinetic scale fluctuations with solar wind conditions, such as the plasma beta and the angle between the magnetic field and the flow velocity which controls the measured (spacecraft frame) frequency of the fluctuations. We discuss how these results would impact how the solar wind plasma is heated.

  8. Facility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Guidebook: Bureau of Reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiatreungwattana, Kosol; VanGeet, Otto; Stoltenberg, Blaise

    2016-09-01

    This guidebook was written for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to explore the use of non-hydro renewable energy resources to meet the U.S. Department of Interior's objectives and Reclamation's mission. This guidebook presents readers with the processes and steps needed to assess and successfully implement facility-scale solar projects.

  9. Real or virtual large-scale structure?

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, August E.

    1999-01-01

    Modeling the development of structure in the universe on galactic and larger scales is the challenge that drives the field of computational cosmology. Here, photorealism is used as a simple, yet expert, means of assessing the degree to which virtual worlds succeed in replicating our own. PMID:10200243

  10. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Large Scale

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative to demonstrate the enormous potential that contaminated lands, landfills, and mine sites provide for developing renewable energy in the United States. EPA developed national level site screening criteria in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal facilities. While the screening criteria demonstrate the potential to reuse contaminated land for renewable energy facilities, the criteria and data are neither designed to identify the best sites for developing renewable energy nor all-inclusive. Therefore, more detailed, site-specific analysis is necessary to identify or prioritize the best sites for developing renewable energy facilities based on the technical and economic potential. Please note that these sites were only pre-screened for renewable energy potential. The sites were not evaluated for land use constraints or current on the ground conditions. Additional research and site-specific analysis are needed to verify viability for renewable energy potential at a given site.

  11. Current Scientific Issues in Large Scale Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Topics in large scale atmospheric dynamics are discussed. Aspects of atmospheric blocking, the influence of transient baroclinic eddies on planetary-scale waves, cyclogenesis, the effects of orography on planetary scale flow, small scale frontal structure, and simulations of gravity waves in frontal zones are discussed.

  12. Large-scale sparse singular value computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Four numerical methods for computing the singular value decomposition (SVD) of large sparse matrices on a multiprocessor architecture are presented. Lanczos and subspace iteration-based methods for determining several of the largest singular triplets (singular values and corresponding left and right-singular vectors) for sparse matrices arising from two practical applications: information retrieval and seismic reflection tomography are emphasized. The target architectures for implementations are the CRAY-2S/4-128 and Alliant FX/80. The sparse SVD problem is well motivated by recent information-retrieval techniques in which dominant singular values and their corresponding singular vectors of large sparse term-document matrices are desired, and by nonlinear inverse problems from seismic tomography applications which require approximate pseudo-inverses of large sparse Jacobian matrices.

  13. Forecasting decadal and shorter time-scale solar cycle features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi

    2016-07-01

    Solar energetic particles and magnetic fields reach the Earth through the interplanetary medium and affect it in various ways, producing beautiful aurorae, but also electrical blackouts and damage to our technology-dependent economy. The root of energetic solar outputs is the solar activity cycle, which is most likely caused by dynamo processes inside the Sun. It is a formidable task to accurately predict the amplitude, onset and peak timings of a solar cycle. After reviewing all solar cycle prediction methods, including empirical as well as physical model-based schemes, I will describe what we have learned from both validation and nonvalidation of cycle 24 forecasts, and how to refine the model-based schemes for upcoming cycle 25 forecasts. Recent observations indicate that within a solar cycle there are shorter time-scale 'space weather' features, such as bursts of various forms of activity with approximately one year periodicity. I will demonstrate how global tachocline dynamics could play a crucial role in producing such space weather. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  14. Modified gravity and large scale flows, a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    Large scale flows have been a challenging feature of cosmography ever since galaxy scaling relations came on the scene 40 years ago. The next generation of surveys will offer a serious test of the standard cosmology.

  15. Linking Large-Scale Reading Assessments: Comment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    E. A. Hanushek points out in this commentary that applied researchers in education have only recently begun to appreciate the value of international assessments, even though there are now 50 years of experience with these. Until recently, these assessments have been stand-alone surveys that have not been linked, and analysis has largely focused on…

  16. Large scale scientific computing - future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G. S.

    1982-06-01

    Every new generation of scientific computers has opened up new areas of science for exploration through the use of more realistic numerical models or the ability to process ever larger amounts of data. Concomitantly, scientists, because of the success of past models and the wide range of physical phenomena left unexplored, have pressed computer designers to strive for the maximum performance that current technology will permit. This encompasses not only increased processor speed, but also substantial improvements in processor memory, I/O bandwidth, secondary storage and facilities to augment the scientist's ability both to program and to understand the results of a computation. Over the past decade, performance improvements for scientific calculations have come from algoeithm development and a major change in the underlying architecture of the hardware, not from significantly faster circuitry. It appears that this trend will continue for another decade. A future archetectural change for improved performance will most likely be multiple processors coupled together in some fashion. Because the demand for a significantly more powerful computer system comes from users with single large applications, it is essential that an application be efficiently partitionable over a set of processors; otherwise, a multiprocessor system will not be effective. This paper explores some of the constraints on multiple processor architecture posed by these large applications. In particular, the trade-offs between large numbers of slow processors and small numbers of fast processors is examined. Strategies for partitioning range from partitioning at the language statement level (in-the-small) and at the program module level (in-the-large). Some examples of partitioning in-the-large are given and a strategy for efficiently executing a partitioned program is explored.

  17. OBSERVING EVOLUTION IN THE SUPERGRANULAR NETWORK LENGTH SCALE DURING PERIODS OF LOW SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Rast, Mark P.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-20

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of {approx}0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of 'extreme' solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  18. Observing Evolution in the Supergranular Network Length Scale During Periods of Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Rast, Mark P.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-01

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of ~0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of "extreme" solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  19. Large-scale preparation of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Heilig, J S; Elbing, K L; Brent, R

    2001-05-01

    Although the need for large quantities of plasmid DNA has diminished as techniques for manipulating small quantities of DNA have improved, occasionally large amounts of high-quality plasmid DNA are desired. This unit describes the preparation of milligram quantities of highly purified plasmid DNA. The first part of the unit describes three methods for preparing crude lysates enriched in plasmid DNA from bacterial cells grown in liquid culture: alkaline lysis, boiling, and Triton lysis. The second part describes four methods for purifying plasmid DNA in such lysates away from contaminating RNA and protein: CsCl/ethidium bromide density gradient centrifugation, polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, and size-exclusion chromatography.

  20. Large-Scale Aerosol Modeling and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    9 October and lasting until 1500 UTC, 11 October. (bottom) COAMPS forecast of visibility for the same period showing a dust storm with a similar...starting time and an ending time of 0900 UTC 12 October. (Walker et al., 2009.) 6 7 Figure 3. Comparison of COAMPS dust storm forecast...forecasts of dust storms in areas downwind of the large deserts of the world: Arabian Gulf, Sea of Japan, China Sea, Mediterranean Sea, and the Tropical

  1. Large-Scale Aerosol Modeling and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    advance anywhere on the globe. NAAPS and COAMPS are particularly useful for forecasts of dust storms in areas downwind of the large deserts of the world... dust source regions in NAAPS. The DSD has been crucial for high-resolution dust forecasting in SW Asia using COAMPS (Walker et al., 2009). Dust ...6 Figure 2. Four-panel product used to compare multiple model forecasts of visibility in SW Asia dust storms . On the web the product is

  2. Large-Scale Aerosol Modeling and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    to six days in advance anywhere on the globe. NAAPS and COAMPS are particularly useful for forecasts of dust storms in areas downwind of the large...in FY08. NAAPS forecasts of CONUS dust storms and long-range dust transport to CONUS were further evaluated in collaboration with CSU. These...visibility. The regional model ( COAMPS /Aerosol) became operational during OIF. The global model Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS

  3. Large scale calculations for hadron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbi, C.

    1985-01-01

    The talk reviews some recent Monte Carlo calculations for Quantum Chromodynamics, performed on Euclidean lattices of rather large extent. Purpose of the calculations is to provide accurate determinations of quantities, such as interquark potentials or mass eigenvalues, which are relevant for hadronic spectroscopy. Results obtained in quenched QCD on 16/sup 3/ x 32 lattices are illustrated, and a discussion of computational resources and techniques required for the calculations is presented. 18 refs.,3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Photovoltaic solar array technology required for three wide scale generating systems for terrestrial applications: rooftop, solar farm, and satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Three major options for wide-scale generation of photovoltaic energy for terrestrial use are considered: (1) rooftop array, (2) solar farm, and (3) satellite station. The rooftop array would use solar cell arrays on the roofs of residential or commercial buildings; the solar farm would consist of large ground-based arrays, probably in arid areas with high insolation; and the satellite station would consist of an orbiting solar array, many square kilometers in area. The technology advancement requirements necessary for each option are discussed, including cost reduction of solar cells and arrays, weight reduction, resistance to environmental factors, reliability, and fabrication capability, including the availability of raw materials. The majority of the technology advancement requirements are applicable to all three options, making possible a flexible basic approach regardless of the options that may eventually be chosen. No conclusions are drawn as to which option is most advantageous, since the feasibility of each option depends on the success achieved in the technology advancement requirements specified.

  5. On the Dynamics of Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Title, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the dynamics of the small-scale solar magnetic field, based on analysis of very high resolution images of the solar photosphere obtained at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope. The data sets are movies from 1 to 4 hr in length, taken in several wavelength bands with a typical time between frames of 20 s. The primary method of tracking small-scale magnetic elements is with very high contrast images of photospheric bright points, taken through a 12 A bandpass filter centered at 4305 A in the Fraunhofer 'G band.' Previous studies have established that such bright points are unambiguously associated with sites of small-scale magnetic flux in the photosphere, although the details of the mechanism responsible for the brightening of the flux elements remain uncertain. The G band bright points move in the intergranular lanes at speeds from 0.5 to 5 km/s. The motions appear to be constrained to the intergranular lanes and are primarily driven by the evolution of the local granular convection flow field. Continual fragmentation and merging of flux is the fundamental evolutionary mode of small-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere. Rotation and folding of chains or groups of bright points are also observed. The timescale for magnetic flux evolution in active region plage is on the order of the correlation time of granulation (typically 6-8 minutes), but significant morphological changes can occur on timescales as short as 100 S. Smaller fragments are occasionally seen to fade beyond observable contrast. The concept of a stable, isolated subarcsecond magnetic 'flux tube' in the solar photosphere is inconsistent with the observations presented here.

  6. Large scale instabilities and dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Schindler, K.

    1986-01-01

    The stability properties of the magnetotail current sheet against large scale modes is reviewed in the framework of ideal MHD, resistive MHD, and collisionless Vlasov theory. It appears that the small deviations from a plane sheet pinch (in particular a magnetic field component normal to the sheet) are important to explain the transition of the tail from a quiet stable state to an unstable dynamic state. It is found that the tail is essentially stable in ideal MHD, but unstable in resistive MHD, while both stable and unstable configurations are found within collisionless theory. The results favor an interpretation where the onset of magnetotail dyanmics leading to a sudden thinning of the plasma sheet and the ejection of a plasmoid is caused by the onset of a collisionless instability that either directly leads to the growth of a collisionless tearing mode or via microscopic turbulence to the growth of a resistive mode. The actual onset conditions are not fully explored yet by rigorous methods. The onset may be triggered by local conditions as well as by boundary conditions at the ionosphere or at the magnetopause (resulting from solar wind conditions). 53 refs., 5 figs.

  7. The Influence of Large Solar Proton Events on the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can cause changes in constituents in the Earth s polar middle atmosphere. A number of large SPEs have occurred over the past 50 years and tend to happen most frequently near solar maximum. The highly energetic protons cause ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents. Complicated ion chemistry leads to HOx (H, OH, HO2) production and dissociation of N2 leads to NOy (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2) production. Both the HOx and NOy increases can result in changes to ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The HOx increases lead to short-lived (days) ozone decreases in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The NOy increases lead to long-lived (several months) stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of NOy constituents in this region. UARS HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument observations showed SPE-caused polar stratospheric NOx (NO+NO2) increases over 10 ppbv in September 2000 due to the very large SPE of July 2000, which are reasonably well simulated with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). WACCM-computed SPE-caused polar stratospheric ozone decreases >10% continued for up to 5 months past the largest events in the past 50 years, however, SPE-caused total ozone changes were not found to be statistically significant. Small polar middle atmospheric temperature changes of <4 K have also been predicted to occur as a result of the larger SPEs. The polar atmospheric effects of large SPEs during solar cycle 23 and 24 will be emphasized in this presentation.

  8. Research Update: Large-area deposition, coating, printing, and processing techniques for the upscaling of perovskite solar cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razza, Stefano; Castro-Hermosa, Sergio; Di Carlo, Aldo; Brown, Thomas M.

    2016-09-01

    To bring perovskite solar cells to the industrial world, performance must be maintained at the photovoltaic module scale. Here we present large-area manufacturing and processing options applicable to large-area cells and modules. Printing and coating techniques, such as blade coating, slot-die coating, spray coating, screen printing, inkjet printing, and gravure printing (as alternatives to spin coating), as well as vacuum or vapor based deposition and laser patterning techniques are being developed for an effective scale-up of the technology. The latter also enables the manufacture of solar modules on flexible substrates, an option beneficial for many applications and for roll-to-roll production.

  9. Destruction of large-scale magnetic field in non-linear simulations of the shear dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teed, Robert J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun's magnetic field exhibits coherence in space and time on much larger scales than the turbulent convection that ultimately powers the dynamo. In the past the α-effect (mean-field) concept has been used to model the solar cycle, but recent work has cast doubt on the validity of the mean-field ansatz under solar conditions. This indicates that one should seek an alternative mechanism for generating large-scale structure. One possibility is the recently proposed `shear dynamo' mechanism where large-scale magnetic fields are generated in the presence of a simple shear. Further investigation of this proposition is required, however, because work has been focused on the linear regime with a uniform shear profile thus far. In this paper we report results of the extension of the original shear dynamo model into the non-linear regime. We find that whilst large-scale structure can initially persist into the saturated regime, in several of our simulations it is destroyed via large increase in kinetic energy. This result casts doubt on the ability of the simple uniform shear dynamo mechanism to act as an alternative to the α-effect in solar conditions.

  10. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/cm2) and storm shelter (20 g/cm2) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high dose rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  11. Large Solar Flares and Sheared Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2001-01-01

    This Comment gives additional information about the nature of flaring locations on the Sun described in the article "Sun unleashes Halloween storm", by R. E. Lopez, et al. What causes the large explosions from solar active regions that unleash huge magnetic storms and adverse space weather? It is now beyond doubt that the magnetic field in solar active regions harbors free energy that is released during these events. Direct measurements of the longitudinal and transverse components of active region magnetic fields with the vector magnetograph at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), taken on a regular basis for the last 30 years, have found key signatures of the locations of powerful flares. A vector magnetograph detects and measures the magnetic shear, which is the deviation of the observed transverse magnetic field direction from the potential field. The sheared locations possess abundant free magnetic energy for solar flares. In addition to active region NOAA 10486, the one that produced the largest flares last October, the NASA/MSFC vector magnetograph has observed several other such complex super active regions, including NOAA 6555 and 6659.

  12. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/sq cm) and storm shelter (20 g/sq cm) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high-dose-rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  13. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/sq cm) and storm shelter (20 g/sq cm) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high-dose-rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  14. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC KINK WAVES IN NONUNIFORM SOLAR FLUX TUBES: PHASE MIXING AND ENERGY CASCADE TO SMALL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume

    2015-04-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. The propagation and damping of these waves may play relevant roles in the transport and dissipation of energy in the solar atmospheric medium. However, in the atmospheric plasma dissipation of transverse MHD wave energy by viscosity or resistivity needs very small spatial scales to be efficient. Here, we theoretically investigate the generation of small scales in nonuniform solar magnetic flux tubes due to phase mixing of MHD kink waves. We go beyond the usual approach based on the existence of a global quasi-mode that is damped in time due to resonant absorption. Instead, we use a modal expansion to express the MHD kink wave as a superposition of Alfvén continuum modes that are phase mixed as time evolves. The comparison of the two techniques evidences that the modal analysis is more physically transparent and describes both the damping of global kink motions and the building up of small scales due to phase mixing. In addition, we discuss that the processes of resonant absorption and phase mixing are closely linked. They represent two aspects of the same underlying physical mechanism: the energy cascade from large scales to small scales due to naturally occurring plasma and/or magnetic field inhomogeneities. This process may provide the necessary scenario for efficient dissipation of transverse MHD wave energy in the solar atmospheric plasma.

  15. Responses in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a rigorous definition of general power-spectrum responses as resummed vertices with two hard and n soft momenta in cosmological perturbation theory. These responses measure the impact of long-wavelength perturbations on the local small-scale power spectrum. The kinematic structure of the responses (i.e., their angular dependence) can be decomposed unambiguously through a ``bias'' expansion of the local power spectrum, with a fixed number of physical response coefficients, which are only a function of the hard wavenumber k. Further, the responses up to n-th order completely describe the (n+2)-point function in the squeezed limit, i.e. with two hard and n soft modes, which one can use to derive the response coefficients. This generalizes previous results, which relate the angle-averaged squeezed limit to isotropic response coefficients. We derive the complete expression of first- and second-order responses at leading order in perturbation theory, and present extrapolations to nonlinear scales based on simulation measurements of the isotropic response coefficients. As an application, we use these results to predict the non-Gaussian part of the angle-averaged matter power spectrum covariance CovNGl=0(k1,k2), in the limit where one of the modes, say k2, is much smaller than the other. Without any free parameters, our model results are in very good agreement with simulations for k2 lesssim 0.06 h Mpc-1, and for any k1 gtrsim 2k2. The well-defined kinematic structure of the power spectrum response also permits a quick evaluation of the angular dependence of the covariance matrix. While we focus on the matter density field, the formalism presented here can be generalized to generic tracers such as galaxies.

  16. Global scale deposition of radioactivity from a large scale exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, J.B.

    1983-10-01

    The global impact of radioactivity pertains to the continental scale and planetary scale deposition of the radioactivity in a delayed mode; it affects all peoples. Global deposition is distinct and separate from close-in fallout. Close-in fallout is delivered in a matter of a few days or less and is much studied in the literature of civilian defense. But much less studied is the matter of global deposition. The global deposition of radioactivity from the reference strategic exchange (5300 MT) leads to an estimated average whole body, total integrated dose of 20 rem for the latitudes of 30 to 50/sup 0/ in the Northern Hemisphere. Hotspots of deposited radioactivity can occur with doses of about 70 rem (winter) to 40 to 110 rem (summer) in regions like Europe, western Asia, western North Pacific, southeastern US, northeastern US, and Canada. The neighboring countries within a few hundred kilometers of areas under strategic nuclear attack can be impacted by the normal (termal close-in) fallout due to gravitational sedimentation with lethal radiation doses to unsheltered populations. In regard to the strategic scenario about 40% of the megatonage is assumed to be in a surface burst mode and the rest in the free air burst mode.

  17. Observations of Anisotropic Scaling of Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Q. Y.; Wu, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Using high-speed solar wind data recorded by the Ulysses spacecraft, we investigate and estimate the anisotropic inertial range scaling of the interplanetary magnetic field. We apply the method of the magnetic structure function (MSF), Sn (τ) = lang|b(t + τ) - b(t)| n rang vprop τζ(n), to analyze the scaling of solar wind turbulence over the range from 1 s to 104 s. By sorting the fluctuations according to the direction of the local mean magnetic field, we obtain a second-order structure function in (r, Θ) coordinates that reveals the scale-dependent anisotropy of the power spectrum. The scale-dependent anisotropy of the MSF indicates that the fluctuation energy tends to cascade toward the direction perpendicular to the local field. The dependence of the MSF scaling index ζ on the direction of the local field is found to be similar to that reported in Horbury et al. and Podesta, with ζbottom = 0.53 ± 0.18 and ζpar = 1.00 ± 0.14. Furthermore, we estimate and find the scaling law between the perpendicular and parallel scales r par vprop r 0.614 bottom, which implies the elongation along the parallel direction as the turbulence eddy evolves toward the small lengthscales. These results are in agreement with the predictions of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence theory.

  18. OBSERVATIONS OF ANISOTROPIC SCALING OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Q. Y.; Wu, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Using high-speed solar wind data recorded by the Ulysses spacecraft, we investigate and estimate the anisotropic inertial range scaling of the interplanetary magnetic field. We apply the method of the magnetic structure function (MSF), S{sup n} ({tau}) = (|b(t + {tau}) - b(t)| {sup n}) {proportional_to} {tau}{sup {zeta}(n)}, to analyze the scaling of solar wind turbulence over the range from 1 s to 10{sup 4} s. By sorting the fluctuations according to the direction of the local mean magnetic field, we obtain a second-order structure function in (r, {Theta}) coordinates that reveals the scale-dependent anisotropy of the power spectrum. The scale-dependent anisotropy of the MSF indicates that the fluctuation energy tends to cascade toward the direction perpendicular to the local field. The dependence of the MSF scaling index {zeta} on the direction of the local field is found to be similar to that reported in Horbury et al. and Podesta, with {zeta}{sub perpendicular} = 0.53 {+-} 0.18 and {zeta}{sub ||} = 1.00 {+-} 0.14. Furthermore, we estimate and find the scaling law between the perpendicular and parallel scales r {sub ||} {proportional_to} r {sup 0.614} {sub perpendicular}, which implies the elongation along the parallel direction as the turbulence eddy evolves toward the small lengthscales. These results are in agreement with the predictions of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence theory.

  19. THE 'TWIN-CME' SCENARIO AND LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Liuguan; Jiang, Yong; Zhao, Lulu; Li, Gang

    2013-01-20

    Energetic particles in large solar energetic particle (SEP) events are a major concern for space weather. Recently, Li et al. proposed a 'twin-CME' scenario for ground-level events. Here we extend that study to large SEP events in solar cycle 23. Depending on whether preceding coronal mass ejections (CMEs) within 9 hr exist and whether ions >10 MeV nucleon{sup -1} exceed 10 pfu, we categorize fast CMEs with speed >900 km s{sup -1} and width >60 Degree-Sign from the western hemisphere source regions into four groups: groups I and II are 'twin' and single CMEs that lead to large SEPs; groups III and IV are 'twin' and single CMEs that do not lead to large SEPs. The major findings of this paper are: first, large SEP events tend to be 'twin-CME' events. Of 59 western large SEP events in solar cycle 23, 43 are 'twin-CME' (group I) events and 16 are single-CME (group II) events. Second, not all 'twin CMEs' produced large SEPs: 28 twin CMEs did not produce large SEPs (group III events). Some of them produced excesses of particles up to a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Third, there were 39 single fast CMEs that did not produce SEPs (group IV events). Some of these also showed an excess of particles up to a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. For all four groups of events, we perform statistical analyses on properties such as the angular width, the speed, the existence of accompanying metric type II radio bursts, and the associated flare class for the main CMEs and the preceding CMEs.

  20. Large-scale GW software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjung; Mandal, Subhasish; Mikida, Eric; Jindal, Prateek; Bohm, Eric; Jain, Nikhil; Kale, Laxmikant; Martyna, Glenn; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    Electronic excitations are important in understanding and designing many functional materials. In terms of ab initio methods, the GW and Bethe-Saltpeter Equation (GW-BSE) beyond DFT methods have proved successful in describing excited states in many materials. However, the heavy computational loads and large memory requirements have hindered their routine applicability by the materials physics community. We summarize some of our collaborative efforts to develop a new software framework designed for GW calculations on massively parallel supercomputers. Our GW code is interfaced with the plane-wave pseudopotential ab initio molecular dynamics software ``OpenAtom'' which is based on the Charm++ parallel library. The computation of the electronic polarizability is one of the most expensive parts of any GW calculation. We describe our strategy that uses a real-space representation to avoid the large number of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) common to most GW methods. We also describe an eigendecomposition of the plasmon modes from the resulting dielectric matrix that enhances efficiency. This work is supported by NSF through Grant ACI-1339804.

  1. Electrostatic short-scale termination of solar-wind turbulence.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2009-06-05

    Recent hybrid Vlasov simulations [F. Valentini, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 025006 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.025006] have shown that the short-scale termination of solar-wind turbulence is characterized by the occurrence of longitudinal electrostatic fluctuations. Beside the ion-acoustic branch, in agreement with solar-wind observations, a novel branch of acoustic-like waves, with phase velocity close to the ion thermal speed, has been recovered in the simulations. In this Letter, we show that these waves turn out to be Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal-like solutions of the hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell equations, driven by kinetic effects of resonant particle trapping. We also discuss the development of the solar-wind turbulent spectra across the ion inertial length and especially stress the fact that turbulence privileges acoustic paths to develop towards short wavelengths.

  2. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Jomaas, Grunde

    2012-01-01

    Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant know how about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due to the complexity, cost and risk associated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment of a relevant size in microgravity. Therefore, there is currently a gap in knowledge of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The entire body of low-gravity fire research has either been conducted in short duration ground-based microgravity facilities or has been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date has shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal-gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour, flame colour and flame structure. As a result, the prediction of the behaviour of fires in reduced gravity is at present not validated. To address this gap in knowledge, a collaborative international project, Spacecraft Fire Safety, has been established with its cornerstone being the development of an experiment (Fire Safety 1) to be conducted on an ISS resupply vehicle, such as the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) or Orbital Cygnus after it leaves the ISS and before it enters the atmosphere. A computer modelling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the possibility of examining fire behaviour on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This unprecedented opportunity will expand the understanding of the fundamentals of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The experiment is being

  3. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Tien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; hide

    2012-01-01

    Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant knowhow about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due to the complexity, cost and risk associated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment of a relevant size in microgravity. Therefore, there is currently a gap in knowledge of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The entire body of low-gravity fire research has either been conducted in short duration ground-based microgravity facilities or has been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date has shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour, flame colour and flame structure. As a result, the prediction of the behaviour of fires in reduced gravity is at present not validated. To address this gap in knowledge, a collaborative international project, Spacecraft Fire Safety, has been established with its cornerstone being the development of an experiment (Fire Safety 1) to be conducted on an ISS resupply vehicle, such as the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) or Orbital Cygnus after it leaves the ISS and before it enters the atmosphere. A computer modelling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the possibility of examining fire behaviour on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This unprecedented opportunity will expand the understanding of the fundamentals of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The experiment is being

  4. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous

  5. Toward Increasing Fairness in Score Scale Calibrations Employed in International Large-Scale Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveri, Maria Elena; von Davier, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the creation of comparable score scales across countries in international assessments. We examine potential improvements to current score scale calibration procedures used in international large-scale assessments. Our approach seeks to improve fairness in scoring international large-scale assessments, which often…

  6. Toward Increasing Fairness in Score Scale Calibrations Employed in International Large-Scale Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveri, Maria Elena; von Davier, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the creation of comparable score scales across countries in international assessments. We examine potential improvements to current score scale calibration procedures used in international large-scale assessments. Our approach seeks to improve fairness in scoring international large-scale assessments, which often…

  7. Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara Denise.; Zemlick, Katie M.; Macknick, Jordan

    2013-07-01

    As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

  8. Merged interaction regions and large-scale fluctuations observed by the Voyager 2 in the distant heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1995-01-01

    The merged interaction regions (MIRs) and large-scale fluctuations of the heliospheric magnetic field play a major role in the dynamics of the solar wind, the position and motion of the termination shock and heliopause, the triggering of radio emissions, and the modulation of cosmic rays. The structure of MIRs and large-scale fluctuations varies with distance from the sun and with solar activity. Here we compare Voyager 2 observations near the maximum of solar activity (1989 through 1991) with those during the declining phase of solar activity (1992 thorough 1994). Global MIRs with strong magnetic fields, preceded by a strong shock, were observed near solar maximum. During the declining phase of the solar cycle, the MIRs had significantly weaker magnetic fields. In both cases the pickup protons, identified by an analysis of pressure balanced structures, play a major role in the dynamical evolution of the MIRs beyond 30 AU. The large-scale magnetic field fluctuations have significantly greater amplitudes near solar maximum than during the declining phase of the solar cycle.

  9. Python for large-scale electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Spacek, Martin; Blanche, Tim; Swindale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiology is increasingly moving towards highly parallel recording techniques which generate large data sets. We record extracellularly in vivo in cat and rat visual cortex with 54-channel silicon polytrodes, under time-locked visual stimulation, from localized neuronal populations within a cortical column. To help deal with the complexity of generating and analysing these data, we used the Python programming language to develop three software projects: one for temporally precise visual stimulus generation ("dimstim"); one for electrophysiological waveform visualization and spike sorting ("spyke"); and one for spike train and stimulus analysis ("neuropy"). All three are open source and available for download (http://swindale.ecc.ubc.ca/code). The requirements and solutions for these projects differed greatly, yet we found Python to be well suited for all three. Here we present our software as a showcase of the extensive capabilities of Python in neuroscience.

  10. Large Scale CW ECRH Systems: Some considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erckmann, V.; Kasparek, W.; Plaum, B.; Lechte, C.; Petelin, M. I.; Braune, H.; Gantenbein, G.; Laqua, H. P.; Lubiako, L.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Michel, G.; Turkin, Y.; Weissgerber, M.

    2012-09-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) is a key component in the heating arsenal for the next step fusion devices like W7-X and ITER. These devices are equipped with superconducting coils and are designed to operate steady state. ECRH must thus operate in CW-mode with a large flexibility to comply with various physics demands such as plasma start-up, heating and current drive, as well as configurationand MHD - control. The request for many different sophisticated applications results in a growing complexity, which is in conflict with the request for high availability, reliability, and maintainability. `Advanced' ECRH-systems must, therefore, comply with both the complex physics demands and operational robustness and reliability. The W7-X ECRH system is the first CW- facility of an ITER relevant size and is used as a test bed for advanced components. Proposals for future developments are presented together with improvements of gyrotrons, transmission components and launchers.

  11. Python for Large-Scale Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Spacek, Martin; Blanche, Tim; Swindale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiology is increasingly moving towards highly parallel recording techniques which generate large data sets. We record extracellularly in vivo in cat and rat visual cortex with 54-channel silicon polytrodes, under time-locked visual stimulation, from localized neuronal populations within a cortical column. To help deal with the complexity of generating and analysing these data, we used the Python programming language to develop three software projects: one for temporally precise visual stimulus generation (“dimstim”); one for electrophysiological waveform visualization and spike sorting (“spyke”); and one for spike train and stimulus analysis (“neuropy”). All three are open source and available for download (http://swindale.ecc.ubc.ca/code). The requirements and solutions for these projects differed greatly, yet we found Python to be well suited for all three. Here we present our software as a showcase of the extensive capabilities of Python in neuroscience. PMID:19198646

  12. Large-Scale Pattern Discovery in Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin-Mahieux, Thierry

    This work focuses on extracting patterns in musical data from very large collections. The problem is split in two parts. First, we build such a large collection, the Million Song Dataset, to provide researchers access to commercial-size datasets. Second, we use this collection to study cover song recognition which involves finding harmonic patterns from audio features. Regarding the Million Song Dataset, we detail how we built the original collection from an online API, and how we encouraged other organizations to participate in the project. The result is the largest research dataset with heterogeneous sources of data available to music technology researchers. We demonstrate some of its potential and discuss the impact it already has on the field. On cover song recognition, we must revisit the existing literature since there are no publicly available results on a dataset of more than a few thousand entries. We present two solutions to tackle the problem, one using a hashing method, and one using a higher-level feature computed from the chromagram (dubbed the 2DFTM). We further investigate the 2DFTM since it has potential to be a relevant representation for any task involving audio harmonic content. Finally, we discuss the future of the dataset and the hope of seeing more work making use of the different sources of data that are linked in the Million Song Dataset. Regarding cover songs, we explain how this might be a first step towards defining a harmonic manifold of music, a space where harmonic similarities between songs would be more apparent.

  13. Short- and Medium-term Atmospheric Effects of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Labow, Gordon J.; Randall, Cora E.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Funke, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. In particular, the humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone from chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. These anthropogenic effects on ozone are most important in polar regions and have been significant since the 1970s. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the short- and medium-term (days to a few months) influences of solar proton events between 1963 and 2005 on stratospheric ozone. The four largest events in the past 45 years (August 1972; October 1989; July 2000; and October-November 2003) caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen- containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The hydrogen-containing compounds have very short lifetimes and lasted for only a few days (typically the duration of the solar proton event). On the other hand, the nitrogen-containing compounds lasted much longer, especially in the Winter. The nitrogen oxides were predicted

  14. Pulsar Rotation Measures and the Large-Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.; Manchester, R. N.; Lyne, A. G.; Qiao, G. J.; van Straten, W.

    2006-05-01

    The large-scale magnetic field of our Galaxy can be probed in three dimensions using Faraday rotation of pulsar signals. We report on the determination of 223 rotation measures from polarization observations of relatively distant southern pulsars made using the Parkes radio telescope. Combined with previously published observations, these data give clear evidence for large-scale counterclockwise fields (viewed from the north Galactic pole) in the spiral arms interior to the Sun and weaker evidence for a counterclockwise field in the Perseus arm. However, in interarm regions, including the solar neighborhood, we present evidence that suggests that large-scale fields are clockwise. We propose that the large-scale Galactic magnetic field has a bisymmetric structure with reversals on the boundaries of the spiral arms. Streaming motions associated with spiral density waves can directly generate such a structure from an initial, inwardly directed radial field. Large-scale fields increase toward the Galactic center, with a mean value of about 2 μG in the solar neighborhood and 4 μG at a galactocentric radius of 3 kpc.

  15. Environmental impacts of large-scale CSP plants in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiyong; Hou, Anping; Chang, Chun; Huang, Xiang; Shi, Duoqi; Wang, Zhifeng

    2014-01-01

    Several concentrated solar power demonstration plants are being constructed, and a few commercial plants have been announced in northwestern China. However, the mutual impacts between the concentrated solar power plants and their surrounding environments have not yet been addressed comprehensively in literature by the parties involved in these projects. In China, these projects are especially important as an increasing amount of low carbon electricity needs to be generated in order to maintain the current economic growth while simultaneously lessening pollution. In this study, the authors assess the potential environmental impacts of large-scale concentrated solar power plants. Specifically, the water use intensity, soil erosion and soil temperature are quantitatively examined. It was found that some of the impacts are favorable, while some impacts are negative in relation to traditional power generation techniques and some need further research before they can be reasonably appraised. In quantitative terms, concentrated solar power plants consume about 4000 L MW(-1) h(-1) of water if wet cooling technology is used, and the collectors lead to the soil temperature changes of between 0.5 and 4 °C; however, it was found that the soil erosion is dramatically alleviated. The results of this study are helpful to decision-makers in concentrated solar power site selection and regional planning. Some conclusions of this study are also valid for large-scale photovoltaic plants.

  16. Large scale static and dynamic friction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtar, K.; Barton, N.

    1984-12-31

    A series of nineteen shear tests were performed on fractures 1 m/sup 2/ in area, generated in blocks of sandstone, granite, tuff, hydrostone and concrete. The tests were conducted under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. A vertical stress assisted fracturing technique was developed to create the fractures through the large test blocks. Prior to testing, the fractured surface of each block was characterized using the Barton JRC-JCS concept. the results of characterization were used to generate the peak strength envelope for each fractured surface. Attempts were made to model the stress path based on the classical transformation equations which assumes a theoretical plane, elastic isotropic properties, and therefore no slip. However, this approach gave rise to a stress path passing above the strength envelope which is clearly unacceptable. The results of the experimental investigations indicated that actual stress path is affected by the dilatancy due to fracture roughness, as well as by the side friction imposed by the boundary conditions. By introducing the corrections due to the dilation and boundary conditions into the stress transformation equation, the fully corrected stress paths for predicting the strength of fractured blocks were obtained.

  17. Impact Cratering Physics al Large Planetary Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2007-06-01

    Present understanding of the physics controlling formation of ˜10^3 km diameter, multi-ringed impact structures on planets were derived from the ideas of Scripps oceanographer, W. Van Dorn, University of London's, W, Murray, and, Caltech's, D. O'Keefe who modeled the vertical oscillations (gravity and elasticity restoring forces) of shock-induced melt and damaged rock within the transient crater immediately after the downward propagating hemispheric shock has processed rock (both lining, and substantially below, the transient cavity crater). The resulting very large surface wave displacements produce the characteristic concentric, multi-ringed basins, as stored energy is radiated away and also dissipated upon inducing further cracking. Initial calculational description, of the above oscillation scenario, has focused upon on properly predicting the resulting density of cracks, and, their orientations. A new numerical version of the Ashby--Sammis crack damage model is coupled to an existing shock hydrodynamics code to predict impact induced damage distributions in a series of 15--70 cm rock targets from high speed impact experiments for a range of impactor type and velocity. These are compared to results of crack damage distributions induced in crustal rocks with small arms impactors and mapped ultrasonically in recent Caltech experiments (Ai and Ahrens, 2006).

  18. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

    2004-05-06

    Significant improvements in the properties ofsuperconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements arebeing incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapesthat are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devicesinclude new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusionpower experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines.These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applicationsthat utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments suchas ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising newmaterials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied inorder to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, wewill review the key developments that are leading to these newapplications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factoris improved understanding or development of materials with significantlyimproved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Snfor use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, thedevelopment is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort todevelop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materialsthat can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications ofthese two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, wewill discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order fornew applications to be realized.

  19. Large-scale structural monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Ian; Cunnane, James; Stevenson, Paul

    2000-06-01

    Extensive structural health instrumentation systems have been installed on three long-span cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong. The quantities measured include environment and applied loads (such as wind, temperature, seismic and traffic loads) and the bridge response to these loadings (accelerations, displacements, and strains). Measurements from over 1000 individual sensors are transmitted to central computing facilities via local data acquisition stations and a fault- tolerant fiber-optic network, and are acquired and processed continuously. The data from the systems is used to provide information on structural load and response characteristics, comparison with design, optimization of inspection, and assurance of continued bridge health. Automated data processing and analysis provides information on important structural and operational parameters. Abnormal events are noted and logged automatically. Information of interest is automatically archived for post-processing. Novel aspects of the instrumentation system include a fluid-based high-accuracy long-span Level Sensing System to measure bridge deck profile and tower settlement. This paper provides an outline of the design and implementation of the instrumentation system. A description of the design and implementation of the data acquisition and processing procedures is also given. Examples of the use of similar systems in monitoring other large structures are discussed.

  20. A Large Scale Virtual Gas Sensor Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Fernández-Diaz, Eduard; Chaudry, A.; Marco, Santiago; Persaud, Krishna; Perera, Alexandre

    2011-09-01

    This paper depicts a virtual sensor array that allows the user to generate gas sensor synthetic data while controlling a wide variety of the characteristics of the sensor array response: arbitrary number of sensors, support for multi-component gas mixtures and full control of the noise in the system such as sensor drift or sensor aging. The artificial sensor array response is inspired on the response of 17 polymeric sensors for three analytes during 7 month. The main trends in the synthetic gas sensor array, such as sensitivity, diversity, drift and sensor noise, are user controlled. Sensor sensitivity is modeled by an optionally linear or nonlinear method (spline based). The toolbox on data generation is implemented in open source R language for statistical computing and can be freely accessed as an educational resource or benchmarking reference. The software package permits the design of scenarios with a very large number of sensors (over 10000 sensels), which are employed in the test and benchmarking of neuromorphic models in the Bio-ICT European project NEUROCHEM.