Science.gov

Sample records for large scale structure

  1. Cosmology with Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, A.; Ross, A.; Seo, H.; DePutter, R.; Padmanabhan, N.; White, M.; Myers, A.; Bovy, J.; Blanton, M.; Hernandez, C.; Mena, O.; Percival, W.; Prada, F.; Ross, N. P.; Saito, S.; Schneider, D.; Skibba, R.; Smith, K.; Slosar, A.; Strauss, M.; Verde, L.; Weinberg, D.; Bachall, N.; Brinkmann, J.; da Costa, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey I-III surveyed 14,000 square degrees, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. I present cosmological results from this unprecedented data set which contains over a million galaxies distributed between redshift of 0.45 to 0.70. With such a large volume of data set, high precision cosmological constraints can be obtained given a careful control and understanding of observational systematics. I present a novel treatment of observational systematics and its application to the clustering signals from the data set. I will present cosmological constraints on dark components of the Universe and tightest constraints of the non-gaussianity of early Universe to date utilizing Large Scale Structure.

  2. Large-scale structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1983-01-01

    Problems encountered by aerospace designers in attempting to optimize whole aircraft are discussed, along with possible solutions. Large scale optimization, as opposed to component-by-component optimization, is hindered by computational costs, software inflexibility, concentration on a single, rather than trade-off, design methodology and the incompatibility of large-scale optimization with single program, single computer methods. The software problem can be approached by placing the full analysis outside of the optimization loop. Full analysis is then performed only periodically. Problem-dependent software can be removed from the generic code using a systems programming technique, and then embody the definitions of design variables, objective function and design constraints. Trade-off algorithms can be used at the design points to obtain quantitative answers. Finally, decomposing the large-scale problem into independent subproblems allows systematic optimization of the problems by an organization of people and machines.

  3. Large Scale Coordination of Small Scale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelski, Adam; Tarr, Lucas A.; Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Savage, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    Transient brightenings are ubiquitous features of the solar atmosphere across many length and energy scales, the most energetic of which manifest as large-class solar flares. Often, transient brightenings originate in regions of strong magnetic activity and create strong observable enhancements across wavelengths from X-ray to radio, with notable dynamics on timescales of seconds to hours.The coronal aspects of these brightenings have often been studied by way of EUV and X-ray imaging and spectra. These events are likely driven by photospheric activity (such as flux emergence) with the coronal brightenings originating largely from chromospheric ablation (evaporation). Until recently, chromospheric and transition region observations of these events have been limited. However, new observational capabilities have become available which significantly enhance our ability to understand the bi-directional flow of energy through the chromosphere between the photosphere and the corona.We have recently obtained a unique data set with which to study this flow of energy through the chromosphere via the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT), Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuStar), Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), and Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter (IBIS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). This data set targets a small active area near disk center which was tracked simultaneously for approximately four hours. Within this region, many transient brightenings detected through multiple layers of the solar atmosphere. In this study, we combine the imaging data and use the spectra from EIS and IRIS to track flows from the photosphere (HMI, SOT) through the chromosphere and transition region (AIA, IBIS, IRIS, ALMA) into the corona

  4. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  5. Statistical Measures of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogeley, Michael; Geller, Margaret; Huchra, John; Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard

    1993-12-01

    \\inv Mpc} To quantify clustering in the large-scale distribution of galaxies and to test theories for the formation of structure in the universe, we apply statistical measures to the CfA Redshift Survey. This survey is complete to m_{B(0)}=15.5 over two contiguous regions which cover one-quarter of the sky and include ~ 11,000 galaxies. The salient features of these data are voids with diameter 30-50\\hmpc and coherent dense structures with a scale ~ 100\\hmpc. Comparison with N-body simulations rules out the ``standard" CDM model (Omega =1, b=1.5, sigma_8 =1) at the 99% confidence level because this model has insufficient power on scales lambda >30\\hmpc. An unbiased open universe CDM model (Omega h =0.2) and a biased CDM model with non-zero cosmological constant (Omega h =0.24, lambda_0 =0.6) match the observed power spectrum. The amplitude of the power spectrum depends on the luminosity of galaxies in the sample; bright (L>L(*) ) galaxies are more strongly clustered than faint galaxies. The paucity of bright galaxies in low-density regions may explain this dependence. To measure the topology of large-scale structure, we compute the genus of isodensity surfaces of the smoothed density field. On scales in the ``non-linear" regime, <= 10\\hmpc, the high- and low-density regions are multiply-connected over a broad range of density threshold, as in a filamentary net. On smoothing scales >10\\hmpc, the topology is consistent with statistics of a Gaussian random field. Simulations of CDM models fail to produce the observed coherence of structure on non-linear scales (>95% confidence level). The underdensity probability (the frequency of regions with density contrast delta rho //lineρ=-0.8) depends strongly on the luminosity of galaxies; underdense regions are significantly more common (>2sigma ) in bright (L>L(*) ) galaxy samples than in samples which include fainter galaxies.

  6. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  7. Voids in the Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ad, Hagai; Piran, Tsvi

    1997-12-01

    Voids are the most prominent feature of the large-scale structure of the universe. Still, their incorporation into quantitative analysis of it has been relatively recent, owing essentially to the lack of an objective tool to identify the voids and to quantify them. To overcome this, we present here the VOID FINDER algorithm, a novel tool for objectively quantifying voids in the galaxy distribution. The algorithm first classifies galaxies as either wall galaxies or field galaxies. Then, it identifies voids in the wall-galaxy distribution. Voids are defined as continuous volumes that do not contain any wall galaxies. The voids must be thicker than an adjustable limit, which is refined in successive iterations. In this way, we identify the same regions that would be recognized as voids by the eye. Small breaches in the walls are ignored, avoiding artificial connections between neighboring voids. We test the algorithm using Voronoi tesselations. By appropriate scaling of the parameters with the selection function, we apply it to two redshift surveys, the dense SSRS2 and the full-sky IRAS 1.2 Jy. Both surveys show similar properties: ~50% of the volume is filled by voids. The voids have a scale of at least 40 h-1 Mpc and an average -0.9 underdensity. Faint galaxies do not fill the voids, but they do populate them more than bright ones. These results suggest that both optically and IRAS-selected galaxies delineate the same large-scale structure. Comparison with the recovered mass distribution further suggests that the observed voids in the galaxy distribution correspond well to underdense regions in the mass distribution. This confirms the gravitational origin of the voids.

  8. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  9. The challenge of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The tasks that I have assumed for myself in this presentation include three separate parts. The first, appropriate to the particular setting of this meeting, is to review the basic work of the founding of this field; the appropriateness comes from the fact that W. G. Tifft made immense contributions that are not often realized by the astronomical community. The second task is to outline the general tone of the observational evidence for large scale structures. (Here, in particular, I cannot claim to be complete. I beg forgiveness from any workers who are left out by my oversight for lack of space and time.) The third task is to point out some of the major aspects of the field that may represent the clues by which some brilliant sleuth will ultimately figure out how galaxies formed.

  10. "Cosmological Parameters from Large Scale Structure"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2005-01-01

    This grant has provided primary support for graduate student Mark Neyrinck, and some support for the PI and for colleague Nick Gnedin, who helped co-supervise Neyrinck. This award had two major goals. First, to continue to develop and apply methods for measuring galaxy power spectra on large, linear scales, with a view to constraining cosmological parameters. And second, to begin try to understand galaxy clustering at smaller. nonlinear scales well enough to constrain cosmology from those scales also. Under this grant, the PI and collaborators, notably Max Tegmark. continued to improve their technology for measuring power spectra from galaxy surveys at large, linear scales. and to apply the technology to surveys as the data become available. We believe that our methods are best in the world. These measurements become the foundation from which we and other groups measure cosmological parameters.

  11. Large scale structure of the sun's corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Mukul R.

    Results concerning the large-scale structure of the solar corona obtained by observations at meter-decameter wavelengths are reviewed. Coronal holes observed on the disk at multiple frequencies show the radial and azimuthal geometry of the hole. At the base of the hole there is good correspondence to the chromospheric signature in He I 10,830 A, but at greater heights the hole may show departures from symmetry. Two-dimensional imaging of weak-type III bursts simultaneously with the HAO SMM coronagraph/polarimeter measurements indicate that these bursts occur along elongated features emanating from the quiet sun, corresponding in position angle to the bright coronal streamers. It is shown that the densest regions of streamers and the regions of maximum intensity of type II bursts coincide closely. Non-flare-associated type II/type IV bursts associated with coronal streamer disruption events are studied along with correlated type II burst emissions originating from distant centers on the sun.

  12. Neutrino footprint in large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, Carlos Peña; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2017-03-01

    Recent constrains on the sum of neutrino masses inferred by analyzing cosmological data, show that detecting a non-zero neutrino mass is within reach of forthcoming cosmological surveys. Such a measurement will imply a direct determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale. Physically, the measurement relies on constraining the shape of the matter power spectrum below the neutrino free streaming scale: massive neutrinos erase power at these scales. However, detection of a lack of small-scale power from cosmological data could also be due to a host of other effects. It is therefore of paramount importance to validate neutrinos as the source of power suppression at small scales. We show that, independent on hierarchy, neutrinos always show a footprint on large, linear scales; the exact location and properties are fully specified by the measured power suppression (an astrophysical measurement) and atmospheric neutrinos mass splitting (a neutrino oscillation experiment measurement). This feature cannot be easily mimicked by systematic uncertainties in the cosmological data analysis or modifications in the cosmological model. Therefore the measurement of such a feature, up to 1% relative change in the power spectrum for extreme differences in the mass eigenstates mass ratios, is a smoking gun for confirming the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale from cosmological observations. It also demonstrates the synergy between astrophysics and particle physics experiments.

  13. Real or virtual large-scale structure?

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, August E.

    1999-01-01

    Modeling the development of structure in the universe on galactic and larger scales is the challenge that drives the field of computational cosmology. Here, photorealism is used as a simple, yet expert, means of assessing the degree to which virtual worlds succeed in replicating our own. PMID:10200243

  14. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  15. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  16. Large-Scale Structures of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2015-12-01

    A class of solar system analogs has yet to be identified among the large crop of planetary systems now observed. However, since most observed worlds are more easily detectable than direct analogs of the Sun's planets, the frequency of systems with structures similar to our own remains unknown. Identifying the range of possible planetary system architectures is complicated by the large number of physical processes that affect the formation and dynamical evolution of planets. I will present two ways of organizing planetary system structures. First, I will suggest that relatively few physical parameters are likely to differentiate the qualitative architectures of different systems. Solid mass in a protoplanetary disk is perhaps the most obvious possible controlling parameter, and I will give predictions for correlations between planetary system properties that we would expect to be present if this is the case. In particular, I will suggest that the solar system's structure is representative of low-metallicity systems that nevertheless host giant planets. Second, the disk structures produced as young stars are fed by their host clouds may play a crucial role. Using the observed distribution of RV giant planets as a function of stellar mass, I will demonstrate that invoking ice lines to determine where gas giants can form requires fine tuning. I will suggest that instead, disk structures built during early accretion have lasting impacts on giant planet distributions, and disk clean-up differentially affects the orbital distributions of giant and lower-mass planets. These two organizational hypotheses have different implications for the solar system's context, and I will suggest observational tests that may allow them to be validated or falsified.

  17. Large-scale structural monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Ian; Cunnane, James; Stevenson, Paul

    2000-06-01

    Extensive structural health instrumentation systems have been installed on three long-span cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong. The quantities measured include environment and applied loads (such as wind, temperature, seismic and traffic loads) and the bridge response to these loadings (accelerations, displacements, and strains). Measurements from over 1000 individual sensors are transmitted to central computing facilities via local data acquisition stations and a fault- tolerant fiber-optic network, and are acquired and processed continuously. The data from the systems is used to provide information on structural load and response characteristics, comparison with design, optimization of inspection, and assurance of continued bridge health. Automated data processing and analysis provides information on important structural and operational parameters. Abnormal events are noted and logged automatically. Information of interest is automatically archived for post-processing. Novel aspects of the instrumentation system include a fluid-based high-accuracy long-span Level Sensing System to measure bridge deck profile and tower settlement. This paper provides an outline of the design and implementation of the instrumentation system. A description of the design and implementation of the data acquisition and processing procedures is also given. Examples of the use of similar systems in monitoring other large structures are discussed.

  18. Responses in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a rigorous definition of general power-spectrum responses as resummed vertices with two hard and n soft momenta in cosmological perturbation theory. These responses measure the impact of long-wavelength perturbations on the local small-scale power spectrum. The kinematic structure of the responses (i.e., their angular dependence) can be decomposed unambiguously through a ``bias'' expansion of the local power spectrum, with a fixed number of physical response coefficients, which are only a function of the hard wavenumber k. Further, the responses up to n-th order completely describe the (n+2)-point function in the squeezed limit, i.e. with two hard and n soft modes, which one can use to derive the response coefficients. This generalizes previous results, which relate the angle-averaged squeezed limit to isotropic response coefficients. We derive the complete expression of first- and second-order responses at leading order in perturbation theory, and present extrapolations to nonlinear scales based on simulation measurements of the isotropic response coefficients. As an application, we use these results to predict the non-Gaussian part of the angle-averaged matter power spectrum covariance CovNGl=0(k1,k2), in the limit where one of the modes, say k2, is much smaller than the other. Without any free parameters, our model results are in very good agreement with simulations for k2 lesssim 0.06 h Mpc-1, and for any k1 gtrsim 2k2. The well-defined kinematic structure of the power spectrum response also permits a quick evaluation of the angular dependence of the covariance matrix. While we focus on the matter density field, the formalism presented here can be generalized to generic tracers such as galaxies.

  19. Large Scale Turbulent Structures in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    Jet noise is a major concern in the design of commercial aircraft. Studies by various researchers suggest that aerodynamic noise is a major contributor to jet noise. Some of these studies indicate that most of the aerodynamic jet noise due to turbulent mixing occurs when there is a rapid variation in turbulent structure, i.e. rapidly growing or decaying vortices. The objective of this research was to simulate a compressible round jet to study the non-linear evolution of vortices and the resulting acoustic radiations. In particular, to understand the effect of turbulence structure on the noise. An ideal technique to study this problem is Direct Numerical Simulations(DNS), because it provides precise control on the initial and boundary conditions that lead to the turbulent structures studied. It also provides complete 3-dimensional time dependent data. Since the dynamics of a temporally evolving jet are not greatly different from those, of a spatially evolving jet, a temporal jet problem was solved, using periodicity ill the direction of the jet axis. This enables the application of Fourier spectral methods in the streamwise direction. Physically this means that turbulent structures in the jet are repeated in successive downstream cells instead of being gradually modified downstream into a jet plume. The DNS jet simulation helps us understand the various turbulent scales and mechanisms of turbulence generation in the evolution of a compressible round jet. These accurate flow solutions will be used in future research to estimate near-field acoustic radiation by computing the total outward flux across a surface and determine how it is related to the evolution of the turbulent solutions. Furthermore, these simulations allow us to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic radiations to inlet/boundary conditions, with possible application to active noise suppression. In addition, the data generated can be used to compute various turbulence quantities such as mean velocities

  20. Large Scale Turbulent Structures in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    Jet noise is a major concern in the design of commercial aircraft. Studies by various researchers suggest that aerodynamic noise is a major contributor to jet noise. Some of these studies indicate that most of the aerodynamic jet noise due to turbulent mixing occurs when there is a rapid variation in turbulent structure, i.e. rapidly growing or decaying vortices. The objective of this research was to simulate a compressible round jet to study the non-linear evolution of vortices and the resulting acoustic radiations. In particular, to understand the effect of turbulence structure on the noise. An ideal technique to study this problem is Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), because it provides precise control on the initial and boundary conditions that lead to the turbulent structures studied. It also provides complete 3-dimensional time dependent data. Since the dynamics of a temporally evolving jet are not greatly different from those of a spatially evolving jet, a temporal jet problem was solved, using periodicity in the direction of the jet axis. This enables the application of Fourier spectral methods in the streamwise direction. Physically this means that turbulent structures in the jet are repeated in successive downstream cells instead of being gradually modified downstream into a jet plume. The DNS jet simulation helps us understand the various turbulent scales and mechanisms of turbulence generation in the evolution of a compressible round jet. These accurate flow solutions will be used in future research to estimate near-field acoustic radiation by computing the total outward flux across a surface and determine how it is related to the evolution of the turbulent solutions. Furthermore, these simulations allow us to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic radiations to inlet/boundary conditions, with possible appli(,a- tion to active noise suppression. In addition, the data generated can be used to compute, various turbulence quantities such as mean

  1. Large scale structure from viscous dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Blas, Diego; Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim E-mail: stefan.floerchinger@cern.ch E-mail: ntetrad@phys.uoa.gr

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations of sufficiently long wavelength admit a fluid dynamic description. We consider modes with wavevectors below a scale k{sub m} for which the dynamics is only mildly non-linear. The leading effect of modes above that scale can be accounted for by effective non-equilibrium viscosity and pressure terms. For mildly non-linear scales, these mainly arise from momentum transport within the ideal and cold but inhomogeneous fluid, while momentum transport due to more microscopic degrees of freedom is suppressed. As a consequence, concrete expressions with no free parameters, except the matching scale k{sub m}, can be derived from matching evolution equations to standard cosmological perturbation theory. Two-loop calculations of the matter power spectrum in the viscous theory lead to excellent agreement with N-body simulations up to scales k=0.2 h/Mpc. The convergence properties in the ultraviolet are better than for standard perturbation theory and the results are robust with respect to variations of the matching scale.

  2. Large scale structure from viscous dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations of sufficiently long wavelength admit a fluid dynamic description. We consider modes with wavevectors below a scale km for which the dynamics is only mildly non-linear. The leading effect of modes above that scale can be accounted for by effective non-equilibrium viscosity and pressure terms. For mildly non-linear scales, these mainly arise from momentum transport within the ideal and cold but inhomogeneous fluid, while momentum transport due to more microscopic degrees of freedom is suppressed. As a consequence, concrete expressions with no free parameters, except the matching scale km, can be derived from matching evolution equations to standard cosmological perturbation theory. Two-loop calculations of the matter power spectrum in the viscous theory lead to excellent agreement with N-body simulations up to scales k=0.2 h/Mpc. The convergence properties in the ultraviolet are better than for standard perturbation theory and the results are robust with respect to variations of the matching scale.

  3. Large-Scale Structure of Magnetospheric Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Delcourt, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigations of magnetospheric plasma structure are summarized under the broad categories of empirical models, transport across boundaries, formation, and dynamics of the plasma sheet. This report reviews work in these areas during the period 1991 to 1993. Fully three-dimensional empirical models and simulations have become important contributors to our understanding of the magnetospheric system. Some new structural concepts have appeared in the literature: the 'entry boundary' and 'geo-pause', the plasma sheet 'region 1 vortices', the 'low-energy layer', the 'adia-baticity boundary' or 'wall region', and a region in the tail to which we refer as the 'injection port'. Traditional structural concepts have also been the subject of recent study, notably the plasmapause, the magnetopause, and the plasma sheet. Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of plasma sheet formation and dynamics, but the acceleration of electrons to high energy remains somewhat mysterious.

  4. Management Structures and Large-Scale Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welty, Gordon; Lundin, Edward

    The structure of an organization plays a vital role in the evaluation of the organization. Social science researchers often assume that controls inherent in the physical sciences are as applicable to human subjects. Evaluation of Head Start is an example of the social relation of investigator to subject matter and of the variables introduced by…

  5. Large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, X L; Tong, P

    2001-09-01

    A systematic study of large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection is carried out in three different aspect-ratio cells filled with water. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the velocity profiles and statistics over varying Rayleigh numbers Ra and at various spatial positions across the whole convection cell. Large velocity fluctuations are found both in the central region and near the cell boundary. Despite the large velocity fluctuations, the flow field still maintains a large-scale quasi-two-dimensional structure, which rotates in a coherent manner. This coherent single-roll structure scales with Ra and can be divided into three regions in the rotation plane: (1) a thin viscous boundary layer, (2) a fully mixed central core region with a constant mean velocity gradient, and (3) an intermediate plume-dominated buffer region. The experiment reveals a unique driving mechanism for the large-scale coherent rotation in turbulent convection.

  6. Cosmic strings and the large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert

    1988-01-01

    A possible problem for cosmic string models of galaxy formation is presented. If very large voids are common and if loop fragmentation is not much more efficient than presently believed, then it may be impossible for string scenarios to produce the observed large-scale structure with Omega sub 0 = 1 and without strong environmental biasing.

  7. EINSTEIN'S SIGNATURE IN COSMOLOGICAL LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Bruni, Marco; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Wands, David

    2014-10-10

    We show how the nonlinearity of general relativity generates a characteristic nonGaussian signal in cosmological large-scale structure that we calculate at all perturbative orders in a large-scale limit. Newtonian gravity and general relativity provide complementary theoretical frameworks for modeling large-scale structure in ΛCDM cosmology; a relativistic approach is essential to determine initial conditions, which can then be used in Newtonian simulations studying the nonlinear evolution of the matter density. Most inflationary models in the very early universe predict an almost Gaussian distribution for the primordial metric perturbation, ζ. However, we argue that it is the Ricci curvature of comoving-orthogonal spatial hypersurfaces, R, that drives structure formation at large scales. We show how the nonlinear relation between the spatial curvature, R, and the metric perturbation, ζ, translates into a specific nonGaussian contribution to the initial comoving matter density that we calculate for the simple case of an initially Gaussian ζ. Our analysis shows the nonlinear signature of Einstein's gravity in large-scale structure.

  8. The Evolution of Baryons in Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Arielle Phillips, Lara; Mathews, Grant James; Coughlin, Jared; Suh, In-Saeng; Bhattacharya, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The environments of galaxies play a critical role in their formation and evolution. We study these environments using cosmological simulations with star formation and supernova feedback included. From these simulations, we parse the large scale structure into clusters, filaments and voids using a segmentation algorithm adapted from medical imaging. We trace the star formation history, gas phase and metal evolution of the baryons in the intergalactic medium as function of structure. We find that our algorithm reproduces the baryon fraction in the intracluster medium and that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, dense filaments. We present the consequences this large scale environment has for galactic halos and galaxy evolution.

  9. Large-scale structure from wiggly cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Vilenkin, Alexander

    1991-08-01

    Recent simulations of the evolution of cosmic strings indicate the presence of small-scale structure on the strings. It is shown that wakes produced by such 'wiggly' cosmic strings can result in the efficient formation of large-scale structure and large streaming velocities in the universe without significantly affecting the microwave-background isotropy. It is also argued that the motion of strings will lead to the generation of a primordial magnetic field. The most promising version of this scenario appears to be the one in which the universe is dominated by light neutrinos.

  10. The Large-Scale Structure of Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosso, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The standard textbook description of the nature of science describes the proposal, testing, and acceptance of a theoretical idea almost entirely in isolation from other theories. The resulting model of science is a kind of piecemeal empiricism that misses the important network structure of scientific knowledge. Only the large-scale description of…

  11. The Large-Scale Structure of Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosso, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The standard textbook description of the nature of science describes the proposal, testing, and acceptance of a theoretical idea almost entirely in isolation from other theories. The resulting model of science is a kind of piecemeal empiricism that misses the important network structure of scientific knowledge. Only the large-scale description of…

  12. Large scale structure of the sun's radio corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Results of studies of large scale structures of the corona at long radio wavelengths are presented, using data obtained with the multifrequency radioheliograph of the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. It is shown that features corresponding to coronal streamers and coronal holes are readily apparent in the Clark Lake maps.

  13. Wiggly cosmic strings, neutrinos and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    1993-04-01

    We discuss the cosmic string scenario of large-scale structure formation in light of the result that the strings are not smooth but instead have a lot of sub-structure or wiggles on them. It appears from the results of Albrecht and Stebbins that the scenario works best if the universe is dominated by massive neutrinos or some other form of hot dark matter. Some unique features of the scenario, such as the generation of primordial magnetic fields, are also described.

  14. The CLASSgal code for relativistic cosmological large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea; Montanari, Francesco; Lesgourgues, Julien; Durrer, Ruth

    2013-11-01

    We present accurate and efficient computations of large scale structure observables, obtained with a modified version of the CLASS code which is made publicly available. This code includes all relativistic corrections and computes both the power spectrum Cl(z1,z2) and the corresponding correlation function ξ(θ,z1,z2) of the matter density and the galaxy number fluctuations in linear perturbation theory. For Gaussian initial perturbations, these quantities contain the full information encoded in the large scale matter distribution at the level of linear perturbation theory. We illustrate the usefulness of our code for cosmological parameter estimation through a few simple examples.

  15. Large-scale structure of randomly jammed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Atsushi; Berthier, Ludovic; Parisi, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    We numerically analyze the density field of three-dimensional randomly jammed packings of monodisperse soft frictionless spherical particles, paying special attention to fluctuations occurring at large length scales. We study in detail the two-point static structure factor at low wave vectors in Fourier space. We also analyze the nature of the density field in real space by studying the large-distance behavior of the two-point pair correlation function, of density fluctuations in subsystems of increasing sizes, and of the direct correlation function. We show that such real space analysis can be greatly improved by introducing a coarse-grained density field to disentangle genuine large-scale correlations from purely local effects. Our results confirm that both Fourier and real space signatures of vanishing density fluctuations at large scale are absent, indicating that randomly jammed packings are not hyperuniform. In addition, we establish that the pair correlation function displays a surprisingly complex structure at large distances, which is however not compatible with the long-range negative correlation of hyperuniform systems but fully compatible with an analytic form for the structure factor. This implies that the direct correlation function is short ranged, as we also demonstrate directly. Our results reveal that density fluctuations in jammed packings do not follow the behavior expected for random hyperuniform materials, but display instead a more complex behavior.

  16. Alteration of Large-Scale Chromatin Structure by Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Anne C.; Rajendran, Ramji R.; Stenoien, David L.; Mancini, Michael A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2002-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily important in human physiology and disease, recruits coactivators which modify local chromatin structure. Here we describe effects of ER on large-scale chromatin structure as visualized in live cells. We targeted ER to gene-amplified chromosome arms containing large numbers of lac operator sites either directly, through a lac repressor-ER fusion protein (lac rep-ER), or indirectly, by fusing lac repressor with the ER interaction domain of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator 1. Significant decondensation of large-scale chromatin structure, comparable to that produced by the ∼150-fold-stronger viral protein 16 (VP16) transcriptional activator, was produced by ER in the absence of estradiol using both approaches. Addition of estradiol induced a partial reversal of this unfolding by green fluorescent protein-lac rep-ER but not by wild-type ER recruited by a lac repressor-SRC570-780 fusion protein. The chromatin decondensation activity did not require transcriptional activation by ER nor did it require ligand-induced coactivator interactions, and unfolding did not correlate with histone hyperacetylation. Ligand-induced coactivator interactions with helix 12 of ER were necessary for the partial refolding of chromatin in response to estradiol using the lac rep-ER tethering system. This work demonstrates that when tethered or recruited to DNA, ER possesses a novel large-scale chromatin unfolding activity. PMID:11971975

  17. Lagrangian space consistency relation for large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao E-mail: lh399@columbia.edu

    2015-09-01

    Consistency relations, which relate the squeezed limit of an (N+1)-point correlation function to an N-point function, are non-perturbative symmetry statements that hold even if the associated high momentum modes are deep in the nonlinear regime and astrophysically complex. Recently, Kehagias and Riotto and Peloso and Pietroni discovered a consistency relation applicable to large scale structure. We show that this can be recast into a simple physical statement in Lagrangian space: that the squeezed correlation function (suitably normalized) vanishes. This holds regardless of whether the correlation observables are at the same time or not, and regardless of whether multiple-streaming is present. The simplicity of this statement suggests that an analytic understanding of large scale structure in the nonlinear regime may be particularly promising in Lagrangian space.

  18. Efficient multiobjective optimization scheme for large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandhi, Ramana V.; Bharatram, Geetha; Venkayya, V. B.

    1992-09-01

    This paper presents a multiobjective optimization algorithm for an efficient design of large scale structures. The algorithm is based on generalized compound scaling techniques to reach the intersection of multiple functions. Multiple objective functions are treated similar to behavior constraints. Thus, any number of objectives can be handled in the formulation. Pseudo targets on objectives are generated at each iteration in computing the scale factors. The algorithm develops a partial Pareto set. This method is computationally efficient due to the fact that it does not solve many single objective optimization problems in reaching the Pareto set. The computational efficiency is compared with other multiobjective optimization methods, such as the weighting method and the global criterion method. Trusses, plate, and wing structure design cases with stress and frequency considerations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  19. Clusters as cornerstones of large-scale structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1997-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are one of the best tracers of large-scale structure in the Universe on scales well above 100 Mpc. The authors investigate here the clustering properties of a redshift sample of Abell/ACO clusters and compare the observational sample with mock samples constructed from N-body simulations on the basis of four different cosmological models. The authors discuss the power spectrum, the Minkowski functionals and the void statistics of these samples and conclude, that the SCDM and TCDM models are ruled out whereas the ACDM and BSI models are in agreement with the observational data.

  20. Evolution of baryons in cosmic large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali

    We introduce a new self-consistent structure finding algorithm that parses large scale cosmological structure into clusters, filaments and voids. This algorithm probes the structure at multiple scales and classifies the appropriate regions with the most probable structure type and size. We use this structure finding algorithm to parse and follow the evolution of poor clusters, filaments and voids in large scale simulations. We trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find the majority of star formation occurs in cold condensed gas in filaments at all redshifts and that it peaks at intermediate redshifts (z ~ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to high contrast regions or the inner parts of filaments. Since filaments bridge between void and cluster regions, this suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion onto poor clusters. We find that at the present epoch, the gas phase distribution is 43.1%, 30.0%, 24.7% and 2.2% in the diffuse, WHIM, hot halo and condensed phases, respectively. Most of the WHIM is found to be in filamentary structures. Moreover 8.77%, 79.1%, 2.11% and 9.98% of the gas is located in poor clusters, filaments, voids and unassigned regions respectively. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments at redshift z = 0.

  1. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  2. Large scale structure in universes dominated by cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. Richard

    1986-01-01

    The theory of Gaussian random density field peaks is applied to a numerical study of the large-scale structure developing from adiabatic fluctuations in models of biased galaxy formation in universes with Omega = 1, h = 0.5 dominated by cold dark matter (CDM). The angular anisotropy of the cross-correlation function demonstrates that the far-field regions of cluster-scale peaks are asymmetric, as recent observations indicate. These regions will generate pancakes or filaments upon collapse. One-dimensional singularities in the large-scale bulk flow should arise in these CDM models, appearing as pancakes in position space. They are too rare to explain the CfA bubble walls, but pancakes that are just turning around now are sufficiently abundant and would appear to be thin walls normal to the line of sight in redshift space. Large scale streaming velocities are significantly smaller than recent observations indicate. To explain the reported 700 km/s coherent motions, mass must be significantly more clustered than galaxies with a biasing factor of less than 0.4 and a nonlinear redshift at cluster scales greater than one for both massive neutrino and cold models.

  3. Simplified DGS procedure for large-scale genome structural study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Chul; Xu, Jia; Chen, Jun; Kim, Yeong; Winchester, David; Wang, San Ming

    2009-11-01

    Ditag genome scanning (DGS) uses next-generation DNA sequencing to sequence the ends of ditag fragments produced by restriction enzymes. These sequences are compared to known genome sequences to determine their structure. In order to use DGS for large-scale genome structural studies, we have substantially revised the original protocol by replacing the in vivo genomic DNA cloning with in vitro adaptor ligation, eliminating the ditag concatemerization steps, and replacing the 454 sequencer with Solexa or SOLiD sequencers for ditag sequence collection. This revised protocol further increases genome coverage and resolution and allows DGS to be used to analyze multiple genomes simultaneously.

  4. Origin of the large scale structures of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Oaknin, David H.

    2004-11-15

    We revise the statistical properties of the primordial cosmological density anisotropies that, at the time of matter-radiation equality, seeded the gravitational development of large scale structures in the otherwise homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker flat universe. Our analysis shows that random fluctuations of the density field at the same instant of equality and with comoving wavelength shorter than the causal horizon at that time can naturally account, when globally constrained to conserve the total mass (energy) of the system, for the observed scale invariance of the anisotropies over cosmologically large comoving volumes. Statistical systems with similar features are generically known as glasslike or latticelike. Obviously, these conclusions conflict with the widely accepted understanding of the primordial structures reported in the literature, which requires an epoch of inflationary cosmology to precede the standard expansion of the universe. The origin of the conflict must be found in the widespread, but unjustified, claim that scale invariant mass (energy) anisotropies at the instant of equality over comoving volumes of cosmological size, larger than the causal horizon at the time, must be generated by fluctuations in the density field with comparably large comoving wavelength.

  5. The CLASSgal code for relativistic cosmological large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dio, Enea Di; Montanari, Francesco; Durrer, Ruth; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: Francesco.Montanari@unige.ch E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch

    2013-11-01

    We present accurate and efficient computations of large scale structure observables, obtained with a modified version of the CLASS code which is made publicly available. This code includes all relativistic corrections and computes both the power spectrum C{sub ℓ}(z{sub 1},z{sub 2}) and the corresponding correlation function ξ(θ,z{sub 1},z{sub 2}) of the matter density and the galaxy number fluctuations in linear perturbation theory. For Gaussian initial perturbations, these quantities contain the full information encoded in the large scale matter distribution at the level of linear perturbation theory. We illustrate the usefulness of our code for cosmological parameter estimation through a few simple examples.

  6. Large Scale Parallel Structured AMR Calculations using the SAMRAI Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Wissink, A M; Hornung, R D; Kohn, S R; Smith, S S; Elliott, N

    2001-08-01

    This paper discusses the design and performance of the parallel data communication infrastructure in SAMRAI, a software framework for structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) multi-physics applications. We describe requirements of such applications and how SAMRAI abstractions manage complex data communication operations found in them. Parallel performance is characterized for two adaptive problems solving hyperbolic conservation laws on up to 512 processors of the IBM ASCI Blue Pacific system. Results reveal good scaling for numerical and data communication operations but poorer scaling in adaptive meshing and communication schedule construction phases of the calculations. We analyze the costs of these different operations, addressing key concerns for scaling SAMR computations to large numbers of processors, and discuss potential changes to improve our current implementation.

  7. U-shaped Vortex Structures in Large Scale Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yantao; Peng, Xiaoxing; Xu, Lianghao; Hong, Fangwen

    2015-12-01

    The control of cloud cavitation, especially large scale cloud cavitation(LSCC), is always a hot issue in the field of cavitation research. However, there has been little knowledge on the evolution of cloud cavitation since it is associated with turbulence and vortex flow. In this article, the structure of cloud cavitation shed by sheet cavitation around different hydrofoils and a wedge were observed in detail with high speed camera (HSC). It was found that the U-shaped vortex structures always existed in the development process of LSCC. The results indicated that LSCC evolution was related to this kind of vortex structures, and it may be a universal character for LSCC. Then vortex strength of U-shaped vortex structures in a cycle was analyzed with numerical results.

  8. Solving large scale structure in ten easy steps with COLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassev, Svetlin; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2013-06-01

    We present the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method: an N-body method for solving for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). Unlike standard N-body methods, the COLA method can straightforwardly trade accuracy at small-scales in order to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing, as those catalogs are essential for performing detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS. As an illustration, we ran a COLA-based N-body code on a box of size 100 Mpc/h with particles of mass ≈ 5 × 109Msolar/h. Running the code with only 10 timesteps was sufficient to obtain an accurate description of halo statistics down to halo masses of at least 1011Msolar/h. This is only at a modest speed penalty when compared to mocks obtained with LPT. A standard detailed N-body run is orders of magnitude slower than our COLA-based code. The speed-up we obtain with COLA is due to the fact that we calculate the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT, while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos. Achieving a similar level of accuracy in halo statistics without the COLA method requires at least 3 times more timesteps than when COLA is employed.

  9. Solving large scale structure in ten easy steps with COLA

    SciTech Connect

    Tassev, Svetlin; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Eisenstein, Daniel J. E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method: an N-body method for solving for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). Unlike standard N-body methods, the COLA method can straightforwardly trade accuracy at small-scales in order to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing, as those catalogs are essential for performing detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS. As an illustration, we ran a COLA-based N-body code on a box of size 100 Mpc/h with particles of mass ≈ 5 × 10{sup 9}M{sub s}un/h. Running the code with only 10 timesteps was sufficient to obtain an accurate description of halo statistics down to halo masses of at least 10{sup 11}M{sub s}un/h. This is only at a modest speed penalty when compared to mocks obtained with LPT. A standard detailed N-body run is orders of magnitude slower than our COLA-based code. The speed-up we obtain with COLA is due to the fact that we calculate the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT, while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos. Achieving a similar level of accuracy in halo statistics without the COLA method requires at least 3 times more timesteps than when COLA is employed.

  10. From Systematic Errors to Cosmology Using Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunterer, Dragan

    We propose to carry out a two-pronged program to significantly improve links between galaxy surveys and constraints on primordial cosmology and fundamental physics. We will first develop the methodology to self-calibrate the survey, that is, determine the large-angle calibration systematics internally from the survey. We will use this information to correct biases that propagate from the largest to smaller angular scales. Our approach for tackling the systematics is very complementary to existing ones, in particular in the sense that it does not assume knowledge of specific systematic maps or templates. It is timely to undertake these analyses, since none of the currently known methods addresses the multiplicative effects of large-angle calibration errors that contaminate the small-scale signal and present one of the most significant sources of error in the large-scale structure. The second part of the proposal is to precisely quantify the statistical and systematic errors in the reconstruction of the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky map using information from galaxy surveys. Unlike the ISW contributions to CMB power, the ISW map reconstruction has not been studied in detail to date. We will create a nimble plug-and-play pipeline to ascertain how reliably a map from an arbitrary LSS survey can be used to separate the late-time and early-time contributions to CMB anisotropy at large angular scales. We will pay particular attention to partial sky coverage, incomplete redshift information, finite redshift range, and imperfect knowledge of the selection function for the galaxy survey. Our work should serve as the departure point for a variety of implications in cosmology, including the physical origin of the large-angle CMB "anomalies".

  11. Large-scale structures in turbulent Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of fully developed turbulent Couette flow is performed with a large computational domain in the streamwise and spanwise directions (40 πh and 6 πh) to investigate streamwise-scale growth mechanism of the streamwise velocity fluctuating structures in the core region, where h is the channel half height. It is shown that long streamwise-scale structures (> 3 h) are highly energetic and they contribute to more than 80% of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress, compared to previous studies in canonical Poiseuille flows. Instantaneous and statistical analysis show that negative-u' structures on the bottom wall in the Couette flow continuously grow in the streamwise direction due to mean shear, and they penetrate to the opposite moving wall. The geometric center of the log layer is observed in the centerline with a dominant outer peak in streamwise spectrum, and the maximum streamwise extent for structure is found in the centerline, similar to previous observation in turbulent Poiseuille flows at high Reynolds number. Further inspection of time-evolving instantaneous fields clearly exhibits that adjacent long structures combine to form a longer structure in the centerline. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2014R1A1A2057031).

  12. Large-scale structure non-Gaussianities with modal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Relying on a separable modal expansion of the bispectrum, the implementation of a fast estimator for the full bispectrum of a 3d particle distribution is presented. The computational cost of accurate bispectrum estimation is negligible relative to simulation evolution, so the bispectrum can be used as a standard diagnostic whenever the power spectrum is evaluated. As an application, the time evolution of gravitational and primordial dark matter bispectra was measured in a large suite of N-body simulations. The bispectrum shape changes characteristically when the cosmic web becomes dominated by filaments and halos, therefore providing a quantitative probe of 3d structure formation. Our measured bispectra are determined by ~ 50 coefficients, which can be used as fitting formulae in the nonlinear regime and for non-Gaussian initial conditions. We also compare the measured bispectra with predictions from the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS).

  13. Probing large-scale structure with radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shea D.

    This thesis focuses on detecting magnetized relativistic plasma in the intergalactic medium (IGM) of filamentary large-scale structure (LSS) by observing synchrotron emission emitted by structure formation shocks. Little is known about the IGM beyond the largest clusters of galaxies, and synchrotron emission holds enormous promise as a means of probing magnetic fields and relativistic particle populations in these low density regions. I'll first report on observations taken at the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of the diffuse radio source 0809+39. I use these observations to demonstrate that 0809+39 is likely the first "radio relic" discovered that is not associated with a rich |"X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. I then demonstrate that an unconventional reprocessing of the NVSS polarization survey can reveal structures on scales from 15' to hundreds of degrees, far larger than the nominal shortest-baseline scale. This yields hundreds of new diffuse sources as well as the identification of a new nearby galactic loop . These observations also highlight the major obstacle that diffuse galactic foreground emission poses for any search for large-scale, low surface- brightness extragalactic emission. I therefore explore the cross-correlation of diffuse radio emission with optical tracers of LSS as a means of statistically detecting the presence of magnetic fields in the low-density regions of the cosmic web. This initial study with the Bonn 1.4 GHz radio survey yields an upper limit of 0.2 mG for large-scale filament magnetic fields. Finally, I report on new Green Bank Telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations of the famous Coma cluster of galaxies. Major findings include an extension to the Coma cluster radio relic source 1253+275 which makes its total extent ~2 Mpc, as well as a sharp edge, or "front", on the Western side of the radio halo which shows a strong correlation with merger activity associated with an

  14. Large-scale coherent structures as drivers of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Gutmark, E.; Parr, T.P.; Parr, D.M.; Wilson, K.J.

    1987-06-01

    The role of flow coherent structures as drivers of combustion instabilities in a dump combustor was studied. Results of nonreacting tests in air and water flows as well as combustion experiments in a diffusion flame and dump combustor are discussed to provide insight into the generation process of large-scale structures in the combustor flow and their interaction with the combustion process. It is shown that the flow structures, or vortices, are formed by interaction between the flow instabilities and the chamber acoustic resonance. When these vortices dominate the reacting flow, the combustion is confined to their cores, leading to periodic heat release, which may result in the driving of high amplitude pressure oscillations. These oscillations are typical to the occurrence of combustion instabilities for certain operating conditions. The basic understanding of the interaction between flow dynamics and the combustion process opens up the possibility for rational control of combustion-induced pressure oscillations. 42 references.

  15. The large-scale structure of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the solar wind is reviewed on the basis of experimental space measurements acquired over approximately the last decade. The observations cover the fading portion of the last solar cycle up through the maximum of the present cycle. The character of the interplanetary medium is considered from the viewpoint of the temporal behavior of the solar wind over increasingly longer time intervals, the average properties of the various solar wind parameters and their interrelationships. Interplanetary-terrestrial relationships and the expected effects of heliographic lattitude and radial distance are briefly discussed.

  16. Structure and function of large-scale brain systems.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the functional neuroanatomy of large-scale brain systems. Both the structure and functions of these brain networks are presented. All human behavior is the result of interactions within and between these brain systems. This system of brain function completely changes our understanding of how cognition and behavior are organized within the brain, replacing the traditional lesion model. Understanding behavior within the context of brain network interactions has profound implications for modifying abstract constructs such as attention, learning, and memory. These constructs also must be understood within the framework of a paradigm shift, which emphasizes ongoing interactions within a dynamically changing environment.

  17. Large-scale structure formation with global topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Zhou, Zhi-Hong

    1996-05-01

    We investigate cosmological structure formation seeded by topological defects which may form during a phase transition in the early Universe. First, we derive a partially new, local, and gauge-invariant system of perturbation equations to treat microwave background and dark matter fluctuations induced by topological defects or any other type of seeds. We then show that this system is well suited for numerical analysis of structure formation by applying it to seeds induced by fluctuations of a global scalar field. Our numerical results cover a larger dynamical range than those covered by previous investigations and are complementary to them since we use substantially different methods. The resulting microwave background fluctuations are compatible with older simulations. We also obtain a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations although with somewhat higher amplitude. On the other hand, our dark matter results yield a smaller bias parameter compatible with b~2 on scales of 20h-1 Mpc in contrast with previous work which yielded larger bias factors. Our conclusions are thus more positive. According to the aspects analyzed in this work, global topological defect-induced fluctuations yield viable scenarios of structure formation and do better than standard CDM on large scales.

  18. Planck data versus large scale structure: Methods to quantify discordance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Tom; Battye, Richard A.; Moss, Adam

    2017-06-01

    Discordance in the Λ cold dark matter cosmological model can be seen by comparing parameters constrained by cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements to those inferred by probes of large scale structure. Recent improvements in observations, including final data releases from both Planck and SDSS-III BOSS, as well as improved astrophysical uncertainty analysis of CFHTLenS, allows for an update in the quantification of any tension between large and small scales. This paper is intended, primarily, as a discussion on the quantifications of discordance when comparing the parameter constraints of a model when given two different data sets. We consider Kullback-Leibler divergence, comparison of Bayesian evidences and other statistics which are sensitive to the mean, variance and shape of the distributions. However, as a byproduct, we present an update to the similar analysis in [R. A. Battye, T. Charnock, and A. Moss, Phys. Rev. D 91, 103508 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.103508], where we find that, considering new data and treatment of priors, the constraints from the CMB and from a combination of large scale structure (LSS) probes are in greater agreement and any tension only persists to a minor degree. In particular, we find the parameter constraints from the combination of LSS probes which are most discrepant with the Planck 2015 +Pol +BAO parameter distributions can be quantified at a ˜2.55 σ tension using the method introduced in [R. A. Battye, T. Charnock, and A. Moss, Phys. Rev. D 91, 103508 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.103508]. If instead we use the distributions constrained by the combination of LSS probes which are in greatest agreement with those from Planck 2015 +Pol +BAO this tension is only 0.76 σ .

  19. Systematic renormalization of the effective theory of Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Pajer, Enrico

    2016-05-31

    A perturbative description of Large Scale Structure is a cornerstone of our understanding of the observed distribution of matter in the universe. Renormalization is an essential and defining step to make this description physical and predictive. Here we introduce a systematic renormalization procedure, which neatly associates counterterms to the UV-sensitive diagrams order by order, as it is commonly done in quantum field theory. As a concrete example, we renormalize the one-loop power spectrum and bispectrum of both density and velocity. In addition, we present a series of results that are valid to all orders in perturbation theory. First, we show that while systematic renormalization requires temporally non-local counterterms, in practice one can use an equivalent basis made of local operators. We give an explicit prescription to generate all counterterms allowed by the symmetries. Second, we present a formal proof of the well-known general argument that the contribution of short distance perturbations to large scale density contrast δ and momentum density π(k) scale as k{sup 2} and k, respectively. Third, we demonstrate that the common practice of introducing counterterms only in the Euler equation when one is interested in correlators of δ is indeed valid to all orders.

  20. Dark energy from large-scale structure lensing information

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Tingting; Pen Ueli; Dore, Oliver

    2010-06-15

    Wide area large-scale structure (LSS) surveys are planning to map a substantial fraction of the visible Universe to quantify dark energy through baryon acoustic oscillations. At increasing redshift, for example, that probed by proposed 21-cm intensity mapping surveys, gravitational lensing potentially limits the fidelity (Hui et al., 2007) because it distorts the apparent matter distribution. In this paper we show that these distortions can be reconstructed, and actually used to map the distribution of intervening dark matter. The lensing information for sources at z=1-3 allows accurate reconstruction of the gravitational potential on large scales, l < or approx. 100, which is well matched for integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect measurements of dark energy and its sound speed, and a strong constraint for modified gravity models of dark energy. We built an optimal quadratic lensing estimator for non-Gaussian sources, which is necessary for LSS. The phenomenon of 'information saturation' (Rimes and Hamilton, 2005) saturates reconstruction at mildly nonlinear scales, where the linear source power spectrum {Delta}{sup 2{approx}}0.2-0.5, depending on power spectrum slope. Naive Gaussian estimators with nonlinear cutoff can be tuned to reproduce the optimal non-Gaussian errors within a factor of 2. We compute the effective number densities of independent lensing sources for LSS lensing, and find that they increase rapidly with redshifts. For LSS/21-cm sources at z{approx}2-4, the lensing reconstruction is limited by cosmic variance at l < or approx. 100.

  1. Simulation and experiment for large scale space structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongbo; Zhou, Jian; Zha, Zuoliang

    2013-04-01

    The future space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a large scale space structure. A new design of transient temperature field analysis method of the developable reflector on orbit environment is presented, which simulates physical characteristic of developable antenna reflector with a high precision. The different kinds of analysis denote that different thermal elastic characteristics of different materials. The three-dimension multi-physics coupling transient thermal distortion equations for the antenna are founded based on the Galerkins method. For a reflector on geosynchronous orbit, the transient temperature field results from this method are compared with these from NASA. It follows from the analysis that the precision of this method is high. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with IEBIS and thermal sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing developable tube. Results reveal that the temperature levels of the developable antenna reflector alternate greatly in the orbital period, which is about ±120° when considering solar flux ,earth radiating flux and albedo scattering flux.

  2. The Large-scale Structure of the Universe: Probes of Cosmology and Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Yookyung

    The usefulness of large-scale structure as a probe of cosmology and structure formation is increasing as large deep surveys in multi-wavelength bands are becoming possible. The observational analysis of large-scale structure guided by large volume numerical simulations are beginning to offer us complementary information and crosschecks of cosmological parameters estimated from the anisotropies in Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. Understanding structure formation and evolution and even galaxy formation history is also being aided by observations of different redshift snapshots of the Universe, using various tracers of large-scale structure. This dissertation work covers aspects of large-scale structure from the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, to that of large scale filaments and galaxy clusters. First, I discuss a large- scale structure use for high precision cosmology. I investigate the reconstruction of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak within the context of Lagrangian perturbation theory, testing its validity in a large suite of cosmological volume N-body simulations. Then I consider galaxy clusters and the large scale filaments surrounding them in a high resolution N-body simulation. I investigate the geometrical properties of galaxy cluster neighborhoods, focusing on the filaments connected to clusters. Using mock observations of galaxy clusters, I explore the correlations of scatter in galaxy cluster mass estimates from multi-wavelength observations and different measurement techniques. I also examine the sources of the correlated scatter by considering the intrinsic and environmental properties of clusters.

  3. Large-scale structure and matter in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Peacock, J A

    2003-11-15

    This paper summarizes the physical mechanisms that encode the type and quantity of cosmological matter in the properties of large-scale structure, and reviews the application of such tests to current datasets. The key lengths of the horizon size at matter-radiation equality and at last scattering determine the total matter density and its ratio to the relativistic density; acoustic oscillations can diagnose whether the matter is collisionless, and small-scale structure or its absence can limit the mass of any dark-matter relic particle. The most stringent constraints come from combining data on present-day galaxy clustering with data on CMB anisotropies. Such an analysis breaks the degeneracies inherent in either dataset alone, and proves that the Universe is very close to flat. The matter content is accurately consistent with pure cold dark matter, with ca. 25% of the critical density, and fluctuations that are scalar only, adiabatic and scale invariant. It is demonstrated that these conclusions cannot be evaded by adjusting either the equation of state of the vacuum, or the total relativistic density.

  4. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A. B.; Littlewood, R.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-10-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work and from field observations: (1) Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; (2) when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides (`calving'); and (3) when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first-order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  5. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A.; Littlewood, R. C.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work, and from field observations: Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides ('calving'); and when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  6. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  7. Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations using Quantum Chemistry Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-03-01

    This talk will address our recent efforts in developing fast, linear scaling electronic structure methods for large scale applications. Of special importance is our fast multipole method( M. C. Strain, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Science 271), 51 (1996). (FMM) for achieving linear scaling for the quantum Coulomb problem (GvFMM), the traditional bottleneck in quantum chemistry calculations based on Gaussian orbitals. Fast quadratures(R. E. Stratmann, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 257), 213 (1996). combined with methods that avoid the Hamiltonian diagonalization( J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 106), 5569 (1997) have resulted in density functional theory (DFT) programs that can be applied to systems containing many hundreds of atoms and ---depending on computational resources or level of theory-- to many thousands of atoms.( A. D. Daniels, J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 107), 425 (1997). Three solutions for the diagonalization bottleneck will be analyzed and compared: a conjugate gradient density matrix search (CGDMS), a Hamiltonian polynomial expansion of the density matrix, and a pseudo-diagonalization method. Besides DFT, our near-field exchange method( J. C. Burant, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 105), 8969 (1996). for linear scaling Hartree-Fock calculations will be discussed. Based on these improved capabilities, we have also developed programs to obtain vibrational frequencies (via analytic energy second derivatives) and excitation energies (through time-dependent DFT) of large molecules like porphyn or C_70. Our GvFMM has been extended to periodic systems( K. N. Kudin and G. E. Scuseria, Chem. Phys. Lett., in press.) and progress towards a Gaussian-based DFT and HF program for polymers and solids will be reported. Last, we will discuss our progress on a Laplace-transformed \\cal O(N^2) second-order pertubation theory (MP2) method.

  8. Plasma Suppression of Large Scale Structure Formation in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin; Lai, Kwang-Chang

    2007-12-10

    We point out that during the reionization epoch of the cosmic history, the plasma collective effect among the ordinary matter would suppress the large scale structure formation. The imperfect Debye shielding at finite temperature would induce a residual long-range electrostatic potential which, working together with the baryon thermal pressure, would counter the gravitational collapse. As a result the effective Jean's length, {tilde {lambda}}{sub J}, is increased by a factor, {tilde {lambda}}{sub J}/{lambda}{sub J} = {radical}8/5, relative to the conventional one. For scales smaller than the effective Jean's scale the plasma would oscillate at the ion-acoustic frequency. The modes that would be influenced by this effect depend on the starting time and the initial temperature of reionization, but roughly lie in the range 0.5hMpc{sup -1} < k, which corresponds to the region of the Lyman-{alpha} forest from the inter-galactic medium. We predict that in the linear regime of density-contrast growth, the plasma suppression of the matter power spectrum would approach 1 - ({Omega}{sub dm}/{Omega}{sub m}){sup 2} {approx} 1 -(5/6){sup 2} {approx} 30%.

  9. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. We describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/k{sub NL} and k/k{sub M}, where k is the wavenumber of interest, k{sub NL} is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and k{sub M} is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  10. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    DOE PAGES

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local inmore » space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.« less

  11. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  12. Large-scale testing of structural clay tile infilled frames

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.D.; Bennett, R.M.

    1993-03-18

    A summary of large-scale cyclic static tests of structural clay tile infilled frames is given. In-plane racking tests examined the effects of varying frame stiffness, varying infill size, infill offset from frame centerline, and single and double wythe infill construction. Out-of-plane tests examined infilled frame response to inertial loadings and inter-story drift loadings. Sequential in-plane and out-of-plane loadings were performed to determine the effects of orthogonal damage and degradation on both strength and stiffness. A combined out-of-plane inertial and in-plane racking test was conducted to investigate the interaction of multi-directional loading. To determine constitutive properties of the infills, prism compression, mortar compression and various unit tile tests were performed.

  13. Phase Correlations and Topological Measures of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, P.

    The process of gravitational instability initiated by small primordial density perturbations is a vital ingredient of cosmological models that attempt to explain how galaxies and large-scale structure formed in the Universe. In the standard picture (the "concordance" model), a period of accelerated expansion ("inflation") generated density fluctuations with simple statistical properties through quantum processes (Starobinsky [82], [83], [84]; Guth [39]; Guth & Pi [40]; Albrecht & Steinhardt [2]; Linde [55]). In this scenario the primordial density field is assumed to form a statistically homogeneous and isotropic Gaussian random field (GRF). Over years of observational scrutiny this paradigm has strengthened its hold in the minds of cosmologists and has survived many tests, culminating in those furnished by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP; Bennett et al. [7]; Hinshaw et al. [45].

  14. Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Marcello; Baldauf, T.; Bond, J. Richard; Dalal, N.; Putter, R. D.; Dore, O.; Green, Daniel; Hirata, Chris; Huang, Zhiqi; Huterer, Dragan; Jeong, Donghui; Johnson, Matthew C.; Krause, Elisabeth; Loverde, Marilena; Meyers, Joel; Meeburg, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo; Shandera, Sarah; Silverstein, Eva; Slosar, Anze; Smith, Kendrick; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Assassi, Valentin; Braden, Jonathan; Hajian, Amir; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Stein, George; Engelen, Alexander van

    2014-12-15

    The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large-scale structure is, however, from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude f$loc\\atop{NL}$ (f$eq\\atop{NL}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are Δf$loc, eq\\atop{NL}$ ≃ 1. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.

  15. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  16. Large scale structure of the globular cluster population in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, Alexander T.; O'Neill, Conor; Madrid, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    A search for globular cluster candidates in the Coma Cluster was carried out using Hubble Space Telescope data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We combine different observing programs including the Coma Treasury Survey in order to obtain the large scale distribution of globular clusters in Coma. Globular cluster candidates were selected through careful morphological inspection and a detailed analysis of their magnitude and colors in the two available wavebands, F475W (Sloan g) and F814W (I). Color Magnitude Diagrams, radial density plots and density maps were then created to characterize the globular cluster population in Coma. Preliminary results show the structure of the intergalactic globular cluster system throughout Coma, among the largest globular clusters catalogues to date. The spatial distribution of globular clusters shows clear overdensities, or bridges, between Coma galaxies. It also becomes evident that galaxies of similar luminosity have vastly different numbers of associated globular clusters.

  17. Inflationary tensor fossils in large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Fasiello, Matteo; Jeong, Donghui; Kamionkowski, Marc E-mail: mrf65@case.edu E-mail: kamion@jhu.edu

    2014-12-01

    Inflation models make specific predictions for a tensor-scalar-scalar three-point correlation, or bispectrum, between one gravitational-wave (tensor) mode and two density-perturbation (scalar) modes. This tensor-scalar-scalar correlation leads to a local power quadrupole, an apparent departure from statistical isotropy in our Universe, as well as characteristic four-point correlations in the current mass distribution in the Universe. So far, the predictions for these observables have been worked out only for single-clock models in which certain consistency conditions between the tensor-scalar-scalar correlation and tensor and scalar power spectra are satisfied. Here we review the requirements on inflation models for these consistency conditions to be satisfied. We then consider several examples of inflation models, such as non-attractor and solid-inflation models, in which these conditions are put to the test. In solid inflation the simplest consistency conditions are already violated whilst in the non-attractor model we find that, contrary to the standard scenario, the tensor-scalar-scalar correlator probes directly relevant model-dependent information. We work out the predictions for observables in these models. For non-attractor inflation we find an apparent local quadrupolar departure from statistical isotropy in large-scale structure but that this power quadrupole decreases very rapidly at smaller scales. The consistency of the CMB quadrupole with statistical isotropy then constrains the distance scale that corresponds to the transition from the non-attractor to attractor phase of inflation to be larger than the currently observable horizon. Solid inflation predicts clustering fossils signatures in the current galaxy distribution that may be large enough to be detectable with forthcoming, and possibly even current, galaxy surveys.

  18. Testing LSST Dither Strategies for Large-scale Structure Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awan, Humna; Gawiser, Eric J.; Kurczynski, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will start a ten-year survey of the southern sky in 2022. Since the telescope observing strategy can lead to artifacts in the observed data, we undertake an investigation of implementing large telescope-pointing offsets (called dithers) as a means to minimize the induced artifacts. We implement various types of dithers, varying in both implementation timescale and the dither geometry, and examine their effects on the r-band coadded depth after the 10-year survey. Then we propagate the depth fluctuations to galaxy counts fluctuations, which are a systematic for large-scale structure studies. We show that the observing strategies induce window function uncertainties which set a constraint on the level of information we can extract from an optimized survey to precisely measure Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations at high redshifts. We find that the best dither strategies lead to window function uncertainties well below the minimum statistical uncertainty after the 10 years of survey, hence not requiring any systematics correction methods. While the systematics level is considerably higher after the first year of the survey, dithering can play a critical role in reducing it. We also explore different cadences, and demonstrate that the best dither strategies minimize the window function uncertainties for various cadences.

  19. Reconstructing Information in Large-Scale Structure via Logarithmic Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, Istvan

    We propose to develop a new method to extract information from large-scale structure data combining two-point statistics and non-linear transformations; before, this information was available only with substantially more complex higher-order statistical methods. Initially, most of the cosmological information in large-scale structure lies in two-point statistics. With non- linear evolution, some of that useful information leaks into higher-order statistics. The PI and group has shown in a series of theoretical investigations how that leakage occurs, and explained the Fisher information plateau at smaller scales. This plateau means that even as more modes are added to the measurement of the power spectrum, the total cumulative information (loosely speaking the inverse errorbar) is not increasing. Recently we have shown in Neyrinck et al. (2009, 2010) that a logarithmic (and a related Gaussianization or Box-Cox) transformation on the non-linear Dark Matter or galaxy field reconstructs a surprisingly large fraction of this missing Fisher information of the initial conditions. This was predicted by the earlier wave mechanical formulation of gravitational dynamics by Szapudi & Kaiser (2003). The present proposal is focused on working out the theoretical underpinning of the method to a point that it can be used in practice to analyze data. In particular, one needs to deal with the usual real-life issues of galaxy surveys, such as complex geometry, discrete sam- pling (Poisson or sub-Poisson noise), bias (linear, or non-linear, deterministic, or stochastic), redshift distortions, pro jection effects for 2D samples, and the effects of photometric redshift errors. We will develop methods for weak lensing and Sunyaev-Zeldovich power spectra as well, the latter specifically targetting Planck. In addition, we plan to investigate the question of residual higher- order information after the non-linear mapping, and possible applications for cosmology. Our aim will be to work out

  20. Simulating the large-scale structure of HI intensity maps

    SciTech Connect

    Seehars, Sebastian; Paranjape, Aseem; Witzemann, Amadeus; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel E-mail: aseem@iucaa.in E-mail: alexandre.refregier@phys.ethz.ch E-mail: joel.akeret@phys.ethz.ch

    2016-03-01

    Intensity mapping of neutral hydrogen (HI) is a promising observational probe of cosmology and large-scale structure. We present wide field simulations of HI intensity maps based on N-body simulations of a 2.6 Gpc / h box with 2048{sup 3} particles (particle mass 1.6 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙} / h). Using a conditional mass function to populate the simulated dark matter density field with halos below the mass resolution of the simulation (10{sup 8} M{sub ⊙} / h < M{sub halo} < 10{sup 13} M{sub ⊙} / h), we assign HI to those halos according to a phenomenological halo to HI mass relation. The simulations span a redshift range of 0.35 ∼< z ∼< 0.9 in redshift bins of width Δ z ≈ 0.05 and cover a quarter of the sky at an angular resolution of about 7'. We use the simulated intensity maps to study the impact of non-linear effects and redshift space distortions on the angular clustering of HI. Focusing on the autocorrelations of the maps, we apply and compare several estimators for the angular power spectrum and its covariance. We verify that these estimators agree with analytic predictions on large scales and study the validity of approximations based on Gaussian random fields, particularly in the context of the covariance. We discuss how our results and the simulated maps can be useful for planning and interpreting future HI intensity mapping surveys.

  1. Large Scale Structure in the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekemoer, Anton; Mould, Jeremy; Cooke, Jeffrey; Wyithe, Stuart; Lidman, Christopher; Trenti, Michele; Abbott, Tim; Kunder, Andrea; Barone-Nugent, Robert; Tescari, Edoardo; Katsianis, Antonios

    2014-02-01

    We propose to capitalize on the high red sensitivity and large field of view of DECam to detect the brightest and rarest galaxies at z=6-7. Our 2012 results show the signature of large scale structure with wavenumber of order 0.1 inverse Mpc in line with expectations of primordial non-gaussianity. But the signal to noise in one deep field from two nights' data is insufficient for a robust conclusion. Ten nights' data will do the job. These data will also constrain the galaxy contribution to reionization by enabling a tighter constraint on the full galaxy luminosity function, including the faint end. The observations will be executed with a cadence and depth that will enable the detection of super-luminous supernovae at z=6-7. Super-luminous supernovae are a recently observed class of supernovae that are 10-100x more luminous than typical supernovae. This class includes pair- instability supernovae that are a rare, third type of supernova explosion in which only 3 events are known. The proposed observations will greatly extend the current reach of supernovae research, examining their occurrence rate and properties near the epoch of reionization.

  2. Generating intrinsic dipole anisotropy in the large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shamik

    2014-03-01

    There have been recent reports of unexpectedly large velocity dipole in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) data. We investigate whether the excess in the NVSS dipole reported can be of cosmological origin. We assume a long wavelength inhomogeneous scalar perturbation of the form αsin(κz) and study its effects on the matter density contrasts. Assuming an ideal fluid model, we calculate, in the linear regime, the contribution of the inhomogeneous mode to the density contrast. We calculate the expected dipole in the large scale structure (LSS) for two cases, first assuming that the mode is still superhorizon everywhere, and second assuming the mode is subhorizon but has crossed the horizon deep in matter domination and is subhorizon everywhere in the region of the survey (NVSS). In both cases, we find that such an inhomogeneous scalar perturbation is sufficient to generate the reported values of dipole anisotropy in LSS. For the superhorizon modes, we find values which are consistent with both cosmic microwave background and NVSS results. We also predict signatures for the model which can be tested by future observations.

  3. A relativistic signature in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Verde, Licia; Wands, David

    2016-09-01

    In General Relativity, the constraint equation relating metric and density perturbations is inherently nonlinear, leading to an effective non-Gaussianity in the dark matter density field on large scales-even if the primordial metric perturbation is Gaussian. Intrinsic non-Gaussianity in the large-scale dark matter overdensity in GR is real and physical. However, the variance smoothed on a local physical scale is not correlated with the large-scale curvature perturbation, so that there is no relativistic signature in the galaxy bias when using the simplest model of bias. It is an open question whether the observable mass proxies such as luminosity or weak lensing correspond directly to the physical mass in the simple halo bias model. If not, there may be observables that encode this relativistic signature.

  4. Structural coloring in large scale core-shell nanowires.

    PubMed

    Khudiyev, Tural; Ozgur, Erol; Yaman, Mecit; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2011-11-09

    We demonstrated two complementary size-dependent structural coloring mechanisms, interference and scattering, in indefinitely long core-shell nanowire arrays. The unusual nanostructures are comprised of an amorphous semiconducting core and a polymer shell layer with disparate refractive indices but with similar thermomechanical properties. Core-shell nanowires are mass produced from a macroscopic semiconductor rod by using a new top-to-bottom fabrication approach based on thermal size reduction. Nanostructures with diameters from 30 to 200 nm result in coloration that spans the whole visible spectrum via resonant Mie scattering. Nanoshell coloration based on thin film interference is proposed as a structural coloration mechanism which becomes dominant for nanowires having 700-1200 nm diameter. Controlled color generation in any part of visible and infrared spectral regions can be achieved by the simple scaling down procedure. Spectral color generation in mass-produced uniform core-shell nanowire arrays paves the way for applications such as spectral authentication at nanoscale, light-scattering ingredients in paints and cosmetics, large-area devices, and infrared shielding.

  5. Cosmological parameters from large scale structure - geometric versus shape information

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Lesgourgues, Julien; Rampf, Cornelius; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk E-mail: rampf@physik.rwth-aachen.de

    2010-07-01

    The matter power spectrum as derived from large scale structure (LSS) surveys contains two important and distinct pieces of information: an overall smooth shape and the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We investigate the separate impact of these two types of information on cosmological parameter estimation for current data, and show that for the simplest cosmological models, the broad-band shape information currently contained in the SDSS DR7 halo power spectrum (HPS) is by far superseded by geometric information derived from the baryonic features. An immediate corollary is that contrary to popular beliefs, the upper limit on the neutrino mass m{sub ν} presently derived from LSS combined with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data does not in fact arise from the possible small-scale power suppression due to neutrino free-streaming, if we limit the model framework to minimal ΛCDM+m{sub ν}. However, in more complicated models, such as those extended with extra light degrees of freedom and a dark energy equation of state parameter w differing from -1, shape information becomes crucial for the resolution of parameter degeneracies. This conclusion will remain true even when data from the Planck spacecraft are combined with SDSS DR7 data. In the course of our analysis, we update both the BAO likelihood function by including an exact numerical calculation of the time of decoupling, as well as the HPS likelihood, by introducing a new dewiggling procedure that generalises the previous approach to models with an arbitrary sound horizon at decoupling. These changes allow a consistent application of the BAO and HPS data sets to a much wider class of models, including the ones considered in this work. All the cases considered here are compatible with the conservative 95%-bounds Σm{sub ν} < 1.16eV, N{sub eff} = 4.8±2.0.

  6. Cosmological parameters from large scale structure - geometric versus shape information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Lesgourgues, Julien; Rampf, Cornelius; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The matter power spectrum as derived from large scale structure (LSS) surveys contains two important and distinct pieces of information: an overall smooth shape and the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We investigate the separate impact of these two types of information on cosmological parameter estimation for current data, and show that for the simplest cosmological models, the broad-band shape information currently contained in the SDSS DR7 halo power spectrum (HPS) is by far superseded by geometric information derived from the baryonic features. An immediate corollary is that contrary to popular beliefs, the upper limit on the neutrino mass mν presently derived from LSS combined with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data does not in fact arise from the possible small-scale power suppression due to neutrino free-streaming, if we limit the model framework to minimal ΛCDM+mν. However, in more complicated models, such as those extended with extra light degrees of freedom and a dark energy equation of state parameter w differing from -1, shape information becomes crucial for the resolution of parameter degeneracies. This conclusion will remain true even when data from the Planck spacecraft are combined with SDSS DR7 data. In the course of our analysis, we update both the BAO likelihood function by including an exact numerical calculation of the time of decoupling, as well as the HPS likelihood, by introducing a new dewiggling procedure that generalises the previous approach to models with an arbitrary sound horizon at decoupling. These changes allow a consistent application of the BAO and HPS data sets to a much wider class of models, including the ones considered in this work. All the cases considered here are compatible with the conservative 95%-bounds ∑mν < 1.16eV, Neff = 4.8±2.0.

  7. Investigation of Coronal Large Scale Structures Utilizing Spartan 201 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    1998-01-01

    Two telescopes aboard Spartan 201, a small satellite has been launched from the Space Shuttles, on April 8th, 1993, September 8th, 1994, September 7th, 1995 and November 20th, 1997. The main objective of the mission was to answer some of the most fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics-What accelerates the solar wind and what heats the corona? The two telescopes are 1) Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory which uses ultraviolet emissions from neutral hydrogen and ions in the corona to determine velocities of the coronal plasma within the solar wind source region, and the temperature and density distributions of protons and 2) White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center which measures visible light to determine the density distribution of coronal electrons within the same region. The PI has had the primary responsibility in the development and application of computer codes necessary for scientific data analysis activities, end instrument calibration for the white-light coronagraph for the entire Spartan mission. The PI was responsible for the science output from the WLC instrument. PI has also been involved in the investigation of coronal density distributions in large-scale structures by use of numerical models which are (mathematically) sufficient to reproduce the details of the observed brightness and polarized brightness distributions found in SPARTAN 201 data.

  8. White-Light Polarization and Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalyan, O. G.; Livshits, M. A.; Sýkora, J.

    1997-06-01

    The results of the white-light polarization measurements performed during three solar eclipses (1973, 1980, 1991) are presented. The eclipse images were processed and analysed by the same technique and method and, consequently, the distributions of the polarization and coronal intensity around the Sun were obtained in unified form for all three solar eclipses. The mutual comparisons of our results, and their comparison with the distributions found by other authors, allowed the real accuracy of the current measurements of the white-light corona polarization, which is not worse than +/-5%, to be estimated. We have investigated the behaviour of the polarization in dependence on heliocentric distance in helmet streamers and coronal holes. Simultaneous interpretation of the data on polarization and intensity in white-light helmet streamers is only possible if a considerable concentration of coronal matter (plasma) towards the plane of the sky is assumed. The values obtained for the coronal hole regions can be understood within the framework of a spherically symmetrical model of the low density solar atmosphere. A tendency towards increasing polarization in coronal holes, connected with the decrease of the hole's size and with the transition from the minimum to the maximum of the solar cycle, was noticed. The problem of how the peculiarities of the large-scale coronal structures are related to the orientation of the global (dipole) solar magnetic field and to the degree of the goffer character of the coronal and interplanetary current sheet is discussed briefly.

  9. Auxiliary basis expansions for large-scale electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yousung; Sodt, Alex; Gill, Peter M W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2005-05-10

    One way to reduce the computational cost of electronic structure calculations is to use auxiliary basis expansions to approximate four-center integrals in terms of two- and three-center integrals, usually by using the variationally optimum Coulomb metric to determine the expansion coefficients. However, the long-range decay behavior of the auxiliary basis expansion coefficients has not been characterized. We find that this decay can be surprisingly slow. Numerical experiments on linear alkanes and a toy model both show that the decay can be as slow as 1/r in the distance between the auxiliary function and the fitted charge distribution. The Coulomb metric fitting equations also involve divergent matrix elements for extended systems treated with periodic boundary conditions. An attenuated Coulomb metric that is short-range can eliminate these oddities without substantially degrading calculated relative energies. The sparsity of the fit coefficients is assessed on simple hydrocarbon molecules and shows quite early onset of linear growth in the number of significant coefficients with system size using the attenuated Coulomb metric. Hence it is possible to design linear scaling auxiliary basis methods without additional approximations to treat large systems.

  10. Geometric algorithms for electromagnetic modeling of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingenot, James

    With the rapid increase in the speed and complexity of integrated circuit designs, 3D full wave and time domain simulation of chip, package, and board systems becomes more and more important for the engineering of modern designs. Much effort has been applied to the problem of electromagnetic (EM) simulation of such systems in recent years. Major advances in boundary element EM simulations have led to O(n log n) simulations using iterative methods and advanced Fast. Fourier Transform (FFT), Multi-Level Fast Multi-pole Methods (MLFMM), and low-rank matrix compression techniques. These advances have been augmented with an explosion of multi-core and distributed computing technologies, however, realization of the full scale of these capabilities has been hindered by cumbersome and inefficient geometric processing. Anecdotal evidence from industry suggests that users may spend around 80% of turn-around time manipulating the geometric model and mesh. This dissertation addresses this problem by developing fast and efficient data structures and algorithms for 3D modeling of chips, packages, and boards. The methods proposed here harness the regular, layered 2D nature of the models (often referred to as "2.5D") to optimize these systems for large geometries. First, an architecture is developed for efficient storage and manipulation of 2.5D models. The architecture gives special attention to native representation of structures across various input models and special issues particular to 3D modeling. The 2.5D structure is then used to optimize the mesh systems First, circuit/EM co-simulation techniques are extended to provide electrical connectivity between objects. This concept is used to connect independently meshed layers, allowing simple and efficient 2D mesh algorithms to be used in creating a 3D mesh. Here, adaptive meshing is used to ensure that the mesh accurately models the physical unknowns (current and charge). Utilizing the regularized nature of 2.5D objects and

  11. Long gradient mode and large-scale structure observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyari, Alireza; Firouzjaee, Javad T.

    2017-03-01

    We extend the study of long-mode perturbations to other large-scale observables such as cosmic rulers, galaxy-number counts, and halo bias. The long mode is a pure gradient mode that is still outside an observer's horizon. We insist that gradient-mode effects on observables vanish. It is also crucial that the expressions for observables are relativistic. This allows us to show that the effects of a gradient mode on the large-scale observables vanish identically in a relativistic framework. To study the potential modulation effect of the gradient mode on halo bias, we derive a consistency condition to the first order in gradient expansion. We find that the matter variance at a fixed physical scale is not modulated by the long gradient mode perturbations when the consistency condition holds. This shows that the contribution of long gradient modes to bias vanishes in this framework.

  12. Large-scale structure in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-05-15

    In this work we study the cosmology of the general f(T) gravity theory. We express the modified Einstein equations using covariant quantities, and derive the gauge-invariant perturbation equations in covariant form. We consider a specific choice of f(T), designed to explain the observed late-time accelerating cosmic expansion without including an exotic dark energy component. Our numerical solution shows that the extra degree of freedom of such f(T) gravity models generally decays as one goes to smaller scales, and consequently its effects on scales such as galaxies and galaxies clusters are small. But on large scales, this degree of freedom can produce large deviations from the standard {Lambda}CDM scenario, leading to severe constraints on the f(T) gravity models as an explanation to the cosmic acceleration.

  13. Response function of the large-scale structure of the universe to the small scale inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimichi, Takahiro; Bernardeau, Francis; Taruya, Atsushi

    2016-11-01

    In order to infer the impact of the small-scale physics to the large-scale properties of the universe, we use a series of cosmological N-body simulations of self-gravitating matter inhomogeneities to measure, for the first time, the response function of such a system defined as a functional derivative of the nonlinear power spectrum with respect to its linear counterpart. Its measured shape and amplitude are found to be in good agreement with perturbation theory predictions except for the coupling from small to large-scale perturbations. The latter is found to be significantly damped, following a Lorentzian form. These results shed light on validity regime of perturbation theory calculations giving a useful guideline for regularization of small scale effects in analytical modeling. Most importantly our result indicates that the statistical properties of the large-scale structure of the universe are remarkably insensitive to the details of the small-scale physics, astrophysical or gravitational, paving the way for the derivation of robust estimates of theoretical uncertainties on the determination of cosmological parameters from large-scale survey observations.

  14. Soft-Pion theorems for large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-09-01

    Consistency relations — which relate an N-point function to a squeezed (N+1)-point function — are useful in large scale structure (LSS) because of their non-perturbative nature: they hold even if the N-point function is deep in the nonlinear regime, and even if they involve astrophysically messy galaxy observables. The non-perturbative nature of the consistency relations is guaranteed by the fact that they are symmetry statements, in which the velocity plays the role of the soft pion. In this paper, we address two issues: (1) how to derive the relations systematically using the residual coordinate freedom in the Newtonian gauge, and relate them to known results in ζ-gauge (often used in studies of inflation); (2) under what conditions the consistency relations are violated. In the non-relativistic limit, our derivation reproduces the Newtonian consistency relation discovered by Kehagias & Riotto and Peloso & Pietroni. More generally, there is an infinite set of consistency relations, as is known in ζ-gauge. There is a one-to-one correspondence between symmetries in the two gauges; in particular, the Newtonian consistency relation follows from the dilation and special conformal symmetries in ζ-gauge. We probe the robustness of the consistency relations by studying models of galaxy dynamics and biasing. We give a systematic list of conditions under which the consistency relations are violated; violations occur if the galaxy bias is non-local in an infrared divergent way. We emphasize the relevance of the adiabatic mode condition, as distinct from symmetry considerations. As a by-product of our investigation, we discuss a simple fluid Lagrangian for LSS.

  15. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  16. Lithospheric discontinuities beneath Australia: interaction of large-scale and fine scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, Brian L. N.; Yoshizawa, Kazunori

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the complex heterogeneity of the continental lithosphere involves a wide variety of spatial scales and the synthesis of multiple classes of information. Seismic surface waves and multiply reflected body waves provide the main information on broad-scale structure, and bounds on the extent of the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition (LAT) can be found from the vertical gradients of S wavespeed. Information on finer scale structures comes though body wave studies, including detailed seismic tomography and P wave reflectivity extracted from stacked autocorrelograms of continuous component records. With the inclusion of deterministic large-scale structure and realistic medium-scale stochastic features there is not a need for strong fine-scale variations. The resulting multi-scale heterogeneity model for the Australian region gives a good representation of the character of observed seismograms and their geographic variations and matches the observations of P wave reflectivity. The presence of reflections in the 0.5-3.0 Hz band in the uppermost mantle suggests variations on vertical scales of a few hundred metres with amplitudes of the order of 1%. There are some indications of a change of reflection character in the lower part of the lithosphere in the transition to the asthenosphere. In some parts of central Australia there is a reasonable tie between a change in reflectivity and other information on mid-lithospheric discontinuities. Individual seismic probes illuminate different aspects of the heterogeneity, but the full spectrum has to be taken into account to understand the properties of apparent discontinuities and their geodynamic implications. Once fine-scale structure is taken into consideration it becomes apparent that wave interference plays a very important role in determining the nature of apparent discontinuities seen with lower frequency probes such as S wave receiver functions. Changes in the character of fine-scale heterogeneity can

  17. Spatial length scales of large-scale structures in atmospheric surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, HongYou; Wang, GuoHua; Zheng, XiaoJing

    2017-06-01

    Synchronous multipoint measurements were performed in the atmospheric surface layer at the Qingtu Lake Observation Array site to obtain high-Reynolds-number [Reτ˜O (106) ] data. Based on the selected high-quality data in the near-neutral surface layer, the spatial length scales of the large-scale dominant structures in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer are investigated. The characteristic length scales are extracted from the two-point streamwise velocity correlations. Results show that the spatial length scales are invariant over a three order of magnitude change in Reynolds number [Reτ˜O (103) -O (106) ] . However, they increase significantly with the wall-normal distance, showing reasonable collapses on outer-scaled axes. The variation of the spanwise width scale in the logarithmic region follows a linear increase, with the rate of increase much larger than that in the wake region. Moreover, the variation of the wall-normal length scale is also revealed, which displays a qualitative behavior similar to that of the spanwise width scale. The universal laws revealed in the present work contribute to a better understanding of the dominant structures in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers.

  18. Measuring Cosmic Expansion and Large Scale Structure with Destiny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Lauer, Tod R.

    2007-01-01

    Destiny is a simple, direct, low cost mission to determine the properties of dark energy by obtaining a cosmologically deep supernova (SN) type Ia Hubble diagram and by measuring the large-scale mass power spectrum over time. Its science instrument is a 1.65m space telescope, featuring a near-infrared survey camera/spectrometer with a large field of view. During its first two years, Destiny will detect, observe, and characterize 23000 SN Ia events over the redshift interval 0.4lo00 square degrees to measure the large-scale mass power spectrum. The combination of surveys is much more powerful than either technique on its own, and will have over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than will be provided by ongoing ground-based projects.

  19. Galaxies and large scale structure at high redshifts

    PubMed Central

    Steidel, Charles C.

    1998-01-01

    It is now straightforward to assemble large samples of very high redshift (z ∼ 3) field galaxies selected by their pronounced spectral discontinuity at the rest frame Lyman limit of hydrogen (at 912 Å). This makes possible both statistical analyses of the properties of the galaxies and the first direct glimpse of the progression of the growth of their large-scale distribution at such an early epoch. Here I present a summary of the progress made in these areas to date and some preliminary results of and future plans for a targeted redshift survey at z = 2.7–3.4. Also discussed is how the same discovery method may be used to obtain a “census” of star formation in the high redshift Universe, and the current implications for the history of galaxy formation as a function of cosmic epoch. PMID:9419319

  20. From large scale structure to the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, U.

    In the last decade, the accumulation of extremely high quality data from astrophysical observations has heralded the era of "Precision Cosmology". A number of surveys have provided a substantially comprehensive picture of the Universe, represented as a spatially flat geometrical manifold, with a matter content well below the critical value needed to close it and an accelerated expansion stage. The model which better agrees with the wealth of astrophysical data is the so-called Lambda Cold Dark Matter (Lambda CDM) model, composed up of a cosmological constant (or cosmological fluid with negative pressure) otherwise known as dark energy (DE), cold dark matter (CDM) and baryons each contributing roughly 70%, 26% and 4% respectively to the global energy budget of the universe. Notwithstanding the satisfactory agreement with observations at large scales, the Lambda CDM model still faces several theoretical (e.g. cosmological constant problem, coincidence problem) and observational issues at galactic scales (e.g. substructure problem, core vs cuspy density profiles, satellite anisotropy problem, angular momentum problem). Astrometric cosmology promises to play a defining role in differentiating between the Lambda CDM model and alternatives at galactic scales.

  1. Local Large-Scale Structure and the Assumption of Homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Ryan C.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-10-01

    Our recent estimates of galaxy counts and the luminosity density in the near-infrared (Keenan et al. 2010, 2012) indicated that the local universe may be under-dense on radial scales of several hundred megaparsecs. Such a large-scale local under-density could introduce significant biases in the measurement and interpretation of cosmological observables, such as the inferred effects of dark energy on the rate of expansion. In Keenan et al. (2013), we measured the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance from us to test for such a local under-density. We made this measurement over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.2 (radial distances D ~ 50 - 800 h 70 -1 Mpc). We found that the shape of the K-band luminosity function is relatively constant as a function of distance and environment. We derive a local (z < 0.07, D < 300 h 70 -1 Mpc) K-band luminosity density that agrees well with previously published studies. At z > 0.07, we measure an increasing luminosity density that by z ~ 0.1 rises to a value of ~ 1.5 times higher than that measured locally. This implies that the stellar mass density follows a similar trend. Assuming that the underlying dark matter distribution is traced by this luminous matter, this suggests that the local mass density may be lower than the global mass density of the universe at an amplitude and on a scale that is sufficient to introduce significant biases into the measurement of basic cosmological observables. At least one study has shown that an under-density of roughly this amplitude and scale could resolve the apparent tension between direct local measurements of the Hubble constant and those inferred by Planck team. Other theoretical studies have concluded that such an under-density could account for what looks like an accelerating expansion, even when no dark energy is present.

  2. The large-scale structure of the Universe.

    PubMed

    Springel, Volker; Frenk, Carlos S; White, Simon D M

    2006-04-27

    Research over the past 25 years has led to the view that the rich tapestry of present-day cosmic structure arose during the first instants of creation, where weak ripples were imposed on the otherwise uniform and rapidly expanding primordial soup. Over 14 billion years of evolution, these ripples have been amplified to enormous proportions by gravitational forces, producing ever-growing concentrations of dark matter in which ordinary gases cool, condense and fragment to make galaxies. This process can be faithfully mimicked in large computer simulations, and tested by observations that probe the history of the Universe starting from just 400,000 years after the Big Bang.

  3. Large-scale shielding structures in low earth orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, D. V.; Silnikov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.; Rubzov, I. S.; Nosikov, V. B.; Minenko, E. Yu.; Murtazin, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The problems involved in the design-engineering digital simulation of large-size transformable-screen constructions for protecting spacecraft and equipment from space debris and meteoroids were considered. The engineering principles used to improve the design and efficiency of protective screens are presented. The use of embedded matrix transducers located all over the composite material used for armor tiles is proposed for the construction of protective clad screens; this approach enables efficient detection of damaged areas of the protective screen, the assessment of the level of damage, and the prediction of damage to spacecraft and equipment structures.

  4. The large-scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springel, Volker; Frenk, Carlos S.; White, Simon D. M.

    2006-04-01

    Research over the past 25 years has led to the view that the rich tapestry of present-day cosmic structure arose during the first instants of creation, where weak ripples were imposed on the otherwise uniform and rapidly expanding primordial soup. Over 14 billion years of evolution, these ripples have been amplified to enormous proportions by gravitational forces, producing ever-growing concentrations of dark matter in which ordinary gases cool, condense and fragment to make galaxies. This process can be faithfully mimicked in large computer simulations, and tested by observations that probe the history of the Universe starting from just 400,000 years after the Big Bang.

  5. Cosmological parameter estimation with large scale structure observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea; Montanari, Francesco; Durrer, Ruth; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2014-01-01

    We estimate the sensitivity of future galaxy surveys to cosmological parameters, using the redshift dependent angular power spectra of galaxy number counts, Cl(z1,z2), calculated with all relativistic corrections at first order in perturbation theory. We pay special attention to the redshift dependence of the non-linearity scale and present Fisher matrix forecasts for Euclid-like and DES-like galaxy surveys. We compare the standard P(k) analysis with the new Cl(z1,z2) method. We show that for surveys with photometric redshifts the new analysis performs significantly better than the P(k) analysis. For spectroscopic redshifts, however, the large number of redshift bins which would be needed to fully profit from the redshift information, is severely limited by shot noise. We also identify surveys which can measure the lensing contribution and we study the monopole, C0(z1,z2).

  6. CONSTRAINING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS THROUGH LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas; Maravin, Yurii; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2013-06-10

    We study primordial magnetic field effects on the matter perturbations in the universe. We assume magnetic field generation prior to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), i.e., during the radiation-dominated epoch of the universe expansion, but do not limit analysis by considering a particular magnetogenesis scenario. Contrary to previous studies, we limit the total magnetic field energy density and not the smoothed amplitude of the magnetic field at large (of the order of 1 Mpc) scales. We review several cosmological signatures, such as halo abundance, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and Ly{alpha} data. For a cross-check, we compare our limits with that obtained through the cosmic microwave background faraday rotation effect and BBN. The limits range between 1.5 nG and 4.5 nG for n{sub B} in (- 3; -1.5).

  7. Large-scale Filamentary Structures around the Virgo Cluster Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Bureau, Martin; Yoon, Hyein; Chung, Aeree; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Lee, Woong; Chung, Jiwon

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the filamentary structures of galaxies around the Virgo cluster, exploiting a larger data set, based on the HyperLeda database, than previous studies. In particular, this includes a large number of low-luminosity galaxies, resulting in better sampled individual structures. We confirm seven known structures in the distance range 4 h -1 Mpc < SGY < 16 h -1 Mpc, now identified as filaments, where SGY is the axis of the supergalactic coordinate system roughly along the line of sight. The Hubble diagram of the filament galaxies suggests they are infalling toward the main body of the Virgo cluster. We propose that the collinear distribution of giant elliptical galaxies along the fundamental axis of the Virgo cluster is smoothly connected to two of these filaments (Leo II A and B). Behind the Virgo cluster (16 h -1 Mpc < SGY < 27 h -1 Mpc), we also identify a new filament elongated toward the NGC 5353/4 group (“NGC 5353/4 filament”) and confirm a sheet that includes galaxies from the W and M clouds of the Virgo cluster (“W-M sheet”). In the Hubble diagram, the NGC 5353/4 filament galaxies show infall toward the NGC 5353/4 group, whereas the W-M sheet galaxies do not show hints of gravitational influence from the Virgo cluster. The filamentary structures identified can now be used to better understand the generic role of filaments in the build-up of galaxy clusters at z ≈ 0.

  8. Cosmological implications of the CMB large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Melia, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck may have uncovered several anomalies in the full cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky that could indicate possible new physics driving the growth of density fluctuations in the early universe. These include an unusually low power at the largest scales and an apparent alignment of the quadrupole and octopole moments. In a ΛCDM model where the CMB is described by a Gaussian Random Field, the quadrupole and octopole moments should be statistically independent. The emergence of these low probability features may simply be due to posterior selections from many such possible effects, whose occurrence would therefore not be as unlikely as one might naively infer. If this is not the case, however, and if these features are not due to effects such as foreground contamination, their combined statistical significance would be equal to the product of their individual significances. In the absence of such extraneous factors, and ignoring the biasing due to posterior selection, the missing large-angle correlations would have a probability as low as ∼0.1% and the low-l multipole alignment would be unlikely at the ∼4.9% level; under the least favorable conditions, their simultaneous observation in the context of the standard model could then be likely at only the ∼0.005% level. In this paper, we explore the possibility that these features are indeed anomalous, and show that the corresponding probability of CMB multipole alignment in the R{sub h}=ct universe would then be ∼7–10%, depending on the number of large-scale Sachs–Wolfe induced fluctuations. Since the low power at the largest spatial scales is reproduced in this cosmology without the need to invoke cosmic variance, the overall likelihood of observing both of these features in the CMB is ⩾7%, much more likely than in ΛCDM, if the anomalies are real. The key physical ingredient responsible for this difference is the existence in the former of a

  9. Cosmological parameter estimation with large scale structure observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dio, Enea Di; Montanari, Francesco; Durrer, Ruth; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: Francesco.Montanari@unige.ch E-mail: Julien.Lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2014-01-01

    We estimate the sensitivity of future galaxy surveys to cosmological parameters, using the redshift dependent angular power spectra of galaxy number counts, C{sub ℓ}(z{sub 1},z{sub 2}), calculated with all relativistic corrections at first order in perturbation theory. We pay special attention to the redshift dependence of the non-linearity scale and present Fisher matrix forecasts for Euclid-like and DES-like galaxy surveys. We compare the standard P(k) analysis with the new C{sub ℓ}(z{sub 1},z{sub 2}) method. We show that for surveys with photometric redshifts the new analysis performs significantly better than the P(k) analysis. For spectroscopic redshifts, however, the large number of redshift bins which would be needed to fully profit from the redshift information, is severely limited by shot noise. We also identify surveys which can measure the lensing contribution and we study the monopole, C{sub 0}(z{sub 1},z{sub 2})

  10. Could the electroweak scale be linked to the large scale structure of the Universe?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravorty, Alak; Massarotti, Alessandro

    1991-01-01

    We study a model where the domain walls are generated through a cosmological phase transition involving a scalar field. We assume the existence of a coupling between the scalar field and dark matter and show that the interaction between domain walls and dark matter leads to an energy dependent reflection mechanism. For a simple Yakawa coupling, we find that the vacuum expectation value of the scalar field is theta approx. equals 30GeV - 1TeV, in order for the model to be successful in the formation of large scale 'pancake' structures.

  11. Large-Scale Structure of the Carina Nebula.

    PubMed

    Smith; Egan; Carey; Price; Morse; Price

    2000-04-01

    Observations obtained with the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite reveal for the first time the complex mid-infrared morphology of the entire Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). On the largest size scale of approximately 100 pc, the thermal infrared emission from the giant H ii region delineates one coherent structure: a (somewhat distorted) bipolar nebula with the major axis perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The Carina Nebula is usually described as an evolved H ii region that is no longer actively forming stars, clearing away the last vestiges of its natal molecular cloud. However, the MSX observations presented here reveal numerous embedded infrared sources that are good candidates for sites of current star formation. Several compact infrared sources are located at the heads of dust pillars or in dark globules behind ionization fronts. Because their morphology suggests a strong interaction with the peculiar collection of massive stars in the nebula, we speculate that these new infrared sources may be sites of triggered star formation in NGC 3372.

  12. Large-Scale Structure of the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Egan, Michael P.; Carey, Sean; Price, Stephan D.; Morse, Jon A.; Price, Paul A.

    2000-04-01

    Observations obtained with the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite reveal for the first time the complex mid-infrared morphology of the entire Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). On the largest size scale of ~100 pc, the thermal infrared emission from the giant H II region delineates one coherent structure: a (somewhat distorted) bipolar nebula with the major axis perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The Carina Nebula is usually described as an evolved H II region that is no longer actively forming stars, clearing away the last vestiges of its natal molecular cloud. However, the MSX observations presented here reveal numerous embedded infrared sources that are good candidates for sites of current star formation. Several compact infrared sources are located at the heads of dust pillars or in dark globules behind ionization fronts. Because their morphology suggests a strong interaction with the peculiar collection of massive stars in the nebula, we speculate that these new infrared sources may be sites of triggered star formation in NGC 3372.

  13. Double inflation: A possible resolution of the large-scale structure problem

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.; Villumsen, J.V.; Vittorio, N.; Silk, J.; Juszkiewicz, R.

    1986-11-01

    A model is presented for the large-scale structure of the universe in which two successive inflationary phases resulted in large small-scale and small large-scale density fluctuations. This bimodal density fluctuation spectrum in an ..cap omega.. = 1 universe dominated by hot dark matter leads to large-scale structure of the galaxy distribution that is consistent with recent observational results. In particular, large, nearly empty voids and significant large-scale peculiar velocity fields are produced over scales of approx.100 Mpc, while the small-scale structure over less than or equal to 10 Mpc resembles that in a low density universe, as observed. Detailed analytical calculations and numerical simulations are given of the spatial and velocity correlations. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Double inflation - A possible resolution of the large-scale structure problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.; Villumsen, Jens V.; Vittorio, Nicola; Silk, Joseph; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented for the large-scale structure of the universe in which two successive inflationary phases resulted in large small-scale and small large-scale density fluctuations. This bimodal density fluctuation spectrum in an Omega = 1 universe dominated by hot dark matter leads to large-scale structure of the galaxy distribution that is consistent with recent observational results. In particular, large, nearly empty voids and significant large-scale peculiar velocity fields are produced over scales of about 100 Mpc, while the small-scale structure over less than about 10 Mpc resembles that in a low-density universe, as observed. Detailed analytical calculations and numerical simulations are given of the spatial and velocity correlations.

  15. Rich Linguistic Structure from Large-Scale Web Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamangil, Elif

    2013-01-01

    The past two decades have shown an unexpected effectiveness of "Web-scale" data in natural language processing. Even the simplest models, when paired with unprecedented amounts of unstructured and unlabeled Web data, have been shown to outperform sophisticated ones. It has been argued that the effectiveness of Web-scale data has…

  16. Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David H.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method for large scale ab initio electronic structure calculations. LS3DF is based on a divide-and-conquer approach, which incorporates a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects due to the subdivision of the system. As a consequence, the LS3DF program yields essentially the same results as direct density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The fragments of the LS3DF algorithm can be calculated separately with different groups of processors. This leads to almost perfect parallelization on tens of thousands of processors. After code optimization, we were able to achieve 35.1 Tflop/s, which is 39percent of the theoretical speed on 17,280 Cray XT4 processor cores. Our 13,824-atom ZnTeO alloy calculation runs 400 times faster than a direct DFTcalculation, even presuming that the direct DFT calculation can scale well up to 17,280 processor cores. These results demonstrate the applicability of the LS3DF method to material simulations, the advantage of using linearly scaling algorithms over conventional O(N3) methods, and the potential for petascale computation using the LS3DF method.

  17. The large-scale organized structure in free turbulent shear flow and its radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. T. C.; Alper, A.; Mankbadi, R.

    1978-01-01

    Modeling of the large-scale coherent structures in a turbulent free shear flow is described. The objective is to gain insight into the interaction between the large-scale structure and the fine-grained turbulence. Some aerodynamic sound radiation properties of the large-scale structure are examined. It is found that the dominant contributions to the radiation come from shear noise rather than self-noise. The fact that a pure tone excitation leads to broadband amplification is most probably due to the enhancement of the fine-grained turbulence by the coherent structure. Numerical modeling of the coherent structure is also discussed.

  18. Cosmic structure formation: From first stars to large-scale filamentary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zheng

    Theory of cosmic structure formation outlines how stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and large-scale structures formed out of primordial density fluctuations. It presents us a picture of cosmic mass assembly, and places strong constraints on cosmological model. Both observations and theories suggest that structures formation follows a "bottom up" process, in which small, low-mass component form first, and gradually develop into larger, more massive systems. This dissertation focuses on three crucial stages of cosmic structure formation: first generation stars, quasar host galaxies and the large-scale galaxy overdensities. In Chapter 1, I present an overview of structure formation, acquainting readers with a general picture from first object in the Universe to large-scale structures at later epochs. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3, I derive strong constraints to the star formation rates (SFRs) of very massive Population III (Pop III) stars in two high redshift galaxies at z = 7. By probing the He II emission lines for both galaxies, I conclude that the contributions of very massive Pop III stars to total the SFRs are less than 3%. In Chapter 4, I move to more massive systems, quasar host galaxies at z ˜ 3. Using damped Lyman alpha absorption systems as natural coronagraphs, I report that rest-frame far-UV emission of quasar host galaxy correlates strongly with quasar luminosity. This result suggests a co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. In Chapter 5, I develop a novel method for searching the most massive protoclusters at z = 2--3, by utilizing intergalactic Lyman alpha absorption. My investigations suggest that large intergalactic Lyman alpha absorption systems effectively trace the most overdense regions at large scale of ˜15 h -1 Mpc. In Chapter 6, I present our imaging observations of an extreme galaxy overdensity (protocluster) BOSS1441+4000, which is discovered using the techniques developed in Chapter 5. Furthermore, I report an

  19. CSM Testbed Development and Large-Scale Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, R. E.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Lotts, C. G.; Poole, E. L.; Overman, A. L.; Macy, S. C.

    1989-01-01

    A research activity called Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center is described. This activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM Testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM Testbed methods development environment is presented and some new numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  20. Peak mass in large-scale structure and dynamical friction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.; Gambera, M.

    1996-04-01

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock & Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  1. Solar cycle variation of large-scale coronal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Duvall, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    A green line intensity variation is associated with the interplanetary and photospheric magnetic sector structure. This effect depends on the solar cycle and occurs with the same amplitude in the latitude range 60 deg N - 60 deg S. Extended longitudinal coronal structures are suggested, which indicate the existence of closed magnetic field lines over the neutral line, separating adjacent regions of opposite polarities on the photospheric surface.

  2. Large-scale structure in the Southern Sky Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III; Da Costa, L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The power spectrum from the Southern Sky Redshift Survey and the CfA samples are measured in order to explore the amplitude of fluctuation in the galaxy density. At lambda of less than or equal to 30/h Mpc the observed power spectrum is quite consistent with the standard CDM model. At larger scales the data indicate an excess of power over the standard CDM model. The observed power spectrum from these optical galaxy samples is in good agreement with that drawn from the sparsely sampled IRAS galaxies. The shape of the power spectrum is also studied by examining the relation between the genus per unit volume and the smoothing length. It is found that, over Gaussian smoothing scales from 6 to 14/h Mpc, the power spectrum has a slope of about -1. The topology of the galaxy density field is studied by measuring the shift of the genus curve from the Gaussian case. Over all smoothing scales studied, the observed genus curves are consistent with a random phase distribution of the galaxy density field, as predicted by the inflationary scenarios.

  3. Large-scale density structures in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Lazarus, A. J.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.; Gordon, G. S., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Plasma Science experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft has measured the solar wind density from 1 to 38 AU. Over this distance, the solar wind density decreases as the inverse square of the heliocentric distance. However, there are large variations in this density at a given radius. Such changes in density are the dominant cause of changes in the solar wind ram pressure in the outer heliosphere and can cause large perturbations in the location of the termination shock of the solar wind. Following a simple model suggested by Suess, we study the non-equilibrium, dynamic location of the termination shock as it responds to these pressure changes. The results of this study suggest that the termination shock is rarely if ever at its equilibrium distance and may depart from that distance by as much as 50 AU at times.

  4. An Algorithm for Structured, Large-Scale Quadratic Programming Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    of the Madison Academic Computing Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In the program we set the stopping criterio as follows. -4l = 10 - 4...for Large Systems, Macmillan. Madison Academic Computing Center (MACC, 1976), Nonlinear programming routines, reference manual . Madison Academic...Computing Center (MACC, 1978), Random number routines, reference manual . Mangasarian, 0. L. (1969), Nonlinear Programming, McGraw-Hill. Rockafellar, R. T

  5. The large-scale structure of software-intensive systems

    PubMed Central

    Booch, Grady

    2012-01-01

    The computer metaphor is dominant in most discussions of neuroscience, but the semantics attached to that metaphor are often quite naive. Herein, we examine the ontology of software-intensive systems, the nature of their structure and the application of the computer metaphor to the metaphysical questions of self and causation. PMID:23386964

  6. Recent developments in large-scale structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkayya, Vipperla B.

    1989-01-01

    A brief discussion is given of mathematical optimization and the motivation for the development of more recent numerical search procedures. A review of recent developments and issues in multidisciplinary optimization is also presented. These developments are discussed in the context of the preliminary design of aircraft structures. A capability description of programs FASTOP, TSO, STARS, LAGRANGE, ELFINI and ASTROS is included.

  7. The large scale structure of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    The solar wind structure is reviewed based on experimental space measurements acquired over approximately the last decade. The character of the interplanetary medium is considered from the viewpoint of the temporal behavior of the solar wind over increasingly longer time intervals, the average properties of the various solar wind parameters and their interrelationships. A brief discussion is included of interplanetary-terrestrial relationships and the expected effects of heliographic latitude and radial distance.

  8. Simulations of the formation of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. D. M.

    Numerical studies related to the simulation of structure growth are examined. The linear development of fluctuations in the early universe is studied. The research of Aarseth, Gott, and Turner (1979) based on N-body integrators that obtained particle accelerations by direct summation of the forces due to other objects is discussed. Consideration is given to the 'pancake theory' of Zel'dovich (1970) for the evolution from adiabatic initial fluctuation, the neutrino-dominated universe models of White, Frenk, and Davis (1983), and the simulations of Davis et al. (1985).

  9. Large-scale computations in analysis of structures

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, D.B.; Goudreau, G.L.

    1993-09-01

    Computer hardware and numerical analysis algorithms have progressed to a point where many engineering organizations and universities can perform nonlinear analyses on a routine basis. Through much remains to be done in terms of advancement of nonlinear analysis techniques and characterization on nonlinear material constitutive behavior, the technology exists today to perform useful nonlinear analysis for many structural systems. In the current paper, a survey on nonlinear analysis technologies developed and employed for many years on programmatic defense work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is provided, and ongoing nonlinear numerical simulation projects relevant to the civil engineering field are described.

  10. The Study of Clusters of Galaxies and Large Scale Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The work on the ROSAT Deep Survey has been successfully completed. A number of interesting results have been established within this joint MPE, Cal Tech, JHU, ST Scl, ESO collaboration. First, a very large fraction, 70-80 percent, of the X-ray background has been directly resolved into point sources. We have derived a new log N-log S for X- ray sources and have measured a source density of 970 sources per square degree at a limiting flux level of 10(exp -15)/erg s sq cm (0.5-2.0 keV). Care was taken in these studies to accurately model and measure the effects of sources confusion. This was possible because of our observing strategy which included both deep PSPC and HRI observations. In the last year we initiated work in the design and development of the Next Generation Space Telescope.

  11. Dusty Starbursts within a z=3 Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehata, H.; Kohno, K.; Tamura, Y.; Iono, D.; Nakanishi, K.; Hatsukade, B.; Ikarashi, S.; Izumi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Ivison, R.; Yun, M.; Wilson, G.; Hughes, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of an ALMA survey of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the SSA22 field. Totally 45 sources discovered by the AzTEC/ASTE survey were observed at 1.1mm to find 64 ALMA -identified SMGs with S/N≥4.5. This is the largest SMG survey in Band 6 in ALMA Cycle1. Previous panoramic Lyman-alpha emitter (LAE) surveys have unveiled that SSA22 is not a general field but a highly biased field at z=3.1. We find large excess in the number counts and surface number density compared to the ALESS survey in ECDFS, which suggests SMGs are preferentially formed in the dense environment at z˜3.

  12. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Noreña, Jorge; Simonović, Marko; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: jorge.norena@icc.ub.edu E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2013-12-01

    We derive consistency relations for the late universe (CDM and ΛCDM): relations between an n-point function of the density contrast δ and an (n+1)-point function in the limit in which one of the (n+1) momenta becomes much smaller than the others. These are based on the observation that a long mode, in single-field models of inflation, reduces to a diffeomorphism since its freezing during inflation all the way until the late universe, even when the long mode is inside the horizon (but out of the sound horizon). These results are derived in Newtonian gauge, at first and second order in the small momentum q of the long mode and they are valid non-perturbatively in the short-scale δ. In the non-relativistic limit our results match with [1]. These relations are a consequence of diffeomorphism invariance; they are not satisfied in the presence of extra degrees of freedom during inflation or violation of the Equivalence Principle (extra forces) in the late universe.

  13. The Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-06-26

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  14. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-28

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  15. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-01

    The linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  16. Cosmic string wakes and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of structure from infinite cosmic string wakes is modeled for a universe dominated by cold dark matter (CDM). Cross-sectional slices through the wake distribution tend to outline empty regions with diameters which are not inconsistent with the range of sizes of the voids in the CfA slice of the universe. The topology of the wake distribution is found to be spongy rather than cell-like. Correlations between CDM wakes do not extend much beyond a horizon length, so it is unlikely that CDM wakes are responsible for the correlations between clusters of galaxies. An estimate of the fraction of matter to accrete onto CDM wakes indicates that wakes could be more important in galaxy formation than previously anticipated.

  17. Imprints of massive primordial fields on large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Fasiello, Matteo; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Attention has focussed recently on models of inflation that involve a second or more fields with a mass near the inflationary Hubble parameter H, as may occur in supersymmetric theories if the supersymmetry-breaking scale is not far from H. Quasi-single-field (QsF) inflation is a relatively simple family of phenomenological models that serve as a proxy for theories with additional fields with masses m~ H. Since QsF inflation involves fields in addition to the inflaton, the consistency conditions between correlations that arise in single-clock inflation are not necessarily satisfied. As a result, correlation functions in the squeezed limit may be larger than in single-field inflation. Scalar non-Gaussianities mediated by the massive isocurvature field in QsF have been shown to be potentially observable. These are especially interesting since they would convey information about the mass of the isocurvature field. Here we consider non-Gaussian correlators involving tensor modes and their observational signatures. A physical correlation between a (long-wavelength) tensor mode and two scalar modes (tss), for instance, may give rise to local departures from statistical isotropy or, in other words, a non-trivial four-point function. The presence of the tensor mode may moreover be inferred geometrically from the shape dependence of the four-point function. We compute tss and stt (one soft curvature mode and two hard tensors) bispectra in QsF inflation, identifying the conditions necessary for these to "violate" the consistency relations. We find that while consistency conditions are violated by stt correlations, they are preserved by the tss in the minimal QsF model. Our study of primordial correlators which include gravitons in seeking imprints of additional fields with masses m~ H during inflation can be seen as complementary to the recent ``cosmological collider physics'' proposal.

  18. Imprints of massive primordial fields on large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Fasiello, Matteo; Kamionkowski, Marc E-mail: matteorf@stanford.edu

    2016-02-01

    Attention has focussed recently on models of inflation that involve a second or more fields with a mass near the inflationary Hubble parameter H, as may occur in supersymmetric theories if the supersymmetry-breaking scale is not far from H. Quasi-single-field (QsF) inflation is a relatively simple family of phenomenological models that serve as a proxy for theories with additional fields with masses m∼ H. Since QsF inflation involves fields in addition to the inflaton, the consistency conditions between correlations that arise in single-clock inflation are not necessarily satisfied. As a result, correlation functions in the squeezed limit may be larger than in single-field inflation. Scalar non-Gaussianities mediated by the massive isocurvature field in QsF have been shown to be potentially observable. These are especially interesting since they would convey information about the mass of the isocurvature field. Here we consider non-Gaussian correlators involving tensor modes and their observational signatures. A physical correlation between a (long-wavelength) tensor mode and two scalar modes (tss), for instance, may give rise to local departures from statistical isotropy or, in other words, a non-trivial four-point function. The presence of the tensor mode may moreover be inferred geometrically from the shape dependence of the four-point function. We compute tss and stt (one soft curvature mode and two hard tensors) bispectra in QsF inflation, identifying the conditions necessary for these to 'violate' the consistency relations. We find that while consistency conditions are violated by stt correlations, they are preserved by the tss in the minimal QsF model. Our study of primordial correlators which include gravitons in seeking imprints of additional fields with masses m∼ H during inflation can be seen as complementary to the recent ''cosmological collider physics'' proposal.

  19. Testing coupled dark energy with large scale structure observation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Weiqiang; Xu, Lixin E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn

    2014-08-01

    The coupling between the dark components provides a new approach to mitigate the coincidence problem of cosmological standard model. In this paper, dark energy is treated as a fluid with a constant equation of state, whose coupling with dark matter is Q-bar =3Hξ{sub x}ρ-bar {sub x}. In the frame of dark energy, we derive the evolution equations for the density and velocity perturbations. According to the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we constrain the model by currently available cosmic observations which include cosmic microwave background radiation, baryon acoustic oscillation, type Ia supernovae, and fσ{sub 8}(z) data points from redshift-space distortion. The results show the interaction rate in σ regions: ξ{sub x} = 0.00328{sub -0.00328-0.00328-0.00328}{sup +0.000736+0.00549+0.00816}, which means that the recently cosmic observations favor a small interaction rate which is up to the order of 10{sup -2}, meanwhile, the measurement of redshift-space distortion could rule out the large interaction rate in the σ region.

  20. The Study of Clusters of Galaxies and Large Scale Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Many research projects have been initiated and completed under support of this program. The results are summarized below. The work on the ROSAT Deep Survey has been successfully completed. A number of interesting results have been established within this joint MPE, Cal Tech, JHU, ST ScI, ESO collaboration. First, a very large fraction, 70-80 percent, of the X-ray background has been directly resolved into point sources. We have derived a new log N-log S for X-ray sources and have measured a source density of 970 sources per square degree at a limiting flux level. Care was taken in these studies to accurately model and measure the effects of sources confusion. This was possible because of our observing strategy which included both deep PSPC and HRI observations. No evidence of a population of narrow emission line galaxies has been established but some evidence for the evolution of low luminosity AGN (Seyfert galaxies) has been reported. The work on the ROSAT All Sky Survey Northern Cluster Survey has been substantially concluded but the publication of the list has been held up by the need to analyze newly re-calibrated data. This should result in publication over the next year. During the past year we have submitted a paper to the Astrophysical Journal which utilized a sample of clusters originally selected from the ROSAT All-sky survey at redshifts greater than 0.3. This sample was studied with ASCA to determine temperature and luminosity.

  1. Stability constraints on large-scale structural brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard T.; Robinson, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Stability is an important dynamical property of complex systems and underpins a broad range of coherent self-organized behavior. Based on evidence that some neurological disorders correspond to linear instabilities, we hypothesize that stability constrains the brain's electrical activity and influences its structure and physiology. Using a physiologically-based model of brain electrical activity, we investigated the stability and dispersion solutions of networks of neuronal populations with propagation time delays and dendritic time constants. We find that stability is determined by the spectrum of the network's matrix of connection strengths and is independent of the temporal damping rate of axonal propagation with stability restricting the spectrum to a region in the complex plane. Time delays and dendritic time constants modify the shape of this region but it always contains the unit disk. Instabilities resulting from changes in connection strength initially have frequencies less than a critical frequency. For physiologically plausible parameter values based on the corticothalamic system, this critical frequency is approximately 10 Hz. For excitatory networks and networks with randomly distributed excitatory and inhibitory connections, time delays and non-zero dendritic time constants have no impact on network stability but do effect dispersion frequencies. Random networks with both excitatory and inhibitory connections can have multiple marginally stable modes at low delta frequencies. PMID:23630490

  2. Renormalizing a viscous fluid model for large scale structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Führer, Florian; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos E-mail: gerasimos.rigopoulos@ncl.ac.uk

    2016-02-01

    Using the Stochastic Adhesion Model (SAM) as a simple toy model for cosmic structure formation, we study renormalization and the removal of the cutoff dependence from loop integrals in perturbative calculations. SAM shares the same symmetry with the full system of continuity+Euler equations and includes a viscosity term and a stochastic noise term, similar to the effective theories recently put forward to model CDM clustering. We show in this context that if the viscosity and noise terms are treated as perturbative corrections to the standard eulerian perturbation theory, they are necessarily non-local in time. To ensure Galilean Invariance higher order vertices related to the viscosity and the noise must then be added and we explicitly show at one-loop that these terms act as counter terms for vertex diagrams. The Ward Identities ensure that the non-local-in-time theory can be renormalized consistently. Another possibility is to include the viscosity in the linear propagator, resulting in exponential damping at high wavenumber. The resulting local-in-time theory is then renormalizable to one loop, requiring less free parameters for its renormalization.

  3. Large-scale magnetic structure formation in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Müller, Wolf-Christian

    2013-11-20

    The inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D-MHD) turbulence is believed to be one of the processes responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in astrophysical systems. In this work, we present an exhaustive set of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of both forced and decaying 3D-MHD turbulence, to understand this structure formation process. It is first shown that an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in small-scale driven turbulence does not necessarily generate coherent large-scale magnetic structures. The observed large-scale magnetic field, in this case, is severely perturbed by magnetic fluctuations generated by the small-scale forcing. In the decaying case, coherent large-scale structures form similarly to those observed astronomically. Based on the numerical results, the formation of large-scale magnetic structures in some astrophysical systems is suggested to be the consequence of an initial forcing that imparts the necessary turbulent energy into the system, which, after the forcing shuts off, decays to form the large-scale structures. This idea is supported by representative examples, e.g., clusters of galaxies.

  4. Dark and luminous matter in galaxies and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guangfei

    of ≲ 0.035 on the average external shear. The total mass has an average ellipticity = 0.78 +/- 0.03 (rms of 0.12), which correlates extremely well with the stellar ellipticity, q*, resulting in = 0.99 +/- 0.03 (rms of 0.11) for sigma ≳ 225 kms-1. (iii) The average projected dark-matter mass fraction is inferred to be = 0.25 +/- 0.06 (rms of 0.22) inside , using the stellar mass-to-light ratios derived from the Fundamental Plane as priors. (iv) Combined with results from the Lenses Structure & Dynamics (LSD) Survey at z ≳ 0.3, we find no significant evolution of the total density slope inside one effective radius for galaxies with sigmaap ≥ 200 kms -1: a linear fit gives alphagamma' ≡ d/dz = 0.23 +/- 0.16 (1sigma) for the range z=0.08--1.01. We conclude that massive early-type galaxies at z=0.06--0.33 on average have an isothermal logarithmic density slope inside half an effective radius, with an intrinsic spread of at most 6% (1 sigma). Based on the galaxies hosted by halos more massive than 1013.5 M⊙ from the Millennium Run Simulation (MRS), the relations between the halo mass and cluster optical observables are investigated, at redshifts z = 0, z = 0.3, and z = 0.5 are investigated. Two simulated galaxy catalogs are used, with one from the Durham university group, and the other from Max Planck Institution for Astrophysics (MPA) group. The relations between halo mass and cluster luminosity, or halo mass and galaxy richness (galaxy number) can be well fit by power-law mean relations with lognormal scatter. The scatter is around 0.12 dex (Durham) and 0.15 dex (MPA) at cluster luminosity Ltot 101.4L*. The scatter in the Durham simulation decreases with increasing cluster luminosity, while no obvious trend appears in the MPA simulation. The central galaxy luminosity is also correlated with halo mass, but with larger scatter. At fixed halo mass, there is little or no correlation of average galaxy luminosity or

  5. The galaxy distribution and the large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M. J.; Kurtz, M. J.; De Lapparent, V.

    1986-01-01

    Data related to the large-scale galaxy distribution are discussed. The galaxy counts of Shane-Wirtanen (1967) are analyzed; the effects of residual systematic errors on the galaxy distribution measurements are considered. The analysis reveals that the Shane-Wirtanen data are not applicable to the study of large-scale structure. A model which is capable of measuring galaxy correlation functions on scales greater than about 10 Mpc is evaluated.

  6. Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Ohmori, Kenji; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-07-13

    A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

  7. Insights into interphase large-scale chromatin structure from analysis of engineered chromosome regions.

    PubMed

    Belmont, A S; Hu, Y; Sinclair, P B; Wu, W; Bian, Q; Kireev, I

    2010-01-01

    How chromatin folds into mitotic and interphase chromosomes has remained a difficult question for many years. We have used three generations of engineered chromosome regions as a means of visualizing specific chromosome regions in live cells and cells fixed under conditions that preserve large-scale chromatin structure. Our results confirm the existence of large-scale chromatin domains and fibers formed by the folding of 10-nm and 30-nm chromatin fibers into larger, spatially distinct domains. Transcription at levels within severalfold of the levels measured for endogenous loci occur within these large-scale chromatin structures on a condensed template linearly compacted several hundred fold to 1000-fold relative to B-form DNA. However, transcriptional induction is accompanied by a severalfold decondensation of this large-scale chromatin structure that propagates hundreds of kilobases beyond the induced gene. Examination of engineered chromosome regions in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and differentiated cells suggests a surprising degree of plasticity in this large-scale chromatin structure, allowing long-range DNA interactions within the context of large-scale chromatin fibers. Recapitulation of gene-specific differences in large-scale chromatin conformation and nuclear positioning using these engineered chromosome regions will facilitate identification of cis and trans determinants of interphase chromosome architecture.

  8. Insights into interphase large-scale chromatin structure from analysis of engineered chromosome regions

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, Andrew S.; Hu, Yan; Sinclair, Paul; Wu, Wei; Bian, Qian; Kireev, Igor

    2012-01-01

    How chromatin folds into mitotic and interphase chromosomes has remained a difficult question for many years. We have used three generations of engineered chromosome regions as a means of visualizing specific chromosome regions in live cells and cells fixed under conditions which preserve large-scale chromatin structure. Our results confirm the existence of large-scale chromatin domains and fibers formed by the folding of 10 and 30 nm chromatin fibers into larger, spatially distinct domains. Transcription at levels within several fold of the levels measured for endogenous loci occur within these large-scale chromatin structures on a condensed template linearly compacted several hundred fold to one thousand fold relative to B-form DNA. However, transcriptional induction is accompanied by a several fold decondensation of this large-scale chromatin structure that propagates hundreds of kb beyond the induced gene. Examination of engineered chromosome regions in mouse ES and differentiated cells suggests a surprising degree of plasticity in this large-scale chromatin structure, allowing long-range DNA interactions within the context of large-scale chromatin fibers. Recapitulation of gene specific differences in large-scale chromatin conformation and nuclear positioning using these engineered chromosome regions will facilitate identification of cis and trans determinants of interphase chromosome architecture. PMID:21467143

  9. Decoupling local mechanics from large-scale structure in modular metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Silverberg, Jesse L.

    2017-04-01

    A defining feature of mechanical metamaterials is that their properties are determined by the organization of internal structure instead of the raw fabrication materials. This shift of attention to engineering internal degrees of freedom has coaxed relatively simple materials into exhibiting a wide range of remarkable mechanical properties. For practical applications to be realized, however, this nascent understanding of metamaterial design must be translated into a capacity for engineering large-scale structures with prescribed mechanical functionality. Thus, the challenge is to systematically map desired functionality of large-scale structures backward into a design scheme while using finite parameter domains. Such “inverse design” is often complicated by the deep coupling between large-scale structure and local mechanical function, which limits the available design space. Here, we introduce a design strategy for constructing 1D, 2D, and 3D mechanical metamaterials inspired by modular origami and kirigami. Our approach is to assemble a number of modules into a voxelized large-scale structure, where the module’s design has a greater number of mechanical design parameters than the number of constraints imposed by bulk assembly. This inequality allows each voxel in the bulk structure to be uniquely assigned mechanical properties independent from its ability to connect and deform with its neighbors. In studying specific examples of large-scale metamaterial structures we show that a decoupling of global structure from local mechanical function allows for a variety of mechanically and topologically complex designs.

  10. Decoupling local mechanics from large-scale structure in modular metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Silverberg, Jesse L

    2017-04-04

    A defining feature of mechanical metamaterials is that their properties are determined by the organization of internal structure instead of the raw fabrication materials. This shift of attention to engineering internal degrees of freedom has coaxed relatively simple materials into exhibiting a wide range of remarkable mechanical properties. For practical applications to be realized, however, this nascent understanding of metamaterial design must be translated into a capacity for engineering large-scale structures with prescribed mechanical functionality. Thus, the challenge is to systematically map desired functionality of large-scale structures backward into a design scheme while using finite parameter domains. Such "inverse design" is often complicated by the deep coupling between large-scale structure and local mechanical function, which limits the available design space. Here, we introduce a design strategy for constructing 1D, 2D, and 3D mechanical metamaterials inspired by modular origami and kirigami. Our approach is to assemble a number of modules into a voxelized large-scale structure, where the module's design has a greater number of mechanical design parameters than the number of constraints imposed by bulk assembly. This inequality allows each voxel in the bulk structure to be uniquely assigned mechanical properties independent from its ability to connect and deform with its neighbors. In studying specific examples of large-scale metamaterial structures we show that a decoupling of global structure from local mechanical function allows for a variety of mechanically and topologically complex designs.

  11. Linear Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale ElectronicStructure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan

    2006-10-16

    We present a linear scaling 3 dimensional fragment (LS3DF)method that uses a novel decomposition and patching scheme to do abinitio density functional theory (DFT) calculations for large systems.This method cancels out the artificial boundary effects that arise fromthe spatial decomposition. As a result, the LS3DF results are essentiallythe same as the original full-system DFT results with errors smaller thanthe errors introduced by other sources of numerical approximations. Inaddition, the resulting computational times are thousands of timessmaller than conventional DFT methods, making calculations with 100,000atom systems possible. The LS3DF method is applicable to insulator andsemiconductor systems, which covers a current gap in the DOE's materialsscience code portfolio for large-scale ab initio simulations.

  12. TOPOLOGY OF A LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE AS A TEST OF MODIFIED GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Chen Xuelei; Park, Changbom

    2012-03-01

    The genus of the isodensity contours is a robust measure of the topology of a large-scale structure, and it is relatively insensitive to nonlinear gravitational evolution, galaxy bias, and redshift-space distortion. We show that the growth of density fluctuations is scale dependent even in the linear regime in some modified gravity theories, which opens a new possibility of testing the theories observationally. We propose to use the genus of the isodensity contours, an intrinsic measure of the topology of the large-scale structure, as a statistic to be used in such tests. In Einstein's general theory of relativity, density fluctuations grow at the same rate on all scales in the linear regime, and the genus per comoving volume is almost conserved as structures grow homologously, so we expect that the genus-smoothing-scale relation is basically time independent. However, in some modified gravity models where structures grow with different rates on different scales, the genus-smoothing-scale relation should change over time. This can be used to test the gravity models with large-scale structure observations. We study the cases of the f(R) theory, DGP braneworld theory as well as the parameterized post-Friedmann models. We also forecast how the modified gravity models can be constrained with optical/IR or redshifted 21 cm radio surveys in the near future.

  13. A study of energetic large-scale structures in turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanhua

    2014-04-01

    This study established the connection in turbulent boundary layers between the first two dominant proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes and the instantaneous large-scale turbulence structures. The velocity fields consistent with the signature velocity fields of the hairpin vortex packets in two-dimensional PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurement planes are observed as the major contributors to the first two POD modes. Another kind of equally important turbulence structure is the large region of Q4 vectors, which may possibly be obtained by slicing the outskirts of the three-dimensional structure of the hairpin vortex packet by PIV planes. The streamwise Reynolds normal stress, Reynolds shear stress, and the length scales of the two-point velocity correlation coefficients ρuu and ρuv are noticeably decreased without those large-scale turbulence structures contributing significantly to the first POD mode. Similarity of these results is observed at a higher Reynolds number.

  14. The new discussion of a neutrino mass and issues in the formation of large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.

    1991-01-01

    It is argued that the discrepancy between the large-scale structure predicted by cosmological models with neutrino mass (hot dark matter) do not differ drastically from the observed structure. Evidence from the correlation amplitude, nonlinearity and the onset of galaxy formation, large-scale streaming velocities, and the topology of large-scale structure is considered. Hot dark matter models seem to be as accurate predictors of the large-scale structure as are cold dark matter models.

  15. The Large-Scale Structure of Semantic Networks: Statistical Analyses and a Model of Semantic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyvers, Mark; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2005-01-01

    We present statistical analyses of the large-scale structure of 3 types of semantic networks: word associations, WordNet, and Roget's Thesaurus. We show that they have a small-world structure, characterized by sparse connectivity, short average path lengths between words, and strong local clustering. In addition, the distributions of the number of…

  16. The Large-Scale Structure of Semantic Networks: Statistical Analyses and a Model of Semantic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyvers, Mark; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2005-01-01

    We present statistical analyses of the large-scale structure of 3 types of semantic networks: word associations, WordNet, and Roget's Thesaurus. We show that they have a small-world structure, characterized by sparse connectivity, short average path lengths between words, and strong local clustering. In addition, the distributions of the number of…

  17. Virtual Testing of Large Composite Structures: A Multiple Length/Time-Scale Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigliotti, Luigi; Pinho, Silvestre T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper illustrates a multiple length/time-scale framework for the virtual testing of large composite structures. Such framework hinges upon a Mesh Superposition Technique (MST) for the coupling between areas of the structure modelled at different length-scales and upon an efficient solid-to-shell numerical homogenization which exploits the internal symmetries of Unit Cells (UCs). Using this framework, it is possible to minimize the areas of the structure modelled at the lowest- (and computationally demanding) scales and the computational cost required to calculate the homogenised to be used in the higher-scales subdomains of multiscale FE models, as well as to simulate the mechanical response of different parts of the structure using different solvers, depending on where they are expected to provide the most computationally efficient solution. The relevance and key-aspects of the multiple length/time-scale framework are demonstrated through the analysis of a real-sized aeronautical composite component.

  18. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops and cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Some results from a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops are presented. It is found that even though G x mu is required to be lower than 2 x 10 to the -6th (where mu is the mass per unit length of the string) to give a low enough autocorrelation amplitude, there is excessive power on smaller scales, so that galaxies would be more dense than observed. The large-scale structure does not include a filamentary or connected appearance and shares with more conventional models based on Gaussian perturbations the lack of cluster-cluster correlation at the mean cluster separation scale as well as excessively small bulk velocities at these scales.

  19. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops and cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Some results from a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops are presented. It is found that even though G x mu is required to be lower than 2 x 10 to the -6th (where mu is the mass per unit length of the string) to give a low enough autocorrelation amplitude, there is excessive power on smaller scales, so that galaxies would be more dense than observed. The large-scale structure does not include a filamentary or connected appearance and shares with more conventional models based on Gaussian perturbations the lack of cluster-cluster correlation at the mean cluster separation scale as well as excessively small bulk velocities at these scales.

  20. Modification in drag of turbulent boundary layers resulting from manipulation of large-scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, T. C.; Guezennec, Y.; Nagib, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of placing a parallel-plate turbulence manipulator in a boundary layer are documented through flow visualization and hot wire measurements. The boundary layer manipulator was designed to manage the large scale structures of turbulence leading to a reduction in surface drag. The differences in the turbulent structure of the boundary layer are summarized to demonstrate differences in various flow properties. The manipulator inhibited the intermittent large scale structure of the turbulent boundary layer for at least 70 boundary layer thicknesses downstream. With the removal of the large scale, the streamwise turbulence intensity levels near the wall were reduced. The downstream distribution of the skin friction was also altered by the introduction of the manipulator.

  1. A Linear Scaling Three Dimensional Fragment Method for Large ScaleElectronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan

    2007-07-26

    We present a novel linear scaling ab initio total energyelectronic structure calculation method, which is simple to implement,easily to parallelize, and produces essentially thesame results as thedirect ab initio method, while it could be thousands of times faster.Using this method, we have studied the dipole moments of CdSe quantumdots, and found both significant bulk and surface contributions. The bulkdipole contribution cannot simply be estimated from the bulk spontaneouspolarization value by a proportional volume factor. Instead it has ageometry dependent screening effect. The dipole moment also produces astrong internal electric field which induces a strong electron holeseparation.

  2. DNS study of large-scale structures in a separated turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Mizobuchi, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Yuichi

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a separated flat-plate turbulent boundary layer have been carried out. The inlet data are prescribed by DNSs of a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with the rescaling-recycling method; blowing and suction are imposed at the upper boundary for producing a separation bubble. The Reynolds numbers at the inlet are set to be Reθ =300, 600 and 900, where Reθ is the Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity and the momentum thickness. Particular attention is given to large- scale structures existing in a separated region. Results indicate that large-scale organized structures of the streamwise velocity fluctuation appear in a detached shear layer when a large separated region is formed. The latter structures consist of positive and negative regions alternating in the spanwise direction with a spacing of about 2 ~ 3δ99 (δ99 denotes the 99% boundary layer thickness at the inlet), which become more apparent with increasing Reynolds number. They are most likely associated with large-scale spanwise meandering of the separation line. There is also close relationship between the large-scale structures and vortical structures, the latter tending to form vortex clusters where hairpin-like vortices are also observed.

  3. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of models of structure formation for higher order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly nonlinear regime. Several variations of the standard Omega = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations have recently been introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R(sub p) is approximately 20/h Mpc, e.g., low matter-density (nonzero cosmological constant) models, 'tilted' primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower et al. We show that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the the hierarchical amplitudes Q(sub J) at large scales, r is greater than or approximately R(sub p). Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q(sub 3) and S(sub 3) can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  4. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    1993-01-01

    The consequences of models of structure formation for higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly non-linear regime are analyzed. Several variations of the standard Omega = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations were recently introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R(sub p) is approximately 20 h(sup -1) Mpc, e.g., low-matter-density (non-zero cosmological constant) models, 'tilted' primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower, etal. It is shown that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale-dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the hierarchical amplitudes Q(sub J) at large scales, r is approximately greater than R(sub p). Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q(sub 3) and S(sub 3) can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  5. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of models of structure formation for higher order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly nonlinear regime. Several variations of the standard Omega = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations have recently been introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R(sub p) is approximately 20/h Mpc, e.g., low matter-density (nonzero cosmological constant) models, 'tilted' primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower et al. We show that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the the hierarchical amplitudes Q(sub J) at large scales, r is greater than or approximately R(sub p). Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q(sub 3) and S(sub 3) can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  6. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A. ); Gaztanaga, E. )

    1993-06-19

    The authors analyze the consequences of models of structure formation for higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly non-linear regime. Several variations of the standard [Omega] = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations have recently been introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R[sub p] [approximately]20 h[sup [minus]1] Mpc, e.g., low-matter-density (non-zero cosmological constant) models, [open quote]tilted[close quote] primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower, et al. The authors show that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale-dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the hierarchical amplitudes Q[sub J] at large scales, r [approx gt] R[sub p]. Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q[sub 3] and S[sub 3] can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  7. On the large-scale structures formed by wakes of open cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, Tetsuya; Morioka, Shoji; Miyoshi, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    Large-scale structures of the universe have been variously described as sheetlike, filamentary, cellular, bubbles or spongelike. Recently cosmic strings became one of viable candidates for a galaxy formation scenario, and some of the large-scale structures seem to be simply explained by the open cosmic strings. According to this scenario, sheets are wakes which are traces of moving open cosmic strings where dark matter and baryonic matter have accumulated. Filaments are intersections of such wakes and high density regions are places where three wakes intersect almost orthogonally. The wakes formed at t sub eq become the largest surface density among all wakes, where t sub eq is the epoch when matter density equals to radiation density. If we assume that there is one open cosmic string per each horizon, then it can be explained that the typical distances among wakes, filaments and clusters are also approx. 10(exp 2) Mpc. This model does not exclude a much more large scale structure. Open cosmic string may move even now and accumulate cold dark matter after its traces. However, the surface density is much smaller than the ones formed at t sub eq. From this model, it is expected that the typical high density region will have extended features such as six filaments and three sheets and be surrounded by eight empty regions (voids). Here, the authors are mainly concerned with such structures and have made numerical simulations for the formation of such large scale structures.

  8. Multiscaling and nonextensivity of large-scale structures in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, F. M.; Wuensche, C. A.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Rosa, R. R.

    2002-08-01

    There has been a trend in the past decade to describe the large-scale structures in the Universe as a (multi)fractal set. However, one of the main objections raised by the opponents of this approach deals with the transition to homogeneity. Moreover, they claim there is not enough sampling space to determine a scaling index which characterizes a (multi)fractal set. In this work we propose an alternative solution to this problem, using the generalized thermostatistics formalism. We show that applying the idea of nonextensivity, intrinsic to this approach, it is possible to derive an expression for the correlation function, describing the scaling properties of large-scale structures in the Universe and the transition to homogeneity, which is in good agreement with observational data.

  9. Implications of a class of grand unified theories for large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    A class of grand unified theories in which cosmologicaly significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is discussed. To obtain large scale structure three scenarios are considered: (1) an inflationary scenario; (2) inflation followed by string production; and (3) a non-inflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. Inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that mega 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  10. Giant radio galaxies as effective probes of X-ray gas in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Malarecki, Jurek; Jones, Heath; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2015-08-01

    Giant radio galaxies are AGNs with relativistic jets that dynamically evolve into Mpc scale synchrotron lobes around the host elliptical. The thermal gas environment influences the jet advance and lobe formation. Since the host ellipticals are in filamentary low-density galaxy environments, the ambient gas for the Mpc-scale radio structures is likely the warm-hot X-ray gas inhabiting the intergalactic medium. We have, therefore, used large radio galaxies as probes of the distribution of hot and tenuous gas on mega-parsec scales in these relatively low density large-scale structures.For a sample of 19 giant radio galaxies we obtained radio continuum images of the synchrotron structures, and redshifts of a total of nearly 9000 galaxies in their vicinity. The 2-degree field redshift data traces the large-scale galaxy structure around the radio sources. The radio-optical data allows an estimation of the pressure, temperature and distribution of hot thermal gas associated with the large-scale structure in the vicinity of the radio AGN (Malarecki, Staveley-Smith, Saripalli, Subrahmanyan, Jones, Duffy, Rioja 2013, MNRAS 432, 200).Strong correspondence between radio galaxy lobes and galaxy distribution is observed. The data suggests that galaxies trace gas, and that radio jets and lobes of giant radio galaxies are sensitive tracers of gas on mega-parsec scales and may be used as effective probes of the difficult-to-detect IGM (Malarecki, Jones, Saripalli, Stavele-Smith, Subrahmanyan, 2015, MNRAS in press; arXiv150203954).

  11. Simultaneous effect of modified gravity and primordial non-Gaussianity in large scale structure observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzatuny, Nareg; Khosravi, Shahram; Baghram, Shant; Moshafi, Hossein E-mail: khosravi@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: hosseinmoshafi@iasbs.ac.ir

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the simultaneous effect of primordial non-Gaussianity and the modification of the gravity in f(R) framework on large scale structure observations. We show that non-Gaussianity and modified gravity introduce a scale dependent bias and growth rate functions. The deviation from ΛCDM in the case of primordial non-Gaussian models is in large scales, while the growth rate deviates from ΛCDM in small scales for modified gravity theories. We show that the redshift space distortion can be used to distinguish positive and negative f{sub NL} in standard background, while in f(R) theories they are not easily distinguishable. The galaxy power spectrum is generally enhanced in presence of non-Gaussianity and modified gravity. We also obtain the scale dependence of this enhancement. Finally we define galaxy growth rate and galaxy growth rate bias as new observational parameters to constrain cosmology.

  12. Pulsar Rotation Measures and the Large-Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.; Manchester, R. N.; Lyne, A. G.; Qiao, G. J.; van Straten, W.

    2006-05-01

    The large-scale magnetic field of our Galaxy can be probed in three dimensions using Faraday rotation of pulsar signals. We report on the determination of 223 rotation measures from polarization observations of relatively distant southern pulsars made using the Parkes radio telescope. Combined with previously published observations, these data give clear evidence for large-scale counterclockwise fields (viewed from the north Galactic pole) in the spiral arms interior to the Sun and weaker evidence for a counterclockwise field in the Perseus arm. However, in interarm regions, including the solar neighborhood, we present evidence that suggests that large-scale fields are clockwise. We propose that the large-scale Galactic magnetic field has a bisymmetric structure with reversals on the boundaries of the spiral arms. Streaming motions associated with spiral density waves can directly generate such a structure from an initial, inwardly directed radial field. Large-scale fields increase toward the Galactic center, with a mean value of about 2 μG in the solar neighborhood and 4 μG at a galactocentric radius of 3 kpc.

  13. Structure of isolated large-scale inhomogeneities in the outer ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Iu. K.; Romanchuk, A. A.

    1991-03-01

    The structure of large-scale inhomogeneities in the outer ionosphere is examined with reference to Thomson scattering data. The dependence of delta Ne/Ne and delta Ne on the local coordinates is established. The shape function is also examined.

  14. Phase transitions as the origin of large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    A review of the formation of large scale structure through gravitational growth of primordial perturbations is given. This is followed by a discussion of how symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe might have produced the required perturbations, in particular through the formation and evolution of a network of cosmic strings.

  15. Factor Structure and Correlates of the Dissociative Experiences Scale in a Large Offender Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Mark A.; Poythress, Norman G.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Douglas, Kevin S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the psychometric properties, factor structure, and construct validity of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) in a large offender sample (N = 1,515). Although the DES is widely used with community and clinical samples, minimal work has examined offender samples. Participants were administered self-report and interview…

  16. Large-scale structure in the universe. Proceedings. Conference, London (UK), 25 - 26 Mar 1998.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Universe: large-scale structure, early Universe: quantum fluctuations, microwave background radiation studies, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, galaxy clustering evolution, the CNOC2 Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, quasar clustering.

  17. Phase transitions as the origin of large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    A review of the formation of large scale structure through gravitational growth of primordial perturbations is given. This is followed by a discussion of how symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe might have produced the required perturbations, in particular through the formation and evolution of a network of cosmic strings.

  18. Characterizing the existing and potential structural space of proteins by large-scale multiple loop permutations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Liang; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide structural genomics projects are increasing structure coverage of sequence space but have not significantly expanded the protein structure space itself (i.e. number of unique structural folds) since 2007. Discovering new structural folds experimentally by directed evolution and random recombination of secondary-structure blocks is also proved rarely successful. Meanwhile, previous computational efforts for large-scale mapping of protein structure space are limited to simple model proteins and led to an inconclusive answer on the completeness of the existing, observed protein structure space. Here, we build novel protein structures by extending naturally occurring circular (single-loop) permutation to multiple-loop permutations (MLP). These structures are clustered by structural similarity measure called TM-Score. The computational technique allows us to produce different structural clusters on the same naturally occurring, packed, stable core but with alternatively connected secondary-structure segments. A large-scale MLP of 2936 SCOP domains reproduces those existing structural clusters (63%) mostly as hubs for many non-redundant sequences and illustrates newly discovered novel clusters as islands adopted by a few sequences only. Results further show that there exist a significant number of novel, potentially stable clusters for medium or large-size single-domain proteins, in particular (>100 amino-acid residues) that are either not yet adopted by nature or adopted only by a few sequences. This study suggests that MLP provides a simple yet highly effective tool for engineering and design of novel protein structures (including naturally knotted proteins). The implication of recovering CASP new-fold targets by MLP on template-based structure prediction is also discussed. Our MLP structures are available for download at the publication page of the website http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu. PMID:21376059

  19. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Melott, Adrian L.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of large-scale structure formation from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos are described. The linear power spectrum in this model resembles the cold-dark-matter power spectrum. Galaxy formation begins early, and the final distribution consists of isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, leading to a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. The distribution of clustered matter has a filamentary appearance with large voids.

  20. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Melott, Adrian L.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of large-scale structure formation from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos are described. The linear power spectrum in this model resembles the cold-dark-matter power spectrum. Galaxy formation begins early, and the final distribution consists of isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, leading to a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. The distribution of clustered matter has a filamentary appearance with large voids.

  1. Magnetic fields and large scale structure in a hot Universe. IV. The egg-carton Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaner, E.; Florido, E.

    1998-10-01

    Considering the possibility of a network of octahedra contacting at their vertexes for the large scale structure of the present Universe, as was discussed in previous papers of this series, we now try to identify real octahedra in the observed distribution of superclusters and voids. This identification is easy and clear. The network seems to have been deformed locally near the great mass associated to the large Piscis-Cetus complex.

  2. Structure Discovery in Large Semantic Graphs Using Extant Ontological Scaling and Descriptive Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    al-Saffar, Sinan; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Chappell, Alan R.

    2011-07-18

    As semantic datasets grow to be very large and divergent, there is a need to identify and exploit their inherent semantic structure for discovery and optimization. Towards that end, we present here a novel methodology to identify the semantic structures inherent in an arbitrary semantic graph dataset. We first present the concept of an extant ontology as a statistical description of the semantic relations present amongst the typed entities modeled in the graph. This serves as a model of the underlying semantic structure to aid in discovery and visualization. We then describe a method of ontological scaling in which the ontology is employed as a hierarchical scaling filter to infer different resolution levels at which the graph structures are to be viewed or analyzed. We illustrate these methods on three large and publicly available semantic datasets containing more than one billion edges each. Keywords-Semantic Web; Visualization; Ontology; Multi-resolution Data Mining;

  3. Diffusion on complex networks: a way to probe their large-scale topological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Ingve; Astrup Eriksen, Kasper; Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2004-05-01

    A diffusion process on complex networks is introduced in order to uncover their large-scale topological structures. This is achieved by focusing on the slowest decaying diffusive modes of the network. The proposed procedure is applied to real-world networks like a friendship network of known modular structure, and an Internet routing network. For the friendship network, its known structure is well reproduced. In case of the Internet, where the structure is far less well known, one indeed finds a modular structure, and modules can roughly be associated with individual countries. Quantitatively, the modular structure of the Internet manifests itself in an approximately 10 times larger participation ratio of its slowest decaying modes as compared to the null model-a random scale-free network. The extreme edges of the Internet are found to correspond to Russian and US military sites.

  4. On the renormalization of the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pajer, Enrico; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2013-08-01

    Standard perturbation theory (SPT) for large-scale matter inhomogeneities is unsatisfactory for at least three reasons: there is no clear expansion parameter since the density contrast is not small on all scales; it does not fully account for deviations at large scales from a perfect pressureless fluid induced by short-scale non-linearities; for generic initial conditions, loop corrections are UV-divergent, making predictions cutoff dependent and hence unphysical. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures successfully addresses all three issues. Here we focus on the third one and show explicitly that the terms induced by integrating out short scales, neglected in SPT, have exactly the right scale dependence to cancel all UV-divergences at one loop, and this should hold at all loops. A particularly clear example is an Einstein deSitter universe with no-scale initial conditions P{sub in} ∼ k{sup n}. After renormalizing the theory, we use self-similarity to derive a very simple result for the final power spectrum for any n, excluding two-loop corrections and higher. We show how the relative importance of different corrections depends on n. For n ∼ −1.5, relevant for our universe, pressure and dissipative corrections are more important than the two-loop corrections.

  5. Weak lensing of large scale structure in the presence of screening

    SciTech Connect

    Tessore, Nicolas; Metcalf, R. Benton; Giocoli, Carlo E-mail: hans.winther@astro.ox.ac.uk E-mail: pedro.ferreira@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-10-01

    A number of alternatives to general relativity exhibit gravitational screening in the non-linear regime of structure formation. We describe a set of algorithms that can produce weak lensing maps of large scale structure in such theories and can be used to generate mock surveys for cosmological analysis. By analysing a few basic statistics we indicate how these alternatives can be distinguished from general relativity with future weak lensing surveys.

  6. Large-Scale Computations Leading to a First-Principles Approach to Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W E; Navratil, P

    2003-08-18

    We report on large-scale applications of the ab initio, no-core shell model with the primary goal of achieving an accurate description of nuclear structure from the fundamental inter-nucleon interactions. In particular, we show that realistic two-nucleon interactions are inadequate to describe the low-lying structure of {sup 10}B, and that realistic three-nucleon interactions are essential.

  7. Results from large scale ultimate strength tests of K-braced jacket frame structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bolt, H.M.

    1995-12-01

    Phase 2 of the JIP Frames Project included four large scale collapse tests of K-braced frames in which both gap and overlap K joints were the critical components. The results are presented in this paper. The local failure modes differed from typical isolated component tests, yet were representative of structural damage observed following Hurricane Andrew. The frame test results therefore provide important insight to the ultimate response of offshore jacket structures.

  8. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghram, Shant; Akbar Abolhasani, Ali; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling knA-1 for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound nA < 0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale Mc in which for M Mc) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  9. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Baghram, Shant; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: MohammadHossein.Namjoo@utdallas.edu

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling k{sup n{sub A}-1} for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound n{sub A} < 0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale M{sub c} in which for M M{sub c}) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  10. The small-world organization of large-scale brain systems and relationships with subcortical structures.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    Brain structure and function is characterized by large-scale brain systems. However, each system has its own "small-world" organization, with sub-regions, or "hubs," that have varying degrees of specialization for certain cognitive and behavioral processes. This article describes this small-world organization, and the concepts of functional specialization and functional integration are defined and explained through practical examples. We also describe the development of large-scale brain systems and this small-world organization as a sensitive, protracted process, vulnerable to a variety of influences that generate neurodevelopmental disorders.

  11. Multi-thread parallel algorithm for reconstructing 3D large-scale porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Yang; Huang, Yaohui; Zheng, Jiangtao; Qian, Xu; Xie, Heping; Zhao, Xi

    2017-04-01

    Geomaterials inherently contain many discontinuous, multi-scale, geometrically irregular pores, forming a complex porous structure that governs their mechanical and transport properties. The development of an efficient reconstruction method for representing porous structures can significantly contribute toward providing a better understanding of the governing effects of porous structures on the properties of porous materials. In order to improve the efficiency of reconstructing large-scale porous structures, a multi-thread parallel scheme was incorporated into the simulated annealing reconstruction method. In the method, four correlation functions, which include the two-point probability function, the linear-path functions for the pore phase and the solid phase, and the fractal system function for the solid phase, were employed for better reproduction of the complex well-connected porous structures. In addition, a random sphere packing method and a self-developed pre-conditioning method were incorporated to cast the initial reconstructed model and select independent interchanging pairs for parallel multi-thread calculation, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by examining the similarity between the reconstructed structure and a prototype in terms of their geometrical, topological, and mechanical properties. Comparisons of the reconstruction efficiency of porous models with various scales indicated that the parallel multi-thread scheme significantly shortened the execution time for reconstruction of a large-scale well-connected porous model compared to a sequential single-thread procedure.

  12. Light domain walls, massive neutrinos and the large scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1991-01-01

    Domain walls generated through a cosmological phase transition are considered, which interact nongravitationally with light neutrinos. At a redshift z greater than or equal to 10(exp 4), the network grows rapidly and is virtually decoupled from the matter. As the friction with the matter becomes dominant, a comoving network scale close to that of the comoving horizon scale at z of approximately 10(exp 4) gets frozen. During the later phases, the walls produce matter wakes of a thickness d of approximately 10h(exp -1)Mpc, that may become seeds for the formation of the large scale structure observed in the Universe.

  13. Effect of primordial magnetic field on seeds for large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Dai Great; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Umezu, Ken-ichi

    2006-12-15

    Magnetic field plays a very important role in many astronomical phenomena at various scales of the universe. It is no exception in the early universe. Since the energy density, pressure, and tension of the primordial magnetic field affect gravitational collapses of plasma, the formation of seeds for large-scale structures should be influenced by them. Here we numerically investigate the effects of stochastic primordial magnetic field on the seeds of large-scale structures in the universe in detail. We found that the amplitude ratio between the density spectra with and without PMF (vertical bar P(k)/P{sub 0}(k) vertical bar at k>0.2 Mpc{sup -1}) lies between 75% and 130% at present for the range of PMF strengths 0.5nG

  14. Cosmic Rays and Gamma-Rays in Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Susumu; Nagashima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Aoki, Wako

    2004-12-01

    During the hierarchical formation of large scale structure in the universe, the progressive collapse and merging of dark matter should inevitably drive shocks into the gas, with nonthermal particle acceleration as a natural consequence. Two topics in this regard are discussed, emphasizing what important things nonthermal phenomena may tell us about the structure formation (SF) process itself. 1. Inverse Compton gamma-rays from large scale SF shocks and non-gravitational effects, and the implications for probing the warm-hot intergalactic medium. We utilize a semi-analytic approach based on Monte Carlo merger trees that treats both merger and accretion shocks self-consistently. 2. Production of 6Li by cosmic rays from SF shocks in the early Galaxy, and the implications for probing Galaxy formation and uncertain physics on sub-Galactic scales. Our new observations of metal-poor halo stars with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph are highlighted.

  15. Constraints on the dark energy dipole from large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurier, G.

    2016-11-01

    The high-significance measurement of large-scale structure signals enables testing the isotropy of the Universe. The measurement of cosmological parameters through the large-scale distribution of matter is now a mature domain. This approach is mainly limited by our knowledge of astrophysical processes that are used to observe the large-scale structure. However, when we assume that these astrophysical processes are the same across the Universe, then it is possible to tightly constrain the isotropy of cosmological parameters across the sky. Particularly the X-SZ cross-correlation has been shown to be a probe of the large scale structures that has a high signal-to-noise ratio and low bias. For this analysis, we used a localized measurement of the X-SZ cross-correlation as a test of the cosmological parameter isotropy. Using the scatter of the X-SZ cross-correlation across the sky, we derive cosmological constraints σ8(Ωm/ 0.28)0.34 = 0.78 ± 0.02 and tight isotropy constraints on the dark energy dipole ΔΩΛ < 0.07 at 95% confidence level.

  16. The origin of large scale structure in mantle convection: Effects of plate motions and viscosity stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunge, Hans-Peter; Richards, Mark A.

    Convection in Earth's mantle is dominated by long-wavelength structure, as evidenced by the very “red” spectra of both seismic velocity heterogeneity in the deep mantle and the non-hydrostatic gravity field, or geoid. Here we show that this large-scale structure may be a consequence of two factors that influence the scale of mantle convection. First, the existence of surface plates, which tend to organize the flow. Second, a substantial increase in lower mantle viscosity for which there is considerable independent geophysical evidence. Combining these two factors in 3-D spherical mantle convection models explains rather well the observed seismic spectrum of mantle heterogeneity.

  17. Investigation of the large scale coherent structure in a jet and its relevance to jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, R. E. A.; George, W. K.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the causes of aircraft noise in large jet aircraft. It was determined that jet noise varies strongly with velocity and that significant pure tones are generated by rotor-stator interaction in the jet engines. An objective method for deducing the large eddy structure in a large jet is described. The provisions of lighthill's theory are analyzed and applied to investigating the nature of jet noise. There is considerable evidence that a large scale coherent structure exists in a jet and that this structure can play a major role in sound radiation. Mathematical models are developed to define the parameters of orthogonal decomposition, finite extent velocity field, homogeneous fields, and periodic velocity fields.

  18. Non-Gaussianity and Large Scale Structure in a two-field Inflationary model

    SciTech Connect

    Tseliakhovich, D.; Slosar, A.; Hirata, C.

    2010-08-30

    Single-field inflationary models predict nearly Gaussian initial conditions, and hence a detection of non-Gaussianity would be a signature of the more complex inflationary scenarios. In this paper we study the effect on the cosmic microwave background and on large-scale structure from primordial non-Gaussianity in a two-field inflationary model in which both the inflaton and curvaton contribute to the density perturbations. We show that in addition to the previously described enhancement of the galaxy bias on large scales, this setup results in large-scale stochasticity. We provide joint constraints on the local non-Gaussianity parameter f*{sub NL} and the ratio {zeta} of the amplitude of primordial perturbations due to the inflaton and curvaton using WMAP and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data.

  19. Non-Gaussianity and large-scale structure in a two-field inflationary model

    SciTech Connect

    Tseliakhovich, Dmitriy; Hirata, Christopher

    2010-08-15

    Single-field inflationary models predict nearly Gaussian initial conditions, and hence a detection of non-Gaussianity would be a signature of the more complex inflationary scenarios. In this paper we study the effect on the cosmic microwave background and on large-scale structure from primordial non-Gaussianity in a two-field inflationary model in which both the inflaton and curvaton contribute to the density perturbations. We show that in addition to the previously described enhancement of the galaxy bias on large scales, this setup results in large-scale stochasticity. We provide joint constraints on the local non-Gaussianity parameter f-tilde{sub NL} and the ratio {xi} of the amplitude of primordial perturbations due to the inflaton and curvaton using WMAP and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data.

  20. Measuring the topology of large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm for quantitatively measuring the topology of large-scale structure has now been applied to a large number of observational data sets. The present paper summarizes and provides an overview of some of these observational results. On scales significantly larger than the correlation length, larger than about 1200 km/s, the cluster and galaxy data are fully consistent with a sponge-like random phase topology. At a smoothing length of about 600 km/s, however, the observed genus curves show a small shift in the direction of a meatball topology. Cold dark matter (CDM) models show similar shifts at these scales but not generally as large as those seen in the data. Bubble models, with voids completely surrounded on all sides by wall of galaxies, show shifts in the opposite direction. The CDM model is overall the most successful in explaining the data.

  1. Probing for Dark Energy Perturbations using the CMB and Large Scale Structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Rachel; Doré, Olivier

    2004-12-01

    We review the implications of having a non-trivial matter component in the universe and the potential for detecting such a component through the matter power spectrum and ISW effect. We adopt a phenomenological approach and consider the mysterious dark energy to be a cosmic fluid. It is thus fully characterized, up to linear order, by its equation of state and its speed of sound. Whereas the equation of state has been widely studied in the literature, less interest has been devoted to the speed of sound. Its observational consequences come predominantly from very large scale modes of dark matter perturbations (k < 0.01hMpc-1). Since these modes have hardly been probed so far by large scale galaxy surveys, we investigate whether joint constraints that can be placed on those two quantities using the recent CMB fluctuations measurements by WMAP as well as the recently measured CMB large scale structure cross-correlation.

  2. Measuring the topology of large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm for quantitatively measuring the topology of large-scale structure has now been applied to a large number of observational data sets. The present paper summarizes and provides an overview of some of these observational results. On scales significantly larger than the correlation length, larger than about 1200 km/s, the cluster and galaxy data are fully consistent with a sponge-like random phase topology. At a smoothing length of about 600 km/s, however, the observed genus curves show a small shift in the direction of a meatball topology. Cold dark matter (CDM) models show similar shifts at these scales but not generally as large as those seen in the data. Bubble models, with voids completely surrounded on all sides by wall of galaxies, show shifts in the opposite direction. The CDM model is overall the most successful in explaining the data.

  3. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to resum the effect of large scale motions in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because the linear power spectrum in ΛCDM is not scale free the effects of the large scale flows are enhanced. Although previous EFT calculations of the equal-time density power spectrum at one and two loops showed a remarkable agreement with numerical results, they also showed a 2% residual which appeared related to the BAO oscillations. We show that this was indeed the case, explain the physical origin and show how a Lagrangian based calculation removes this differences. We propose a simple method to upgrade existing Eulerian calculations to effectively make them Lagrangian and compare the new results with existing fits to numerical simulations. Our new two-loop results agrees with numerical results up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} to within 1% with no oscillatory residuals. We also compute power spectra involving momentum which is significantly more affected by the large scale flows. We show how keeping track of these velocities significantly enhances the UV reach of the momentum power spectrum in addition to removing the BAO related residuals. We compute predictions for the real space correlation function around the BAO scale and investigate its sensitivity to the EFT parameters and the details of the resummation technique.

  4. Mechanism design and dynamic analysis of a large-scale spatial deployable structure for space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanling; Lin, Qiuhong; Wang, Xingze; Li, Lin; Cong, Qiang; Pan, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The deployable structure is critical to the overall success of the space mission. This paper introduces a large-scale spatial deployable structure (SDS), which is developed to deploy and support the payload panels in a precise configuration once on the track. And segmental researching in the design, kinematics and dynamics analysis of SDS's prototyping system are presented. Geometric construction method and Bar-groups method are adopted to analysis the dimensions and coordinates of the SDS, which finally construct an well-determined mathematical model to raise the productivity and efficiency during optimization and analysis work. Be reasoned with the large-scale of the truss structures, flexible multibody dynamic simulations are developed, which present much more authentic stress transfer and kinematics behaviors. According to the deployment experiments of SDS's prototyping system, the correctness and validity of the flexible multibody simulation work are well proved.

  5. Accelerating large-scale protein structure alignments with graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bin; Zhao, Nan; Becchi, Michela; Korkin, Dmitry; Shyu, Chi-Ren

    2012-02-22

    Large-scale protein structure alignment, an indispensable tool to structural bioinformatics, poses a tremendous challenge on computational resources. To ensure structure alignment accuracy and efficiency, efforts have been made to parallelize traditional alignment algorithms in grid environments. However, these solutions are costly and of limited accessibility. Others trade alignment quality for speedup by using high-level characteristics of structure fragments for structure comparisons. We present ppsAlign, a parallel protein structure Alignment framework designed and optimized to exploit the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). As a general-purpose GPU platform, ppsAlign could take many concurrent methods, such as TM-align and Fr-TM-align, into the parallelized algorithm design. We evaluated ppsAlign on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card, and compared it with existing software solutions running on an AMD dual-core CPU. We observed a 36-fold speedup over TM-align, a 65-fold speedup over Fr-TM-align, and a 40-fold speedup over MAMMOTH. ppsAlign is a high-performance protein structure alignment tool designed to tackle the computational complexity issues from protein structural data. The solution presented in this paper allows large-scale structure comparisons to be performed using massive parallel computing power of GPU.

  6. Accelerating large-scale protein structure alignments with graphics processing units

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Large-scale protein structure alignment, an indispensable tool to structural bioinformatics, poses a tremendous challenge on computational resources. To ensure structure alignment accuracy and efficiency, efforts have been made to parallelize traditional alignment algorithms in grid environments. However, these solutions are costly and of limited accessibility. Others trade alignment quality for speedup by using high-level characteristics of structure fragments for structure comparisons. Findings We present ppsAlign, a parallel protein structure Alignment framework designed and optimized to exploit the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). As a general-purpose GPU platform, ppsAlign could take many concurrent methods, such as TM-align and Fr-TM-align, into the parallelized algorithm design. We evaluated ppsAlign on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card, and compared it with existing software solutions running on an AMD dual-core CPU. We observed a 36-fold speedup over TM-align, a 65-fold speedup over Fr-TM-align, and a 40-fold speedup over MAMMOTH. Conclusions ppsAlign is a high-performance protein structure alignment tool designed to tackle the computational complexity issues from protein structural data. The solution presented in this paper allows large-scale structure comparisons to be performed using massive parallel computing power of GPU. PMID:22357132

  7. Large-scale structure effects on the gravitational lens image positions and time delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seljak, Uros

    1994-01-01

    We compute the fluctuations in gravitational lens image positions and time delay caused by large-scale structure correlations. We show that these fluctuations can be expressed as a simple integral over the density power spectrum. Using the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization we find that positions of objects at cosmological distances are expected to deviate from their true positions by few arcminutes. These deflections are not directly observable. The positions of the images relative to one another fluctuate by a few percent of the relative separation, implying that one does not expect multiple images to be produced by large-scale structure. Nevertheless, the fluctuations are larger than the observational errors on the positions and affect reconstructions of the lens potential. The time delay fluctuations have a geometrical and a gravitational contribution. Both are much larger than the expected time delay from the primary lens, but partially cancel each other. We find that large-scale structure weakly affects the time delay and time delay measurements can be used as a probe of the distance scale in the universe.

  8. Large-scale structure topology in non-standard cosmologies: impact of dark sector physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Andrew L.; Elahi, Pascal J.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Power, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Even as our measurements of cosmological parameters improve, the physical nature of the dark sector of the universe largely remains a mystery. Many effects of dark sector models are most prominent at very large scales and will rely on future galaxy surveys to elucidate. In this paper, we compare the topological properties of the large-scale dark matter distribution in a number of cosmological models using hydrodynamical simulations and the cosmological genus statistic. Genus curves are computed from z = 11 to 0 for Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM), quintessence and warm dark matter (WDM) models, over a scale range of 1-20 h-1 Mpc. The curves are analysed in terms of their Hermite spectra to describe the power contained in non-Gaussian deformations to the cosmological density field. We find that the ΛCDM and ΛWDM models produce nearly identical genus curves indicating no topological differences in structure formation. The quintessence model, which differs solely in its expansion history, produces significant differences in the strength and redshift evolution of non-Gaussian modes associated with higher cluster abundances and lower void abundances. These effects are robust to cosmic variance and are characteristically different from those produced by tweaking the parameters of a ΛCDM model. Given the simplicity and similarity of the models, detecting these discrepancies represents a promising avenue for understanding the effect of non-standard cosmologies on large-scale structure.

  9. On the large-scale structure of the turbulent wake of a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovic, S.; Ramaprian, B. R.

    1989-01-01

    A simple heat-tagging technique was used to isolate and analyze the large-scale coherent structures present in the two-dimensional wake of a flat plate. The results indicate the presence of these coherent structures even at 250 momentum thicknesses downstream of the trailing edge. These structures have a vortexlike topology and carry a significant amount of the total shear stress. The present results for the flat-plate wake seem to be in general agreement with those that have been obtained in cylinder wakes by other comtemporary investigators using more complex techniques of eduction and signal enhancement.

  10. Thick strings, the liquid crystal blue phase, and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model based on the liquid crystal blue phase is proposed as a model for a late-time cosmological phase transition. Topological defects, in particular thick strings and/or domain walls, are presented as seeds for structure formation. It is shown that the observed large-scale structure, including quasi-periodic wall structure, can be well fitted in the model without violating the microwave background isotropy bound or the limits from induced gravitational waves and the millisecond pulsar timing. Furthermore, such late-time transitions can produce objects such as quasars at high redshifts. The model appears to work with either cold or hot dark matter.

  11. Thick strings, the liquid crystal blue phase, and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model based on the liquid crystal blue phase is proposed as a model for a late-time cosmological phase transition. Topological defects, in particular thick strings and/or domain walls, are presented as seeds for structure formation. It is shown that the observed large-scale structure, including quasi-periodic wall structure, can be well fitted in the model without violating the microwave background isotropy bound or the limits from induced gravitational waves and the millisecond pulsar timing. Furthermore, such late-time transitions can produce objects such as quasars at high redshifts. The model appears to work with either cold or hot dark matter.

  12. Spatial distribution of ultra-diffuse galaxies within large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, Javier; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2017-06-01

    Taking advantage of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe82 data, we have explored the spatial distribution of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) within an area of 8 × 8 Mpc2 centred around the galaxy cluster Abell 168 (z = 0.045). This intermediate massive cluster (σ = 550 km s-1) is surrounded by a complex large-scale structure. Our work confirms the presence of UDGs in the cluster and in the large-scale structure that surrounds it, and it is the first detection of UDGs outside clusters. Approximately 50 per cent of the UDGs analysed in the selected area inhabit the cluster region (˜11 ± 5 per cent in the core and ˜39 ± 9 per cent in the outskirts), whereas the remaining UDGs are found outside the main cluster structure (˜50 ± 11 per cent). The colours and the spatial distribution of the UDGs within this large-scale structure are more similar to dwarf galaxies than to L⋆ galaxies, suggesting that most UDGs could be bona fide dwarf galaxies.

  13. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  14. Extracting Primordial Non-Gaussianity from Large Scale Structure in the Post-Planck Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Olivier

    Astronomical observations have become a unique tool to probe fundamental physics. Cosmology, in particular, emerged as a data-driven science whose phenomenological modeling has achieved great success: in the post-Planck era, key cosmological parameters are measured to percent precision. A single model reproduces a wealth of astronomical observations involving very distinct physical processes at different times. This success leads to fundamental physical questions. One of the most salient is the origin of the primordial perturbations that grew to form the large-scale structures we now observe. More and more cosmological observables point to inflationary physics as the origin of the structure observed in the universe. Inflationary physics predict the statistical properties of the primordial perturbations and it is thought to be slightly non-Gaussian. The detection of this small deviation from Gaussianity represents the next frontier in early Universe physics. To measure it would provide direct, unique and quantitative insights about the physics at play when the Universe was only a fraction of a second old, thus probing energies untouchable otherwise. En par with the well-known relic gravitational wave radiation -- the famous ``B-modes'' -- it is one the few probes of inflation. This departure from Gaussianity leads to very specific signature in the large scale clustering of galaxies. Observing large-scale structure, we can thus establish a direct connection with fundamental theories of the early universe. In the post-Planck era, large-scale structures are our most promising pathway to measuring this primordial signal. Current estimates suggests that the next generation of space or ground based large scale structure surveys (e.g. the ESA EUCLID or NASA WFIRST missions) might enable a detection of this signal. This potential huge payoff requires us to solidify the theoretical predictions supporting these measurements. Even if the exact signal we are looking for is of

  15. The Price of Precision: Large-Scale Mapping of Forest Structure and Biomass Using Airborne Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubayah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing provides one of the best means for acquiring detailed information on forest structure. However, its application over large areas has been limited largely because of its expense. Nonetheless, extant data exist over many states in the U.S., funded largely by state and federal consortia and mainly for infrastructure, emergency response, flood plain and coastal mapping. These lidar data are almost always acquired in leaf-off seasons, and until recently, usually with low point count densities. Even with these limitations, they provide unprecedented wall-to-wall mappings that enable development of appropriate methodologies for large-scale deployment of lidar. In this talk we summarize our research and lessons learned in deriving forest structure over regional areas as part of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). We focus on two areas: the entire state of Maryland and Sonoma County, California. The Maryland effort used low density, leaf-off data acquired by each county in varying epochs, while the on-going Sonoma work employs state-of-the-art, high density, wall-to-wall, leaf-on lidar data. In each area we combine these lidar coverages with high-resolution multispectral imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) and in situ plot data to produce maps of canopy height, tree cover and biomass, and compare our results against FIA plot data and national biomass maps. Our work demonstrates that large-scale mapping of forest structure at high spatial resolution is achievable but products may be complex to produce and validate over large areas. Furthermore, fundamental issues involving statistical approaches, plot types and sizes, geolocation, modeling scales, allometry, and even the definitions of "forest" and "non-forest" must be approached carefully. Ultimately, determining the "price of precision", that is, does the value of wall-to-wall forest structure data justify their expense, should consider not only carbon market applications

  16. Scalar-fluid theories: cosmological perturbations and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, Tomi S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Tamanini, Nicola E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu

    2015-09-01

    Recently a new Lagrangian framework was introduced to describe interactions between scalar fields and relativistic perfect fluids. This allows two consistent generalizations of coupled quintessence models: non-vanishing pressures and a new type of derivative interaction. The implications of these to the formation of cosmological large-scale structure are uncovered here at the linear order. The full perturbation equations in the two cases are derived in a unified formalism and their Newtonian, quasi-static limit is studied analytically. Requiring the absence of an effective sound speed term in the coupled dark matter fluid restricts the Lagrangian to be a linear function of the matter number density. This leaves new potentially viable classes of both algebraically and derivatively interacting models wherein the coupling may impact the background expansion dynamics and imprint new signatures into the large-scale structure.

  17. Music in the moment? Revisiting the effect of large scale structures.

    PubMed

    Lalitte, P; Bigand, E

    2006-12-01

    The psychological relevance of large-scale musical structures has been a matter of debate in the music community. This issue was investigated with a method that allows assessing listeners' detection of musical incoherencies in normal and scrambled versions of popular and contemporary music pieces. Musical excerpts were segmented into 28 or 29 chunks. In the scrambled version, the temporal order of these chunks was altered with the constraint that the transitions between two chunks never created local acoustical and musical disruptions. Participants were required (1) to detect on-line incoherent linking of chunks, (2) to rate aesthetic quality of pieces, and (3) to evaluate their overall coherence. The findings indicate a moderate sensitivity to large-scale musical structures for popular and contemporary music in both musically trained and untrained listeners. These data are discussed in light of current models of music cognition.

  18. Turbulence and magnetic fields in the large-scale structure of the universe.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung; Cho, Jungyeon; Das, Santabrata

    2008-05-16

    The nature and origin of turbulence and magnetic fields in the intergalactic space are important problems that are yet to be understood. We propose a scenario in which turbulent-flow motions are induced via the cascade of the vorticity generated at cosmological shocks during the formation of the large-scale structure. The turbulence in turn amplifies weak seed magnetic fields of any origin. Supercomputer simulations show that the turbulence is subsonic inside clusters and groups of galaxies, whereas it is transonic or mildly supersonic in filaments. Based on a turbulence dynamo model, we then estimated that the average magnetic field strength would be a few microgauss (microG) inside clusters and groups, approximately 0.1 muG around clusters and groups, and approximately 10 nanogauss in filaments. Our model presents a physical mechanism that transfers the gravitational energy to the turbulence and magnetic field energies in the large-scale structure of the universe.

  19. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.; Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2016-10-01

    Cosmology and neutrino physics have converged into a recent discovery era. The success of the standard model of cosmology in explaining the cosmic microwave background and cosmological large-scale structure data allows for the possibility of measuring the absolute neutrino mass and providing exquisite constraints on the number of light degrees of freedom, including neutrinos. This sensitivity to neutrino physics requires the validity of some of the assumptions, including general relativity, inflationary cosmology, and standard thermal history, many of which can be tested with cosmological data. This sensitivity is also predicated on the robust handling of systematic uncertainties associated with different cosmological observables. We review several past, current, and future measurements of the cosmic microwave background and cosmological large-scale structure that allow us to do fundamental neutrino physics with cosmology.

  20. Computation of Large-Scale Structure Jet Noise Sources With Weak Nonlinear Effects Using Linear Euler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Hixon, Ray; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    2003-01-01

    An approximate technique is presented for the prediction of the large-scale turbulent structure sound source in a supersonic jet. A linearized Euler equations code is used to solve for the flow disturbances within and near a jet with a given mean flow. Assuming a normal mode composition for the wave-like disturbances, the linear radial profiles are used in an integration of the Navier-Stokes equations. This results in a set of ordinary differential equations representing the weakly nonlinear self-interactions of the modes along with their interaction with the mean flow. Solutions are then used to correct the amplitude of the disturbances that represent the source of large-scale turbulent structure sound in the jet.

  1. Large-scale structures in the wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Ryuichiro; Mochimaru, Yoshihiro; Yagita, Miki; Tanaka, Yutaka; Shirakashi, Masataka

    1986-11-01

    The authors have reported (1984) that the two-dimensional Karman vortices behind a circular cylinder with diameter d are broken into lengths of about 8(d) and they form chains of spoon-shaped vortex couples. In the present experiment, disks were attached to the cylinder so that the Karman vortices were artificially cut to fixed lengths of 4(d), 6(d), 8(d), and 10(d). The structures with 8(d) were most stable forming a vortex chain with least irregularities, and the wake was much wider than without the disks, while the neighboring vortices with a length 4(d) merged to a scale of 8(d). These results show that the length 8(d) is a unique scale in the deformation of the Karman vortices to a three-dimensional large scale structure.

  2. Computational Speed-Up of Complex Durability Analysis of Large-Scale Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O; Abdi, Frank; Dutton, Renly; Cochran, Ernest J

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of modern structures for aerospace, infrastructure, and automotive engineering applications necessitates the use of larger and larger computational models for accurate prediction of structural response. The ever-increasing size of computational structural mechanics simulations imposes a pressing need for commensurate increases in computational speed to keep costs and computation times in check. Innovative methods are needed to expedite the numerical analysis of complex structures while minimizing computational costs. The need for these methodologies is even more critical when performing durability and damage tolerance evaluation as the computation is repeated a number of times for various loading conditions. This paper describes a breakthrough for efficient and accurate predictive methodologies that are amenable to the analysis of progressive failure, reliability, and optimization of large-scale composite structures or structural components.

  3. Resurrecting hot dark matter - Large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    These are the results of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a universe dominated by massive neutrinos (hot dark matter). This model has several desirable features. The final matter distribution contains isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, producing a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. Because baryons can accrete onto the cosmic strings before the neutrinos, the galaxies will have baryon cores and dark neutrino halos. Galaxy formation in this model begins much earlier than in random-phase models. On large scales the distribution of clustered matter visually resembles the CfA survey, with large voids and filaments.

  4. Resurrecting hot dark matter - Large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    These are the results of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a universe dominated by massive neutrinos (hot dark matter). This model has several desirable features. The final matter distribution contains isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, producing a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. Because baryons can accrete onto the cosmic strings before the neutrinos, the galaxies will have baryon cores and dark neutrino halos. Galaxy formation in this model begins much earlier than in random-phase models. On large scales the distribution of clustered matter visually resembles the CfA survey, with large voids and filaments.

  5. Testing the Big Bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, a detailed discussion is presented regarding: (1) nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances, and neutrino counting; (2) the dark matter problems; and (3) the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments are made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it.

  6. Spatio-Temporal Complexity and Large-Scale Structures in Problems of Continuum Mechanic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-15

    TEMPORAL COMPLEXITY & LARGE SCALE STRUCTURES IN PROBLEMS OF CONTINUUM MECHANICS" (U) 61103D 3484/D7 (URI) 6. AUTHOR(S) Drs. Basil Nicolaenko, Dieter...orbits on-the attractor. We have applied our method to two experimental data sets from Taylor-Couette flows . 14. SUBJECT TERMS -WS.-UMBER OF PAGES’ 14 S...8217 .. . .,16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 1. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19., SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION OFA. OF REPORT OF THIS

  7. Weak gravitational lensing due to large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroszynski, Michal; Park, Changbom; Paczynski, Bohdan; Gott, J. Richard, III

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the large-scale structure of the universe on the propagation of light rays is studied. The development of the large-scale density fluctuations in the omega = 1 universe is calculated within the cold dark matter scenario using a smooth particle approximation. The propagation of about 10 to the 6th random light rays between the redshift z = 5 and the observer was followed. It is found that the effect of shear is negligible, and the amplification of single images is dominated by the matter in the beam. The spread of amplifications is very small. Therefore, the filled-beam approximation is very good for studies of strong lensing by galaxies or clusters of galaxies. In the simulation, the column density was averaged over a comoving area of approximately (1/h Mpc)-squared. No case of a strong gravitational lensing was found, i.e., no 'over-focused' image that would suggest that a few images might be present. Therefore, the large-scale structure of the universe as it is presently known does not produce multiple images with gravitational lensing on a scale larger than clusters of galaxies.

  8. Gamma-ray bursts as a probe of large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Quashnock, Jean M.

    1993-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursts are cosmological in origin, the sources of the bursts are expected to trace the large-scale structure of luminous matter in the universe. We show that, if this is so and if the Burst and Transient Source Experiment yields the locations of approximately greater than 3000 gamma-ray bursts, it may be possible to use them to probe the structure of luminous matter on the largest scales known, consistent with recent determinations from pencil beam surveys and studies of superclusters. A positive result would provide compelling evidence that most gamma-ray bursts are cosmological in origin and would allow comparison between the distributions of luminous matter and dark matter on large scales. Conversely, a negative result might cast doubt on the cosmological origin of the bursts, provide evidence that the clustering of burst sources on large scales is less than that expected from pencil beam surveys and studies of superclusters, or indicate that gamma-ray bursts have some more exotic origin.

  9. Large Scale Chromosome Folding Is Stable against Local Changes in Chromatin Structure

    PubMed Central

    Therizols, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the link between small-scale chromatin structure and large-scale chromosome folding during interphase is a prerequisite for understanding transcription. Yet, this link remains poorly investigated. Here, we introduce a simple biophysical model where interphase chromosomes are described in terms of the folding of chromatin sequences composed of alternating blocks of fibers with different thicknesses and flexibilities, and we use it to study the influence of sequence disorder on chromosome behaviors in space and time. By employing extensive computer simulations, we thus demonstrate that chromosomes undergo noticeable conformational changes only on length-scales smaller than 105 basepairs and time-scales shorter than a few seconds, and we suggest there might exist effective upper bounds to the detection of chromosome reorganization in eukaryotes. We prove the relevance of our framework by modeling recent experimental FISH data on murine chromosomes. PMID:27295501

  10. Spatial distribution of GRBs and large scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Rácz, István I.; Balázs, Lajos G.; Tóth, L. Viktor; Horváth, István

    We studied the space distribution of the starburst galaxies from Millennium XXL database at z = 0.82. We examined the starburst distribution in the classical Millennium I (De Lucia et al. (2006)) using a semi-analytical model for the genesis of the galaxies. We simulated a starburst galaxies sample with Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. The connection between the large scale structures homogenous and starburst groups distribution (Kofman and Shandarin 1998), Suhhonenko et al. (2011), Liivamägi et al. (2012), Park et al. (2012), Horvath et al. (2014), Horvath et al. (2015)) on a defined scale were checked too.

  11. Spatial distribution of GRB and large scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Racz, Istvan; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos; Toth, Viktor; Horvath, Istvan

    2015-08-01

    We studied the distribution the starburst galaxies from Millenium XXL database at z=0.82. First we examined the starburst distribution in the classical Millenium I, from the DeLucia (2006) database which used a semi-analytical model for the galaxies genesis. We found a relationship between the starburst galaxies and the dark matter density distribution in Millenium I and we determined the Millenium I and Millenium XXL transformation factor. We simulated a starburst galaxies sample with Markov Chain Monte Carlo method where we used the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. The connection between the large scale structures homogenous and starburst groups distribution on a defined scale were checked too.

  12. Characterising large-scale structure with the REFLEX II cluster survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    We study the large-scale structure with superclusters from the REFLEX X-ray cluster survey together with cosmological N-body simulations. It is important to construct superclusters with criteria such that they are homogeneous in their properties. We lay out our theoretical concept considering future evolution of superclusters in their definition, and show that the X-ray luminosity and halo mass functions of clusters in superclusters are found to be top-heavy, different from those of clusters in the field. We also show a promising aspect of using superclusters to study the local cluster bias and mass scaling relation with simulations.

  13. Coherent large-scale structures in high Reynolds number supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Burrin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The flow structure of a 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter jet operated at a full expanded Mach number of 1.37, with Reynolds numbers in the range 1.7 to 2.35 million, was examined for the first 20 jet diameters. To facilitate the study of the large scale structure, and determine any coherence, a discrete tone acoustic excitation method was used. Phase locked flow visualization as well as laser velocimeter quantitative measurements were made. The main conclusions derived from this study are: (1) large scale coherent like turbulence structures do exist in large Reynolds number supersonic jets, and they prevail even beyond the potential core; (2) the most preferential Strouhal number for these structures is in the vicinity of 0.4; and (3) quantitatively, the peak amplitudes of these structures are rather low, and are about 1% of the jet exit velocity. Finally, since a number of unique problems related to LV measurements in supersonic jets were encountered, a summary of these problems and lessons learned therefrom are also reported.

  14. Developing eThread Pipeline Using SAGA-Pilot Abstraction for Large-Scale Structural Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Ragothaman, Anjani; Feinstein, Wei; Jha, Shantenu; Kim, Joohyun

    2014-01-01

    While most of computational annotation approaches are sequence-based, threading methods are becoming increasingly attractive because of predicted structural information that could uncover the underlying function. However, threading tools are generally compute-intensive and the number of protein sequences from even small genomes such as prokaryotes is large typically containing many thousands, prohibiting their application as a genome-wide structural systems biology tool. To leverage its utility, we have developed a pipeline for eThread—a meta-threading protein structure modeling tool, that can use computational resources efficiently and effectively. We employ a pilot-based approach that supports seamless data and task-level parallelism and manages large variation in workload and computational requirements. Our scalable pipeline is deployed on Amazon EC2 and can efficiently select resources based upon task requirements. We present runtime analysis to characterize computational complexity of eThread and EC2 infrastructure. Based on results, we suggest a pathway to an optimized solution with respect to metrics such as time-to-solution or cost-to-solution. Our eThread pipeline can scale to support a large number of sequences and is expected to be a viable solution for genome-scale structural bioinformatics and structure-based annotation, particularly, amenable for small genomes such as prokaryotes. The developed pipeline is easily extensible to other types of distributed cyberinfrastructure. PMID:24995285

  15. Formation of large-scale structures in ablative Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Don, Wai-Sun; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, Y. J.; He, X. T.

    2010-12-01

    In this research, we studied numerically nonlinear evolutions of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) with and without thermal conduction, aka, the ablative KHI (AKHI) and the classical KHI (CKHI). The second order thermal conduction term with a variable thermal conductivity coefficient is added to the energy equation in the Euler equations in the AKHI to investigate the effect of thermal conduction on the evolution of large and small scale structures within the shear layer which separate the fluids with different velocities. The inviscid hyperbolic flux of Euler equation is computed via the classical fifth order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite difference scheme and the temperature is solved by an implicit fourth order finite difference scheme with variable coefficients in the second order parabolic term to avoid severe time step restriction imposed by the stability of the numerical scheme. As opposed to the CKHI, fine scale structures such as the vortical structures are suppressed from forming in the AKHI due to the dissipative nature of the second order thermal conduction term. With a single-mode sinusoidal interface perturbation, the results of simulations show that the growth of higher harmonics is effectively suppressed and the flow is stabilized by the thermal conduction. With a two-mode sinusoidal interface perturbation, the vortex pairing is strengthened by the thermal conduction which would allow the formation of large-scale structures and enhance the mixing of materials. In summary, our numerical studies show that thermal conduction can have strong influence on the nonlinear evolutions of the KHI. Thus, it should be included in applications where thermal conduction plays an important role, such as the formation of large-scale structures in the high energy density physics and astrophysics.

  16. Formation of large-scale structures in ablative Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; He, X. T.; Don, Wai-Sun; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-12-15

    In this research, we studied numerically nonlinear evolutions of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) with and without thermal conduction, aka, the ablative KHI (AKHI) and the classical KHI (CKHI). The second order thermal conduction term with a variable thermal conductivity coefficient is added to the energy equation in the Euler equations in the AKHI to investigate the effect of thermal conduction on the evolution of large and small scale structures within the shear layer which separate the fluids with different velocities. The inviscid hyperbolic flux of Euler equation is computed via the classical fifth order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite difference scheme and the temperature is solved by an implicit fourth order finite difference scheme with variable coefficients in the second order parabolic term to avoid severe time step restriction imposed by the stability of the numerical scheme. As opposed to the CKHI, fine scale structures such as the vortical structures are suppressed from forming in the AKHI due to the dissipative nature of the second order thermal conduction term. With a single-mode sinusoidal interface perturbation, the results of simulations show that the growth of higher harmonics is effectively suppressed and the flow is stabilized by the thermal conduction. With a two-mode sinusoidal interface perturbation, the vortex pairing is strengthened by the thermal conduction which would allow the formation of large-scale structures and enhance the mixing of materials. In summary, our numerical studies show that thermal conduction can have strong influence on the nonlinear evolutions of the KHI. Thus, it should be included in applications where thermal conduction plays an important role, such as the formation of large-scale structures in the high energy density physics and astrophysics.

  17. The BAHAMAS project: calibrated hydrodynamical simulations for large-scale structure cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop; Bird, Simeon; Le Brun, Amandine M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of the large-scale distribution of matter is sensitive to a variety of fundamental parameters that characterize the dark matter, dark energy, and other aspects of our cosmological framework. Since the majority of the mass density is in the form of dark matter that cannot be directly observed, to do cosmology with large-scale structure, one must use observable (baryonic) quantities that trace the underlying matter distribution in a (hopefully) predictable way. However, recent numerical studies have demonstrated that the mapping between observable and total mass, as well as the total mass itself, are sensitive to unresolved feedback processes associated with galaxy formation, motivating explicit calibration of the feedback efficiencies. Here, we construct a new suite of large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulations (called BAHAMAS, for BAryons and HAloes of MAssive Systems), where subgrid models of stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback have been calibrated to reproduce the present-day galaxy stellar mass function and the hot gas mass fractions of groups and clusters in order to ensure the effects of feedback on the overall matter distribution are broadly correct. We show that the calibrated simulations reproduce an unprecedentedly wide range of properties of massive systems, including the various observed mappings between galaxies, hot gas, total mass, and black holes, and represent a significant advance in our ability to mitigate the primary systematic uncertainty in most present large-scale structure tests.

  18. Spectra and Large-Scale Structures in a Turbulent Boundary Layer Interacting with Wind Turbine Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, Yulia; Chatterjee, Tanmoy

    2016-11-01

    Wind Turbine Array Boundary Layer is a relatively simple, yet useful theoretical conceptualization to study very large wind farms in an atmospheric boundary layer. In this talk, we investigate the length scales of eddies involved in the power generation in these very large, "infinite" wind farms by analyzing the spectra of the turbulent flux of the mean kinetic energy from Large Eddy Simulations (LES). A goal is to provide a fundamental understanding of the dynamic behavior, the size, the scaling laws and the anisotropic structure of the energy containing eddies responsible for power generation from the wind turbines. Large-scale structures with an order of magnitude bigger than the turbine rotor diameter are shown to have substantial contribution to wind power. The study is performed with a Spectral Element LES code with the recently implemented near-wall model and the actuator line model to represent the effect of rotating wind turbine blades. In this presentation, we also explore an idea of a "multiscale" wind farm, where larger and smaller turbines are arranged in a symbiotic way, with smaller turbines helping to harvest additional power from the wakes of the larger turbines, inspired by the findings of the spectral analysis in uniform wind farms. NSF CBET 13358568 award.

  19. Emergence of coherent structures and large-scale flows in motile suspensions.

    PubMed

    Saintillan, David; Shelley, Michael J

    2012-03-07

    The emergence of coherent structures, large-scale flows and correlated dynamics in suspensions of motile particles such as swimming micro-organisms or artificial microswimmers is studied using direct particle simulations. A detailed model is proposed for a slender rod-like particle that propels itself in a viscous fluid by exerting a prescribed tangential stress on its surface, and a method is devised for the efficient calculation of hydrodynamic interactions in large-scale suspensions of such particles using slender-body theory and a smooth particle-mesh Ewald algorithm. Simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions for various system sizes and suspension volume fractions, and demonstrate a transition to large-scale correlated motions in suspensions of rear-actuated swimmers, or Pushers, above a critical volume fraction or system size. This transition, which is not observed in suspensions of head-actuated swimmers, or Pullers, is seen most clearly in particle velocity and passive tracer statistics. These observations are consistent with predictions from our previous mean-field kinetic theory, one of which states that instabilities will arise in uniform isotropic suspensions of Pushers when the product of the linear system size with the suspension volume fraction exceeds a given threshold. We also find that the collective dynamics of Pushers result in giant number fluctuations, local alignment of swimmers and strongly mixing flows. Suspensions of Pullers, which evince no large-scale dynamics, nonetheless display interesting deviations from the random isotropic state.

  20. Large Scale Overturned Structures and Frontal Thrusts Structures in Taiwan: Insight from Sandbox Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Malavieille, J.; Chen, L.; Huang, C.

    2013-12-01

    In Taiwan today, the subduction of the Chinese continental margin under the Philippine Sea plate results in the progressive growth of an active orogenic wedge. It is one of the best places to study the complex relationships that occur between the tectono-metamorphic processes controlling deformation (plate rheology and kinematics) and surface processes (erosion and sedimentation). In the Central Range of Taiwan, foliation and lineation traces outline the geometry and kinematics of deformation in both, the foreland and hinterland of the orogenic wedge. The foliation dip and the strain ellipsoids distribution show the fan shape of a large pop-up structure characterizing the effects of oblique plate convergence. On the eastern flank, regionally developed penetrative cleavage dips, isotope data and sedimentary structures demonstrating regional overturned structures. Two mélange units, the Kenting and Lichi mélange are exposed at the south and east of the Central Range respectively. Experiments allow the study of interactions between tectonics and surface processes. Accounting for various boundary conditions and parameters such as sedimentation, erosion, basal friction, and décollement level. We present the results of 2D sandbox models designed to investigate the complex deformation characterizing the active Taiwan orogenic wedge and to demonstrate the development of those mélanges, overturned structures and mountain frontal thrusts. Models are analyzed using pictures, movies and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry software). We then characterize the exhumation patterns, the mode of fault propagation and displacement patterns by strain partitioning of those mélanges and overturned structures. The preliminary conclusions are: 1.the Lichi mélange may result from mega-back thrust/ back fold, with the ophiolite source from the western oceanic lithosphere. 2. Double subduction are necessary to produce large E-vergent and overturned sequence. 3. The frontal fault

  1. Large Scale Overturned Structures Structures in Taiwan: Insight from Sandbox Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chia-Yu; Malavieille, Jacques; Chen, Liwen; Huang, Chinhuang

    2014-05-01

    In Taiwan today, the subduction of the Chinese continental margin under the Philippine Sea plate results in the progressive growth of an active orogenic wedge. It is one of the best places to study the complex relationships that occur between the tectono-metamorphic processes controlling deformation (plate rheology and kinematics) and surface processes (erosion and sedimentation). In the Central Range of Taiwan, foliation and lineation traces outline the geometry and kinematics of deformation in both, the foreland and hinterland of the orogenic wedge. The foliation dip and the strain ellipsoids distribution show the fan shape of a large pop-up structure characterizing the effects of oblique plate convergence. On the eastern flank, regionally developed penetrative cleavage dips, isotope data and sedimentary structures demonstrating regional overturned structures. Two mélange units, the Kenting and Lichi mélange are exposed at the south and east of the Central Range respectively. Experiments allow the study of interactions between tectonics and surface processes. Accounting for various boundary conditions and parameters such as sedimentation, erosion, basal friction, and décollement level. We present the results of 2D sandbox models designed to investigate the complex deformation characterizing the active Taiwan orogenic wedge and to demonstrate the development of those mélanges, overturned structures and mountain frontal thrusts. Models are analyzed using pictures, movies and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry software). We then characterize the exhumation patterns, the mode of fault propagation and displacement patterns by strain partitioning of those mélanges and overturned structures. The preliminary conclusions are: 1.the Lichi mélange may result from mega-back thrust/ back fold, with the ophiolite source from the western oceanic lithosphere. 2. Double subduction favors to produce large E-vergent and overturned sequence. 3. The structures in Suao area and

  2. Morphology of Large- and Meso-scale structures in the Mid and Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekic, V.; Cottaar, S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography tells us that the large-scale structure of the lower mantle is dominated by a pair of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs), and contains regions of faster-than-average velocities associated with past subduction. These structures are thought to influence and be influenced by mantle convection, and are linked to the introduction/creation, survival, and destruction of chemical heterogeneity in the deep interior. In fact, while sinking slabs are ipso facto associated with compositional variations, the laterally abrupt velocity changes across the boundaries of the LLSVPs - among other lines of evidence - indicate that the LLSVPs also represent a domain compositionally distinct from ambient mantle. The discovery of meso-scales structures, seismically similar to the LLSVPs and exemplified by the Perm Anomaly, suggests that compositional variations in the lower mantle might be tomographically discernible even at smaller length scales. Quantifying the morphology and spatial distribution of these seismically imaged structures provides important clues to the chemical heterogeneity and dynamical state of the Earth's deep interior. In this presentation, we determine the morphology of the slower-than-average, faster-than-average, and neutral seismic regions, in order to provide quantitative estimates of the locations, volumes, and shapes of lower mantle structures, including, but not limited to the African and Pacific LLSVPs. We do so by carrying out a cluster analysis of VS profiles with a sliding window in depth, which allows us to map out the three-dimensional morphology of the LLSVPs that is consistent across tomographic models. Based on these analyses, we estimate the volume of the LLSVPs to be 5-9% of the mantle, which is several times larger than past estimates. We then catalog the broad range of boundary geometries for the LLSVPs and compare them to results from high-resolution waveform studies, where available. Finally, we identify meso-scale

  3. MIC-Large Scale Magnetically Inflated Cable Structures for Space Power, Propulsion, Communications and Observational Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Rather, John

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for the erection of rigid large scale structures in space-MIC (Magnetically Inflated Cable)-is described. MIC structures are launched as a compact payload of superconducting cables and attached tethers. After reaching orbit, the superconducting cables are energized with electrical current. The magnet force interactions between the cables cause them to expand outwards into the final large structure. Various structural shapes and applications are described. The MIC structure can be a simple flat disc with a superconducting outer ring that supports a tether network holding a solar cell array, or it can form a curved mirror surface that concentrates light and focuses it on a smaller region-for example, a high flux solar array that generates electric power, a high temperature receiver that heats H2 propellant for high Isp propulsion, and a giant primary reflector for a telescope for astronomy and Earth surveillance. Linear dipole and quadrupole MIC structures are also possible. The linear quadrupole structure can be used for magnetic shielding against cosmic radiation for astronauts, for example. MIC could use lightweight YBCO superconducting HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) cables, that can operate with liquid N2 coolant at engineering current densities of ~105 amp/cm2. A 1 kilometer length of MIC cable would weigh only 3 metric tons, including superconductor, thermal insulations, coolant circuits, and refrigerator, and fit within a 3 cubic meter compact package for launch. Four potential MIC applications are described: Solar-thermal propulsion using H2 propellant, space based solar power generation for beaming power to Earth, a large space telescope, and solar electric generation for a manned lunar base. The first 3 applications use large MIC solar concentrating mirrors, while the 4th application uses a surface based array of solar cells on a magnetically levitated MIC structure to follow the sun. MIC space based mirrors can be very large and light

  4. The large- and small-scale structures of 3C 293

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridle, A. H.; Fomalont, E. B.; Cornwell, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A Very Large Array (VLA) 1.465-GHz map of the radio galaxy 3C 293 shows that the source, which is unusual in that it is dominated by a steep-spectrum extended core, has a two-sided Z-shaped structure whose physical association with the galaxy VV 5-33-12 is now clear. The core is resolved by the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) at 1.666-GHz, and the VLA at 15.035 GHz, into an inner, two-sided structure within 1 kpc of the center of VV 5-33-12, and curved bridges of emission linking this structure to the large-scale emission. The major axis of the core lies 35 deg from the major axes of the emission bridges that make up the bar of the large-scale Z structure, and 60 deg from the minor axis of VV 5-33-12. Precessional and buoyant-refraction models for these misalignments are discussed.

  5. The variation of large-scale structure inclination angles in high Reynolds number atmospheric surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-You; Bo, Tian-Li; Liang, Yi-Rui

    2017-03-01

    Field observations were performed to explore the variation of large-scale structure inclination angles in the high Reynolds number atmospheric surface layer (ASL). The high Reynolds number flow measurements [Reτ ˜ Ο (106)] were acquired at the Qingtu Lake observation array site. The structure inclination angles inferred from two-point correlations of the fluctuating streamwise velocity were obtained for different friction velocities in the neutral regime and different thermal stability conditions. Results indicate that, in addition to the Monin- Obukhov stability parameter, the structure inclination angle varies systematically with the friction velocity in the neutral surface layer. An empirical model is proposed to parametrize the variation of the inclination angle with the normalized friction velocity. The empirical formula agrees well with both the current ASL results and the previously documented results. Further analysis suggests that the inclination angle is dominated by the vertical velocity gradient (vertical wind shear) for both neutral and non-neutral regimes. The present work contributes to a better understanding of the inclination angle for the large-scale structures and may be used to improve the existing wall-models in the large-eddy simulation of the ASL.

  6. Bayesian inference of the initial conditions from large-scale structure surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of three-dimensional cosmological surveys has the potential to answer outstanding questions on the initial conditions from which structure appeared, and therefore on the very high energy physics at play in the early Universe. We report on recently proposed statistical data analysis methods designed to study the primordial large-scale structure via physical inference of the initial conditions in a fully Bayesian framework, and applications to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7. We illustrate how this approach led to a detailed characterization of the dynamic cosmic web underlying the observed galaxy distribution, based on the tidal environment.

  7. On the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mercolli, Lorenzo; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    We compute the renormalized two-point functions of density, divergence and vorticity of the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because of momentum and mass conservation, the corrections from short scales to the large-scale power spectra of density, divergence and vorticity must start at order k{sup 4}. For the vorticity this constitutes one of the two leading terms. Exact (approximated) self-similarity of an Einstein-de Sitter (ΛCDM) background fixes the time dependence so that the vorticity power spectrum at leading order is determined by the symmetries of the problem and the power spectrum around the non-linear scale. We show that to cancel all divergences in the velocity correlators one needs new counterterms. These fix the definition of velocity and do not represent new properties of the system. For an Einstein-de Sitter universe, we show that all three renormalized cross- and auto-correlation functions have the same structure but different numerical coefficients, which we compute. We elucidate the differences between using momentum and velocity.

  8. Time-sliced perturbation theory for large scale structure I: general formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    We present a new analytic approach to describe large scale structure formation in the mildly non-linear regime. The central object of the method is the time-dependent probability distribution function generating correlators of the cosmological observables at a given moment of time. Expanding the distribution function around the Gaussian weight we formulate a perturbative technique to calculate non-linear corrections to cosmological correlators, similar to the diagrammatic expansion in a three-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory, with time playing the role of an external parameter. For the physically relevant case of cold dark matter in an Einstein-de Sitter universe, the time evolution of the distribution function can be found exactly and is encapsulated by a time-dependent coupling constant controlling the perturbative expansion. We show that all building blocks of the expansion are free from spurious infrared enhanced contributions that plague the standard cosmological perturbation theory. This paves the way towards the systematic resummation of infrared effects in large scale structure formation. We also argue that the approach proposed here provides a natural framework to account for the influence of short-scale dynamics on larger scales along the lines of effective field theory.

  9. Formation and dynamics of large-scale magnetic structures in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutier, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The formation and dynamics of large-scale magnetic structures in the ionosphere of Venus are examined. It is shown that such structures must be the result of steady state convection of interplanetary field lines into the ionosphere by the small amount of solar wind plasma (less than or approximately equal to 1-5 percent) absorbed by the planetary atmosphere below the ionopause, rather than isolated remnants of large fields persisting for long periods without connection to the solar wind induced current and convection pattern. In particular, it is demonstrated that the magnetic diffusion of such structures would result in their dissipation with time scales of 1-10 min, if they were not steady state structures in convective and diffusive equilibriuim. It is shown that the equations governing the diffusion of these magnetic structures are similar to those governing diffusion of a gas out of an enclosed chamber with a porous wall, and a simple analog is illustrated. The application of these results to magnetic fields of astrophysical plasmas is discussed.

  10. Spatial properties of large-scale structure in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinyul; Lee, Jin; Jung, Seo Yoon; Zaki, Tamer A.; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) database of a zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer was scrutinized to investigate the spatial distribution of vortices around a streamwise-elongated low-speed structure. The turbulent flow field has been numerically produced by preceding the bypass transition simulation using the isotropic free-stream turbulence, in which the Reynolds number reaches up to Reθ = 3280 . In the present study, the low-speed structures and vortices have been identified and tracked in order to obtain spatial properties of the large-scale structures. The information about the inclination angle, distance and population of individual vortices on the long streamwise structure has been investigated. Finally, the present study provides statistical evidence on the formation of large-scale packet-like structure and its variation along the downstream. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2013-003364) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and partially supported by KISTI under the Strategic Supercomputing Support Program.

  11. Large scale structure simulations of inhomogeneous Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi void models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, David; García-Bellido, Juan; Haugbølle, Troels; Vicente, Julián

    2010-12-01

    We perform numerical simulations of large scale structure evolution in an inhomogeneous Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) model of the Universe. We follow the gravitational collapse of a large underdense region (a void) in an otherwise flat matter-dominated Einstein-de Sitter model. We observe how the (background) density contrast at the center of the void grows to be of order one, and show that the density and velocity profiles follow the exact nonlinear LTB solution to the full Einstein equations for all but the most extreme voids. This result seems to contradict previous claims that fully relativistic codes are needed to properly handle the nonlinear evolution of large scale structures, and that local Newtonian dynamics with an explicit expansion term is not adequate. We also find that the (local) matter density contrast grows with the scale factor in a way analogous to that of an open universe with a value of the matter density ΩM(r) corresponding to the appropriate location within the void.

  12. Large-scale chromatin structure of inducible genes: transcription on a condensed, linear template

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Kireev, Igor; Plutz, Matt; Ashourian, Nazanin

    2009-01-01

    The structure of interphase chromosomes, and in particular the changes in large-scale chromatin structure accompanying transcriptional activation, remain poorly characterized. Here we use light microscopy and in vivo immunogold labeling to directly visualize the interphase chromosome conformation of 1–2 Mbp chromatin domains formed by multi-copy BAC transgenes containing 130–220 kb of genomic DNA surrounding the DHFR, Hsp70, or MT gene loci. We demonstrate near-endogenous transcription levels in the context of large-scale chromatin fibers compacted nonuniformly well above the 30-nm chromatin fiber. An approximately 1.5–3-fold extension of these large-scale chromatin fibers accompanies transcriptional induction and active genes remain mobile. Heat shock–induced Hsp70 transgenes associate with the exterior of nuclear speckles, with Hsp70 transcripts accumulating within the speckle. Live-cell imaging reveals distinct dynamic events, with Hsp70 transgenes associating with adjacent speckles, nucleating new speckles, or moving to preexisting speckles. Our results call for reexamination of classical models of interphase chromosome organization. PMID:19349581

  13. Strong New Evidence for Oscillation of the Cosmological Scale Factor Observed in the Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringermacher, Harry I.; Mead, Lawrence R.

    2017-01-01

    We have analyzed SDSSIII-BOSS, DR9 galaxy number count data using 2 independent approaches, a relativistic expanding space model based on work by Ostriker and direct Fourier analysis, and found incontrovertible evidence for a scale factor oscillation at 7 Hubble-Hertz (HHz) in both methods, where we define 1 HHz as 1 cycle over 1 Hubble-time. The number count of galaxies on these scales should be relatively smooth. However, a DR9 plot of galaxy number count per 0.01 redshift bin as a function of redshift shows significant bumps to redshift 0.5. We take the SDSSIII data (about ¼ of the sky) to be a fair representation of the entire sky when using number count. Our model fits essentially all bumps at a 99.8% R-squared goodness level if and only if the 7 HHz oscillation ( plus 2nd and 3rd harmonics at 14 HHz and 21 HHz) is included. These are the same frequencies observed by us in AJ 149, 137 (2015) using SNe data. Since the SDSSIII data set only goes to redshift 0.8, only one cycle of oscillation is included compared to 2-3 in our earlier work. Thus a Fourier analysis performed on the SDSS redshift data converted to equal-time binning leaves a broadened spectrum over the range where harmonics would normally reside but nevertheless peaked at 7 HHz. A scalar field model presented in the AJ paper describes the oscillation and enters the Friedmann equations by replacing the LCDM dark matter density parameter with the scalar field density. Thus, LCDM dark matter is the median of the wave which appears to act like a fluid with a changing equation-of-state. The oscillation may be a longitudinal gravitational wave originating with the Big Bang and requiring a massive graviton. 7 HHz is consistent with a graviton mass of 10^ -32 eV.

  14. Large-scale Structure around a z=2.1 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Casey, Caitlin M.; Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Capak, Peter L.; Cowley, Michael J.; Darvish, Behnam; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Kovač, K.; Lilly, Simon J.; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Spitler, Lee R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Yuan, Tiantian

    2016-08-01

    The most prodigious starburst galaxies are absent in massive galaxy clusters today, but their connection with large-scale environments is less clear at z≳ 2. We present a search of large-scale structure around a galaxy cluster core at z = 2.095 using a set of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies. We find that both color-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) show significant overdensities around the z = 2.095 cluster. A total of eight DSFGs (including three X-ray luminous active galactic nuclei, AGNs) and 34 SFGs are found within a 10‧ radius (corresponds to ˜15 cMpc at z˜ 2.1) from the cluster center and within a redshift range of {{Δ }}z=0.02, which leads to galaxy overdensities of {δ }{{DSFG}}˜ 12.3 and {δ }{{SFG}}˜ 2.8. The cluster core and the extended DSFG- and SFG-rich structures together demonstrate an active cluster formation phase, in which the cluster is accreting a significant amount of material from large-scale structure while the more mature core may begin to virialize. Our finding of this DSFG-rich structure, along with a number of other protoclusters with excess DSFGs and AGNs found to date, suggest that the overdensities of these rare sources indeed trace significant mass overdensities. However, it remains puzzling how these intense star formers are triggered concurrently. Although an increased probability of galaxy interactions and/or enhanced gas supply can trigger the excess of DSFGs, our stacking analysis based on 850 μm images and morphological analysis based on rest-frame optical imaging do not show such enhancements of merger fraction and gas content in this structure.

  15. Evolution of the Busbar Structure in Large-Scale Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Liang, Jinding; Li, Jie; Sun, Kena; Xiao, Jin

    2017-02-01

    Studies of magnetic field and magneto-hydro-dynamics are regarded as the foundation for the development of large-scale aluminum reduction cells, while due to the direct relationship between the busbar configuration and magnetic compensation, the actual key content is the configuration of the busbar. As the line current has been increased from 160 kA to 600 kA, the configuration of the busbar was becoming more complex. To summarize and explore the evolution of busbar configuration in aluminum reduction cells, this paper has reviewed various representative large-scale pre-baked aluminum reduction cell busbar structures, such as end-to-end potlines, side-by-side potlines and external compensation current. The advantages and disadvantages in the magnetic distribution or technical specifications have also been introduced separately, especially for the configurations of the mainstream 400-kA potlines. In the end, the development trends of the bus structure configuration were prospected, based on the recent successful applications of super-scale cell busbar structures in China (500-600 kA).

  16. Measures of large-scale structure in the CfA redshift survey slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lapparent, Valerie; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Variations of the counts-in-cells with cell size are used here to define two statistical measures of large-scale clustering in three 6 deg slices of the CfA redshift survey. A percolation criterion is used to estimate the filling factor which measures the fraction of the total volume in the survey occupied by the large-scale structures. For the full 18 deg slice of the CfA redshift survey, f is about 0.25 + or - 0.05. After removing groups with more than five members from two of the slices, variations of the counts in occupied cells with cell size have a power-law behavior with a slope beta about 2.2 on scales from 1-10/h Mpc. Application of both this statistic and the percolation analysis to simulations suggests that a network of two-dimensional structures is a better description of the geometry of the clustering in the CfA slices than a network of one-dimensional structures. Counts-in-cells are also used to estimate at 0.3 galaxy h-squared/Mpc the average galaxy surface density in sheets like the Great Wall.

  17. Evolution of the Busbar Structure in Large-Scale Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Liang, Jinding; Li, Jie; Sun, Kena; Xiao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Studies of magnetic field and magneto-hydro-dynamics are regarded as the foundation for the development of large-scale aluminum reduction cells, while due to the direct relationship between the busbar configuration and magnetic compensation, the actual key content is the configuration of the busbar. As the line current has been increased from 160 kA to 600 kA, the configuration of the busbar was becoming more complex. To summarize and explore the evolution of busbar configuration in aluminum reduction cells, this paper has reviewed various representative large-scale pre-baked aluminum reduction cell busbar structures, such as end-to-end potlines, side-by-side potlines and external compensation current. The advantages and disadvantages in the magnetic distribution or technical specifications have also been introduced separately, especially for the configurations of the mainstream 400-kA potlines. In the end, the development trends of the bus structure configuration were prospected, based on the recent successful applications of super-scale cell busbar structures in China (500-600 kA).

  18. Narrow-line Seyfert Galaxies. Connection between abundance and the large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermash, A. A.; Komberg, B. V.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing methods, developed by the author the correlations between spatial concentrations of active nuclei (NLS and BLS) and concentration of galaxies of full uniform sample were obtained. Galaxies of this uniform sample trace the large-scale structure. We used SDSS DR 7 data. The correlations obtained are linear and the NLS/BLS ratio is constant. That leads to conclusion that amounts NLS and BLS are some fixed portion of all galaxies independent on the density of large-scale environment. In order to check validity of our results we also confirmed the well known result that fraction of red galaxies increases with density of environment. Also it was confirmed that this trend is more prominent for less massive galaxies.

  19. Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity and the large scale structure of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Banados, M.; Ferreira, P. G.; Skordis, C.

    2009-03-15

    It has been argued that a Universe governed by Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity can be compatible with current cosmological constraints. The extra fields introduced in this theory can behave as both dark matter and dark energy, unifying the dark sector in one coherent framework. We show the various roles the extra fields can play in the expansion of the Universe and study the evolution of linear perturbations in the various regimes. We find that, as a unified theory of the dark sector, Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity will lead to excessive fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background on large scales. In the presence of a cosmological constant, however, the extra fields can behave as a form of nonparticulate dark matter and can lead to a cosmology which is entirely compatible with current observations of large scale structure. We discuss the interpretation of this form of dark matter and how it can differ from standard, particulate dark matter.

  20. Large-scale structure after COBE: Peculiar velocities and correlations of cold dark matter halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Quinn, Peter J.; Salmon, John K.; Warren, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Large N-body simulations on parallel supercomputers allow one to simultaneously investigate large-scale structure and the formation of galactic halos with unprecedented resolution. Our study shows that the masses as well as the spatial distribution of halos on scales of tens of megaparsecs in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe with the spectrum normalized to the anisotropies detected by Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is compatible with the observations. We also show that the average value of the relative pairwise velocity dispersion sigma(sub v) - used as a principal argument against COBE-normalized CDM models-is significantly lower for halos than for individual particles. When the observational methods of extracting sigma(sub v) are applied to the redshift catalogs obtained from the numerical experiments, estimates differ significantly between different observation-sized samples and overlap observational estimates obtained following the same procedure.

  1. Energetics and Structural Characterization of the large-scale Functional Motion of Adenylate Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formoso, Elena; Limongelli, Vittorio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Adenylate Kinase (AK) is a signal transducing protein that regulates cellular energy homeostasis balancing between different conformations. An alteration of its activity can lead to severe pathologies such as heart failure, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A comprehensive elucidation of the large-scale conformational motions that rule the functional mechanism of this enzyme is of great value to guide rationally the development of new medications. Here using a metadynamics-based computational protocol we elucidate the thermodynamics and structural properties underlying the AK functional transitions. The free energy estimation of the conformational motions of the enzyme allows characterizing the sequence of events that regulate its action. We reveal the atomistic details of the most relevant enzyme states, identifying residues such as Arg119 and Lys13, which play a key role during the conformational transitions and represent druggable spots to design enzyme inhibitors. Our study offers tools that open new areas of investigation on large-scale motion in proteins.

  2. SPIN ALIGNMENTS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES WITHIN THE LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE FROM SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Luo, Wentao; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Mo, H. J.; Van den Bosch, Frank C. E-mail: xyang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of spiral galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Galaxy Zoo 2, we investigate the alignment of spin axes of spiral galaxies with their surrounding large-scale structure, which is characterized by the large-scale tidal field reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the spin axes only have weak tendencies to be aligned with (or perpendicular to) the intermediate (or minor) axis of the local tidal tensor. The signal is the strongest in a cluster environment where all three eigenvalues of the local tidal tensor are positive. Compared to the alignments between halo spins and the local tidal field obtained in N-body simulations, the above observational results are in best agreement with those for the spins of inner regions of halos, suggesting that the disk material traces the angular momentum of dark matter halos in the inner regions.

  3. Effective theory of large-scale structure with primordial non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Pajer, Enrico; Woude, Drian van der; Welling, Yvette E-mail: d.baumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: yvettewelling@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    We develop the effective theory of large-scale structure for non-Gaussian initial conditions. The effective stress tensor in the dark matter equations of motion contains new operators, which originate from the squeezed limit of the primordial bispectrum. Parameterizing the squeezed limit by a scaling and an angular dependence, captures large classes of primordial non-Gaussianity. Within this parameterization, we classify the possible contributions to the effective theory. We show explicitly how all terms consistent with the symmetries arise from coarse graining the dark matter equations of motion and its initial conditions. We also demonstrate that the system is closed under renormalization and that the basis of correction terms is therefore complete. The relevant corrections to the matter power spectrum and bispectrum are computed numerically and their relative importance is discussed.

  4. Multi-level structure in the large scale distribution of optically luminous galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xin-fa; Deng, Zu-gan; Liu, Yong-zhen

    1992-04-01

    Fractal dimensions in the large scale distribution of galaxies have been calculated with the method given by Wen et al. [1] Samples are taken from CfA redshift survey in northern and southern galactic [2] hemisphere in our analysis respectively. Results from these two regions are compared with each other. There are significant differences between the distributions in these two regions. However, our analyses do show some common features of the distributions in these two regions. All subsamples show multi-level fractal character distinctly. Combining it with the results from analyses of samples given by IRAS galaxies and results from samples given by redshift survey in pencil-beam fields, [3,4] we suggest that multi-level fractal structure is most likely to be a general and important character in the large scale distribution of galaxies. The possible implications of this character are discussed.

  5. Large-scale structure after COBE: Peculiar velocities and correlations of cold dark matter halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Quinn, Peter J.; Salmon, John K.; Warren, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Large N-body simulations on parallel supercomputers allow one to simultaneously investigate large-scale structure and the formation of galactic halos with unprecedented resolution. Our study shows that the masses as well as the spatial distribution of halos on scales of tens of megaparsecs in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe with the spectrum normalized to the anisotropies detected by Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is compatible with the observations. We also show that the average value of the relative pairwise velocity dispersion sigma(sub v) - used as a principal argument against COBE-normalized CDM models-is significantly lower for halos than for individual particles. When the observational methods of extracting sigma(sub v) are applied to the redshift catalogs obtained from the numerical experiments, estimates differ significantly between different observation-sized samples and overlap observational estimates obtained following the same procedure.

  6. Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2010-08-01

    A primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large scale structure(LSS). In this article, we demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales as follows, We also report the newest constraints on the PMF amplitude Bλ and the power spectral index nB which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework and the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In particular we find that |Bλ|<2.10(68%CL) nG and < 2.98(95%CL) nG and nB<-1.19(68%CL) and <-0.25(95%CL) at a present scale of 1 Mpc.

  7. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at two loops

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k{sub NL}, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields. We find that the EFTofLSS prediction at two loops matches to percent accuracy the non-linear matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1}, requiring just one unknown coefficient that needs to be fit to observations. Given that Standard Perturbation Theory stops converging at redshift zero at k∼ 0.1 h Mpc{sup −1}, our results demonstrate the possibility of accessing a factor of order 200 more dark matter quasi-linear modes than naively expected. If the remaining observational challenges to accessing these modes can be addressed with similar success, our results show that there is tremendous potential for large scale structure surveys to explore the primordial universe.

  8. The Signature of Large Scale Structures on the Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoco, A.; Hannestad, S.; Haugbolle, T.; Miele, G.; Serpico, P.D.; Tu, H.; /Aarhus U. /UC, Irvine

    2006-12-01

    If the diffuse extragalactic gamma ray emission traces the large scale structures of the universe, peculiar anisotropy patterns are expected in the gamma ray sky. In particular, because of the cutoff distance introduced by the absorption of 0.1-10 TeV photons on the infrared/optical background, prominent correlations with the local structures within a range of few hundreds Mpc should be present. We provide detailed predictions of the signal based on the PSCz map of the local universe. We also use mock N-body catalogues complemented with the halo model of structures to study some statistical features of the expected signatures. The results are largely independent from cosmological details, and depend mostly on the index of correlation (or bias) of the sources with respect to the large scale distribution of galaxies. For instance, the predicted signal in the case of a quadratic correlation (as it may happen for a dark matter annihilation contribution to the diffuse gamma flux) differs substantially from a linear correlation case, providing a complementary tool to unveil the nature of the sources of the diffuse gamma ray emission. The chances of the present and future space and ground based observatories to measure these features are discussed.

  9. The dark mark of large-scale structure on the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granett, Benjamin R.

    2010-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) offers a screen to study the Universe in projection. Large-scale structures leave gravitational imprints on the background radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. In an accelerating universe, photons following trajectories across large clusters or voids are heated or cooled as the gravitational potential decays. The hot and cold marks left on the radiation field are a direct signature of dark energy in a spatially flat universe. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to trace large-scale structures and confirm their effect on the cosmic microwave background. We construct a map of the anisotropy over the survey area and find that the pattern is present on the microwave sky. This detection demonstrates that the positive statistical correlation between the galaxy density and the CMB temperature reported in the literature is consistent with the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect under dark energy. The imprints of individual voids and clusters can be isolated on the cosmic microwave background. By summing the signal from voids and clusters, we overcome the noise of primary fluctuations and produce an image of the average imprint left by the gravitational potential of the structures. Intriguingly, the detection level surpasses the all-sky integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurement. We suggest that the technique may be used as a new probe of dark energy. Supervoid and supercluster structures could be responsible for anomalous regions on the microwave background. We introduce the method of constrained realization to identify statistically anomalous regions on the sky. Of particular interest is the Cold Spot which could arise from a supervoid structure at low redshift. To test this idea, we conduct a photometric redshift survey of the region to moderate redshift. However, we find no strong evidence that a large void is responsible.

  10. Analytic prediction of baryonic effects from the EFT of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Matthew; Perko, Ashley; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-05-01

    The large scale structures of the universe will likely be the next leading source of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to understand their behavior. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures provides a consistent way to perturbatively predict the clustering of dark matter at large distances. The fact that baryons move distances comparable to dark matter allows us to infer that baryons at large distances can be described in a similar formalism: the backreaction of short-distance non-linearities and of star-formation physics at long distances can be encapsulated in an effective stress tensor, characterized by a few parameters. The functional form of baryonic effects can therefore be predicted. In the power spectrum the leading contribution goes as propto k2 P(k), with P(k) being the linear power spectrum and with the numerical prefactor depending on the details of the star-formation physics. We also perform the resummation of the contribution of the long-wavelength displacements, allowing us to consistently predict the effect of the relative motion of baryons and dark matter. We compare our predictions with simulations that contain several implementations of baryonic physics, finding percent agreement up to relatively high wavenumbers such as k simeq 0.3 hMpc-1 or k simeq 0.6 hMpc-1, depending on the order of the calculation. Our results open a novel way to understand baryonic effects analytically, as well as to interface with simulations.

  11. Planck measurements of the isotropy and statistics of the large scale structure of the universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    2015-08-01

    Planck was originally proposed to deliver definitive measurements of the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background on angular scales larger than ~5 arcmin. This goal has been met with the 2015 release of the legacy data set comprising full sky maps of the microwave sky at multiple frequencies. One of the fundamental aspects of cosmology is the precision with which we understand the universe itself, and in particular the nature of the structure-seeding primordial perturbations. More specifically, what do their statistical properties and consistency or otherwise with isotropy reveal about early universe physics?I will discuss the phenomenological determination of the isotropy and statistics of the large scale structure of the universe from Planck data. This is likely to remain unsurpassed in the foreseeable future.

  12. Large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a baryon-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure in a universe with Omega(0) = 0.2 and h = 0.5 dominated by baryons in which cosmic strings provide the initial density perturbations. The numerical model yields a power spectrum. Nonlinear evolution confirms that the model can account for 700 km/s bulk flows and a strong cluster-cluster correlation, but does rather poorly on smaller scales. There is no visual 'filamentary' structure, and the two-point correlation has too steep a logarithmic slope. The value of G mu = 4 x 10 to the -6th is significantly lower than previous estimates for the value of G mu in baryon-dominated cosmic string models.

  13. Maximum-entropy large-scale structures of Boolean networks optimized for criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Marco; Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2015-04-01

    We construct statistical ensembles of modular Boolean networks that are constrained to lie at the critical line between frozen and chaotic dynamic regimes. The ensembles are maximally random given the imposed constraints, and thus represent null models of critical networks. By varying the network density and the entropic cost associated with biased Boolean functions, the ensembles undergo several phase transitions. The observed structures range from fully random to several ordered ones, including a prominent core-periphery-like structure, and an 'attenuated' two-group structure, where the network is divided in two groups of nodes, and one of them has Boolean functions with very low sensitivity. This shows that such simple large-scale structures are the most likely to occur when optimizing for criticality, in the absence of any other constraint or competing optimization criteria.

  14. Large-scale screening of zeolite structures for CO2 membrane separations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihan; Abouelnasr, Mahmoud; Lin, Li-Chiang; Smit, Berend

    2013-05-22

    We have conducted large-scale screening of zeolite materials for CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 membrane separation applications using the free energy landscape of the guest molecules inside these porous materials. We show how advanced molecular simulations can be integrated with the design of a simple separation process to arrive at a metric to rank performance of over 87,000 different zeolite structures, including the known IZA zeolite structures. Our novel, efficient algorithm using graphics processing units can accurately characterize both the adsorption and diffusion properties of a given structure in just a few seconds and accordingly find a set of optimal structures for different desired purity of separated gases from a large database of porous materials in reasonable wall time. Our analysis reveals that the optimal structures for separations usually consist of channels with adsorption sites spread relatively uniformly across the entire channel such that they feature well-balanced CO2 adsorption and diffusion properties. Our screening also shows that the top structures in the predicted zeolite database outperform the best known zeolite by a factor of 4-7. Finally, we have identified a completely different optimal set of zeolite structures that are suitable for an inverse process, in which the CO2 is retained while CH4 or N2 is passed through a membrane.

  15. Large-Scale Screening of Zeolite Structures for CO2 Membrane Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, JH; Abouelnasr, M; Lin, LC; Smit, B

    2013-05-22

    We have conducted large-scale screening of zeolite materials for CO2/CH4 and CO2/N-2 membrane separation applications using the free energy landscape of the guest molecules inside these porous materials. We show how advanced molecular simulations can be integrated with the design of a simple separation process to arrive at a metric to rank performance of over 87 000 different zeolite structures, including the known IZA zeolite structures. Our novel, efficient algorithm using graphics processing units can accurately characterize both the adsorption and diffusion properties of a given structure in just a few seconds and accordingly find a set of optimal structures for different desired purity of separated gases from a large database of porous materials in reasonable wall time. Our analysis reveals that the optimal structures for separations usually consist of channels with adsorption sites spread relatively uniformly across the entire channel such that they feature well-balanced CO2 adsorption and diffusion properties. Our screening also shows that the top structures in the predicted zeolite database outperform the best known zeolite by a factor of 4-7. Finally, we have identified a completely different optimal set of zeolite structures that are suitable for an inverse process, in which the CO2 is retained while CH4 or N-2 is passed through a membrane.

  16. The IRAC-ORELSE Survey: Galaxy Masses in Large Scale Structures at zD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Roy; Kocevski, Dale; Lacy, Mark; Lemaux, Brian; Lubin, Lori; Squires, Gordon; Surace, Jason

    2009-04-01

    We propose an IRAC mapping campaign of 14 large scale structures at 0.7 < z < 1.3 to obtain stellar mass estimates and photometric redshifts for their constituent galaxies. As part of the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments (ORELSE) Survey, these clusters represent a mix of confirmed X-ray, optically and radio selected systems. They range from multi-group mergers to superclusters with multiple clusters and groups, all with existing deep rizK_s imaging and are the subjects of a Keck-DEIMOS survey that has already yielded thousands of high-resolution spectra of constituent galaxies. The wide-area regions around high redshift clusters are are dynamic environments where galaxies are undergoing many transformative events, including mergers, tidal encounters, harassment and ram pressure stripping. By targeting known structures at an active period in their history, we can efficiently examine the physical processes responsible for the quenching and/or ignition of star formation and AGN activity, and the transformation of disk (spiral) galaxies to spheroids (ellipticals) over the last ~9 Gyr as a function of both environment and galaxy stellar mass. In comparison, field surveys such as COSMOS encounter only one such structure, while our targeted approach is an efficient means of generating a statistically significant sample. The IRAC data is essential to accurately determine photometric redshifts and estimate stellar masses for the full galaxy population in each structure.

  17. Bias to CMB lensing measurements from the bispectrum of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Vanessa; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sherwin, Blake D.

    2016-08-01

    The rapidly improving precision of measurements of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) also requires a corresponding increase in the precision of theoretical modeling. A commonly made approximation is to model the CMB deflection angle or lensing potential as a Gaussian random field. In this paper, however, we analytically quantify the influence of the non-Gaussianity of large-scale structure (LSS) lenses, arising from nonlinear structure formation, on CMB lensing measurements. In particular, evaluating the impact of the nonzero bispectrum of large-scale structure on the relevant CMB four-point correlation functions, we find that there is a bias to estimates of the CMB lensing power spectrum. For temperature-based lensing reconstruction with CMB stage III and stage IV experiments, we find that this lensing power spectrum bias is negative and is of order 1% of the signal. This corresponds to a shift of multiple standard deviations for these upcoming experiments. We caution, however, that our numerical calculation only evaluates two of the largest bias terms and, thus, only provides an approximate estimate of the full bias. We conclude that further investigation into lensing biases from nonlinear structure formation is required and that these biases should be accounted for in future lensing analyses.

  18. XLinkDB 2.0: integrated, large-scale structural analysis of protein crosslinking data.

    PubMed

    Schweppe, Devin K; Zheng, Chunxiang; Chavez, Juan D; Navare, Arti T; Wu, Xia; Eng, Jimmy K; Bruce, James E

    2016-09-01

    Large-scale chemical cross-linking with mass spectrometry (XL-MS) analyses are quickly becoming a powerful means for high-throughput determination of protein structural information and protein-protein interactions. Recent studies have garnered thousands of cross-linked interactions, yet the field lacks an effective tool to compile experimental data or access the network and structural knowledge for these large scale analyses. We present XLinkDB 2.0 which integrates tools for network analysis, Protein Databank queries, modeling of predicted protein structures and modeling of docked protein structures. The novel, integrated approach of XLinkDB 2.0 enables the holistic analysis of XL-MS protein interaction data without limitation to the cross-linker or analytical system used for the analysis. XLinkDB 2.0 can be found here, including documentation and help: http://xlinkdb.gs.washington.edu/ : jimbruce@uw.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Role of magnetic shear in dynamics of large-scale structures in electron temperature gradient turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.; Miyato, N.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate how the magnetic shear governs the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as zonal flows and streamers, in electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence. Based on the well-known 2D Hasegawa-Mima turbulence modeling, which is the inviscid version of fluid (or gyrofluid) ETG turbulence [1], we derive a general dispersion relation of secondary fluctuations through modulation instability analysis. The results show that the formation of different large-scale structures including zonal flow, streamer and so-called generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (GKH) mode in ETG turbulence depends on the spectral anisotropy of turbulent fluctuation. In a slab geometry, the magnetic shear closely relates to the ETG mode structures so that it may determine the pattern selection in the quasi-steady ETG turbulence. 3D gyrofluid slab ETG simulations show that turbulent ETG fluctuation energy condenses to the zonal flows in the weak shear plasmas and to the streamer component for the high shears. 2D ETG simulations with rather high resolution not only exhibits the global spectral distribution of zonal flows, but also further confirm a mechanism: enhanced zonal flow in weak shear ETG turbulence is limited by exciting a KH mode [1]. Furthermore, in toroidal ETG simulations, streamer structures are observed at around good curvature region along the flux tube in the quasisteady state in some medium shear regime. Related streamer dynamics are also investigated. [1] Jiquan Li and Y. Kishimoto, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1493(2004)

  20. Joint Hierarchical Category Structure Learning and Large-Scale Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanyun; Lin, Li; Shen, Fumin; Lu, Chang; Wu, Yang; Xie, Yuan; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-10-05

    We investigate the scalable image classification problem with a large number of categories. Hierarchical visual data structures are helpful for improving the efficiency and performance of large-scale multi-class classification. We propose a novel image classification method based on learning hierarchical interclass structures. Specifically, we first design a fast algorithm to compute the similarity metric between categories, based on which a visual tree is constructed by hierarchical spectral clustering. Using the learned visual tree, a test sample label is efficiently predicted by searching for the best path over the entire tree. The proposed method is extensively evaluated on the ILSVRC2010 and Caltech 256 benchmark datasets. Experimental results show that our method obtains significantly better category hierarchies than other state-of-the-art visual tree-based methods and, therefore, much more accurate classification.

  1. Large-scale structure from quantum fluctuations in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Turner

    2000-05-25

    A better understanding of the formation of large-scale structure in the Universe is arguably the most pressing question in cosmology. The most compelling and promising theoretical paradigm, Inflation + Cold Dark Matter, holds that the density inhomogeneities that seeded the formation of structure in the Universe originated from quantum fluctuations arising during inflation and that the bulk of the dark matter exists as slowing moving elementary particles (cold dark matter) left over from the earliest, fiery moments. Large redshift surveys (such as the SDSS and 2dF) and high-resolution measurements of CBR anisotropy (to be made by the MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites) have the potential to decisively test Inflation + Cold Dark Matter and to open a window to the very early Universe and fundamental physics.

  2. Non-linear shrinkage estimation of large-scale structure covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    In many astrophysical settings, covariance matrices of large data sets have to be determined empirically from a finite number of mock realizations. The resulting noise degrades inference and precludes it completely if there are fewer realizations than data points. This work applies a recently proposed non-linear shrinkage estimator of covariance to a realistic example from large-scale structure cosmology. After optimizing its performance for the usage in likelihood expressions, the shrinkage estimator yields subdominant bias and variance comparable to that of the standard estimator with a factor of ∼50 less realizations. This is achieved without any prior information on the properties of the data or the structure of the covariance matrix, at a negligible computational cost.

  3. Theory of large-scale HF heating processes in the unstructured and structured ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Keskinen, M.J.; Chaturvedi, P.K.; Ossakow, S.L.

    1990-10-01

    Theoretical aspects of large-scale HF heating processes in the unstructured and structured ionosphere have been studied. For the unstructured case, we present an analytical model for the generation, convection, and steepening of HF-induced density cavities. We discuss the nonlinear propagation of high power HF in steepened cavities. Properties of thermal self-focusing instabilities in the presence of a convecting and steepened cavity is studied. For the structured ionosphere, we discuss parametric coupling processes of a large amplitude HF pump wave with both F-region, i.e., interchange, current-convective, and ion cyclotron and E-region, i.e., two-stream and gradient-drift ionospheric instabilities which instabilities have been proposed to account, in part, for naturally occurring ionospheric irregularities. We show that these instabilities may be stabilized or destabilized using high power HF heaters.

  4. Joint Hierarchical Category Structure Learning and Large-Scale Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yanyun; Lin, Li; Shen, Fumin; Lu, Chang; Wu, Yang; Xie, Yuan; Tao, Dacheng

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the scalable image classification problem with a large number of categories. Hierarchical visual data structures are helpful for improving the efficiency and performance of large-scale multi-class classification. We propose a novel image classification method based on learning hierarchical inter-class structures. Specifically, we first design a fast algorithm to compute the similarity metric between categories, based on which a visual tree is constructed by hierarchical spectral clustering. Using the learned visual tree, a test sample label is efficiently predicted by searching for the best path over the entire tree. The proposed method is extensively evaluated on the ILSVRC2010 and Caltech 256 benchmark datasets. Experimental results show that our method obtains significantly better category hierarchies than other state-of-the-art visual tree-based methods and, therefore, much more accurate classification.

  5. Inference of 3-dimensional structure underlying large-scale coronal events observed by Yohkoh and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Freeland, S. L.; Hoeksema, T.; Zhao, X.; Hudson, H. S.

    1995-01-01

    The Yohkoh/SXT images provide full-disk coverage of the solar corona, usually extending before and after one of the large-scale eruptive events that occur in the polar crown These produce large arcades of X-ray loops, often with a cusp-shaped coronal extension, and are known to be associated with coronal mass ejections. The Yohkoh prototype of such events occurred 12 Nov. 1991. This allows us to determine heights from the apparent rotation rates of these structures. In comparison v with magnetic-field extrapolations from Wilcox Solar Observatory. use use this tool to infer the three dimensional structure of the corona in particular cases: 24 Jan. 1992, 24 Feb. 1993, 14 Apr. 1994, and 13 Nov. 1994. The last event is a long-duration flare event.

  6. Computing global structural balance in large-scale signed social networks

    PubMed Central

    Facchetti, Giuseppe; Iacono, Giovanni; Altafini, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Structural balance theory affirms that signed social networks (i.e., graphs whose signed edges represent friendly/hostile interactions among individuals) tend to be organized so as to avoid conflictual situations, corresponding to cycles of negative parity. Using an algorithm for ground-state calculation in large-scale Ising spin glasses, in this paper we compute the global level of balance of very large online social networks and verify that currently available networks are indeed extremely balanced. This property is explainable in terms of the high degree of skewness of the sign distributions on the nodes of the graph. In particular, individuals linked by a large majority of negative edges create mostly “apparent disorder,” rather than true “frustration.” PMID:22167802

  7. Computing global structural balance in large-scale signed social networks.

    PubMed

    Facchetti, Giuseppe; Iacono, Giovanni; Altafini, Claudio

    2011-12-27

    Structural balance theory affirms that signed social networks (i.e., graphs whose signed edges represent friendly/hostile interactions among individuals) tend to be organized so as to avoid conflictual situations, corresponding to cycles of negative parity. Using an algorithm for ground-state calculation in large-scale Ising spin glasses, in this paper we compute the global level of balance of very large online social networks and verify that currently available networks are indeed extremely balanced. This property is explainable in terms of the high degree of skewness of the sign distributions on the nodes of the graph. In particular, individuals linked by a large majority of negative edges create mostly "apparent disorder," rather than true "frustration."

  8. On the soft limit of the large scale structure power spectrum: UV dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Konstandin, Thomas; Sagunski, Laura; Porto, Rafael A. E-mail: thomas.konstandin@desy.de E-mail: laura.sagunski@desy.de

    2015-11-01

    We derive a non-perturbative equation for the large scale structure power spectrum of long-wavelength modes. Thereby, we use an operator product expansion together with relations between the three-point function and power spectrum in the soft limit. The resulting equation encodes the coupling to ultraviolet (UV) modes in two time-dependent coefficients, which may be obtained from response functions to (anisotropic) parameters, such as spatial curvature, in a modified cosmology. We argue that both depend weakly on fluctuations deep in the UV. As a byproduct, this implies that the renormalized leading order coefficient(s) in the effective field theory (EFT) of large scale structures receive most of their contribution from modes close to the non-linear scale. Consequently, the UV dependence found in explicit computations within standard perturbation theory stems mostly from counter-term(s). We confront a simplified version of our non-perturbative equation against existent numerical simulations, and find good agreement within the expected uncertainties. Our approach can in principle be used to precisely infer the relevance of the leading order EFT coefficient(s) using small volume simulations in an 'anisotropic separate universe' framework. Our results suggest that the importance of these coefficient(s) is a ∼ 10% effect, and plausibly smaller.

  9. A quantitative approach to the topology of large-scale structure. [for galactic clustering computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Weinberg, David H.; Melott, Adrian L.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative measure of the topology of large-scale structure: the genus of density contours in a smoothed density distribution, is described and applied. For random phase (Gaussian) density fields, the mean genus per unit volume exhibits a universal dependence on threshold density, with a normalizing factor that can be calculated from the power spectrum. If large-scale structure formed from the gravitational instability of small-amplitude density fluctuations, the topology observed today on suitable scales should follow the topology in the initial conditions. The technique is illustrated by applying it to simulations of galaxy clustering in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter. The technique is also applied to a volume-limited sample of the CfA redshift survey and to a model in which galaxies reside on the surfaces of polyhedral 'bubbles'. The topology of the evolved mass distribution and 'biased' galaxy distribution in the cold dark matter models closely matches the topology of the density fluctuations in the initial conditions. The topology of the observational sample is consistent with the random phase, cold dark matter model.

  10. Large-scale structure in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Spergel, David N.; Turok, Nail

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the formation of large-scale structure by global texture in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter. A code for evolution of the texture fields was combined with an N-body code for evolving the dark matter. The results indicate some promising aspects: with only one free parameter, the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function is reproduced, clusters of galaxies are found to be significantly clustered on a scale of 20-50/h Mpc, and coherent structures of over 50/h Mpc in the galaxy distribution were found. The large-scale streaming motions observed are in good agreement with the observations: the average magnitude of the velocity field smoothed over 30/h Mpc is 430 km/sec. Global texture produces a cosmic Mach number that is compatible with observation. Also, significant evolution of clusters at low redshift was seen. Possible problems for the theory include too high velocity dispersions in clusters, and voids which are not as empty as those observed.

  11. Large-scale structure in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Spergel, David N.; Turok, Nail

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the formation of large-scale structure by global texture in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter. A code for evolution of the texture fields was combined with an N-body code for evolving the dark matter. The results indicate some promising aspects: with only one free parameter, the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function is reproduced, clusters of galaxies are found to be significantly clustered on a scale of 20-50/h Mpc, and coherent structures of over 50/h Mpc in the galaxy distribution were found. The large-scale streaming motions observed are in good agreement with the observations: the average magnitude of the velocity field smoothed over 30/h Mpc is 430 km/sec. Global texture produces a cosmic Mach number that is compatible with observation. Also, significant evolution of clusters at low redshift was seen. Possible problems for the theory include too high velocity dispersions in clusters, and voids which are not as empty as those observed.

  12. Vorticity and large-scale structures in the transition region of a turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisgraber, Todd Heinrich

    Though the existence of large-scale structures in the near and far field of jets has been demonstrated, their exact nature in the self-similar region is still open to debate. Furthermore, the evolution of these structures in the transition region is not well understood. In this thesis, a hybrid experimental-numerical approach is developed to investigate the flow structure of the jet transition region. The spatial-temporal characteristics of these large eddies and their effect on local entrainment are examined. The velocity field in planes normal and parallel to the jet axis are measured using the digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique with a computationally efficient algorithm designed to minimize sub-pixel bias. The numerics employ a second order projection method with adaptive mesh refinement to simulate a natural unforced jet. The link between the experiments and numerics is provided by a temporal sequence of DPIV nozzle velocity data which serves as the inflow boundary condition to the computation. Successful comparisons of the development of near-field primary and secondary structures validate the simulation. The mean jet growth rate is identical to the experiments. Analysis of the experimental data with a proper orthogonal decomposition identifies and reveals the evolution of large-scale structures. After the first pairing the rings develop a tilting instability which is amplified by the interaction of adjacent rings. After the potential core, the inclined rings have a unique time scale and are responsible for a significant fraction of the local turbulent transport and rapid growth of the jet. Further downstream, beginning at nine diameters, the rings evolve into a flow that alternates between ejection and entrainment of fluid. This motion persists through the remainder of the transition region and increases its contribution to lateral mixing with downstream distance. The time scale governing the inward and outward flow oscillations increases

  13. Inflation physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D. L.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crill, B. P.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Doré, O.; Dunkley, J.; Feng, J. L.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Giddings, S. B.; Green, D.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hanson, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Horowitz, G.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jackson, M.; Jones, W. C.; Kallosh, R.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Kinney, W.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Kuo, C.-L.; Kusaka, A.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linde, A.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; Maldacena, J.; Martinec, E.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Senatore, L.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Slosar, A.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.; Zaldarriaga, M.

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments-the theory of cosmic inflation-and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1% of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5 σ measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B-mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  14. Inflation Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abazajian, K.N.; Arnold,K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B.A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D.L.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Carvalho, C.S.; Chang, C.L.; Chiang, H.C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T.M.; Crill, B.P.; Dawson, K.S.; Das, S.; Devline, M.J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S; Wollack, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments---the theory of cosmic inflation---and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1 of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5-sigma measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B-mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  15. Correlated primordial perturbations in light of CMB and large scale structure data

    SciTech Connect

    Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Muhonen, Vesa; Vaeliviita, Jussi

    2005-03-15

    We use cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large scale structure data to constrain cosmological models where the primordial perturbations have both an adiabatic and a cold dark matter (CDM) isocurvature component. We allow for a possible correlation between the adiabatic and isocurvature modes, and for different spectral indices for the power in each mode and for their correlation. We do a likelihood analysis with 11 independent parameters and discuss the effect of choosing the pivot scale for the definition of amplitude parameters. The upper limit to the isocurvature fraction is 18% around a pivot scale k=0.01 Mpc{sup -1}. For smaller pivot wavenumbers the limit stays about the same. For larger pivot wavenumbers, very large values of the isocurvature spectral index are favored, which makes the analysis problematic, but larger isocurvature fractions seem to be allowed. For large isocurvature spectral indices n{sub iso}>2 a positive correlation between the adiabatic and isocurvature mode is favored, and for n{sub iso}<2 a negative correlation is favored. The upper limit to the nonadiabatic contribution to the CMB temperature variance is 7.5%. Of the standard cosmological parameters, determination of the CDM density {omega}{sub c} and the sound horizon angle {theta} (or the Hubble constant H{sub 0}) are affected most by a possible presence of a correlated isocurvature contribution. The baryon density {omega}{sub b} nearly retains its 'adiabatic value'.

  16. Inflation physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D. L.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crill, B. P.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Doré, O.; Dunkley, J.; Feng, J. L.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Giddings, S. B.; Green, D.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hanson, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Horowitz, G.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jackson, M.; Jones, W. C.; Kallosh, R.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Kinney, W.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Kuo, C. -L.; Kusaka, A.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linde, A.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; Maldacena, J.; Martinec, E.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Senatore, L.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Slosar, A.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.; Zaldarriaga, M.

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments—the theory of cosmic inflation—and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1% of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5σ measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B -mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  17. Large-scale genetic structuring of a widely distributed carnivore--the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Rueness, Eli K; Naidenko, Sergei; Trosvik, Pål; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the phylogeography and genetic structure of a multitude of species inhabiting Europe and North America have been described. The flora and fauna of the vast landmasses of north-eastern Eurasia are still largely unexplored in this respect. The Eurasian lynx is a large felid that is relatively abundant over much of the Russian sub-continent and the adjoining countries. Analyzing 148 museum specimens collected throughout its range over the last 150 years we have described the large-scale genetic structuring in this highly mobile species. We have investigated the spatial genetic patterns using mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and cytochrome b) and 11 microsatellite loci, and describe three phylogenetic clades and a clear structuring along an east-west gradient. The most likely scenario is that the contemporary Eurasian lynx populations originated in central Asia and that parts of Europe were inhabited by lynx during the Pleistocene. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) range expansions lead to colonization of north-western Siberia and Scandinavia from the Caucasus and north-eastern Siberia from a refugium further east. No evidence of a Berinigan refugium could be detected in our data. We observed restricted gene flow and suggest that future studies of the Eurasian lynx explore to what extent the contemporary population structure may be explained by ecological variables.

  18. Large-Scale Genetic Structuring of a Widely Distributed Carnivore - The Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx)

    PubMed Central

    Rueness, Eli K.; Naidenko, Sergei; Trosvik, Pål; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the phylogeography and genetic structure of a multitude of species inhabiting Europe and North America have been described. The flora and fauna of the vast landmasses of north-eastern Eurasia are still largely unexplored in this respect. The Eurasian lynx is a large felid that is relatively abundant over much of the Russian sub-continent and the adjoining countries. Analyzing 148 museum specimens collected throughout its range over the last 150 years we have described the large-scale genetic structuring in this highly mobile species. We have investigated the spatial genetic patterns using mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and cytochrome b) and 11 microsatellite loci, and describe three phylogenetic clades and a clear structuring along an east-west gradient. The most likely scenario is that the contemporary Eurasian lynx populations originated in central Asia and that parts of Europe were inhabited by lynx during the Pleistocene. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) range expansions lead to colonization of north-western Siberia and Scandinavia from the Caucasus and north-eastern Siberia from a refugium further east. No evidence of a Berinigan refugium could be detected in our data. We observed restricted gene flow and suggest that future studies of the Eurasian lynx explore to what extent the contemporary population structure may be explained by ecological variables. PMID:24695745

  19. Large-Scale Numerical Simulation of Fluid Structure Interactions in Low Reynolds Number Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eken, Ali; Sahin, Mehmet

    2011-11-01

    A fully coupled numerical algorithm has been developed for the numerical simulation of large-scale fluid structure interaction problems. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation based on the side-centered unstructured finite volume method. A special attention is given to satisfy the discrete continuity equation within each element at discrete level as well as the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL). The linear elasticity equations are discretized within the structure domain using the Galerkin finite element method. The resulting algebraic linear equations are solved in a fully coupled form using a monolitic multigrid method. The implementation of the fully coupled iterative solvers is based on the PETSc library for improving the efficiency of the parallel code. The present numerical algorithm is initially validated for a beam in cross flow and then it is used to simulate the fluid structure interaction of a membrane-wing micro aerial vehicle (MAV).

  20. Large scale nonlinear numerical optimal control for finite element models of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, Christine A.; Liao, Li-Zhi

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of large scale numerical optimal control algorithms for nonlinear systems and their application to finite element models of structures. This work is based on our expansion of the optimal control algorithm (DDP) in the following steps: improvement of convergence for initial policies in non-convex regions, development of a numerically accurate penalty function method approach for constrained DDP problems, and parallel processing on supercomputers. The expanded constrained DDP algorithm was applied to the control of a four-bay, two dimensional truss with 12 soft members, which generates geometric nonlinearities. Using an explicit finite element model to describe the structural system requires 32 state variables and 10,000 time steps. Our numerical results indicate that for constrained or unconstrained structural problems with nonlinear dynamics, the results obtained by our expanded constrained DDP are significantly better than those obtained using linear-quadratic feedback control.

  1. A correlation between the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Boughn, Stephen; Crittenden, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Observations of distant supernovae and the fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) indicate that the expansion of the Universe may be accelerating under the action of a 'cosmological constant' or some other form of 'dark energy'. This dark energy now appears to dominate the Universe and not only alters its expansion rate, but also affects the evolution of fluctuations in the density of matter, slowing down the gravitational collapse of material (into, for example, clusters of galaxies) in recent times. Additional fluctuations in the temperature of CMB photons are induced as they pass through large-scale structures and these fluctuations are necessarily correlated with the distribution of relatively nearby matter. Here we report the detection of correlations between recent CMB data and two probes of large-scale structure: the X-ray background and the distribution of radio galaxies. These correlations are consistent with those predicted by dark energy, indicating that we are seeing the imprint of dark energy on the growth of structure in the Universe.

  2. A study of large, medium and small scale structures in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Stanley H.; Kuo, Spencer P.; Shmoys, Jerry

    1986-01-01

    Alouette and ISIS data were studied for large, medium, and small scale structures in the ionosphere. Correlation was also sought with measurements by other satellites, such as the Atmosphere Explorer C and E and the Dynamic Explorer 2 satellites, of both neutrals and ionization, and with measurements by ground facilities, such as the incoherent scatter radars. Large scale coherent wavelike structures were found from ISIS 2 electron density contours from above the F peak to nearly the satellite altitude. Such structures were also found to correlate with the observation by AE-C below the F peak during a conjunction of the two satellites. Vertical wavefronts found in the upper F region suggest the dominance of diffusion along field lines as well. Also discovered were multiple, evenly spaced field-aligned ducts in the F region that, at low latitudes, extended to the other hemisphere and were in the form of field-aligned sheets in the east-west direction. Low latitude heating events were discovered that could serve as sources for waves in the ionosphere.

  3. Contributions to the understanding of large-scale coherent structures in developing free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. T. C.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in the mechanics of boundary layer flow are reported. The physical problems of large scale coherent structures in real, developing free turbulent shear flows, from the nonlinear aspects of hydrodynamic stability are addressed. The presence of fine grained turbulence in the problem, and its absence, lacks a small parameter. The problem is presented on the basis of conservation principles, which are the dynamics of the problem directed towards extracting the most physical information, however, it is emphasized that it must also involve approximations.

  4. Networks of silicon nanowires: A large-scale atomistic electronic structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keleş, Ümit; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Liedke, Bartosz; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2013-11-11

    Networks of silicon nanowires possess intriguing electronic properties surpassing the predictions based on quantum confinement of individual nanowires. Employing large-scale atomistic pseudopotential computations, as yet unexplored branched nanostructures are investigated in the subsystem level as well as in full assembly. The end product is a simple but versatile expression for the bandgap and band edge alignments of multiply-crossing Si nanowires for various diameters, number of crossings, and wire orientations. Further progress along this line can potentially topple the bottom-up approach for Si nanowire networks to a top-down design by starting with functionality and leading to an enabling structure.

  5. Dusty Starbursts within a z=3 Large Scale Structure revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehata, Hideki

    The role of the large-scale structure is one of the most important theme in studying galaxy formation and evolution. However, it has been still mystery especially at z>2. On the basis of our ALMA 1.1 mm observations in a z ~ 3 protocluster field, it is suggested that submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) preferentially reside in the densest environment at z ~ 3. Furthermore we find a rich cluster of AGN-host SMGs at the core of the protocluster, combining with Chandra X-ray data. Our results indicate the vigorous star-formation and accelerated super massive black hole (SMBH) growth in the node of the cosmic web.

  6. Testing the big bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1991-06-01

    In this series of lectures, several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, detailed discussion is presented regarding nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances and neutrino counting; the dark matter problems; and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments will also be made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing'' and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it. 126 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Topology of large-scale structure. IV - Topology in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Cohen, Alexander P.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Weinberg, David H.

    1989-01-01

    In a recent series of papers, an algorithm was developed for quantitatively measuring the topology of the large-scale structure of the universe and this algorithm was applied to numerical models and to three-dimensional observational data sets. In this paper, it is shown that topological information can be derived from a two-dimensional cross section of a density field, and analytic expressions are given for a Gaussian random field. The application of a two-dimensional numerical algorithm for measuring topology to cross sections of three-dimensional models is demonstrated.

  8. Phase transitions as the origin of large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turok, Neil

    1988-01-01

    A review of the formation of large scale structure through gravitational growth of primordial perturbations is given. This is followed by a discussion of how symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe might have produced the required perturbations, in particular through the formation and evolution of a network of cosmic strings. Finally, the statistical mechanics of string networks, for both cosmic and fundamental strings is discussed, leading to some more speculative ideas on the possible role of fundamental strings (superstrings or heterotic strings) in the very early universe.

  9. Large-scale structural transitions in supercoiled DNA revealed by coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajina, Brad; Spakowitz, Andrew

    Topological constraints, such as DNA supercoiling, play an integral role in genomic regulation and organization in living systems. However, physical understanding of the principles that underlie DNA structure and organization at biologically-relevant length-scales remains a formidable challenge. We develop a coarse-grained simulation approach for predicting equilibrium conformations of supercoiled DNA. With this approach, we study the conformational transitions that arise due to supercoiling across the full range of supercoiling densities that are commonly explored by living systems. Simulations of ring DNA molecules with lengths up to the scale of topological domains in the E. coli chromosome (~10 kilobases) reveal large-scale structural transitions elicited by supercoiling, resulting in 3 supercoiling conformational regimes: chiral coils, extended plectonemes, and branched hyper-supercoils. These results capture the non-monotonic relationship of size versus degree of supercoiling observed in experimental sedimentation studies of supercoiled DNA, and our results provide a physical explanation of the structural transitions underlying this behavior.

  10. Large-scale structure evolution in axisymmetric, compressible free-shear layers

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    This paper is a description of work-in-progress. It describes Sandia`s program to study the basic fluid mechanics of large-scale mixing in unbounded, compressible, turbulent flows, specifically, the turbulent mixing of an axisymmetric compressible helium jet in a parallel, coflowing compressible air freestream. Both jet and freestream velocities are variable over a broad range, providing a wide range mixing layer Reynolds number. Although the convective Mach number, M{sub c}, range is currently limited by the present nozzle design to values of 0.6 and below, straightforward nozzle design changes would permit a wide range of convective Mach number, to well in excess of 1.0. The use of helium allows simulation of a hot jet due to the large density difference, and also aids in obtaining optical flow visualization via schlieren due to the large density gradient in the mixing layer. The work comprises a blend of analysis, experiment, and direct numerical simulation (DNS). There the authors discuss only the analytical and experimental efforts to observe and describe the evolution of the large-scale structures. The DNS work, used to compute local two-point velocity correlation data, will be discussed elsewhere.

  11. Structure of Wall-Eddies at Very Large Reynolds Number--A Large-Scale PIV Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommema, S. E.; Adrian, R. J.

    2000-11-01

    The results of an experiment performed in the first 5 m of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Large-scale PIV measurements (up to 2 m × 2 m field-of-view) were obtained in the streamwise / wall-normal plane of a very-large Reynolds number (Re_θ > 10^6, based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity), flat-plate, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Measurements were obtained at the SLTEST facility in the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Grounds. Coherent packets of ramp-like structures with downstream inclination are observed and show a remarkable resemblance to those observed in typical laboratory-scale experiments at far lower Reynolds number. The results are interpreted in terms of a vortex packet paradigm(Adrian, R.J., C.D. Meinhart, and C.D. Tomkins, Vortex organization in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer, to appear in J. Fluid Mech., 2000.) and begin to extend the model to high Reynolds numbers of technological importance. Additional results obtained during periods of non-neutral atmospheric stability are contrasted with those of the canonical neutral boundary layer. Sample smoke visualization images (3 m × 15 m field-of-view) are available online from the author.

  12. Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shaocheng; Hume, Timothy; Jakob, Christian; ...

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the characteristics of the large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles observed during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which was conducted in January–February 2006 in Darwin during the northern Australian monsoon season. The examined profiles exhibit significant variations between four distinct synoptic regimes that were observed during the experiment. The active monsoon period is characterized by strong upward motion and large advective cooling and moistening throughout the entire troposphere, while the suppressed and clear periods are dominated by moderate midlevel subsidence and significant low- to midlevel drying through horizontal advection. The midlevel subsidence andmore » horizontal dry advection are largely responsible for the dry midtroposphere observed during the suppressed period and limit the growth of clouds to low levels. During the break period, upward motion and advective cooling and moistening located primarily at midlevels dominate together with weak advective warming and drying (mainly from horizontal advection) at low levels. The variations of the diabatic heating and drying profiles with the different regimes are closely associated with differences in the large-scale structures, cloud types, and rainfall rates between the regimes. Strong diabatic heating and drying are seen throughout the troposphere during the active monsoon period while they are moderate and only occur above 700 hPa during the break period. The diabatic heating and drying tend to have their maxima at low levels during the suppressed periods. Furthermore, the diurnal variations of these structures between monsoon systems, continental/coastal, and tropical inland-initiated convective systems are also examined.« less

  13. Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Hume, Timothy; Jakob, Christian; Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Zhang, Minghua

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the characteristics of the large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles observed during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which was conducted in January–February 2006 in Darwin during the northern Australian monsoon season. The examined profiles exhibit significant variations between four distinct synoptic regimes that were observed during the experiment. The active monsoon period is characterized by strong upward motion and large advective cooling and moistening throughout the entire troposphere, while the suppressed and clear periods are dominated by moderate midlevel subsidence and significant low- to midlevel drying through horizontal advection. The midlevel subsidence and horizontal dry advection are largely responsible for the dry midtroposphere observed during the suppressed period and limit the growth of clouds to low levels. During the break period, upward motion and advective cooling and moistening located primarily at midlevels dominate together with weak advective warming and drying (mainly from horizontal advection) at low levels. The variations of the diabatic heating and drying profiles with the different regimes are closely associated with differences in the large-scale structures, cloud types, and rainfall rates between the regimes. Strong diabatic heating and drying are seen throughout the troposphere during the active monsoon period while they are moderate and only occur above 700 hPa during the break period. The diabatic heating and drying tend to have their maxima at low levels during the suppressed periods. Furthermore, the diurnal variations of these structures between monsoon systems, continental/coastal, and tropical inland-initiated convective systems are also examined.

  14. Galilean invariance and the consistency relation for the nonlinear squeezed bispectrum of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: pietroni@pd.infn.it

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the constraints imposed on the nonlinear evolution of the Large Scale Structure (LSS) of the universe by galilean invariance, the symmetry relevant on subhorizon scales. Using Ward identities associated to the invariance, we derive fully nonlinear consistency relations between statistical correlators of the density and velocity perturbations, such as the power spectrum and the bispectrum. These relations are valid up to O(f{sub NL}{sup 2}) corrections. We then show that most of the semi-analytic methods proposed so far to resum the perturbative expansion of the LSS dynamics fail to fulfill the constraints imposed by galilean invariance, and are therefore susceptible to non-physical infrared effects. Finally, we identify and discuss a nonperturbative semi-analytical scheme which is manifestly galilean invariant at any order of its expansion.

  15. Efficient preconditioning of the electronic structure problem in large scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-06-28

    We present an improved preconditioning scheme for electronic structure calculations based on the orbital transformation method. First, a preconditioner is developed which includes information from the full Kohn-Sham matrix but avoids computationally demanding diagonalisation steps in its construction. This reduces the computational cost of its construction, eliminating a bottleneck in large scale simulations, while maintaining rapid convergence. In addition, a modified form of Hotelling’s iterative inversion is introduced to replace the exact inversion of the preconditioner matrix. This method is highly effective during molecular dynamics (MD), as the solution obtained in earlier MD steps is a suitable initial guess. Filtering small elements during sparse matrix multiplication leads to linear scaling inversion, while retaining robustness, already for relatively small systems. For system sizes ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand atoms, which are typical for many practical applications, the improvements to the algorithm lead to a 2-5 fold speedup per MD step.

  16. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part III: test of the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Hui, Lam; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: msimonov@sissa.it

    2014-06-01

    The recently derived consistency relations for Large Scale Structure do not hold if the Equivalence Principle (EP) is violated. We show it explicitly in a toy model with two fluids, one of which is coupled to a fifth force. We explore the constraints that galaxy surveys can set on EP violation looking at the squeezed limit of the 3-point function involving two populations of objects. We find that one can explore EP violations of order 10{sup −3}÷10{sup −4} on cosmological scales. Chameleon models are already very constrained by the requirement of screening within the Solar System and only a very tiny region of the parameter space can be explored with this method. We show that no violation of the consistency relations is expected in Galileon models.

  17. Efficient preconditioning of the electronic structure problem in large scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-06-01

    We present an improved preconditioning scheme for electronic structure calculations based on the orbital transformation method. First, a preconditioner is developed which includes information from the full Kohn-Sham matrix but avoids computationally demanding diagonalisation steps in its construction. This reduces the computational cost of its construction, eliminating a bottleneck in large scale simulations, while maintaining rapid convergence. In addition, a modified form of Hotelling's iterative inversion is introduced to replace the exact inversion of the preconditioner matrix. This method is highly effective during molecular dynamics (MD), as the solution obtained in earlier MD steps is a suitable initial guess. Filtering small elements during sparse matrix multiplication leads to linear scaling inversion, while retaining robustness, already for relatively small systems. For system sizes ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand atoms, which are typical for many practical applications, the improvements to the algorithm lead to a 2-5 fold speedup per MD step.

  18. Higher-order massive neutrino perturbations in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Führer, Florian; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2015-03-01

    We develop a higher-order perturbation theory for large-scale structure formation involving a free-streaming hot or warm dark matter species. We focus on the case of mixed cold dark matter and massive neutrinos, although our approach is applicable also to a single warm dark matter species. In order to capture the suppressed growth of neutrino density perturbations on small scales, we account for the full momentum dependence of the phase space distribution using the Vlasov equation, and derive from it a formal closed-form nonlinear equation for the neutrino density. Using a systematic perturbative expansion of this equation we compute high-order corrections to the neutrino density contrast without the explicit need to track the perturbed neutrino momentum distribution. We calculate the leading-order total matter bispectrum for several neutrino masses. Using our result as a benchmark, we test the accuracy of the fluid approximation and a linear approximation used in perturbative and N-body analyses, as well as a new hybrid approach that combines the exact linear evolution with the nonlinear structure of the fluid equations. Aiming at lesssim 1% accuracy, we find that the total matter bispectrum with a low neutrino mass m = 0.046 eV can be reproduced by all but the fluid approximation, while for larger neutrino masses m=0.46 → 0.93 eV only the hybrid approach has the desired accuracy on a large range of scales. This result serves as a cautionary note that approximate nonlinear models of neutrino clustering that reproduce the gross features of some observables may not suffice for precision calculations, nor are they guaranteed to apply to other observables. All of the approximation schemes fail to reproduce the bispectrum of the neutrino density perturbations at better than 20% accuracy across all scales, indicating that an exact treatment of nonlinear neutrino perturbations is necessary.

  19. Higher-order massive neutrino perturbations in large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Führer, Florian; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: yvonne.y.wong@unsw.edu.au

    2015-03-01

    We develop a higher-order perturbation theory for large-scale structure formation involving a free-streaming hot or warm dark matter species. We focus on the case of mixed cold dark matter and massive neutrinos, although our approach is applicable also to a single warm dark matter species. In order to capture the suppressed growth of neutrino density perturbations on small scales, we account for the full momentum dependence of the phase space distribution using the Vlasov equation, and derive from it a formal closed-form nonlinear equation for the neutrino density. Using a systematic perturbative expansion of this equation we compute high-order corrections to the neutrino density contrast without the explicit need to track the perturbed neutrino momentum distribution. We calculate the leading-order total matter bispectrum for several neutrino masses. Using our result as a benchmark, we test the accuracy of the fluid approximation and a linear approximation used in perturbative and N-body analyses, as well as a new hybrid approach that combines the exact linear evolution with the nonlinear structure of the fluid equations. Aiming at ∼< 1% accuracy, we find that the total matter bispectrum with a low neutrino mass m = 0.046 eV can be reproduced by all but the fluid approximation, while for larger neutrino masses m=0.46 → 0.93 eV only the hybrid approach has the desired accuracy on a large range of scales. This result serves as a cautionary note that approximate nonlinear models of neutrino clustering that reproduce the gross features of some observables may not suffice for precision calculations, nor are they guaranteed to apply to other observables. All of the approximation schemes fail to reproduce the bispectrum of the neutrino density perturbations at better than 20% accuracy across all scales, indicating that an exact treatment of nonlinear neutrino perturbations is necessary.

  20. Symbolic and Graphical Representation Scheme for Sensors Deployed in Large-Scale Structures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Seon; Shin, Yunah; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-01-01

    As wireless sensor network (WSN)-based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are increasingly being employed in civil infrastructures and building structures, the management of large numbers of sensing devices and the large amount of data acquired from WSNs will become increasingly difficult unless systematic expressions of the sensor network are provided. This study introduces a practical WSN for SHM that consists of sensors, wireless sensor nodes, repeater nodes, master nodes, and monitoring servers. This study also proposes a symbolic and graphical representation scheme (SGRS) for this system, in which the communication relationships and respective location information of the distributed sensing components are expressed in a concise manner. The SGRS was applied to the proposed WSN, which is employed in an actual large-scale irregular structure in which three types of sensors (75 vibrating wire strain gauges, 10 inclinometers, and three laser displacement sensors) and customized wireless sensor nodes are installed. The application results demonstrate that prompt identification of sensing units and effective management of the distributed sensor network can be realized from the SGRS. The results also demonstrate the superiority of the SGRS over conventional expression methods in which a box diagram or tree diagram representing the ID of sensors and data loggers is used. PMID:23912426

  1. Symbolic and graphical representation scheme for sensors deployed in large-scale structures.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Seon; Shin, Yunah; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-07-31

    As wireless sensor network (WSN)-based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are increasingly being employed in civil infrastructures and building structures, the management of large numbers of sensing devices and the large amount of data acquired from WSNs will become increasingly difficult unless systematic expressions of the sensor network are provided. This study introduces a practical WSN for SHM that consists of sensors, wireless sensor nodes, repeater nodes, master nodes, and monitoring servers. This study also proposes a symbolic and graphical representation scheme (SGRS) for this system, in which the communication relationships and respective location information of the distributed sensing components are expressed in a concise manner. The SGRS was applied to the proposed WSN, which is employed in an actual large-scale irregular structure in which three types of sensors (75 vibrating wire strain gauges, 10 inclinometers, and three laser displacement sensors) and customized wireless sensor nodes are installed. The application results demonstrate that prompt identification of sensing units and effective management of the distributed sensor network can be realized from the SGRS. The results also demonstrate the superiority of the SGRS over conventional expression methods in which a box diagram or tree diagram representing the ID of sensors and data loggers is used.

  2. Chaotic dynamics of large-scale structures in a turbulent wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varon, Eliott; Eulalie, Yoann; Edwige, Stephie; Gilotte, Philippe; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of a three-dimensional (3D) bimodal turbulent wake downstream of a square-back Ahmed body are experimentally studied in a wind tunnel through high-frequency wall-pressure probes mapping the rear of the model and a horizontal two-dimensional (2D) velocity field. The barycenters of the pressure distribution over the rear part of the model and the intensity recirculation are found highly correlated. Both described the most energetic large-scale structures dynamics, confirming the relation between the large-scale recirculation bubble and its wall-pressure footprint. Focusing on the pressure, its barycenter trajectory has a stochastic behavior but its low-frequency dynamics exhibit the same characteristics as a weak strange chaotic attractor system, with two well-defined attractors. The low-frequency dynamics associated to the large-scale structures are then analyzed. The largest Lyapunov exponent is first estimated, leading to a low positive value characteristic of strange attractors and weak chaotic systems. Afterwards, analyzing the autocorrelation function of the timeseries, we compute the correlation dimension, larger than two. The signal is finally transformed and analyzed as a telegraph signal, showing that its dynamics correspond to a quasirandom telegraph signal. This is the first demonstration that the low-frequency dynamics of a turbulent 3D wake are not a purely stochastic process but rather a weak chaotic process exhibiting strange attractors. From the flow control point of view, it also opens the path to more simple closed-loop flow-control strategies aiming at the stabilization of the wake and the control of the dynamics of the wake barycenter.

  3. Primordial non-Gaussianity in the bispectra of large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Tellarini, Matteo; Ross, Ashley J.; Wands, David E-mail: matteo.tellarini@port.ac.uk E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    The statistics of large-scale structure in the Universe can be used to probe non-Gaussianity of the primordial density field, complementary to existing constraints from the cosmic microwave background. In particular, the scale dependence of halo bias, which affects the halo distribution at large scales, represents a promising tool for analyzing primordial non-Gaussianity of local form. Future observations, for example, may be able to constrain the trispectrum parameter g{sub NL} that is difficult to study and constrain using the CMB alone. We investigate how galaxy and matter bispectra can distinguish between the two non-Gaussian parameters f{sub NL} and g{sub NL}, whose effects give nearly degenerate contributions to the power spectra. We use a generalization of the univariate bias approach, making the hypothesis that the number density of halos forming at a given position is a function of the local matter density contrast and of its local higher-order statistics. Using this approach, we calculate the halo-matter bispectra and analyze their properties. We determine a connection between the sign of the halo bispectrum on large scales and the parameter g{sub NL}. We also construct a combination of halo and matter bispectra that is sensitive to f{sub NL}, with little contamination from g{sub NL}. We study both the case of single and multiple sources to the primordial gravitational potential, discussing how to extend the concept of stochastic halo bias to the case of bispectra. We use a specific halo mass-function to calculate numerically the bispectra in appropriate squeezed limits, confirming our theoretical findings.

  4. Large-scale coherent structures in fractal-generated, axisymmetric wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Jovan; Supponen, Outi; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2013-11-01

    The coherence and energy of large-scale structures in turbulent axisymmetric wakes are known to play a role on the drag coefficient of the body. Specifically, there is an expectation that drag can be reduced by reducing the energy of the vortex shedding. We use fractal plates which have been shown to have higher drag coefficients than square plates and disks with the same frontal area (Nedic, Ganapathisubramani & Vassilicos FDR 2013), yet show that the energy of the large-scale vortices shed from these plates is reduced by 15% to 60% compared to non-fractal plates. Fractal plates can reduce wake size and alter dissipation scalings [see DFD13-2013-000126] and the relation CD =CVCɛ between the drag coefficient and coefficients of wake volume and average turbulent dissipation rate can be used to explore consequences on drag. Furthermore, the azimuthal mode associated with the vortex shedding (m = 1) is still found to be dominant for all plates, however its coherence is slightly altered by the fractals, whilst mode m = 2 has been dramatically altered.

  5. Gauss-Bonnet quintessence: Background evolution, large scale structure, and cosmological constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, Tomi; Mota, David F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a string-inspired dark energy scenario featuring a scalar field with a coupling to the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. We discuss extensively the cosmological and astrophysical implications of the coupled scalar field. Such coupling can trigger the onset of late dark energy domination after a scaling matter era. The universe may then cross the phantom divide and perhaps also exit from the acceleration. The evolution of fluctuations in the scalar field and their impact on the clustering of matter are studied in detail and model independently. The small-scale limit is derived for the perturbations and their stability is addressed. The general equations for scalar perturbations are also presented and solved numerically, confirming that the Gauss-Bonnet coupling can be compatible with the observed spectrum of cosmic microwave background radiation as well as the matter power spectrum inferred from large-scale surveys. Data from the solar system, supernovae Ia, cosmic microwave background radiation, large-scale structure, and big bang nucleosynthesis are used to constrain the parameters of the model. The geometric constraints from background expansion favor exponential potentials with a shallow slope, which is in tension with the nucleosynthesis bound on early quintessence. Also, high values for the present matter density are required. Including the baryon oscillation scale, one could rule out the model at about 99% confidence level. A discussion of how to overcome such possible problems in more elaborate models is included, together with considerations of the validity of these constraints in the present context. Interestingly, one also finds that a good Newtonian limit may require fixing the coupling.

  6. Large-scale internal structure in volcanogenic breakout flood deposits: Extensive GPR survey on volcaniclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, K.; Gomez, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale outburst floods from volcanic lakes such as caldera lakes or volcanically dammed river-valleys tend to be voluminous with total discharge of > 1-10s km3 and peak discharge of >10000s to 100000s m3 s-1. Such a large flood can travel long distance and leave sediments and bedforms/landforms extensively with large-scale internal structures, which are difficult to assess from single local sites. Moreover, the sediments and bedforms/landforms are sometimes untraceable, and outcrop information obtained by classical geological and geomorphological field surveys is limited to the dissected/terraced parts of fan body, road cuts and/or large quarries. Therefore, GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar), using the properties of electromagnetic waves' propagation through media, seems best adapted for the appraisal of large-scale subsurface structures. Recently, studies on GPR applications to volcanic deposits have successfully captured images of lava flows and volcaniclastic deposits and proved the usefulness of this method even onto the volcanic areas which often encompass complicated stratigraphy and structures with variable material, grainsize, and ferromagnetic content. Using GPR, the present study aims to understand the large-scale internal structures of volcanogenic flood deposits. The survey was carried out over two volcanogenic flood fan (or apron) sediments in northeast Japan, at Numazawa and Towada volcanoes. The 5 ka Numazawa flood deposits in the Tadami river catchment that has been emplaced by a breakout flood from ignimbrite-dammed valley leaving pumiceous gravelly sediments with meter-sized boulders in the flow path. At Towada volcano, a comparable flood event originating from a breach in the caldera rim emplaced the 13-15 ka Sanbongi fan deposits in the Oirase river valley, which is characterized by a bouldery fan deposits. The GPR data was collected following 200 to 500 m long lateral and longitudinal transects, which were captured using a GPR Pulse

  7. The topology of large-scale structure. VI - Slices of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III; Melott, Adrian L.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the topology of large-scale structure in two observed slices of the universe are presented. Both slices pass through the Coma cluster and their depths are 100 and 230/h Mpc. The present topology study shows that the largest void in the CfA slice is divided into two smaller voids by a statistically significant line of galaxies. The topology of toy models like the white noise and bubble models is shown to be inconsistent with that of the observed slices. A large N-body simulation was made of the biased cloud dark matter model and the slices are simulated by matching them in selection functions and boundary conditions. The genus curves for these simulated slices are spongelike and have a small shift in the direction of a meatball topology like those of observed slices.

  8. The topology of large-scale structure. VI - Slices of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III; Melott, Adrian L.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the topology of large-scale structure in two observed slices of the universe are presented. Both slices pass through the Coma cluster and their depths are 100 and 230/h Mpc. The present topology study shows that the largest void in the CfA slice is divided into two smaller voids by a statistically significant line of galaxies. The topology of toy models like the white noise and bubble models is shown to be inconsistent with that of the observed slices. A large N-body simulation was made of the biased cloud dark matter model and the slices are simulated by matching them in selection functions and boundary conditions. The genus curves for these simulated slices are spongelike and have a small shift in the direction of a meatball topology like those of observed slices.

  9. CMB lensing bispectrum from nonlinear growth of the large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2016-06-01

    We discuss detectability of the nonlinear growth of the large-scale structure in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing. The lensing signals involved in the CMB fluctuations have been measured from multiple CMB experiments, such as Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), Planck, POLARBEAR, and South Pole Telescope (SPT). The reconstructed CMB lensing signals are useful to constrain cosmology via their angular power spectrum, while detectability and cosmological application of their bispectrum induced by the nonlinear evolution are not well studied. Extending the analytic estimate of the galaxy lensing bispectrum presented by Takada and Jain (2004) to the CMB case, we show that even near term CMB experiments such as Advanced ACT, Simons Array and SPT3G could detect the CMB lensing bispectrum induced by the nonlinear growth of the large-scale structure. In the case of the CMB Stage-IV, we find that the lensing bispectrum is detectable at ≳50 σ statistical significance. This precisely measured lensing bispectrum has rich cosmological information, and could be used to constrain cosmology, e.g., the sum of the neutrino masses and the dark-energy properties.

  10. Correlation of CMB with large-scale structure. II. Weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Christopher M.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Seljak, Uros

    2008-08-15

    We investigate the correlation of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with several tracers of large-scale structure, including luminous red galaxies (LRGs), quasars, and radio sources. The lensing field is reconstructed based on the CMB maps from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite; the LRGs and quasars are observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); and the radio sources are observed in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). Combining all three large-scale structure samples, we find evidence for a positive cross correlation at the 2.5{sigma} level (1.8{sigma} for the SDSS samples and 2.1{sigma} for NVSS); the cross correlation amplitude is 1.06{+-}0.42 times that expected for the WMAP cosmological parameters. Our analysis extends other recent analyses in that we carefully determine bias-weighted redshift distribution of the sources, which is needed for a meaningful cosmological interpretation of the detected signal. We investigate contamination of the signal by galactic emission, extragalactic radio and infrared sources, thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and the Rees-Sciama effect, and find all of them to be negligible.

  11. Measuring the matter energy density and Hubble parameter from large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the method to measure both the present value of the matter energy density contrast and the Hubble parameter directly from the measurement of the linear growth rate which is obtained from the large scale structure of the Universe. From this method, one can obtain the value of the nuisance cosmological parameter Ω{sub m0} (the present value of the matter energy density contrast) within 3% error if the growth rate measurement can be reached z > 3.5. One can also investigate the evolution of the Hubble parameter without any prior on the value of H{sub 0} (the current value of the Hubble parameter). Especially, estimating the Hubble parameter are insensitive to the errors on the measurement of the normalized growth rate fσ{sub 8}. However, this method requires the high z (z > 3.5) measurement of the growth rate in order to get the less than 5% errors on the measurements of H(z) at z ≤ 1.2 with the redshift bin Δz = 0.2. Thus, this will be suitable for the next generation large scale structure galaxy surveys like WFMOS and LSST.

  12. Analytic prediction of baryonic effects from the EFT of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, Matthew; Perko, Ashley; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: perko@stanford.edu

    2015-05-01

    The large scale structures of the universe will likely be the next leading source of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to understand their behavior. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures provides a consistent way to perturbatively predict the clustering of dark matter at large distances. The fact that baryons move distances comparable to dark matter allows us to infer that baryons at large distances can be described in a similar formalism: the backreaction of short-distance non-linearities and of star-formation physics at long distances can be encapsulated in an effective stress tensor, characterized by a few parameters. The functional form of baryonic effects can therefore be predicted. In the power spectrum the leading contribution goes as ∝ k{sup 2} P(k), with P(k) being the linear power spectrum and with the numerical prefactor depending on the details of the star-formation physics. We also perform the resummation of the contribution of the long-wavelength displacements, allowing us to consistently predict the effect of the relative motion of baryons and dark matter. We compare our predictions with simulations that contain several implementations of baryonic physics, finding percent agreement up to relatively high wavenumbers such as k ≅ 0.3 hMpc{sup −1} or k ≅ 0.6 hMpc{sup −1}, depending on the order of the calculation. Our results open a novel way to understand baryonic effects analytically, as well as to interface with simulations.

  13. Renormalization-group flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2017-01-01

    Following an approach of Matarrese and Pietroni, we derive the functional renormalization group (RG) flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures. Perturbative solutions of this RG flow equation are shown to be consistent with standard cosmological perturbation theory. Non-perturbative approximate solutions can be obtained by truncating the a priori infinite set of possible effective actions to a finite subspace. Using for the truncated effective action a form dictated by dissipative fluid dynamics, we derive RG flow equations for the scale dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity of non-interacting dark matter, and we solve them numerically. Physically, the effective viscosity and sound velocity account for the interactions of long-wavelength fluctuations with the spectrum of smaller-scale perturbations. We find that the RG flow exhibits an attractor behaviour in the IR that significantly reduces the dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity on the input values at the UV scale. This allows for a self-contained computation of matter and velocity power spectra for which the sensitivity to UV modes is under control.

  14. Production of large-scale, freestanding vanadium pentoxide nanobelt porous structures.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Byung Hoon; Hong, Won G; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Yark Yeon; Jeong, Eun-ju; Jang, Won Ick; Yu, Han Young

    2012-03-07

    Large-scale, freestanding, porous structures of vanadium pentoxide nanobelts (VPNs) were successfully prepared using the template-free freeze-drying method. The porous and multi-layered VPN macrostructures are composed of randomly oriented long nanobelts (over 100 μm) and their side length can be controlled up to a few tens of centimetres. Also, the bulk density and surface area of these macrostructures are 3-5 mg cm(-3) and 40-80 m(2) g(-1), respectively, which are similar to those of the excellent adsorbents. In addition, the removal efficiency measurements of ammonia molecules revealed that the VPN porous structures can adsorb the ammonia molecules with the combinations of van der Waals forces and strong chemical bonding by functional groups on the VPN surface.

  15. Production of large-scale, freestanding vanadium pentoxide nanobelt porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Byung Hoon; Hong, Won G.; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Yark Yeon; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Jang, Won Ick; Yu, Han Young

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale, freestanding, porous structures of vanadium pentoxide nanobelts (VPNs) were successfully prepared using the template-free freeze-drying method. The porous and multi-layered VPN macrostructures are composed of randomly oriented long nanobelts (over 100 μm) and their side length can be controlled up to a few tens of centimetres. Also, the bulk density and surface area of these macrostructures are 3-5 mg cm-3 and 40-80 m2 g-1, respectively, which are similar to those of the excellent adsorbents. In addition, the removal efficiency measurements of ammonia molecules revealed that the VPN porous structures can adsorb the ammonia molecules with the combinations of van der Waals forces and strong chemical bonding by functional groups on the VPN surface.

  16. Vibration suppression for large scale adaptive truss structures using direct output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Lyan-Ywan; Utku, Senol; Wada, Ben K.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the vibration control of adaptive truss structures, where the control actuation is provided by length adjustable active members, is formulated as a direct output feedback control problem. A control method named Model Truncated Output Feedback (MTOF) is presented. The method allows the control feedback gain to be determined in a decoupled and truncated modal space in which only the critical vibration modes are retained. The on-board computation required by MTOF is minimal; thus, the method is favorable for the applications of vibration control of large scale structures. The truncation of the modal space inevitably introduces spillover effect during the control process. In this article, the effect is quantified in terms of active member locations, and it is shown that the optimal placement of active members, which minimizes the spillover effect (and thus, maximizes the control performance) can be sought. The problem of optimally selecting the locations of active members is also treated.

  17. Factor structure and correlates of the dissociative experiences scale in a large offender sample.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mark A; Poythress, Norman G; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Douglas, Kevin S

    2008-12-01

    The authors examined the psychometric properties, factor structure, and construct validity of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) in a large offender sample (N = 1,515). Although the DES is widely used with community and clinical samples, minimal work has examined offender samples. Participants were administered self-report and interview measures, and a subsample was followed longitudinally to determine criminal and violent recidivism. The DES exhibited good psychometric properties, but an identified three-factor structure was of questionable replicability. Moreover, the DES factors displayed no evidence of differential correlates. DES total scores were correlated with trauma-related variables even after controlling for negative affectivity. Total scores were related to measures of antisocial behavior and aggression but did not predict recidivism. These findings support the reliability and construct validity of the DES in offenders but raise questions regarding the clinical utility of the DES factor scores above and beyond that of the total score.

  18. Molecular clouds and the large-scale structure of the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, Patrick; Stacy, J. Gregory

    1990-01-01

    The application of molecular radio astronomy to the study of the large-scale structure of the Galaxy is reviewed and the distribution and characteristic properties of the Galactic population of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), derived primarily from analysis of the Columbia CO survey, and their relation to tracers of Population 1 and major spiral features are described. The properties of the local molecular interstellar gas are summarized. The CO observing programs currently underway with the Center for Astrophysics 1.2 m radio telescope are described, with an emphasis on projects relevant to future comparison with high-energy gamma-ray observations. Several areas are discussed in which high-energy gamma-ray observations by the EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope) experiment aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory will directly complement radio studies of the Milky Way, with the prospect of significant progress on fundamental issues related to the structure and content of the Galaxy.

  19. Seismic imaging of structural heterogeneity in Earth's mantle: evidence for large-scale mantle flow.

    PubMed

    Ritsema, J; Van Heijst, H J

    2000-01-01

    Systematic analyses of earthquake-generated seismic waves have resulted in models of three-dimensional elastic wavespeed structure in Earth's mantle. This paper describes the development and the dominant characteristics of one of the most recently developed models. This model is based on seismic wave travel times and wave shapes from over 100,000 ground motion recordings of earthquakes that occurred between 1980 and 1998. It shows signatures of plate tectonic processes to a depth of about 1,200 km in the mantle, and it demonstrates the presence of large-scale structure throughout the lower 2,000 km of the mantle. Seismological analyses make it increasingly more convincing that geologic processes shaping Earth's surface are intimately linked to physical processes in the deep mantle.

  20. Detection of the Effect of Cosmological Large-Scale Structure on the Orientation of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Carretero, Conrado; Patiri, Santiago G.

    2006-04-01

    Galaxies are not distributed randomly throughout space but are instead arranged in an intricate ``cosmic web'' of filaments and walls surrounding bubble-like voids. There is still no compelling observational evidence of a link between the structure of the cosmic web and how galaxies form within it. However, such a connection is expected on the basis of our understanding of the origin of galaxy angular momentum: disk galaxies should be highly inclined relative to the plane defined by the large-scale structure surrounding them. Using the two largest galaxy redshift surveys currently in existence (2dFGRS and SDSS), we show at the 99.7% confidence level that these alignments do indeed exist: spiral galaxies located on the shells of the largest cosmic voids have rotation axes that lie preferentially on the void surface.

  1. Altered functional-structural coupling of large-scale brain networks in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Liao, Wei; Chen, Huafu; Mantini, Dante; Ding, Ju-Rong; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Zhengge; Yuan, Cuiping; Chen, Guanghui; Jiao, Qing; Lu, Guangming

    2011-10-01

    The human brain is a large-scale integrated network in the functional and structural domain. Graph theoretical analysis provides a novel framework for analysing such complex networks. While previous neuroimaging studies have uncovered abnormalities in several specific brain networks in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by tonic-clonic seizures, little is known about changes in whole-brain functional and structural connectivity networks. Regarding functional and structural connectivity, networks are intimately related and share common small-world topological features. We predict that patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy would exhibit a decoupling between functional and structural networks. In this study, 26 patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by tonic-clonic seizures and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal correlations and diffusion tensor image tractography were used to generate functional and structural connectivity networks. Graph theoretical analysis revealed that the patients lost optimal topological organization in both functional and structural connectivity networks. Moreover, the patients showed significant increases in nodal topological characteristics in several cortical and subcortical regions, including mesial frontal cortex, putamen, thalamus and amygdala relative to controls, supporting the hypothesis that regions playing important roles in the pathogenesis of epilepsy may display abnormal hub properties in network analysis. Relative to controls, patients showed further decreases in nodal topological characteristics in areas of the default mode network, such as the posterior cingulate gyrus and inferior temporal gyrus. Most importantly, the degree of coupling between functional and structural connectivity networks was decreased, and exhibited a negative correlation with epilepsy duration in patients. Our findings

  2. Predictions of a non-Gaussian model for large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Z.H.; Bardeen, J.M.

    1992-06-26

    A modified CDM model for the origin of structure in the universe based on an inflation model with two interacting scalar fields, is analyzed to make predictions for the statistical properties of the density and velocity fields and the microwave background anisotropy. The initial gauge-invariant potential [zeta] which is defined as [zeta] = [delta][rho]/([rho] + p) + 3[var phi], where [var phi] is the curvature perturbation amplitude and p is the pressure, is the sum of a Gaussian field [phi][sub 1], and the square of a Gaussian field [phi][sub 2]. A Harrison-Zel'dovich scale-invariant power spectrum is assumed for [phi][sub 1]; and a log-normal 'peak' power spectrum for [phi][sub 2]. The location and the width of the peak are described by parameters k[sub c] and a. respectively. The model is motivated to some extent by inflation models with two interacting scalar fields, but is mainly interesting as an example of a model whose statistical properties change with scale. On small scales, it is almost identical to a standard scale-invariant Gaussian CDM model. On scales near the location of the peak of the non-Gaussian field, the distributions have long tails in high positive values of the density and velocity fields. Thus, it is easier to get large-scale streaming velocities than the standard CDM model. The quadrupole amplitude of fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background radiation and the rms variation of the temperature field smoothed with a 10[degree] FWHM Gaussian are calculated; a reasonable agreement is found with the new COBE results.

  3. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; ...

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 hmore » Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.« less

  4. Traveling wave solutions of large-scale structures in turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yongyun; Willis, Ashley; Cossu, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    Recently, a set of stationary invariant solutions for the large-scale structures in turbulent Couette flow was computed at Reτ = 128 using an over-damped LES with the Smagorinsky model which accounts the effect of the surrounding small-scale motions. In this talk, we show that this approach can be extended to Reτ = 1000 in turbulent channel flow, towards the regime where the large-scale structures in the form of very-large-scale motions (long streaky motions) and large-scale motions (short vortical structures) energetically emerge. We demonstrate that a set of invariant solutions in the form of a traveling wave can be computed from simulations of the self-sustaining large-scale structures in the minimal unit with midplane reflection symmetry. By approximating the surrounding small scales with an artificially elevated Smagorinsky constant, a set of equilibrium states are found, labelled upper- and lower-branch according to their related wall shear stress. In particular, we will show that the upper-branch equilibrium state is a reasonable proxy for the spatial structure and the turbulent statistics of the self-sustaining large-scale structures. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, UK (EP/N019342/1).

  5. Symposium on Parallel Computational Methods for Large-scale Structural Analysis and Design, 2nd, Norfolk, VA, US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O. (Editor); Housner, Jerrold M. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Computing speed is leaping forward by several orders of magnitude each decade. Engineers and scientists gathered at a NASA Langley symposium to discuss these exciting trends as they apply to parallel computational methods for large-scale structural analysis and design. Among the topics discussed were: large-scale static analysis; dynamic, transient, and thermal analysis; domain decomposition (substructuring); and nonlinear and numerical methods.

  6. Automatic Generation of Connectivity for Large-Scale Neuronal Network Models through Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Pier, Sandra; Naveau, Mikaël; Butz-Ostendorf, Markus; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of new high performance computation technology in the last decade, the simulation of large scale neural networks which are able to reproduce the behavior and structure of the brain has finally become an achievable target of neuroscience. Due to the number of synaptic connections between neurons and the complexity of biological networks, most contemporary models have manually defined or static connectivity. However, it is expected that modeling the dynamic generation and deletion of the links among neurons, locally and between different regions of the brain, is crucial to unravel important mechanisms associated with learning, memory and healing. Moreover, for many neural circuits that could potentially be modeled, activity data is more readily and reliably available than connectivity data. Thus, a framework that enables networks to wire themselves on the basis of specified activity targets can be of great value in specifying network models where connectivity data is incomplete or has large error margins. To address these issues, in the present work we present an implementation of a model of structural plasticity in the neural network simulator NEST. In this model, synapses consist of two parts, a pre- and a post-synaptic element. Synapses are created and deleted during the execution of the simulation following local homeostatic rules until a mean level of electrical activity is reached in the network. We assess the scalability of the implementation in order to evaluate its potential usage in the self generation of connectivity of large scale networks. We show and discuss the results of simulations on simple two population networks and more complex models of the cortical microcircuit involving 8 populations and 4 layers using the new framework. PMID:27303272

  7. Implementing DICOM Structured Reporting in a Large-Scale Telemedicine Network

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos, Cloves Langendorf; Andrade, Rafael; de Carlos Back Giuliano, Isabela; Borgatto, Adriano Ferreti; de Andrade, Dalton Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Large-scale asynchronous telemedicine networks can offer a unique opportunity for the acquisition of detailed epidemiological information if the data are acquired and handled in an appropriate way. In this work, an approach is presented for the integration of medical reports in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Structured Reporting standard in telemedicine networks using structured vocabularies. Materials and Methods: The use of these structured vocabularies is extended beyond radiology, and a case study in telecardiology is presented. The approach was applied in the context of a real-world statewide public telemedicine network; nowadays on average 470 written electrocardiographic structured reports daily are being performed. Cardiologists provided more than 220,000 written structured reports, and these reports are stored into a central database. Results: This study was performed during a 12-month period, and it was possible to examine possible associations between a list of co-morbidities and cardiac risk factors with a diagnosis that indicates the presence of cardiac ischemia, cardiac injury, or possible necrosis by using DICOM Structured Reporting. Our application is responsible for coordinating the process of issuance of reports through various technologies and devices. The system works as a library in an HTTP server, which accesses information from studies in DICOM format from the database and from structured vocabularies. Conclusions: Results indicate that traceability of morbidity, diagnoses, and patient clinical information can be achieved, resulting in an efficient data mining–friendly framework. A multidevice application for Web-based and smartphone-based platforms showed that it is a viable solution for applying the DICOM Structured Reporting standard in telemedicine networks. PMID:23837517

  8. Large-scale structural analysis: The structural analyst, the CSM Testbed and the NAS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Macy, Steven C.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM testbed methods development environment is presented and some numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  9. An Open-Source Galaxy Redshift Survey Simulator for next-generation Large Scale Structure Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijak, Uros

    Galaxy redshift surveys produce three-dimensional maps of the galaxy distribution. On large scales these maps trace the underlying matter fluctuations in a relatively simple manner, so that the properties of the primordial fluctuations along with the overall expansion history and growth of perturbations can be extracted. The BAO standard ruler method to measure the expansion history of the universe using galaxy redshift surveys is thought to be robust to observational artifacts and understood theoretically with high precision. These same surveys can offer a host of additional information, including a measurement of the growth rate of large scale structure through redshift space distortions, the possibility of measuring the sum of neutrino masses, tighter constraints on the expansion history through the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and constraints on the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations. Extracting this broadband clustering information hinges on both our ability to minimize and subtract observational systematics to the observed galaxy power spectrum, and our ability to model the broadband behavior of the observed galaxy power spectrum with exquisite precision. Rapid development on both fronts is required to capitalize on WFIRST's data set. We propose to develop an open-source computational toolbox that will propel development in both areas by connecting large scale structure modeling and instrument and survey modeling with the statistical inference process. We will use the proposed simulator to both tailor perturbation theory and fully non-linear models of the broadband clustering of WFIRST galaxies and discover novel observables in the non-linear regime that are robust to observational systematics and able to distinguish between a wide range of spatial and dynamic biasing models for the WFIRST galaxy redshift survey sources. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach in a pilot study of the SDSS-III BOSS galaxies, in which we

  10. Efficient Large-Scale Structure From Motion by Fusing Auxiliary Imaging Information.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hainan; Shen, Shuhan; Gao, Wei; Hu, Zhanyi

    2015-11-01

    One of the potentially effective means for large-scale 3D scene reconstruction is to reconstruct the scene in a global manner, rather than incrementally, by fully exploiting available auxiliary information on the imaging condition, such as camera location by Global Positioning System (GPS), orientation by inertial measurement unit (or compass), focal length from EXIF, and so on. However, such auxiliary information, though informative and valuable, is usually too noisy to be directly usable. In this paper, we present an approach by taking advantage of such noisy auxiliary information to improve structure from motion solving. More specifically, we introduce two effective iterative global optimization algorithms initiated with such noisy auxiliary information. One is a robust rotation averaging algorithm to deal with contaminated epipolar graph, the other is a robust scene reconstruction algorithm to deal with noisy GPS data for camera centers initialization. We found that by exclusively focusing on the estimated inliers at the current iteration, the optimization process initialized by such noisy auxiliary information could converge well and efficiently. Our proposed method is evaluated on real images captured by unmanned aerial vehicle, StreetView car, and conventional digital cameras. Extensive experimental results show that our method performs similarly or better than many of the state-of-art reconstruction approaches, in terms of reconstruction accuracy and completeness, but is more efficient and scalable for large-scale image data sets.

  11. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi; Tsai, Yuhsinz

    2016-12-21

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H0 and the matter density perturbation σ8 inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid. The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ8 problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H0 problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.

  12. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    DOE PAGES

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; ...

    2016-12-21

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H0 and the matter density perturbation σ8 inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid.more » The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ8 problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H0 problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.« less

  13. Large-scale Sedimentary Structures and Contaminant Transport: an Example from Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, A.; Uchupi, E.

    2002-05-01

    A review of 289 borehole logs collected across Cape Cod reveals that two large glacial lakes once covered the peninsula. The older lake, which existed about 19,000 years ago, covered the east-west portion of Cape Cod and deposited clay, silt, and very fine sand across the area. The southern dam of this lake ultimately failed and large drainage channels were carved into the surface of the glaciolacustrine sediments. These eroded lake deposits were subsequently buried by the outwash plains of sand and gravel that make up the surficial geology of today. One of the major drainage channels in the lake deposit surface is located below the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), a 34 square mile facility with >10 known groundwater contaminant plumes. We will present preliminary evidence that the buried paleochannel is exerting a strong control on the transport of several plumes at MMR and thus are critical stratigraphic structures that must be understood and delineated. Although fine-grained sediments are described in borehole logs from the MMR, infering the origin and significance of these deposits is made difficult by local-scale heterogeneities. The existence of the proglacial lake and the extensive, deep drainage channels are only apparent from investigating borehole data across a larger scale. This work illustrates the importance of characterizing the stratigraphic framework beyond the confines of a specific contamination site and further shows the controls that paleochannels filled with high permeability sediments can exert on flow and transport.

  14. Ward identities and consistency relations for the large scale structure with multiple species

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: pietroni@pd.infn.it

    2014-04-01

    We present fully nonlinear consistency relations for the squeezed bispectrum of Large Scale Structure. These relations hold when the matter component of the Universe is composed of one or more species, and generalize those obtained in [1,2] in the single species case. The multi-species relations apply to the standard dark matter + baryons scenario, as well as to the case in which some of the fields are auxiliary quantities describing a particular population, such as dark matter halos or a specific galaxy class. If a large scale velocity bias exists between the different populations new terms appear in the consistency relations with respect to the single species case. As an illustration, we discuss two physical cases in which such a velocity bias can exist: (1) a new long range scalar force in the dark matter sector (resulting in a violation of the equivalence principle in the dark matter-baryon system), and (2) the distribution of dark matter halos relative to that of the underlying dark matter field.

  15. Correlations Between Large-scale Flow Structures and Acoustic Signatures in an Axisymmetric Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Berger, Zachary; Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In a test campaign studying jet noise, simultaneous far-field acoustic measurements and near-field particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) data were sampled from a supersonic underexpanded axisymmetric jet operating at a Reynolds number of 1.3×106 . Using overlapping snapshots from three adjacent cameras, separate images of the velocity field were stitched together to form an uninterrupted window. Centered about the axis of the jet, the effective field of view spanned two jet diameters in the cross-stream direction (r) and seven diameters in the streamwise direction (z) . This area proved to be sufficiently large to capture important scales of supersonic flow relevant to noise generation. Specifically, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) has extracted particular energy modes thought to be associated with the large-scale instability wave, shock cells, and turbulent mixing characteristic of supersonic noise. As example, time-dependent modal correlations present evidence linking the existence of shock cells to screech tones. From the data gathered, these experimental and analytical techniques are believed to be valuable tools in isolating energy-based flow structures relevant to noise generation. The authors would like to thank Spectral Energies for their continued support of research at Syracuse University.

  16. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi; Tsai, Yuhsinz

    2016-12-01

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H 0 and the matter density perturbation σ 8 inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid. The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ 8 problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H 0 problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.

  17. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; ...

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  18. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part II: resummation and redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2014-02-01

    We generalize the recently derived single-field consistency relations of Large Scale Structure in two directions. First, we treat the effect of the long modes (with momentum q) on the short ones (with momentum k) non-perturbatively, by writing resummed consistency relations which do not require k/q⋅δ{sub q} << 1. These relations do not make any assumptions on the short-scales physics and are extended to include (an arbitrary number of) multiple long modes, internal lines with soft momenta and soft loops. We do several checks of these relations in perturbation theory and we verify that the effect of soft modes always cancels out in equal-time correlators. Second, we write the relations directly in redshift space, without assuming the single-stream approximation: not only the long mode affects the short scales as a homogeneous gravitational field, but it also displaces them by its velocity along the line-of-sight. Redshift space consistency relations still vanish when short modes are taken at equal time: an observation of a signal in the squeezed limit would point towards multifield inflation or a violation of the equivalence principle.

  19. The Detection and Removal of Large-scale Detector Background Structures in NICMOS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, E. Y.; Suzuki, N.; Ripoche, P.; Aldering, G.; Faccioli, L.; Huang, X.; Perlmutter, S.; Spadafora, A. L.; Strovink, M.; Lidman, C.; Dawson, K. S.; Bergeron, L. E.; Deustua, S.; Fruchter, A. S.; Barbary, K.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Meyers, J.; Rubin, D.

    2010-07-01

    After applying the standard corrections for well-studied NICMOS anomalies, significant large-scale spatial background variation remains. We report on the detections of a sky-dependent fringe pattern in the F110W filter, and a time-dependent residual corner glow in the calibrated NICMOS deep science images. We also describe methods developed to further correct these anomalies. A model of the background structure is derived from the algebraic manipulation of stacked science images and consists of the following two components. The first component is constant, dominated by a residual glow as high as 20 DN at the corners and by residual flat and persistence structures at the center. The second component, which scales with sky level, displays a clear fringe pattern with 10% variation for F110W images. However this pattern is not detected for F160W images. Using these model components to correct for the anomalies significantly improves the cosmetic appearance of NICMOS images and reduces the magnitude scatter in the photometry of distant galaxies by 20%.

  20. Large-Scale Structures in Earth Foreshock Waves during Radial IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganse, Urs; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian; Palmroth, Minna; Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    Wave instabilities in the foreshock region of Earth's bow shock lead to formation of magnetic field and density fluctuations, commonly observed by spacecraft as 30-second waves. These waves are oblique to the interplanetary magnetic field, with the mechanism leading to oblique propagation still under discussion. Using the VLASIATOR (http://vlasiator.fmi.fi) global hybrid-Vlasov simulation code, we performed runs of radial and near-radial IMF conditions and were able to reproduce the development of these oblique foreshock wave instabilities, revealing a peculiar global structure, in which waves with different wave-vector directions are arranged around central spines, which are spatially offset from the bow shock's nose. We present analysis of the waves' growth behaviour and combine them with artificial observations, comparing to in-situ spacecraft data. Furthermore, we employed a test particle approach to investigate the formation mechanism of the instabilities' large-scale structure, and found that a coupling between the microphysics of wave-particle interaction and global-scale shock and foreshock geometry is essential to explain them.

  1. The bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Mercolli, Lorenzo; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: lorenzo.mercolli@gmail.com E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2015-05-01

    We study the bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure, consistently accounting for the effects of short-scale dynamics. We begin by proving that, as long as the theory is perturbative, it can be formulated to arbitrary order using only operators that are local in time. We then derive all the new operators required to cancel the UV-divergences and obtain a physically meaningful prediction for the one-loop bispectrum. In addition to new, subleading stochastic noises and the viscosity term needed for the one-loop power spectrum, we find three new effective operators. The three new parameters can be constrained by comparing with N-body simulations. The best fit is precisely what is suggested by the structure of UV-divergences, hence justifying a formula for the EFTofLSS bispectrum whose only fitting parameter is already fixed by the power spectrum. This result predicts the bispectrum of N-body simulations up to k{sub max}≈0.22 h Mpc{sup −1} at 0z=, an improvement by nearly a factor of two as compared to one-loop standard perturbation theory.

  2. The future of primordial features with large-scale structure surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingang; Dvorkin, Cora; Huang, Zhiqi; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Verde, Licia

    2016-11-01

    Primordial features are one of the most important extensions of the Standard Model of cosmology, providing a wealth of information on the primordial Universe, ranging from discrimination between inflation and alternative scenarios, new particle detection, to fine structures in the inflationary potential. We study the prospects of future large-scale structure (LSS) surveys on the detection and constraints of these features. We classify primordial feature models into several classes, and for each class we present a simple template of power spectrum that encodes the essential physics. We study how well the most ambitious LSS surveys proposed to date, including both spectroscopic and photometric surveys, will be able to improve the constraints with respect to the current Planck data. We find that these LSS surveys will significantly improve the experimental sensitivity on features signals that are oscillatory in scales, due to the 3D information. For a broad range of models, these surveys will be able to reduce the errors of the amplitudes of the features by a factor of 5 or more, including several interesting candidates identified in the recent Planck data. Therefore, LSS surveys offer an impressive opportunity for primordial feature discovery in the next decade or two. We also compare the advantages of both types of surveys.

  3. Kinematic morphology of large-scale structure: evolution from potential to rotational flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Eyink, Gregory L.

    2014-09-20

    As an alternative way to describe the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of the characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, is very useful for understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with the cosmic web structure because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between the cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of the phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariant space.

  4. Dynamics of the large-scale ULF electromagnetic wave structures in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburjania, G. D.; Chargazia, Z. Kh.

    2007-12-01

    The present article displays the results of theoretical investigation of the planetary ultra-low-frequency (ULF) electromagnetic wave structure, generation and propagation dynamics in the dissipative ionosphere. These waves are stipulated by a spatial inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The waves propagate in different ionospheric layers along the parallels to the east as well as to the west and their frequencies vary in the range of (10 10-6) s-1 with a wavelength of order 103 km. The fast disturbances are associated with oscillations of the ionospheric electrons frozen in the geomagnetic field. The large-scale waves are weakly damped. They generate the geomagnetic field adding up to several tens of nanotesla (nT) near the Earth's surface. It is prescribed that the planetary ULF electromagnetic waves preceding their nonlinear interaction with the local shear winds can self-localize in the form of nonlinear long-living solitary vortices, moving along the latitude circles westward as well as eastward with a velocity different from the phase velocity of the corresponding linear waves. The vortex structures transfer the trapped particles of medium, as well as energy and heat. That is why such nonlinear vortex structures can be the structural elements of the ionospheric strong macro-turbulences.

  5. Stability-to-instability transition in the structure of large-scale networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dandan; Ronhovde, Peter; Nussinov, Zohar

    2012-12-01

    We examine phase transitions between the “easy,” “hard,” and “unsolvable” phases when attempting to identify structure in large complex networks (“community detection”) in the presence of disorder induced by network “noise” (spurious links that obscure structure), heat bath temperature T, and system size N. The partition of a graph into q optimally disjoint subgraphs or “communities” inherently requires Potts-type variables. In earlier work [Philos. Mag.1478-643510.1080/14786435.2011.616547 92, 406 (2012)], when examining power law and other networks (and general associated Potts models), we illustrated that transitions in the computational complexity of the community detection problem typically correspond to spin-glass-type transitions (and transitions to chaotic dynamics in mechanical analogs) at both high and low temperatures and/or noise. The computationally “hard” phase exhibits spin-glass type behavior including memory effects. The region over which the hard phase extends in the noise and temperature phase diagram decreases as N increases while holding the average number of nodes per community fixed. This suggests that in the thermodynamic limit a direct sharp transition may occur between the easy and unsolvable phases. When present, transitions at low temperature or low noise correspond to entropy driven (or “order by disorder”) annealing effects, wherein stability may initially increase as temperature or noise is increased before becoming unsolvable at sufficiently high temperature or noise. Additional transitions between contending viable solutions (such as those at different natural scales) are also possible. Identifying community structure via a dynamical approach where “chaotic-type” transitions were found earlier. The correspondence between the spin-glass-type complexity transitions and transitions into chaos in dynamical analogs might extend to other hard computational problems. In this work, we examine large

  6. A case study of large-scale structure in a 'hot' model universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.; Gallagher, John S., III; Melott, Adrian L.; Bushouse, Howard A.

    1988-01-01

    Large-scale structure is studied in an Omega(0) = 1 model universe filled with 'hot' dark matter. A particle mesh computer code is used to calculate the development of gravitational instabilities in 64-cubed mass clouds on a 64-cubed three-dimensional grid over an expansion factor of about 1000. The present epoch is identified by matching the slope of the model particle-particle two-point correlation function with that obtained from observations of galaxies, and the model then corresponds to a cubical sample of the universe of about 105/h Mpc on a side. Properties of the simulated universe are investigated by casting the model quantities into observer's coordinates and comparing the results with observations of the spatial and velocity distributions of luminous matter. It is concluded based on simple arguments that current limits on the time of galaxy formation do not rule out 'hot' dark matter.

  7. Automatic three-dimensional measurement of large-scale structure based on vision metrology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Guan, Banglei; Zhang, Xiaohu; Li, Daokui; Yu, Qifeng

    2014-01-01

    All relevant key techniques involved in photogrammetric vision metrology for fully automatic 3D measurement of large-scale structure are studied. A new kind of coded target consisting of circular retroreflective discs is designed, and corresponding detection and recognition algorithms based on blob detection and clustering are presented. Then a three-stage strategy starting with view clustering is proposed to achieve automatic network orientation. As for matching of noncoded targets, the concept of matching path is proposed, and matches for each noncoded target are found by determination of the optimal matching path, based on a novel voting strategy, among all possible ones. Experiments on a fixed keel of airship have been conducted to verify the effectiveness and measuring accuracy of the proposed methods.

  8. Large-Scale Predictive Drug Safety: From Structural Alerts to Biological Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Serna, Ricard; Vidal, David; Remez, Nikita; Mestres, Jordi

    2015-10-19

    The recent explosion of data linking drugs, proteins, and pathways with safety events has promoted the development of integrative systems approaches to large-scale predictive drug safety. The added value of such approaches is that, beyond the traditional identification of potentially labile chemical fragments for selected toxicity end points, they have the potential to provide mechanistic insights for a much larger and diverse set of safety events in a statistically sound nonsupervised manner, based on the similarity to drug classes, the interaction with secondary targets, and the interference with biological pathways. The combined identification of chemical and biological hazards enhances our ability to assess the safety risk of bioactive small molecules with higher confidence than that using structural alerts only. We are still a very long way from reliably predicting drug safety, but advances toward gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to adverse outcomes represent a step forward in this direction.

  9. Simulating large scale structure with lognormal fields: a new code and approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, H. S.; Abdalla, F. B.; Joachimi, B.

    2017-07-01

    It is common practice in cosmology to use lognormal random fields to model large-scale structure observables such as matter density and weak lensing convergence. I will present the public code Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit (FLASK) which can make tomographic realizations on spherical shells around the observer of an arbitrary number of correlated lognormal or Gaussian random fields, including the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and multiple tracers of matter. I will show that lognormal fields have fundamental limitations which prevent its use for jointly modelling density and convergence and will propose two ways of overcoming these limitations. The first approach slightly distorts the power spectra of the fields while the second one generates a different weak lensing convergence marginal distribution by integrating the lognormal density along the line of sight. The latter approach also provides a way to determine directly from theory the skewness of the convergence distribution and, therefore, the parameters for a lognormal fit.

  10. Modeling of the dielectrophoretic conveyer-belt assembling microparticles into large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusid, Boris; Jacqmin, David; Kumar, Anil; Acrivos, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    A dielectrophoretic conveyor-belt method for assembling negatively polarized microparticles into large-scale structures was recently developed (APL 90, 154104, 2007). To do this, first, an array of microelectrodes is energized to generate a spatially periodic AC electric field that causes the particles to aggregate into boluses in positions of the field intensity- minima, which are located mid-way along the height of the channel. The minima and their associated boluses are then moved by periodically grounding and energizing the electrode array so as to generate an electrical field moving along the electrode array. We simulate this experiment numerically via a two- dimensional electro-hydrodynamic model (PRE 69, 021402, 2004). The numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experiments in that they show similar particle aggregation rates, bolus sizes and bolus transport speeds.

  11. Automatic Three-Dimensional Measurement of Large-Scale Structure Based on Vision Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Guan, Banglei; Zhang, Xiaohu; Li, Daokui; Yu, Qifeng

    2014-01-01

    All relevant key techniques involved in photogrammetric vision metrology for fully automatic 3D measurement of large-scale structure are studied. A new kind of coded target consisting of circular retroreflective discs is designed, and corresponding detection and recognition algorithms based on blob detection and clustering are presented. Then a three-stage strategy starting with view clustering is proposed to achieve automatic network orientation. As for matching of noncoded targets, the concept of matching path is proposed, and matches for each noncoded target are found by determination of the optimal matching path, based on a novel voting strategy, among all possible ones. Experiments on a fixed keel of airship have been conducted to verify the effectiveness and measuring accuracy of the proposed methods. PMID:24701143

  12. Computational Cosmology: From the Early Universe to the Large Scale Structure.

    PubMed

    Anninos, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations (and numerical methods applied to specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  13. Computational Cosmology: from the Early Universe to the Large Scale Structure.

    PubMed

    Anninos, Peter

    1998-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  14. Consistency relations for large-scale structures with primordial non-Gaussianities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valageas, Patrick; Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    We investigate how the consistency relations of large-scale structures are modified when the initial density field is not Gaussian. We consider both scenarios where the primordial density field can be written as a nonlinear functional of a Gaussian field and more general scenarios where the probability distribution of the primordial density field can be expanded around the Gaussian distribution, up to all orders over δL 0. Working at linear order over the non-Gaussianity parameters fNL(n ) or Sn, we find that the consistency relations for the matter density fields are modified as they include additional contributions that involve all-order mixed linear-nonlinear correlations ⟨∏δL∏δ ⟩. We derive the conditions needed to recover the simple Gaussian form of the consistency relations. This corresponds to scenarios that become Gaussian in the squeezed limit. Our results also apply to biased tracers and velocity or momentum cross-correlations.

  15. The trispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the connected four point correlation function (the trispectrum in Fourier space) of cosmological density perturbations at one-loop order in Standard Perturbation Theory (SPT) and the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure (EFT of LSS). This paper is a companion to our earlier work on the non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum, which corresponds to a particular wavenumber configuration of the trispectrum. In the present calculation, we highlight and clarify some of the subtle aspects of the EFT framework that arise at third order in perturbation theory for general wavenumber configurations of the trispectrum. We consistently incorporate vorticity and non-locality in time into the EFT counterterms and lay out a complete basis of building blocks for the stress tensor. We show predictions for the one-loop SPT trispectrum and the EFT contributions, focusing on configurations which have particular relevance for using LSS to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity.

  16. N-point statistics of large-scale structure in the Zel'dovich approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Tassev, Svetlin

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by the results presented in a companion paper, here we give a simple analytical expression for the matter n-point functions in the Zel'dovich approximation (ZA) both in real and in redshift space (including the angular case). We present numerical results for the 2-dimensional redshift-space correlation function, as well as for the equilateral configuration for the real-space 3-point function. We compare those to the tree-level results. Our analysis is easily extendable to include Lagrangian bias, as well as higher-order perturbative corrections to the ZA. The results should be especially useful for modelling probes of large-scale structure in the linear regime, such as the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations. We make the numerical code used in this paper freely available.

  17. Evidence for the interaction of large scale magnetic structures in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Demoulin, P.; Henoux, J. C.; Machado, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    By modeling the observed vertical magnetic field of an active region AR 2372 by the potential field of an ensemble of magnetic dipoles, the likely location of the separatrices, surfaces that separates cells of different field line connectivities, and of the separator which is the intersection of the separatrices, is derived. Four of the five off-band H-alpha kernels of a flare that occurred less than 20 minutes before obtaining the magnetogram are shown to have taken place near or at the separatrices. These H-alpha kernels are connected by field lines that pass near the separator. This indicates that the flare may have resulted from the interaction in the separator region of large scale magnetic structures.

  18. First hints of large scale structures in the ultrahigh energy sky?

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoco, A.; Miele, G.; Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The result of the recent publication [1] of a broad maximum around 25 degrees in the two-point autocorrelation function of ultra-high energy cosmic ray arrival directions has been intriguingly interpreted as the first imprint of the large scale structures (LSS) of baryonic matter in the near universe. We analyze this suggestion in light of the clustering properties expected from the PSCz astronomical catalogue of LSS. The chance probability of the signal is consistent within 2 {sigma} with the predictions based on the catalogue. No evidence for a significant cross-correlation of the observed events with known overdensities in the LSS is found, which may be due to the role of the galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields, and is however consistent with the limited statistics. The larger statistics to be collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory is needed to answer definitely the question.

  19. Stochastic inflation lattice simulations: Ultra-large scale structure of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Salopek, D.S.

    1990-11-01

    Non-Gaussian fluctuations for structure formation may arise in inflation from the nonlinear interaction of long wavelength gravitational and scalar fields. Long wavelength fields have spatial gradients {alpha}{sup {minus}1} {triangledown} small compared to the Hubble radius, and they are described in terms of classical random fields that are fed by short wavelength quantum noise. Lattice Langevin calculations are given for a toy model'' with a scalar field interacting with an exponential potential where one can obtain exact analytic solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation. For single scalar field models that are consistent with current microwave background fluctuations, the fluctuations are Gaussian. However, for scales much larger than our observable Universe, one expects large metric fluctuations that are non-Guassian. This example illuminates non-Gaussian models involving multiple scalar fields which are consistent with current microwave background limits. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Evidence for the interaction of large scale magnetic structures in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Demoulin, P.; Henoux, J. C.; Machado, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    By modeling the observed vertical magnetic field of an active region AR 2372 by the potential field of an ensemble of magnetic dipoles, the likely location of the separatrices, surfaces that separates cells of different field line connectivities, and of the separator which is the intersection of the separatrices, is derived. Four of the five off-band H-alpha kernels of a flare that occurred less than 20 minutes before obtaining the magnetogram are shown to have taken place near or at the separatrices. These H-alpha kernels are connected by field lines that pass near the separator. This indicates that the flare may have resulted from the interaction in the separator region of large scale magnetic structures.

  1. Mantle convection and the large scale structures of the Earth's gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    The connection between the observed large scale structure of the Earths' gravitational field, as represented by the GEM10 model, and the surface kinematic manifestations of plate tectonics, as represented by the absolute plate motion model of Minster and Jordan, is explored using a somewhat novel method of analysis. Two scalar derivatives of the field of surface plate velocities, namely the horizontal divergence and the radial vorticity, are computed from the plate motion data. These two scalars are respectively determined by the poloidal and toroidal scalars in terms of which any essentially solenoidal vector field may be completely represented. They provide a compact summary of the observed plate boundary types in nature, with oceanic ridges and trenches being essentially boundaries of divergence, and transform faults being essentially boundaries of vorticity.

  2. Large-Scale Recombinant Expression and Purification of Human Tyrosinase Suitable for Structural Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xuelei; Soler-Lopez, Montserrat; Wichers, Harry J.

    2016-01-01

    Human tyrosinase (TYR) is a glycoprotein that initiates the first two reactions in the melanin biosynthesis pathway. Mutations in its encoding gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism type I (OCA1), the most severe form of albinism, which is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by reduced or absent production of melanin in skin, hair and eyes. Despite extensive structural and characterization studies of its homologues in lower eukaryotic organisms, the catalytic mechanism of human TYR and the molecular basis of OCA1 are largely unknown. In this work, we have carried out a large-scale recombinant expression of TYR that has enabled us to obtain high yields of pure and active protein, required for crystallization trials and screening of skin whitening agents, which is highly demanded in the cosmetic industry. Addition of an N-terminal honeybee melittin signal peptide for secretion of the produced protein into the (protein-free) medium, as well as a cleavable His-tag at the C-terminus, was crucial for increasing the yield of pure protein. We have successfully crystallized two TYR variants, in both glycosylated and deglycosylated forms, showing preliminary X-ray diffraction patterns at 3.5 Å resolution. Hence, we have established an expression and purification protocol suitable for the crystal structure determination of human TYR, which will give unique atomic insight into the nature and conformation of the residues that shape the substrate binding pocket that will ultimately lead to efficient compound design. PMID:27551823

  3. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Lima, Nelson A.

    2017-02-01

    With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar-tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar-tensor modification of gravity.

  4. Large-scale gas kinematics and structure: An analysis of the Milky Way and NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Evan Scott

    2007-12-01

    This thesis quantitatively investigates the large-scale distribution and kinematics of gas in the Milky Way and other galaxies. Using the Leiden/ Argentine/Bonn (LAB) survey, I map the vertical structure of the Milky Way in atomic hydrogen. I reduce the complex structure of the warp to three simple Fourier spatial frequencies, and I show that the vertical oscillations known as "scalloping" are local rather than global. I then use unsharp masking to produce perturbed surface density and thickness maps of the outer Milky Way disk. These maps show the presence of spiral arms out to at least 25 kpc from the Galactic center, and demonstrate that overdensities in the surface density are coincident with regions of reduced gas thickness. Using interferometric observations from the VLA Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS) and the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS), I constrain the rotation curve of the inner Galaxy and its first two vertical derivatives. I use global and local models to find the falloff in the rotation curve from the plane is -22 ± 6 km s -1 kpc - 1 . This result is consistent with the falloff measured in the halos of other galaxies, but is too large to be explained by gravitational physics alone. I also present new observations of dense gas tracers in the central kiloparsec of NGC 6946 made with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). These observations spatially resolve the emission from HCN and HCO+ . I discuss two plausible hypotheses for the distribution of the dense gas.

  5. Using large scale structure to measure fNL , gNL and τNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Simone; Smith, Kendrick M.

    2015-02-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity of local type is known to produce a scale-dependent contribution to the galaxy bias. Several classes of multifield inflationary models predict non-Gaussian bias which is stochastic, in the sense that dark matter and halos do not trace each other perfectly on large scales. In this work, we forecast the ability of next-generation large-scale structure surveys to constrain common types of primordial non-Gaussianity like fNL, gNL and τNL using halo bias, including stochastic contributions. We provide fitting functions for statistical errors on these parameters which can be used for rapid forecasting or survey optimization. A next-generation survey with volume V =25 h-3 Gpc3 , median redshift z =0.7 and mean bias bg=2.5 can achieve σ (fNL)=6 , σ (gNL)=105 and σ (τNL)=103 if no mass information is available. If halo masses are available, we show that optimally weighting the halo field in order to reduce sample variance can achieve σ (fNL)=1.5 , σ (gNL)=104 and σ (τNL)=100 if halos with mass down to Mmin=1011h-1M⊙ are resolved, outperforming Planck by a factor of 4 on fNL and nearly an order of magnitude on gNL and τNL. Finally, we study the effect of photometric redshift errors and discuss degeneracies between different non-Gaussian parameters, as well as the impact of marginalizing Gaussian bias and shot noise.

  6. Complex networks, community structure, and catchment classification in a large-scale river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Koren; Sivakumar, Bellie; Woldemeskel, Fitsum M.

    2017-02-01

    This study introduces the concepts of complex networks, especially community structure, to classify catchments in large-scale river basins. The Mississippi River basin (MRB) is considered as a representative large-scale basin, and daily streamflow from a network of 1663 stations are analyzed. Six community structure methods are employed: edge betweenness, greedy algorithm, multilevel modularity optimization, leading eigenvector, label propagation, and walktrap. The influence of correlation threshold (i.e. spatial correlation in flow between stations) on classification (i.e. community formation) is examined. The consistency among the methods in classifying catchments is assessed, using a normalized mutual information (NMI) index. An attempt is also made to explain the community formation in terms of river network/branching and some important catchment/flow properties. The results indicate that the correlation threshold has a notable influence on the number and size of communities identified and that there is a high level of consistency in the performance among the methods (except for the leading eigenvector method at lower thresholds). The results also reveal that only a few communities combine to represent a majority of the catchments, with the 10 largest communities (roughly 4% of the total number of communities) representing almost two-thirds of the catchments. Community formation is found to be influenced not only by geographic proximity but also, more importantly, by the organization of the river network (i.e. main stem and subsequent branching). Some communities are found to exhibit a greater variability in catchment/flow properties within themselves when compared to that of the whole network, thus indicating that such characteristics are unlikely to be a significant influence on community grouping.

  7. Herschel view of the large-scale structure in the Chamaeleon dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Oliveira, C.; Schneider, N.; Merín, B.; Prusti, T.; Ribas, Á.; Cox, N. L. J.; Vavrek, R.; Könyves, V.; Arzoumanian, D.; Puga, E.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Kóspál, Á.; André, Ph.; Didelon, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Royer, P.; Waelkens, C.; Bontemps, S.; Winston, E.; Spezzi, L.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest star-forming sites and encompasses three molecular clouds (Cha I, II, and III) that have a different star-formation history, from quiescent (Cha III) to actively forming stars (Cha II), and one that reaches the end of star-formation (Cha I). Aims: We aim at characterising the large-scale structure of the three sub-regions of the Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex by analysing new far-infrared images taken with the Herschel Space Observatory. Methods: We derived column density and temperature maps using PACS and SPIRE observations from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey and applied several tools, such as filament tracing, power-spectra, Δ-variance, and probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the column density, to derive the physical properties. Results: The column density maps reveal a different morphological appearance for each of the three clouds, with a ridge-like structure for Cha I, a clump-dominated regime for Cha II, and an intricate filamentary network for Cha III. The filament width is measured to be about 0.12 ± 0.04 pc in the three clouds, and the filaments are found to be gravitationally unstable in Cha I and II, but mostly subcritical in Cha III. Faint filaments (striations) are prominent in Cha I and are mostly aligned with the large-scale magnetic field. The PDFs of all regions show a lognormal distribution at low column densities. For higher densities, the PDF of Cha I shows a turnover indicative of an extended higher density component and culminates in a power-law tail. Cha II shows a power-law tail with a slope characteristic of gravity. The PDF of Cha III can be best fit by a single lognormal. Conclusions: The turbulence properties of the three regions are found to be similar, pointing towards a scenario where the clouds are impacted by large-scale processes. The magnetic field might possibly play an important role for the star formation efficiency in the Chamaeleon clouds

  8. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, N.; White, B.R.; Lei, T.

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T`) were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T` large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T` structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T` structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T` structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T` structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. 11 refs.

  9. Study of Large-Scale Wave Structure and Development of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles Using the C/NOFS Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-31

    R.T., Multi-reflected echoes : Another ionogram signature of large-scale wave structure, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L01102, doi:10.1029/2008GL036221...model to relate multi-reflected echoes and satellite traces to large-scale wave structure, Geophys. Res. Lett., in press, 2012a. Tsunoda, R.T., On...Ram et al. [2011]). (a) Satellite tracks at the ionospheric penetration points (IPP) from each of the three stations. (b) Absolute TEC as a function

  10. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  11. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Karen J. I.; Calder, Grant M.; Hindle, Christopher R.; Newman, Jacob L.; Robinson, Simon N.; Avondo, Jerome J. H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale. PMID:28025317

  12. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2016-12-26

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale.

  13. Structure-preserving model reduction of large-scale logistics networks. Applications for supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz-Reiter, B.; Wirth, F.; Dashkovskiy, S.; Makuschewitz, T.; Schönlein, M.; Kosmykov, M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the problem of model reduction with a view to large-scale logistics networks, specifically supply chains. Such networks are modeled by means of graphs, which describe the structure of material flow. An aim of the proposed model reduction procedure is to preserve important features within the network. As a new methodology we introduce the LogRank as a measure for the importance of locations, which is based on the structure of the flows within the network. We argue that these properties reflect relative importance of locations. Based on the LogRank we identify subgraphs of the network that can be neglected or aggregated. The effect of this is discussed for a few motifs. Using this approach we present a meta algorithm for structure-preserving model reduction that can be adapted to different mathematical modeling frameworks. The capabilities of the approach are demonstrated with a test case, where a logistics network is modeled as a Jackson network, i.e., a particular type of queueing network.

  14. Development and Applications of a Modular Parallel Process for Large Scale Fluid/Structures Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A modular process that can efficiently solve large scale multidisciplinary problems using massively parallel super computers is presented. The process integrates disciplines with diverse physical characteristics by retaining the efficiency of individual disciplines. Computational domain independence of individual disciplines is maintained using a meta programming approach. The process integrates disciplines without affecting the combined performance. Results are demonstrated for large scale aerospace problems on several supercomputers. The super scalability and portability of the approach is demonstrated on several parallel computers.

  15. Development and Applications of a Modular Parallel Process for Large Scale Fluid/Structures Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A modular process that can efficiently solve large scale multidisciplinary problems using massively parallel supercomputers is presented. The process integrates disciplines with diverse physical characteristics by retaining the efficiency of individual disciplines. Computational domain independence of individual disciplines is maintained using a meta programming approach. The process integrates disciplines without affecting the combined performance. Results are demonstrated for large scale aerospace problems on several supercomputers. The super scalability and portability of the approach is demonstrated on several parallel computers.

  16. Model and controller reduction of large-scale structures based on projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildin, Eduardo

    The design of low-order controllers for high-order plants is a challenging problem theoretically as well as from a computational point of view. Frequently, robust controller design techniques result in high-order controllers. It is then interesting to achieve reduced-order models and controllers while maintaining robustness properties. Controller designed for large structures based on models obtained by finite element techniques yield large state-space dimensions. In this case, problems related to storage, accuracy and computational speed may arise. Thus, model reduction methods capable of addressing controller reduction problems are of primary importance to allow the practical applicability of advanced controller design methods for high-order systems. A challenging large-scale control problem that has emerged recently is the protection of civil structures, such as high-rise buildings and long-span bridges, from dynamic loadings such as earthquakes, high wind, heavy traffic, and deliberate attacks. Even though significant effort has been spent in the application of control theory to the design of civil structures in order increase their safety and reliability, several challenging issues are open problems for real-time implementation. This dissertation addresses with the development of methodologies for controller reduction for real-time implementation in seismic protection of civil structures using projection methods. Three classes of schemes are analyzed for model and controller reduction: nodal truncation, singular value decomposition methods and Krylov-based methods. A family of benchmark problems for structural control are used as a framework for a comparative study of model and controller reduction techniques. It is shown that classical model and controller reduction techniques, such as balanced truncation, modal truncation and moment matching by Krylov techniques, yield reduced-order controllers that do not guarantee stability of the closed-loop system, that

  17. Reconciling large- and small-scale structure in Twin Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilepina, Valentina; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2017-09-01

    We study possible extensions of the Twin Higgs model that solve the Hierarchy problem and simultaneously address problems of the large- and small-scale structures of the Universe. Besides naturally providing dark matter (DM) candidates as the lightest charged twin fermions, the twin sector contains a light photon and neutrinos, which can modify structure formation relative to the prediction from the ΛCDM paradigm. We focus on two viable scenarios. First, we study a Fraternal Twin Higgs model in which the spin-3/2 baryon \\widehat{Ω}˜ (\\widehat{b}\\widehat{b}\\widehat{b}) and the lepton twin tau \\widehat{τ} contribute to the dominant and subcomponent dark matter densities. A non-decoupled scattering between the twin tau and twin neutrino arising from a gauged twin lepton number symmetry provides a drag force that damps the density inhomogeneity of a dark matter subcomponent. Next, we consider the possibility of introducing a twin hydrogen atom Ĥ as the dominant DM component. After recombination, a small fraction of the twin protons and leptons remains ionized during structure formation, and their scattering to twin neutrinos through a gauged U(1) B-L force provides the mechanism that damps the density inhomogeneity. Both scenarios realize the Partially Acoustic dark matter (PAcDM) scenario and explain the σ 8 discrepancy between the CMB and weak lensing results. Moreover, the self-scattering neutrino behaves as a dark fluid that enhances the size of the Hubble rate H 0 to accommodate the local measurement result while satisfying the CMB constraint. For the small-scale structure, the scattering of \\widehat{Ω} 's and Ĥ's through the twin photon exchange generates a self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) model that solves the mass deficit problem from dwarf galaxy to galaxy cluster scales. Furthermore, when varying general choices of the twin photon coupling, bounds from the dwarf galaxy and the cluster merger observations can set an upper limit on the twin

  18. The Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Porto, Rafael A.; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory (LEFT) formalism for the study of cosmological large scale structures. Unlike the previous Eulerian-space construction, it is naturally formulated as an effective field theory of extended objects in Lagrangian space. In LEFT the resulting finite size effects are described using a multipole expansion parameterized by a set of time dependent coefficients and organized in powers of the ratio of the wavenumber of interest k over the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. The multipoles encode the effects of the short distance modes on the long-wavelength universe and absorb UV divergences when present. There are no IR divergences in LEFT. Some of the parameters that control the perturbative approach are not assumed to be small and can be automatically resummed. We present an illustrative one-loop calculation for a power law universe. We describe the dynamics both at the level of the equations of motion and through an action formalism.

  19. Screening and large-scale expression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Goehring, April; Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Wang, Kevin H; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Claxton, Derek P; Baconguis, Isabelle; Althoff, Thorsten; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K Christopher; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins are often hampered by difficulties in overexpression of the candidate molecule. Baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells (BacMam), although a powerful method to heterologously express membrane proteins, can be cumbersome for screening and expression of multiple constructs. We therefore developed plasmid Eric Gouaux (pEG) BacMam, a vector optimized for use in screening assays, as well as for efficient production of baculovirus and robust expression of the target protein. In this protocol, we show how to use small-scale transient transfection and fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) experiments using a GFP-His8-tagged candidate protein to screen for monodispersity and expression level. Once promising candidates are identified, we describe how to generate baculovirus, transduce HEK293S GnTI(-) (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I-negative) cells in suspension culture and overexpress the candidate protein. We have used these methods to prepare pure samples of chicken acid-sensing ion channel 1a (cASIC1) and Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) for X-ray crystallography, demonstrating how to rapidly and efficiently screen hundreds of constructs and accomplish large-scale expression in 4-6 weeks.

  20. Screening and large-scale expression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, April; Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Wang, Kevin H.; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Claxton, Derek P.; Baconguis, Isabelle; Althoff, Thorsten; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins are often hampered by difficulties in over-expression of the candidate molecule. Baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells (BacMam), although a powerful method to heterologously express membrane proteins, can be cumbersome for screening and expression of multiple constructs. We therefore developed plasmid Eric Gouaux (pEG) BacMam, a vector optimized for use in screening assays, as well as for efficient production of baculovirus and robust expression of the target protein. In this protocol we show how to use small-scale transient transfection and fluorescence-detection, size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) experiments using a GFP-His8 tagged candidate protein to screen for monodispersity and expression level. Once promising candidates are identified, we describe how to generate baculovirus, transduce HEK293S GnTI− (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I-negative) cells in suspension culture, and over-express the candidate protein. We have used these methods to prepare pure samples of chicken acid-sensing ion channel 1a (cASIC1) and Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl), for X-ray crystallography, demonstrating how to rapidly and efficiently screen hundreds of constructs and accomplish large-scale expression in 4-6 weeks. PMID:25299155

  1. The structure and large-scale organization of extreme cold waves over the conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zuowei; Black, Robert X.; Deng, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Extreme cold waves (ECWs) occurring over the conterminous United States (US) are studied through a systematic identification and documentation of their local synoptic structures, associated large-scale meteorological patterns (LMPs), and forcing mechanisms external to the US. Focusing on the boreal cool season (November-March) for 1950‒2005, a hierarchical cluster analysis identifies three ECW patterns, respectively characterized by cold surface air temperature anomalies over the upper midwest (UM), northwestern (NW), and southeastern (SE) US. Locally, ECWs are synoptically organized by anomalous high pressure and northerly flow. At larger scales, the UM LMP features a zonal dipole in the mid-tropospheric height field over North America, while the NW and SE LMPs each include a zonal wave train extending from the North Pacific across North America into the North Atlantic. The Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) in general simulates the three ECW patterns quite well and successfully reproduces the observed enhancements in the frequency of their associated LMPs. La Niña and the cool phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) favor the occurrence of NW ECWs, while the warm PDO phase, low Arctic sea ice extent and high Eurasian snow cover extent (SCE) are associated with elevated SE-ECW frequency. Additionally, high Eurasian SCE is linked to increases in the occurrence likelihood of UM ECWs.

  2. Large scale structure and galaxy disks as Lyman-alpha clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salpeter, Edwin E.

    1993-10-01

    Large-scale structure in the universe is enriched by two morphological categories, expanding 'clouds' of bound 'local groups' of galaxies and superclusters. Part of the complexity is due to a 'category overlap' in length scales, e.g., some galaxy pairs have a larger separation than the size of some rich compact groups. This essay includes conjectures on (presently unseen) galaxies, located in the Voids between superclusters, with highly extended gas disks (out to about 250 kpc) providing most of the Ly-alpha 'forest' absorption systems. The main postulate is a small central peak value N(max) of the mass surface density for the protodisks of these galaxies, which delays not only the recombination of hydrogen but also the phase transition from warm to cold neutral hydrogen. On this model, star formation starts only when the cold phase is reached, but then results in a violent starburst. If conditions are favorable, this burst results in a mild galactic wind (or a galactic fountain) which removes much of the inner gas disk, but leaves most of the outer disk intact; the ratio of the number of 'damped wing' to the number of forest lines is predicted to be much smaller at low redshifts than for z above 2.

  3. THREE-POINT PHASE CORRELATIONS: A NEW MEASURE OF NONLINEAR LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Wolstenhulme, Richard; Bonvin, Camille; Obreschkow, Danail

    2015-05-10

    We derive an analytical expression for a novel large-scale structure observable: the line correlation function. The line correlation function, which is constructed from the three-point correlation function of the phase of the density field, is a robust statistical measure allowing the extraction of information in the nonlinear and non-Gaussian regime. We show that, in perturbation theory, the line correlation is sensitive to the coupling kernel F{sub 2}, which governs the nonlinear gravitational evolution of the density field. We compare our analytical expression with results from numerical simulations and find a 1σ agreement for separations r ≳ 30 h{sup −1} Mpc. Fitting formulae for the power spectrum and the nonlinear coupling kernel at small scales allow us to extend our prediction into the strongly nonlinear regime, where we find a 1σ agreement with the simulations for r ≳ 2 h{sup −1} Mpc. We discuss the advantages of the line correlation relative to standard statistical measures like the bispectrum. Unlike the latter, the line correlation is independent of the bias, in the regime where the bias is local and linear. Furthermore, the variance of the line correlation is independent of the Gaussian variance on the modulus of the density field. This suggests that the line correlation can probe more precisely the nonlinear regime of gravity, with less contamination from the power spectrum variance.

  4. Measuring Lensing Magnification of Quasars by Large Scale Structure Using the Variability-Luminosity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Anne H.; Seitz, Stella; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R 200) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming Navarro-Frenk-White cluster profiles, particularly after accounting for the known uncertainty in the clusters' centers. Variability-based lensing measurements are a valuable complement to shape-based techniques because their systematic errors are very different, and also because the variability measurements are amenable to photometric errors of a few percent and to depths seen in current wide-field surveys. Given the volume data of the expected from current and upcoming surveys, this new technique has the potential to be competitive with weak lensing shear measurements of large-scale structure.

  5. LUMINOUS RED GALAXY HALO DENSITY FIELD RECONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION TO LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Spergel, David N.; Bode, Paul E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    The nontrivial relationship between observations of galaxy positions in redshift space and the underlying matter field complicates our ability to determine the linear theory power spectrum and extract cosmological information from galaxy surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalog has the potential to place powerful constraints on cosmological parameters. LRGs are bright, highly biased tracers of large-scale structure. However, because they are highly biased, the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies to the galaxy power spectrum is large and fingers-of-God (FOGs) are significant. The combination of these effects leads to a {approx}10% correction in the underlying power spectrum at k = 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {approx}40% correction at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} in the LRG P(k) analysis of Tegmark et al., thereby compromising the cosmological constraints when this potentially large correction is left as a free parameter. We propose an alternative approach to recovering the matter field from galaxy observations. Our approach is to use halos rather than galaxies to trace the underlying mass distribution. We identify FOGs and replace each FOG with a single halo object. This removes the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies, the one-halo term. We test our method on a large set of high-fidelity mock SDSS LRG catalogs and find that the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field deviates from the underlying matter power spectrum at the {<=}1% level for k {<=} 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {<=}4% at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}. The reconstructed halo density field also removes the bias in the measurement of the redshift space distortion parameter {beta} induced by the FOG smearing of the linear redshift space distortions.

  6. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  7. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Senatore, Leonardo; Schmittfull, Marcel E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2015-10-01

    Given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/k{sub NL}, where k is the wavenumber of interest and k{sub NL} is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k≅ 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} and k≅ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which k{sub NL} is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ{sub 8}=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k≅ 0.25 h Mpc{sup −1}, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k≅ 0.25 h Mpc{sup −1}, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  8. Determining large-scale heliospheric structure using ultraviolet resonance line observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Doyle T.

    1995-01-01

    Currently the Pioneer 10 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are beyond the orbit of Pluto, traveling outward from the Sun. Each is capable of detecting ultraviolet radiation resonantly scattered from hydrogen and helium atoms in the heliosphere and local interstellar medium. These observations are particularly well suited for the investigation of the large-scale heliospheric H and He distributions because the Voyager spacecraft are heading upstream, into the direction of local interstellar flow, whereas Pioneer 10 is heading downstream. Observations of the brightest resonance line, H Lyman-alpha, reveals that beyond about 20 AU from the Sun, upstream intensities decrease less quickly as a function of solar distance than downstream intensities. This implies that the heliospheric H distributions in the upstream and downstream directions are significantly different. Heliospheric H atoms originate in the local interstellar flow, and must penetrate through the heliospheric interface, where they are subject to charge exchange collisions with solar wind and interstellar protons. Models indicate that this process is probably responsible for the upstream/downstream difference in H Lyman-alpha. In addition, a recent spectroscopic determination of the H atom velocity distribution in the inner heliosphere implies a significant deceleration in the bulk flow speed of the heliospheric hydrogen gas relative to the helium flow, an effect that is also likely due to H-p charge exchange occurring in the upstream heliospheric interface region. In this presentation, recent heliospheric resonance line observations and their interpretations will be reviewed, focusing on their sensitivity to large-scale heliospheric structure.

  9. Determining large-scale heliospheric structure using ultraviolet resonance line observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Doyle T.

    1995-01-01

    Currently the Pioneer 10 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are beyond the orbit of Pluto, traveling outward from the Sun. Each is capable of detecting ultraviolet radiation resonantly scattered from hydrogen and helium atoms in the heliosphere and local interstellar medium. These observations are particularly well suited for the investigation of the large-scale heliospheric H and He distributions because the Voyager spacecraft are heading upstream, into the direction of local interstellar flow, whereas Pioneer 10 is heading downstream. Observations of the brightest resonance line, H Lyman-alpha, reveals that beyond about 20 AU from the Sun, upstream intensities decrease less quickly as a function of solar distance than downstream intensities. This implies that the heliospheric H distributions in the upstream and downstream directions are significantly different. Heliospheric H atoms originate in the local interstellar flow, and must penetrate through the heliospheric interface, where they are subject to charge exchange collisions with solar wind and interstellar protons. Models indicate that this process is probably responsible for the upstream/downstream difference in H Lyman-alpha. In addition, a recent spectroscopic determination of the H atom velocity distribution in the inner heliosphere implies a significant deceleration in the bulk flow speed of the heliospheric hydrogen gas relative to the helium flow, an effect that is also likely due to H-p charge exchange occurring in the upstream heliospheric interface region. In this presentation, recent heliospheric resonance line observations and their interpretations will be reviewed, focusing on their sensitivity to large-scale heliospheric structure.

  10. High Dimensional Classification of Structural MRI Alzheimer’s Disease Data Based on Large Scale Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Ramon; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Wagner, Benjamin; Williamson, Jeff; Shumaker, Sally A.; Maldjian, Joseph A.; Espeland, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we use a large scale regularization approach based on penalized logistic regression to automatically classify structural MRI images (sMRI) according to cognitive status. Its performance is illustrated using sMRI data from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) clinical database. We downloaded sMRI data from 98 subjects (49 cognitive normal and 49 patients) matched by age and sex from the ADNI website. Images were segmented and normalized using SPM8 and ANTS software packages. Classification was performed using GLMNET library implementation of penalized logistic regression based on coordinate-wise descent optimization techniques. To avoid optimistic estimates classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were determined based on a combination of three-way split of the data with nested 10-fold cross-validations. One of the main features of this approach is that classification is performed based on large scale regularization. The methodology presented here was highly accurate, sensitive, and specific when automatically classifying sMRI images of cognitive normal subjects and Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Higher levels of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were achieved for gray matter (GM) volume maps (85.7, 82.9, and 90%, respectively) compared to white matter volume maps (81.1, 80.6, and 82.5%, respectively). We found that GM and white matter tissues carry useful information for discriminating patients from cognitive normal subjects using sMRI brain data. Although we have demonstrated the efficacy of this voxel-wise classification method in discriminating cognitive normal subjects from AD patients, in principle it could be applied to any clinical population. PMID:22016732

  11. A Bayesian Estimate of the CMB-Large-scale Structure Cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura-Santos, E.; Carvalho, F. C.; Penna-Lima, M.; Novaes, C. P.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    Evidences for late-time acceleration of the universe are provided by multiple probes, such as Type Ia supernovae, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large-scale structure (LSS). In this work, we focus on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary CMB fluctuations generated by evolving gravitational potentials due to the transition between, e.g., the matter and dark energy (DE) dominated phases. Therefore, assuming a flat universe, DE properties can be inferred from ISW detections. We present a Bayesian approach to compute the CMB-LSS cross-correlation signal. The method is based on the estimate of the likelihood for measuring a combined set consisting of a CMB temperature and galaxy contrast maps, provided that we have some information on the statistical properties of the fluctuations affecting these maps. The likelihood is estimated by a sampling algorithm, therefore avoiding the computationally demanding techniques of direct evaluation in either pixel or harmonic space. As local tracers of the matter distribution at large scales, we used the Two Micron All Sky Survey galaxy catalog and, for the CMB temperature fluctuations, the ninth-year data release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9). The results show a dominance of cosmic variance over the weak recovered signal, due mainly to the shallowness of the catalog used, with systematics associated with the sampling algorithm playing a secondary role as sources of uncertainty. When combined with other complementary probes, the method presented in this paper is expected to be a useful tool to late-time acceleration studies in cosmology.

  12. Measuring Large-Scale Structure at z ~ 1 with the VIPERS galaxy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is the largest redshift survey ever conducted with the ESO telescopes. It has used the Very Large Telescope to collect nearly 100,000 redshifts from the general galaxy population at 0.5 < z < 1.2. With a combination of volume and high sampling density that is unique for these redshifts, it allows statistical measurements of galaxy clustering and related cosmological quantities to be obtained on an equal footing with classic results from local redshift surveys. At the same time, the simple magnitude-limited selection and the wealth of ancillary photometric data provide a general view of the galaxy population, its physical properties and the relation of the latter to large-scale structure. This paper presents an overview of the galaxy clustering results obtained so far, together with their cosmological implications. Most of these are based on the ~ 55,000 galaxies forming the first public data release (PDR-1). As of January 2015, observations and data reduction are complete and the final data set of more than 90,000 redshifts is being validated and made ready for the final investigations.

  13. Measuring large-scale structure with quasars in narrow-band filter surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramo, L. Raul; Strauss, Michael A.; Lima, Marcos; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Lazkoz, Ruth; Moles, Mariano; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; Sendra, Irene; Sodré, Laerte; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2012-07-01

    We show that a large-area imaging survey using narrow-band filters could detect quasars in sufficiently high number densities, and with more than sufficient accuracy in their photometric redshifts, to turn them into suitable tracers of large-scale structure. If a narrow-band optical survey can detect objects as faint as i= 23, it could reach volumetric number densities as high as 10-4 h3 Mpc-3 (comoving) at z˜ 1.5. Such a catalogue would lead to precision measurements of the power spectrum up to z˜ 3-4. We also show that it is possible to employ quasars to measure baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshifts, where the uncertainties from redshift distortions and non-linearities are much smaller than at z≲ 1. As a concrete example we study the future impact of the Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS), which is a narrow-band imaging survey in the optical over 1/5 of the unobscured sky with 42 filters of ˜100-Å full width at half-maximum. We show that J-PAS will be able to take advantage of the broad emission lines of quasars to deliver excellent photometric redshifts, σz≃ 0.002 (1 +z), for millions of objects.

  14. Non-detection of a statistically anisotropic power spectrum in large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Hirata, Christopher M. E-mail: chirata@tapir.caltech.edu

    2010-05-01

    We search a sample of photometric luminous red galaxies (LRGs) measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for a quadrupolar anisotropy in the primordial power spectrum, in which P( k-vector ) is an isotropic power spectrum P-bar (k) multiplied by a quadrupolar modulation pattern. We first place limits on the 5 coefficients of a general quadrupole anisotropy. We also consider axisymmetric quadrupoles of the form P( k-vector ) = P-bar (k)(1+g{sub *}[( k-circumflex ⋅ n-circumflex ){sup 2}−(1/3)]) where n-circumflex is the axis of the anisotropy. When we force the symmetry axis n-circumflex to be in the direction (l,b) = (94°,26°) identified in the recent Groeneboom et al. analysis of the cosmic microwave background, we find g{sub *} = 0.006±0.036 (1σ). With uniform priors on n-circumflex and g{sub *} we find that −0.41 < g{sub *} < +0.38 with 95% probability, with the wide range due mainly to the large uncertainty of asymmetries aligned with the Galactic Plane. In none of these three analyses do we detect evidence for quadrupolar power anisotropy in large scale structure.

  15. Evidence for Large-Scale Structure at z ~ 2.4 from Lyα Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, William C.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Waddington, Ian

    1999-12-01

    The history of large-scale structure depends on cosmological parameters and on how merging unfolds among both galaxies and groups. There has been recent evidence for clustering among Lyα emitters, Lyman-break galaxies, and Lyman absorbers. We present deep, wide-field medium-band imaging in redshifted Lyα of fields surrounding regions selected to have HST detections of faint Lyα emitters, over a range of surface densities, to characterize the large-scale environment. The radio galaxy 53W002 was previously found, using HST, to be part of a rich grouping at z=2.39, including ~5 spectroscopically confirmed, compact, lower luminosity star-forming objects. Our new data show this to be part of a larger structure traced by bright active nuclei, all contained within a projected span of 6.8‧ (3.2 Mpc). Of the 14 candidate emitters, six have been spectroscopically confirmed as active nuclei in the range z=2.390+/-0.008. Various statistical tests give a significance of 95%-99% for the reality of this structure on the sky. Our data thus strengthen the evidence for clustering at these redshifts. The grouping around 53W002 is more extended than a relaxed King model, at the 90% confidence level. This may be evidence either for a configuration that has yet to decouple fully from the Hubble expansion or for multiple subgroupings that will themselves at some point form a more compact, relaxed structure. The redshift range for measured members is comparable to the Hubble flow across the structure, which may imply that the structure is seen near turnaround and suggests that its mass cannot be derived from the velocity dispersion. We surveyed two additional 14' fields at z=2.4, each centered on an HST WFPC2 field that has been searched for faint Lyα emitters, as well as on three contiguous fields near 53W002 for objects at z~2.55. Only a single emitter consistent with showing Lyα at z~2.4 appears in these fields, to a somewhat brighter flux limit, while a total of six candidate

  16. Horizon Run 4 Simulation: Coupled Evolution of Galaxies and Large-Scale Structures of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Hong, Sungwook E.

    2015-08-01

    The Horizon Run 4 is a cosmological N-body simulation designed for the study of coupled evolution between galaxies and large-scale structures of the Universe, and for the test of galaxy formation models. Using 6300^3 gravitating particles in a cubic box of L_{box} = 3150 h^{-1} Mpc, we build a dense forest of halo merger trees to trace the halo merger history with a halo mass resolution scale down to M_s = 2.7 × 10^{11} h^{-1} M_⊙. We build a set of particle and halo data, which can serve as testbeds for comparison of cosmological models and gravitational theories with observations. We find that the FoF halo mass function shows a substantial deviation from the universal form with tangible redshift evolution of amplitude and shape. At higher redshifts, the amplitude of the mass function is lower, and the functional form is shifted toward larger values of ln (1/σ). We also find that the baryonic acoustic oscillation feature in the two-point correlation funct-ion of mock galaxies becomes broader with a peak position moving to smaller scales and the peak amplitude decreasing for increasing directional cosine mu compared to the linear predictions. From the halo merger trees built from halo data at 75 redshifts, we measure the half-mass epoch of halos and find that less massive halos tend to reach half of their current mass at higher redshifts. Simulation outputs including snapshot data, past lightcone space data, and halo merger data are available at http://sdss.kias.re.kr/astro/Horizon-Run4

  17. The Origin of the Large-Scale Structure in the Universe: Theoretical and Statistical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Yeinzon

    2005-07-01

    We review some theoretical and statistical aspects of the origin of the large-scale structure in the Universe, in view of the two most widely known and accepted scenarios: the inflaton and the curvaton scenarios. Among the theoretical aspects, we point out the impossibility of having a low inflationary energy scale in the simplest curvaton model. A couple of modifications to the simplest setup are explored, corresponding to the implementation of a second (thermal) inflationary period whose end makes the curvaton field `heavy', triggering either its oscillations or immediate decay. Low scale inflation is then possible to attain with H_ast being as low as 1 TeV. Among the statistical aspects, we study the bispectrum B_zeta(k_1,k_2,k_3) of the primordial curvature perturbation zeta whose normalisation fnl gives information about the level of non-gaussianity in zeta. In connection with fnl, several conserved and/or gauge invariant quantities described as the second-order curvature perturbation have been given in the literature. We review each of these quantities showing how to interpret one in terms of the others, and analyze the respective expected fnl in both the inflaton and the curvaton scenarios as well as in other less known models for the generation of primordial perturbations and/or non-gaussianities. The delta N formalism turns out to be a powerful technique to compute fnl in multi-component slow-roll inflation, as the knowledge of the evolution of some family of unperturbed universes is the only requirement. We present for the first time this formalism and apply it to selected examples.

  18. Investigation of Strain/Vorticity and Large-Scale Flow Structure in Turbulent Nonpremixed Jet Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    Our study will use the microgravity environment to investigate the underlying flow structure of turbulent nonpremixed round jet flames. In particular, we aim to investigate the large-scale turbulent structure using planar laser Mie scattering (PLMS), and the strain rate and vorticity fields using particle image velocimetry (PIV). This work is motivated by recent studies in our laboratory that have led to several interesting observations of nominally momentum-driven turbulent nonpremixed planar flames. First of all, the organized large-scale turbulent structures that are observed in nonreacting planar jets may be substantially modified or suppressed in nonpremixed planar jet flames. Furthermore, a recent study using PIV and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH has shown that in transitional and turbulent nonpremixed planar jet flames the presence of the flame seems to greatly influence the underlying vorticity and strain fields, as compared to nonreacting jets. For example, the reaction zones in the jet flames are strongly correlated with regions of high vorticity. A related study has demonstrated that vorticity is not correlated in the same way with either iso-scalar surfaces or scalar dissipation layers in nonreacting planar jets. Furthermore, the relationship between strain and the reaction zone appears to be modified by the presence of high levels of heat release. In particular, the strain rate field in planar jet flames exhibits a preferred direction of principal compressive strain that apparently is related to strong shear across the reaction zone. This preferred direction of strain was not observed in nonreacting jets. One of the major problems encountered when conducting these types of studies is that it is difficult to know to what extent buoyancy influences the results. Therefore, the microgravity environment provides us with an excellent opportunity to explore these issues without the complicating effects of buoyancy. This is particularly the case when

  19. A transient FETI methodology for large-scale parallel implicit computations in structural mechanics, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Crivelli, Luis

    1993-01-01

    Explicit codes are often used to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of large-scale structural systems, even for low frequency response, because the storage and CPU requirements entailed by the repeated factorizations traditionally found in implicit codes rapidly overwhelm the available computing resources. With the advent of parallel processing, this trend is accelerating because explicit schemes are also easier to parallellize than implicit ones. However, the time step restriction imposed by the Courant stability condition on all explicit schemes cannot yet and perhaps will never be offset by the speed of parallel hardware. Therefore, it is essential to develop efficient and robust alternatives to direct methods that are also amenable to massively parallel processing because implicit codes using unconditionally stable time-integration algorithms are computationally more efficient than explicit codes when simulating low-frequency dynamics. Here we present a domain decomposition method for implicit schemes that requires significantly less storage than factorization algorithms, that is several times faster than other popular direct and iterative methods, that can be easily implemented on both shared and local memory parallel processors, and that is both computationally and communication-wise efficient. The proposed transient domain decomposition method is an extension of the method of Finite Element Tearing and Interconnecting (FETI) developed by Farhat and Roux for the solution of static problems. Serial and parallel performance results on the CRAY Y-MP/8 and the iPSC-860/128 systems are reported and analyzed for realistic structural dynamics problems. These results establish the superiority of the FETI method over both the serial/parallel conjugate gradient algorithm with diagonal scaling and the serial/parallel direct method, and contrast the computational power of the iPSC-860/128 parallel processor with that of the CRAY Y-MP/8 system.

  20. A transient FETI methodology for large-scale parallel implicit computations in structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Crivelli, Luis; Roux, Francois-Xavier

    1992-01-01

    Explicit codes are often used to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of large-scale structural systems, even for low frequency response, because the storage and CPU requirements entailed by the repeated factorizations traditionally found in implicit codes rapidly overwhelm the available computing resources. With the advent of parallel processing, this trend is accelerating because explicit schemes are also easier to parallelize than implicit ones. However, the time step restriction imposed by the Courant stability condition on all explicit schemes cannot yet -- and perhaps will never -- be offset by the speed of parallel hardware. Therefore, it is essential to develop efficient and robust alternatives to direct methods that are also amenable to massively parallel processing because implicit codes using unconditionally stable time-integration algorithms are computationally more efficient when simulating low-frequency dynamics. Here we present a domain decomposition method for implicit schemes that requires significantly less storage than factorization algorithms, that is several times faster than other popular direct and iterative methods, that can be easily implemented on both shared and local memory parallel processors, and that is both computationally and communication-wise efficient. The proposed transient domain decomposition method is an extension of the method of Finite Element Tearing and Interconnecting (FETI) developed by Farhat and Roux for the solution of static problems. Serial and parallel performance results on the CRAY Y-MP/8 and the iPSC-860/128 systems are reported and analyzed for realistic structural dynamics problems. These results establish the superiority of the FETI method over both the serial/parallel conjugate gradient algorithm with diagonal scaling and the serial/parallel direct method, and contrast the computational power of the iPSC-860/128 parallel processor with that of the CRAY Y-MP/8 system.

  1. Characteristics of large-scale wave structure observed from African and Southeast Asian longitudinal sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Tsunoda, R. T.; Chau, H. D.; Hoang, T. L.; Damtie, B.; Wassaie, M.; Yatini, C. Y.; Manik, T.; Tsugawa, T.

    2014-03-01

    The spatial large-scale wave structure (LSWS) at the base of F layer is the earliest manifestation of seed perturbation for Rayleigh-Taylor instability, hence, found to play a deterministic role in the development of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). Except for a few case studies, a comprehensive investigation has not been conducted on the characteristics of LSWS because of the complexity involved in detecting the LSWS, particularly, in spatial domain. In this scenario, a comprehensive study is carried out, for the first time, on the spatial and temporal characteristics of LSWS observed in spatial domain over African and Southeast Asian longitudinal sectors during the year 2011. The observations indicate that these wave structures can be detected a few degrees west of E region sunset terminator and found to grow significantly at longitudes past the sunset terminator. The phase fronts of these spatial structures are found to align with the geomagnetic field (B→) lines over a latitudinal belt for at least 5-6° (~500-600 km) centered on dip equator. The zonal wavelengths of these structures are found to vary from 100 to 700 km, which is consistent with the earlier reports, and the EPBs were consistently observed when the amplitudes of LSWS were grown to sufficient strengths. These results would provide better insights on the underlying physical processes involved in excitation of LSWS in terms of important roles being played by E region electrical loading and polarization electric fields induced via spatially varying dynamo current due to neutral wind perturbations associated with atmospheric gravity waves.

  2. Visualisation and graph-theoretic analysis of a large-scale protein structural interactome

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Dan; Dafas, Panos; Harrington, Richard; Park, Jong; Schroeder, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Background Large-scale protein interaction maps provide a new, global perspective with which to analyse protein function. PSIMAP, the Protein Structural Interactome Map, is a database of all the structurally observed interactions between superfamilies of protein domains with known three-dimensional structure in the PDB. PSIMAP incorporates both functional and evolutionary information into a single network. Results We present a global analysis of PSIMAP using several distinct network measures relating to centrality, interactivity, fault-tolerance, and taxonomic diversity. We found the following results: Centrality: we show that the center and barycenter of PSIMAP do not coincide, and that the superfamilies forming the barycenter relate to very general functions, while those constituting the center relate to enzymatic activity. Interactivity: we identify the P-loop and immunoglobulin superfamilies as the most highly interactive. We successfully use connectivity and cluster index, which characterise the connectivity of a superfamily's neighbourhood, to discover superfamilies of complex I and II. This is particularly significant as the structure of complex I is not yet solved. Taxonomic diversity: we found that highly interactive superfamilies are in general taxonomically very diverse and are thus amongst the oldest. Fault-tolerance: we found that the network is very robust as for the majority of superfamilies removal from the network will not break up the network. Conclusions Overall, we can single out the P-loop containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases superfamily as it is the most highly connected and has the highest taxonomic diversity. In addition, this superfamily has the highest interaction rank, is the barycenter of the network (it has the shortest average path to every other superfamily in the network), and is an articulation vertex, whose removal will disconnect the network. More generally, we conclude that the graph-theoretic and taxonomic analysis of

  3. Design of decentralised variable structure observer for mismatched nonlinear uncertain large-scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Jeng

    2011-03-01

    Although the state feedback approach is quite popular in control engineering, it cannot be used while the system states cannot be measured. The state observer approach may be used to overcome such a shortcoming. Also, most control systems have become larger and more complicated; therefore, based on the variable structure control theory, a new decentralised variable structure observer (DVSO) for a class of nonlinear large-scale systems with mismatched uncertainties will be considered in this article. The switching surface function is determined such that the equivalent system will have the desired behaviour once the system reaches the switching surface. And then a new DVSO is designed such that the estimated states will approach the system states. Using the Lyapunov stability theory and using the generalised matrix inverse concept, the uncertain nonlinear error system trajectories can be driven onto the sliding manifold and then the existence of a sliding mode and the attractiveness to the sliding surface is ensured. With the proposed DVSO, the estimation errors asymptotically tend to zero if the matching condition is satisfied, and the effects of the mismatched parts can be uniformly ultimately bounded if the matching condition is not satisfied. Finally, a numerical example with a succession of computer simulations is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Neural Schematics as a unified formal graphical representation of large-scale Neural Network Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Matthias; Schüffny, René

    2013-01-01

    One of the major outcomes of neuroscientific research are models of Neural Network Structures (NNSs). Descriptions of these models usually consist of a non-standardized mixture of text, figures, and other means of visual information communication in print media. However, as neuroscience is an interdisciplinary domain by nature, a standardized way of consistently representing models of NNSs is required. While generic descriptions of such models in textual form have recently been developed, a formalized way of schematically expressing them does not exist to date. Hence, in this paper we present Neural Schematics as a concept inspired by similar approaches from other disciplines for a generic two dimensional representation of said structures. After introducing NNSs in general, a set of current visualizations of models of NNSs is reviewed and analyzed for what information they convey and how their elements are rendered. This analysis then allows for the definition of general items and symbols to consistently represent these models as Neural Schematics on a two dimensional plane. We will illustrate the possibilities an agreed upon standard can yield on sampled diagrams transformed into Neural Schematics and an example application for the design and modeling of large-scale NNSs. PMID:24167490

  5. Large scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer and their imprint on wall shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a turbulent boundary layer developing on a flat plate model under zero pressure gradient flow. A MEMS differential capacitive shear stress sensor with a 1 mm × 1 mm floating element was used to capture the fluctuating wall shear stress simultaneously with streamwise velocity measurements from a hot-wire anemometer traversed in the wall normal direction. Near the wall, the peak in the cross correlation corresponds to an organized motion inclined 45° from the wall. In the outer region, the peak diminishes in value, but is still significant at a distance greater than half the boundary layer thickness, and corresponds to a structure inclined 14° from the wall. High coherence between the two signals was found for the low-frequency content, reinforcing the belief that large scale structures have a vital impact on wall shear stress. Thus, estimation of the wall shear stress from the low-frequency velocity signal will be performed, and is expected to be statistically significant in the outer boundary layer. Additionally, conditionally averaged mean velocity profiles will be presented to assess the effects of high and low shear stress. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  6. Micrometer scale guidance of mesenchymal stem cells to form structurally oriented large-scale tissue engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chih-Ling; Rivera, Alexander L; Williams, Valencia; Welter, Jean F; Mansour, Joseph M; Drazba, Judith A; Sakai, Takao; Baskaran, Harihara

    2017-09-15

    Current clinical methods to treat articular cartilage lesions provide temporary relief of the symptoms but fail to permanently restore the damaged tissue. Tissue engineering, using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with scaffolds and bioactive factors, is viewed as a promising method for repairing cartilage injuries. However, current tissue engineered constructs display inferior mechanical properties compared to native articular cartilage, which could be attributed to the lack of structural organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of these engineered constructs in comparison to the highly oriented structure of articular cartilage ECM. We previously showed that we can guide MSCs undergoing chondrogenesis to align using microscale guidance channels on the surface of a two-dimensional (2-D) collagen scaffold, which resulted in the deposition of aligned ECM within the channels and enhanced mechanical properties of the constructs. In this study, we developed a technique to roll 2-D collagen scaffolds containing MSCs within guidance channels in order to produce a large-scale, three-dimensional (3-D) tissue engineered cartilage constructs with enhanced mechanical properties compared to current constructs. After rolling the MSC-scaffold constructs into a 3-D cylindrical structure, the constructs were cultured for 21days under chondrogenic culture conditions. The microstructure architecture and mechanical properties of the constructs were evaluated using imaging and compressive testing. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the constructs showed extensive glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II deposition. Second harmonic generation imaging and Picrosirius red staining indicated alignment of neo-collagen fibers within the guidance channels of the constructs. Mechanical testing indicated that constructs containing the guidance channels displayed enhanced compressive properties compared to control constructs without these channels. In conclusion, using a novel

  7. Large-Scale Structures in the Zone of Avoidance: The Galactic Anticenter Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Nanyao Y.; Freudling, Wolfram

    1995-01-01

    We have selected a sample of 876 galaxy candidates from the IRAS Point Source Catalog in the region of 2(exp h) < alpha < 10(exp h) and 0 deg < delta < 36 deg, which crosses the Galactic anticenter part of the Zone of Avoidance (ZOA) and includes most of the highly obscured Orion-Taurus complex region. We have identified galaxies among the candidate sources by attempting to detect the 21 cm H I line of those sources which were not known to be galaxies at the beginning of the survey. In this manner, we constructed a galaxy sample which is largely free from Galactic reddening. Of the 272 observed candidates, 89 were detected in the H I line up to a heliocentric velocity of v(sub h) approximately 16,000 km/s. The resulting galaxy sample of 717 galaxies is fairly complete (within about 10%) and uniform (within about 4%) in the part of the survey area 10 deg away from the Galactic plane and for velocities up to at least 9000 km/s. This provides, for the first time, a largely unbiased view on the large-scale structures in much of the survey area. Our main results are the following: (1) Several large voids are identified. In particular, a void between alpha approximately equals 3(sup h) and 4(sup h), up to v(sub h) approximately 6000 km/s, separates the Pisces-Perseus supercluster at alpha < 3(sup h) from structures at alpha > 4(sup h); and a "nearby void" occupies most of our survey area and reaches out to a redshift of nearly 3000 km/s. (2) We found no nearby galaxy concentration that could significantly contribute to the "Local Velocity Anomoly" (LVA), but a general excess of galaxies around v(sub h) approximately 5000 km/s in the survey area. (3) The contrast between the "Great Wall" at v(sub h) approximately 8500 km/s and the void in front of it appears to gradually diffuse out after it enters the Zone of Avoidance from the northern Galactic hemisphere. (4) Our data combined with other galaxy surveys in or near the Galactic anticenter part of the ZOA suggest that the

  8. Morphology and large-scale structure within the Horologium-Reticulum supercluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleenor, Matthew Clay

    We have undertaken a comprehensive spectroscopic survey of the Horologium-Reticulum supercluster (HRS) of galaxies. With a concentration on the intercluster regions, our goal is to resolve the "cosmic web" of filaments, voids, and sheets within the HRS and to examine the interrelationship between them. What are the constituents of the HRS? What can be understood about the formation of such a behemoth from these current constituents? More locally, are there small-scale imprints of the larger, surrounding environment, and can we relate the two with any confidence? What is the relationship between the HRS and the other superclusters in the nearby universe? These are the questions driving our inquiry. To answer them, we have obtained over 2500 galaxy redshifts in the direction of the intercluster regions in the HRS. Specifically, we have developed a sample of galaxies with a limiting brightness of bJ < 17.5, which samples the galaxy luminosity function down to one magnitude below M* at the mean redshift of the HRS, z¯ ≈ 0.06. Exclusively, these intercluster redshifts were obtained with the six-degree field (6dF), multi-fiber spectrograph at the Anglo-Australian Observatory. In conjunction with the wide-field, 1.2m UK Schmidt, 6dF is the ideal supercluster observatory. Because it deploys the 150 fiber buttons over a 6-degree field, we are able to obtain coherent information over large areas of the sky, as is the case with a supercluster. In addition, we have obtained a complete sample of mean cluster redshifts and velocity dispersions for Abell clusters in the HRS using the Australian National University/2.3m, primarily. For most of the clusters, more than 10 galaxies were observed, and a reliable mean cluster redshift is determined. Furthermore, we have a near complete sample of bJ < 18.6 galaxies over a 4° x 4° region that encompasses several HRS clusters. With these datasets, we are able to "piece" together various structures over a large range of scales. We

  9. An Ag-grid/graphene hybrid structure for large-scale, transparent, flexible heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junmo; Jang, Yonghee; Kim, Youngsoo; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Suhr, Jonghwan; Hong, Byung Hee; Choi, Jae-Boong; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-04-01

    Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non-vacuum, maskless, and low-temperature environment. The hybrid electrode offers an effective and simple route for achieving a sheet resistance as low as ~4 Ω per square with ~78% optical transmittance. Finally, we demonstrate that transparent flexible heaters based on the hybrid conductive films could be used in a vehicle or a smart window system.Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non

  10. Large-scale sequence and structural comparisons of human naive and antigen-experienced antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Brandon J.; Lungu, Oana I.; Park, Daechan; Johnson, Erik L.; Charab, Wissam; Chrysostomou, Constantine; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ellington, Andrew D.; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Georgiou, George

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating how antigen exposure and selection shape the human antibody repertoire is fundamental to our understanding of B-cell immunity. We sequenced the paired heavy- and light-chain variable regions (VH and VL, respectively) from large populations of single B cells combined with computational modeling of antibody structures to evaluate sequence and structural features of human antibody repertoires at unprecedented depth. Analysis of a dataset comprising 55,000 antibody clusters from CD19+CD20+CD27− IgM-naive B cells, >120,000 antibody clusters from CD19+CD20+CD27+ antigen–experienced B cells, and >2,000 RosettaAntibody-predicted structural models across three healthy donors led to a number of key findings: (i) VH and VL gene sequences pair in a combinatorial fashion without detectable pairing restrictions at the population level; (ii) certain VH:VL gene pairs were significantly enriched or depleted in the antigen-experienced repertoire relative to the naive repertoire; (iii) antigen selection increased antibody paratope net charge and solvent-accessible surface area; and (iv) public heavy-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3) antibodies in the antigen-experienced repertoire showed signs of convergent paired light-chain genetic signatures, including shared light-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-L3) amino acid sequences and/or Vκ,λ–Jκ,λ genes. The data reported here address several longstanding questions regarding antibody repertoire selection and development and provide a benchmark for future repertoire-scale analyses of antibody responses to vaccination and disease. PMID:27114511

  11. Bayesian reconstruction of the cosmological large-scale structure: methodology, inverse algorithms and numerical optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, F. S.; Enßlin, T. A.

    2008-09-01

    We address the inverse problem of cosmic large-scale structure reconstruction from a Bayesian perspective. For a linear data model, a number of known and novel reconstruction schemes, which differ in terms of the underlying signal prior, data likelihood and numerical inverse extraregularization schemes are derived and classified. The Bayesian methodology presented in this paper tries to unify and extend the following methods: Wiener filtering, Tikhonov regularization, ridge regression, maximum entropy and inverse regularization techniques. The inverse techniques considered here are the asymptotic regularization, the Jacobi, Steepest Descent, Newton-Raphson, Landweber-Fridman and both linear and non-linear Krylov methods based on Fletcher-Reeves, Polak-Ribière and Hestenes-Stiefel conjugate gradients. The structures of the up-to-date highest performing algorithms are presented, based on an operator scheme, which permits one to exploit the power of fast Fourier transforms. Using such an implementation of the generalized Wiener filter in the novel ARGO software package, the different numerical schemes are benchmarked with one-, two- and three-dimensional problems including structured white and Poissonian noise, data windowing and blurring effects. A novel numerical Krylov scheme is shown to be superior in terms of performance and fidelity. These fast inverse methods ultimately will enable the application of sampling techniques to explore complex joint posterior distributions. We outline how the space of the dark matter density field, the peculiar velocity field and the power spectrum can jointly be investigated by a Gibbs-sampling process. Such a method can be applied for the redshift distortions correction of the observed galaxies and for time-reversal reconstructions of the initial density field.

  12. Deep Imaging of large scale extensional structures in the SW South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yao; Delescluse, Matthias; Wang, Jun; Pubellier, Manuel; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Qiu, Yan; Savva, Dimitri; Meresse, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest marginal basin in SE Asia and exhibits hundreds of kilometres of extended continental crust on both conjugate margins. The structures and processes leading to the formation of the SCS are still debated at various levels (timing, mechanisms). A joint collaboration between French and Chinese scientists led to the acquisition of coincident refraction and reflection seismic data over the SW sub-basin. In 2011, a 1000-km-long refraction line was first shot using R/V Tan Bao and 50 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS). Among the results was the homogeneous thickness (~12 km) of the thinned continental crust over hundreds of kilometres and the possible large scale normal faults rooting in a ductile lower crust which could explain the relatively flat Moho. The coincident multichannel seismic (MCS) profile is now available to us. The 1000-km-long MCS line was acquired using a ~7000 cu.in. tuned airgun array and 6 to 8 km long streamers. Here we focus on a 230-km-long section of the profile to the south of the V-shaped SW oceanic basin across Spratley Islands. Multiples attenuation and high density velocity analysis are performed to obtain a detailed imaging of the sediments and crust at depth. We apply pre-stack Kirchhoff time migration and superimpose the obtained reflectivity on the refraction velocity model. The processed section includes a basin bound by a large crustal normal fault already imaged in the refraction velocity model, although no information on the basement was used to model the refraction velocities. The results validate the interpretation of the refraction velocity lateral variations and emphasize the significant vertical offsets of the large scale normal faults. Deep crustal reflectivity may give additional hints at a lower crustal ductile flow. Future work will consist in using the geometry of the MCS profiles in the refraction velocity modelling and an attempt to use more advanced migration methods with the help of

  13. Dynamic Arrest in Charged Colloidal Systems Exhibiting Large-Scale Structural Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Perez, C.; Callejas-Fernandez, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.; Rojas-Ochoa, L. F.; Castaneda-Priego, R.; Quesada-Perez, M.; Trappe, V.

    2009-01-09

    Suspensions of charged liposomes are found to exhibit typical features of strongly repulsive fluid systems at short length scales, while exhibiting structural heterogeneities at larger length scales that are characteristic of attractive systems. We model the static structure factor of these systems using effective pair interaction potentials composed of a long-range attraction and a shorter range repulsion. Our modeling of the static structure yields conditions for dynamically arrested states at larger volume fractions, which we find to agree with the experimentally observed dynamics.

  14. Error analysis and system implementation for structured light stereo vision 3D geometric detection in large scale condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Zhu, Fan

    2012-11-01

    Stereo vision based 3D metrology technique is an effective approach for relatively large scale object's 3D geometric detection. In this paper, we present a specified image capture system, which implements LVDS interface embedded CMOS sensor and CAN bus to ensure synchronous trigger and exposure. We made an error analysis for structured light vision measurement in large scale condition, based on which we built and tested the system prototype both indoor and outfield. The result shows that the system is very suitable for large scale metrology applications.

  15. A Strong-Lens Survey in AEGIS: the Influence of Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Marshall, Phil J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hopkins, Andrew; Koekemoer, Anton; Konidaris, Nicholas P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Willmer, Christopher N.A.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-07-14

    We report on the results of a visual search for galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses over 650 arcmin2 of HST/ACS imaging in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). These deep F606W- and F814W-band observations are in the DEEP2-EGS field. In addition to a previously-known Einstein Cross also found by our search (the ''Cross'', HSTJ141735+52264, with z{sub lens} = 0.8106 and a published z{sub source} = 3.40), we identify two new strong galaxy-galaxy lenses with multiple extended arcs. The first, HSTJ141820+52361 (the ''Dewdrop''; z{sub lens} = 0.5798), lenses two distinct extended sources into two pairs of arcs (z{sub source} = 0.9818 by nebular [O{sub II}] emission), while the second, HSTJ141833+52435 (the ''Anchor''; z{sub lens} = 0.4625), produces a single pair of arcs (source redshift not yet known). Four less convincing arc/counter-arc and two-image lens candidates are also found and presented for completeness. All three definite lenses are fit reasonably well by simple singular isothermal ellipsoid models including external shear, giving {chi}{sub {nu}}{sup 2}values close to unity. Using the three-dimensional line-of-sight (LOS) information on galaxies from the DEEP2 data, we calculate the convergence and shear contributions {kappa}{sub los} and {gamma}{sub los} to each lens, assuming singular isothermal sphere halos truncated at 200 h{sup -1} kpc. These are compared against a robust measure of local environment, {delta}{sub 3}, a normalized density that uses the distance to the third nearest neighbor. We find that even strong lenses in demonstrably underdense local environments may be considerably affected by LOS contributions, which in turn, under the adopted assumptions, may be underestimates of the effect of large scale structure.

  16. The Structure and Large-Scale Organization of Extreme Cold Waves over the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z.; Black, R. X.; Deng, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme cold waves (ECWs) occurring over the conterminous United States (US) are investigated through a systematic identification and documentation of their synoptic structures, associated large-scale meteorological patterns (LMPs), and relevant planetary wave patterns driven by forcing mechanisms external to the US. Three boreal-cool-season ECW patterns are identified via a hierarchical clustering analysis, characterized by cold surface air temperature anomalies over the upper midwest (UM), northwestern (NW), and southeastern (SE) US, respectively. Locally, ECWs are synoptically organized by anomalous high pressure and northerly flow. At larger scales, the UM-ECW LMP features a zonal dipole in the mid-tropospheric height field over North America, while the NW- and SE-ECW LMPs are each characterized by a zonal wave train extending from the North Pacific across North America into the North Atlantic. The Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) in general well simulates the three ECW patterns and successfully replicates the observed enhancement in the frequency of their associated LMPs. The SE-ECWs are linked to a mid-tropospheric planetary wave pattern resembling the negative phase of the northern annular mode (NAM¯), whereas the UM- and NW-ECWs are related to a zonal wavenumber 1 pattern. La Niña and the cool phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) favor the occurrence of NW-ECWs via the zonal wavenumber 1 pattern, while the warm PDO phase, low Arctic sea ice extent and high Eurasian snow cover extent (SCE) are partly responsible for elevated SE-ECW frequency via the NAM¯-like pattern. Additionally, high Eurasian SCE increases the occurrence likelihood of UM-ECWs.

  17. The EFT of Large Scale Structures at all redshifts: analytical predictions for lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Simon; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    We study the prediction of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) for the matter power spectrum at different redshifts. In previous work, we found that the two-loop prediction can match the nonlinear power spectrum measured from N-body simulations at redshift zero within approximately 2% up to k~ 0.6 h Mpc-1 after fixing a single free parameter, the so-called "speed of sound". We determine the time evolution of this parameter by matching the EFTofLSS prediction to simulation output at different redshifts, and find that it is well-described by a fitting function that only includes one additional parameter. After the two free parameters are fixed, the prediction agrees with nonlinear data within approximately 2% up to at least k~ 1 h Mpc-1 at z>= 1, and also within approximately 5% up to k~ 1.2 h Mpc-1 at z=1 and k~ 2.3 h Mpc-1 at z=3, a major improvement with respect to other perturbative techniques. We also develop an accurate way to estimate where the EFTofLSS predictions at different loop orders should fail, based on the sizes of the next-order terms that are neglected, and find agreement with the actual comparisons to data. Finally, we use our matter power spectrum results to perform analytical calculations of lensing potential power spectra corresponding to both CMB and galaxy lensing. This opens the door to future direct applications of the EFTofLSS to observations of gravitational clustering on cosmic scales.

  18. THE COSMIC HISTORY OF THE SPIN OF DARK MATTER HALOS WITHIN THE LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Trowland, Holly E.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-01-10

    We use N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the orientation and magnitude of dark matter halo angular momentum within the large-scale structure since z = 3. We look at the evolution of the alignment of halo spins with filaments and with each other, as well as the spin parameter, which is a measure of the magnitude of angular momentum. It was found that the angular momentum vectors of dark matter halos at high redshift have a weak tendency to be orthogonal to filaments and high-mass halos have a stronger orthogonal alignment than low-mass halos. Since z = 1, the spins of low-mass halos have become weakly aligned parallel to filaments, whereas high-mass halos kept their orthogonal alignment. This recent parallel alignment of low-mass halos casts doubt on tidal torque theory as the sole mechanism for the buildup of angular momentum. We see evidence for bulk flows and the broadening of filaments over time in the alignments of halo spin and velocities. We find a significant alignment of the spin of neighboring dark matter halos only at very small separations, r < 0.3 Mpc h {sup -1}, which is driven by substructure. A correlation of the spin parameter with halo mass is confirmed at high redshift.

  19. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengaly, C. A. P., Jr.; Bernui, A.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Xavier, H. S.; Novaes, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is A = 0.0507 ± 0.0014 towards the (l, b) = (323°, -5°) direction, whose result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues. Furthermore, this dipole amplitude is statistically consistent (p-value = 0.061) with mock catalogues simulated according to the expected Λ cold dark matter density fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage and anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy in the LSS, given the limitations and systematics of current data, in the concordance model scenario.

  20. Principal shapes and squeezed limits in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Solon, Mikhail P.

    2016-11-01

    We apply an orthogonalization procedure on the effective field theory of large scale structure (EFT of LSS) shapes, relevant for the angle-averaged bispectrum and non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum at one loop. Assuming natural-sized EFT parameters, this identifies a linear combination of EFT shapes—referred to as the principal shape—that gives the dominant contribution for the whole kinematic plane, with subdominant combinations suppressed by a few orders of magnitude. For the covariance, our orthogonal transformation is in excellent agreement with a principal component analysis applied to available data. Additionally we find that, for both observables, the coefficients of the principal shapes are well approximated by the EFT coefficients appearing in the squeezed limit, and are thus measurable from power spectrum response functions. Employing data from N-body simulations for the growth-only response, we measure the single EFT coefficient describing the angle-averaged bispectrum with 𝒪(10%) precision. These methods of shape orthogonalization and measurement of coefficients from response functions are valuable tools for developing the EFT of LSS framework, and can be applied to more general observables.

  1. Variations of cosmic large-scale structure covariance matrices across parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, Robert; Kiessling, Alina; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-03-01

    The likelihood function for cosmological parameters, given by e.g. weak lensing shear measurements, depends on contributions to the covariance induced by the non-linear evolution of the cosmic web. As highly non-linear clustering to date has only been described by numerical N-body simulations in a reliable and sufficiently precise way, the necessary computational costs for estimating those covariances at different points in parameter space are tremendous. In this work, we describe the change of the matter covariance and the weak lensing covariance matrix as a function of cosmological parameters by constructing a suitable basis, where we model the contribution to the covariance from non-linear structure formation using Eulerian perturbation theory at third order. We show that our formalism is capable of dealing with large matrices and reproduces expected degeneracies and scaling with cosmological parameters in a reliable way. Comparing our analytical results to numerical simulations, we find that the method describes the variation of the covariance matrix found in the SUNGLASS weak lensing simulation pipeline within the errors at one-loop and tree-level for the spectrum and the trispectrum, respectively, for multipoles up to ℓ ≤ 1300. We show that it is possible to optimize the sampling of parameter space where numerical simulations should be carried out by minimizing interpolation errors and propose a corresponding method to distribute points in parameter space in an economical way.

  2. The Large Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field and High Energy Cosmic Ray Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Stanev, Todor

    2006-10-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field in our Galaxy are complex and usually difficult to interpret. A spiral regular field in the disk is favored by observations, however the number of field reversals is still under debate. Measurements of the parity of the field across the Galactic plane are also very difficult due to the presence of the disk field itself. In this work we demonstrate that cosmic ray protons in the energy range 1018 to 1019eV, if accelerated near the center of the Galaxy, are sensitive to the large scale structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field (GMF). In particular if the field is of even parity, and the spiral field is bi-symmetric (BSS), ultra high energy protons will predominantly come from the Southern Galactic hemisphere, and predominantly from the Northern Galactic hemisphere if the field is of even parity and axi-symmetric (ASS). There is no sensitivity to the BSS or ASS configurations if the field is of odd parity.

  3. Large scale dynamical structure measured over the South Pole, 2001-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, S. E.; Iimura, H.; South Pole Team

    In January 2001 the University of Colorado in conjunction with the Institute for Experimental Meteorology in Obninsk Russia installed a new 46.3MHz all-sky meteor radar system at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. This system utilizes a single transmitter and receiver with multiple data acquisitions systems. These data acquisition systems are adapted from the Colorado Obninsk Radar system (COBRA) and the Meteor Echo Detection and Collection system (MEDAC). Because of its unique location at the rotational pole of the Earth this system has the ability to measure the meridional winds at four distinct longitudes around the pole. Utilizing these measurements the spatial structure including zonal wavenumber and direction of propagation can be determined for disturbances in the vicinity of the pole. Results for the large-scale dynamical features observed over the pole including the migrating diurnal and nonmigrating semidiurnal tides will be presented. With observations spanning multiple years it is now possible to investigate the interannual variability of these features over the pole. These results will be compared with previous meteor radar measurements made at the South Pole in 1996 and 1997.

  4. Comparison of CMB lensing efficiency of gravitational waves and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2013-09-01

    We provide a detailed treatment and comparison of the weak lensing effects due to large scale structure (LSS), or scalar density perturbations and those due to gravitational waves (GWs) or tensor perturbations, on the temperature and polarization power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We carry out the analysis both in real space by using the correlation function method, as well as in the spherical harmonic space. We find an intriguing similarity between the lensing kernels associated with LSS lensing and GW lensing. It is found that the lensing kernels only differ in relative negative signs and their form is very reminiscent of even and odd parity bipolar spherical harmonic coefficients. Through a numerical study of these lensing kernels, we establish that lensing due to GW is more efficient at distorting the CMB spectra as compared to LSS lensing, particularly for the polarization power spectra. Finally we argue that the CMB B-mode power spectra measurements can be used to place interesting constraints on GW energy densities.

  5. Cosmological Shock Waves in the Large Scale Structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renyi; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung

    2013-01-01

    Based on the cosmological hydrodynamic simulation, we study the properties of shock waves formed during the formation of the large scale structure (LSS) of the universe, and investigate their contribution to the cosmic ray (CR) fraction in the intergalactic medium (IGM). It is found that while strong accretion shocks prevail at high redshift, weak internal shocks become dominant in the intracluster medium (ICM) as galaxy clusters form and virialize at low redshift, z < 1. The accumulated CR proton energy is likely to be less than 10 % of the thermal energy in the ICM, since weak shocks of M ≲ 3 are most abundant. This is consistent with the upper limit constrained by radio and gamma-ray observations of galaxy clusters. In the warm-hot medium (WHIM) inside filaments, CRs and gas could be almost in energy equipartition, since relatively stronger shocks of 5 ≲ M ≲ 10 are dominant there. We suggest that the non-thermal emissions from the CR electrons and protons accelerated by cosmological shock waves could provide a new way to detect the WHIM of the universe.

  6. Approximate Bayesian computation in large-scale structure: constraining the galaxy-halo connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, ChangHoon; Vakili, Mohammadjavad; Walsh, Kilian; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hogg, David W.; Campbell, Duncan

    2017-08-01

    Standard approaches to Bayesian parameter inference in large-scale structure assume a Gaussian functional form (chi-squared form) for the likelihood. This assumption, in detail, cannot be correct. Likelihood free inferences such as approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) relax these restrictions and make inference possible without making any assumptions on the likelihood. Instead ABC relies on a forward generative model of the data and a metric for measuring the distance between the model and data. In this work, we demonstrate that ABC is feasible for LSS parameter inference by using it to constrain parameters of the halo occupation distribution (HOD) model for populating dark matter haloes with galaxies. Using specific implementation of ABC supplemented with population Monte Carlo importance sampling, a generative forward model using HOD and a distance metric based on galaxy number density, two-point correlation function and galaxy group multiplicity function, we constrain the HOD parameters of mock observation generated from selected 'true' HOD parameters. The parameter constraints we obtain from ABC are consistent with the 'true' HOD parameters, demonstrating that ABC can be reliably used for parameter inference in LSS. Furthermore, we compare our ABC constraints to constraints we obtain using a pseudo-likelihood function of Gaussian form with MCMC and find consistent HOD parameter constraints. Ultimately, our results suggest that ABC can and should be applied in parameter inference for LSS analyses.

  7. Interplanetary Scintillation Observations of the Large-Scale Structure of the Solar Wind Using EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Breen, A. R.; Habbal, S. R.; Fallows, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) taken with the European Incoherent SCATter radar (EISCAT) in northern Scandinavia can be used to study the evolution of the solar wind as it expands through interplanetary space. IPS arises from changes in the apparent brightness of distant, compact radio sources due to scattering by density irregularities in the solar wind and can be used to obtain estimates of the solar wind speed. In this paper we present the results of a study of the large-scale structure of the fast solar wind under near solar minimum conditions, using data taken with the EISCAT system, and the extremely long baseline observations which combine the EISCAT and MERLIN systems. The latter are the best measurements to date of meridional components of velocity in the inner solar wind. In particular, the existence of a gradient in solar wind velocity of the fast wind over the polar crown, at latitudes corresponding to the x-ray and ultra-violet coronal hole boundary, as reported by Habbal and Woo (2001), is also explored.

  8. The Cosmic History of the Spin of Dark Matter Halos within the Large-scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowland, Holly E.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the orientation and magnitude of dark matter halo angular momentum within the large-scale structure since z = 3. We look at the evolution of the alignment of halo spins with filaments and with each other, as well as the spin parameter, which is a measure of the magnitude of angular momentum. It was found that the angular momentum vectors of dark matter halos at high redshift have a weak tendency to be orthogonal to filaments and high-mass halos have a stronger orthogonal alignment than low-mass halos. Since z = 1, the spins of low-mass halos have become weakly aligned parallel to filaments, whereas high-mass halos kept their orthogonal alignment. This recent parallel alignment of low-mass halos casts doubt on tidal torque theory as the sole mechanism for the buildup of angular momentum. We see evidence for bulk flows and the broadening of filaments over time in the alignments of halo spin and velocities. We find a significant alignment of the spin of neighboring dark matter halos only at very small separations, r < 0.3 Mpc h -1, which is driven by substructure. A correlation of the spin parameter with halo mass is confirmed at high redshift. Research undertaken as part of the Commonwealth Cosmology Initiative (CCI), an international collaboration supported by the Australian Research Council.

  9. Factorial structure of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale in a large sample of somatoform patients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Anne Sarah; Kleiman, Alexandra; Wegener, Ingo; Zur, Berndt; Imbierowicz, Katrin; Geiser, Franziska; Conrad, Rupert

    2015-02-28

    Although a strong association between alexithymia and somatization has been postulated in numerous studies, no systematic study has investigated the psychometric properties of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) in a sample of patients with somatoform disorder yet. The purpose of this study was to ensure a valid assessment by the German version of the TAS-20 in somatoform samples. We investigated whether the original three-factor model proposed by Bagby et al. (1994a), which is widely used in clinical research and practice, is replicable in a large sample of somatoform patients (n=806). Using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) the goodness-of-fit of the originally proposed factor structure was compared to three factor models generated with exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and other factorial solutions derived from the literature. Our results demonstrate that the original three-factor model is not replicable in somatoform patients. Instead, the four-factor model by Franz et al. (2001b) described the data best. However, none of the models met all criteria of confirmatory factor analysis. Our results indicate that the three-factor model is not robust in the German version of the TAS-20. At this state of research we recommend to use the TAS-20 sum-score as a measure of alexithymia in somatoform patients in clinical practice.

  10. Hierarchical system for autonomous sensing-healing of delamination in large-scale composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Sun, Denghao; Takeda, Nobuo

    2014-10-01

    This study combines our hierarchical fiber-optic-based delamination detection system with a microvascular self-healing material to develop the first autonomous sensing-healing system applicable to large-scale composite structures. In this combined system, embedded vascular modules are connected through check valves to a surface-mounted supply tube of a pressurized healing agent while fiber-optic-based sensors monitor the internal pressure of these vascular modules. When delamination occurs, the healing agent flows into the vascular modules breached by the delamination and infiltrates the damage for healing. At the same time, the pressure sensors identify the damaged modules by detecting internal pressure changes. This paper begins by describing the basic concept of the combined system and by discussing the advantages that arise from its hierarchical nature. The feasibility of the system is then confirmed through delamination infiltration tests. Finally, the hierarchical system is validated in a plate specimen by focusing on the detection and infiltration of the damage. Its self-diagnostic function is also demonstrated.

  11. An Ag-grid/graphene hybrid structure for large-scale, transparent, flexible heaters.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junmo; Jang, Yonghee; Kim, Youngsoo; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Suhr, Jonghwan; Hong, Byung Hee; Choi, Jae-Boong; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-04-21

    Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non-vacuum, maskless, and low-temperature environment. The hybrid electrode offers an effective and simple route for achieving a sheet resistance as low as ∼4 Ω per square with ∼78% optical transmittance. Finally, we demonstrate that transparent flexible heaters based on the hybrid conductive films could be used in a vehicle or a smart window system.

  12. Large-scale turbulent structures in jets and in flows over cavities and their relationship to entrainment and mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Massier, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    Large scale structures in jets and in flows over cavities were investigated experimentally to determine their role in entrainment, mixing, and noise production. The presence of these structures resulted in growth of the shear layer and entrainment. Merging of adjacent large scale structures caused the near field pressure signal in excited flows. It is believed that both the entrained fluid as well as its eventual mixing with the jet flow can be controlled by introducing pulsation in the jet flow at a frequency for which the flow is most unstable.

  13. Electronic structure and aromaticity of large-scale hexagonal graphene nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wei E-mail: linlin@lbl.gov E-mail: jlyang@ustc.edu.cn; Yang, Chao E-mail: linlin@lbl.gov E-mail: jlyang@ustc.edu.cn; Lin, Lin E-mail: linlin@lbl.gov E-mail: jlyang@ustc.edu.cn; Yang, Jinlong E-mail: linlin@lbl.gov E-mail: jlyang@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-12-07

    With the help of the recently developed SIESTA-pole (Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms) - PEXSI (pole expansion and selected inversion) method [L. Lin, A. García, G. Huhs, and C. Yang, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 26, 305503 (2014)], we perform Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations to study the stability and electronic structure of hydrogen passivated hexagonal graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) with up to 11 700 atoms. We find the electronic properties of GNFs, including their cohesive energy, edge formation energy, highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gap, edge states, and aromaticity, depend sensitively on the type of edges (armchair graphene nanoflakes (ACGNFs) and zigzag graphene nanoflakes (ZZGNFs)), size and the number of electrons. We observe that, due to the edge-induced strain effect in ACGNFs, large-scale ACGNFs’ edge formation energy decreases as their size increases. This trend does not hold for ZZGNFs due to the presence of many edge states in ZZGNFs. We find that the energy gaps E{sub g} of GNFs all decay with respect to 1/L, where L is the size of the GNF, in a linear fashion. But as their size increases, ZZGNFs exhibit more localized edge states. We believe the presence of these states makes their gap decrease more rapidly. In particular, when L is larger than 6.40 nm, we find that ZZGNFs exhibit metallic characteristics. Furthermore, we find that the aromatic structures of GNFs appear to depend only on whether the system has 4N or 4N + 2 electrons, where N is an integer.

  14. A New Lumped Structure Photochemical Mechanism for Large-Scale Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Peters, Leonard K.

    1999-12-20

    The lumped-structure approach for condensing organic chemical mechanisms is attractive, since it yields fewer species and reactions, and reduces computational costs. This paper leads through the development of a new lumped-structure mechanism, largely based on the widely used Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-IV) developed by Gery et al.[1989]. The new mechanism called CBM-Z, extends the original framework to function properly at larger spatial and longer time scales. The major modifications in the mechanism include: revised inorganic chemistry; explicit treatment of the lesser reactive paraffins - methane and ethane; revised parameterizations of the reactive paraffin, olefin and aromatic reactions; inclusion of alkyl and acyl peroxy radical interactions and their reactions with NO3; inclusion of organic nitrates and hydroperoxides; and refined isoprene chemistry based on the condensed one-product mechanism of Carter[1996a,b]. CBM-Z was successfully evaluated along with the CBM-IV, a partially revised CBM-IV and a revised RADM2 mechanism[Stockwell et al., 1990; Kirchner and Stockwell, 1996] using the low VOC and NOx concentration smog chamber experiments of Simonaitis et al.[1997]. Box-model versions of the four mechanisms were also evaluated under a variety of hypothetical urban and rural scenarios for a period of 30 days. Results from CBM-Z and revised RADM2 were found to be within (+/-) 20% of each other, while CBM-IV and revised CBM-IV results deviated significantly by up to 50-95%. Sensitivity tests were performed to elucidate the effects of some of the new features added in CBM-Z. Relative computational memory and time requirements of these mechanisms are also discussed.

  15. A Confirmatory Approach to Examining the Factor Structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ): A Large Scale Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niclasen, Janni; Skovgaard, Anne Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Somhovd, Mikael Julius; Obel, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) using a Structural Confirmatory Factor Analytic approach. The Danish translation of the SDQ was distributed to 71,840 parents and teachers of 5-7 and 10-12-year-old boys and girls from four large scale cohorts. Three theoretical models…

  16. A Confirmatory Approach to Examining the Factor Structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ): A Large Scale Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niclasen, Janni; Skovgaard, Anne Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Somhovd, Mikael Julius; Obel, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) using a Structural Confirmatory Factor Analytic approach. The Danish translation of the SDQ was distributed to 71,840 parents and teachers of 5-7 and 10-12-year-old boys and girls from four large scale cohorts. Three theoretical models…

  17. Large scale scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Deuflhard, P. ); Engquist, B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on large scale scientific computing. It includes: Initial value problems of ODE's and parabolic PDE's; Boundary value problems of ODE's and elliptic PDE's; Hyperbolic PDE's; Inverse problems; Optimization and optimal control problems; and Algorithm adaptation on supercomputers.

  18. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  19. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  20. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  1. Relating the large-scale structure of time series and visibility networks.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Miguel A

    2017-06-01

    The structure of time series is usually characterized by means of correlations. A new proposal based on visibility networks has been considered recently. Visibility networks are complex networks mapped from surfaces or time series using visibility properties. The structures of time series and visibility networks are closely related, as shown by means of fractional time series in recent works. In these works, a simple relationship between the Hurst exponent H of fractional time series and the exponent of the distribution of edges γ of the corresponding visibility network, which exhibits a power law, is shown. To check and generalize these results, in this paper we delve into this idea of connected structures by defining both structures more properly. In addition to the exponents used before, H and γ, which take into account local properties, we consider two more exponents that, as we will show, characterize global properties. These are the exponent α for time series, which gives the scaling of the variance with the size as var∼T^{2α}, and the exponent κ of their corresponding network, which gives the scaling of the averaged maximum of the number of edges, 〈k_{M}〉∼N^{κ}. With this representation, a more precise connection between the structures of general time series and their associated visibility network is achieved. Similarities and differences are more clearly established, and new scaling forms of complex networks appear in agreement with their respective classes of time series.

  2. Photometric Redshifts for the Dark Energy Survey and VISTA and Implications for Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, Manda; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the photometric redshift requirements for the proposed Dark Energy Survey (DES) using two sets of mock galaxy simulations and an artificial neural network code-ANNz. In particular, we examine how optical photometry in the DES grizY bands can be complemented with near infra-red photometry from the planned VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) in the JHK{sub s} bands in order to improve the photometric redshift estimate by a factor of two at z > 1. We draw attention to the effects of galaxy formation scenarios such as reddening on the photo-z estimate and using our neural network code, calculate A{sub v} for these reddened galaxies. We also look at the impact of using different training sets when calculating photometric redshifts. In particular, we find that using the ongoing DEEP2 and VVDS-Deep spectroscopic surveys to calibrate photometric redshifts for DES, will prove effective. However we need to be aware of uncertainties in the photometric redshift bias that arise when using different training sets as these will translate into errors in the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. Furthermore, we show that the neural network error estimate on the photometric redshift may be used to remove outliers from our samples before any kind of cosmological analysis, in particular for large-scale structure experiments. By removing all galaxies with a 1{sigma} photo-z scatter greater than 0.1 from our DES+VHS sample, we can constrain the galaxy power spectrum out to a redshift of 2 and reduce the fractional error on this power spectrum by {approx}15-20% compared to using the entire catalogue.

  3. Large Scale Structure in Absorption up to z~0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejos, Nicolas

    2012-10-01

    We propose to observe and characterize IGM absorption systems associated with Large Scale Structure {LSS} in a statistical manner up to redshift 0.4. For this purpose, we have used a recently published cluster catalog {GMBCG; Hao et al., 2010} to identify massive nodes in the 'cosmic web'. Then, we used cluster pairs with small separations {<20 Mpc} at similar redshifts to identify zones where filaments should reside with high probabilities. Combining the GMBCG cluster catalog with the SDSS DR7 QSO catalog, we selected a single QSO whose sightline passes through a total of 6 predicted filaments {3 of which are independent} and 3 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts at impact parameters <1.5 Mpc. This will considerably increase the sample of known LSS {especially filaments} at low redshift. We propose to observe the QSO with HST/COS using the G130M and G160M gratings to cover the full FUV spectral range at high resolution {R 20000}. We require observations at S/N 10 to ensure a full characterization of HI and OVI lines at small column densities {N 10^13 cm^-2}. These low column densities will allow us to detect broad and shallow HI lines with OVI, believed to be associated with portions of the warm-hot intergalactic medium {WHIM}. Our results will also be suitable for testing an alternative hypothesis which states that the majority of OVI absorbers at low-z are confined within <300 kpc from galaxies and are not directly related to the WHIM {Prochaska et al., 2011; Tumlinson et al., 2011}. Our findings will test our understanding of galaxy formation and the importance of AGN/supernova feedbacks by comparing them with state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations.

  4. Cross-correlation of diffuse synchrotron and large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shea; Farnsworth, Damon; Rudnick, Lawrence

    2010-02-01

    We explore for the first time the method of cross-correlation of radio synchrotron emission and tracers of large-scale structure in order to detect the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). We performed a cross-correlation of a 34° × 34° area of Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) galaxies for two redshift slices (0.03 < z < 0.04 and 0.06 < z < 0.07) with the corresponding region of the 1.4 GHz Bonn survey. For this analysis, we assumed that the synchrotron surface brightness is linearly proportional to surface density of galaxies. We also sampled the cross-correlation function (CCF) using 24 distant fields of the same size from the Bonn survey, to better assess the noise properties. Though we obtained a null result, we found that by adding a signal weighted by the 2MASS image with a filament (peak) surface brightness of 1 (7) and 7 (49) mK would produce a 3σ positive correlation for the 0.03 < z < 0.04 and 0.06 < z < 0.07 redshift slices, respectively. These detection thresholds correspond to minimum energy magnetic fields as low as 0.2 μG, close to some theoretical expectations for filament field values. This injected signal is also below the rms noise of the Bonn survey, and demonstrates the power of this technique and its utility for upcoming sensitive continuum surveys such as those planned with the Murchison Widefield Array.

  5. How CMB and large-scale structure constrain chameleon interacting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Boriero, Daniel; Das, Subinoy; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: subinoy@iiap.res.in

    2015-07-01

    We explore a chameleon type of interacting dark matter-dark energy scenario in which a scalar field adiabatically traces the minimum of an effective potential sourced by the dark matter density. We discuss extensively the effect of this coupling on cosmological observables, especially the parameter degeneracies expected to arise between the model parameters and other cosmological parameters, and then test the model against observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and other cosmological probes. We find that the chameleon parameters α and β, which determine respectively the slope of the scalar field potential and the dark matter-dark energy coupling strength, can be constrained to α < 0.17 and β < 0.19 using CMB data and measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. The latter parameter in particular is constrained only by the late Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Adding measurements of the local Hubble expansion rate H{sub 0} tightens the bound on α by a factor of two, although this apparent improvement is arguably an artefact of the tension between the local measurement and the H{sub 0} value inferred from Planck data in the minimal ΛCDM model. The same argument also precludes chameleon models from mimicking a dark radiation component, despite a passing similarity between the two scenarios in that they both delay the epoch of matter-radiation equality. Based on the derived parameter constraints, we discuss possible signatures of the model for ongoing and future large-scale structure surveys.

  6. Dusty Starbursts within a z=3 Large Scale Structure revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehata, Hideki; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a series of ALMA observations in the SSA22 field. In this field a remarkable large-scale structure (across ~1 deg) has been found at z=3.09, which makes the field an unique laboratory to investigate galaxy formation and evolution at biased fields in the early universe. First we have conducted a 1.1 mm continuum follow-up of 45 SMGs discovered by the 1.1 mm AzTEC/ASTE survey with ALMA in its Cycle 1 (PI. Umehata). We have achieved 1σ sensitivity of 0.07 - 0.16 mJy/beam and angular resolution of 0.6″ to find 64 discrete sources with S/N ≥ 4.5. Second in ALMA Cycle 2 we have carried out a contiguous 2‧ × 3‧ mapping observation at 1.1 mm (PI. Umehata) achieved by 103 point mosaic. This ‘ALMA deep field’ reaches 1σ sensitivity of 0.066 - 0.070 mJy/beam for an entire field and have angular resolution of 0.5″, which allows us to detect dusty star-forming galaxies with SFRIR ~ 60 M⊙yr-1 (if we assume β=1.5, Tdust=40 K, and Chablier IMF) at z=3.09. On the basis of comparison with the results from general fields, it is suggested that SMGs preferentially reside in the most dense environment at z~3. Furthermore we find a rich cluster of X-ray luminous ALMA sources at the core of the proto-cluster composed of seven objects with spec-z/photo-z = 3.09. Our results indicate that environment can be a key factor on the formation of dusty starbursts and the growth of SMBHs within them.

  7. Rapid separable analysis of higher order correlators in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergusson, J. R.; Regan, D. M.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2012-09-01

    We present an efficient separable approach to the estimation and reconstruction of the bispectrum and the trispectrum from observational (or simulated) large-scale structure data. This is developed from general cosmic microwave background (poly)spectra methods that exploit the fact that the bispectrum and trispectrum in the literature can be represented by a separable mode expansion that converges rapidly (with nmax⁡=O(30) terms). The underlying methodology can encompass a wide variety of modal types, including polynomials, trigonometric functions, wavelets, and bins. With an effective grid resolution lmax⁡ (number of particles/grid points N=lmax⁡3), we present a bispectrum estimator that requires only O(nmax⁡×lmax⁡3) operations, along with a corresponding method for direct bispectrum reconstruction. This method is extended to the trispectrum revealing an estimator that requires only O(nmax⁡4/3×lmax⁡3) operations. The complexity in calculating the trispectrum in this method is now involved in the original decomposition and orthogonalization process that need only be performed once for each model. However, for nondiagonal trispectra these processes present little extra difficulty and may be performed in O(lmax⁡4) operations. A discussion of how the methodology may be applied to the quadspectrum is also given. An efficient algorithm for the generation of arbitrary non-Gaussian initial conditions for use in N-body codes using this separable approach is described. This prescription allows for the production of non-Gaussian initial conditions for arbitrary bispectra and trispectra. A brief outline of the key issues involved in parameter estimation, particularly in the nonlinear regime, is also given.

  8. High-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas in galaxy halos and large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Limin

    This dissertation presents spectroscopic studies of gas in galaxy halos and large-scale structures through high-resolution quasar absorption lines. The broad goal of this effort is to learn how galaxies acquire their gas and how they return it to the intergalactic medium, or more generally, how galaxies interact with their environment. The study of the absorption lines due to the extraplanar 21cm "Outer Arm" (OA) of the Milky Way toward two quasars, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907, provides valuable insight into the gas accretion processes. It yields the following results. (1) The OA is a multiphase cloud and high ions show small but significant offsets in velocity and are unlikely to be cospatial with the low ions. (2) The overall metallicity of the OA is Z=0.3-0.5 Z⊙, but nitrogen is underabundant. (3) The abundance of N, O, and S derived are roughly consistent with outer-galaxy emission-line abundances and the metallicity gradient derived from H II regions. The similarity of the OA kinematics to several nearby high velocity clouds (HVCs, e.g. Complexes C, G, and H) suggests that these clouds could be detritus from a merging satellite galaxy. To test this hypothesis, we build up a simple model including tidal tripping, ram-pressure stripping, and dynamical friction to consider whether the OA could be debris affiliated with the Monoceros Ring. Our model can roughly reproduce the spatial and velocity characteristics of the OA. Moreover, the metallicity of the OA is similar to the higher metallicities measured in the younger stellar components of the Monoceros Ring and the progenitor candidate, the CMa overdensity. However, both our model and the Galactic warp scenario can not explain other HVCs that are likely to be related to the OA. Instead of acquiring gas, some galaxies have their gas removed through various physical processes. Ram-pressure stripping and tidal interaction are important mechanisms for galaxies to loose their gas. The high-resolution spectrum of Mrk

  9. Studies of large- and fine-scale atmospheric structure using dense seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlin, M.

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have shown that the fit of infrasound synthetics to recorded data can be improved by adding small-scale structure to atmospheric models. However these findings have been based on sparse recordings. Although the IMS infrasound network gives unprecedented coverage of the atmosphere, and this network has been infilled in some regions, there are still not enough stations for close examination of the complexity of the infrasound wavefield, which is due to spatial and temporal variability of the atmosphere. There is a pressing need for more stations, deployed at small offsets, to rigorously test atmospheric models, in particular currently popular hybrid models that include realizations of small-scale structure. Infrasound signals couple to seismic at the Earth's surface. In some regions there are considerably more seismic stations than infrasound stations. For example, the USArray Transportable Array (TA) comprises 400 stations deployed on a 70 km spaced Cartesian grid spanning approximately 2,000,000 sq km. In our study we use the TA, and the more dense High Lava Plains (HLP) network, to study the spread of the infrasound wavefield from large ground-truthed explosions at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR). The TA provides a broad spatial coverage while the HLP network offers a detailed look at how infrasound branches vary with range from near UTTR to a distance of about 800 km at an azimuth of 300°. We have used these networks to evaluate two types of atmospheric model, 1) mesoscale G2S atmospheric models, and 2) G2S models that include realizations of gravity waves. We evaluate these models for predicting the spatial extent of the infrasound wavefield (in particular the limits of the "zones of silence" near the source), signal travel times and the duration of recorded signals. We have used ray theory for the bulk of our analysis. Both the unperturbed and perturbed models provide accurate predictions of acoustic travel times although rays shot

  10. DEMNUni: the clustering of large-scale structures in the presence of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Castorina, Emanuele; Carbone, Carmelita; Bel, Julien; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Dolag, Klaus E-mail: carmelita.carbone@brera.inaf.it E-mail: emiliano.sefusatti@brera.inaf.it

    2015-07-01

    We analyse the clustering features of Large Scale Structures (LSS) in the presence of massive neutrinos, employing a set of large-volume, high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations, where neutrinos are treated as separate collisionless particles. The volume of 8 h{sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}, combined with a resolution of about 8×10{sup 10}h{sup -1}M{sub ⊚} for the cold dark matter (CDM) component, represents a significant improvement over previous N-body simulations in massive neutrino cosmologies. In this work we focus, in the first place, on the analysis of nonlinear effects in CDM and neutrinos perturbations contributing to the total matter power spectrum. We show that most of the nonlinear evolution is generated exclusively by the CDM component. We therefore compare mildly nonlinear predictions from Eulerian Perturbation Theory (PT), and fully nonlinear prescriptions (HALOFIT) with the measurements obtained from the simulations. We find that accounting only for the nonlinear evolution of the CDM power spectrum allows to recover the total matter power spectrum with the same accuracy as the massless case. Indeed, we show that, the most recent version of the (HALOFIT) formula calibrated on ΛCDM simulations can be applied directly to the linear CDM power spectrum without requiring additional fitting parameters in the massive case. As a second step, we study the abundance and clustering properties of CDM halos, confirming that, in massive neutrino cosmologies, the proper definition of the halo bias should be made with respect to the cold rather than the total matter distribution, as recently shown in the literature. Here we extend these results to the redshift space, finding that, when accounting for massive neutrinos, an improper definition of the linear bias can lead to a systematic error of about 1-2 % in the determination of the linear growth rate from anisotropic clustering. This result is quite important if we consider that future spectroscopic galaxy

  11. Does lower Omega allow a resolution of the large-scale structure problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate angular scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background, peculiar velocities, density correlations, and mass fluctuations for both neutrino and baryon-dominated universes with Omega less than one are evaluated. The large coherence length associated with a low-Omega, hot dark matter-dominated universe provides substantial density fluctuations on scales up to 100 Mpc: there is a range of acceptable models that are capable of producing large voids and superclusters of galaxies and the clustering of galaxy clusters, with Omega roughly 0.3, without violating any observational constraint. Low-Omega, cold dark matter-dominated cosmologies are also examined. All of these models may be reconciled with the inflationary requirement of a flat universe by introducing a cosmological constant 1-Omega.

  12. Observing trans-Planckian ripples in the primordial power spectrum with future large scale structure probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth, Martin S; Wong, Yvonne Y Y E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-09-15

    We revisit the issue of ripples in the primordial power spectra caused by trans-Planckian physics, and the potential for their detection by future cosmological probes. We find that for reasonably large values of the first slow-roll parameter {epsilon} ({approx}>0.001), a positive detection of trans-Planckian ripples can be made even if the amplitude is as low as 10{sup -4}. Data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the proposed future 21 cm survey with the Fast Fourier Transform Telescope (FFTT) will be particularly useful in this regard. If the scale of inflation is close to its present upper bound, a scale of new physics as high as {approx}0.2 M{sub P} could lead to observable signatures.

  13. Does lower Omega allow a resolution of the large-scale structure problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate angular scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background, peculiar velocities, density correlations, and mass fluctuations for both neutrino and baryon-dominated universes with Omega less than one are evaluated. The large coherence length associated with a low-Omega, hot dark matter-dominated universe provides substantial density fluctuations on scales up to 100 Mpc: there is a range of acceptable models that are capable of producing large voids and superclusters of galaxies and the clustering of galaxy clusters, with Omega roughly 0.3, without violating any observational constraint. Low-Omega, cold dark matter-dominated cosmologies are also examined. All of these models may be reconciled with the inflationary requirement of a flat universe by introducing a cosmological constant 1-Omega.

  14. Clipping the cosmos: the bias and bispectrum of large scale structure.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Fergus; James, J Berian; Heavens, Alan F; Heymans, Catherine

    2011-12-30

    A large fraction of the information collected by cosmological surveys is simply discarded to avoid length scales which are difficult to model theoretically. We introduce a new technique which enables the extraction of useful information from the bispectrum of galaxies well beyond the conventional limits of perturbation theory. Our results strongly suggest that this method increases the range of scales where the relation between the bispectrum and power spectrum in tree-level perturbation theory may be applied, from k(max) ∼ 0.1 to ∼0.7 hMpc(-1). This leads to correspondingly large improvements in the determination of galaxy bias. Since the clipped matter power spectrum closely follows the linear power spectrum, there is the potential to use this technique to probe the growth rate of linear perturbations and confront theories of modified gravity with observation.

  15. New Insights about Enzyme Evolution from Large Scale Studies of Sequence and Structure Relationships*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Shoshana D.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. PMID:25210038

  16. New insights about enzyme evolution from large scale studies of sequence and structure relationships.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shoshana D; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-10-31

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes.

  17. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    SciTech Connect

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  18. Large Scale Structures in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey and in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1999-06-01

    The large supercluster structures obvious in recent galaxy redshift surveys are quantified using an one-dimensional cluster analysis (core sampling) and a three-dimensional cluster analysis based on the minimal spanning tree. The comparison with the LCRS reveals promising stable results. At a mean overdensity of about ten, the supercluster systems form huge wall-like structures comprising about 40% of all galaxies. The overdense clusters have a low mean transverse velocity dispersion of about 400 km/s, i.e. they look quite narrow in redshift space. We performed N-body simulations with large box sizes for six cosmological scenarios. The quantitative analysis shows that the observed structures can be understood best in low density models with Ω_m <= 0.5 with or without a cosmological constant.

  19. Implications of a class of grand-unified theories for large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    A class of grand-unified theories in which cosmologically significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is considered. To obtain large-scale structure, attention is given to (1) an inflationary scenario, (2) inflation followed by string production, and (3) a noninflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. It is shown that inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that Omega less than 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  20. Creating High Quality DEMs of Large Scale Fluvial Environments Using Structure-from-Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javernick, L. A.; Brasington, J.; Caruso, B. S.; Hicks, M.; Davies, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    During the past decade, advances in survey and sensor technology have generated new opportunities to investigate the structure and dynamics of fluvial systems. Key geomatic technologies include the Global Positioning System (GPS), digital photogrammetry, LiDAR, and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The application of such has resulted in a profound increase in the dimensionality of topographic surveys - from cross-sections to distributed 3d point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs). Each of these technologies have been used successfully to derive high quality DEMs of fluvial environments; however, they often require specialized and expensive equipment, such as a TLS or large format camera, bespoke platforms such as survey aircraft, and consequently make data acquisition prohibitively expensive or highly labour intensive, thus restricting the extent and frequency of surveys. Recently, advances in computer vision and image analysis have led to development of a novel photogrammetric approach that is fully automated and suitable for use with simple compact (non-metric) cameras. In this paper, we evaluate a new photogrammetric method, Structure-from-Motion (SfM), and demonstrate how this can be used to generate DEMs of comparable quality to airborne LiDAR, using consumer grade cameras at low costs. Using the SfM software PhotoScan (version 0.8.5), high quality DEMs were produced for a 1.6 km reach and a 3.3 km reach of the braided Ahuriri River, New Zealand. Photographs used for DEM creation were acquired from a helicopter flying at 600 m and 800 m above ground level using a consumer grade 10.1mega-pixel, non-metric digital camera, resulting in object space resolution imagery of 0.12 m and 0.16 m respectively. Point clouds for the two study reaches were generated using 147 and 224 photographs respectively, and were extracted automatically in an arbitrary coordinate system; RTK-GPS located ground control points (GCPs) were used to define a 3d non

  1. Generation of large-scale structures and vortex systems in numerical experiments for rotating annular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledzer, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Methods for solving shallow-water equations that describe flows in rotating annular channels are considered and the results of numerical calculations are analyzed for the possible generation of global large-scale flows, narrow jets, and numerous small-scale vortices in laboratory experiments. External effects in fluids are induced using a mass source-sink and the MHD-method of interaction of radial electric current with the magnetic field generated by the field of permanent magnets. A central-upwind scheme modified to suit the specific aspects of geophysical hydrodynamics. Initially, this method was used to solve shallow-water equations only in hydraulic problems, such as for flows in dam breaks, channels, rivers, and lakes. Geophysical hydrodynamics (in addition to free surface and topography) requires a rotation of the system as a whole, which is accompanied by the appearance of a complex system of vortices, jets, and turbulence (these should be taken into account in the formulation of the problem). Accordingly, the basic features of the central-upwind method should be changed. The modifications should ensure that the scheme is well-balanced and choose interpolation methods for desired variables. The main result of this modification is the control over numerical viscosity affecting the fluid motion variety. The active dynamics of a large number of vortices transformed into jets or generating large-scale streams is the general result of modifications suitable for geophysical hydrodynamics. Because there are technical difficulties in the creation of an appropriate laboratory setup for modeling of geophysical flows with the help of numerous source-sinks, it will be appropriate to use numerical experiments for studying the motions generated by this method. Unlike this method, the MHD-method can be rather easily used in laboratory conditions to generate a large variety of flows and vortex currents in the channel by a relatively small number of permanent magnets

  2. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; ...

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describemore » the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.« less

  3. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describe the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.

  4. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir E-mail: matteorf@stanford.edu E-mail: zvlah@stanford.edu

    2015-09-01

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describe the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ{sub 8} = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k≅ 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k≅ 0.15 h Mpc{sup −1} for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. This is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.

  5. Dark matter, long-range forces, and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradwohl, Ben-Ami; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1992-01-01

    If the dark matter in galaxies and clusters is nonbaryonic, it can interact with additional long-range fields that are invisible to experimental tests of the equivalence principle. We discuss the astrophysical and cosmological implications of a long-range force coupled only to the dark matter and find rather tight constraints on its strength. If the force is repulsive (attractive), the masses of galaxy groups and clusters (and the mean density of the universe inferred from them) have been systematically underestimated (overestimated). We explore the consequent effects on the two-point correlation function, large-scale velocity flows, and microwave background anisotropies, for models with initial scale-invariant adiabatic perturbations and cold dark matter.

  6. Structure and dynamics of glass formers: Predictability at large length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, Ludovic; Jack, Robert L.

    2007-10-01

    Dynamic heterogeneity in glass formers has been related to their static structure using the concept of dynamic propensity. We reexamine this relationship by analyzing dynamical fluctuations in two atomistic glass formers and two theoretical models. We introduce quantitative statistical indicators which show that the dynamics of individual particles cannot be predicted on the basis of the propensity or by any structural indicator. However, the spatial structure of the propensity field does have predictive power for the spatial correlations associated with dynamic heterogeneity. Our results suggest that the quest for a connection between the static and dynamic properties of glass formers at the particle level is in vain, but they demonstrate that such a connection does exist on larger length scales.

  7. Large Scale Nonlinear Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-15

    KEY WORDS (Conhinu. as, t.n.t.. aid. if nic••iary aid ld.ntify by block n,a,b.r) L. In,~~~ IP!CIE LARGE SCALE OPTIMIZATION APPLICATIONS OF NONLINEAR ... NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING by Garth P. McCormick 1. Introduction The general mathematical programming ( optimization ) problem can be stated in the following form...because the difficulty in solving a general nonlinear optimization problem has a~ much to do with the nature of the functions involved as it does with the

  8. An algebraic sub-structuring method for large-scale eigenvaluecalculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.; Bai, Z.; Li, X.; Lee, L.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.

    2004-05-26

    We examine sub-structuring methods for solving large-scalegeneralized eigenvalue problems from a purely algebraic point of view. Weuse the term "algebraic sub-structuring" to refer to the process ofapplying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a largesparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectralcomponents are extracted and combined to provide approximate solutions tothe original problem. We are interested in the question of which spectralcomponentsone should extract from each sub-structure in order to producean approximate solution to the original problem with a desired level ofaccuracy. Error estimate for the approximation to the small esteigen pairis developed. The estimate leads to a simple heuristic for choosingspectral components (modes) from each sub-structure. The effectiveness ofsuch a heuristic is demonstrated with numerical examples. We show thatalgebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve a generalizedeigenvalue problem arising from the simulation of an acceleratorstructure. One interesting characteristic of this application is that thestiffness matrix produced by a hierarchical vector finite elements schemecontains a null space of large dimension. We present an efficient schemeto deflate this null space in the algebraic sub-structuringprocess.

  9. State-of-the-art eigensolvers for electronic structure calculations of large scale nano-systems

    SciTech Connect

    Voemel, Christof Tomov, Stanimire Z. Marques, Osni A.; Canning, A. Wang, L.-W. Dongarra, Jack J.

    2008-07-20

    The band edge states determine optical and electronic properties of semiconductor nano-structures which can be computed from an interior eigenproblem. We study the reliability and performance of state-of-the-art iterative eigensolvers on large quantum dots and wires, focusing on variants of preconditioned CG, Lanczos, and Davidson methods. One Davidson variant, the GD + k (Olsen) method, is identified to be as reliable as the commonly used preconditioned CG while consistently being between two and three times faster.

  10. Relationship between the large scale structure of the universe and spatial distribution of GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, István I.; Balázs, Lajos G.; Bagoly, Zsolt; Tóth, L. Viktor; Horváth, István

    2017-01-01

    We studied the distribution of star-forming galaxies in the classical Millenium Simulation Springer et al. [1] and the Horizon Runs Kim et al. [2] databases. DeLucia and Blaizot [3] used a semi-analytical model for the galaxy genesis in Millenium I. We found a relationship between the distribution of the star-forming galaxies and the dark matter (DM), which we used as a transformation factor from the Millenium I to Millenium XXL. We simulated a star-forming galaxy sample with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, and checked the relation between structures and the distribution of star-forming groups on a various scales. We concluded that above the BAO-scale we need a much more numerous sample than that of the current 407 GRBs to reveal the DM distribution. We got similar results applying our method to the Horizon Runs data.

  11. Spatial Structure of Large-Scale Plasma Density Perturbations HF-Induced in the Ionospheric F 2 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Komrakov, G. P.; Glukhov, Ya. V.; Andreeva, E. S.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Kurbatov, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the experimental results obtained by studying the large-scale structure of the HF-disturbed ionospheric region. The experiments were performed using the SURA heating facility. The disturbed ionospheric region was sounded by signals radiated by GPS navigation satellite beacons as well as by signals of low-orbit satellites (radio tomography). The results of the experiments show that large-scale plasma density perturbations induced at altitudes higher than the F2 layer maximum can contribute significantly to the measured variations of the total electron density and can, with a certain arrangement of the reception points, be measured by the GPS sounding method.

  12. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-01-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  13. LARGE-SCALE AZIMUTHAL STRUCTURES OF TURBULENCE IN ACCRETION DISKS: DYNAMO TRIGGERED VARIABILITY OF ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Flock, M.; Dzyurkevich, N.; Klahr, H.; Turner, N.; Henning, Th.

    2012-01-10

    We investigate the significance of large-scale azimuthal, magnetic, and velocity modes for the magnetorotational instability (MRI) turbulence in accretion disks. We perform three-dimensional global ideal MHD simulations of global stratified protoplanetary disk models. Our domains span azimuthal angles of {pi}/4, {pi}/2, {pi}, and 2{pi}. We observe up to 100% stronger magnetic fields and stronger turbulence for the restricted azimuthal domain models {pi}/2 and {pi}/4 compared to the full 2{pi} model. We show that for those models the Maxwell stress is larger due to strong axisymmetric magnetic fields generated by the {alpha}{Omega} dynamo. Large radial extended axisymmetric toroidal fields trigger temporal magnification of accretion stress. All models display a positive dynamo-{alpha} in the northern hemisphere (upper disk). The parity is distinct in each model and changes on timescales of 40 local orbits. In model 2{pi}, the toroidal field is mostly antisymmetric with respect to the midplane. The eddies of the MRI turbulence are highly anisotropic. The major wavelengths of the turbulent velocity and magnetic fields are between one and two disk scale heights. At the midplane, we find magnetic tilt angles around 8 Degree-Sign -9 Degree-Sign increasing up to 12 Degree-Sign -13 Degree-Sign in the corona. We conclude that an azimuthal extent of {pi} is sufficient to reproduce most turbulent properties in three-dimensional global stratified simulations of magnetized accretion disks.

  14. Seismic Modelling of the Earth's Large-Scale Three-Dimensional Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, J. H.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    1989-07-01

    Several different kinds of seismological data, spanning more than three orders of magnitude in frequency, have been employed in the study of the Earth's large-scale three-dimensional structure. These yield different but overlapping information, which is leading to a coherent picture of the Earth's internal heterogeneity. In this article we describe several methods of seismic inversion and intercompare the resulting models. Models of upper-mantle shear velocity based upon mantle waveforms (Woodhouse & Dziewonski (J. geophys. Res. 89, 5953-5986 (1984))) (f lesssim 7 mHz) and long-period body waveforms (f lesssim 20 mHz; Woodhouse & Dziewonski (Eos, Wash. 67, 307 (1986))) show the mid-oceanic ridges to be the major low-velocity anomalies in the uppermost mantle, together with regions in the western Pacific, characterized by back-arc volcanism. High velocities are associated with the continents, and in particular with the continental shields, extending to depths in excess of 300 km. By assuming a given ratio between density and wave velocity variations, and a given mantle viscosity structure, such models have been successful in explaining some aspects of observed plate motion in terms of thermal convection in the mantle (Forte & Peltier (J. geophys. Res. 92, 3645-3679 (1987))). An important qualitative conclusion from such analysis is that the magnitude of the observed seismic anomalies is of the order expected in a convecting system having the viscosity, temperature derivatives and flow rates which characterize the mantle. Models of the lower mantle based upon P-wave arrival times (f ≈ 1 Hz; Dziewonski (J. geophys. Res. 89, 5929-5952 (1984)); Morelli & Dziewonski (Eos, Wash. 67, 311 (1986))) SH waveforms (f ≈ 20 mHz; Woodhouse & Dziewonski (1986)) and free oscillations (Giardini et al. (Nature, Lond. 325, 405-411 (1987); J. geophys. Res. 93, 13716-13742 (1988))) (f ≈ 0.5-5 mHz) show a very long wavelength pattern, largely contained in spherical harmonics of

  15. Geographic distribution, large-scale spatial structure and diversity of parasitoids of the seed-feeding beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus.

    PubMed

    Wood, A; Haga, E B; Costa, V A; Rossi, M N

    2016-10-21

    Bruchine beetles are highly host-specific seed feeders during the larval stage. Although some specific parasitoid families have been recorded attacking bruchine beetles, most studies have been done at small spatial scales. Therefore, the current knowledge about the diversity and the geographic distribution of parasitoid species parasitizing bruchines is scarce, especially at a wide geographic area that extends over large distances through a latitudinal cline (i.e. large-scale spatial structure). The present study determined the species richness and evenness of parasitoids attacking the bruchine beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus feeding on Leucaena leucocephala seeds, examined their geographic distribution, and characterized the large-scale spatial structure in parasitoid species composition. A total of 1420 parasitoids (all Hymenoptera) belonging to four families, five subfamilies and eight species were collected (genera: Horismenus, Paracrias, Urosigalphus, Stenocorse, Chryseida, Eupelmus). Most parasitoid species showed wide spatial distribution, high evenness in species abundance and the species richness estimators were close to stabilization (approximately eight species). Overall, greater similarity was observed in the species composition of plant populations near to each other than those farther apart, revealing a large-scale spatial structure in parasitoid species composition.

  16. PubChemQC Project: A Large-Scale First-Principles Electronic Structure Database for Data-Driven Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Maho; Shimazaki, Tomomi

    2017-06-26

    Large-scale molecular databases play an essential role in the investigation of various subjects such as the development of organic materials, in silico drug design, and data-driven studies with machine learning. We have developed a large-scale quantum chemistry database based on first-principles methods. Our database currently contains the ground-state electronic structures of 3 million molecules based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, and we successively calculated 10 low-lying excited states of over 2 million molecules via time-dependent DFT with the B3LYP functional and the 6-31+G* basis set. To select the molecules calculated in our project, we referred to the PubChem Project, which was used as the source of the molecular structures in short strings using the InChI and SMILES representations. Accordingly, we have named our quantum chemistry database project "PubChemQC" ( http://pubchemqc.riken.jp/ ) and placed it in the public domain. In this paper, we show the fundamental features of the PubChemQC database and discuss the techniques used to construct the data set for large-scale quantum chemistry calculations. We also present a machine learning approach to predict the electronic structure of molecules as an example to demonstrate the suitability of the large-scale quantum chemistry database.

  17. Large-scale structures of solar wind and dynamics of parameters in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Yermolaev, Michael

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI dataset and our catalog of large-scale solar wind (SW) phenomena (see web-site ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/ and paper by Yermolaev et al., 2009) we study temporal profile of interplanetary and magnetospheric parameters in following SW phenomena: interplanetary manifestation of coronal mass ejection (ICME) including magnetic cloud (MC) and Ejecta, Sheath—compression region before ICME and corotating interaction region (CIR)—compression region before high-speed stream (HSS) of solar wind. To take into account a possible influence of other SW types, following sequences of phenomena, which include all typical sequences of non-stationary SW events, are analyzed: (1) SW/ CIR/ SW, (2) SW/ IS/ CIR/ SW, (3) SW/ Ejecta/ SW, (4) SW/ Sheath/Ejecta/ SW, (5) SW/ IS/ Sheath/ Ejecta/ SW, (6) SW/ MC/ SW, (7) SW/Sheath/ MC/ SW, (8) SW/ IS/ Sheath/ MC/ SW (where SW is undisturbed solar wind, and IS is interplanetary shock) (Yermolaev et al., 2015) using the method of double superposed epoch analysis for large numbers of events (Yermolaev et al., 2010). Similarities and distinctions of different SW phenomena depending on neighboring SW types and their geoeffectiveness are discussed. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, projects 16-12-10062. References: Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research, , Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 81-94. Yermolaev, Y. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Y. Yermolaev (2010), Specific interplanetary conditions for CIR-induced, Sheath-induced, and ICME-induced geomagnetic storms obtained by double superposed epoch analysis, Ann. Geophys., 28, pp.