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Sample records for large spacing loop-loop

  1. Large size space construction for space exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Space exploitation is impossible without large space structures. We need to make sufficient large volume of pressurized protecting frames for crew, passengers, space processing equipment, & etc. We have to be unlimited in space. Now the size and mass of space constructions are limited by possibility of a launch vehicle. It limits our future in exploitation of space by humans and in development of space industry. Large-size space construction can be made with using of the curing technology of the fibers-filled composites and a reactionable matrix applied directly in free space. For curing the fabric impregnated with a liquid matrix (prepreg) is prepared in terrestrial conditions and shipped in a container to orbit. In due time the prepreg is unfolded by inflating. After polymerization reaction, the durable construction can be fitted out with air, apparatus and life support systems. Our experimental studies of the curing processes in the simulated free space environment showed that the curing of composite in free space is possible. The large-size space construction can be developed. A project of space station, Moon base, Mars base, mining station, interplanet space ship, telecommunication station, space observatory, space factory, antenna dish, radiation shield, solar sail is proposed and overviewed. The study was supported by Humboldt Foundation, ESA (contract 17083/03/NL/SFe), NASA program of the stratospheric balloons and RFBR grants (05-08-18277, 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011).

  2. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Mission applications for large space antenna systems; large space antenna structural systems; materials and structures technology; structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the Space Station; and flight test and evaluation were examined.

  3. Infrastructure for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEwen, Howard A.; Lillie, Charles F.

    2016-10-01

    It is generally recognized (e.g., in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration response to recent congressional appropriations) that future space observatories must be serviceable, even if they are orbiting in deep space (e.g., around the Sun-Earth libration point, SEL2). On the basis of this legislation, we believe that budgetary considerations throughout the foreseeable future will require that large, long-lived astrophysics missions must be designed as evolvable semipermanent observatories that will be serviced using an operational, in-space infrastructure. We believe that the development of this infrastructure will include the design and development of a small to mid-sized servicing vehicle (MiniServ) as a key element of an affordable infrastructure for in-space assembly and servicing of future space vehicles. This can be accomplished by the adaptation of technology developed over the past half-century into a vehicle approximately the size of the ascent stage of the Apollo Lunar Module to provide some of the servicing capabilities that will be needed by very large telescopes located in deep space in the near future (2020s and 2030s). We specifically address the need for a detailed study of these servicing requirements and the current proposals for using presently available technologies to provide the appropriate infrastructure.

  4. Is a closing "GA pair" a rule for stable loop-loop RNA complexes?

    PubMed

    Ducongé, F; Di Primo, C; Toulme, J J

    2000-07-14

    RNA hairpin aptamers specific for the trans-activation-responsive (TAR) RNA element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 were identified by in vitro selection (Ducongé, F., and Toulmé, J. J. (1999) RNA 5, 1605-1614). The high affinity sequences selected at physiological magnesium concentration (3 mm) were shown to form a loop-loop complex with the targeted TAR RNA. The stability of this complex depends on the aptamer loop closing "GA pair" as characterized by preliminary electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Thermal denaturation monitored by UV-absorption spectroscopy and binding kinetics determined by surface plasmon resonance show that the GA pair is crucial for the formation of the TAR-RNA aptamer complex. Both thermal denaturation and surface plasmon resonance experiments show that any other "pairs" leads to complexes whose stability decreases in the order AG > GG > GU > AA > GC > UA > CA, CU. The binding kinetics indicate that stability is controlled by the off-rate rather than by the on-rate. Comparison with the complex formed with the TAR* hairpin, a rationally designed TAR RNA ligand (Chang, K. Y., and Tinoco, I. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 91, 8705-8709), demonstrates that the GA pair is a key determinant which accounts for the 50-fold increased stability of the TAR-aptamer complex (K(d) = 2.0 nm) over the TAR-TAR* one (K(d) = 92. 5 nm) at physiological concentration of magnesium. Replacement of the wild-type GC pair next to the loop of RNA I' by a GA pair stabilizes the RNA I'-RNA II' loop-loop complex derived from the one involved in the control of the ColE1 plasmid replication. Thus, the GA pair might be the preferred one for stable loop-loop interactions.

  5. Low Cost Large Space Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur B.; Freeland, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The mobile communication community could significantly benefit from the availability of low-cost, large space-deployable antennas. A new class of space structures, called inflatable deployable structures, will become an option for this industry in the near future. This new technology recently made significant progress with respect to reducing the risk of flying large inflatable structures in space. This progress can be attributed to the successful space flight of the Inflatable Antenna Experiment in May of 1996, which prompted the initiation of the NASA portion of the joint NASA/DOD coordinated Space Inflatables Program, which will develop the technology to be used in future mobile communications antennas along with other users. The NASA/DOD coordinated Space Inflatables Program was initiated in 1997 as a direct result of the Inflatable Antenna Experiment. The program adds a new NASA initiative to a substantial DOD program that involves developing a series of ground test hardware, starting with 3 meter diameter units and advancing the manufacturing techniques to fabricate a 25 meter ground demonstrator unit with surface accuracy exceeding the requirements for mobile communication applications. Simultaneously, the program will be advancing the state of the art in several important inflatable technology areas, such as developing rigidizable materials for struts and tori and investigating thin film technology issues, such as application of coatings, property measurement and materials processing and assembly techniques. A very important technology area being addressed by the program is deployment control techniques. The program will sponsor activities that will lead to understanding the effects of material strain energy release, residual air in the stowed structure, and the design of the launch restraint and release system needed to control deployment dynamics. Other technology areas directly applicable to developing inflatable mobile communication antennas in the near

  6. Large space structure damping design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Several FORTRAN subroutines and programs were developed which compute complex eigenvalues of a damped system using different approaches, and which rescale mode shapes to unit generalized mass and make rigid bodies orthogonal to each other. An analytical proof of a Minimum Constrained Frequency Criterion (MCFC) for a single damper is presented. A method to minimize the effect of control spill-over for large space structures is proposed. The characteristic equation of an undamped system with a generalized control law is derived using reanalysis theory. This equation can be implemented in computer programs for efficient eigenvalue analysis or control quasi synthesis. Methods to control vibrations in large space structure are reviewed and analyzed. The resulting prototype, using electromagnetic actuator, is described.

  7. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  8. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented which provide a comprehensive review of space missions requiring large antenna systems and of the status of key technologies required to enable these missions. Topic areas include mission applications for large space antenna systems, large space antenna structural systems, materials and structures technology, structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the space station, and flight test and evaluation.

  9. Gyrodampers for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, J. N.; Margulies, G.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of controlling the vibrations of a large space structures by the use of actively augmented damping devices distributed throughout the structure is addressed. The gyrodamper which consists of a set of single gimbal control moment gyros which are actively controlled to extract the structural vibratory energy through the local rotational deformations of the structure, is described and analyzed. Various linear and nonlinear dynamic simulations of gyrodamped beams are shown, including results on self-induced vibrations due to sensor noise and rotor imbalance. The complete nonlinear dynamic equations are included. The problem of designing and sizing a system of gyrodampers for a given structure, or extrapolating results for one gyrodamped structure to another is solved in terms of scaling laws. Novel scaling laws for gyro systems are derived, based upon fundamental physical principles, and various examples are given.

  10. Large space systems technology, 1981. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    A total systems approach including structures, analyses, controls, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems. Specifically, program status, structures, materials, and analyses, and control of large space systems are addressed.

  11. Control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gran, R.; Rossi, M.; Moyer, H. G.; Austin, F.

    1979-01-01

    The control of large space structures was studied to determine what, if any, limitations are imposed on the size of spacecraft which may be controlled using current control system design technology. Using a typical structure in the 35 to 70 meter size category, a control system design that used actuators that are currently available was designed. The amount of control power required to maintain the vehicle in a stabilized gravity gradient pointing orientation that also damped various structural motions was determined. The moment of inertia and mass properties of this structure were varied to verify that stability and performance were maintained. The study concludes that the structure's size is required to change by at least a factor of two before any stability problems arise. The stability margin that is lost is due to the scaling of the gravity gradient torques (the rigid body control) and as such can easily be corrected by changing the control gains associated with the rigid body control. A secondary conclusion from the study is that the control design that accommodates the structural motions (to damp them) is a little more sensitive than the design that works on attitude control of the rigid body only.

  12. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A compilation of the unclassified papers presented at the NASA Conference on Large Space Antenna Systems Technology covers the following areas: systems, structures technology, control technology, electromagnetics, and space flight test and evaluation.

  13. Large space systems technology, 1980, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriver, F., III (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The technological and developmental efforts in support of the large space systems technology are described. Three major areas of interests are emphasized: (1) technology pertient to large antenna systems; (2) technology related to large space systems; and (3) activities that support both antenna and platform systems.

  14. Analysis of EM dataset with several sensor configurations obtained by the loop-loop EM survey on magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHOI, J.; Yi, M. J.; Sasaki, Y.; Son, J.; Nam, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Most of mineral mines in Korea are located in rugged mountain area embedding small-scale anomalies. Loop-loop EM survey system can be a better choice for exploring those mines because no ground contact is required and portable loops are freely positioned. Survey design is very important for detecting small amount of mineral deposits efficiently and spatial limits of survey lines should be considered. Along a same survey line, surveys with different separations between a transmitter and a receiver are applicable. EM responses are calculated in a layered-earth model embedding magnetic anomalies and analyses considering electric conductivity and magnetic permeability are made for the loop-loop EM survey data. Combining EM dataset with multi-frequency and multi-separation slightly enhanced a reconstructed image. Loop-loop EM survey using PROMOIS system was conducted on a small magnetite mine. Inversion with and without considering magnetic permeability was conducted for EM data with multi-frequency and multi-separation between a transmitter and a receiver.

  15. Large Space Systems Technology, Part 2, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Four major areas of interest are covered: technology pertinent to large antenna systems; technology related to the control of large space systems; basic technology concerning structures, materials, and analyses; and flight technology experiments. Large antenna systems and flight technology experiments are described. Design studies, structural testing results, and theoretical applications are presented with accompanying validation data. These research studies represent state-of-the art technology that is necessary for the development of large space systems. A total systems approach including structures, analyses, controls, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems.

  16. Large space reflector technology on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankins, J. C.; Dickinson, R. M.; Freeland, R. E.; Marzwell, N. I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of the Space Station in the evolutionary development of large space reflector technology and the accommodation of mission systems which will apply large space reflectors during the late 1990s and the early part of the next century. Reflectors which range from 10 to 100 meters in size and which span the electromagnetic spectrum for applications that include earth communications, earth observations, astrophysics and solar physics, and deep space communications are discussed. The role of the Space Station in large space reflector technology development and system performance demonstration is found to be critical; that role involves the accommodation of a wide variety of technology demonstrations and operational activities on the Station, including reflector deployment and/or assembly, mechanical performance verification and configuration refinement, systematic diagnostics of reflector surfaces, structural dynamics and controls research, overall system performance characterization and modification (including both radio frequency field pattern measurements and required end-to-end system demonstrations), and reflector-to-spacecraft integration and staging. A unique facility for Space Station-based, large space reflector research and development is proposed. A preliminary concept for such a Space Station-based Large Space Reflector Facility (LSRF) is described.

  17. Large space structures - Fantasies and facts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Boyer, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    A review of large space structures activities from 1973 to 1979 is presented. Long-range studies of space colonies, gigantic solar power stations and projected earth applications revived interest in space activities. Studies suggest opportunities for advanced antenna and platform applications. Matching low-thrust propulsion to large flexible vehicles will be a key technology. Current structures technology investigations include deployable and erectable structures and assembly techniques. Based on orbited structures experience, deployment reliability is a critical issue for deployable structures. For erectable structures, concepts for earth-fabricated and space-fabricated memb

  18. Advances in Structures for Large Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    2004-01-01

    The development of structural systems for scientific remote sensing and space exploration has been underway for four decades. The seminal work from 1960 to 1980 provided the basis for many of the design principles of modern space systems. From 1980- 2000 advances in active materials and structures and the maturing of composites technology led to high precision active systems such those used in the Space Interferometry Mission. Recently, thin-film membrane or gossamer structures are being investigated for use in large area space systems because of their low mass and high packaging efficiency. Various classes of Large Space Systems (LSS) are defined in order to describe the goals and system challenges in structures and materials technologies. With an appreciation of both past and current technology developments, future technology challenges are used to develop a list of technology investments that can have significant impacts on LSS development.

  19. Vibration suppression in a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narendra, Kumpati S.

    1988-01-01

    The Yale University Center for Systems Science and the NASA Johnson Space Center collaborated in a study of vibration suppression in a large space structure during the period January 1985 to August 1987. The research proposal submitted by the Center to NASA concerned disturbance isolation in flexible space structures. The general objective of the proposal was to create within the Center a critical mass of expertise on problems related to the dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. A specific objective was to formulate both passive and active control strategies for the disturbance isolation problem. Both objectives were achieved during the period of the contract. While an extensive literature exists on the control of flexible space structures, it is generally acknowledged that many important questions remain open at even a fundamental level. Hence, instead of studying grossly simplified models of complex structural systems, it was decided as a first step to confine attention to detailed and thorough analyses of simple structures.

  20. Learning to build large structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, T.; Patterson, H. G.; Nathan, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines some of the key technologies and forms of construction know-how that will have to be developed and tested for eventual application to building large structures in space. Construction of a shuttle-tended space construction/demonstration platform would comprehensively demonstrate large structure technology, develop construction capability, and furnish a construction platform for a variety of operational large structures. Completion of this platform would lead to demonstrations of the Satellite Power System (SPS) concept, including microwave transmission, fabrication of 20-m-deep beams, conductor installation, rotary joint installation, and solar blanket installation.

  1. Environmental effects and large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.

    1981-01-01

    When planning large scale operations in space, environmental impact must be considered in addition to radiation, spacecraft charging, contamination, high power and size. Pollution of the atmosphere and space is caused by rocket effluents and by photoelectrons generated by sunlight falling on satellite surfaces even light pollution may result (the SPS may reflect so much light as to be a nuisance to astronomers). Large (100 Km 2) structures also will absorb the high energy particles that impinge on them. Altogether, these effects may drastically alter the Earth's magnetosphere. It is not clear if these alterations will in any way affect the Earth's surface climate. Large structures will also generate large plasma wakes and waves which may cause interference with communications to the vehicle. A high energy, microwave beam from the SPS will cause ionospheric turbulence, affecting UHF and VHF communications. Although none of these effects may ultimately prove critical, they must be considered in the design of large structures.

  2. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed by NASA in conjunction with industry for potential large, deployable space antennas with applications in communication, radio astronomy and earth observation is reviewed. Concepts for deployable antennas that have been developed to the point of detail design are summarized, including the advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna, the maypole (hoop/column) antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna. The assessment of state-of-the-art deployable antenna technology is discussed, and the approach taken by the NASA Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program to the development of technology for large space antenna systems is outlined. Finally, the further development of the wrap-rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) concept, which meet mission model requirements, to satisfy LSST size and frequency requirements is discussed.

  3. Space Station Freedom: Dynamic instrumentation for a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, John P.; Cooper, Paul A.; Johnson, James W.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed approach called Modal Identification Experiment (MIE) for obtaining on-orbit dynamic response measurements on Space Station Freedom, the first of a family of large, flexible space structures is discussed. The Phase 2 conceptual design study which provides a conceptual design of a proposed measurement system and an experimental protocol for inobstrusively collecting dynamic response data critical to characterizing important vibration modes of Space Station Freedom were recently concluded. The case for conducting such a measurement program is presented and the specific MIE objectives that were identified, are listed. The sequence of discrete Space Station Freedom assembly configurations is described, and the Phase 2 conceptual design of the experiment and instrumentation system are defined. In addition, a plan to utilize a space station hydrid scale model in laboratory simulations as part of the design process are discussed.

  4. Identification of large space structures - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, Eugene; Juang, Jer-Nan; Junkins, John; Kamat, Manohar; Hasselman, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The system identification process presently discussed for the case of large space structures uses the observed input to a system and its observed response, or output, to derive an analytical model of the system which can then be used to predict its response to future inputs. Due to their size and complexity, as well as the intrinsic difficulty of identifying the environment in which they function, large space structures will require vast amounts of information, encompassing both experimental and analytical data for identification. A status evaluation is made of the structural system identification literature to date.

  5. Indian LSSC (Large Space Simulation Chamber) facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, A. S.; Prasadarao, V. S.; Gambhir, R. D.; Chandramouli, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Indian Space Agency has undertaken a major project to acquire in-house capability for thermal and vacuum testing of large satellites. This Large Space Simulation Chamber (LSSC) facility will be located in Bangalore and is to be operational in 1989. The facility is capable of providing 4 meter diameter solar simulation with provision to expand to 4.5 meter diameter at a later date. With such provisions as controlled variations of shroud temperatures and availability of infrared equipment as alternative sources of thermal radiation, this facility will be amongst the finest anywhere. The major design concept and major aspects of the LSSC facility are presented here.

  6. Dynamics and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurre, G. S.; Ryan, R. S.; Scofield, H. N.; Sims, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to gather data useful to investigators in the fields of large space structure dynamics and control modeling, design and testing. Attention is given to structural dynamics and its relationship to such allied engineering fields as flutter analysis, as well as to problems in the prediction of atmospheric density at orbital altitude. The first challenge posed by large space structure control is the design of control systems with natural frequencies above several major structural frequencies. The establishment of a sufficiently accurate structural model, plant excitation, and shape maintenance, are noted to be additional problems.

  7. Planning for large construction projects in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses briefly some broad plans for developing the technology needed for large construction projects in space ranging from orbiting solar power stations to large communications antennas. Space construction classes include assembly of modules, deployment of compacted structures, assembly of passive preformed pieces, and fabrication of structures from sheet stock. Technological areas related to structural concepts include (1) analyses for prediction of structural behavior, structural/control interaction, electromagnetic and control performance, and integrated design development; (2) electronics for signal conditioning and data acquisition, power distribution, and signal channel interference and multipaction; (3) concepts for shape control, attitude/pointing control, and orbital transfer and station keeping; and (4) materials and techniques for 30-year dimensional stable composites, thermal control, thin-lightweight structural alloys, and material joining in space. The concept of a power module for the construction operations is discussed along with a concept for a habitability module.

  8. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  9. Microwave performance characterization of large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Performance capabilities of large microwave space antenna configurations with apertures generally from 100 wavelengths upwards are discussed. Types of antennas considered include: phased arrays, lenses, reflectors, and hybrid combinations of phased arrays with reflectors or lenses. The performance characteristics of these broad classes of antennas are examined and compared in terms of applications.

  10. Large area space solar cell assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Nowlan, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a large area space solar cell assembly is presented. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are (1) use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and (2) integration of coverglass application and call fabrication.

  11. EVA assembly of large space structure element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bush, H. G.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Stokes, J. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a test program to assess the potential of manned extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly of erectable space trusses are described. Seventeen tests were conducted in which six "space-weight" columns were assembled into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two "space"-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental "element" of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system modes were evaluated. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structures is well within man's capabilities.

  12. Environmental interaction implications for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E.; Fischbein, W.; Stauber, M. C.; Suh, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Large Space Systems (LSS) comprise a new class of spacecraft, the design and performance of which may be seriously affected by a variety of environmental interactions. The special concerns associated with spacecraft charging and plasma interactions from the LSS designer's viewpoint are addressed. Survivability of these systems under combined solar U.V., particle radiation and repeated electrical discharges is of primary importance. Additional questions regard the character of electrical discharges over very large areas, the effects of high current/voltage systems and magnitude of induced structural disturbances. A concept is described for a large scale experiment platform.

  13. Similarity searching in large combinatorial chemistry spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rarey, Matthias; Stahl, Martin

    2001-06-01

    We present a novel algorithm, called Ftrees-FS, for similarity searching in large chemistry spaces based on dynamic programming. Given a query compound, the algorithm generates sets of compounds from a given chemistry space that are similar to the query. The similarity search is based on the feature tree similarity measure representing molecules by tree structures. This descriptor allows handling combinatorial chemistry spaces as a whole instead of looking at subsets of enumerated compounds. Within few minutes of computing time, the algorithm is able to find the most similar compound in very large spaces as well as sets of compounds at an arbitrary similarity level. In addition, the diversity among the generated compounds can be controlled. A set of 17 000 fragments of known drugs, generated by the RECAP procedure from the World Drug Index, was used as the search chemistry space. These fragments can be combined to more than 1018 compounds of reasonable size. For validation, known antagonists/inhibitors of several targets including dopamine D4, histamine H1, and COX2 are used as queries. Comparison of the compounds created by Ftrees-FS to other known actives demonstrates the ability of the method to jump between structurally unrelated molecule classes.

  14. Very large aperture optics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, T. G.; Smith, J. P.; Johnson, M. T.

    1994-09-01

    A new type of space optics technology is presented which promises the realization of very large apertures (tens of meters), while packagable into lightweight, small volume containers compatible with conventional launch vehicles. This technology makes use of thin foils of circular shape which are uniformly mass loaded around the perimeter. Once unfurled and set into rapid rotation about the transversal axis, the foil is stretched into a perfectly flat plane by the centrifugal forces acting on the peripheral masses. The simplest applications of this novel technology are optically flat reflectors, using metallized foils of Mylar, Kevlar, or Kapton. Other more complex optical components can be realized by use of binary optics techniques, such as depositing holograms by selective local microscale removal of the reflective surface. Electrostatic techniques, in conjunction with an auxiliary foil, under local, distributed real-time control of the optical parameters, allow implementation of functions like beam steering and focal length adjustments. Gas pressurization allows stronger curvatures and thus smaller focal ratios for non-imaging applications. Limits on aperture are imposed primarily by manufacturing capabilities. Applications of such large optics in space are numerous. They range from military, such as space based lasers, to the civilian ones of power beaming, solar energy collection, and astronomy. This paper examines this simple and innovative concept in detail, discusses deployment and attitude control issues and presents approaches for realization.

  15. Passive stabilization for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sesak, J. R.; Gronet, M. J.; Marinos, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    The optimal tuning of multiple tuned-mass dampers for the transient vibration damping of large space structures is investigated. A multidisciplinary approach is used. Structural dynamic techniques are applied to gain physical insight into absorber/structure interaction and to optimize specific cases. Modern control theory and parameter optimization techniques are applied to the general optimization problem. A design procedure for multi-absorber multi-DOF vibration damping problems is presented. Classical dynamic models are extended to investigate the effects of absorber placement, existing structural damping, and absorber cross-coupling on the optimal design synthesis. The control design process for the general optimization problem is formulated as a linear output feedback control problem via the development of a feedback control canonical form. The techniques are applied to sample micro-g and pointing problems on the NASA dual keel space station.

  16. Concepts for large interferometers in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H.; Nein, M. E.; Davis, B. G.; Hamilton, E. C.; Roberts, D. H.; Traub, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Very high angular resolution can be achieved in optical and radio astronomy through interferometers in space. Evolutionary approaches and required technological advances are presented. In the optical region a phase-coherent array, (COSMIC) starting as a four-element linear array is discussed. Combining several modules results in greatly improved resolution with a goal of combining images to obtain a single field of view with 0.004 arcsecond resolution. The angular resolution, detail and temporal coverage of radio maps obtained by ground-based Very Long Interferometry (VLBI) can be greatly improved by placing one of the stations in earth orbit. An evolutionary program leading to a large aperture VLBI observatory in space is discussed.

  17. Navigating large hierarchical space using invisible links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming C.; Hsu, Meichun; Dayal, Umeshwar; Krug, Adrian

    2000-02-01

    To date, many web visualization applications have shown the usefulness of a hyperbolic tree. However, we have discovered that strict hierarchical tree structures are too limited. For many practical applications, we need to generalize a hyperbolic tree to a hyperbolic space. This approach results in massive cross-links in a highly connected graph that clutter the display. To resolve this problem, an invisible link technique is introduced. In this paper. we describe the navigation in a large hyperbolic space using invisible links in some detail. We have applied this invisible link method to three data mining visualization applications: e-business web navigation for URL visits, customer call center for question-answer service, and web site index creation.

  18. Adaptive momentum management for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, E.

    1987-01-01

    Momentum management is discussed for a Large Space Structure (LSS) with the structure selected configuration being the Initial Orbital Configuration (IOC) of the dual keel space station. The external forces considered were gravity gradient and aerodynamic torques. The goal of the momentum management scheme developed is to remove the bias components of the external torques and center the cyclic components of the stored angular momentum. The scheme investigated is adaptive to uncertainties of the inertia tensor and requires only approximate knowledge of principle moments of inertia. Computational requirements are minimal and should present no implementation problem in a flight type computer and the method proposed is shown to be effective in the presence of attitude control bandwidths as low as .01 radian/sec.

  19. Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, Michael; Cleveland, Paul; Durand, Dale; Klavins, Andy; Muheim, Daniella; Paine, Christopher; Petach, Mike; Tenerelli, Domenick; Tolomeo, Jason; Walyus, Keith

    2007-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program funded an effort to develop a system cooling technology, which is applicable to all future infrared, sub-millimeter and millimeter cryogenic space telescopes. In particular, this technology is necessary for the proposed large space telescope Single Aperture Far-Infrared Telescope (SAFIR) mission. This technology will also enhance the performance and lower the risk and cost for other cryogenic missions. The new paradigm for cooling to low temperatures will involve passive cooling using lightweight deployable membranes that serve both as sunshields and V-groove radiators, in combination with active cooling using mechanical coolers operating down to 4 K. The Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes (LST) mission planned to develop and demonstrate a multi-layered sunshield, which is actively cooled by a multi-stage mechanical cryocooler, and further the models and analyses critical to scaling to future missions. The outer four layers of the sunshield cool passively by radiation, while the innermost layer is actively cooled to enable the sunshield to decrease the incident solar irradiance by a factor of more than one million. The cryocooler cools the inner layer of the sunshield to 20 K, and provides cooling to 6 K at a telescope mounting plate. The technology readiness level (TRL) of 7 will be achieved by the active cooling technology following the technology validation flight in Low Earth Orbit. In accordance with the New Millennium charter, tests and modeling are tightly integrated to advance the technology and the flight design for "ST-class" missions. Commercial off-the-shelf engineering analysis products are used to develop validated modeling capabilities to allow the techniques and results from LST to apply to a wide variety of future missions. The LST mission plans to "rewrite the book" on cryo-thermal testing and modeling techniques, and validate modeling techniques to scale to future space telescopes such as SAFIR.

  20. Distributed control of large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. M.; Hamidi, M.; Lin, Y. H.; Wang, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    A systematic way to choose control design parameters and to evaluate performance for large space antennas is presented. The structural dynamics and control properties for a Hoop and Column Antenna and a Wrap-Rib Antenna are characterized. Some results of the effects of model parameter uncertainties to the stability, surface accuracy, and pointing errors are presented. Critical dynamics and control problems for these antenna configurations are identified and potential solutions are discussed. It was concluded that structural uncertainties and model error can cause serious performance deterioration and can even destabilize the controllers. For the hoop and column antenna, large hoop and long meat and the lack of stiffness between the two substructures result in low structural frequencies. Performance can be improved if this design can be strengthened. The two-site control system is more robust than either single-site control systems for the hoop and column antenna.

  1. Large space antenna concepts for ESGP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Allan W.

    1989-01-01

    It is appropriate to note that 1988 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the reflector antenna. It was in 1888 that Heinrich Hertz constructed the first one, a parabolic cylinder made of sheet zinc bent to shape and supported by a wooden frame. Hertz demonstrated the existence of the electromagnetic waves that had been predicted theoretically by James Clerk Maxwell some 22 years earlier. In the 100 years since Hertz's pioneering work the field of electromagnetics has grown explosively: one of the technologies is that of remote sensing of planet Earth by means of electromagnetic waves, using both passive and active sensors located on an Earth Science Geostationary Platform (ESEP). For these purposes some exquisitely sensitive instruments were developed, capable of reaching to the fringes of the known universe, and relying on large reflector antennas to collect the minute signals and direct them to appropriate receiving devices. These antennas are electrically large, with diameters of 3000 to 10,000 wavelengths and with gains approaching 80 to 90 dB. Some of the reflector antennas proposed for ESGP are also electrically large. For example, at 220 GHz a 4-meter reflector is nearly 3000 wavelengths in diameter, and is electrically quite comparable with a number of the millimeter wave radiotelescopes that are being built around the world. Its surface must meet stringent requirements on rms smoothness, and ability to resist deformation. Here, however, the environmental forces at work are different. There are no varying forces due to wind and gravity, but inertial forces due to mechanical scanning must be reckoned with. With this form of beam scanning, minimizing momentum transfer to the space platform is a problem that demands an answer. Finally, reflector surface distortion due to thermal gradients caused by the solar flux probably represents the most challenging problem to be solved if these Large Space Antennas are to achieve the gain and resolution required of

  2. Structural design methodology for large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornsife, Ralph J.

    1992-02-01

    The Department of Defense requires research and development in designing, fabricating, deploying, and maintaining large space structures (LSS) in support of Army and Strategic Defense Initiative military objectives. Because of their large size, extreme flexibility, and the unique loading conditions in the space environment, LSS will present engineers with problems unlike those encountered in designing conventional civil engineering or aerospace structures. LSS will require sophisticated passive damping and active control systems in order to meet stringent mission requirements. These structures must also be optimally designed to minimize high launch costs. This report outlines a methodology for the structural design of LSS. It includes a definition of mission requirements, structural modeling and analysis, passive damping and active control system design, ground-based testing, payload integration, on-orbit system verification, and on-orbit assessment of structural damage. In support of this methodology, analyses of candidate LSS truss configurations are presented, and an algorithm correlating ground-based test behavior to expected microgravity behavior is developed.

  3. Structural design methodology for large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornsife, Ralph J.

    The Department of Defense requires research and development in designing, fabricating, deploying, and maintaining large space structures (LSS) in support of Army and Strategic Defense Initiative military objectives. Because of their large size, extreme flexibility, and the unique loading conditions in the space environment, LSS will present engineers with problems unlike those encountered in designing conventional civil engineering or aerospace structures. LSS will require sophisticated passive damping and active control systems in order to meet stringent mission requirements. These structures must also be optimally designed to minimize high launch costs. This report outlines a methodology for the structural design of LSS. It includes a definition of mission requirements, structural modeling and analysis, passive damping and active control system design, ground-based testing, payload integration, on-orbit system verification, and on-orbit assessment of structural damage. In support of this methodology, analyses of candidate LSS truss configurations are presented, and an algorithm correlating ground-based test behavior to expected microgravity behavior is developed.

  4. James Webb Space Telescope: large deployable cryogenic telescope in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.; Atkinson, Charles; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an infrared space telescope designed to explore four major science themes: first light and reionization, the assembly of galaxies, the birth of stars and protoplanetary systems, and planetary systems and origins of life. JWST is a segmented architecture telescope with an aperture of 6.6 m. It will operate at cryogenic temperature (40 K), achieved via passive cooling, in an orbit about the Earth-Sun second Lagrange point (L2). Passive cooling is facilitated by means of a large sunshield that provides thermal isolation and protection from direct illumination from the Sun. The large size of the telescope and spacecraft systems require that they are stowed for launch in a configuration that fits the Ariane 5 fairing, and then deployed after launch. Routine wavefront sensing and control measurements are used to achieve phasing of the segmented primary mirror and initial alignment of the telescope. A suite of instruments will provide the capability to observe over a spectral range from 0.6- to 27-μm wavelengths with imaging and spectroscopic configurations. An overview is presented of the architecture and selected optical design features of JWST are described.

  5. Travelling wave effects in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonflotow, A.

    1983-01-01

    Several aspects of travelling waves in Large Space Structures(LSS) are discussed. The dynamic similarity among LSS's, electric power systems, microwave circuits and communications network is noted. The existence of time lag between actuation and response is illuminated with the aid of simple examples, and their prediction is demonstrated. To prevent echoes, communications lines have matched terminations; this idea is applied to the design of dampers of one dimensional structures. Periodic structures act as mechanical band pass filters. Implications of this behavior are examined on a simple example. It is noted that the implication is twofold; continuum models of periodic lattice structures may err considerably; on the other hand, it is possible to design favorable transmission (and resonance) characteristics into the structure.

  6. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  7. Space transportation alternatives for large space programs: The International Space University Summer Session, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1993-01-01

    In 1992, the International Space University (ISU) held its Summer Session in Kitakyushu, Japan. This paper summarizes and expands upon some aspects of space solar power and space transportation that were considered during that session. The issues discussed in this paper are the result of a 10-week study by the Space Solar Power Program design project members and the Space Transportation Group to investigate new paradigms in space propulsion and how those paradigms might reduce the costs for large space programs. The program plan was to place a series of power satellites in Earth orbit. Several designs were studied where many kW, MW, or GW of power would be transmitted to Earth or to other spacecraft in orbit. During the summer session, a space solar power system was also detailed and analyzed. A high-cost space transportation program is potentially the most crippling barrier to such a space power program. At ISU, the focus of the study was to foster and develop some of the new paradigms that may eliminate the barriers to low cost for space exploration and exploitation. Many international and technical aspects of a large multinational program were studied. Environmental safety, space construction and maintenance, legal and policy issues of frequency allocation, technology transfer and control and many other areas were addressed. Over 120 students from 29 countries participated in this summer session. The results discussed in this paper, therefore, represent the efforts of many nations.

  8. Primary mirror assemblies for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    In this report are considered the basic problems which relate to developemnt, manufacture, experimental trying out, and usage of primary mirrors (PM) of the large space telescopes intended to perform distant sounding of the Earth. Attention is concentrated on development of weight-reduced passive mirrors which ensure more reliable operation of the telescope as a whole. In the report we expressed the opinion that it is quite possible to manufacture a passive weight-reduced PM if its diameter is equal approximately to 3 m. Materials which may be used for the manufacturing of PM are beryllium and silicon carbide, physical and mechanical parameters of which are the most preferable ones. But it should be taken into consideration that this is the glass ceramic of CO115M brand which has been mastered by the industry of Russia in the greatest extent. It was confirmed that parameters of this material remain unchanged during a long period of time. Constructions of the PM, made of glass ceramic, as well as constructions of holders intended to fix the mirror, are presented in this report. A holder is used first of all to prevent lowering of a PM surface quality after a mirror has been removed from a machine and fixed in a primary mirror assembly (PMA). At present two-layer construction of a PM is preferable. This construction consists of thick base including weight reduction structure, which is in a radius which is optimum from the standpoint of deformation of a mirror operating surface. In the process of manufacture a mirror is deprived of its weight with the use of special pneumatic off-loading elements. PMA is erected in vertical plane by means of using an interferometric inspection system. In the end of this report we expressed the views on an approach to engineering of a PM by taking into account potentialities both of space ships and of carrier rockets.

  9. Auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    An insight into auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements for large space systems (LSS) launchable by a single shuttle is presented. In an effort to scope the APS requirements for LSS, a set of generic LSSs were defined. For each generic LSS class a specific structural configuration, representative of that most likely to serve the needs of the 1980's and 1990's was defined. The environmental disturbance forces and torques which would be acting on each specific structural configuration in LEO and GEO orbits were then determined. Auxiliary propulsion requirements were determined as a function of: generic class specific configuration, size and openness of structure, orbit, angle of orientation, correction frequency, duty cycle, number and location of thrusters and direction of thrusters and APS/LSS interactions. The results of this analysis were used to define the APS characteristics of: (1) number and distribution of thrusters, (2) thruster modulation, (3) thrust level, (4) mission energy requirements, (5) total APS mass component breakdown, and (6) state of the art adequacy/deficiency. Previously announced in STAR as N83-26922

  10. Auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    An insight into auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements for large space systems (LSS) launchable by a single shuttle is presented. In an effort to scope the APS requirements for LSS, a set of generic LSSs were defined. For each generic LSS class a specific structural configuration, representative of that most likely to serve the needs of the 1980's and 1990's was defined. The environmental disturbance forces and torques which would be acting on each specific structural configuration in LEO and GEO orbits were then determined. Auxiliary propulsion requirements were determined as a function of: generic class specific configuration, size and openness of structure, orbit, angle of orientation, correction frequency, duty cycle, number and location of thrusters and direction of thrusters and APS/LSS interactions. The results of this analysis were used to define the APS characteristics of: (1) number and distribution of thrusters, (2) thruster modulation, (3) thrust level, (4) mission energy requirements, (5) total APS mass component breakdown, and (6) state of the art adequacy/deficiency.

  11. Toward large space systems. [Space Construction Base development from shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daros, C. J.; Freitag, R. F.; Kline, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The design of the Space Transportation System, consisting of the Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and upper stages, provides experience for the development of more advanced space systems. The next stage will involve space stations in low earth orbit with limited self-sufficiency, characterized by closed ecological environments, space-generated power, and perhaps the first use of space materials. The third phase would include manned geosynchronous space-station activity and a return to lunar operations. Easier access to space will encourage the use of more complex, maintenance-requiring satellites than those currently used. More advanced space systems could perform a wide range of public services such as electronic mail, personal and police communication, disaster control, earthquake detection/prediction, water availability indication, vehicle speed control, and burglar alarm/intrusion detection. Certain products, including integrated-circuit chips and some enzymes, can be processed to a higher degree of purity in space and might eventually be manufactured there. Hardware including dishes, booms, and planar surfaces necessary for advanced space systems and their development are discussed.

  12. Large Space Systems Technology, 1979. [antenna and space platform systems conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. C., Jr. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Items of technology and developmental efforts in support of the large space systems technology programs are described. The major areas of interest are large antennas systems, large space platform systems, and activities that support both antennas and platform systems.

  13. Evolving Coevolutionary Classifiers Under Large Attribute Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doucette, John; Lichodzijewski, Peter; Heywood, Malcolm

    Model-building under the supervised learning domain potentially face a dual learning problem of identifying both the parameters of the model and the subset of (domain) attributes necessary to support the model, thus using an embedded as opposed to wrapper or filter based design. Genetic Programming (GP) has always addressed this dual problem, however, further implicit assumptions are made which potentially increase the complexity of the resulting solutions. In this work we are specifically interested in the case of classification under very large attribute spaces. As such it might be expected that multiple independent/ overlapping attribute subspaces support the mapping to class labels; whereas GP approaches to classification generally assume a single binary classifier per class, forcing the model to provide a solution in terms of a single attribute subspace and single mapping to class labels. Supporting the more general goal is considered as a requirement for identifying a 'team' of classifiers with non-overlapping classifier behaviors, in which each classifier responds to different subsets of exemplars. Moreover, the subsets of attributes associated with each team member might utilize a unique 'subspace' of attributes. This work investigates the utility of coevolutionary model building for the case of classification problems with attribute vectors consisting of 650 to 100,000 dimensions. The resulting team based coevolutionary evolutionary method-Symbiotic Bid-based (SBB) GP-is compared to alternative embedded classifier approaches of C4.5 and Maximum Entropy Classification (MaxEnt). SSB solutions demonstrate up to an order of magnitude lower attribute count relative to C4.5 and up to two orders of magnitude lower attribute count than MaxEnt while retaining comparable or better classification performance. Moreover, relative to the attribute count of individual models participating within a team, no more than six attributes are ever utilized; adding a further

  14. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations. Large space structures, phase 2, midterm review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The large space structures technology development missions to be performed on an early manned space station was studied and defined and the resources needed and the design implications to an early space station to carry out these large space structures technology development missions were determined. Emphasis is being placed on more detail in mission designs and space station resource requirements.

  15. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations: Large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The testbed role of an early (1990-95) manned space station in large space structures technology development is defined and conceptual designs for large space structures development missions to be conducted at the space station are developed. Emphasis is placed on defining requirements and benefits of development testing on a space station in concert with ground and shuttle tests.

  16. Space transportation alternatives for large space programs - The International Space University summer session - 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-06-01

    The issues discussed in this paper are the result of a 10-week study by the Space Solar Power Program design project members and the Space Transportation Group at the International Space University (ISU) summer session of 1992 to investigate new paradigms in space propulsion and how those paradigms might reduce the costs for large space programs. The program plan was to place a series of power satellites in Earth orbit. Several designs were studied where many kW, MW or GW of power would be transmitted to Earth or to other spacecraft in orbit. During the summer session, a space solar power system was also detailed and analyzed. At ISU, the focus of the study was to foster and develop some of the new paradigms that may eliminate the barriers to low cost for space exploration and exploitation. Many international and technical aspects of a large multinational program were studied. Environmental safety, space construction and maintenance, legal and policy issues of frequency allocation, technology transfer and control and many other areas were addressed.

  17. Space transportation alternatives for large space programs - The International Space University summer session - 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    The issues discussed in this paper are the result of a 10-week study by the Space Solar Power Program design project members and the Space Transportation Group at the International Space University (ISU) summer session of 1992 to investigate new paradigms in space propulsion and how those paradigms might reduce the costs for large space programs. The program plan was to place a series of power satellites in Earth orbit. Several designs were studied where many kW, MW or GW of power would be transmitted to Earth or to other spacecraft in orbit. During the summer session, a space solar power system was also detailed and analyzed. At ISU, the focus of the study was to foster and develop some of the new paradigms that may eliminate the barriers to low cost for space exploration and exploitation. Many international and technical aspects of a large multinational program were studied. Environmental safety, space construction and maintenance, legal and policy issues of frequency allocation, technology transfer and control and many other areas were addressed.

  18. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  19. Large area space solar cell assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Spitzer, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    Results of the development of a 34.3 sq cm space solar cell and integral glass cover are presented. Average AM(0) cell efficiency is 14 percent. The cell design includes a high performance back surface reflector yielding a thermal alpha of approximately 0.66. A novel process is described which integrates cell fabrication and encapsulation thereby achieving a reduction of encapsulation cost. Test results indicate the potential of this new technology.

  20. Spacecraft momentum management procedures. [large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. C.; Davenport, P. B.; Sturch, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques appropriate for implementation onboard the space telescope and other spacecraft to manage the accumulation of momentum in reaction wheel control systems using magnetic torquing coils are described. Generalized analytical equations are derived for momentum control laws that command the magnetic torquers. These control laws naturally fall into two main categories according to the methods used for updating the magnetic dipole command: closed loop, in which the update is based on current measurements to achieve a desired torque instantaneously, and open-loop, in which the update is based on predicted information to achieve a desired momentum at the end of a period of time. Physical interpretations of control laws in general and of the Space Telescope cross product and minimum energy control laws in particular are presented, and their merits and drawbacks are discussed. A technique for retaining the advantages of both the open-loop and the closed-loop control laws is introduced. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of these control laws in the Space Telescope environment.

  1. Large Space Structure Charging during Eclipse Passage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-15

    ADDRESS(It different fron Controllng Olfc1 ) IS. SECURITY ::LASS (of In$. report) Unclassified IS.. DE’.LASSIFICATION ’DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 16 ...as a Function of Vmax, the Eclipse Potential 15 10. Ohmic Power Loss in Solar Power Satellite as a Function of Resistivity 16 Tables 1. Space Plasma...total drop between the ends of the structure 6V. The high-resistance curve is nearly linear, owing to the fact 12 - pHo 4 X10- 6 A/M 2 DA1.0 16 800

  2. Structural Dynamics and Control of Large Space Structures, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Basic research in the control of large space structures is discussed. Active damping and control of flexible beams, active stabilization of flexible antenna feed towers, spacecraft docking, and robust pointing control of large space platform payloads are among the topics discussed.

  3. Learning Theory for Collaborative Large Shared Digital Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivern, Daniela; Morgan, Michael; Butler, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This research applies Socio-Cultural theory and Distributed Cognition/Activity theory to conceptualize the design of collaborative learning activities in large shared digital spaces. The paper begins by providing a summary of previous work in the creation of a technology platform for large shared digital spaces. It then details how Socio-Cultural…

  4. Robust control for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, M. F.

    1987-01-01

    A brief description of program objectives and the space based radar application is given. General characteristics of the 100 m diameter reflector spacecraft are described along with the intended mission and associated requirements, and dynamic characteristics relevant to that mission. Preliminary control analyses are carried out for the critical rapid slew and settle maneuver to establish feedback control requirements and fundamental limitations in meeting those requirements with control hardware for a baseline reaction control system (RCS) jet placement assumed for the open loop bang-bang slew limitations. Control moment gyros (CMGs), angular position sensors, and linear translation sensors are placed for feedback control. Control laws are designed for the improved sensor and actuator placement and evaluated for performance and robustness to unstructured model uncertainty. The robustness of the control design is assessed with respect to modal parameter uncertainty. Results of the control designs analyses are summarized, conclusions are drawn, and recommendations made for future studies.

  5. Adaptive Techniques for Large Space Apertures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    GP Anitern, 200l de or,~,’rn, receiner/ proceso 1"’ - requires enternal !titude deter- minationr such as a star tracker Increased mechanizatio’ Sensor...control systems into one unit; namely, a fine pointing control using the gimbal rates as the control variables while maintaining constant rotor speeds...CMG mode), and a coarse control for large maneuvers using the rotor speeds as the control variables and locking the gimbals (RW mode). The simultaneous

  6. Application of NASTRAN to large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balderes, T.; Zalesak, J.; Dyreyes, V.; Lee, E.

    1976-01-01

    The application of NASTRAN to design studies of two very large-area lightweight structures is described. The first is the Satellite Solar Power Station, while the second is a deployable three hundred meter diameter antenna. A brief discussion of the operation of the SSPS is given, followed by a description of the structure. The use of the NASTRAN program for static, vibration and thermal analysis is illustrated and some results are given. Next, the deployable antenna is discussed and the use of NASTRAN for static analysis, buckling analysis and vibration analysis is detailed.

  7. The Space Station as a Construction Base for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of using the Space Station as a construction site for large space structures is examined. An overview is presented of the results of a program entitled Definition of Technology Development Missions (TDM's) for Early Space Stations - Large Space Structures. The definition of LSS technology development missions must be responsive to the needs of future space missions which require large space structures. Long range plans for space were assembled by reviewing Space System Technology Models (SSTM) and other published sources. Those missions which will use large space structures were reviewed to determine the objectives which must be demonstrated by technology development missions. The three TDM's defined during this study are: (1) a construction storage/hangar facility; (2) a passive microwave radiometer; and (3) a precision optical system.

  8. Astronomers, Congress, and the Large Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanle, P. A.

    1985-04-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project was initiated near the end of the Apollo program and immediately encountered fiscal contraints. Planned as a long-term facility, the HST had to be continually justified to the public, astronomers and Congress from 1973 onward. Budgetary restraints caused design reductions which for a while threatened the practicality of the HST and changed it from a pressurized, manned unit to an automatic mode, teleoperated, intermittently visited spacecraft. It is noted that numerous exaggerations were made of both the power of the HST for scientific research and the total support of the astronomical community during promotion of the HST program, although the HST is the most powerful visual wavelength telescope ever to be built due to its unique operating environment. NASA's consistent and steadily more detailed definitions of the design features and missions of the HST proved to be a decisive factor in repeated requests for information by funding committees who were deliberating in the presence of severe fiscal difficulties.

  9. Large Active Retrodirective Arrays for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An active retrodirective array (ARA) electronically points a microwave beam back at the apparent source of an incident pilot signal. Retrodirectivity is the result of phase conjugation of the pilot signal received by each element of the array. The problem of supplying the correct phase reference to the phase conjugation circuit (PCC) associated with each element of the array is solved by central phasing. By eliminating the need for structural rigidity, central phasing confers a decisive advantage on ARA's as large spaceborne antennas. A new form of central phasing suitable for very large arrays is described. ARA's may easily be modified to serve both as transmitting and receiving arrays simultaneously. Two new kinds of exact, frequency translating PCC's are described. Such PCC's provide the ARA with input-output isolation and freedom from squint. The pointing errors caused by the radial and transverse components of the ARA's velocity, by the propagation medium, and by multipath are discussed. A two element ARA breadboard was built and tested at JPL. Its performance is limited primarily by multipath induced errors.

  10. NASA/Howard University Large Space Structures Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, T. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Basic research on the engineering behavior of large space structures is presented. Methods of structural analysis, control, and optimization of large flexible systems are examined. Topics of investigation include the Load Correction Method (LCM) modeling technique, stabilization of flexible bodies by feedback control, mathematical refinement of analysis equations, optimization of the design of structural components, deployment dynamics, and the use of microprocessors in attitude and shape control of large space structures. Information on key personnel, budgeting, support plans and conferences is included.

  11. Developing closed life support systems for large space habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. M.; Harlan, A. D.; Krumhar, K. C.

    1978-01-01

    In anticipation of possible large-scale, long-duration space missions which may be conducted in the future, NASA has begun to investigate the research and technology development requirements to create life support systems for large space habitats. An analysis suggests the feasibility of a regeneration of food in missions which exceed four years duration. Regeneration of food in space may be justified for missions of shorter duration when large crews must be supported at remote sites such as lunar bases and space manufacturing facilities. It is thought that biological components consisting principally of traditional crop and livestock species will prove to be the most acceptable means of closing the food cycle. A description is presented of the preliminary results of a study of potential biological components for large space habitats. Attention is given to controlled ecosystems, Russian life support system research, controlled-environment agriculture, and the social aspects of the life-support system.

  12. Risk to space sustainability from large constellations of satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida Virgili, B.; Dolado, J. C.; Lewis, H. G.; Radtke, J.; Krag, H.; Revelin, B.; Cazaux, C.; Colombo, C.; Crowther, R.; Metz, M.

    2016-09-01

    The number of artificial objects in orbit continues to increase and, with it, a key threat to space sustainability. In response, space agencies have identified a set of mitigation guidelines aimed at enabling space users to reduce the generation of space debris by, for example, limiting the orbital lifetime of their spacecraft and launcher stages after the end of their mission. Planned, large constellations of satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO), though addressing the lack of basic internet coverage in some world regions, may disrupt the sustainability of the space environment enabled by these mitigation practices. We analyse the response of the space object population to the introduction of a large constellation conforming to the post-mission disposal guideline with differing levels of success and with different disposal orbit options. The results show that a high success rate of post-mission disposal by constellation satellites is a key driver for space sustainability.

  13. Spacecraft charging and plasma interaction implications for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E.; Stauber, M.; Rossi, M.; Fischbein, W.

    1978-01-01

    Specific discharge mechanisms, plasma interactions, and scale effects associated with very large spacecraft are studied. The large area, low density character, and extensive use of non-conducting materials is thought to have a major impact on the performance and survivability of many large space systems.

  14. A near term space demonstration program for large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    For applications involving an employment of ultralarge structures in space, it would be necessary to have some form of space fabrication and assembly in connection with launch vehicle payload and volume limitations. The findings of a recently completed NASA sponsored study related to an orbital construction demonstration are reported. It is shown how a relatively small construction facility which is assembled in three shuttle flights can substantially advance space construction know-how and provide the nation with a permanent shuttle tended facility that can further advance large structures technologies and provide a construction capability for deployment of large structural systems envisioned for the late 1980s. The large structures applications identified are related to communications, navigation, earth observation, energy systems, radio astronomy, illumination, space colonization, and space construction.

  15. Industry workshop on large space structures: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, E.

    1976-01-01

    A NASA-sponsored Industry Workshop on Large Space Structures was convened at Langley Research Center on 24-26 February 1976. A number of structures specialists from seven major aerospace companies participated. Predictions about the future structures to be fabricated/assembled/erected in space are presented along with a composite appraisal of what the Aerospace Industry views as the critical structural technology developments needed to support NASA space missions in the 1985-2000 time frame.

  16. Creating and testing large space structures of high precision surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medzmariashvili, Elgudja; Iacobashvili, Alexander; Beducadze, Guram

    The authors describe work on the development of large structures for use in space. This work involves development of structural classes (types), theoretical studis, systems manufacturing and full scale structure testing. Collecting solar energy in space and sending it down to Earth is of great interest to humanity because of the large need for energy on Earth. Building any large solar power station requires industry and construction engineering in space. The problem, as a whole, as well as specific parts thereof virtually always requires certain engineering support, i.e. erection of supporting, reflecting and other large-sized structures in orbit. The Institute of Transformed Structures carries out research, design manufacturing, ground testing and supply of launchable prototypes. The work is performed in an unified manner and contains several trends (categories) which define structures that can be assembled in space.

  17. 19. Interior view of large unoccupied office space looking towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Interior view of large unoccupied office space looking towards opened doorway to corridor; showing interior and exterior windows, and separated office space; main portion of east wing on main floor; view to south. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Group Administration & Secure Storage Building, 2372 Westover Avenue, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  18. Nonterrestrial material processing and manufacturing of large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. F.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide pertinent and readily usable information on the extraterrestrial processing of materials and manufacturing of components and elements of these planned large space systems from preprocessed lunar materials which are made available at a processing and manufacturing site in space. Required facilities, equipment, machinery, energy and manpower are defined.

  19. Benchmarking processes for managing large international space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, Humboldt C., Jr.; Duke, Michael B.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between management style and program costs is analyzed to determine the feasibility of financing large international space missions. The incorporation of management systems is considered to be essential to realizing low cost spacecraft and planetary surface systems. Several companies ranging from large Lockheed 'Skunk Works' to small companies including Space Industries, Inc., Rocket Research Corp., and Orbital Sciences Corp. were studied. It is concluded that to lower the prices, the ways in which spacecraft and hardware are developed must be changed. Benchmarking of successful low cost space programs has revealed a number of prescriptive rules for low cost managements, including major changes in the relationships between the public and private sectors.

  20. Automatic in-orbit assembly of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    The automated assembly of a large number of components required for the on-orbit erection of large tetrahedral space platforms is described. The assembly machine is a huge jig in which a multitude of mechanisms must operated continuously in the thermo vacuum environment of space and under the control of computers programmed to command every step of each motion. The concepts are presented to determine the most reliable solution. Continuous operation of mechanisms in space presents many unresolved problems, with regard to lubrication of unprotected devices, such as chain drives, which must maintain reasonable positioning tolerances.

  1. Nonterrestrial material processing and manufacturing of large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G.

    1979-01-01

    Nonterrestrial processing of materials and manufacturing of large space system components from preprocessed lunar materials at a manufacturing site in space is described. Lunar materials mined and preprocessed at the lunar resource complex will be flown to the space manufacturing facility (SMF), where together with supplementary terrestrial materials, they will be final processed and fabricated into space communication systems, solar cell blankets, radio frequency generators, and electrical equipment. Satellite Power System (SPS) material requirements and lunar material availability and utilization are detailed, and the SMF processing, refining, fabricating facilities, material flow and manpower requirements are described.

  2. Potential large missions enabled by NASA's space launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.; Schnell, Andrew; Smith, David A.; Jackman, Angela; Warfield, Keith R.

    2016-07-01

    Large space telescope missions have always been limited by their launch vehicle's mass and volume capacities. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was specifically designed to fit inside the Space Shuttle and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is specifically designed to fit inside an Ariane 5. Astrophysicists desire even larger space telescopes. NASA's "Enduring Quests Daring Visions" report calls for an 8- to 16-m Large UV-Optical-IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor mission to enable ultra-high-contrast spectroscopy and coronagraphy. AURA's "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earth" report calls for a 12-m class High-Definition Space Telescope to pursue transformational scientific discoveries. NASA's "Planning for the 2020 Decadal Survey" calls for a Habitable Exoplanet Imaging (HabEx) and a LUVOIR as well as Far-IR and an X-Ray Surveyor missions. Packaging larger space telescopes into existing launch vehicles is a significant engineering complexity challenge that drives cost and risk. NASA's planned Space Launch System (SLS), with its 8 or 10-m diameter fairings and ability to deliver 35 to 45-mt of payload to Sun-Earth-Lagrange-2, mitigates this challenge by fundamentally changing the design paradigm for large space telescopes. This paper reviews the mass and volume capacities of the planned SLS, discusses potential implications of these capacities for designing large space telescope missions, and gives three specific mission concept implementation examples: a 4-m monolithic off-axis telescope, an 8-m monolithic on-axis telescope and a 12-m segmented on-axis telescope.

  3. Potential Large Decadal Missions Enabled by Nasas Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.; Schnell, Andrew; Smith, David Alan; Jackman, Angela; Warfield, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Large space telescope missions have always been limited by their launch vehicle's mass and volume capacities. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was specifically designed to fit inside the Space Shuttle and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is specifically designed to fit inside an Ariane 5. Astrophysicists desire even larger space telescopes. NASA's "Enduring Quests Daring Visions" report calls for an 8- to 16-m Large UV-Optical-IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor mission to enable ultra-high-contrast spectroscopy and coronagraphy. AURA's "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earth" report calls for a 12-m class High-Definition Space Telescope to pursue transformational scientific discoveries. NASA's "Planning for the 2020 Decadal Survey" calls for a Habitable Exoplanet Imaging (HabEx) and a LUVOIR as well as Far-IR and an X-Ray Surveyor missions. Packaging larger space telescopes into existing launch vehicles is a significant engineering complexity challenge that drives cost and risk. NASA's planned Space Launch System (SLS), with its 8 or 10-m diameter fairings and ability to deliver 35 to 45-mt of payload to Sun-Earth-Lagrange-2, mitigates this challenge by fundamentally changing the design paradigm for large space telescopes. This paper reviews the mass and volume capacities of the planned SLS, discusses potential implications of these capacities for designing large space telescope missions, and gives three specific mission concept implementation examples: a 4-m monolithic off-axis telescope, an 8-m monolithic on-axis telescope and a 12-m segmented on-axis telescope.

  4. Research on numerical algorithms for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, E. D.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical algorithms for large space structures were investigated with particular emphasis on decoupling method for analysis and design. Numerous aspects of the analysis of large systems ranging from the algebraic theory to lambda matrices to identification algorithms were considered. A general treatment of the algebraic theory of lambda matrices is presented and the theory is applied to second order lambda matrices.

  5. On the design of large space deployable modular antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.; Woods, A. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large deployable antenna modules were verified. Mesh attachment methods compatible with full scale modules were devised. Parametric studies of large modular reflectors established size, mass, and aperture frequency capabilities for these assemblies. Preliminary studies were made devising means of delivering modules to orbit, and once there, of assembling the modules into complete modular antenna reflectors. The basic feasibility of creating mass efficient modules erectable into large structures in space was established.

  6. Shuttle considerations for the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebuck, J. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Shuttle related considerations (constraints and guidelines) are compiled for use by designers of a potential class of large space structures which are transported to orbit and, deployed, fabricated or assembled in space using the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Considerations of all phases of shuttle operations from launch to ground turnaround operations are presented. Design of large space structures includes design of special construction fixtures and support equipment, special stowage cradles or pallets, special checkout maintenance, and monitoring equipment, and planning for packaging into the orbiter of all additional provisions and supplies chargeable to payload. Checklists of design issues, Shuttle capabilities constraints and guidelines, as well as general explanatory material and references to source documents are included.

  7. Modal identification experiment design for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an on-orbit modal identification experiment design for large space structures. Space Station Freedom (SSF) systems design definition and structural dynamic models were used as representative large space structures for optimizing experiment design. Important structural modes of study models were selected to provide a guide for experiment design and used to assess the design performance. A pulsed random excitation technique using propulsion jets was developed to identify closely-spaced modes. A measuremenat location selection approach was developed to estimate accurate mode shapes as well as frequencies and damping factors. The data acquisition system and operational scenarios were designed to have minimal impacts on the SSF. A comprehensive simulation was conducted to assess the overall performance of the experiment design.

  8. Critical requirements for the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The requirements for the design of a large space structure which will be deployed, erected, assembled or fabricated in space are delineated in terms of operational loads, stiffness requirements, structure-control interaction, deformations, precision requirements and member slenderness. Design examples for a truss antenna reflector, interorbit propulsion loads and free-flying solar reflectors are given. It is concluded that the demand for dimensional accuracy and stability form the primary requirements.

  9. Large space systems technology electronics: Data and power distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1980-02-01

    The development of hardware technology and manufacturing techniques required to meet space platform and antenna system needs in the 1980s is discussed. Preliminary designs for manned and automatically assembled space power system cables, connectors, and grounding and bonding materials and techniques are reviewed. Connector concepts, grounding design requirements, and bonding requirements are discussed. The problem of particulate debris contamination for large structure spacecraft is addressed.

  10. Large space systems technology electronics: Data and power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    The development of hardware technology and manufacturing techniques required to meet space platform and antenna system needs in the 1980s is discussed. Preliminary designs for manned and automatically assembled space power system cables, connectors, and grounding and bonding materials and techniques are reviewed. Connector concepts, grounding design requirements, and bonding requirements are discussed. The problem of particulate debris contamination for large structure spacecraft is addressed.

  11. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  12. Large-size space laboratory for biological orbit experiments.

    PubMed

    Kondyurin, A

    2001-01-01

    The study of space factors on living systems has great interest and long-term experiments during orbital flight will be important tool for increasing our knowledge. Realization of such experiments is limited by constraints of modern space stations. A new technology of large-size space laboratory for biological experiments has been developed on the basis of polymerization techniques. Using this technique there are no limits of form and size of laboratory for a space station that will permit long term experiments on Earth orbit with plants and animals in sufficient volume for creation of closed self-regulating ecological systems. The technology is based on experiments of the behavior of polymer materials in simulated free space conditions during the reaction of polymerization. The influences of space vacuum, sharp temperature changes and space plasma generated by galactic rays and Sun irradiation on chemical reaction were evaluated in their impact on liquid organic materials in laboratory conditions. The results of our study shows, that the chemical reaction is sensitive to such space factors. But we believe that the technology of polymerization could be used for the creation of space biological laboratories in Earth orbit in the near future.

  13. Structural dynamics and control of large space structures. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was the basic research program assembled by LaRC to address the fundamental technology deficiencies that were identified in several studies on large space systems (LSS) conducted by NASA in the last several years. The staffs of the respective participants were assembled at the workshop to review the current state of research in the control technology for large structural systems and to plan the efforts that would be pursued by their respective organizations.

  14. Reliability issues in active control of large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervelde, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    The unreliability of control system components was investigated in our attempt to deal with that problem. This matter is of concern in large space structure control because of the large number of components required to achieve specified performance in some situations, and the long operating period required between maintenance visits. The detection and isolation of component failures during system operation, and algorithms for reconfiguring control systems following detection and isolation of a failure were emphasized.

  15. A technology development program for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies sponsored by NASA and United States industry indicate a need for technology to handle large space-based antenna systems. These systems will require apertures of up to 100 m and more in order to be capable of radio frequency operation up to Ku-band for communications, earth observations, and radio astronomy applications. They must also be cost-effective and compatible with the Space Transportation System. Selection criteria for the antennas which include such considerations as surface precision in the intended service environment and mechanical packaging efficiency, are enumerated. Space testing of the antennas will be carried out as part of NASA's Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program, which will be continued through fiscal year 1984. Deployable antennas have been selected for development by the LSST Program. The maturity of this class of antennas is such that a significant number of near-term space based applications will be satisfied (mobile communications, submillimeter radio astronomy, orbiting deep space relay station ODSRS, orbiting VLBI, earth-looking radiometry). Two antenna concepts selected for development are the offset wrap-rib configuration and the maypole (hoop/column) configuration with details for these concepts presented.

  16. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  17. Residual mode filters and adaptive control in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in controlling large systems and structures is compensating for the destructive interaction which can occur between the reduced-order model (ROM) of the plant, which is used by the controller, and the unmodeled dynamics of the plant, often called the residual modes. The problem is more significant in the case of large space structures because their naturally light damping and high performance requirements lead to more frequent, destructive residual mode interaction (RMI). Using the design/compensation technique of residual mode filters (RMF's), effective compensation of RMI can be accomplished in a straightforward manner when using linear controllers. The use of RMF's has been shown to be effective for a variety of large structures, including a space-based laser and infinite dimensional systems. However, the dynamics of space structures is often uncertain and may even change over time due to on-orbit erosion from space debris and corrosive chemicals in the upper atmosphere. In this case, adaptive control can be extremely beneficial in meeting the performance requirements of the structure. Adaptive control for large structures is also based on ROM's and so destructive RMI may occur. Unfortunately, adaptive control is inherently nonlinear, and therefore the known results of RMF's cannot be applied. The purpose is to present the results of new research showing the effects of RMI when using adaptive control and the work which will hopefully lead to RMF compensation of this problem.

  18. Scientific Instrument Package for the large space telescope (SIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a scientific instrument package (SIP) that will satisfy the requirements of the large space telescope was established. A reference configuration serving as a study model and data which will aid in the trade-off studies leading to the final design configuration are reported.

  19. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 4: Scientific instrument package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and characteristics of the scientific instrument package for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The subjects include: (1) general scientific objectives, (2) package system analysis, (3) scientific instrumentation, (4) imaging photoelectric sensors, (5) environmental considerations, and (6) reliability and maintainability.

  20. Low-authority control synthesis for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, J. N.; Margulies, G.

    1982-01-01

    The control of vibrations of large space structures by distributed sensors and actuators is studied. A procedure is developed for calculating the feedback loop gains required to achieve specified amounts of damping. For moderate damping (Low Authority Control) the procedure is purely algebraic, but it can be applied iteratively when larger amounts of damping are required and is generalized for arbitrary time invariant systems.

  1. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 5: Support systems module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the support systems module for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The following systems and described: (1) thermal control, (2) electrical, (3) communication and data landing, (4) attitude control system, and (5) structural features. Analyses of maintainability and reliability considerations are included.

  2. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  3. Development of space stable thermal control coatings for use on large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A reserach project to develop space stable thermal control coatings for large surfaces is discussed. Four major tasks are considered: (1) pigment development, (2) binder development, (3) environmental effects evaluations, and (4) general coatings investigations.

  4. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Requirements for Space Station Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, D. A.; Clayton, M. J.; Runge, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Top level requirements for assembly and integration of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) Observatory at the Space Station are examined. Concepts are currently under study for LDR which will provide a sequel to the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility. LDR will provide a spectacular capability over a very broad spectral range. The Space Station will provide an essential facility for the initial assembly and check out of LDR, as well as a necessary base for refurbishment, repair and modification. By providing a manned platform, the Space Station will remove the time constraint on assembly associated with use of the Shuttle alone. Personnel safety during necessary EVA is enhanced by the presence of the manned facility.

  5. Innovative telescope architectures for future large space observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidan, Ronald S.; Breckinridge, James B.; Lillie, Charles F.; MacEwen, Howard A.; Flannery, Martin R.; Dailey, Dean R.

    2016-10-01

    Over the past few years, we have developed a concept for an evolvable space telescope (EST) that is assembled on orbit in three stages, growing from a 4×12-m telescope in Stage 1, to a 12-m filled aperture in Stage 2, and then to a 20-m filled aperture in Stage 3. Stage 1 is launched as a fully functional telescope and begins gathering science data immediately after checkout on orbit. This observatory is then periodically augmented in space with additional mirror segments, structures, and newer instruments to evolve the telescope over the years to a 20-m space telescope. We discuss the EST architecture, the motivation for this approach, and the benefits it provides over current approaches to building and maintaining large space observatories.

  6. In-space production of large space systems from extraterrestrial materials: A program implementation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. F.

    1977-01-01

    A program implementation model is presented which covers the in-space construction of certain large space systems from extraterrestrial materials. The model includes descriptions of major program elements and subelements and their operational requirements and technology readiness requirements. It provides a structure for future analysis and development.

  7. Enabling the 2nd Generation in Space: Building Blocks for Large Scale Space Endeavours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhardt, D.; Garretson, P.; Will, P.

    Today the world operates within a "first generation" space industrial enterprise, i.e. all industry is on Earth, all value from space is from bits (data essentially), and the focus is Earth-centric, with very limited parts of our population and industry participating in space. We are limited in access, manoeuvring, on-orbit servicing, in-space power, in-space manufacturing and assembly. The transition to a "Starship culture" requires the Earth to progress to a "second generation" space industrial base, which implies the need to expand the economic sphere of activity of mankind outside of an Earth-centric zone and into CIS-lunar space and beyond, with an equal ability to tap the indigenous resources in space (energy, location, materials) that will contribute to an expanding space economy. Right now, there is no comfortable place for space applications that are not discovery science, exploration, military, or established earth bound services. For the most part, space applications leave out -- or at least leave nebulous, unconsolidated, and without a critical mass -- programs and development efforts for infrastructure, industrialization, space resources (survey and process maturation), non-traditional and persistent security situational awareness, and global utilities -- all of which, to a far greater extent than a discovery and exploration program, may help determine the elements of a 2nd generation space capability. We propose a focus to seed the pre-competitive research that will enable global industry to develop the necessary competencies that we currently lack to build large scale space structures on-orbit, that in turn would lay the foundation for long duration spacecraft travel (i.e. key technologies in access, manoeuvrability, etc.). This paper will posit a vision-to-reality for a step wise approach to the types of activities the US and global space providers could embark upon to lay the foundation for the 2nd generation of Earth in space.

  8. Power conditioning for large dc motors for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veatch, Martin S.; Anderson, Paul M.; Eason, Douglas J.; Landis, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The design and performance of a prototype power-conditioning system for use with large brushless dc motors on NASA space missions are discussed in detail and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, and graphs. The 5-kW 8-phase parallel module evaluated here would be suitable for use in the Space Shuttle Orbiter cargo bay. A current-balancing magnetic assembly with low distributed inductance permits high-speed current switching from a low-voltage bus as well as current balancing between parallel MOSFETs.

  9. Orbital transfer of large space structures with nuclear electric rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, T. H.; Byers, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential application of electric propulsion for orbit transfer of a large spacecraft structure from low earth orbit to geosynchronous altitude in a deployed configuration. The electric power was provided by the spacecraft nuclear reactor space power system on a shared basis during transfer operations. Factors considered with respect to system effectiveness included nuclear power source sizing, electric propulsion thruster concept, spacecraft deployment constraints, and orbital operations and safety. It is shown that the favorable total impulse capability inherent in electric propulsion provides a potential economic advantage over chemical propulsion orbit transfer vehicles by reducing the number of Space Shuttle flights in ground-to-orbit transportation requirements.

  10. Effects of material degradation on large space structures dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigao, Alan J.

    1992-08-01

    Composite Large Space Structures (LSS) including booms, planar surfaces, antennas, platforms, and space stations are proposed for use in NASA's Space Station 'Freedom' and the DOD's Global Protection Against Limited Strikes programs. Because of their low mass and high strength and stiffness, composite repetitive lattice structures are ideal for these space applications. LSS will be required to sustain severe environmental effects - radiation, thermal cycling, atomic oxygen bombardment, collision with micrometeoroids and space debris, and hostile actions - and transient operational loads - docking, slewing, manned activities, control system, and the mobile service center - while maintaining strict mission parameters. Platform pointing is one example of these requirements and necessitates tolerances of less than one thousandth of a degree. Over time, material and structural degradation will occur due to environmental effects causing a change in the structure's stiffness and dynamic response. Likely, this structural damage will require immediate repair to restore the LSS to full mission capability. This thesis investigates the dynamic response of one LSS - the NASA Dual-Keel Space Station with 5 meter graphite epoxy erectable truss under one operational load - shuttle docking - and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environmental conditions, and predicts how the material, structural properties, and dynamic response change over the 20-30 year design life. Results show the effects of material degradation on the station's dynamic response and mission requirements and has applications for NASA and DOD logistics planning for future LSS.

  11. Design of optical systems for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    On the basis of long-term experience of LOMO PLC in creating large optical systems for ground and space telescopes, with diameter of primary mirror from 1 to 6 meters, the following issues should be considered: principles of constructing optical systems for space telescopes and selecting their optimum design in respect of dimensions/mass and performance criteria; ensuring the fulfillment of image quality requirements in the process of manufacturing optical systems for controlling ground telescope elements in operating conditions; providing automatic adjustment of telescope secondary mirror, automatic focusing, interferometric control of image quality by means of stellar interferometer with radial shift and internal control with Gartman's test. Description of space telescope equipped with primary mirror of diameter 1.5 m, manufactured in LOMO PLC, is given.

  12. Approximate likelihood for large irregularly spaced spatial data

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Montserrat

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Likelihood approaches for large irregularly spaced spatial datasets are often very difficult, if not infeasible, to implement due to computational limitations. Even when we can assume normality, exact calculations of the likelihood for a Gaussian spatial process observed at n locations requires O(n3) operations. We present a version of Whittle’s approximation to the Gaussian log likelihood for spatial regular lattices with missing values and for irregularly spaced datasets. This method requires O(nlog2n) operations and does not involve calculating determinants. We present simulations and theoretical results to show the benefits and the performance of the spatial likelihood approximation method presented here for spatial irregularly spaced datasets and lattices with missing values. We apply these methods to estimate the spatial structure of sea surface temperatures (SST) using satellite data with missing values. PMID:19079638

  13. Space Spider - A concept for fabrication of large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, W. R.; Johnston, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Space Spider concept for the automated fabrication of large space structures involves a specialized machine which roll-forms thin gauge material such as aluminum and develops continuous spiral structures with radial struts to sizes of 600-1,000 feet in diameter by 15 feet deep. This concept allows the machine and raw material to be integrated using the Orbiter capabilities, then boosting the rigid system to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO) without high sensitivity to acceleration forces. As a teleoperator controlled device having repetitive operations, the fabrication process can be monitored and verified from a ground-based station without astronaut involvement in GEO. The resultant structure will be useful as an intermediate size platform or as a structural element to be used with other elements such as the space-fabricated beams or composite nested tubes.

  14. Optimal control of large space structures via generalized inverse matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Fang, Xiaowen

    1987-01-01

    Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) is a control scheme that decouples the space structure into n independent second-order subsystems according to n controlled modes and controls each mode independently. It is well-known that the IMSC eliminates control and observation spillover caused when the conventional coupled modal control scheme is employed. The independent control of each mode requires that the number of actuators be equal to the number of modelled modes, which is very high for a faithful modeling of large space structures. A control scheme is proposed that allows one to use a reduced number of actuators to control all modeled modes suboptimally. In particular, the method of generalized inverse matrices is employed to implement the actuators such that the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system are as closed as possible to those specified by the optimal IMSC. Computer simulation of the proposed control scheme on a simply supported beam is given.

  15. Space Assembly of Large Structural System Architectures (SALSSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.

    2016-01-01

    Developing a robust capability for Space Assembly of Large Spacecraft Structural System Architectures (SALSSA) has the potential to drastically increase the capabilities and performance of future space missions and spacecraft while significantly reducing their cost. Currently, NASA architecture studies and space science decadal surveys identify new missions that would benefit from SALSSA capabilities, and the technologies that support SALSSA are interspersed throughout the fourteen NASA Technology Roadmaps. However, a major impediment to the strategic development of cross-cutting SALSSA technologies is the lack of an integrated and comprehensive compilation of the necessary information. This paper summarizes the results of a small study that used an integrated approach to formulate a SALSSA roadmap and associated plan for developing key SALSSA technologies.

  16. Shape determination and control for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    An integral operator approach is used to derive solutions to static shape determination and control problems associated with large space structures. Problem assumptions include a linear self-adjoint system model, observations and control forces at discrete points, and performance criteria for the comparison of estimates or control forms. Results are illustrated by simulations in the one dimensional case with a flexible beam model, and in the multidimensional case with a finite model of a large space antenna. Modal expansions for terms in the solution algorithms are presented, using modes from the static or associated dynamic mode. These expansions provide approximated solutions in the event that a used form analytical solution to the system boundary value problem is not available.

  17. Integrated structural electromagnetic optimization of large space antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Adelman, H. M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for extremely precise and powerful large space antenna reflectors have motivated the development of a procedure for shape control of the reflector surface. A mathematical optimization procedure has been developed which improves antenna performance while minimizing necessary shape correction effort. In contrast to previous work which proposed controlling the rms distortion error of the surface thereby indirectly improving antenna performance, the current work includes electromagnetic (EM) performance calculations as an integral part of the control procedure. The application of the procedure to a radiometer design with a tetrahedral truss backup structure demonstrates the potential for significant improvement. The results indicate the benefit of including EM performance calculations in procedures for shape control of large space antenna reflectors.

  18. Integrated structure electromagnetic optimization of large space antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Adelman, Howard M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for extremely precise and powerful large space antenna reflectors have motivated the development of a procedure for shape control of the reflector surface. A mathematical optimization procedure has been developed which improves antenna performance while minimizing necessary shape correction effort. In contrast to previous work which proposed controlling the rms distortion error of the surface thereby indirectly improving antenna performance, the current work includes electromagnetic (EM) performance calculations as an integral of the control procedure. The application of the procedure to a radiometer design with a tetrahedral truss backup structure demonstrates the potential for significant improvement. The results indicate the benefit of including EM performance calculations in procedures for shape control of large space antenna reflectors.

  19. Optimal experiment design for identification of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Meldrum, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    The optimal experiment design for on-orbit identification of modal frequency and damping parameters in large flexible space structures is discussed. The main result is a separation principle for D-optimal design which states that under certain conditions the sensor placement problem is decoupled from the input design problem. This decoupling effect significantly simplifies the overall optimal experiment design determination for large MIMO structural systems with many unknown modal parameters. The error from using the uncoupled design is estimated in terms of the inherent damping of the structure. A numerical example is given, demonstrating the usefulness of the simplified criteria in determining optimal designs for on-orbit Space Station identification experiments.

  20. Lagrangian space consistency relation for large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao E-mail: lh399@columbia.edu

    2015-09-01

    Consistency relations, which relate the squeezed limit of an (N+1)-point correlation function to an N-point function, are non-perturbative symmetry statements that hold even if the associated high momentum modes are deep in the nonlinear regime and astrophysically complex. Recently, Kehagias and Riotto and Peloso and Pietroni discovered a consistency relation applicable to large scale structure. We show that this can be recast into a simple physical statement in Lagrangian space: that the squeezed correlation function (suitably normalized) vanishes. This holds regardless of whether the correlation observables are at the same time or not, and regardless of whether multiple-streaming is present. The simplicity of this statement suggests that an analytic understanding of large scale structure in the nonlinear regime may be particularly promising in Lagrangian space.

  1. Considerations in the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Macneal, R. H.; Knapp, K.; Macgillivray, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    Several analytical studies of topics relevant to the design of large space structures are presented. Topics covered are: the types and quantitative evaluation of the disturbances to which large Earth-oriented microwave reflectors would be subjected and the resulting attitude errors of such spacecraft; the influence of errors in the structural geometry of the performance of radiofrequency antennas; the effect of creasing on the flatness of tensioned reflector membrane surface; and an analysis of the statistics of damage to truss-type structures due to meteoroids.

  2. Large craters on the meteoroid and space debris impact experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, Donald H.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution around the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) of 532 large craters in the Al plates from the Meteoroid and Space Debris Impact Experiment (S0001) is discussed along with 74 additional large craters in Al plates donated to the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group by other LDEF experimenters. The craters are 0.5 mm in diameter and larger. Crater shape is discussed. The number of craters and their distribution around the spacecraft are compared with values predicted with models of the meteoroid environment and the manmade orbital debris environment.

  3. A new approach for vibration control in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K.; Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An approach for augmenting vibration damping characteristics in space structures with large panels is presented. It is based on generation of bending moments rather than forces. The moments are generated using bimetallic strips, suitably mounted at selected stations on both sides of the large panels, under the influence of differential solar heating, giving rise to thermal gradients and stresses. The collocated angular velocity sensors are utilized in conjunction with mini-servos to regulate the control moments by flipping the bimetallic strips. A simple computation of the rate of dissipation of vibrational energy is undertaken to assess the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Research on numerical algorithms for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, E. D.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical algorithms for analysis and design of large space structures are investigated. The sign algorithm and its application to decoupling of differential equations are presented. The generalized sign algorithm is given and its application to several problems discussed. The Laplace transforms of matrix functions and the diagonalization procedure for a finite element equation are discussed. The diagonalization of matrix polynomials is considered. The quadrature method and Laplace transforms is discussed and the identification of linear systems by the quadrature method investigated.

  5. Technology for large space systems: A special bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography lists 460 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between January 1, 1968 and December 31, 1978. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of the Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, and flight experiments.

  6. Accuracy potentials for large space antenna reflectors with passive structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical results indicate that a careful selection of materials and truss design, combined with accurate manufacturing techniques, can result in very accurate surfaces for large space antennas. The purpose of this paper is to examine these relationships for various types of structural configurations. Comparisons are made of the accuracy achievable by truss- and dome-type structures for a wide range of diameter and focal length of the antenna and wavelength of the radiated signal.

  7. Planning Assembly Of Large Truss Structures In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, Luiz S. Homem; Desai, Rajiv S.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses developmental algorithm used in systematic planning of sequences of operations in which large truss structures assembled in outer space. Assembly sequence represented by directed graph called "assembly graph", in which each arc represents joining of two parts or subassemblies. Algorithm generates assembly graph, working backward from state of complete assembly to initial state, in which all parts disassembled. Working backward more efficient than working forward because it avoids intermediate dead ends.

  8. Controlled multibody dynamics simulation for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Wu, S. C.; Chang, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Multibody dynamics discipline, and dynamic simulation in control structure interaction (CSI) design are discussed. The use, capabilities, and architecture of the Large Angle Transient Dynamics (LATDYN) code as a simulation tool are explained. A generic joint body with various types of hinge connections; finite element and element coordinate systems; results of a flexible beam spin-up on a plane; mini-mast deployment; space crane and robotic slewing manipulations; a potential CSI test article; and multibody benchmark experiments are also described.

  9. Large-scale quantization from local correlations in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George; McComas, David J.

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the large-scale quantization that can characterize the phase space of certain physical systems. Plasmas are such systems where large-scale quantization, ħ*, is caused by Debye shielding that structures correlations between particles. The value of ħ* is constant—some 12 orders of magnitude larger than the Planck constant—across a wide range of space plasmas, from the solar wind in the inner heliosphere to the distant plasma in the inner heliosheath and the local interstellar medium. This paper develops the foundation and advances the understanding of the concept of plasma quantization; in particular, we (i) show the analogy of plasma to Planck quantization, (ii) show the key points of plasma quantization, (iii) construct some basic quantum mechanical concepts for the large-scale plasma quantization, (iv) investigate the correlation between plasma parameters that implies plasma quantization, when it is approximated by a relation between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency, (v) analyze typical space plasmas throughout the heliosphere and show the constancy of plasma quantization over many orders of magnitude in plasma parameters, (vi) analyze Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) solar wind measurements to develop another measurement of the value of ħ*, and (vii) apply plasma quantization to derive unknown plasma parameters when some key observable is missing.

  10. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-04-01

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in [1] of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of [2], so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  11. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-04-28

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2003/06/001 of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2007/06/060, so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  12. Conceptual study of the damping of large space structures using large-stroke adaptive stiffness cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorwald, Gregory; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of a large-stroke adaptive stiffness cable-device for damping control of space structures with large mass is introduced. The cable is used to provide damping in several examples, and its performance is shown through numerical simulation results. Displacement and velocity information of how the structure moves is used to determine when to modify the cable's stiffness in order to provide a damping force.

  13. Large space structures and systems in the space station era: A bibliography with indexes (supplement 03)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Bibliographies and abstracts are listed for 1221 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between January 1, 1991 and June 30, 1991. Topics covered include large space structures and systems, space stations, extravehicular activity, thermal environments and control, tethering, spacecraft power supplies, structural concepts and control systems, electronics, advanced materials, propulsion, policies and international cooperation, vibration and dynamic controls, robotics and remote operations, data and communication systems, electric power generation, space commercialization, orbital transfer, and human factors engineering.

  14. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations: Large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.; Reid, G.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives studied are the definition of the tested role of an early Space Station for the construction of large space structures. This is accomplished by defining the LSS technology development missions (TDMs) identified in phase 1. Design and operations trade studies are used to identify the best structural concepts and procedures for each TDMs. Details of the TDM designs are then developed along with their operational requirements. Space Station resources required for each mission, both human and physical, are identified. The costs and development schedules for the TDMs provide an indication of the programs needed to develop these missions.

  15. Inflatable Hangar for Assembly of Large Structures in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Human Space Flight program is interested in projects where humans, beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO), can make an important and unique contribution that cannot be reasonably accomplished purely by robotic means, and is commensurate with the effort and cost associated with human spaceflight. Robotic space telescope missions have been conceived and launched as completed assemblies (e.g., Hubble) or as jack-in-the-box one-time deployments (e.g., James Webb). If it were possible to assemble components of a very large telescope from one or two launches into a telescope that was vastly greater in light-gathering power and resolution, that would constitute a breakthrough. Large telescopes on Earth, like all one-off precision assembly tasks, are done by humans. Humans in shirtsleeves (or cleanroom bunny suits) can perform tasks of remarkable dexterity and precision. Unfortunately, astronauts in pressure suits cannot perform such dexterous and precise tasks because of the limitations of the pressurized gloves. If a large, inflatable hangar were placed in high orbit, along with all the components needed for a large assembly such as a large telescope, then humans in bunny suits could perform the same sorts of extremely precise and dexterous assembly that they could be expected to perform on Earth. Calculations show that such an inflatable hangar, and the necessary gas to make it safe to occupy by shirtsleeves humans wearing oxygen masks, fits within the mass and volume limitations of the proposed "Space Launch System" heavy-lift rocket. A second launch could bring up all the components of an approximately 100-meter-diameter or larger telescope. A large [200 ft (approximately 61 m) in diameter] inflated fabric sphere (or hangar) would contain four humans in bunny suits. The sphere would contain sufficient atmospheric pressure so that spacesuits would not be necessary [about 3.2 psi (approximately 22 kPa)]. The humans would require only oxygen masks and small backpacks

  16. Novel In-Space Manufacturing Concepts for the Development of Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, James T.; Reardon, Patrick; Gregory Don; Manning, Andrew; Blackmon, Jim; Howsman, Tom; Williams, Philip; Brantley, Whitt; Rakoczy, John; Herren, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    There is a continuous demand for larger, lighter, and higher quality telescopes. Over the past several decades, we have seen the evolution from launchable 2 meter-class telescopes (such as Hubble), to today s demand for deployable 6 meter-class telescopes (such as JWST), to tomorrow s need for up to 150 meter-class telescopes. As the apertures continue to grow, it will become much more difficult and expensive to launch assembled telescope structures. To address this issue, we are seeing the emergence of new novel structural concepts, such as inflatable structures and membrane optics. While these structural concepts do show promise, it is very difficult to achieve and maintain high surface figure quality. Another potential solution to develop large space telescopes is to move the fabrication facility into space and launch the raw materials. In this paper we present initial in-space manufacturing concepts to enable the development of large telescopes. This includes novel approaches for the fabrication of both the optical elements and the telescope support structure. We will also discuss potential optical designs for large space telescopes and describe their relation to the fabrication methods. These concepts are being developed to meet the demanding requirements of DARPA s LASSO (Large Aperture Space Surveillance Optic) program which currently requires a 150 meter optical aperture with a 17 degree field of view.

  17. Primary propulsion/large space system interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.; Dergance, R. H.; Robertson, R. I.; Wiggins, J. V.

    1981-01-01

    An interaction study was conducted between propulsion systems and large space structures to determine the effect of low thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS). The LSS which were considered would be deployed from the space shuttle orbiter bay in low Earth orbit, then transferred to geosynchronous equatorial orbit by their own propulsion systems. The types of structures studied were the expandable box truss, hoop and column, and wrap radial rib each with various surface mesh densities. The impact of the acceleration forces on system sizing was determined and the effects of single point, multipoint, and transient thrust applications were examined. Orbit transfer strategies were analyzed to determine the required velocity increment, burn time, trip time, and payload capability over a range of final acceleration levels. Variables considered were number of perigee burns, delivered specific impulse, and constant thrust and constant acceleration modes of propulsion. Propulsion stages were sized for four propellant combinations; oxygen/hydrogen, oxygen/methane, oxygen/kerosene, and nitrogen tetroxide/monomethylhydrazine, for pump fed and pressure fed engine systems. Two types of tankage configurations were evaluated, minimum length to maximize available payload volume and maximum performance to maximize available payload mass.

  18. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Switches the Pathway of TAR RNA/DNA Annealing from Loop-Loop “Kissing” to “Zipper”

    PubMed Central

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Summary The chaperone activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nucleotide (nt) mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is ∼10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable “kissing” loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by ∼105-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate (∼104-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction (∼10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct “zipper” pathway involving nucleation at the 3′/5′ terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC. PMID:19154737

  19. An Improved Wavefront Control Algorithm for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Wavefront sensing and control is required throughout the mission lifecycle of large space telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When an optic of such a telescope is controlled with both surface-deforming and rigid-body actuators, the sensitivity-matrix obtained from the exit pupil wavefront vector divided by the corresponding actuator command value can sometimes become singular due to difference in actuator types and in actuator command values. In this paper, we propose a simple approach for preventing a sensitivity-matrix from singularity. We also introduce a new "minimum-wavefront and optimal control compensator". It uses an optimal control gain matrix obtained by feeding back the actuator commands along with the measured or estimated wavefront phase information to the estimator, thus eliminating the actuator modes that are not observable in the wavefront sensing process.

  20. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Phase A study of the Large Space Telescope (LST) is reported. The study defines an LST concept based on the broad mission guidelines provided by the Office of Space Science (OSS), the scientific requirements developed by OSS with the scientific community, and an understanding of long range NASA planning current at the time the study was performed. The LST is an unmanned astronomical observatory facility, consisting of an optical telescope assembly (OTA), scientific instrument package (SIP), and a support systems module (SSM). The report consists of five volumes. The report describes the constraints and trade off analyses that were performed to arrive at a reference design for each system and for the overall LST configuration. A low cost design approach was followed in the Phase A study. This resulted in the use of standard spacecraft hardware, the provision for maintenance at the black box level, growth potential in systems designs, and the sharing of shuttle maintenance flights with other payloads.

  1. Robust design of distributed controllers for large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.

    1988-01-01

    Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) method avoids control spillover generated by conventional control schemes such as Coupled Modal Control by decoupling the large flexible space structure into independent subsystems of second order and controlling each mode independently. The IMSC implementation requires that the number of actuators be equal to that of modeled modes, which is in general very huge. Consequently the number of required actuators is unrealizable. Two methods are proposed for the implementation of IMSC with reduced number of actuators. In the first method, the first m modes are optimized, leaving the last (n-m) modes unchanged. In the second method, generalized inverse matrices are employed to design the feedback controller so that the control scheme is suboptimal with respect to IMSC. The performance of the proposed methods is tested by performing computer simulation on a simply support beam. Simulation results are presented and discussed.

  2. Camera memory study for large space telescope. [charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. P.; Brewer, J. E.; Brager, E. A.; Farnsworth, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Specifications were developed for a memory system to be used as the storage media for camera detectors on the large space telescope (LST) satellite. Detectors with limited internal storage time such as intensities charge coupled devices and silicon intensified targets are implied. The general characteristics are reported of different approaches to the memory system with comparisons made within the guidelines set forth for the LST application. Priority ordering of comparisons is on the basis of cost, reliability, power, and physical characteristics. Specific rationales are provided for the rejection of unsuitable memory technologies. A recommended technology was selected and used to establish specifications for a breadboard memory. Procurement scheduling is provided for delivery of system breadboards in 1976, prototypes in 1978, and space qualified units in 1980.

  3. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this work is to define and initiate a long-term program to mature six inter-linked critical technologies for future UVOIR space telescope mirrors to TRL6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors: 4 to 8 m monolithic & 8 to 16 m segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, stiffer substrates. (2) Support System:Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error:A very smooth mirror is critical for producing a high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high-contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges:Edges impact PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects the total collecting aperture. (5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing:Segment phasing is critical for producing a high-quality temporally stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation:On-orbit performance is determined by mechanical and thermal stability. Future systems require validated performance models. We are pursuing multiple design paths give the science community the option to enable either a future monolithic or segmented space telescope.

  4. An Expert System Approach to Large Space Systems Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    ISPONSORING 8b. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION Of appil ,k) FOSR F49620-87- C --0105 8¢. ADDRESS (CRtY, Stat...oo...0 - An Expert System Approach To Large Space Systems Control Octobe 1988Accession For NTIS R& DTIC TAB C . GartrmII Unannounced E W...4.4.1 Case A: I Newton Harmonic Wave with a Frequency of 0.14 Hz 4-12 4.4.2 Case B: 1 Newton Impulse at x = 2.5 m 4-13 4.4.3 Case C : Traveling Wave with

  5. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce 5.9 x 5.9 cm space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/W is described. Cell types investigated include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm/cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover glass simultaneously is being developed. Results for cell and array tests are given. Large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  6. Large space erectable structures - building block structures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Skoumal, D. E.; Straayer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A modular planar truss structure and a long slender boom concept identified as building block approaches to construction of large spacecraft configurations are described. The concepts are compatible in weight and volume goals with the Space Transportation System, use standard structural units, and represent high on-orbit productivity in terms of structural area or beam length. Results of structural trade studies involving static and dynamic analyses of a single module and rigid body deployment analyses to assess kinetics and kinematics of automatic deployment of the building block modules are presented.

  7. Optimal member damper controller design for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration is given to the selection of velocity feedback gains for individual dampers for the members of a structurally controlled large flexible space structure. The problem is formulated as an optimal output feedback regulator problem, and necessary conditions are derived for minimizing a quadratic performance function. The diagonal nature of the gain matrix is taken into account, along with knowledge of noise covariances. It is pointed out that the method presented offers a systematic approach to the design of a class of controllers for enhancing structural damping, which have significant potential if used in conjunction with a reduced-order optimal controller for rigid-body modes and selected structural modes.

  8. Mission planning parameters for the Space Shuttle large format camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses the impact of various Space Shuttle mission parameters on the efficient and meaningful utilization of the large format camera (LFC) as a photographic acquisition system. Some of the LFC's vital statistics and its mounting within the Orbiter payload are described. LFC characteristics and mounting dictate certain mission parameters. The controlling parameters are orbit inclinations, launch time of year, launch time of day, orbital altitude, mission duration, overlap selection, film capacity, and climatological prediction. A mission case is evaluated relative to controlling parameters and geographical area(s) of interest.

  9. On passive damping mechanisms in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1982-01-01

    The significance is explained of even tiny amounts of passive energy dissipation to ensure successful stabilization of large, flexible space structures. Study of scale effects on various mechanisms indicates that modal damping ratios are likely to decrease as size increases in a family of similar structures. Paper focuses on thermal dissipation induced by strain gradients during vibration of monolithic configurations. Past work and the expected magnitudes of this damping are reviewed, along with reasons why it is, to some degree, under the designer's control. In the search for the highest practical values, unidirectional metallic composites and other arrangements are examined

  10. Investigation of Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA missions will focus on deep space and Mars surface operations with large structures necessary for transportation of crew and cargo. In addition to the challenges of manufacturing these large structures, there are added challenges from the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, electronics, and vehicle materials. Primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle and the elements inside the vehicle. These interactions lead to the primary radiation being absorbed or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high-energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, which can be significant enough to cause concern. In a previous paper, we embarked upon our first steps toward studying neutron production from large vehicles by validating our radiation transport codes for neutron environments against flight data. The following paper will extend the previous work to focus on the deep space environment and the resulting neutron flux from large vehicles in this deep space environment.

  11. Lightweight optical barrel assembly structures for large deployable space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Peter A.; Silver, Mark J.; Dobson, Benjamin J.

    2009-08-01

    Future space based telescopes will need apertures and focal lengths that exceed the dimensions of the launch vehicle shroud. In addition to deploying the primary mirror and secondary mirror support structure, these large telescopes must also deploy the stray light and thermal barriers needed to ensure proper telescope performance. The authors present a deployable light and thermal optical barrel assembly approach for a very large telescope with a variable sun angle and fast slew rate. The Strain Energy Deployable Optical Barrel Assembly (SEDOBA) uses elastic composite hinges to power the deployment of a hierarchical truss structure that supports the thermal and stray light shroud material that form the overall system. The paper describes the overall design approach, the key component technologies, and the design and preliminary testing of a self deploying scale model prototype.

  12. Integrated controls-structures optimization of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for the simultaneous optimization of structural and control elements of a large space structure is developed and demonstrated for a test problem, the NASA COFS-I Mast Flight System. General-purpose control and structural-analysis codes are applied directly to a large detailed model, with realistic objective and constraint functions. The steps in the process (structural optimization, control optimization, and system coordination) are described and illustrated with diagrams; the numerical implementation (using different computers for different steps) is discussed; and results showing significant design improvements in three COFS-I configurations are presented in graphs. When the weights of both structure and power-generating equipment are taken into account, a 40-bay truss design is found to be better than designs with 42 or 44 bays.

  13. Analysis and design of ion thrusters for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    This study undertakes the analysis and conceptual design of a 0.5 Newton electrostatic ion thruster suitable for use on large space system missions in the next decade. Either argon or xenon gas shall be used as propellant. A 50 cm diameter discharge chamber was selected to meet stipulated performance goals. The discharge plasma is contained at the boundary by a periodic structure of alternating permanent magnets generating a series of line cusps. Anode strips between the magnets collect Maxwellian electrons generated by a central cathode. Ion extraction utilizes either two or three grid optics at the user's choice. An extensive analysis was undertaken to investigate optics behavior in the high power environment of this large thruster. A plasma bridge neutralizer operating on inert gas provides charge neutralizing electrons to complete the design. The resulting conceptual thruster and the necessary power management and control requirements are described.

  14. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce large-area (5.9 x 5.9 cm) space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/watt is descibed. Five cell types under investigation include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm-cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover-glass simultaneously is being developed. A description of cell developments by Applied Solar Energy Corp., Spectrolab and Spire is included. Results are given for cell and array tests, performed by Lockheed, TRW and NASA. Future large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  15. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  16. Electrical rotary joint apparatus for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R.; Boehme, R. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A structural array and electrical rotary joint for transmitting an electrical power between large space structures having relative rotational movement is disclosed which includes large support framework structures which rotate relative to one another about a common axis of rotation. A rotary interface joint is defined between the structures. A cylindrical hub member is carried by one structure and a cylindrical hub member is carried by a support structure with a third hub member being concentrically within a fourth hub member for relative rotation. Tension connecting cables connect hub members with their associated outer structures whereby relative rotational movement between the structures is transmitted to the cylindrical hub members for unitary motion therewith. Electrical conductor brush members are carried by one hub and electrical contact rings are carried by another hub member in sliding electrical contact with the brushes for transmission of electrical power during relative rotational movement between the two support structures.

  17. Finite element structural model of a large, thin, completely free, flat plate. [for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element structural model of a 30.48 m x 30.48 m x 2.54 mm completely free aluminum plate is described and modal frequencies and mode shape data for the first 44 modes are presented. An explanation of the procedure for using the data is also presented. The model should prove useful for the investigation of controller design approaches for large flexible space structures.

  18. The LATT way towards large active primaries for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, Runa; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Biasi, Roberto; Patauner, Christian; Gallieni, Daniele; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; d'Amato, Francesco; Pucci, Mauro; Duò, Fabrizio; Vettore, Christian; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    The Large Aperture Telescope Technology (LATT) goes beyond the current paradigm of future space telescopes, based on a deformable mirror in the pupil relay. Through the LATT project we demonstrated the concept of a low-weight active primary mirror, whose working principle and control strategy benefit from two decades of advances in adaptive optics for ground-based telescopes. We developed a forty centimeter spherical mirror prototype, with an areal density lower than 17 kg/m2, controlled through contactless voice coil actuators with co-located capacitive position sensors. The prototype was subjected to thermo-vacuum, vibration and optical tests, to push its technical readiness toward level 5. In this paper we present the background and the outcomes of the LATT activities under ESA contract (TRP programme), exploring the concept of a lightweight active primary mirror for space telescopes. Active primaries will open the way to very large segmented apertures, actively shaped, which can be lightweight, deployable and accurately phased once in flight.

  19. Lyot coronagraph design study for large, segmented space telescope apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Neil T.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; St. Laurent, Kathryn E.; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Stark, Christopher C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Perrin, Marshall; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Kasdin, N. J.; Shaklan, Stuart; Carlotti, Alexis

    2016-07-01

    Recent efforts combining the optimization techniques of apodized pupil Lyot coronagraphs (APLC) and shaped pupils have demonstrated the viability of a binary-transmission mask architecture for extremely high contrast (10-10) exoplanet imaging. We are now building on those innovations to carry out a survey of Lyot coronagraph performance for large, segmented telescope apertures. These apertures are of the same kind under considera- tion for NASA's Large UV/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) observatory concept. To map the multi-dimensional design parameter space, we have developed a software toolkit to manage large sets of mask optimization programs and execute them on a computing cluster. Here we summarize a preliminary survey of 500 APLC solutions for 4 reference hexagonal telescope apertures. Several promising designs produce annular, 10-10 contrast dark zones down to inner working angle 4λ0=D over a 15% bandpass, while delivering a half-max PSF core throughput of 18%. We also report our progress on devising solutions to the challenges of Lyot stop alignment/fabrication tolerance that arise in this contrast regime.

  20. Model verification of large structural systems. [space shuttle model response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. T.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for the application of parameter identification on the structural dynamic models of space shuttle and other large models with hundreds of degrees of freedom is described. Finite element, dynamic, analytic, and modal models are used to represent the structural system. The interface with math models is such that output from any structural analysis program applied to any structural configuration can be used directly. Processed data from either sine-sweep tests or resonant dwell tests are directly usable. The program uses measured modal data to condition the prior analystic model so as to improve the frequency match between model and test. A Bayesian estimator generates an improved analytical model and a linear estimator is used in an iterative fashion on highly nonlinear equations. Mass and stiffness scaling parameters are generated for an improved finite element model, and the optimum set of parameters is obtained in one step.

  1. Characterization of the bending stiffness of large space structure joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey

    1989-01-01

    A technique for estimating the bending stiffness of large space structure joints is developed and demonstrated for an erectable joint concept. Experimental load-deflection data from a three-point bending test was used as input to solve a closed-form expression for the joint bending stiffness which was derived from linear beam theory. Potential error sources in both the experimental and analytical procedures are identified and discussed. The bending stiffness of a mechanically preloaded erectable joint is studied at three applied moments and seven joint orientations. Using this technique, the joint bending stiffness was bounded between 6 and 17 percent of the bending stiffness of the graphite/epoxy strut member.

  2. Free oscillations of a large drop in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobi, N.; Tagg, R. P.; Kendall, J. M.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.

    1979-01-01

    In preparation for forthcoming studies on materials processing in space, techniques and equipment are being developed for the deployment and control of large globules of liquid in a zero-g environment. This paper first presents a theoretical analysis of the intense sound field within an enclosure by which positioning forces, torques, and temporal perturbations may be applied to a sample. Procedures for digital analysis of photographic records of the sample motion are described. Results on the mean and oscillatory motion of a 2.5 cm diameter water drop during the flight of a SPAR rocket are given. In particular, spectral analysis shows that the drop oscillates at several frequencies. Identification with theoretically expected modes is made for some of the spectral lines.

  3. Adaptive control of large space structures using recursive lattice filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundararajan, N.; Goglia, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    The use of recursive lattice filters for identification and adaptive control of large space structures is studied. Lattice filters were used to identify the structural dynamics model of the flexible structures. This identification model is then used for adaptive control. Before the identified model and control laws are integrated, the identified model is passed through a series of validation procedures and only when the model passes these validation procedures is control engaged. This type of validation scheme prevents instability when the overall loop is closed. Another important area of research, namely that of robust controller synthesis, was investigated using frequency domain multivariable controller synthesis methods. The method uses the Linear Quadratic Guassian/Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR) approach to ensure stability against unmodeled higher frequency modes and achieves the desired performance.

  4. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Reference Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Rioux, Norman; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  5. A future large-aperture UVOIR space observatory: reference designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Norman; Thronson, Harley; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-09-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  6. Adaptive control of large space structures using recursive lattice filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    The use of recursive lattice filters for identification and adaptive control of large space structures was studied. Lattice filters are used widely in the areas of speech and signal processing. Herein, they are used to identify the structural dynamics model of the flexible structures. This identified model is then used for adaptive control. Before the identified model and control laws are integrated, the identified model is passed through a series of validation procedures and only when the model passes these validation procedures control is engaged. This type of validation scheme prevents instability when the overall loop is closed. The results obtained from simulation were compared to those obtained from experiments. In this regard, the flexible beam and grid apparatus at the Aerospace Control Research Lab (ACRL) of NASA Langley Research Center were used as the principal candidates for carrying out the above tasks. Another important area of research, namely that of robust controller synthesis, was investigated using frequency domain multivariable controller synthesis methods.

  7. Advances in Mechanical Architectures of Large Precision Space Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datashvili, Leri; Maghaldadze, Nikoloz; Endler, Stephan; Pauw, Julian; He, Peng; Baier, Horst; Ihle, Alexander; Santiago Prowlad, Julian

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in development of mechanical architectures of large deployable reflectors (LDRs) through the projects of the European Space Agency are addressed in this paper. Two different directions of LDR architectures are being investigated and developed at LSS and LLB. These are LDRs with knitted metal mesh and with flexible shell-membrane reflecting surfaces. The first direction is matured and required advancing of the novel architecture of the supporting structure that provides deployment and final shape accuracy of the metal mesh is underway. The second direction is rather new and its current development stage is focused on investigations of dimensional stability of the flexible shell-membrane reflecting surface. In both directions 5 m diameter functional models will be built to demonstrate achieved performances, which shall prepare the basis for further improvement of their technology readiness levels.

  8. Frequency domain identification for robust large space structure control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Scheid, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is demonstrated for frequency domain identification of large space structures which systematically transforms experimental raw data into a form required for synthesizing H(infinity) controllers using modern robust control design software (e.g., Matlab Toolboxes). A unique feature of this approach is that the additive uncertainty is characterized to a specified statistic confidence rather than with hard bounds. In this study, the difference in robust performance is minimal between the two levels of confidence. In general cases, the present methodology provides a tool for performance/confidence level tradeoff studies. For simplicity, the additive uncertainty on a frequency grid is considered and the interpolation error in between grid points is neglected.

  9. Active disturbance rejection in large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an active control law for the rejection of persistent disturbances, in large space structures is presented. The control system design approach is based on a deterministic model of the disturbances and it optimizes the magnitude of the disturbance that the structure can tolerate without violating certain predetermined constraints. In addition to closed-loop stability, the explicit treatment of state, control, and control rate constraints, such as structural displacement and control actuator effort, guarantees that the final design will exhibit desired performance characteristics. The technique is applied to a simple two-bay truss structure, and its response is compared with that obtained using a linear-quadratic-Gaussian/loop-transfer-recovery (LQG/LTR) compensator. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed control system can reject persistent disturbances of greater magnitude by utilizing most of the available control, while limiting the structural displacements to within desired tolerances.

  10. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/sq cm) and storm shelter (20 g/sq cm) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high-dose-rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  11. Growth Chambers on the International Space Station for Large Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, G. D.; Wheeler, R. M.; Morrow, R. C.; Levine, H. G.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) now has platforms for conducting research on horticultural plant species under LED lighting, and those capabilities continue to expand. The 'Veggie' vegetable production system was deployed to the ISS as an applied research platform for food production in space. Veggie is capable of growing a wide array of horticultural crops. It was designed for low power usage, low launch mass and stowage volume, and minimal crew time requirements. The Veggie flight hardware consists of a light cap containing red (630 nm), blue, (455 nm) and green (530 nm) LEDs. Interfacing with the light cap is an extendable bellows/baseplate for enclosing the plant canopy. A second large plant growth chamber, the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH), is will fly to the ISS in 2017. APH will be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. APH will control light (quality, level, and timing), temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing any cabin or plant-derived ethylene and other volatile organic compounds. Additional capabilities include sensing of leaf temperature and root zone moisture, root zone temperature, and oxygen concentration. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs (4100K). There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations. Veggie and APH are available for research proposals.

  12. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/cm2) and storm shelter (20 g/cm2) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high dose rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  13. Structural identification and damage assessment of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Richard B.; Fourney, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    Two different methods are proposed for identifying the structural properties of large orbiting space structures under ordinary service loads, and for assessing potential damage due to impact or other extreme loadings. It is shown that the behavior of a structure in a weightless environment is nonlinear due to unloaded or lightly loaded connections, an effect which not only complicates structural control, but makes the problem of system identification more difficult than for ground based systems. Both proposed methods assume that the structure is subjected to loads imposed by prescribed self stressing systems sufficient to produce repeatable internal force systems in the structure. The first method is based on statical response and requires a survey of structural displacements produced by the self stressing systems. The displacements do not have to be determined completely (i.e., in three directions at each connection), but more displacement information produces more accurate structural stiffness information. It is anticipated that displacement measurements will be taken using on-board laser measurement devices. The second technique employs dynamic stress wave measurement techniques using on-board loading devices and strain gages to track stress wave propagation through the space structure. This approach, which is in its early stages of development, relies on an analysis of transit times of impulsive stress waves and changes in transit times and wave forms due to changes in structural parameters.

  14. Growth Chambers on the International Space Station for Large Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Morrow, Robert C.; Levine, Howard G.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) now has platforms for conducting research on horticultural plant species under LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lighting, and those capabilities continue to expand. The Veggie vegetable production system was deployed to the ISS as an applied research platform for food production in space. Veggie is capable of growing a wide array of horticultural crops. It was designed for low power usage, low launch mass and stowage volume, and minimal crew time requirements. The Veggie flight hardware consists of a light cap containing red (630 nanometers), blue, (455 nanometers) and green (530 nanometers) LEDs. Interfacing with the light cap is an extendable bellowsbaseplate for enclosing the plant canopy. A second large plant growth chamber, the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH), is will fly to the ISS in 2017. APH will be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. APH will control light (quality, level, and timing), temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing any cabin or plant-derived ethylene and other volatile organic compounds. Additional capabilities include sensing of leaf temperature and root zone moisture, root zone temperature, and oxygen concentration. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs (4100K). There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations. Veggie and APH are available for research proposals.

  15. Pupil Alignment Considerations for Large, Deployable Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent J.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Kubalak, Daivd A.

    2011-01-01

    For many optical systems the properties and alignment of the internal apertures and pupils are not critical or controlled with high precision during optical system design, fabrication or assembly. In wide angle imaging systems, for instance, the entrance pupil position and orientation is typically unconstrained and varies over the system s field of view in order to optimize image quality. Aperture tolerances usually do not receive the same amount of scrutiny as optical surface aberrations or throughput characteristics because performance degradation is typically graceful with misalignment, generally only causing a slight reduction in system sensitivity due to vignetting. But for a large deployable space-based observatory like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we have found that pupil alignment is a key parameter. For in addition to vignetting, JWST pupil errors cause uncertainty in the wavefront sensing process that is used to construct the observatory on-orbit. Furthermore they also open stray light paths that degrade the science return from some of the telescope s instrument channels. In response to these consequences, we have developed several pupil measurement techniques for the cryogenic vacuum test where JWST science instrument pupil alignment is verified. These approaches use pupil alignment references within the JWST science instruments; pupil imaging lenses in three science instrument channels; and unique pupil characterization features in the optical test equipment. This will allow us to verify and crosscheck the lateral pupil alignment of the JWST science instruments to approximately 1-2% of their pupil diameters.

  16. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Study Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Thronson, Harley A.; Feinberg, Lee; Redding, David; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The scientific drivers for very high angular resolution coupled with very high sensitivity and wavefront stability in the UV and optical wavelength regime have been well established. These include characterization of exoplanets in the habitable zones of solar type stars, probing the physical properties of the circumgalactic medium around z < 2 galaxies, and resolving stellar populations across a broad range of galactic environments. The 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the 2013 NASA Science Mission Directorate 30-Year Roadmap identified a large-aperture UVOIR observatory as a priority future space mission. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI team has extended several earlier studies of the technology and engineering requirements needed to design and build a single filled aperture 10-meter class space-based telescope that can enable these ambitious scientific observations. We present here an overview of our new technical work including a brief summary of the reference science drivers as well as in-depth investigations of the viable telescope architectures, the requirements on thermal control and active wavefront control systems, and the range of possible launch configurations.

  17. Advanced Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology project to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. The developed mirror technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Just as JWST’s architecture was driven by launch vehicle, a future UVOIR mission’s architectures (monolithic, segmented or interferometric) will depend on capacities of future launch vehicles (and budget). Since we cannot predict the future, we must prepare for all potential futures. Therefore, to provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We derived engineering specifications for potential future monolithic or segmented space telescopes based on science needs and implement constraints. And we are maturing six inter-linked critical technologies to enable potential future large aperture UVOIR space telescope: 1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors, 2) Support Systems, 3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error, 4) Segment Edges, 5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing, and 6) Integrated Model Validation Science Advisory Team and a Systems Engineering Team. We are maturing all six technologies simultaneously because all are required to make a primary mirror assembly (PMA); and, it is the PMA’s on-orbit performance which determines science return. PMA stiffness depends on substrate and support stiffness. Ability to cost-effectively eliminate mid/high spatial figure errors and polishing edges depends on substrate stiffness. On-orbit thermal and mechanical performance depends on substrate stiffness, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and thermal mass. And, segment-to-segment phasing depends on substrate & structure stiffness

  18. Effects of Turbine Spacing in Very Large Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2015-11-01

    The Dynamic Wake Meandering model(DWM) by Larsen et al. (2007) is considered state of the art for modelling the wake behind a wind turbine. DWM assumes a quasi-steady wake deficit transported as a passive tracer by large atmospheric scales. The approach is also applied to wake interaction within wind farms, although certain aspects of the complex wake interaction are not captured, see Churchfield et al. (2014). Recent studies have shown how turbines introduce low frequencies in the wake, which could describe some of the shortcomings. Chamorro et al. (2015) identified three regions of different lengths scales. Iungo et al. (2013) related low frequencies to the hub vortex instability. Okulov et al. (2014) found Strouhal numbers in the far wake stemming from the rotating helical vortex core. Simulations by Andersen et al. (2013) found low frequencies to be inherent in the flow inside an infinite wind farm. LES simulations of large wind farms are performed with full aero-elastic Actuator Lines. The simulations investigate the inherent dynamics inside wind farms in the absence of atmospheric turbulence compared to cases with atmospheric turbulence. Resulting low frequency structures are inherent in wind farms for certain turbine spacings and affect both power production and loads. Funded by Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant 2104-09-067216/DSF), the Nordic Consortium on Optimization and Control of Wind Farms, and EuroTech wind project. The proprietary data for Vestas' NM80 turbine has been used.

  19. Study of large adaptive arrays for space technology applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, R. S.; Steinberg, B.; Powers, E.; Lim, T.

    1977-01-01

    The research in large adaptive antenna arrays for space technology applications is reported. Specifically two tasks were considered. The first was a system design study for accurate determination of the positions and the frequencies of sources radiating from the earth's surface that could be used for the rapid location of people or vehicles in distress. This system design study led to a nonrigid array about 8 km in size with means for locating the array element positions, receiving signals from the earth and determining the source locations and frequencies of the transmitting sources. It is concluded that this system design is feasible, and satisfies the desired objectives. The second task was an experiment to determine the largest earthbound array which could simulate a spaceborne experiment. It was determined that an 800 ft array would perform indistinguishably in both locations and it is estimated that one several times larger also would serve satisfactorily. In addition the power density spectrum of the phase difference fluctuations across a large array was measured. It was found that the spectrum falls off approximately as f to the minus 5/2 power.

  20. The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for signals of hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a brief description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  1. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  2. Large Space Optics: From Hubble to JWST and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    If necessity truly is the mother of invention, then advances in lightweight space mirror technology have been driven by launch vehicle mass and volume constraints. In the late 1970 s, at the start of Hubble development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 3 to 4 meter monolithic primary mirrors with masses of 6000 to 10,000 kg - clearly too massive for the planned space shuttle 25,000 kg capability to LEO. Necessity led Hubble to a different solution. Launch vehicle mass constraints (and cost) resulted in the development of a 2.4 meter lightweight eggcrate mirror. At 810 kg (180 kg/m2), this mirror was approximately 7.4% of HST s total 11,110 kg mass. And, the total observatory structure at 4.3 m x 13.2 m fit snuggly inside the space shuttle 4.6 m x 18.3 m payload bay. In the early 1990 s, at the start of JWST development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 8 meter class monolithic primary mirrors (16,000 to 23,000 kg) and 10 meter segmented mirrors (14,400 kg). Unfortunately, launch vehicles were still constrained to 4.5 meter payloads and 25,000 kg to LEO or 6,600 kg to L2. Furthermore, science now demanded a space telescope with 6 to 8 meter aperture operating at L2. Mirror technology was identified as a critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996 (1). These studies identified two significant architectural constraints: segmentation and areal density. Because the launch vehicle fairing payload dynamic envelop diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. And, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density of 20 kg/m2. At the inception of

  3. An adaptive identification and control scheme for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. V.

    1988-01-01

    A unified identification and control scheme capable of achieving space at form performance objectives under nominal or failure conditions is described. Preliminary results are also presented, showing that the methodology offers much promise for effective robust control of large space structures. The control method is a multivariable, adaptive, output predictive controller called Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC uses a state space model and input reference trajectories of set or tracking points to adaptively generate optimum commands. For a fixed model, MPC processes commands with great efficiency, and is also highly robust. A key feature of MPC is its ability to control either nonminimum phase or open loop unstable systems. As an output controller, MPC does not explicitly require full state feedback, as do most multivariable (e.g., Linear Quadratic) methods. Its features are very useful in LSS operations, as they allow non-collocated actuators and sensors. The identification scheme is based on canonical variate analysis (CVA) of input and output data. The CVA technique is particularly suited for the measurement and identification of structural dynamic processes - that is, unsteady transient or dynamically interacting processes such as between aerodynamics and structural deformation - from short, noisy data. CVA is structured so that the identification can be done in real or near real time, using computationally stable algorithms. Modeling LSS dynamics in 1-g laboratories has always been a major impediment not only to understanding their behavior in orbit, but also to controlling it. In cases where the theoretical model is not confirmed, current methods provide few clues concerning additional dynamical relationships that are not included in the theoretical models. CVA needs no a priori model data, or structure; all statistically significant dynamical states are determined using natural, entropy-based methods. Heretofore, a major limitation in applying adaptive

  4. Inflatable Space Structures Technology Development for Large Radar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.; Helms, Richard G.; Willis, Paul B.; Mikulas, M. M.; Stuckey, Wayne; Steckel, Gary; Watson, Judith

    2004-01-01

    There has been recent interest in inflatable space-structures technology for possible applications on U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) missions because of the technology's potential for high mechanical-packaging efficiency, variable stowed geometry, and deployment reliability. In recent years, the DOD sponsored Large Radar Antenna (LRA) Program applied this new technology to a baseline concept: a rigidizable/inflatable (RI) perimeter-truss structure supporting a mesh/net parabolic reflector antenna. The program addressed: (a) truss concept development, (b) regidizable materials concepts assessment, (c) mesh/net concept selection and integration, and (d) developed potential mechanical-system performance estimates. Critical and enabling technologies were validated, most notably the orbital radiation durable regidized materials and the high modulus, inflatable-deployable truss members. These results in conjunction with conclusions from previous mechanical-packaging studies by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Special Program Office (SPO) were the impetus for the initiation of the DARPA/SPO Innovative Space-based Antenna Technology (ISAT) Program. The sponsor's baseline concept consisted of an inflatable-deployable truss structure for support of a large number of rigid, active radar panels. The program's goal was to determine the risk associated with the application of these new RI structures to the latest in radar technologies. The approach used to define the technology maturity level of critical structural elements was to: (a) develop truss concept baseline configurations (s), (b) assess specific inflatable-rigidizable materials technologies, and (c) estimate potential mechanical performance. The results of the structures portion of the program indicated there was high risk without the essential materials technology flight experiments, but only moderate risk if the appropriate on-orbit demonstrations were performed. This paper covers both

  5. Modification of the ionosphere by large space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.

    Not Available Copyright 1980 by Michael Mendillo. Extracted from ``Space Systems and their Interactions with Earth's Space Environment'' (Vol. 71 of ``Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics'', eds. H.B. Garret and C.P. Pike), 1980

  6. Methodology for Evaluating Modular Assembly of Large Space Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Wertz, Julie; Caroff, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for analytically comparing approaches to modular assembly of large space platforms. The methodology combines a physical model of the modules, a life-cycle cost model, and a risk model to capture influential trade-offs. The physical model includes alternative module design characteristics, assembly time scenarios, alternative work systems (human, robotic), and infrastructures. A life-cycle cost framework is defined to capture the benefits and costs of modular alternatives for single or multi-mission (programmatic) applications. A probabilistic risk model to address launch and assembly risks is employed to capture uncertainties in launch, as well as in the assembly approaches and their complexity (number of assembly steps, module connections). An illustration of the tradeoffs between these models for a single mission is described using a 448kW Solar Electric Transport Vehicle (SETV) supporting a human lunar mission. The illustration was limited to the launch and assembly phase from beginning of first element launch to completion of assembly. Results and observations are presented and discussed.

  7. Upgrade Of ESA Large Space Simulator For Providing Mercury Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messing, Rene; Popovitch, Alexandre; Tavares, Andre; Sablerolle, Steven

    2012-07-01

    When orbiting Mercury, the BepiColombo spacecraft will have to survive direct sunlight ten times more intense than in the Earth's vicinity, and the infrared radiation from the planet's surface, which exceeds 400°C at its hottest point. In order to simulate the environment for testing the spacecraft in thermal conditions as representative as possible to those it will meet in Mercury’s orbit, it was required to modify the ESTEC Large Space Simulator (LSS) for providing a 10 Solar Constant (SC) illumination. The following test facility adaptations are described: - Investigate powerful lamps - Configure the LSS mirror from 6m to a 2.7m-diameter light beam - Develop a fast flux mapping system - Procure a 10 SC absolute radiometer standard - Replace the sun simulator flux control sensors - Add a dedicated shroud to absorb the high flux - Add a levelling table to adjust heat pipes - Add infra-red cameras for contactless high temperature measurements. The facility performance during the test of one of the BepiColombo modules is reviewed.

  8. Structures-propulsion interactions and requirements. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS) were determined. Three general structural classes of LSS were considered, each with a broad range of diameters and nonstructural surface densities. While transferring the deployed structure from LEO and to GEO, an acceleration range of 0.02 to 0.1 g's was found to maximize deliverable payload based on structural mass impact. After propulsion system parametric analyses considering four propellant combinations produced values for available payload mass, length and volume, a thrust level range which maximizes deliverable LSS diameter was determined corresponding to a structure and propulsion vehicle. The engine start and/or shutdown thrust transients on the last orbit transfer (apogee) burn can impose transient loads which would be greater than the steady-state loads at the burnout acceleration. The effect of the engine thrust transients on the LSS was determined from the dynamic models upon which various engine ramps were imposed.

  9. Replacing a technology - The Large Space Telescope and CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. W.; Tatarewicz, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The technological improvements, design choices and mission goals which led to the inclusion of CCD detectors in the wide field camera of the Large Space Telescope (LST) to be launched by the STS are recounted. Consideration of CCD detectors began before CCDs had seen wide astronomical applications. During planning for the ST, in the 1960s, photographic methods and a vidicon were considered, and seemed feasible provided that periodic manual maintenance could be performed. The invention of CCDs was first reported in 1970 and by 1973 the CCDs were receiving significant attention as potential detectors instead of a vidicon, which retained its own technological challenges. The CCD format gained new emphasis when success was achieved in developments for planetary-imaging spacecraft. The rapidity of progress in CCD capabilities, coupled with the continued shortcomings of the vidicon, resulted in a finalized choice for a CCD device by 1977. The decision was also prompted by continuing commercial and military interest in CCDs, which was spurring the development of the technology and improving the sensitivities and reliability while lowering the costs.

  10. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. Definition of a flight demonstration involving an Automated Beam Builder and the building and assembling of large structures is presented.

  11. New Specimen Access Device for the Large Space Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarini, P.; Ratti, F.

    2004-08-01

    The Large Space Simulator (LSS) is used to simulate in- orbit environmental conditions for spacecraft (S/C) testing. The LSS is intended to be a flexible facility: it can accommodate test articles that can differ significantly in shape and weight and carry various instruments. To improve the accessibility to the S/C inside the LSS chamber a new Specimen Access Device (SAD) has been procured. The SAD provides immediate and easy access to the S/C, thus reducing the amount of time necessary for the installations of set-ups in the LSS. The SAD has been designed as bridge crane carrying a basket to move the operator into the LSS. Such a crane moves on parallel rails on the top floor of the LSS building. The SAD is composed by three subsystems: the main bridge, the trolley that moves along the main bridge and the telescopic mast. A trade off analysis has been carried out for what concerns the telescopic mast design. The choice between friction pads vs rollers, to couple the different sections of the mast, has been evaluated. The resulting design makes use of a four sections square mast, with rollers driven deployment. This design has been chosen for the higher stiffness of the mast, due to the limited number of sections, and because it reduces radically the risk of contamination related to a solution based on sliding bushings. Analyses have been performed to assess the mechanical behaviour both in static and in dynamic conditions. In particular the telescopic mast has been studied in detail to optimise its stiffness and to check the safety margins in the various operational conditions. To increase the safety of the operations an anticollision system has been implemented by positioning on the basket two kind of sensors, ultrasonic and contact ones. All the translations are regulated by inverters with acceleration and deceleration ramps controlled by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). An absolute encoder is installed on each motor to provide the actual position of the

  12. Response of large cavity ion chambers to space protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    The assumption that spherical-shell ion chamber rssponse is equal to the dose in the center of the cavity is found to be a poor approximation for ion chambers used for area monitoring in the space program. The dose response is calculated using the appropriate areal density distribution function. Effects of nuclear reaction are evaluated using proton buildup factors. Errors of up to 100% are found for some components of the space radiation environments.

  13. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - NB32 - Large Space Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory; it was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, HST was finally designed and built; and it finally became operational in the 1990s. HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator served as the training facility for shuttle astronauts for Hubble related missions. Shown is astronaut Sharnon Lucid having her life support system being checked prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  14. Large area flexible solar array design for Space Shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    A large area flexible solar array has been designed for Shuttle power augmentation. The solar array utilizes large area, low cost, weldable solar cells. The paper addresses how the unique requirements of this system are implemented into the design. Economic and reliability issues relating to the optimization of a large area, foldable solar array concomitant to the Shuttle/Orbiter system are reviewed.

  15. Industry/government seminar on Large Space systems technology: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scala, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    The critical technology developments which the participating experts recommend as being required to support the early generation large space systems envisioned as space missions during the years 1985-2000 are summarized.

  16. Adaptive and learning control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Thau, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the adaptive learning system for space operations which assumes that structural testing can be conducted during deployment and assembly. Simulation results using the solar electric propulsion array and a novel remote sensor are presented; they involve faster scan television coverage of the motions of the array from four cameras on the corners of the Space Shuttle payload bay. The description of the simulation, the filtering algorithm for processing the TV data, the parameter extraction algorithm, and the simulation results are presented.

  17. Frame for large self-regulated ecological system for space exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Future long term space activity with human crew requires self-regulated ecological system to provide water, air and food for crew. Modern theoretical and experimental investigation results show that a sustainable ecological system can be made, but it requires large enough area and volume, which cannot be provided with modern space ship and space station technologies. The large volume frame can be created with using of inflatable construction, which can be directly cured in space environment. Problems of the large constructions in space for self-ecological system are discussed.

  18. Large Space Systems/Low-Thrust Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potentially critical interactions that occur between propulsion, structures and materials, and controls for large spacecraft are considered, the technology impacts within these fields are defined and the net effect on large systems and the resulting missions is determined. Topical areas are systems/mission analysis, LSS static and dynamic characterization, and propulsion systems characterization.

  19. A logistics model for large space power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, H. H.

    Space Power Systems (SPS) have to overcome two hurdles: (1) to find an attractive design, manufacturing and assembly concept and (2) to have available a space transportation system that can provide economical logistic support during the construction and operational phases. An initial system feasibility study, some five years ago, was based on a reference system that used terrestrial resources only and was based partially on electric propulsion systems. The conclusion was: it is feasible but not yet economically competitive with other options. This study is based on terrestrial and extraterrestrial resources and on chemical (LH 2/LOX) propulsion systems. These engines are available from the Space Shuttle production line and require small changes only. Other so-called advanced propulsion systems investigated did not prove economically superior if lunar LOX is available! We assume that a Shuttle derived Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) will become available around the turn of the century and that this will be used to establish a research base on the lunar surface. This lunar base has the potential to grow into a lunar factory producing LOX and construction materials for supporting among other projects also the construction of space power systems in geostationary orbit. A model was developed to simulate the logistics support of such an operation for a 50-year life cycle. After 50 years 111 SPS units with 5 GW each and an availability of 90% will produce 100 × 5 = 500 GW. The model comprises 60 equations and requires 29 assumptions of the parameter involved. 60-state variables calculated with the 60 equations mentioned above are given on an annual basis and as averages for the 50-year life cycle. Recycling of defective parts in geostationary orbit is one of the features of the model. The state-of-the-art with respect to SPS technology is introduced as a variable Mg mass/MW electric power delivered. If the space manufacturing facility, a maintenance and repair facility

  20. Large-size monodisperse latexes as a commercial space product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornfeld, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed spacelab production of large-size (2-40 micron diameter) monodispersed latexes is discussed. Explanations are given for the present lack of monodisperse particles in this size range. The four main topics discussed are: (1) the potential uses of these large particle size latexes, (2) why it is necessary for the particles to have a very narrow size distribution, (3) why large amounts of these monodisperse latexes are needed, and (4) why it is necessary to go to microgravity to prepare these latexes.

  1. Radiation-conduction interaction in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Mortazavi, H. R.; Smith, S. O.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of a penumbra due to the long wave radiation emitted by the earth or to solar energy reflected from the earth on temperature distributions, deflections and stresses in plates are studied to determine their importance in the design of space structures. An examination of the state of stress in a thin plate exposed to the sun suggests that deflections are only slightly modified by the penumbra, but that stresses in the vicinity of the shadow line are more affected. Even with the smoothing due to the penumbra, these stresses should be considered in the design of space structures. A simple relationship is given by which albedo viewfactors can be easily derived from the direct viewfactor, thus simplifying the radiation analysis.

  2. Convected transient analysis for large space structures maneuver and deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Convected-transient analysis techniques in the finite-element method are used to investigate the deployment and maneuver of large spacecraft structures with multiple-member flexible trusses and frames. Numerical results are presented for several sample problems.

  3. Optical Detection of Space Debris Using a Large Achromatic Coronagraph

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    34Exploter 46 Meteoroid Bumper Experiment: Earth orbital debris interpretation", in "Properties and Interactions of Interplanetary Dust", Astrophy- sics and...communication, 9th Sacramento Peak Workshop on Coronal Structure, 17-21th August. Su, S. Y.: 1986, " Orbital Debris Environement resulting from Future Activities...in Space", Adv. Sp. Res., 6, 7, 109. Taff, L. G., Jonuskis, D. M.: 1986, "Results and Analysis of a bi-telescopic Sur- vey of low Altitude Orbital

  4. Preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.; Sheu, H. R.; Kornfeld, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported of latex sphere polymerization experiments performed on two flights of the Columbia and three flights of the Challenger. The trials were carried out because polymerization of the spheres in space avoids coagulation, nucleation of a new crop of particles, and excessive stirring requirements, and allows growth of spheres larger than 4 microns diam. The Monodisperse Latex Reactor (MLR) held four stirred 100 cc sealed stainless steel cylindrical containers. The mixtures were monitored for the conversion times, volume decreases as spheres formed and the mixture temperature. The spheres were grown from 0.19 micron seeds. Details of the flight preparation efforts are outlined. In flights which did not experience mechanical malfunctions spheres 3-30 microns diam were grown that had noticeably lower size variations than did the ground-based control particles. The 10 micron diam spheres grown on STS-6 were accepted as standard reference material by the NBS and became the first products made in space to be commercially sold on earth; the 30 micron spheres also became NBS standards. The experiments confirmed all projected benefits of producing the spheres in space, as well as provided the opportunity to grow more larger offsize spheres by finishing the growths on earth.

  5. Automated frequency domain system identification of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental results of an automated on-orbit system identification method for large flexible spacecraft that yields estimated quantities to support on-line design and tuning of robust high performance control systems. The procedure consists of applying an input to the plant, obtaining an output, and then conducting nonparametric identification to yield the spectral estimate of the system transfer function. A parametric model is determined by curve fitting the spectral estimate to a rational transfer function. The identification method has been demonstrated experimentally on the Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory in JPL.

  6. Overview of Mirror Technology Development for Large Lightweight Space-Based Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. Scott; Stahl, H. P.; Rose, M. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center of Marshall Space Flight Center is involved in the development of lightweight optics for spacebased'systems. The NGST and other future NASA programs require large aperture space-based instruments. This paper reviews the technologies under development for NGST including discussions of the environmental testing of candidate segment for the NGST primary mirror.

  7. Advanced technology requirements for large space structures. Part 5: Atlas program requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, E.; Lillenas, A. N.; Broddy, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a special study which identifies and assigns priorities to technology requirements needed to accomplish a particular scenario of future large area space systems are described. Proposed future systems analyzed for technology requirements included large Electronic Mail, Microwave Radiometer, and Radar Surveillance Satellites. Twenty technology areas were identified as requirements to develop the proposed space systems.

  8. Cables and connectors for Large Space System Technology (LSST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the environment and extravehicular activity/remote assembly operations on the cables and connectors for spacecraft with metallic and/or nonmetallic structures was examined. Cable and connector philosophy was outlined for the electrical systems and electronic compartments which contain high-voltage, high-power electrical and electronic equipment. The influence of plasma and particulates on the system is analyzed and the effect of static buildup on the spacecraft electrical system discussed. Conceptual cable and connector designs are assessed for capability to withstand high current and high voltage without danger of arcs and electromagnetic interference. The extravehicular activites required of the space station and/or supply spacecraft crew members to join and inspect the electrical system, using manual or remote assembly construction are also considered.

  9. Dual structural-control optimization of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for solving dual structural-control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures where reduced-order structural models are employed. For a given initial structural dessign, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the stuctural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns using a contrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  10. Stabilization of large space structures by linear reluctance actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Saroj K.; Sendaula, Henry M.

    1991-01-01

    Application of magnetic forces are considered for stabilization of vibrations of flexible space structures. Three electromagnetic phenomena are studied, such as: (1) magnetic body force; (2) reluctance torque; and (3) magnetostriction, and their application is analyzed for stabilization of a beam. The magnetic body force actuator uses the force that exists between poles of magnets. The reluctance actuator is configured in such a way that the reluctance of the magnetic circuit will be minimum when the beam is straight. Any bending of the beam increases the reluctance and hence generates a restoring torque that reduces bending. The gain of the actuator is controlled by varying the magnetizing current. Since the energy density of a magnetic device is much higher compared to piezoelectric or thermal actuators, it is expected that the reluctance actuator will be more effective in controlling the structural vibrations.

  11. Osmotic pumped heat pipes for large space platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzer, H.J.; Fleischman, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    A thermal bus will be required as a thermal control source for future space platforms. The osmotic heat pipe is one candidate device with potential significant payoff toward serving growing thermal management needs. Results of a study evaluating osmotic heat pipes for thermal bus applications are presented. Electrostatic and other techniques are proposed for flow control and solution circulation in zero-gravity. Baseline size and performance design parameters of cellulose acetate membrane/sugar-water solution and other combinations were scaled up to predict osmotic pump performance for heat loads and temperatures of 4 to 120 C. A compact hollow-fiber membrane module measuring 20 inches in diameter by 12 inches long and weighing 190 pounds is projected for 50-kW heat loads.

  12. Osmotic pumped heat pipes for large space platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzer, H. J.; Fleischman, G. L.; Stalmach, D. D.

    1982-06-01

    A thermal bus will be required as a thermal control source for future space platforms. The osmotic heat pipe is one candidate device with potential significant payoff toward serving growing thermal management needs. Results of a study evaluating osmotic heat pipes for thermal bus applications are presented. Electrostatic and other techniques are proposed for flow control and solution circulation in zero-gravity. Baseline size and performance design parameters of cellulose acetate membrane/sugar-water solution and other combinations were scaled up to predict osmotic pump performance for heat loads and temperatures of 4 to 120 C. A compact hollow-fiber membrane module measuring 20 inches in diameter by 12 inches long and weighing 190 pounds is projected for 50-kW heat loads.

  13. Large zeolites - Why and how to grow in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of zeolite crystals which are considered to be the most valuable catalytic and adsorbent materials of the chemical processing industry are discussed. It is proposed to use triethanolamine as a nucleation control agent to control the time release of Al in a zeolite A solution and to increase the average and maximum crystal size by 25-50 times. Large zeolites could be utilized to make membranes for reactors/separators which will substantially increase their efficiency.

  14. Dynamic Identification for Control of Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    This is a compilation of reports by the one author on one subject. It consists of the following five journal articles: (1) A Parametric Study of the Ibrahim Time Domain Modal Identification Algorithm; (2) Large Modal Survey Testing Using the Ibrahim Time Domain Identification Technique; (3) Computation of Normal Modes from Identified Complex Modes; (4) Dynamic Modeling of Structural from Measured Complex Modes; and (5) Time Domain Quasi-Linear Identification of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems.

  15. Space transportation booster engine thrust chamber technology, large scale injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Large Scale Injector (LSI) program was to deliver a 21 inch diameter, 600,000 lbf thrust class injector to NASA/MSFC for hot fire testing. The hot fire test program would demonstrate the feasibility and integrity of the full scale injector, including combustion stability, chamber wall compatibility (thermal management), and injector performance. The 21 inch diameter injector was delivered in September of 1991.

  16. Investigating repeatable ionospheric features during large space storms and superstorms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-25

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Mar-13 – Jan-14 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigating repeatable ionospheric features during large... Ionosphere -Plasmasphere Electrodynamics). The 6 April 2000 superstorm (Dst = -314 nT) was complex as the prompt penetration electric field developed and...event because of its unusual pattern producing unusual ionospheric storms. Our results reveal some strong longitudinal differences caused by the

  17. Controls for orbital assembly of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Davidson, Roger; Gooyabadi, Ali A.; Quan, Ralph; Reisenauer, Brian; Robertson, L.; Mohl, James; Good, Philip; Vredevoogd, Loren; Galvez, Jose

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: flexible structure control; decentralized control for flexible multi-body systems; control of structures during assembly; decentralized control using structural partitioning; reduced-orded model-based controller design; ROM/residual mode filters (RMF) control of large flexible structures;RMF in a distributed parameter system (DPS); LSS active control simulation; 3-D truss beam; mobile transporter with RMS; and flexible robot manipulator.

  18. A Model for Predicting Thermomechanical Response of Large Space Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    micropolar analogy to model large grid frameworks under initial axial forces. This continuous approximation is formulated even for the case of variable member...solutions show that results obtained are accurate especially in the range of long wavelengths. Noor and Nemeth [97] have developed micropolar models for...34 % Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol. 25, pp. 179- 193, 1981. 95. Bazant, Z. P., Christensen, M., "Analogy Between Micropolar

  19. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Krishna, R.; Kumar, V. K.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamics and attitude and shape control of very large, inherently flexible spacecraft systems were investigated. Increasingly more complex examples were examined, beginning with a uniform free-free beam, next a free-free uniform plate/platform and finally by considering a thin shallow spherical shell structure in orbit. The effects devices were modeled. For given sets of assumed actuator locations, the controllability of these systems was first established. Control laws for each of the actuators were developed based on decoupling techniques (including distributed modal control) pole placement algorithms and a application of the linear regulator problem for optical control theory.

  20. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  1. Integrated structural control design of large space structures

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Active control of structures has been under intensive development for the last ten years. Reference 2 reviews much of the identification and control technology for structural control developed during this time. The technology was initially focused on space structure and weapon applications; however, recently the technology is also being directed toward applications in manufacturing and transportation. Much of this technology focused on multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) identification and control methodology because many of the applications require a coordinated control involving multiple disturbances and control objectives where multiple actuators and sensors are necessary for high performance. There have been many optimal robust control methods developed for the design of MIMO robust control laws; however, there appears to be a significant gap between the theoretical development and experimental evaluation of control and identification methods to address structural control applications. Many methods have been developed for MIMO identification and control of structures, such as the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), Q-Markov Covariance Equivalent Realization (Q-Markov COVER) for identification; and, Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG), Frequency Weighted LQG and H-/ii-synthesis methods for control. Upon implementation, many of the identification and control methods have shown limitations such as the excitation of unmodelled dynamics and sensitivity to system parameter variations. As a result, research on methods which address these problems have been conducted.

  2. Formation Flying of Components of a Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Quadrelli, Marco; Breckenridge, William

    2009-01-01

    A conceptual space telescope having an aperture tens of meters wide and a focal length of hundreds of meters would be implemented as a group of six separate optical modules flying in formation: a primary-membrane-mirror module, a relay-mirror module, a focal-plane-assembly module containing a fast steering mirror and secondary and tertiary optics, a primary-mirror-figure-sensing module, a scanning-electron-beam module for controlling the shape of the primary mirror, and a sunshade module. Formation flying would make it unnecessary to maintain the required precise alignments among the modules by means of an impractically massive rigid structure. Instead, a control system operating in conjunction with a metrology system comprising optical and radio subsystems would control the firing of small thrusters on the separate modules to maintain the formation, thereby acting as a virtual rigid structure. The control system would utilize a combination of centralized- and decentralized-control methods according to a leader-follower approach. The feasibility of the concept was demonstrated in computational simulations that showed that relative positions could be maintained to within a fraction of a millimeter and orientations to within several microradians.

  3. Utilization of Space Station by the Large Deployment Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandermann, L. W.; Alff, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), a NASA concept of a very large, orbiting, far infrared submillimeter telescope is described. To be launched in the 1990s, LDR has a projected life of 10 years and is to be serviced every 2 to 3 years. A System Concept and Technology Definition Study of LDR for NASA Ames is currently being conducted. Study results indicate that launch of a 20 m LDR, operating in a 700 to 800 km orbit, requires two shuttle loads. The components of LDR are assembled in a lower parking orbit, and the system is checked out and then transferred to the operational orbit. Furthermore, for servicing, LDR may have to be retrieved to the same lower orbit (and later returned to operational altitude) by an orbit transfer vehicle. These requirements bring up the question of a suitable assembly, checkout, and servicing platform. The deployment process is time consuming and may require special equipment not necessarily available from the orbiter itself. The SS is an attractive choice for that platform.

  4. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  5. Large craters on the meteoroid and space debris impact experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, Donald H.

    1992-01-01

    Examination of 29.37 sq m of thick aluminum plates from the LDEF, which were exposed to the meteoroid and man-made orbital debris environments for 5.8 years, revealed 606 craters that were 0.5 mm in diameter or larger. Most were nearly hemispherical. There was a large variation in the number density of craters around the three axis gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft. A new model of the near-Earth meteoroid environment gives good agreement with the crater fluxes measured on the fourteen faces of the LDEF. The man-made orbital debris model of Kessler, which predicts that 16 pct. of the craters would be caused by man-made debris, is plausible. No chemical analyses of impactor residue that will distinguish between meteoroids and man-made debris is yet available.

  6. Retention of memory for large-scale spaces.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru

    2013-01-01

    This study empirically examined the retention of large-scale spatial memory, taking different types of spatial knowledge and levels of sense of direction into consideration. A total of 38 participants learned a route from a video and conducted spatial tasks immediately after learning the route and after 2 weeks or 3 months had passed. Results showed that spatial memory decayed over time, at a faster rate for the first 2-week period than for the subsequent period of up to 3 months, although it was not completely forgotten even after 3 months. The rate of forgetting differed depending on the type of knowledge, with landmark and route knowledge deteriorating at a much faster rate than survey knowledge. Sense of direction affected both the acquisition and the retention of survey knowledge. Survey knowledge by people with a good sense of direction was more accurate and decayed much less than that by people with a poor sense of direction.

  7. Testing gravity using large-scale redshift-space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bertacca, Daniele; Pietrobon, Davide; Schmidt, Fabian; Samushia, Lado; Bartolo, Nicola; Doré, Olivier; Matarrese, Sabino; Percival, Will J.

    2013-11-01

    We use luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II to test the cosmological structure growth in two alternatives to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM)+general relativity (GR) cosmological model. We compare observed three-dimensional clustering in SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) with theoretical predictions for the standard vanilla ΛCDM+GR model, unified dark matter (UDM) cosmologies and the normal branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (nDGP). In computing the expected correlations in UDM cosmologies, we derive a parametrized formula for the growth factor in these models. For our analysis we apply the methodology tested in Raccanelli et al. and use the measurements of Samushia et al. that account for survey geometry, non-linear and wide-angle effects and the distribution of pair orientation. We show that the estimate of the growth rate is potentially degenerate with wide-angle effects, meaning that extremely accurate measurements of the growth rate on large scales will need to take such effects into account. We use measurements of the zeroth and second-order moments of the correlation function from SDSS DR7 data and the Large Suite of Dark Matter Simulations (LasDamas), and perform a likelihood analysis to constrain the parameters of the models. Using information on the clustering up to rmax = 120 h-1 Mpc, and after marginalizing over the bias, we find, for UDM models, a speed of sound c∞ ≤ 6.1e-4, and, for the nDGP model, a cross-over scale rc ≥ 340 Mpc, at 95 per cent confidence level.

  8. Free-decay time-domain modal identification for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Vanhorn, David A.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1992-01-01

    Concept definition studies for the Modal Identification Experiment (MIE), a proposed space flight experiment for the Space Station Freedom (SSF), have demonstrated advantages and compatibility of free-decay time-domain modal identification techniques with the on-orbit operational constraints of large space structures. Since practical experience with modal identification using actual free-decay responses of large space structures is very limited, several numerical and test data reduction studies were conducted. Major issues and solutions were addressed, including closely-spaced modes, wide frequency range of interest, data acquisition errors, sampling delay, excitation limitations, nonlinearities, and unknown disturbances during free-decay data acquisition. The data processing strategies developed in these studies were applied to numerical simulations of the MIE, test data from a deployable truss, and launch vehicle flight data. Results of these studies indicate free-decay time-domain modal identification methods can provide accurate modal parameters necessary to characterize the structural dynamics of large space structures.

  9. Stability Analysis for a Large-scale Space Power Network, International Space Station and Japanese Experiment Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Masaaki; Arai, Satoaki

    The International Space Station (ISS), which is scheduled to start the operation fully in early 2000’s, is being developed and assembled on orbit since 1998 with international cooperation of the USA, Russia, Europe, Canada, and Japan. Japan participates in this ISS program and will provide the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, named “Kibo") which will be attached to the ISS core. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), which is responsible for the JEM system development and integration, has been developed JEM Electric Power System (JEM EPS) as part of the Space Station Electric Power System (EPS). The International Space Station Electric Power System is the world’s largest orbiting direct-current (DC) power system. The ISS electric power is generated by solar arrays, and distributed to the each module in 120 Vdc bus voltage rating. When designing a large-scale Space Power System using direct current (DC), special attention must be placed on the electrical stability and control of the system and individual load on the system. For a large-scale Space Power System, it is not feasible to design the entire system as a whole. Instead, the system can be defined in term of numerous small blocks, and each block then designed individually. The individual blocks are then integrated to form a complete system. The International Space Station (ISS) is one of good example for these issue and concerns as a large-scale Space Power System. This paper describes the approach of the stability analysis for a large-scale space power network.

  10. Development of a large area space solar cell assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a large area high efficiency solar cell assembly is described. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon solar cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are the use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and integration of coverglass application and cell fabrications. Cell development experiments concerned optimization of ion implantation processing of 2 ohm-cm boron-doped silicon. Process parameters were selected based on these experiments and cells with area of 34.3 sq cm wre fabricated. The average AMO efficiency of the twenty-five best cells was 13.9% and the best bell had an efficiency of 14.4%. An important innovation in cell encapsulation was also developed. In this technique, the coverglass is applied before the cell is sawed to final size. The coverglass and cell are then sawed as a unit. In this way, the cost of the coverglass is reduced, since the tolerance on glass size is relaxed, and costly coverglass/cell alignment procedures are eliminated. Adhesive investigated were EVA, FEP-Teflon sheet and DC 93-500. Details of processing and results are reported.

  11. Development of a large area space solar cell assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1982-05-01

    The development of a large area high efficiency solar cell assembly is described. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon solar cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are the use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and integration of coverglass application and cell fabrications. Cell development experiments concerned optimization of ion implantation processing of 2 ohm-cm boron-doped silicon. Process parameters were selected based on these experiments and cells with area of 34.3 sq cm wre fabricated. The average AMO efficiency of the twenty-five best cells was 13.9% and the best bell had an efficiency of 14.4%. An important innovation in cell encapsulation was also developed. In this technique, the coverglass is applied before the cell is sawed to final size. The coverglass and cell are then sawed as a unit. In this way, the cost of the coverglass is reduced, since the tolerance on glass size is relaxed, and costly coverglass/cell alignment procedures are eliminated. Adhesive investigated were EVA, FEP-Teflon sheet and DC 93-500. Details of processing and results are reported.

  12. Large space system - Charged particle environment interaction technology. [effects on high voltage solar array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Roche, J. C.; Grier, N. T.

    1979-01-01

    Large high-voltage space power systems proposed for future applications in both low earth orbit and geosynchronous altitudes must operate in the space charged-particle environment with possible interactions between this environment and the high-voltage surfaces. The paper reviews the ground experimental work to provide indicators for the interactions that could exist in the space power system. A preliminary analytical model of a large space power system is constructed using the existing NASA Charging Analyzer Program, and its performance in geosynchronous orbit is evaluated. The analytical results are used to illustrate the regions where detrimental interactions could exist and to establish areas where future technology is required.

  13. Space-plasma campaign on UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LAPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, M. E.; Finnegan, S. M.; Knudsen, D. J.; Vincena, S.

    2007-05-01

    Knudsen [JGR, 1996] describes a potential role for stationary Alfvén (StA) waves in auroral arcs' frequency dependence. Magnetized plasmas are predicted to support electromagnetic perturbations that are static in a fixed frame if there is uniform background plasma convection. These stationary waves should not be confused with standing waves that oscillate in time with a fixed, spatially varying envelope. Stationary waves have no time variation in the fixed frame. In the drifting frame, there is an apparent time dependence as plasma convects past fixed electromagnetic structures. We describe early results from an experimental campaign to reproduce in the lab the basic conditions necessary for the creation of StA waves, namely quasi-steady-state convection across magnetic field-aligned current channels. We show that an off-axis, fixed channel of electron current (and depleted density) is created in the Large Plasma Device Upgrade (LAPD) at UCLA, using a small, heated, oxide-coated electrode at one plasma-column end and we show that the larger plasma column rotates about its cylindrical axis from a radial electric field imposed by a special termination electrode on the same end. Initial experimentation with plasma-rotation-inducing termination electrodes began in May 2006 in the West Virginia Q Machine, leading to two designs that, in January 2007, were tested in LAPD. The radial profile of azimuthal velocity was consistent with predictions of rigid-body rotation. Current-channel experiments in LAPD, in August 2006, showed that inertial Alfvén waves could be concentrated in an off-axis channel of electron current and depleted plasma density. These experimental results will be presented and discussed. This research is supported by DOE and NSF.

  14. Innovative research in the design and operation of large telescopes for space: Aspects of giant telescopes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The capability and understanding of how to finish the reflector surfaces needed for large space telescopes is discussed. The technology for making very light glass substrates for mirrors is described. Other areas of development are in wide field imaging design for very fast primaries, in data analysis and retrieval methods for astronomical images, and in methods for making large area closely packed mosaics of solid state array detectors.

  15. Technology for Large Space Systems: A Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 17

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    thermal stability tests of CFRP sandwich panels for far-IR astronomy, ’ Zerodur ’ lightweight (large mirror ) blanks, and the precision machining of grazing...four- mirror , two-stage optical system; a indispensability of a robust Space Shuttle system for these Space lightweight structural composite segmented...The primary N$7-16935# Construcciones Aeronauticas S.A., Madrid (Spain). mirror is a filled aperture made up of 84 hexagonal panels, each Space Div. 2

  16. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems. Volume 3: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Facilities and equipment are defined for refining processes to commercial grade of lunar material that is delivered to a 'space manufacturing facility' in beneficiated, primary processed quality. The manufacturing facilities and the equipment for producing elements of large space systems from these materials and providing programmatic assessments of the concepts are also defined. In-space production processes of solar cells (by vapor deposition) and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, converters, and others are described.

  17. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems, volume 1, chapters 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Space program scenarios for production of large space structures from lunar materials are defined. The concept of the space manufacturing facility (SMF) is presented. The manufacturing processes and equipment for the SMF are defined and the conceptual layouts are described for the production of solar cells and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, and converters. A 'reference' SMF was designed and its operation requirements are described.

  18. Development of precision structure of a large-size space radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astavin, A. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Komaev, R. V.; Moisheev, A. A.; Tsvelev, V. M.; Serebrennikov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents methods for the design and engineering concepts, which made it possible to develop and manufacture the space radio telescope with a large size and high accuracy of the effective reflector area and focal assembly position.

  19. Research on elastic large space structures as "plants' for active control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.; Vonflotow, A.

    1983-01-01

    Research on active control of large space structures is discussed. Intrinsic damping in monolithic metallic structures is discussed. Thermal relaxation and grain boundary relaxation are discussed, as are properties of thermal damping.

  20. The large silicon tracker for the AMS experiment on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluzzi, M.

    1996-02-01

    The design of the high precision microstrip silicon tracker for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment (AMS) is presented. We emphasize features of the silicon tracker which make it suitable for a space born experiment and for equipping large active areas.

  1. Large bearing operation without retainer. [high speed ball bearings for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, E.

    1978-01-01

    The design and testing of large high-speed ball bearings for space application is described. A well-defined lubrication system to provide oil to both race contacts in zero g allows stable operation without ball retainer.

  2. Technology Challenges and Opportunities for Very Large In-Space Structural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.

    2009-01-01

    Space solar power satellites and other large space systems will require creative and innovative concepts in order to achieve economically viable designs. The mass and volume constraints of current and planned launch vehicles necessitate highly efficient structural systems be developed. In addition, modularity and in-space deployment/construction will be enabling design attributes. While current space systems allocate nearly 20 percent of the mass to the primary structure, the very large space systems of the future must overcome subsystem mass allocations by achieving a level of functional integration not yet realized. A proposed building block approach with two phases is presented to achieve near-term solar power satellite risk reduction with accompanying long-term technology advances. This paper reviews the current challenges of launching and building very large space systems from a structures and materials perspective utilizing recent experience. Promising technology advances anticipated in the coming decades in modularity, material systems, structural concepts, and in-space operations are presented. It is shown that, together, the current challenges and future advances in very large in-space structural systems may provide the technology pull/push necessary to make solar power satellite systems more technically and economically feasible.

  3. Computational methods and software systems for dynamics and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Felippa, C. A.; Farhat, C.; Pramono, E.

    1990-01-01

    Two key areas of crucial importance to the computer-based simulation of large space structures are discussed. The first area involves multibody dynamics (MBD) of flexible space structures, with applications directed to deployment, construction, and maneuvering. The second area deals with advanced software systems, with emphasis on parallel processing. The latest research thrust in the second area involves massively parallel computers.

  4. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures. Volume 3: Thermal analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    the development of large space structure technology is discussed. A detailed thermal analysis of a model space fabricated 1 meter beam is presented. Alternative thermal coatings are evaluated, and deflections, stresses, and stiffness variations resulting from flight orientations and solar conditions are predicted.

  5. Definition of ground test for verification of large space structure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, G. B., III; Glaese, J. R.; Tollison, D. K.; Howsman, T. G.; Curtis, S. (Editor); Banks, B.

    1984-01-01

    Control theory and design, dynamic system modelling, and simulation of test scenarios are the main ideas discussed. The overall effort is the achievement at Marshall Space Flight Center of a successful ground test experiment of a large space structure. A simplified planar model of ground test experiment of a large space structure. A simplified planar model of ground test verification was developed. The elimination from that model of the uncontrollable rigid body modes was also examined. Also studied was the hardware/software of computation speed.

  6. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures, Volume 2: Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure (LSS) technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. It is concluded that an LSS flight demonstration using an Automated Beam Builder and the orbiter as a construction base, could be performed in the 1983-1984 time period. The estimated cost is $24 million exclusive of shuttle launch costs. During the mission, a simple space platform could be constructed in-orbit to accommodate user requirements associated with earth viewing and materials exposure experiments needs.

  7. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsecond angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST); ultraviolet/optical space telescopes; astrophysics; astrobiology; technology development.

  8. Development of space stable thermal control coatings for use on large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Harada, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a large scale manufacturing method for the production of a stable zinc orthotitanate pigment is studied, with emphasis placed on the comprehensive analysis of the properties and environmental stability of oxalate precursor zinc orthotitanate pigments and of the preparative conditions (time and temperature) leading to optimum properties and optical stability.

  9. Interpretation of plasma diagnostics package results in terms of large space structure plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, William S.

    1991-01-01

    The Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) is a spacecraft which was designed and built at The University of Iowa and which contained several scientific instruments. These instruments were used for measuring Space Shuttle Orbiter environmental parameters and plasma parameters. The PDP flew on two Space Shuttle flights. The first flight of the PDP was on Space Shuttle Mission STS-3 and was a part of the NASA/Office of Space Science payload (OSS-1). The second flight of the PDP was on Space Shuttle Mission STS/51F and was a part of Spacelab 2. The interpretation of both the OSS-1 and Spacelab 2 PDP results in terms of large space structure plasma interactions is emphasized.

  10. Analysis of large space structures assembly: Man/machine assembly analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Procedures for analyzing large space structures assembly via three primary modes: manual, remote and automated are outlined. Data bases on each of the assembly modes and a general data base on the shuttle capabilities to support structures assembly are presented. Task element times and structure assembly component costs are given to provide a basis for determining the comparative economics of assembly alternatives. The lessons learned from simulations of space structures assembly are detailed.

  11. Addressing the problem of interruptability in the construction of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Morgenthaler, George W.

    1989-01-01

    Large scale space missions of the near future will depend upon successful multi-launch coordination and construction in the space environment. One of the main challenges is how to accomplish a valid global analysis of a construction project with the intent of improving safety, reducing overall mission cost, and total construction time. These three items are dependent on the interruptability of the project, which is the ability of the project to recover from unplanned interruptions; such as failure of the launch vehicle; sudden, on-orbit, crew illness; or damage from a space debris impact on the partially completed space structure. A new method for addressing and analyzing this type of problem is being developed. The method is called Program Interruptability and Risk Evaluation Technique, or PIRET. PIRET has been developed in order to model and analyze potential interruptability concerns of the construction of the U.S. Space Station Freedom (SSF), although PIRET is applicable to any complex, multi-launch structural assembly. This paper is a progress report on the continuing research of the NASA Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado, Boulder into this area of space construction interruptability. The paper will define the problem of interruptability, will diagram the PIRET approach to space construction, will share results from a preliminary PIRET analysis of SSF, and will show that PIRET is a useful tool for modelling space construction interruptability.

  12. Large antenna experiments aboard the space shuttle: Application of nonuniform sampling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmatsamii, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Future satellite communication and scientific spacecraft will utilize antennas with dimensions as large as 20 meters. In order to commercially use these large, low sidelobe and multiple beam antennas, a high level of confidence must be established as to their performance in the 0-g and space environment. Furthermore, it will be desirable to demonstrate the applicability of surface compensation techniques for slowly varying surface distortions which could result from thermal effects. An overview of recent advances in performing RF measurements on large antennas is presented with emphasis given to the application of a space based far-field range utilizing the Space Shuttle and the concept of a newly developed nonuniform sampling technique.

  13. Computer-aided design and distributed system technology development for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Ernest S.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed large space structures have many characteristics that make them difficult to analyze and control. They are highly flexible, with components mathematically modeled by partial differential equations or very large systems of ordinary differential equations. They have many resonant frequencies, typically low and closely spaced. Natural damping may be low and/or improperly modeled. Coupled with stringent operational requirements of orientation, shape control, and vibration suppression, and the inability to perform adequate ground testing, these characteristics present an unconventional identification and control design problem to the systems theorist. Some of the research underway within Langley's Spacecraft Control Branch, Guidance and Control Division aimed at developing theory and algorithms to treat large space structures systems identification and control problems is described. The research areas to be considered are computer-aided design algorithms, and systems identification and control of distributed systems.

  14. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  15. Navigation in large information spaces represented as hypertext: A review of the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Marcus

    1990-01-01

    The problem addressed is the failure of information-space navigation tools when the space grows to large. The basic goal is to provide the power of the hypertext interface in such a way as to be most easily comprehensible to the user. It was determined that the optimal structure for information is an overlapping, simplified hierarchy. The hierarchical structure should be made obvious to the user, and many of the non-hierarchical links in the information space should either by eliminated, or should be de-emphasized so that the novice user is not confused by them. Only one of the hierarchies should be very simple.

  16. Interactive computer graphics and its role in control system design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to show the relevance of interactive computer graphics in the design of control systems to maintain attitude and shape of large space structures to accomplish the required mission objectives. The typical phases of control system design, starting from the physical model such as modeling the dynamics, modal analysis, and control system design methodology are reviewed and the need of the interactive computer graphics is demonstrated. Typical constituent parts of large space structures such as free-free beams and free-free plates are used to demonstrate the complexity of the control system design and the effectiveness of the interactive computer graphics.

  17. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D.

    1981-01-01

    The basic assumption that a large space structure can be decoupled preceding the application of reduced order active control was considered and alternative solutions to the control of such structures (in contrast to the strict modal control) were investigated. The transfer function matrix from the actuators to the sensors was deemed to be a reasonable candidate. More refined models from multivariable systems theory were studied and recent results in the multivariable control field were compared with respect to theoretical deficiencies and likely problems in application to large space structures.

  18. On the accuracy of modelling the dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diarra, C. M.; Bainum, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed space missions will require large scale, light weight, space based structural systems. Large space structure technology (LSST) systems will have to accommodate (among others): ocean data systems; electronic mail systems; large multibeam antenna systems; and, space based solar power systems. The structures are to be delivered into orbit by the Space Shuttle. Because of their inherent size, modelling techniques and scaling algorithms must be developed so that system performance can be predicted accurately prior to launch and assembly. When the size and weight-to-area ratio of proposed LSST systems dictate that the entire system be considered flexible, there are two basic modelling methods which can be used. The first is a continuum approach, a mathematical formulation for predicting the motion of a general orbiting flexible body, in which elastic deformations are considered small compared with characteristic body dimensions. This approach is based on an a priori knowledge of the frequencies and shape functions of all modes included within the system model. Alternatively, finite element techniques can be used to model the entire structure as a system of lumped masses connected by a series of (restoring) springs and possibly dampers. In addition, a computational algorithm was developed to evaluate the coefficients of the various coupling terms in the equations of motion as applied to the finite element model of the Hoop/Column.

  19. On the accuracy of modelling the dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diarra, C. M.; Bainum, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed space missions will require large scale, light weight, space based structural systems. Large space structure technology (LSST) systems will have to accommodate (among others): ocean data systems; electronic mail systems; large multibeam antenna systems; and, space based solar power systems. The structures are to be delivered into orbit by the space shuttle. Because of their inherent size, modelling techniques and scaling algorithms must be developed so that system performance can be predicted accurately prior to launch and assembly. When the size and weight-to-area ratio of proposed LSST systems dictate that the entire system be considered flexible, there are two basic modeling methods which can be used. The first is a continuum approach, a mathematical formulation for predicting the motion of a general orbiting flexible body, in which elastic deformations are considered small compared with characteristic body dimensions. This approach is based on an a priori knowledge of the frequencies and shape functions of all modes included within the system model. Alternatively, finite element techniques can be used to model the entire structure as a system of lumped masses connected by a series of (restoring) springs and possibly dampers. In addition, a computational algorithm was developed to evaluate the coefficients of the various coupling terms in the equations of motion as applied to the finite element model of the Hoop/Column.

  20. Development of Large-Aperture, Light-Weight Fresnel Lenses for Gossamer Space Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, D; Hyde, R; Weisberg, A; Early, J; Rushford, M; Britten, J

    2002-04-29

    In order to examine more distant astronomical objects, with higher resolution, future space telescopes require objectives with significantly larger aperture than presently available. NASA has identified a progression in size from the 2.4m aperture objective currently used in the HUBBLE space telescope[l,2], to 25m and greater in order to observe, e.g., extra-solar planets. Since weight is a crucial factor for any object sent into space, the relative weight of large optics over a given area must be reduced[3]. The areal mass density of the primary mirror for the Hubble space telescope is {approx}200 kg/m{sup 2}. This is expected to be reduced to around 15 kg/m{sup 2} for the successor to Hubble--the next generation space telescope (NGST)[4]. For future very large aperture telescopes needed for extra-solar planet detection, the areal mass density must be reduced even further. For example, the areal mass density goal for the Gossamer space telescopes is < 1 kg/m{sup 2}. The production of lightweight focusing optics at >10m size is also an enabling technology for many other applications such as Earth observation, power beaming, and optical communications.

  1. Computational methods and software systems for dynamics and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Felippa, C. A.; Farhat, C.; Pramono, E.

    1990-01-01

    This final report on computational methods and software systems for dynamics and control of large space structures covers progress to date, projected developments in the final months of the grant, and conclusions. Pertinent reports and papers that have not appeared in scientific journals (or have not yet appeared in final form) are enclosed. The grant has supported research in two key areas of crucial importance to the computer-based simulation of large space structure. The first area involves multibody dynamics (MBD) of flexible space structures, with applications directed to deployment, construction, and maneuvering. The second area deals with advanced software systems, with emphasis on parallel processing. The latest research thrust in the second area, as reported here, involves massively parallel computers.

  2. Sequential Multisine Excitation Signals for System Identification of Large Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-06

    Linear system identification of complex nonlinear systems, such as large space structures, can be difficult because such systems are often lightly...used to collect frequency response data for linear system identification are poorly suited to systems that exhibit nonlinear responses. Specifically

  3. Technology for large space systems: A special bibliography with indexes (supplement 03)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A bibliography containing 217 abstracts addressing the technology for large space systems is presented. State of the art and advanced concepts concerning interactive analysis and design, structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, solar power satellite systems, and flight experiments are represented.

  4. Use of domestic fuels for large-scale space heating and for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Seppaelae, R.; Asplund, D.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of the study was to survey the heating systems for large-scale space heating and district heating with domestic fuels or under development in Finland, and to study alternative technico-economic applications in the size class of 0.5 - 5 MW.

  5. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Large Carbon Molecules and Ions in Support of Space Missions. A New Generation of Laboratory & Space Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Tan, Xiaofeng; Cami, Jan; Biennier, Ludovic; Remy, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials in space. A long-standing and major challenge for laboratory astrophysics has been to measure the spectra of large carbon molecules in laboratory environments that mimic (in a realistic way) the physical conditions that are associated with the interstellar emission and absorption regions [1]. This objective has been identified as one of the critical Laboratory Astrophysics objectives to optimize the data return from space missions [2]. An extensive laboratory program has been developed to assess the properties of PAHs in such environments and to describe how they influence the radiation and energy balance in space. We present and discuss the gas-phase electronic absorption spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs measured in the UV-Visible-NIR range in astrophysically relevant environments and discuss the implications for astrophysics [1]. The harsh physical conditions of the interstellar medium characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - have been simulated in the laboratory by associating a pulsed cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) with a supersonic slit jet seeded with PAHs and an ionizing, penning-type, electronic discharge. We have measured for the {\\it first time} the spectra of a series of neutral [3,4] and ionized [5,6] interstellar PAHs analogs in the laboratory. An effort has also been attempted to quantify the mechanisms of ion and carbon nanoparticles production in the free jet expansion and to model our simulation of the diffuse interstellar medium in the laboratory [7]. These experiments provide {\\it unique} information on the spectra of free, large carbon-containing molecules and ions in the gas phase. We are now, for the first time, in the position to directly compare laboratory spectral data on free, cold, PAH ions and carbon nano-sized carbon particles with astronomical observations in the

  6. Interactions between large space power systems and low-Earth-orbit plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    There is a growing tendency to plan space missions that will incorporate very large space power systems. These space power systems must function in the space plasma environment, which can impose operational limitations. As the power output increases, the operating voltage also must increase and this voltage, exposed at solar array interconnects, interacts with the local plasma. The implications of such interactions are considered. The available laboratory data for biased array segment tests are reviewed to demonstrate the basic interactions considered. A data set for a floating high voltage array test was used to generate approximate relationships for positive and negative current collection from plasmas. These relationships were applied to a hypothetical 100 kW power system operating in a 400 km, near equatorial orbit. It was found that discharges from the negative regions of the array are the most probable limiting factor in array operation.

  7. Fundamental studies of heat load and thermal-structure analysis of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of the basic requirements for modeling slender member shadowing effects on thermally induced deformation continues. The theoretical formulation is complete and computer programming is underway. The basic requirements for thermal finite elements to model heat transfer in orbiting structures were also studied. The need for planar isothermal elements to model large space structures' antenna meshes was established. Finite Element approaches for modeling space structure cable and membrane components with thermal effects is underway. Three levels of structural modeling and analysis were identified: (1) a linear-elastic small deflection analysis that does not permit cable slackening; (2) a linear-elastic analysis that includes stress stiffening (the ANSYS program), but not large deflections; and (3) full nonlinear large deflection analysis with stress stiffening. Methods of determining cable initial tensions are currently being evaluated.

  8. Technology gap assessment for a future large-aperture ultraviolet-optical-infrared space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl M.; Thronson, Harley

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team identified five key technology areas to enable candidate architectures for a future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions." The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technology areas are internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescope systems, detectors, and mirror coatings. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current technology readiness level (TRL), thus identifying the current technology gap. We also report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  9. Tree-space statistics and approximations for large-scale analysis of anatomical trees.

    PubMed

    Feragen, Aasa; Owen, Megan; Petersen, Jens; Wille, Mathilde M W; Thomsen, Laura H; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis of anatomical trees is hard to perform due to differences in the topological structure of the trees. In this paper we define statistical properties of leaf-labeled anatomical trees with geometric edge attributes by considering the anatomical trees as points in the geometric space of leaf-labeled trees. This tree-space is a geodesic metric space where any two trees are connected by a unique shortest path, which corresponds to a tree deformation. However, tree-space is not a manifold, and the usual strategy of performing statistical analysis in a tangent space and projecting onto tree-space is not available. Using tree-space and its shortest paths, a variety of statistical properties, such as mean, principal component, hypothesis testing and linear discriminant analysis can be defined. For some of these properties it is still an open problem how to compute them; others (like the mean) can be computed, but efficient alternatives are helpful in speeding up algorithms that use means iteratively, like hypothesis testing. In this paper, we take advantage of a very large dataset (N = 8016) to obtain computable approximations, under the assumption that the data trees parametrize the relevant parts of tree-space well. Using the developed approximate statistics, we illustrate how the structure and geometry of airway trees vary across a population and show that airway trees with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease come from a different distribution in tree-space than healthy ones. Software is available from http://image.diku.dk/aasa/software.php.

  10. Prime focus architectures for large space telescopes: reduce surfaces to save cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Lillie, C. F.

    2016-07-01

    Conceptual architectures are now being developed to identify future directions for post JWST large space telescope systems to operate in the UV Optical and near IR regions of the spectrum. Here we show that the cost of optical surfaces within large aperture telescope/instrument systems can exceed $100M/reflection when expressed in terms of the aperture increase needed to over come internal absorption loss. We recommend a program in innovative optical design to minimize the number of surfaces by considering multiple functions for mirrors. An example is given using the Rowland circle imaging spectrometer systems for UV space science. With few exceptions, current space telescope architectures are based on systems optimized for ground-based astronomy. Both HST and JWST are classical "Cassegrain" telescopes derived from the ground-based tradition to co-locate the massive primary mirror and the instruments at the same end of the metrology structure. This requirement derives from the dual need to minimize observatory dome size and cost in the presence of the Earth's 1-g gravitational field. Space telescopes, however function in the zero gravity of space and the 1- g constraint is relieved to the advantage of astronomers. Here we suggest that a prime focus large aperture telescope system in space may have potentially have higher transmittance, better pointing, improved thermal and structural control, less internal polarization and broader wavelength coverage than Cassegrain telescopes. An example is given showing how UV astronomy telescopes use single optical elements for multiple functions and therefore have a minimum number of reflections.

  11. Definition of ground test for Large Space Structure (LSS) control verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.; Doane, G. B., III; Tollison, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    An overview for the definition of a ground test for the verification of Large Space Structure (LSS) control is given. The definition contains information on the description of the LSS ground verification experiment, the project management scheme, the design, development, fabrication and checkout of the subsystems, the systems engineering and integration, the hardware subsystems, the software, and a summary which includes future LSS ground test plans. Upon completion of these items, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center will have an LSS ground test facility which will provide sufficient data on dynamics and control verification of LSS so that LSS flight system operations can be reasonably ensured.

  12. A Scalable Approach to Probabilistic Latent Space Inference of Large-Scale Networks.

    PubMed

    Yin, Junming; Ho, Qirong; Xing, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    We propose a scalable approach for making inference about latent spaces of large networks. With a succinct representation of networks as a bag of triangular motifs, a parsimonious statistical model, and an efficient stochastic variational inference algorithm, we are able to analyze real networks with over a million vertices and hundreds of latent roles on a single machine in a matter of hours, a setting that is out of reach for many existing methods. When compared to the state-of-the-art probabilistic approaches, our method is several orders of magnitude faster, with competitive or improved accuracy for latent space recovery and link prediction.

  13. Spacecraft Conceptual Design for the 8-Meter Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Capizzo, Peter; Fincher, Sharon; Hornsby, Linda S.; Jones, David

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at Marshall Space Flight Center completed a brief spacecraft design study for the 8-meter monolithic Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m). This spacecraft concept provides all power, communication, telemetry, avionics, guidance and control, and thermal control for the observatory, and inserts the observatory into a halo orbit about the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point. The multidisciplinary design team created a simple spacecraft design that enables component and science instrument servicing, employs articulating solar panels for help with momentum management, and provides precise pointing control while at the same time fast slewing for the observatory.

  14. Development of a large space robot - A multi-segment approach. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, P. D.; Berka, Reginald B.

    1993-01-01

    A concept of multisegment robot (of a class of large space cranes) is developed for use in space-based construction operations. The robot consists of a collection of segments, which are pinned together to form a snakelike configuration, with a single degree of freedom representing rotation being retained at each pinned connection and with reaction flywheels suspended within each segment for the control necessary to position each body segment. Algorithms are developed for positioning this serpentine robot to a prescribed location and orientation. A multibody dynamics simulation is used to investigate the behavior and interactions of the robot, demonstrating its viability.

  15. On-orbit damage detection and health monitoring of large space trusses: Status and critical issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1991-01-01

    The long lifetimes, delicate nature and stringent pointing requirements of large space structures such as Space Station Freedom and geostationary Earth sciences platforms might require that these spacecraft be monitored periodically for possible damage to the load carrying structures. A review of the literature in damage detection and health monitoring of such structures is presented, along with a candidate structure to be used as a testbed for future work in this field. A unified notation and terminology is also proposed to facilitate comparisons between candidate methods.

  16. Large-Scale Demonstration of Liquid Hydrogen Storage with Zero Boiloff for In-Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, L. J.; Bryant, C. B.; Flachbart, R. H.; Holt, K. A.; Johnson, E.; Hedayat, A.; Hipp, B.; Plachta, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Cryocooler and passive insulation technology advances have substantially improved prospects for zero-boiloff cryogenic storage. Therefore, a cooperative effort by NASA s Ames Research Center, Glenn Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was implemented to develop zero-boiloff concepts for in-space cryogenic storage. Described herein is one program element - a large-scale, zero-boiloff demonstration using the MSFC multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB). A commercial cryocooler was interfaced with an existing MHTB spray bar mixer and insulation system in a manner that enabled a balance between incoming and extracted thermal energy.

  17. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  18. Eyeglass Large Aperture, Lightweight Space Optics FY2000 - FY2002 LDRD Strategic Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R

    2003-02-10

    A series of studies by the Air Force, the National Reconnaissance Office and NASA have identified the critical role played by large optics in fulfilling many of the space related missions of these agencies. Whether it is the Next Generation Space Telescope for NASA, high resolution imaging systems for NRO, or beam weaponry for the Air Force, the diameter of the primary optic is central to achieving high resolution (imaging) or a small spot size on target (lethality). While the detailed requirements differ for each application (high resolution imaging over the visible and near-infrared for earth observation, high damage threshold but single-wavelength operation for directed energy), the challenges of a large, lightweight primary optic which is space compatible and operates with high efficiency are the same. The advantage of such large optics to national surveillance applications is that it permits these observations to be carried-out with much greater effectiveness than with smaller optics. For laser weapons, the advantage is that it permits more tightly focused beams which can be leveraged into either greater effective range, reduced laser power, and/or smaller on-target spot-sizes; weapon systems can be made either much more effective or much less expensive. This application requires only single-wavelength capability, but places an emphasis upon robust, rapidly targetable optics. The advantages of large aperture optics to astronomy are that it increases the sensitivity and resolution with which we can view the universe. This can be utilized either for general purpose astronomy, allowing us to examine greater numbers of objects in more detail and at greater range, or it can enable the direct detection and detailed examination of extra-solar planets. This application requires large apertures (for both light-gathering and resolution reasons), with broad-band spectral capability, but does not emphasize either large fields-of-view or pointing agility. Despite

  19. Fault-tolerant control of large space structures using the stable factorization approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razavi, H. C.; Mehra, R. K.; Vidyasagar, M.

    1986-01-01

    Large space structures are characterized by the following features: they are in general infinite-dimensional systems, and have large numbers of undamped or lightly damped poles. Any attempt to apply linear control theory to large space structures must therefore take into account these features. Phase I consisted of an attempt to apply the recently developed Stable Factorization (SF) design philosophy to problems of large space structures, with particular attention to the aspects of robustness and fault tolerance. The final report on the Phase I effort consists of four sections, each devoted to one task. The first three sections report theoretical results, while the last consists of a design example. Significant results were obtained in all four tasks of the project. More specifically, an innovative approach to order reduction was obtained, stabilizing controller structures for plants with an infinite number of unstable poles were determined under some conditions, conditions for simultaneous stabilizability of an infinite number of plants were explored, and a fault tolerance controller design that stabilizes a flexible structure model was obtained which is robust against one failure condition.

  20. Observation of quantum particles on a large space-time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, L. J.

    1994-10-01

    A quantum particle observed on a sufficiently large space-time scale can be described by means of classical particle trajectories. The joint distribution for large-scale multiple-time position and momentum measurements on a nonrelativistic quantum particle moving freely in R v is given by straight-line trajectories with probabilities determined by the initial momentum-space wavefunction. For large-scale toroidal and rectangular regions the trajectories are geodesics. In a uniform gravitational field the trajectories are parabolas. A quantum counting process on free particles is also considered and shown to converge in the large-space-time limit to a classical counting process for particles with straight-line trajectories. If the quantum particle interacts weakly with its environment, the classical particle trajectories may undergo random jumps. In the random potential model considered here, the quantum particle evolves according to a reversible unitary one-parameter group describing elastic scattering off static randomly distributed impurities (a quantum Lorentz gas). In the large-space-time weak-coupling limit a classical stochastic process is obtained with probability one and describes a classical particle moving with constant speed in straight lines between random jumps in direction. The process depends only on the ensemble value of the covariance of the random field and not on the sample field. The probability density in phase space associated with the classical stochastic process satisfies the linear Boltzmann equation for the classical Lorentz gas, which, in the limit h→0, goes over to the linear Landau equation. Our study of the quantum Lorentz gas is based on a perturbative expansion and, as in other studies of this system, the series can be controlled only for small values of the rescaled time and for Gaussian random fields. The discussion of classical particle trajectories for nonrelativistic particles on a macroscopic spacetime scale applies also to

  1. Control of large flexible spacecraft by the independent modal-space control method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Shenar, J.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of control of a large-order flexible structure in the form of a plate-like lattice by the Independent Modal-Space Control (IMSC) method is presented. The equations of motion are first transformed to the modal space, thus obtaining internal (plant) decoupling of the system. Then, the control laws are designed in the modal space for each mode separately, so that the modal equations of motion are rendered externally (controller) decoupled. This complete decoupling applies both to rigid-body modes and elastic modes. The application of linear optimal control, in conjunction with a quadratic performance index, is first reviewed. A solution for high-order systems is proposed here by the IMSC method, whereby the problem is reduced to a number of modal minimum-fuel problems for the controlled modes.

  2. Piezoelectric Polymers Actuators for Precise Shape Control of Large Scale Space Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Qin; Natale, Don; Neese, Bret; Ren, Kailiang; Lin, Minren; Zhang, Q. M.; Pattom, Matthew; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood

    2007-01-01

    Extremely large, lightweight, in-space deployable active and passive microwave antennas are demanded by future space missions. This paper investigates the development of PVDF based piezopolymer actuators for controlling the surface accuracy of a membrane reflector. Uniaxially stretched PVDF films were poled using an electrodeless method which yielded high quality poled piezofilms required for this application. To further improve the piezoperformance of piezopolymers, several PVDF based copolymers were examined. It was found that one of them exhibits nearly three times improvement in the in-plane piezoresponse compared with PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) piezopolymers. Preliminary experimental results indicate that these flexible actuators are very promising in controlling precisely the shape of the space reflectors.

  3. Large space-based systems for dealing with global environment change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Lyle M.

    1992-01-01

    Increased concern over the effects of global climate change and depletion of the ozone layer has resulted in support for the Global Change Research Program and the Mission to Planet Earth. Research to understand Earth system processes is critical, but it falls short of providing ways of mitigating the effects of change. Geoengineering options and alternatives to interactively manage change need to be developed. Space-based concepts for dealing with changes to the environment should be considered in addition to Earth-based actions. 'Mission for Planet Earth' describes those space-based geoengineering solutions that may combine with an international global change program to stabilize the Global environment. Large space systems that may be needed for this response challenge guidance and control engineering and technology. Definition, analysis, demonstration, and preparation of geoengineering technology will provide a basis for policy response if global change consequences are severe.

  4. Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope: Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Glavallsco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8- to 16-m ultraviolet optical near Infrared space observatory for launch in the 2025 to 2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8- to 16-marcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 micron wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 sq m, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 to 2.4 micron, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to that of current generation observatory-class space missions.

  5. Use of the moon and the large space telescope as an extrasolar planet detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matloff, G. L.; Fennelly, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Roman (1959), Spitzer (1962), and Huang (1973) have discussed photometric detection of extrasolar planets using a 3-m space telescope such as the Large Space Telescope (LST). A space telescope could be an extrasolar planet detection system if used in conjunction with an occulter placed 10,000 km in front of the telescope. The occulter would reduce the amount of light received from the star under observation. For a semi-infinite plane occulter 10,000 km in front of the telescope, Spitzer and Huang's results indicate that a Jupiter-like planet would be observed with a signal/noise of 1.00, for observations at 0.4 micron using a 3-m telescope like the LST.

  6. Some thoughts on the management of large, complex international space ventures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. J.; Kutzer, Ants; Schneider, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Management issues relevant to the development and deployment of large international space ventures are discussed with particular attention given to previous experience. Management approaches utilized in the past are labeled as either simple or complex, and signs of efficient management are examined. Simple approaches include those in which experiments and subsystems are developed for integration into spacecraft, and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project is given as an example of a simple multinational approach. Complex approaches include those for ESA's Spacelab Project and the Space Station Freedom in which functional interfaces cross agency and political boundaries. It is concluded that individual elements of space programs should be managed by individual participating agencies, and overall configuration control is coordinated by level with a program director acting to manage overall objectives and project interfaces.

  7. Passivity control with practically finite-time convergence for large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Quan; Li, Jinyue; Zhang, Jingrui

    2017-02-01

    A nonlinear output feedback control law based on passivity is proposed to reduce the vibration of large space structures. The considered system is assumed to be equipped with collocated actuators and sensors. The concept of practically finite-time stability is first developed to describe the finite-time convergence of a passive system. Then, an output feedback is introduced to drive the trajectories of a passive system into a small set around the origin in finite time. Finally, the proposed control strategy is applied to the vibration suppression of large space structures with distributed thrusters and velocity sensors or torque outputting devices and angular rate sensors. Numerical simulations are conducted to validate the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  8. Model correlation and damage location for large space truss structures: Secant method development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Suzanne Weaver; Beattie, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    On-orbit testing of a large space structure will be required to complete the certification of any mathematical model for the structure dynamic response. The process of establishing a mathematical model that matches measured structure response is referred to as model correlation. Most model correlation approaches have an identification technique to determine structural characteristics from the measurements of the structure response. This problem is approached with one particular class of identification techniques - matrix adjustment methods - which use measured data to produce an optimal update of the structure property matrix, often the stiffness matrix. New methods were developed for identification to handle problems of the size and complexity expected for large space structures. Further development and refinement of these secant-method identification algorithms were undertaken. Also, evaluation of these techniques is an approach for model correlation and damage location was initiated.

  9. Decoupled control analysis of a large flexible space antenna with linear quadratic regulator comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.; Hamer, H. A.; Johnson, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    A decoupled-control analysis was performed for a large flexible space antenna. Control involved commanding changes in the rigid-body modes or nulling disturbances in the flexible modes. The study provides parametric-type data which could be useful in the final design of a large space antenna control system. Results are presented to illustrate the effect on control requirements of (1) the number of modes controlled; (2) the number, type, and location of control actuators; and (3) variations in the closed-loop dynamics of the control system. Comparisons are given between the decoupled-control results and those obtained by using a linear quadratic regulator approach. Time history responses are presented to illustrate the effects of the control procedures.

  10. EVA Assembly of Large Space Structure Neutral Buoyancy, Zero-Gravity Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    EVA Assembly of Large Space Structure Neutral Buoyancy, Zero-Gravity Simulation: NASA-LaRC Nestable Columns and Joints. The film depicts an extravehicular activity (EVA) that involved the assembly of six 'space-weight' columns into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two 'space'-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental 'element' of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions, achieved by neutral buoyancy in water. The cell was assembled on an 'outrigger' assembly aid off the side of a mockup of the Shuttle Orbiter cargo bay. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system (RMS) modes were evaluated. The simulated RMS was used only to transfer stowed hardware from the cargo bay to the work sites. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structur is well within man's capabilities. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070031008. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  11. Study on supporting force sensing and control during large aperture space mirror test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long; Hu, Wenqi; Zheng, Liehua; Hao, Peiming

    2016-10-01

    During the machining of large aperture lightweight space mirror, the mirror figure consistency between ground test and space mission is a problem. In order to effectively control the supporting deformation effect on test results in gravity environment, in view of a 1.2-m space mirror with back blind holes, a supporting method for optical axis horizontal test is proposed, with this method, mirror under test is positioned by three center hole surfaces and supported by six external hole surfaces. The effect of deformation caused by different supporting force value, area and position is analyzed by finite element method, the simulation results show that this supporting method can control the mirror supporting deformation within PV0.035λ rms0.005λ. The actual supporting system uses soft expansion mandrel to control the mirror position and pneumatic lever to realize the floating support. In order to ensure that the support force can evenly distribute on the contact surface, a pressure mapping system is adopted to measure the interface pressure between the mirror blind holes and the soft supporting pads for the first time. This method can meet the test requirements of rms=1/40λ mirror and provides a technical support for high precision test of large aperture space mirror with back blind holes.

  12. An Analysis Methodology for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2004-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has been designed to detect high-energy gamma rays and determine their direction of incidence and energy. We propose a reconstruction algorithm based on recent advances in statistical methodology. This method, alternative to the standard event analysis inherited from high energy collider physics experiments, incorporates more accurately the physical processes occurring in the detector, and makes full use of the statistical information available. It could thus provide a better estimate of the direction and energy of the primary photon.

  13. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William

    2014-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies. AMTD is deliberately pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with op-tions to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  14. Fabrication of large-aperture, high efficiency, Fresnel diffractive membrane optic for space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Mengjuan; Yin, Ganghua; Jiao, Jianchao; Liu, Zhengkun; Xu, Xiangdong; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive optical system can be a favorable choice for large-aperture space telescope to reduce the mass and size of image system. To meet the demand of large-aperture, high efficiency, lightweight diffractive optic for high resolution remote sensing, a 200 mm diameter, 20 μmthick, 4-level diffractive membrane fabricated is shown to have over 62% diffraction efficiency into the +1 order, with 0.051 efficiency RMS. Over 66% diffraction efficiency is achieved for a 100 mm aperture membrane, with 0.023 efficiency RMS. The membrane thickness uniformity control is discussed and 8 nm wave front error RMS is achieved in 100 mm diameter.

  15. Conceptual design of the scientific instrument arrangement for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurasky, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the scientific instrument arrangement for the large space telescope (LST) is given, with some of the rationale for selecting this concept. The first section of this report describes the basic configuration and was designed for an f/20 telescope focal plane. The subsequent LSTWG meeting held in November gave some redirection to the scientific requirements, and these changes are described in the section, Configuration Update.

  16. Technology for large space systems: A bibliography with indexes (supplement 10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bibliography lists 408 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system to provide helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of large space system technology. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural and thermal analysis and design, structural concepts and control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, and solar power satellite systems.

  17. SpaceTree: Supporting Exploration in Large Node Link Tree, Design Evolution and Empirical Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    of tasks were used. Node searches (e.g. find kangaroo, find planaria ), search of previously visited nodes (return to kangaroo) and typology...partly supported, but the careful observation of users during the experiment was very helpful to understand differences in user behavior . There were...Display of Large Two- Dimensional Spaces. Behavior & Information Technology. 9 (6), 451-466. [4] Bederson, B., Shneiderman, B., Wattenberg, M. (2002

  18. Technology for large space systems: A bibliography with indexes (supplement 08)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography lists 414 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system. It provides helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of Large Space System Technology. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural and thermal analysis and design, structural concepts and control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, and solar power satellite systems.

  19. Technology for large space systems: A bibliography with indexes (supplement 22)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This bibliography lists 1077 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information System between July 1, 1989 and December 31, 1989. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher or manager engaged in the development of technologies related to large space systems. Subject areas include mission and program definition, design techniques, structural and thermal analysis, structural dynamics and control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, and propulsion.

  20. Out-of-Furnace Brazing Technology for Assembly of Large Carbon-Carbon Space Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    composites required use of high temperature vacuum furnaces which, in addition to needing costly mechanical and diffusion vacuum pumps, also require...structures such as Space Based Radar ( SBR ), Survivable Power Subsystem (SUPER), and Zenith STAR may involve C/C structures in excess of 350 ft. Figure 3...depicts the size and complexity of some of these structures. Consequently, mechanical fastening becomes the joining method of choice for large C/C

  1. Technology for large space systems: A bibliography with indexes (supplement 20)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography lists 694 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information System between July, 1988 and December, 1988. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher or manager engaged in the development of technologies related to large space systems. Subject areas include mission and program definition, design techniques, structural and thermal analysis, structural dynamics and control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, and propulsion.

  2. An observer for a deployable antenna. [for large space structure flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.

    1981-01-01

    An observer is derived for use on an Orbiter-Deployable Antenna configuration. The unique feature of this observer design for this flight experiment is that all the plant inputs are not required to be directly accessible for the observer to ferret out the system states. The observer uses state and rate of the state information to reconstruct the plant states. Results are presented which show how effectively this observer design works for this large space structure flight experiment.

  3. Study of auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    A range of single shuttle launched large space systems were identified and characterized including a NASTRAN and loading dynamics analysis. The disturbance environment, characterization of thrust level and APS mass requirements, and a study of APS/LSS interactions were analyzed. State-of-the-art capabilities for chemical and ion propulsion were compared with the generated propulsion requirements to assess the state-of-the-art limitations and benefits of enhancing current technology.

  4. Space switching enabled tunable wavelength converter and its application in large scale optical interconnect architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaowen; Zhou, Luying; Cheng, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a large scale Clos structure based optical interconnect by employing cyclic arrayed waveguide grating routers (AWGRs) and novel space switching enabled tunable wavelength converters (SS-TWCs). The 1:2 or 1:4 SS-TWCs expand the scale of the optical interconnect up to 8 times of standard Clos structure while using the same AWGR modules. Experimental results are given to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed optical interconnect.

  5. Inflight optical measurement of antenna surfaces. [triangulation to measure deformations of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A technology base was developed for a wide variety of applications oriented sensors to meet requirements for the fabrication, assembly, test, surface figure monitoring, and ultimately surface figure active control of large space antennas. An optical sensor technique is described which establishes an ideal centerline at each beam during fabrication or later during assembly. Deviations from the centerline, either in lateral deformation or in twist, are measured to produce limit warnings or to evoke active control at the building machine.

  6. Control system design for the large space systems technology reference platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunds, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Structural models and classical frequency domain control system designs were developed for the large space systems technology (LSST) reference platform which consists of a central bus structure, solar panels, and platform arms on which a variety of experiments may be mounted. It is shown that operation of multiple independently articulated payloads on a single platform presents major problems when subarc second pointing stability is required. Experiment compatibility will be an important operational consideration for systems of this type.

  7. Technology for large space systems: A bibliography with indexes (supplement 09)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography lists 414 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between January 1, 1983 and June 30, 1983. Information on technology development and mission design in the area of Large Space System Technology is provided. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural and thermal analysis and design, structural concepts and control systems, electronics. advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, and solar power satellite systems.

  8. Technology for large space systems: A special bibliography with indexes (supplement 04)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography lists 259 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between July 1, 1980 and December 31, 1980. Its purpose is to provide information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of the Large Space Systems Technology Program. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design. Structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, solar power satellite systems, and flight experiments.

  9. Technology for large space systems: A special bibliography with indexes (supplement 01)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography lists 180 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between January 1, 1979 and June 30, 1979. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of the Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, and flight experiments.

  10. JPL self pulsed laser surface measurement system development. [large space deployed antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, M.

    1980-01-01

    The use of a self pulsed laser system for accurately describing the surface shape of large space deployed antenna structures was evaluated. Tests with a breadboard system verified functional operation with short time resolution on the order of .2 mm, nonambiguous ranging, and a maximum range capability on the order of 150 m. The projected capability of the system is resolution of less than .1 mm over a reasonable time period and a range extension to over 300 m.

  11. Propellantless precision formation flying with photonic laser thrusters for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young K.

    2009-08-01

    One economically and technologically feasible bedrock structure for constructing large (diameter > 10 m) space telescopes is a segmented or sparse aperture system with subcomponents in precision formation flight. For UV/Visible/IR systems, initial targeting and targeting new objects to establish initial fringes requires the positioning precision to nm - μm accuracy, thus the control system should be capable of the required precision positioning and attitude controls without producing contaminations from thruster exhaust plumes. A nanometer accuracy contaminationfree formation architecture, Photon Tether Formation Flight (PTFF), based on Photonic Laser Thrusters (PLTs) and tethers has been proposed to exploit a force equilibrium formed by PLT thrust and tether tension for forming precision persistent 3-D formation structures ideal for the large UV/Visible/IR space telescopes. The range of the PLT force can theoretically extend over several kms. Under previous NASA sponsorship, we have successfully demonstrated a proofof- concept PLT. In addition, the demonstrations of required laser components, optics and tracking technologies developed under military laser applications now support that implementation of PLTs for large space telescopes is one step closer to reality.

  12. Initial operational capability of the ASTREX large space structures test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    Future DOD, NASA, and SDI space systems will be larger than any spacecraft flown before. The economics of placing these large space systems (LSS) into orbit dictates that they be as low in mass as possible. The combination of very large size and relatively low mass produces systems which possess little structural rigidity. This flexibility causes severe technical problems when combined with the precise shape and pointing requirements associated with many future LSS missions. Development of new control technologies which can solve these problems and enable future LSS missions is under way, but a test bed is needed for demonstration and evaluation of the emerging control hardware (sensors and actuators) and methodologies. In particular, the need exists for a facility which enables both large angle slewing and subsequent pointing/shape control of a variety of flexible bodies. The Air Force Astronautics Laboratory (AFAL) has conceived the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiments (ASTREX) facility to fill this need. An overview of the ASTREX facility is given.

  13. From monolithics to tethers to freeflyers: the spectrum of large aperture sensing from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Jesse; Quinn, Dave; Matsumura, Mark M.

    2003-02-01

    As part of The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) endeavor to push the envelope and go where we have never been before, the Space Science Enterprise has laid out a vision which includes several missions that revolutionize the collection of scientific data from space. Many of the missions designed to meet the objectives of these programs depend heavily on the ability to perform space-based interferometry, which has recently become a rapidly growing field of investigation for both the scientific and engineering communities. While scientists are faced with the challenges of designing high fidelity optical systems capable of making detailed observations, engineers wrestle with the problem of providing space-based platforms that can permit this data gathering to occur. Observational data gathering is desired at a variety of spectral wavelengths and resolutions, calling for interferometers with a range of baseline requirements. Approaches to configuration design are as varied as the missions themselves from large monolithic spacecraft to multiple free-flying small spacecraft and everything in between. As will be discussed, no one approach provides a ?panacea? of solutions rather each has its place in terms of the mission requirements. The purpose here is to identify the advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches, to discuss the driving factors in design selection and determine the relative range of applicability of each design approach.

  14. An Engineering Design Reference Mission for a Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie A.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    From the 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the NASA Thirty-Year Roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions, to the recent AURA report, From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths, multiple community assessments have recommended development of a large-aperture UVOIR space observatory capable of achieving a broad range of compelling scientific goals. Of these priority science goals, the most technically challenging is the search for spectroscopic biomarkers in the atmospheres of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood. Here we present an engineering design reference mission (EDRM) for the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), which was conceived from the start as capable of breakthrough science paired with an emphasis on cost control and cost effectiveness. An EDRM allows the engineering design trade space to be explored in depth to determine what are the most demanding requirements and where there are opportunities for margin against requirements. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. The ATLAST observatory is designed to operate at a Sun-Earth L2 orbit, which provides a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Our reference designs have emphasized a serviceable 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five-meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. As part of our cost-management effort, this particular reference mission builds upon the engineering design for JWST. Moreover, it is scalable to a variety of launch vehicle fairings. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of additional reference designs, including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  15. Space use of African wild dogs in relation to other large carnivores.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Angela M; Graf, Jan A; Somers, Michael J; Slotow, Rob; Szykman Gunther, Micaela

    2014-01-01

    Interaction among species through competition is a principle process structuring ecological communities, affecting behavior, distribution, and ultimately the population dynamics of species. High competition among large African carnivores, associated with extensive diet overlap, manifests in interactions between subordinate African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) and dominant lions (Panthera leo) and spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta). Using locations of large carnivores in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa, we found different responses from wild dogs to their two main competitors. Wild dogs avoided lions, particularly during denning, through a combination of spatial and temporal avoidance. However, wild dogs did not exhibit spatial or temporal avoidance of spotted hyenas, likely because wild dog pack sizes were large enough to adequately defend their kills. Understanding that larger carnivores affect the movements and space use of other carnivores is important for managing current small and fragmented carnivore populations, especially as reintroductions and translocations are essential tools used for the survival of endangered species, as with African wild dogs.

  16. Structural stiffness, strength and dynamic characteristics of large tetrahedral space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Bush, H. G.; Card, M. F.

    1977-01-01

    Physical characteristics of large skeletal frameworks for space applications are investigated by analyzing one concept: the tetrahedral truss, which is idealized as a sandwich plate with isotropic faces. Appropriate analytical relations are presented in terms of the truss column element properties which for calculations were taken as slender graphite/epoxy tubes. Column loads, resulting from gravity gradient control and orbital transfer, are found to be small for the class structure investigated. Fundamental frequencies of large truss structures are shown to be an order of magnitude lower than large earth based structures. Permissible loads are shown to result in small lateral deflections of the truss due to low-strain at Euler buckling of the slender graphite/epoxy truss column elements. Lateral thermal deflections are found to be a fraction of the truss depth using graphite/epoxy columns.

  17. Graph theory approach to the eigenvalue problem of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graph theory is used to obtain numerical solutions to eigenvalue problems of large space structures (LSS) characterized by a state vector of large dimensions. The LSS are considered as large, flexible systems requiring both orientation and surface shape control. Graphic interpretation of the determinant of a matrix is employed to reduce a higher dimensional matrix into combinations of smaller dimensional sub-matrices. The reduction is implemented by means of a Boolean equivalent of the original matrices formulated to obtain smaller dimensional equivalents of the original numerical matrix. Computation time becomes less and more accurate solutions are possible. An example is provided in the form of a free-free square plate. Linearized system equations and numerical values of a stiffness matrix are presented, featuring a state vector with 16 components.

  18. Advances in deployable structures and surfaces for large apertures in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Prowald, J.; Baier, H.

    2013-12-01

    Large apertures in space have applications for telecommunications, Earth observation and scientific missions. This paper reviews advances in mechanical architectures and technologies for large deployable apertures for space antennas and telescopes. Two complementary approaches are described to address this challenge: the deployment of structures based on quasi-rigid members and highly flexible structures. Regarding the first approach, deployable articulated structures are classified in terms of their kinematics as 3D or planar linkages in multiple variants, resulting in different architectures of radial, peripheral or modular constructions. A dedicated discussion on the number of degrees of freedom and constraints addresses the deployment reliability and thermo-elastic stability of large elastic structures in the presence of thermal gradients. This aspect has been identified as a design driver for new developments of peripheral ring and modular structures. Meanwhile, other design drivers are maintained, such as the optimization of mass and stiffness, overall accuracy and stability, and pragmatic aspects including controlled industrial development and a commitment to operators' needs. Furthermore, reflecting surface technologies and concepts are addressed with a view to the future, presenting advances in technical solutions for increasing apertures and reducing areal mass densities to affordable levels for future missions. Highly flexible materials capable of producing ultra-stable shells are described with reference to the state of the art and new developments. These concepts may enable large deployable surfaces for antennas and telescopes, as well as innovative optical concepts such as photon sieves. Shape adjustment and shape control of these surfaces are described in terms of available technologies and future needs, particularly for the reconfiguration of telecommunications antennas. In summary, the two complementary approaches described and reviewed cover the

  19. Space-Time Controls on Carbon Sequestration Over Large-Scale Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Cooper, Harry J.; Gu, Jiujing; Grose, Andrew; Norman, John; daRocha, Humberto R.; Starr, David O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A major research focus of the LBA Ecology Program is an assessment of the carbon budget and the carbon sequestering capacity of the large scale forest-pasture system that dominates the Amazonia landscape, and its time-space heterogeneity manifest in carbon fluxes across the large scale Amazon basin ecosystem. Quantification of these processes requires a combination of in situ measurements, remotely sensed measurements from space, and a realistically forced hydrometeorological model coupled to a carbon assimilation model, capable of simulating details within the surface energy and water budgets along with the principle modes of photosynthesis and respiration. Here we describe the results of an investigation concerning the space-time controls of carbon sources and sinks distributed over the large scale Amazon basin. The results are derived from a carbon-water-energy budget retrieval system for the large scale Amazon basin, which uses a coupled carbon assimilation-hydrometeorological model as an integrating system, forced by both in situ meteorological measurements and remotely sensed radiation fluxes and precipitation retrieval retrieved from a combination of GOES, SSM/I, TOMS, and TRMM satellite measurements. Brief discussion concerning validation of (a) retrieved surface radiation fluxes and precipitation based on 30-min averaged surface measurements taken at Ji-Parana in Rondonia and Manaus in Amazonas, and (b) modeled carbon fluxes based on tower CO2 flux measurements taken at Reserva Jaru, Manaus and Fazenda Nossa Senhora. The space-time controls on carbon sequestration are partitioned into sets of factors classified by: (1) above canopy meteorology, (2) incoming surface radiation, (3) precipitation interception, and (4) indigenous stomatal processes varied over the different land covers of pristine rainforest, partially, and fully logged rainforests, and pasture lands. These are the principle meteorological, thermodynamical, hydrological, and biophysical

  20. Manufacture of large-scale lightweight SiC mirror for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhengren; Liu, Guiling; Liu, Xuejian; Chen, Zhongming; Jiang, Dongliang

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale lightweight silicon carbide (SiC) mirrors were manufactured for space. Sintered SiC (SSiC) ceramic was adopted as the material to manufacture these mirrors. Complex structure designed for highly weight reduction and installation requirements was near-net-shape formed on SiC green body by digital machining technique before the high temperature sintering process. The dimensional accuracy of thin ribs and faceplate can be precisely controlled above 99.5%. During sintering process, the temperature distribution was kept uniform enough to avoid residual stress and deformation in the whole furnace. Isotropic shrinkage occurs during densification from SiC green body to ceramic with a fluctuation less than 0.3%, which is the dimension error of the final size as well. Mirror surface with low surface roughness, high shape accuracy and reflectivity was finished by polishing and plating. Moreover, large-scale lightweight SSiC mirror was demonstrated to be suitable for space use by tests simulating launch conditions and space environments.

  1. Solar Sail - Fresnel Zone Plate Lens for a Large Space Based Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J T

    2002-02-13

    A Fresnel zone plate lens made with solar sail material could be used as the primary optic for a very large aperture telescope on deep space probes propelled by solar sails. The large aperture telescope capability could enable significant science on fly-by missions to the asteroids, Pluto, Kuiper belt or the tort cloud and could also enable meaningful interstellar fly-by missions for laser propelled sails. This type of lens may also have some potential for laser communications and as a solar concentrator. The techniques for fabrication of meter size and larger Fresnel phase plate optics are under development at LLNL, and we are extending this technology to amplitude zone plates made from sail materials. Corrector optics to greatly extend the bandwidth of these Fresnel optics will be demonstrated in the future. This novel telescope concept will require new understanding of the fabrication, deployment and control of gossamer space structures. It will also require new materials technology for fabricating these optics and understanding their long term stability in a space environment.

  2. Fabrication technique of large-scale lightweight SiC space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ge; Zhao, Rucheng; Zhao, Wenxing

    2007-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a new type candidate material for large-scale lightweight space mirror. Its low thermal distortion, high stiffness, high optical quality, and its dimensional stability are better than other traditional optical substrate materials such as ULE, Zerodure, Beryllium (Be) and so on. In this paper, the lightweight silicon carbide space mirror blank was fabricated by reaction sintering. As a space born mirror material, silicon carbide must be an optical grade ceramic. So we prepared the silicon carbide green body with gel-casting method. Then some carbon materials were supplemented into the green body which will bring reaction-sintering with silicon in a vacuum furnace during 1500-1600°C, ultimately the reaction bonded silicon carbide was made. The diameter of SiC space mirror blank we have made is 680mm. If expanding the size of the vacuum furnace, bigger mirror blank can be obtained. The test results show that the mechanical and thermal properties of RB-SiC are excellent with bending strength of 350MPa, fracture toughness of 4.1 MPaÂ.m1/2 and coefficient of thermal expansion(CET) of 2.67×10-6/K. The surface roughness(RMS) could be better than 3nm.

  3. A mobile work station concept for mechanically aided astronaut assembly of large space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, W. L., Jr.; Bush, H. G.; Wallson, R. E.; Jensen, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents results of a series of truss assembly tests conducted to evaluate a mobile work station concept intended to mechanically assist astronaut manual assembly of erectable space trusses. The tests involved assembly of a tetrahedral truss beam by a pair of test subjects with and without pressure (space) suits, both in Earth gravity and in simulated zero gravity (neutral buoyancy in water). The beam was assembled from 38 identical graphite-epoxy nestable struts, 5.4 m in length with aluminum quick-attachment structural joints. Struts and joints were designed to closely simulate flight hardware. The assembled beam was approximately 16.5 m long and 4.5 m on each of the four sides of its diamond-shaped cross section. The results show that average in-space assembly rates of approximately 38 seconds per strut can be expected for struts of comparable size. This result is virtually independent of the overall size of the structure being assembled. The mobile work station concept would improve astronaut efficiency for on-orbit manual assembly of truss structures, and also this assembly-line method is highly competitive with other construction methods being considered for large space structures.

  4. MIC-Large Scale Magnetically Inflated Cable Structures for Space Power, Propulsion, Communications and Observational Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Rather, John

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for the erection of rigid large scale structures in space-MIC (Magnetically Inflated Cable)-is described. MIC structures are launched as a compact payload of superconducting cables and attached tethers. After reaching orbit, the superconducting cables are energized with electrical current. The magnet force interactions between the cables cause them to expand outwards into the final large structure. Various structural shapes and applications are described. The MIC structure can be a simple flat disc with a superconducting outer ring that supports a tether network holding a solar cell array, or it can form a curved mirror surface that concentrates light and focuses it on a smaller region-for example, a high flux solar array that generates electric power, a high temperature receiver that heats H2 propellant for high Isp propulsion, and a giant primary reflector for a telescope for astronomy and Earth surveillance. Linear dipole and quadrupole MIC structures are also possible. The linear quadrupole structure can be used for magnetic shielding against cosmic radiation for astronauts, for example. MIC could use lightweight YBCO superconducting HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) cables, that can operate with liquid N2 coolant at engineering current densities of ~105 amp/cm2. A 1 kilometer length of MIC cable would weigh only 3 metric tons, including superconductor, thermal insulations, coolant circuits, and refrigerator, and fit within a 3 cubic meter compact package for launch. Four potential MIC applications are described: Solar-thermal propulsion using H2 propellant, space based solar power generation for beaming power to Earth, a large space telescope, and solar electric generation for a manned lunar base. The first 3 applications use large MIC solar concentrating mirrors, while the 4th application uses a surface based array of solar cells on a magnetically levitated MIC structure to follow the sun. MIC space based mirrors can be very large and light

  5. Need, utilization, and configuration of a large, multi-G centrifuge on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1987-01-01

    A large, multi-g centrifuge is required on the Space Station (1) to provide valid 1-g controls for the study of zero-g effects on animals and plants and to study readaptation to 1 g; (2) to store animals at 1 g prior to short-term zero-g experimentation; (3) to permit g-level threshold studies of gravity effects. These requirements can be met by a 13-ft-diam., center-mounted centrifuge, on which up to 48 modular habitats with animals (squirrel monkey, rat, mouse) and plants are attached. The advantages of locating this centrifuge with the vivarium, a common environmental control and life support system, a general-purpose work station and storage of food, water, and supplies in an attached short module, are elaborated. Servicing and operation of the centrifuge, as well as minimizing its impact on other Space Station functions are also considered.

  6. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Large Carbon Molecules and Ions in Support of Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salana, Farid; Tan, X.; Cami, J.; Remy, J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major objectives of Laboratory Astrophysics is the optimization of data return from space missions by measuring spectra of atomic and molecular species in laboratory environments that mimic interstellar conditions (WhitePaper (2002, 2006)). Among interstellar species, PAHs are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials that represents a particularly difficult challenge for gas-phase laboratory studies. We present the absorption spectra of jet-cooled neutral and ionized PAHs and discuss the implications for astrophysics. The harsh physical conditions of the interstellar medium have been simulated in the laboratory. We are now, for the first time, in the position to directly compare laboratory spectra of PAHs and carbon nanoparticles with astronomical observations. This new phase offers tremendous opportunities for the data analysis of current and upcoming space missions geared toward the detection of large aromatic systems (HST/COS, FUSE, JWST, Spitzer).

  7. Large File Transfers from Space Using Multiple Ground Terminals and Delay-Tolerant Networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Paulsen, Phillip; Stewart, Dave; Eddy, Wesley; McKim, James; Taylor, John; Lynch, Scott; Heberle, Jay; Northam, James; Jackson, Chris; Wood, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    We use Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) to break control loops between space-ground communication links and ground-ground communication links to increase overall file delivery efficiency, as well as to enable large files to be proactively fragmented and received across multiple ground stations. DTN proactive fragmentation and reactive fragmentation were demonstrated from the UK-DMC satellite using two independent ground stations. The files were reassembled at a bundle agent, located at Glenn Research Center in Cleveland Ohio. The first space-based demonstration of this occurred on September 30 and October 1, 2009. This paper details those experiments. Communication, delay-tolerant networking, DTN, satellite, Internet, protocols, bundle, IP, TCP.

  8. Analysis of separation of the space shuttle orbiter from a large transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of safely separating the space shuttle orbiter (140A/B) from the top of a large carrier vehicle (the C-5 airplane) at subsonic speeds was investigated. The longitudinal equations of motion for both vehicles were numerically integrated using a digital computer program which incorporates experimentally derived interference aerodynamic data to analyze the separation maneuver for various initial conditions. Separation of the space shuttle orbiter from a carrier vehicle was feasible for a range of dynamic-pressure and flight-path-angle conditions. By using an autopilot, the vehicle attitudes were held constant which ensured separation. Carrier-vehicle engine thrust, landing gear, and spoilers provide some flexibility in the separation maneuver.

  9. Application of optical distributed sensing and computation to control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    A real time holographic sensing technique is introduced and its advantages are investigated from the filtering and control point of view. A feature of holographic sensing is its capability to make distributed measurements of the position and velocity of moving objects, such as a vibrating flexible space structure. This work is based upon the distributed parameter models of linear time invariant systems, particularly including the linear oscillator equations describing the vibration of large flexible space structures. The general conclusion is that application of optical distributed sensors bring gains in the situation where Kalman filtering is necessary for state estimation. In this case, both steady state and transient filtering error covariance become smaller. This in turn results in smaller cost in the LQG problem.

  10. ATLAST-9.2m: a Large-Aperture Deployable Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oergerle, William; Feinberg, Lee D.; Purves, Lloyd R.; Hyde, T. Tupper; Thronson, Harley A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Postman, Marc; Bolear, Matthew R.; Budinoff, Jason G.; Dean, Bruce H.; Clampin, Mark C.; Ebbets, Dennis C.; Gong, Qian; Gull, Theodore R.; Howard, Joseph M.; Jones, Andrew L.; Lyon, Richard G.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Perrygo, Charles; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Thompson, Patrick L.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results of a study of a deployable version of the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), designed to operate in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit. The primary mirror of the segmented 9.2-meter aperture has 36 hexagonal 1.315 m (flat to flat) glass mirrors. The architecture and folding of the telescope is similar to JWST, allowing it to fit into the 6.5 m fairing of a modest upgrade to the Delta-IV Heavy version of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). We discuss the overall observatory design, optical design, instruments, stray light, wavefront sensing and control, pointing and thermal control, and in-space servicing options.

  11. Manufacturing and NDE of Large Composite Structures for Space Transportation at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Russell, Sam

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) vision to manufacture, increase safety and reduce the cost of launch vehicles. Nondestructive evaluations of large composite structures are tested for space transportation at MSFC. The topics include: 1) 6 1/2 Generations of Airplanes in a Century; 2) Shuttle Safety Upgrades; 3) Generations of Reusable Launch Vehicles; 4) RLV Technology Demonstration Path; 5) Second Generation; 6) Key NASA Requirements; 7) X-33 Elements; 8) Future-X Pathfinder Projects and Experiments; 9) Focus Area Technical Goals; 10) X-34 Expanded View; 11) X-38 Spacecraft with De-Orbit Propulsion Stage (DPS); 12) Deorbit Module (DM) Critical Design Review (CDR) Design; 13) Forward Structural Adapter (FSA) CDR Design; 14) X-38 DPS CDR Design; 15) RLV Focused Propulsion Technologies; and 16) Challenges in Technology. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  12. Efficient development and processing of thermal math models of very large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Andrew H.; Arelt, Joseph E.; Lalicata, Anthony L.

    1993-01-01

    As the spacecraft moves along the orbit, the truss members are subjected to direct and reflected solar, albedo and planetary infra-red (IR) heating rates, as well as IR heating and shadowing from other spacecraft components. This is a transient process with continuously changing heating loads and the shadowing effects. The resulting nonuniform temperature distribution may cause nonuniform thermal expansion, deflection and stress in the truss elements, truss warping and thermal distortions. There are three challenges in the thermal-structural analysis of the large truss structures. The first is the development of the thermal and structural math models, the second - model processing, and the third - the data transfer between the models. All three tasks require considerable time and computer resources to be done because of a very large number of components involved. To address these challenges a series of techniques of automated thermal math modeling and efficient processing of very large space truss structures were developed. In the process the finite element and finite difference methods are interfaced. A very substantial reduction of the quantity of computations was achieved while assuring a desired accuracy of the results. The techniques are illustrated on the thermal analysis of a segment of the Space Station main truss.

  13. Radiometer requirements for Earth-observation systems using large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr.; Harrington, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Requirements are defined for Earth observation microwave radiometry for the decade of the 1990's by using large space antenna (LSA) systems with apertures in the range from 50 to 200 m. General Earth observation needs, specific measurement requirements, orbit mission guidelines and constraints, and general radiometer requirements are defined. General Earth observation needs are derived from NASA's basic space science program. Specific measurands include soil moisture, sea surface temperature, salinity, water roughness, ice boundaries, and water pollutants. Measurements are required with spatial resolution from 10 to 1 km and with temporal resolution from 3 days to 1 day. The primary orbit altitude and inclination ranges are 450 to 2200 km and 60 to 98 deg, respectively. Contiguous large scale coverage of several land and ocean areas over the globe dictates large (several hundred kilometers) swaths. Radiometer measurements are made in the bandwidth range from 1 to 37 GHz, preferably with dual polarization radiometers with a minimum of 90 percent beam efficiency. Reflector surface, root mean square deviation tolerances are in the wavelength range from 1/30 to 1/100.

  14. Large Format Si:As IBC Array Performance for NGST and Future IR Space Telescope Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Johnson, Roy; Love, Peter; Lum, Nancy; McKelvey, Mark; McCreight, Craig; McMurray, Robert, Jr.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A mid-IR (5-30micrometer) instrument aboard a cryogenic space telescope can have an enormous impact in resolving key questions in astronomy and cosmology. A space platform's greatly reduced thermal backgrounds (compared to airborne or ground-based platforms), allow for more sensitive observations of dusty young galaxies at high redshifts, star formation of solar-type stars in the local universe, and formation and evolution of planetary disks and systems. The previous generation's largest, in sensitive IR detectors at these wavelengths are 256x256 pixel Si:As Impurity Band Conduction (IBC) devices built by Raytheon Infrared Operations (RIO) for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility/Infrared Array Camera (SIRTF)/(IRAC) instrument. RIO has successfully enhanced these devices, increasing the pixel count by a factor of 16 while matching or exceeding SIRTF/IRAC device performance. NASA-ARC in collaboration with RIO has tested the first high performance large format (1024x 1024) Si:As IBC arrays for low background applications, such as for the middle instrument on Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and future IR Explorer missions. These hybrid devices consist of radiation hard SIRTF/IRAC-type Si:As IBC material mated to a readout multiplexer that has been specially processed for operation at low cryogenic temperatures (below 10K), yielding high device sensitivity over a wavelength range of 5-28 micrometers. We present laboratory testing results from these benchmark, devices. Continued development in this technology is essential for conducting large-area surveys of the local and early universe through observation and for complementing future missions such as NGST, Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), and Focal Plane Instruments and Requirement Science Team (FIRST).

  15. Stability of large DC power systems using switching converters, with application to the international space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manners, B.; Gholdston, E. W.; Karimi, K.; Lee, F. C.; Rajagopalan, J.; Panov, Y.

    1996-01-01

    As space direct current (dc) power systems continue to grow in size, switching power converters are playing an ever larger role in power conditioning and control. When designing a large dc system using power converters of this type, special attention must be placed on the electrical stability of the system and of the individual loads on the system. In the design of the electric power system (EPS) of the International Space Station (ISS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its contractor team led by Boeing Defense & Space Group has placed a great deal of emphasis on designing for system and load stability. To achieve this goal, the team has expended considerable effort deriving a dear concept on defining system stability in both a general sense and specifically with respect to the space station. The ISS power system presents numerous challenges with respect to system stability, such as high power, complex sources and undefined loads. To complicate these issues, source and load components have been designed in parallel by three major subcontractors (Boeing, Rocketdyne, and McDonnell Douglas) with interfaces to both sources and loads being designed in different countries (Russia, Japan, Canada, Europe, etc.). These issues, coupled with the program goal of limiting costs, have proven a significant challenge to the program. As a result, the program has derived an impedance specification approach for system stability. This approach is based on the significant relationship between source and load impedances and the effect of this relationship on system stability. This approach is limited in its applicability by the theoretical and practical limits on component designs as presented by each system segment. As a result, the overall approach to system stability implemented by the ISS program consists of specific hardware requirements coupled with extensive system analysis and hardware testing. Following this approach, the ISS program plans to begin

  16. Technology for large space systems: A bibliography with indexes (supplement 12)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A bibliography listing 516 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between July 1, 1984 and December 31, 1984 is presented. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of Large Space System Technology. Subject matter is grouped according to system, interactive analysis and design, structural and thermal analysis and design, structural concepts and control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, and solar power satellite systems.

  17. Collimator equipment of the Large Optical Test Facility Vertical for testing space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Pavel A.; Gogolev, Yuri A.; Zvonkova, V. V.; Kobozev, I. R.; Ostapenko, S. V.; Malamed, Evgeny R.; Demidov, V. V.

    1995-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the collimator equipment of the large optical test facility (LOTF) 'vertical' designed for testing space telescopes. It is being created in the Research Center 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute' in Russia. The optical scheme and special structural features of the vacuum vertical-type double-mirror collimator will be covered here. This paper deals with technical data and potentials of collimator focal equipment. Estimations of the collimator thermal aberrations caused by temperature fields coming from thermal simulators are put forward.

  18. Technology for large space systems: A special bibliography with indexes (supplement 05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography lists 298 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between January 1, 1981 and June 30, 1981. Its purpose is to provide helpful, information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of the Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, solar power satellite systems, and flight experiments.

  19. Design study of large area 8 cm x 8 cm wrapthrough cells for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garlick, George F. J.; Lillington, David R.

    1987-01-01

    The design of large area silicon solar cells for the projected NASA space station is discussed. It is based on the NASA specification for the cells which calls for an 8 cm by 8 cm cell of wrapthrough type with gridded back contacts. The beginning of life (BOL) power must be 1.039 watts per cell or larger and maximum end of life (EOL) after 10 years in the prescribed orbit under an equivalent 1MeV electron radiation damage fluence of 5 times 10 to the 13th power e/square cm. On orbit efficiency is to be optimized by a low thermal absorptance goal (thermal alpha) of .63.

  20. Plans for a large deployable reflector for submillimeter and infrared astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. N.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Gulkis, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kiya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Continuing plans for a large deployable reflector (LDR), conceived as a 10- to 30-m-diameter clear-aperture telescope, operating at wavelengths from 1000 microns to a diffraction-limited 30 microns, and to be placed in orbit for a life of 10 years by the Space Shuttle, are discussed. The primary reflector will be composed of a number of closely packed hexagonal segments of glass or lightweight composite material and attached to a truss integrating structure through position actuators providing three degrees of freedom for each segment. Technical aspects of optical design, surface measurement systems, deployment, and detectors are discussed, as are practical and fiscal limitations.

  1. Generalized parity relations for large space structures with uncertain parameters. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutilloy, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The generalized parity relations method is a technique that can be used to detect sensor and actuator failures on a large space structure. A model of a grid structure was used to evaluate the performance of these relations. It shows their relative sensitivity to modeling errors. A method using sensor outputs and actuator inputs is required for the design of the generalized parity relations. Three different estimators are studied. The last estimator can generate relations optimized for the detection of a particular failure which are interesting when the level of sensor noise is high.

  2. A flat array large telescope concept for use on the moon, earth, and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.

    1991-01-01

    An astronomical optical telescope concept is described which can provide very large collecting areas, of order 1000 sq m. This is an order of magnitude larger than the new generation of telescopes now being designed and built. Multiple gimballed flat mirrors direct the beams from a celestial source into a single telescope of the same aperture as each flat mirror. Multiple images of the same source are formed at the telescope focal plane. A beam combiner collects these images and superimposes them into a single image, onto a detector or spectrograph aperture. This telescope could be used on the earth, the moon, or in space.

  3. Integrated Analysis Capability pilot computer program. [large space structures and data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated analysis capability (IAC) computer software package was developed for the design analysis and performance evaluation of large space systems. The IAC aids the user in coupling the required technical disciplines (initially structures, thermal and controls), providing analysis solution paths which reveal critical interactive effects in order to study loads, stability and mission performance. Existing technical software modules, having a wide existing user community, are combined with the interface software to bridge between the different technologies and mathematical modeling techniques. The package is supported by executive, data management and interactive graphics software, with primary development within the superminicomputer environment.

  4. Characteristics and performance of the ESTEC large space simulator cryogenic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amlinger, H.; Bosma, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The final concept and performance characteristics of the Large Space Simulator (LSS) at ESTEC, The Netherlands are discussed. The LSS cryogenics system has proven its operational capabilities under simulated heat load conditions and provides sufficient margin for future elevated requirements. The acceptance test proved that nominal operating pressures can be lower than the design parameters, providing increased system safety and reliability. The ease of access for repair and the incorporated redundancy will limit system downtime. Finally, the system design resulted in a low consumption of LN sub 2, which is an important factor in keeping the operational costs at a low level.

  5. On-orbit damage detection and health monitoring of large space trusses - Status and critical issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashangaki, Thomas A.-L.

    1991-01-01

    The literature in the fields of structural identification, mode shape expansion and orthogonalization, and on-orbit damage location of large space trusses is reviewed. The use of a Dynamic Scale Model Technology (DSMT) hybrid scale model for damage location research and as a universal test bed for other damage location methods is proposed as a means of comparing and evaluating existing and newly developed methods in the named areas. Issues concerning on-orbit data acquisition, data accuracy, and data quality relevant to structural dynamic system identification which require extensive research are identified.

  6. Technology for Large Space Systems: A Special Bibliography with Indexes (Supplement 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography lists 258 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between July 1, 1979 and December 31, 1979. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of the Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, solar power satellite systems, and flight experiments.

  7. The Silicon Tracker Readout Electronics of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Luca; Brez, Alessandro; Himel, Thomas; Hirayama, Masaharu; Johnson, R.P.; Kroeger, Wilko; Latronico, Luca; Minuti, Massimo; Nelson, David; Rando, Riccardo; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Sgro, Carmelo; Spandre, Gloria; Spencer, E.N.; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Tajima, Hiro; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ziegler, Marcus; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /Maryland U. /UC, Santa Cruz /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2006-02-27

    A unique electronics system has been built and tested for reading signals from the silicon-strip detectors of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. The system amplifies and processes signals from 884,736 36-cm strips using only 160 W of power, and it achieves close to 100% detection efficiency with noise occupancy sufficiently low to allow it to self trigger. The design of the readout system is described, and results are presented from ground-based testing of the completed detector system.

  8. Technology for large space systems: A special bibliography with indexes (supplement 06)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 220 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between July 1, 1981 and December 31, 1981. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of the Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, solar power satellite systems, and flight experiments.

  9. Optimal fine pointing control of a large space telescope using an Annular Momentum Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.; Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) to fine pointing control of a large space telescope (LST). The AMCD represents a new development in the field of momentum storage devices. A linearized mathematical model is developed for the AMCD/LST system, including the magnetic suspension actuators. Two approaches to control system design are considered. The first approach uses a stochastic linear-quadratic Gaussian controller which utilizes feedback of all states. The second approach considers a more practical control system design in which the axial and radial loops are designed independently.

  10. Rapidly eliminating pathogenic microorganisms in large air space using spraying *OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mindong; Zhang, Zhitao; Tian, Yiping; Bai, Mindi

    2012-04-01

    A new method for rapidly eliminating pathogenic microorganisms in large air space using spraying *OH radicals is presented in this paper With a physical method of strong electric-field discharge, large numbers of *OH radicals were produced by the oxygen activated particles of O2+, O(1D), O(3P), etc., and the introducing reagent HO2-. The gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, the gram-negative bacteria Serratia marcescens, and Bacillus spores were used for the eliminating experiments. Results show that the different microorganisms were rapidly killed by *OH radicals with a concentration of 0.8 mg/L and spraying density of 21 microL/m2 within 4 sec. Cell morphological changes were also observed under microscope. The cells of B. subtilis and Bacillus spores in their cellular wall, cellular membrane, or cell protoplasm were greatly destroyed when being exposed to a killing dosage of *OH radicals.

  11. Mechanism design and dynamic analysis of a large-scale spatial deployable structure for space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanling; Lin, Qiuhong; Wang, Xingze; Li, Lin; Cong, Qiang; Pan, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The deployable structure is critical to the overall success of the space mission. This paper introduces a large-scale spatial deployable structure (SDS), which is developed to deploy and support the payload panels in a precise configuration once on the track. And segmental researching in the design, kinematics and dynamics analysis of SDS's prototyping system are presented. Geometric construction method and Bar-groups method are adopted to analysis the dimensions and coordinates of the SDS, which finally construct an well-determined mathematical model to raise the productivity and efficiency during optimization and analysis work. Be reasoned with the large-scale of the truss structures, flexible multibody dynamic simulations are developed, which present much more authentic stress transfer and kinematics behaviors. According to the deployment experiments of SDS's prototyping system, the correctness and validity of the flexible multibody simulation work are well proved.

  12. Landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies and their signature space at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Nath, Pran

    2007-12-21

    The minimal supersymmetric standard model with soft breaking has a large landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies. This number is reduced significantly in well-motivated scenarios such as minimal supergravity and alternatives. We carry out an analysis of the landscape for the first four lightest particles and identify at least 16 mass patterns, and provide benchmarks for each. We study the signature space for the patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider by analyzing the lepton+ (jet> or =2) + missing P{T} signals with 0, 1, 2, and 3 leptons. Correlations in missing P{T} are also analyzed. It is found that even with 10 fb{-1} of data a significant discrimination among patterns emerges.

  13. An assessment of methods for the control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Oz, H.

    1979-01-01

    Large flexible spacecraft represent highly complex distributed-parameter systems. In theory, a distributed-parameter system possesses an infinite number of degrees of freedom. For practical reasons, however, it must be discretized, which implies truncation. From a structural dynamics point of view, a mathematical model can be made more accurate by retaining an increasing number of degrees of freedom. From a control theory point of view, however, an increasing number of degrees of freedom places severe demands on the reliability of the various control algorithms. There is a difference of at least one order of magnitude between the structural modeling requirements and control theory capability. One of the challenges of large space structures control technology is to bridge this difference.

  14. Stability analysis of large space structure control systems with delayed input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    Large space structural systems, due to their inherent flexibility and low mass to area ratio, are represented by large dimensional mathematical models. For implementation of the control laws for such systems a finite amount of time is required to evaluate the control signals; and this time delay may cause instability in the closed loop control system that was previously designed without taking the input delay into consideration. The stability analysis of a simple harmonic oscillator representing the equation of a single mode as a function of delay time is analyzed analytically and verified numerically. The effect of inherent damping on the delay is also analyzed. The control problem with delayed input is also formulated in the discrete time domain.

  15. Stability analysis of large space structure control systems with delayed input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, Peter M.

    1988-01-01

    Large space structural systems, due to their inherent flexibility and low mass to area ratio, are represented by large dimensional mathematical models. For implementation of the control laws for such systems a finite amount of time is required to evaluate the control signals; and this time delay may cause instability in the closed loop control system that was previously designed without taking the input delay into consideration. The stability analysis of a simple harmonic oscillator representing the equation of a single mode as a function of delay time is treated analytically and verified numerically. The effect of inherent damping on the delay is also analyzed. The control problem with delayed input is also formulated in the discrete time domain.

  16. Development of a large scale Chimera grid system for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, Daniel G.; Stanley, Scott A.; Martin, Fred W., Jr.; Gomez, Ray J.; Le Beau, Gerald J.; Buning, Pieter G.; Chan, William M.; Chiu, Ing-Tsau; Wulf, Armin; Akdag, Vedat

    1993-01-01

    The application of CFD techniques to large problems has dictated the need for large team efforts. This paper offers an opportunity to examine the motivations, goals, needs, problems, as well as the methods, tools, and constraints that defined NASA's development of a 111 grid/16 million point grid system model for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle. The Chimera approach used for domain decomposition encouraged separation of the complex geometry into several major components each of which was modeled by an autonomous team. ICEM-CFD, a CAD based grid generation package, simplified the geometry and grid topology definition by provoding mature CAD tools and patch independent meshing. The resulting grid system has, on average, a four inch resolution along the surface.

  17. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST): Status and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view makes it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June, GLAST now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts: the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  18. Gravity and thermal deformation of large primary mirror in space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Jiang, Shouwang; Wan, Jinlong; Shu, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The technology of integrating mechanical FEA analysis with optical estimation is essential to simulate the gravity deformation of large main mirror and the thermal deformation such as static or temperature gradient of optical structure. We present the simulation results of FEA analysis, data processing, and image performance. Three kinds of support structure for large primary mirror which have the center holding structure, the edge glue fixation and back support, are designed and compared to get the optimal gravity deformation. Variable mirror materials Zerodur/SiC are chosen and analyzed to obtain the small thermal gradient distortion. The simulation accuracy is dependent on FEA mesh quality, the load definition of structure, the fitting error from discrete data to smooth surface. A main mirror with 1m diameter is designed as an example. The appropriate structure material to match mirror, the central supporting structure, and the key aspects of FEA simulation are optimized for space application.

  19. Multi body model approach to obtain construction criteria for a large space structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigehara, M.; Shigedomi, Y.

    Such natural environmental torques as the gravity gradient could substantially influence the attitude behavior of a large space structure, especially in a low Earth orbit. This paper has tried to introduce the basic criteria for constructing a large structure in low-orbit environment, by using the Solar Power Satellite as a model. The criteria can be derived from the static stability map from the rigid body equations and the dynamic behavior from the multi body equations. The multi-body octopus type equations of motion has been introduced to examine transient behaviors during construction. Specifically, inertia matrix change including unsymmetrical configuration change, construction speed and internal momentum change are considered. These results from the transient behavior studies are included, in a general level, in a set of construction criteria.

  20. Efficient eigenvalue assignment by state and output feedback with applications for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannell, Eric C.; Kenny, Sean P.; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1995-01-01

    The erection and deployment of large flexible structures having thousands of degrees of freedom requires controllers based on new techniques of eigenvalue assignment that are computationally stable and more efficient. Scientists at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a novel and efficient algorithm for the eigenvalue assignment of large, time-invariant systems using full-state and output feedback. The objectives of this research were to improve upon the output feedback version of this algorithm, to produce a toolbox of MATLAB functions based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm, and to experimentally verify the algorithm and software by implementing controllers designed using the MATLAB toolbox on the phase 2 configuration of NASA Langley's controls-structures interaction evolutionary model, a laboratory model used to study space structures. Results from laboratory tests and computer simulations show that effective controllers can be designed using software based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm.

  1. A large high vacuum, high pumping speed space simulation chamber for electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.; Parkes, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Testing high power electric propulsion devices poses unique requirements on space simulation facilities. Very high pumping speeds are required to maintain high vacuum levels while handling large volumes of exhaust products. These pumping speeds are significantly higher than those available in most existing vacuum facilities. There is also a requirement for relatively large vacuum chamber dimensions to minimize facility wall/thruster plume interactions and to accommodate far field plume diagnostic measurements. A 4.57 m (15 ft) diameter by 19.2 m (63 ft) long vacuum chamber at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The chamber utilizes oil diffusion pumps in combination with cryopanels to achieve high vacuum pumping speeds at high vacuum levels. The facility is computer controlled for all phases of operation from start-up, through testing, to shutdown. The computer control system increases the utilization of the facility and reduces the manpower requirements needed for facility operations.

  2. Concept for a Large Space Telescope for Detailed Spectroscopy of Terrestrial exo-planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Woolf, N. J.; Burge, J. H.

    1998-12-01

    Once terrestrial planets of other stars are detected, cryogenic space telescopes of large collecting area will be needed to obtain detailed atmospheric spectra in the thermal infrared. Our concept is for an ultralightweight telescope with area approaching 1000 m(2) , made from large flat panels of stretched plastic membrane. Thin reflective material held in tension from points around a plane perimeter is fundamentally stable; its flat shape is not critically dependent on tension, and will hold even against penetration by micrometeorites. The perimeter support points would be actively controlled to maintain their co-planarity. We envisage about ten panels each about 10 m square, arranged on a rigid carbon composite truss to approximate a 100 m x 10 m mirror with 1 km focal length. A separate free-flyer at the quasi-focus would complete the telescope. Where all the beams from the target star overlap, a 10 m concave secondary would be used to form an image of the primary array at about 1/10 scale, and slightly below the plane of incoming beams. At each panel image would be a 1 m tertiary, suitably shaped so as to recollimate each individual starlight beam, or to bring all the beams to a common focus. From this point on the instrument might use the focus directly, or multi-aperture interferometric nulling techniques as described by Angel and Woolf. The unaberrated field will be large enough for exoplanet studies. The new technology goes beyond that needed for an 8 m NGST in two main ways: 1) need for thin metallized plastic of large size and uniform thickness and 2) capability to assemble or deploy in space the structure to support the panels.

  3. Distribution-dependent total exoplanet yield for a large aperture space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Evan; Schiminovich, David

    2017-01-01

    A major scientific goal for future large aperture space telescopes is the discovery and characterization of habitable earth-like planets around FGK+M stars out to 10-20 pc. Using the design and observing plan for such a mission, we calculated the total exoplanet yield of a direct imaging survey, with detections including but not limited to potential earth analogs. In light of uncertainty of exoplanet occurrence rates, we used several of the best available exoplanetary distribution functions and assumed architectures to produce a Monte Carlo simulation of nearby planetary systems and observational parameters, and assessed detectability across the sample. Our calculations show a range of yields depending on the assumed distribution functions. We also compare our predictions to those of other detection methods in order to identify areas of parameter space (e.g. radius, period) uniquely constrained by direct imaging. In general, our calculations suggest that a higher completeness can be achieved with direct imaging, which will allow for calculation of a more accurate occurrence rate in local space.

  4. Large Scale Refrigeration Plant for Ground Testing the James Webb Telescope at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, P.; Decker, Lutz; Howe, D.; Urbin, J.; Homan, Jonathan; Reis, Carl; Creel, J.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

    2010-04-01

    The James Webb Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Telescope and will be placed in an orbit of 1.5 million km from earth. Before launch in 2014, the telescope will be tested in NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) space simulation chamber, Chamber A. The tests will be conducted at deep space conditions. Chamber A's helium cryo-panels are currently cooled down to 20 K by two Linde 3.5 kW helium refrigerators. The new 12.5 kW, 20-K helium coldbox described in this paper is part of the upgrade to the chamber systems for this large test program. The Linde coldbox will provide refrigeration in several operating modes where the temperature of the chamber is being controlled with a high accuracy due to the demanding NASA test requirements. The implementation of two parallel expansion turbine strings and the Ganni cycle-Floating Pressure process results in a highly efficient and flexible process that minimizes the electrical input power. This paper will describe the collaboration and execution of the coldbox project.

  5. From Monolithics to Tethers to Freeflyers: The Spectrum of Large Aperture Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse; Quinn, David; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA's endeavor to push the envelope and go where we have never been before, the Space Science Enterprise has laid out a vision which includes several missions that revolutionize the collection of scientific data from space. Many of the missions designed to meet the objectives of these programs depend heavily on the ability to perform space-based interferometry, which has recently become a rapidly growing field of investigation for both the scientific and engineering communities. While scientists are faced with the challenges of designing high fidelity optical systems capable of making detailed observations, engineers wrestle with the problem of providing s-pace-based platforms that can permit this data gathering to occur. Observational data gathering is desired at's variety of spectral wavelengths and resolutions, calling for interferometers with a range of baseline requirements. Approaches to configuration design are as varied as the missions themselves from large monolithic spacecraft to multiple free-flying small spacecraft and everything in between. As will be discussed, no one approach provides a 'panacea' of solutions rather each has its place in terms of the mission requirements. The purpose here is to identify the advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches, to discuss the driving factors in design selection and determine the relative range of applicability of each design approach.

  6. Variations of cosmic large-scale structure covariance matrices across parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, Robert; Kiessling, Alina; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-03-01

    The likelihood function for cosmological parameters, given by e.g. weak lensing shear measurements, depends on contributions to the covariance induced by the non-linear evolution of the cosmic web. As highly non-linear clustering to date has only been described by numerical N-body simulations in a reliable and sufficiently precise way, the necessary computational costs for estimating those covariances at different points in parameter space are tremendous. In this work, we describe the change of the matter covariance and the weak lensing covariance matrix as a function of cosmological parameters by constructing a suitable basis, where we model the contribution to the covariance from non-linear structure formation using Eulerian perturbation theory at third order. We show that our formalism is capable of dealing with large matrices and reproduces expected degeneracies and scaling with cosmological parameters in a reliable way. Comparing our analytical results to numerical simulations, we find that the method describes the variation of the covariance matrix found in the SUNGLASS weak lensing simulation pipeline within the errors at one-loop and tree-level for the spectrum and the trispectrum, respectively, for multipoles up to ℓ ≤ 1300. We show that it is possible to optimize the sampling of parameter space where numerical simulations should be carried out by minimizing interpolation errors and propose a corresponding method to distribute points in parameter space in an economical way.

  7. The Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Porto, Rafael A.; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory (LEFT) formalism for the study of cosmological large scale structures. Unlike the previous Eulerian-space construction, it is naturally formulated as an effective field theory of extended objects in Lagrangian space. In LEFT the resulting finite size effects are described using a multipole expansion parameterized by a set of time dependent coefficients and organized in powers of the ratio of the wavenumber of interest k over the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. The multipoles encode the effects of the short distance modes on the long-wavelength universe and absorb UV divergences when present. There are no IR divergences in LEFT. Some of the parameters that control the perturbative approach are not assumed to be small and can be automatically resummed. We present an illustrative one-loop calculation for a power law universe. We describe the dynamics both at the level of the equations of motion and through an action formalism.

  8. Overview of Small and Large-Scale Space Solar Power Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Seth; Henley, Mark; Howell, Joe; Carrington, Connie; Fikes, John

    2006-01-01

    An overview of space solar power studies performed at the Boeing Company under contract with NASA will be presented. The major concepts to be presented are: 1. Power Plug in Orbit: this is a spacecraft that collects solar energy and distributes it to users in space using directed radio frequency or optical energy. Our concept uses solar arrays having the same dimensions as ISS arrays, but are assumed to be more efficient. If radiofrequency wavelengths are used, it will necessitate that the receiving satellite be equipped with a rectifying antenna (rectenna). For optical wavelengths, the solar arrays on the receiving satellite will collect the power. 2. Mars Clipper I Power Explorer: this is a solar electric Mars transfer vehicle to support human missions. A near-term precursor could be a high-power radar mapping spacecraft with self-transport capability. Advanced solar electric power systems and electric propulsion technology constitute viable elements for conducting human Mars missions that are roughly comparable in performance to similar missions utilizing alternative high thrust systems, with the one exception being their inability to achieve short Earth-Mars trip times. 3. Alternative Architectures: this task involves investigating alternatives to the traditional solar power satellite (SPS) to supply commercial power from space for use on Earth. Four concepts were studied: two using photovoltaic power generation, and two using solar dynamic power generation, with microwave and laser power transmission alternatives considered for each. All four architectures use geostationary orbit. 4. Cryogenic Propellant Depot in Earth Orbit: this concept uses large solar arrays (producing perhaps 600 kW) to electrolyze water launched from Earth, liquefy the resulting hydrogen and oxygen gases, and store them until needed by spacecraft. 5. Beam-Powered Lunar Polar Rover: a lunar rover powered by a microwave or laser beam can explore permanently shadowed craters near the lunar

  9. MIC - a self deploying magnetically inflated cable system for large scale space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Paniagua, John

    2001-03-01

    A new approach, termed MIC (Magnetically Inflated Cable) that enables large, lightweight very strong and rigid space structures is described. MIC would be launched as a compact package of coiled superconducting (SC) cables. After reaching orbit, the cables would be cryogenically cooled and electrically energized by a small power source. The resultant repulsion magnetic forces between the DC currents in the SC cables automatically cause the coiled launch package to self deploy into the final large space structure. The SC cables are held in place by a distributed network of high tensile strength tethers (e.g., Spectra material), creating a very stiff, rigid truss structure that strongly resists bending and torsional, etc. movements, without the need for gravity gradient stabilization. A linear quadrupole (LQ) MIC configuration is described that is suitable for large solar power satellites, space stations, space hotels, propellant tanks, manned Mars spacecraft, etc. The LQ has 2 long SC dipole loops, of horizontal width W, length L, and opposite magnetic polarity, which are vertically separated by distance W, producing a long truss structure of square cross-section (width W) with the 4 SC cables at the corners of the square. The SC currents are opposite in adjacent cables, yielding an outwardly directed net radial force on each cable. The ends of each SC loop experience outwards longitudinal forces. The magnetic forces are very strong, even for modest supercurrents. For example, a 4 meter square truss with I = 250 kiloamp has an outwards radial force of 220 kg per meter of cable. and 5250 kg outwards longitudinal force at the ends of each SC loop. The network of restraining tensile lines can support lightweight structures, including solar panels, propellant tankage, habitat modules, power transmission lines, etc. The design of a 1 kilometer long, 4 meter square cross section MIC truss for solar power satellites is described. The MIC launch package fits within the

  10. Effects of space plasma discharge on the performance of large antenna structures in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, Hans-Juergen C.

    1987-01-01

    The anomalous plasma around spacecrafts in low Earth orbit represents the coma of an artificial comet. The plasma discharge is caused by an energetic disturbance of charged particles which were formerly in a state of equilibrium. The plasma can effect the passive and active radio frequency operation of large space antennas by inducing corona discharge or strong arcing in the antenna feeds. One such large space antenna is the 15-meter hoop column antenna which consists of a mesh membrane material (tricot knitted gold plated wire) reflector and carbon fiber tension cords. The atomic oxygen in the plasma discharge state can force the wire base metal particles through the gold lattice and oxydize the metal particles to build a Schottky-barrier contact at the point where the wires meet. This effect can cause strong deviations in the reflector performance in terms of antenna pattern and losses. Also, the carbon-fiber cords can experience a strength reduction of 30 percent over a 40-hour exposure time.

  11. A New Large Vibration Test Facility Concept for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brian P.; Johnson, Eric L.; Hoksbergen, Joel; Lund, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope consists of three main components, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Element, the Optical Telescope Element (OTE), and the Spacecraft Element. The ISIM and OTE are being assembled at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC). The combined OTE and ISIM Elements, called OTIS, will undergo sine vibration testing before leaving Goddard. OTIS is the largest payload ever tested at Goddard and the existing GSFC vibration facilities are incapable of performing a sine vibration test of the OTIS payload. As a result, a new large vibration test facility is being designed. The new facility will consist of a vertical system with a guided head expander and a horizontal system with a hydrostatic slip table. The project is currently in the final design phase with installation to begin in early 2015 and the facility is expected to be operational by late 2015. This paper will describe the unique requirements for a new large vibration test facility and present the selected final design concepts.

  12. Large space-borne reflector antenna characterization: Evaluation and distortion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferer, Robert Alois

    For space-borne reflector antenna applications, both size and weight of the antenna is restricted to the payload capacity of the launch vehicle. Advantages in the material and manufacturing capabilities of large reflector antennas over the recent years have made it possible to propose antenna systems with ever increasing size and operating frequency. Before deployment, however, it is crucial to accurately evaluate the radiation characteristics of these antennas. Also, if compensatory measures are applied to compensate for structural distortions, it is necessary to assess its effectiveness for a particular the examined antenna configuration. In this dissertation, an effective dual reflector analysis technique has been developed, using a combination of Physical Optics, Geometrical Optics and Fourier-Jacobi surface expansion. This analysis technique has been applied to two classes of reflector antenna applications. First, two challenging single reflector antenna configurations have been designed and analyzed. Second, the analysis technique is used for subreflector shaping in the process of main reflector distortion compensation for an electrically large dual reflector antenna configuration. Note that the inflatable reflector antenna configurations investigated in this thesis belong to the class reflector antennas larger than 20 m, which are now being considered for future space missions.

  13. Large interarcuate spaces in the cervical vertebral column of the tyrolean mountain sheep.

    PubMed

    Turkof, E; Jurasch, N; Grassberger, M; Schwendenwein, S; Habib, D; Knolle, E; Losert, U

    2003-02-01

    Large interarcual spaces have been described between the arcus vertebrae C5/C6 and C6/C7 in the cervical vertebral column of Nubian goats. This aperture enables direct access to spinal cord and rootlets without the need to perform a hemilaminectomy. The present study was performed in order to determine whether these large interarcual spaces can also be found in the vertebral column of the Tyrolean mountain sheep, as this small ruminant, which is anatomically very similar to the Nubian goat, is frequently used for experimental purposes at the Surgical University Clinic in Austria. The carcasses of 10 sheep (six females, four males; range of age: 2.5-6 years, range of weight: 52-89 kg) were dissected and the vertebral column was exposed. All 10 sheep showed elliptic openings between the fourth cervical and the first thoracal vertebrae. Three sheep had additional openings between the first and the second thoracal vertebrae. All openings were covered solitarily by the ligamentum flavum and under this ligamentum lay the spinal cord without any further osseous or ligamentous protection. These findings are not mentioned in the common textbooks of veterinary anatomy and deserve attention, as they can be a step forward towards non-traumatic experimental surgery on the spinal cord.

  14. High-fidelity cryothermal test of a subscale large space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Ollendorf, S.; Mattern, A.; Leisawitz, D.; Jackson, M.; Francis, J.; Hait, T.; Cleveland, P.; Muheim, D.; Mastropietro, A. J.

    2007-09-01

    To take advantage of the unique environment of space and optimize infrared observations for faint sources, space telescopes must be cooled to low temperatures. The new paradigm in cooling large space telescopes is to use a combination of passive radiative cooling and mechanical cryocoolers. The passive system must shield the telescope from the Sun, Earth, and the warm spacecraft components while providing radiative cooling to deep space. This shield system is larger than the telescope itself, and must attenuate the incoming energy by over one million to limit heat input to the telescope. Testing of such a system on the ground is a daunting task due to the size of the thermal/vacuum chamber required and the degree of thermal isolation necessary between the room temperature and cryogenic parts of the shield. These problems have been attacked in two ways: by designing a subscale version of a larger sunshield and by carefully closing out radiation sneak paths. The 18% scale (the largest diameter shield was 1.5 m) version of the SPIRIT Origins Probe telescope shield was tested in a low cost helium shroud within a 3.1 m diameter x 4.6 m long LN II shrouded vacuum chamber. Thermal straps connected from three shield stages to the liquid helium cooled shroud were instrumented with heaters and thermometers to simulate mechanical cryocooler stages at 6 K, 18-20 K, and 45-51 K. Performance data showed that less than 10 microwatts of radiative heat leaked from the warm to cold sides of the shields during the test. The excellent agreement between the data and the thermal models is discussed along with shroud construction techniques.

  15. Active suspension design for a Large Space Structure ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Thomas J. H.; Schlegel, Clemens

    1993-01-01

    The expected future high performance requirements for Large Space Structures (LSS) enforce technology innovations such as active vibration damping techniques e.g., by means of structure sensors and actuators. The implementation of new technologies like that requires an interactive and integrated structural and control design with an increased effort in hardware validation by ground testing. During the technology development phase generic system tests will be most important covering verification and validation aspects up to the preparation and definition of relevant space experiments. For many applications using advanced designs it is deemed necessary to improve existing testing technology by further reducing disturbances and gravity coupling effects while maintaining high performance reliability. A key issue in this context is the improvement of suspension techniques. The ideal ground test facility satisfying these requirements completely will never be found. The highest degree of reliability will always be obtained by passive suspension methods taking into account severe performance limitations such as non-zero rigid body modes, restriction of degrees of freedom of motion and frequency response limitations. Passive compensation mechanisms, e.g., zero-spring-rate mechanisms, either require large moving masses or they are limited with respect to low-frequency performance by friction, stiction or other non-linear effects. With active suspensions these limitations can be removed to a large extent thereby increasing the range of applications. Despite an additional complexity which is associated with a potential risk in reliability their development is considered promising due to the amazing improvement of real-time control technology which is still continuing.

  16. GLAST: Exploring Nature's Highest Energy Processes with the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, Seth; Myers, J. D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multi-agency space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV. Several successful exploratory missions in gamma-ray astronomy led to the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). Launched in 1991, EGRET made the first complete survey of the sky in the 30 MeV-10 GeV range. EGRET showed the high-energy gamma-ray sky to be surprisingly dynamic and diverse, with sources ranging from the sun and moon to massive black holes at large redshifts. Most of the gamma-ray sources detected by EGRET remain unidentified. In light of the discoveries with EGRET, the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope vastly more capable than instruments flown previously, as well as a secondary instrument to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. The main instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will have superior area, angular resolution, field of view, and deadtime that together will provide a factor of 30 or more advance in sensitivity, as well as provide capability for study of transient phenomena. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will have a field of view several times larger than the LAT and will provide spectral coverage of gamma-ray bursts that extends from the lower limit of the LAT down to 10 keV. The basic parameters of the GBM are compared to those of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on CGRO in Table 1-2. With the LAT and GBM, GLAST will be a flexible observatory for investigating the great range of astrophysical phenomena best studied in high-energy gamma rays. NASA plans to launch GLAST in late 2005.

  17. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Soummer, Remi; Sivramakrishnan, Annand; Macintosh, Bruce; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Kirk, Charles; Arnold, William

    2013-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD is the start of a multiyear effort to develop, demonstrate and mature critical technologies to TRL-6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies: (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirror Substrates: Both (4 to 8 m) monolithic and (8 to 16 m) segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, and stiffer substrates. (2) Support System: Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error: Very smooth mirror is critical for producing high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges: The quality of segment edges impacts PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects total collecting aperture. (5) Segment to Segment Gap Phasing: Segment phasing is critical for producing high-quality temporally-stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation: On-orbit performance is driven by mechanical & thermal stability. Compliance cannot be 100% tested, but relies on modeling. AMTD is pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with options to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  18. Hybrid Electrostatic/Flextensional Mirror for Lightweight, Large-Aperture, and Cryogenic Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Brian; Moore, James; Hackenberger, Wesley; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    A lightweight, cryogenically capable, scalable, deformable mirror has been developed for space telescopes. This innovation makes use of polymer-based membrane mirror technology to enable large-aperture mirrors that can be easily launched and deployed. The key component of this innovation is a lightweight, large-stroke, cryogenic actuator array that combines the high degree of mirror figure control needed with a large actuator influence function. The latter aspect of the innovation allows membrane mirror figure correction with a relatively low actuator density, preserving the lightweight attributes of the system. The principal components of this technology are lightweight, low-profile, high-stroke, cryogenic-capable piezoelectric actuators based on PMN-PT (piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate) single-crystal configured in a flextensional actuator format; high-quality, low-thermal-expansion polymer membrane mirror materials developed by NeXolve; and electrostatic coupling between the membrane mirror and the piezoelectric actuator assembly to minimize problems such as actuator print-through.

  19. Children's search behaviour in large-scale space: developmental components of exploration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alastair D; Gilchrist, Iain D; Hood, Bruce M

    2005-01-01

    It has been argued that visual-search tasks provide a valid model for foraging behaviour. However, Gilchrist et al (2001 Perception 30 1459-1464) demonstrated that, whilst some aspects of behaviour transferred to large-scale egocentric search, there were substantially fewer revisits to previously searched locations than would be expected from the visual-search literature. This difference might be a result of the greater effort required to search in a large-scale egocentric context. Here, we present a novel, automated paradigm, for examining the effect of effort on egocentric search behaviour by manipulating the motor difficulty of the task. Children searched for a hidden target amongst a randomised display of lights by activating a switch at each potential location. The motor difficulty of the task was manipulated by requiring children to search with either their dominant or their nondominant hand. We found that when children searched with their nondominant hand, they made significantly more revisits to previously checked locations than they did when using their dominant hand. This suggests that, when the motor response was more effortful, children were less able to efficiently guide their search behaviour. Individuals with a greater visuo-spatial short-term memory span performed the task more quickly than those with a lower span. However, search latencies were unrelated to general fluid intelligence. This highlights the role of spatial working memory in the development of efficient exploration of large-scale space.

  20. Coordinate-Space Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Solvers for Superfluid Fermi Systems in Large Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, J. C.; Fann, George I; Harrison, Robert J; Nazarewicz, W.; Hill, Judith C; Galindo, Diego A; Jia, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov problem in large boxes can be solved accurately in the coordinate space with the recently developed solvers HFB-AX (2D) and MADNESS-HFB (3D). This is essential for the description of superfluid Fermi systems with complicated topologies and significant spatial extend, such as fissioning nuclei, weakly-bound nuclei, nuclear matter in the neutron star rust, and ultracold Fermi atoms in elongated traps. The HFB-AX solver based on B-spline techniques uses a hybrid MPI and OpenMP programming model for parallel computation for distributed parallel computation, within a node multi-threaded LAPACK and BLAS libraries are used to further enable parallel calculations of large eigensystems. The MADNESS-HFB solver uses a novel multi-resolution analysis based adaptive pseudo-spectral techniques to enable fully parallel 3D calculations of very large systems. In this work we present benchmark results for HFB-AX and MADNESS-HFB on ultracold trapped fermions.

  1. Space Use of African Wild Dogs in Relation to Other Large Carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Angela M.; Graf, Jan A.; Somers, Michael J.; Slotow, Rob; Szykman Gunther, Micaela

    2014-01-01

    Interaction among species through competition is a principle process structuring ecological communities, affecting behavior, distribution, and ultimately the population dynamics of species. High competition among large African carnivores, associated with extensive diet overlap, manifests in interactions between subordinate African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) and dominant lions (Panthera leo) and spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta). Using locations of large carnivores in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa, we found different responses from wild dogs to their two main competitors. Wild dogs avoided lions, particularly during denning, through a combination of spatial and temporal avoidance. However, wild dogs did not exhibit spatial or temporal avoidance of spotted hyenas, likely because wild dog pack sizes were large enough to adequately defend their kills. Understanding that larger carnivores affect the movements and space use of other carnivores is important for managing current small and fragmented carnivore populations, especially as reintroductions and translocations are essential tools used for the survival of endangered species, as with African wild dogs. PMID:24896638

  2. Space Situational Awareness of Large Numbers of Payloads From a Single Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segerman, A.; Byers, J.; Emmert, J.; Nicholas, A.

    2014-09-01

    The nearly simultaneous deployment of a large number of payloads from a single vehicle presents a new challenge for space object catalog maintenance and space situational awareness (SSA). Following two cubesat deployments last November, it took five weeks to catalog the resulting 64 orbits. The upcoming Kicksat mission will present an even greater SSA challenge, with its deployment of 128 chip-sized picosats. Although all of these deployments are in short-lived orbits, future deployments will inevitably occur at higher altitudes, with a longer term threat of collision with active spacecraft. With such deployments, individual scientific payload operators require rapid precise knowledge of their satellites' locations. Following the first November launch, the cataloguing did not initially associate a payload with each orbit, leaving this to the satellite operators. For short duration missions, the time required to identify an experiment's specific orbit may easily be a large fraction of the spacecraft's lifetime. For a Kicksat-type deployment, present tracking cannot collect enough observations to catalog each small object. The current approach is to treat the chip cloud as a single catalog object. However, the cloud dissipates into multiple subclouds and, ultimately, tiny groups of untrackable chips. One response to this challenge may be to mandate installation of a transponder on each spacecraft. Directional transponder transmission detections could be used as angle observations for orbit cataloguing. Of course, such an approach would only be employable with cooperative spacecraft. In other cases, a probabilistic association approach may be useful, with the goal being to establish the probability of an element being at a given point in space. This would permit more reliable assessment of the probability of collision of active spacecraft with any cloud element. This paper surveys the cataloguing challenges presented by large scale deployments of small spacecraft

  3. Design and fabrication of a large vertical travel silicon inchworm microactuator for advanced segmented silicon space telescope (ASSIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E.; Dekany, R.; Padin, S.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop inchworm motor systems capable of simultaneously providing nanometer resolution, high stiffness, large output force, long travel range, and compactness for ultraprecision positioning applications in space.

  4. The Development of Large Inflatable Antenna for Deep-Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Fang, Houfei; Lovick, Richard; Lou, Michael

    2004-01-01

    NASA/JPL's deep-space exploration program has been placing emphasis on reducing the mass and stowage volume of its spacecraft's high-gain and large-aperture antennas. To achieve these goals, the concept of deployable flat reflectarray antenna using an inflatable/thin-membrane structure was introduced at JPL several years ago. A reflectarray is a flat array antenna space-fed by a low-gain feed located at its focal point in a fashion similar to that of a parabolic reflector. The ref1ectarray's elements, using microstrip technology, can be printed onto a flat thin-membrane surface and are each uniquely designed to compensate for the different phase delays due to different path lengths from the feed. Although the reflectarray suffers from limited bandwidth (typically < 10%), it offers a more reliably deployed and maintained flat "natural" surface. A recent hardware development at JPL has demonstrated that a 0.2mm rms surface tolerance (l/50th of a wavelength) was achieved on a 3-meter Ka-band inflatable reflectarray. Another recent development, to combat the reflectarray's narrow band characteristic, demonstrated that dual-band performance, such as X- and Ka-bands, with an aperture efficiency of above 50 percent is achievable by the reflectarray antenna. To mechanically deploy the antenna, the reflectarray's thin membrane aperture surface is supported, tensioned and deployed by an inflatable tubular structure. There are several critical elements and challenging issues associated with the inflatable tube structure. First, the inflatable tube must be made rigidizable so that, once the tube is fully deployed in space, it rigidizes itself and the inflation system is no longer needed. In addition, if the tube is penetrated by small space debris, the tube will maintain its rigidity and not cause deformation to the antenna structure. To support large apertures (e.g. 10m or beyond) without causing any buckling to the small-diameter inflatable tube during vibration, the tube

  5. Statistical and systematic errors in redshift-space distortion measurements from large surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Branchini, E.; Majerotto, E.; de la Torre, S.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Angulo, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the impact of statistical and systematic errors on measurements of linear redshift-space distortions (RSD) in future cosmological surveys by analysing large catalogues of dark matter haloes from the baryonic acoustic oscillation simulations at the Institute for Computational Cosmology. These allow us to estimate the dependence of errors on typical survey properties, as volume, galaxy density and mass (i.e. bias factor) of the adopted tracer. We find that measures of the specific growth rate β = f/b using the Hamilton/Kaiser harmonic expansion of the redshift-space correlation function ξ(rp, π) on scales larger than 3 h-1 Mpc are typically underestimated by up to 10 per cent for galaxy-sized haloes. This is significantly larger than the corresponding statistical errors, which amount to a few per cent, indicating the importance of non-linear improvements to the Kaiser model, to obtain accurate measurements of the growth rate. The systematic error shows a diminishing trend with increasing bias value (i.e. mass) of the haloes considered. We compare the amplitude and trends of statistical errors as a function of survey parameters to predictions obtained with the Fisher information matrix technique. This is what is usually adopted to produce RSD forecasts, based on the Feldman-Kaiser-Peacock prescription for the errors on the power spectrum. We show that this produces parameter errors fairly similar to the standard deviations from the halo catalogues, provided it is applied to strictly linear scales in Fourier space (k<0.2 h Mpc-1). Finally, we combine our measurements to define and calibrate an accurate scaling formula for the relative error on β as a function of the same parameters, which closely matches the simulation results in all explored regimes. This provides a handy and plausibly more realistic alternative to the Fisher matrix approach, to quickly and accurately predict statistical errors on RSD expected from future surveys.

  6. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  7. Study of electrical and chemical propulsion systems for auxiliary propulsion of large space systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    The five major tasks of the program are reported. Task 1 is a literature search followed by selection and definition of seven generic spacecraft classes. Task 2 covers the determination and description of important disturbance effects. Task 3 applies the disturbances to the generic spacecraft and adds maneuver and stationkeeping functions to define total auxiliary propulsion systems requirements for control. The important auxiliary propulsion system characteristics are identified and sensitivities to control functions and large space system characteristics determined. In Task 4, these sensitivities are quantified and the optimum auxiliary propulsion system characteristics determined. Task 5 compares the desired characteristics with those available for both electrical and chemical auxiliary propulsion systems to identify the directions technology advances should take.

  8. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TeV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  9. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TcV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a Galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  10. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST): Instrument Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; GLAST Collaboration

    1999-04-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a satellite-based experiment under development to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV. The primary telescope for the mission is a pair-conversion telescope. The telescope design includes a precision tracker/converter section based on silicon-strip detectors, a CsI scintillating crystal calorimeter arranged in a hodoscopic configuration, an anticoincidence shield that is an array of plastic scintillator tiles read out with waveshifting optical fibers, and a powerful distributed data acquisition and triggering system. The design and expected performance of the telescope are presented along with results obtained from a high-energy beam test of a prototype.

  11. Integrated Thermal-structural-electromagnetic Design Optimization of Large Space Antenna Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Padula, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The requirements for low mass and high electromagnetic (EM) performance in large, flexible space antenna structures is motivating the development of a systematic procedure for antenna design. In contrast to previous work which concentrated on reducing rms distortions of the reflector surface, thereby indirectly increasing antenna performance, the current work involves a direct approach to increasing electromagnetic performance using mathematical optimization. The thermal, structural, and EM analyses are fully integrated in the context of an optimization procedure, and consequently, the interaction of the various responses is accounted for directly and automatically. Preliminary results are presented for sizing cross-sectional areas of a tetrahedral truss reflector. The results indicate potential for this integrated procedure from the standpoint of mass reduction, performance increase, and efficiency of the design process.

  12. Adaptive Filtering for Large Space Structures: A Closed-Form Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, H. E.; Schaechter, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    In a previous paper Schaechter proposes using an extended Kalman filter to estimate adaptively the (slowly varying) frequencies and damping ratios of a large space structure. The time varying gains for estimating the frequencies and damping ratios can be determined in closed form so it is not necessary to integrate the matrix Riccati equations. After certain approximations, the time varying adaptive gain can be written as the product of a constant matrix times a matrix derived from the components of the estimated state vector. This is an important savings of computer resources and allows the adaptive filter to be implemented with approximately the same effort as the nonadaptive filter. The success of this new approach for adaptive filtering was demonstrated using synthetic data from a two mode system.

  13. Large-Scale Hollow Retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Alix M.

    2012-05-01

    Laser ranging to the retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Luna missions have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Although the precision of the range measurements has historically been limited by the ground station capabilities, advances in the APOLLO instrument at the Apache Point facility in New Mexico is beginning to be limited by errors associated with the lunar arrays. We report here on efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center to develop the next generation of lunar retroreflectors. We will describe a new facility that is being used to design, assemble, and test large-scale hollow retroreflectors. We will also describe results from investigations into various bonding techniques used to assemble the open corner cubes and mirror coatings that have dust mitigation properties.

  14. Structural evaluation of candidate designs for the large space telescope primary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.; Grin, R.; Furey, M.; Hamilton, J.

    1975-01-01

    Structural performance analyses were conducted on two candidate designs (Itek and Perkin-Elmer designs) for the large space telescope three-meter mirror. The mirror designs and the finite-element models used in the analyses evaluation are described. The results of the structural analyses for several different types of loading are presented in tabular and graphic forms. Several additional analyses are also reported: the evaluation of a mirror design concept proposed by the Boeing Co., a study of the global effects of local cell plate deflections, and an investigation of the fracture mechanics problems likely to occur with Cervit and ULE. Flexibility matrices were obtained for the Itek and Perkin-Elmer mirrors to be used in active figure control studies. Summary, conclusions, and recommendations are included.

  15. Imaging Extra-Solar Planets with an Ultra-Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Charles R.

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Origins Program is directed toward two main goals: Imaging of galactic evolution in the early universe, and searching for planets orbiting nearby stars. The Next-Generation Space Telescope (NGST), operating at low temperature with an 8-m aperture, is well designed to meet the first goal. The goal of imaging planets orbiting nearby stars is more problematic. One line of investigation has been the ULTIMA concept (Ultra-Large Telescope, Integrated Missions in Astronomy). In this report, I will lay out the resolution requirements for telescopes to achieve the imaging of extrasolar planets, and describe a modeling tool created to investigate the requirements for imaging a planet when it is very near a much brighter star.

  16. Large-Scale Hollow Retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Alix

    2012-01-01

    Laser ranging to the retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Luna missions have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Although the precision of the range measurements has historically been limited by the ground station capabilities, advances in the APOLLO instrument at the Apache Point facility in New Mexico is beginning to be limited by errors associated with the lunar arrays. We report here on efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center to develop the next generation of lunar retroreflectors. We will describe a new facility that is being used to design, assemble, and test large-scale hollow retroreflectors. We will also describe results from investigations into various bonding techniques used to assemble the open comer cubes and mirror coatings that have dust mitigation properties.

  17. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, on Behalf of the Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays can be produced by processes that also produce neutrinos, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi (Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of potential targets for neutrino observations. Gamma-ray bursts. Active Galactic Nuclei, and supernova remnants are all sites where hadronic, neutrino-producing interactions are plausible. Pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and binary sources are all phenomena that reveal leptonic particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. While important to gamma-ray astrophysics, such sources are of less interest to neutrino studies. This talk will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT)on the Fermi spacecraft.

  18. Spline-based distributed system identification with application to large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Lamm, P. K.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    A parameter and state estimation technique for distributed models is demonstrated through the solution of a problem generic to large space antenna system identification. Assuming the position of the reflective surface of the maypole (hoop/column) antenna to be approximated by the static two-dimensional, stretched-membrane partial differential equation with variable-stiffness coefficient functions, a spline-based approximation procedure is described that estimates the shape and stiffness functions from data set observations. For given stiffness functions, the Galerkin projection with linear spline-based functions is applied to project the distributed problem onto a finite-dimensional subspace wherein algebraic equations exist for determining a static shape (state) prediction. The stiffness functions are then parameterized by cubic splines and the parameters estimated by an output error technique. Numerical results are presented for data descriptive of a 100-m-diameter maypole antenna.

  19. Modal test and analysis: Multiple tests concept for improved validation of large space structure mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.; Kuo, C-P.; Glaser, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    For the structural dynamic analysis of large space structures, the technology in structural synthesis and the development of structural analysis software have increased the capability to predict the dynamic characteristics of the structural system. The various subsystems which comprise the system are represented by various displacement functions; the displacement functions are then combined to represent the total structure. Experience has indicated that even when subsystem mathematical models are verified by test, the mathematical representations of the total system are often in error because the mathematical model of the structural elements which are significant when loads are applied at the interconnection points are not adequately verified by test. A multiple test concept, based upon the Multiple Boundary Condition Test (MBCT), is presented which will increase the accuracy of the system mathematical model by improving the subsystem test and test/analysis correlation procedure.

  20. Large Advanced Space Systems (LASS) computer-aided design program additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The LSS preliminary and conceptual design requires extensive iteractive analysis because of the effects of structural, thermal, and control intercoupling. A computer aided design program that will permit integrating and interfacing of required large space system (LSS) analyses is discussed. The primary objective of this program is the implementation of modeling techniques and analysis algorithms that permit interactive design and tradeoff studies of LSS concepts. Eight software modules were added to the program. The existing rigid body controls module was modified to include solar pressure effects. The new model generator modules and appendage synthesizer module are integrated (interfaced) to permit interactive definition and generation of LSS concepts. The mass properties module permits interactive specification of discrete masses and their locations. The other modules permit interactive analysis of orbital transfer requirements, antenna primary beam n, and attitude control requirements.

  1. Dynamic Model Averaging in Large Model Spaces Using Dynamic Occam’s Window*

    PubMed Central

    Onorante, Luca; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian model averaging has become a widely used approach to accounting for uncertainty about the structural form of the model generating the data. When data arrive sequentially and the generating model can change over time, Dynamic Model Averaging (DMA) extends model averaging to deal with this situation. Often in macroeconomics, however, many candidate explanatory variables are available and the number of possible models becomes too large for DMA to be applied in its original form. We propose a new method for this situation which allows us to perform DMA without considering the whole model space, but using a subset of models and dynamically optimizing the choice of models at each point in time. This yields a dynamic form of Occam’s window. We evaluate the method in the context of the problem of nowcasting GDP in the Euro area. We find that its forecasting performance compares well with that of other methods. PMID:26917859

  2. Automated assembly of large space structures using an expert system executive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Cheryl L.

    1993-01-01

    NASA LaRC has developed a unique testbed for investigating the practical problems associated with the assembly of large space structures using robotic manipulators. The testbed is an interdisciplinary effort which considers the full spectrum of assembly problems from the design of mechanisms to the development of software. This paper will describe the automated structures assembly testbed and its operation, detail the expert system executive and its development, and discuss the planned system evolution. Emphasis will be placed on the expert system development of the program executive. The executive program must be capable of directing and reliably performing complex assembly tasks with the flexibility to recover from realistic system errors. By employing an expert system, information pertaining to the operation of the system was encapsulated concisely within a knowledge base. This lead to a substantial reduction in code, increased flexibility, eased software upgrades, and realized a savings in software maintenance costs.

  3. Load concentration due to missing members in planar faces of a large space truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltz, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A large space structure with members missing was investigated using a finite element analysis. The particular structural configuration was the tetrahedral truss, with attention restricted to one of its planar faces. Initially the finite element model of a complete face was verified by comparing it with known results for some basic loadings. Then an analysis was made of the structure with members near the center removed. Some calculations were made on the influence of the mesh size of a structure containing a hexagonal hole, and an analysis was also made of a structure with a rigid hexagonal insert. In general, load concentration effects in these trusses were significantly lower than classical stress concentration effects in an infinitely wide isotropic plate with a circular rigid inclusion, although larger effects were obtained when a hole extended over several rings of elements.

  4. Controller design and parameter identifiability studies for a large space antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of control systems synthesis and parameter identifiability are considered for a large, space-based antenna. Two methods are considered for control system synthesis, the first of which uses torque actuators and collocated attitude and rate sensors, and the second method is based on the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control theory. The predicted performance obtained by computing variances of pointing, surface and feed misalignment errors in the presence of sensor noise indicates that the LQG-based controller yields superior results. Since controller design requires the knowledge of the system parameters, the identifiability of the structural parameters is investigated by obtaining Cramer-Rao lower bounds. The modal frequencies are found to have the best identifiability, followed by damping ratios, and mode-slopes.

  5. An expert system executive for automated assembly of large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Cheryl L.

    1993-01-01

    Langley Research Center developed a unique test bed for investigating the practical problems associated with the assembly of large space truss structures using robotic manipulators. The test bed is the result of an interdisciplinary effort that encompasses the full spectrum of assembly problems - from the design of mechanisms to the development of software. The automated structures assembly test bed and its operation are described, the expert system executive and its development are detailed, and the planned system evolution is discussed. Emphasis is on the expert system implementation of the program executive. The executive program must direct and reliably perform complex assembly tasks with the flexibility to recover from realistic system errors. The employment of an expert system permits information that pertains to the operation of the system to be encapsulated concisely within a knowledge base. This consolidation substantially reduced code, increased flexibility, eased software upgrades, and realized a savings in software maintenance costs.

  6. A large underestimate of the pyrogenic source of formic acid inferred from space-borne measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaliyakunnel, S.; Millet, D. B.; Wells, K. C.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Shephard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere, and a dominant source of acidity in the global troposphere. Recent work has revealed a major gap in our present understanding of the atmospheric formic acid budget, with observed concentrations much larger than can be reconciled with current estimates of its sources. In this work, we employ new space-based observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite instrument with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to better quantify the source of atmospheric formic acid from biomass burning, and assess the degree to which this source can help close the large budget gap for this species. The space-based formic acid data reveal a severe model underestimate for HCOOH that is most prominent over tropical biomass burning regions, indicating a major missing source of organic acids from fires. Based on two independent methods for inferring the fractional contribution of fires to the measured HCOOH abundance, we find that the pyrogenic HCOOH:CO enhancement ratio measured by TES (including direct emissions plus secondary production) is 5-10 times higher than current estimates of the direct emission ratio, providing evidence of substantial secondary production of HCOOH in fire plumes. We further show that current models significantly underestimate (by a factor of 2-6) the total primary and secondary source of HCOOH from tropical fires.

  7. A finite element approach for large motion dynamic analysis of multibody structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Che-Wei

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element formulation for modeling the transient dynamics of constrained multibody space sructures with truss-like configurations is presented. Convected coordinate systems are used to define rigid-body motion of individual elements in the system. These systems are located at one end of each element and are oriented such that one axis passes through the other end of the element. Deformation of each element, relative to its convected coordinate system, is defined by cubic flexural shape functions as used in finite element methods of structural analysis. The formulation is oriented toward joint dominated structures and places the generalized coordinates at the joint. A transformation matrix is derived to integrate joint degree-of-freedom into the equations of motion of the element. Based on the derivation, a general-purpose code LATDYN (Large Angle Transient DYNamics) was developed. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of the code. For the spin-up of a flexible beam, results are compared with existing solutions available in the literature. For the deployment of one bay of a deployable space truss (the Minimast), results are verified by the geometric knowledge of the system and converged solution of a successively refined model.

  8. 8 Meter Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    ATLAST-8m (Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope) is a proposed 8-meter monolithic UV/optical/NIR space observatory (wavelength range 110 to 2500 nm) to be placed in orbit at Sun-Earth L2 by NASA's planned Ares V heavy lift vehicle. Given its very high angular resolution (15 mas @ 500 nm), sensitivity and performance stability, ATLAST-8m is capable of achieving breakthroughs in a broad range of astrophysics including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? An 8-meter UVOIR observatory has the performance required to detect habitability (H2O, atmospheric column density) and biosignatures (O2, O3, CH4) in terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres, to reveal the underlying physics that drives star formation, and to trace the complex interactions between dark matter, galaxies, and intergalactic medium. The ATLAST Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study developed a detailed point design for an 8-m monolithic observatory including optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; mass and power budgets; and system cost. The results of which were submitted by invitation to NRC's 2010 Astronomy & Astrophysics Decadal Survey.

  9. Advances in solid state switchgear technology for large space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    High voltage solid state remote power controllers (RPC's) and the required semiconductor power switches to provide baseline technology for large, high power distribution systems in the space station, all electric airplane and other advanced aerospace applications were developed. The RPC's were developed for dc voltages from 28 to 1200 V and ac voltages of 115, 230, and 440 V at frequencies of 400 Hz to 20 kHz. The benefits and operation of solid state RPC's and highlights of several developments to bring the RPC to technology readiness for future aerospace needs are examined. The 28 V dc Space Shuttle units, three RPC types at 120 V dc, two at 270/300 V dc, two at 230 V ac and several high power RPC models at voltages up to 1200 V dc with current ratings up to 100 A are reviewed. New technology programs to develop a new family of (DI)2 semiconductor switches and 20 kHz, 440 V ac RPC's are described.

  10. Laboratory demonstration of a primary active mirror for space with the LATT: large aperture telescope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Vettore, Christian; d'Amato, Francesco; Xompero, Marco; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Patauner, Christian; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; Duò, Fabrizio; Pucci, Mauro; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Maresi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The LATT project is an ESA contract under TRP programme to demonstrate the scalability of the technology from ground-based adaptive mirrors to space active primary mirrors. A prototype spherical mirror based on a 40 cm diameter 1 mm thin glass shell with 19 contactless, voice-coil actuators and co-located position sensors have been manufactured and integrated into a final unit with an areal density lower than 20 kg/m2. Laboratory tests demonstrated the controllability with very low power budget and the survival of the fragile glass shell exposed to launch accelerations, thanks to an electrostatic locking mechanism; such achievements pushes the technology readiness level toward 5. With this prototype, the LATT project explored the feasibility of using an active and lightweight primary for space telescopes. The concept is attractive for large segmented telescopes, with surface active control to shape and co-phase them once in flight. In this paper we will describe the findings of the technological advances and the results of the environmental and optical tests.

  11. GESE: A Small UV Space Telescope to Conduct a Large Spectroscopic Survey of Z-1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Gong, Qian; Hull, Tony; Kruk, Jeffrey; Purves, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    One of the key goals of NASA's astrophysics program is to answer the question: How did galaxies evolve into the spirals and elliptical galaxies that we see today? We describe a space mission concept called Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) to address this question by making a large spectroscopic survey of galaxies at a redshift, z is approximately 1 (look-back time of approximately 8 billion years). GESE is a 1.5-meter space telescope with an ultraviolet (UV) multi-object slit spectrograph that can obtain spectra of hundreds of galaxies per exposure. The spectrograph covers the spectral range, 0.2-0.4 micrometers at a spectral resolving power, R approximately 500. This observed spectral range corresponds to 0.1-0.2 micrometers as emitted by a galaxy at a redshift, z=1. The mission concept takes advantage of two new technological advances: (1) light-weighted, wide-field telescope mirrors, and (2) the Next- Generation MicroShutter Array (NG-MSA) to be used as a slit generator in the multi-object slit spectrograph.

  12. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part II: resummation and redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2014-02-01

    We generalize the recently derived single-field consistency relations of Large Scale Structure in two directions. First, we treat the effect of the long modes (with momentum q) on the short ones (with momentum k) non-perturbatively, by writing resummed consistency relations which do not require k/q⋅δ{sub q} << 1. These relations do not make any assumptions on the short-scales physics and are extended to include (an arbitrary number of) multiple long modes, internal lines with soft momenta and soft loops. We do several checks of these relations in perturbation theory and we verify that the effect of soft modes always cancels out in equal-time correlators. Second, we write the relations directly in redshift space, without assuming the single-stream approximation: not only the long mode affects the short scales as a homogeneous gravitational field, but it also displaces them by its velocity along the line-of-sight. Redshift space consistency relations still vanish when short modes are taken at equal time: an observation of a signal in the squeezed limit would point towards multifield inflation or a violation of the equivalence principle.

  13. Real time identification of large space structures. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, Janice E.

    1987-01-01

    Identification of frequencies, damping ratios, and mode shapes of large space structures (LSSs) are examined in real time. Real time processing allows for quick updates of model processing after a reconfiguration of structural failure. Recursive lattice least squares (RLLS) was selected as the baseline algorithm for the identification. Simulation results on a one dimensional LSS demonstrated that it provides good estimates, was not ill-conditioned in the presence of under-excited modes, allowed activity by a supervisory control system which prevented damage to the LSS or excessive drift, and was capable of real-time processing for typical LSS models. A suboptimal version of RLLS, which is equivalent to simulated parallel processing, was derived. A NASTRAN model of the dual keel U.S. space station was used to demonstrate the input/identification algorithm package in a more realistic simulation. Because the first eight flexible modes were very close together, the identification was much more difficult than in the simple examples. Even so, the model was accurately identified in real time.

  14. Isn't the space-charge potential in ceria-based solid electrolytes largely overestimated?

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtae

    2016-07-20

    The effective ionic conductivity of polycrystalline solid electrolytes that conduct oxide ions or protons is known to be markedly below those of the corresponding single crystals due to substantial current obstruction across the grain boundary. Numerous studies have previously demonstrated that the ionic charge carriers deplete in the vicinity of the grain boundary to form a potential barrier at the grain boundary, which further impedes the current across the grain boundary. Hence an accurate estimation of the barrier height is essential to acquire a comprehensive and precise mechanistic picture of the ionic current in solid electrolytes. The values of the potential barrier height, i.e. equivalent to the equilibrium space-charge potential with the opposite sign, in prominent solid electrolytes such as ceria solid solutions are available in the literature and were determined exclusively from the ratio of the resistivity of the grain boundary to that of the crystal interior. Here I present the results clearly demonstrating that the resistivity ratio yields considerable overestimation of the barrier height even in relatively diluted solid solutions of ceria. These results imply that the space charge is unlikely the sole origin of the large current obstruction across the grain boundary in ceria-based solid electrolytes.

  15. Status of Technology Development to enable Large Stable UVOIR Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; MSFC AMTD Team

    2017-01-01

    NASA MSFC has two funded Strategic Astrophysics Technology projects to develop technology for potential future large missions: AMTD and PTC. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is developing technology to make mechanically stable mirrors for a 4-meter or larger UVOIR space telescope. AMTD is demonstrating this technology by making a 1.5 meter diameter x 200 mm thick ULE(C) mirror that is 1/3rd scale of a full size 4-m mirror. AMTD is characterizing the mechanical and thermal performance of this mirror and of a 1.2-meter Zerodur(R) mirror to validate integrate modeling tools. Additionally, AMTD has developed integrated modeling tools which are being used to evaluate primary mirror systems for a potential Habitable Exoplanet Mission and analyzed the interaction between optical telescope wavefront stability and coronagraph contrast leakage. Predictive Thermal Control (PTC) project is developing technology to enable high stability thermal wavefront performance by using integrated modeling tools to predict and actively control the thermal environment of a 4-m or larger UVOIR space telescope.

  16. Observing the Moon at Microwave Frequencies Using a Large-Diameter Deep Space Network Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.; Imbriale, William; Keihm, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will result in an increase in system operating noise temperature, which needs to be accounted for in RF telecommunications, radio science or radiometric link calculations. The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) may use its large-diameter antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature incre ase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular position of the antenna beam on the lunar disk. This paper reports on a comprehensive lunar noise temperature measurement campaign and associated theoretical treatment for a 34-m diameter Deep Space Network antenna observing an extended source such as the Moon. A set of measurements over a wide range of lunar phase angles was acquired at DSS-13, a 34-m diameter beam waveguide antenna (BWG) located at Goldstone, California at 2.3 GHz (S-band), 8.4 GHz (X-band) and 32 GHz (Ka-band). For validation purposes, independent predictions of noise temperature increase were derived using a physical optics characterization of the 34-m diameter antenna gain patterns and Apollo model-based brightness temperature maps of the Moon as input. The model-based predictions of noise temperature increase were compared with the measurements at all three frequencies. In addition, a methodology is presented that relates noise temperature increase due to the Moon to disk-centered or disk-averaged brightness temperature of the Moon at the microwave frequencies of interest. Comparisons were made between the measurements and models in the domain of lunar disk-centered and disk-averaged brightness temperatures. It is anticipated that the measurements and associated theoretical development will be useful in developing telecommunications strategies for future high-rate Ka-band communications where large

  17. Topology optimization-based lightweight primary mirror design of a large-aperture space telescope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shutian; Hu, Rui; Li, Quhao; Zhou, Ping; Dong, Zhigang; Kang, Renke

    2014-12-10

    For the large-aperture space telescope, the lightweight primary mirror design with a high-quality optical surface is a critical and challenging issue. This work presents a topology optimization-based design procedure for a lightweight primary mirror and a new mirror configuration of a large-aperture space telescope is obtained through the presented design procedure. Inspired by the topology optimization method considering cast constraints, an optimization model for the configuration design of the mirror back is proposed, through which the distribution and the heights of the stiffeners on the mirror back can be optimized simultaneously. For the purpose of minimizing the optical surface deviation due to self-weight and polishing pressure loadings, the objective function is selected as to maximize the mirror structural stiffness, which can be achieved by minimizing the structural compliance. The total mass of the primary mirror is assigned as the constraint. In the application example, results of the optimized design topology for two kinds of mass constraints are presented. Executing the design procedure for specific requirements and postprocessing the topology obtained of the structure, a new mirror configuration with tree-like stiffeners and a multiple-arch back in double directions is proposed. A verification model is constructed to evaluate the design results and the finite element method is used to calculate the displacement of the mirror surface. Then the RMS deviation can be obtained after fitting the deformed surface by Zernike polynomials. The proposed mirror is compared with two classical mirrors in the optical performance, and the comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the new mirror configuration.

  18. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.; Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Anderson, B. Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bartelt, J.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bederede, D.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bisello, D.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R.D.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view (FoV), high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT was built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. This paper describes the LAT, its preflight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4 x 4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 (x, y) tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an eight-layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths, giving both longitudinal and transverse information about the energy deposition pattern. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large FoV (2.4 sr) and ensuring that most pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (1) permit rapid notification of high-energy {gamma}-ray bursts and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (2) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (3) measure

  19. Concepted design of a surface measurement system for large deployable space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The sensor system is in essence a point design, specifically interfacing with the Harris, Inc., 1000 meter deployable mesh communication antenna. The design can, without large modification, be adapted to other large deployable antennas such as the Lockheed Wrap-rib, the General Dynamics Precision Erectable Truss and the TRW Advanced Sunflower antennas. Measurements are optical displacements. The elements of the system are a central cluster of receivers near the apex of the antenna and active bright targets at the antenna. The cluster defines a single coordinate frame from which all surface positions are referenced. The receivers continuously observe an extended array of sample points located throughout the reflecting surface and its supporting structure. For the Harris antenna, the surface samples are at the mesh gore lines and at the supporting hoop. Output data is in real-time, compatible with on-board processing and active control of antenna figure. Lifetime of the system is at least 10 years continuous operation in space.

  20. R×B drift momentum spectrometer with high resolution and large phase space acceptance.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Konrad, G; Abele, H

    2013-02-11

    We propose a new type of momentum spectrometer, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse the charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, and measures the particles with large phase space acceptance and high resolution. This kind of R×B spectrometer is designed for the momentum analyses of the decay electrons and protons in the PERC (Proton and Electron Radiation Channel) beam station, which provides a strong magnetic field to guide the charged particles in the instrument. Instead of eliminating the guiding field, the R×B spectrometer evolves the field gradually to the analysing field, and the charged particles can be adiabatically transported during the dispersion and detection. The drifts of the particles have similar properties as their dispersion in the normal magnetic spectrometer. Besides, the R×B spectrometer is especially ideal for the measurements of particles with low momenta and large incident angles. We present a design of the R×B spectrometer, which can be used in PERC. For the particles with solid angle smaller than 88 msr, the maximum aberration is below 10(-4). The resolution of the momentum spectra can reach 14.4 keV/c, if the particle position measurements have a resolution of 1 mm.

  1. Requirements for a mobile communications satellite system. Volume 3: Large space structures measurements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akle, W.

    1983-01-01

    This study report defines a set of tests and measurements required to characterize the performance of a Large Space System (LSS), and to scale this data to other LSS satellites. Requirements from the Mobile Communication Satellite (MSAT) configurations derived in the parent study were used. MSAT utilizes a large, mesh deployable antenna, and encompasses a significant range of LSS technology issues in the areas of structural/dynamics, control, and performance predictability. In this study, performance requirements were developed for the antenna. Special emphasis was placed on antenna surface accuracy, and pointing stability. Instrumentation and measurement systems, applicable to LSS, were selected from existing or on-going technology developments. Laser ranging and angulation systems, presently in breadboard status, form the backbone of the measurements. Following this, a set of ground, STS, and GEO-operational were investigated. A third scale (15 meter) antenna system as selected for ground characterization followed by STS flight technology development. This selection ensures analytical scaling from ground-to-orbit, and size scaling. Other benefits are cost and ability to perform reasonable ground tests. Detail costing of the various tests and measurement systems were derived and are included in the report.

  2. A parameter database for large scientific projects: application to the Gaia space astrometry mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perryman, Michael; de Bruijne, Jos; Lammers, Uwe

    2008-10-01

    The parallel development of many aspects of a complex space science mission like Gaia, which includes numerous participants in ESA, industrial companies, and a large and active scientific collaboration throughout Europe, makes keeping track of the many design changes, instrument and operational parameters, and numerical values for the data analysis and simulations, a challenging but crucially important problem. A comprehensive, easily-accessible, up-to-date, and definitive compilation of a large range of numerical quantities is required, and the Gaia parameter database has been established to satisfy these needs. The database is a centralised repository containing, besides mathematical, physical, and astronomical constants, many satellite and subsystem design parameters. Version control provides both a ‘live’ version with the most recent parameters, as well as previous ‘reference’ versions of the full database contents. Query results are formatted by default in HTML, while an important feature is that data can also be retrieved as Java, ANSI-C, C++, Ruby, or XML structures for direct inclusion into software codes, such that all collaborating scientists can use the retrieved database parameters and values directly linked to computational routines.

  3. Time-space Kriging to address the spatiotemporal misalignment in the large datasets.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Kumar, Naresh

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a Bayesian hierarchical spatiotemporal method of interpolation, termed as Markov Cube Kriging (MCK). The classical Kriging methods become computationally prohibitive, especially for large datasets due to the O(n(3)) matrix decomposition. MCK offers novel and computationally efficient solutions to address spatiotemporal misalignment, mismatch in the spatiotemporal scales and missing values across space and time in large spatiotemporal datasets. MCK is flexible in that it allows for non-separable spatiotemporal structure and nonstationary covariance at the hierarchical spatiotemporal scales. Employing MCK we developed estimates of daily concentration of fine particulates matter ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) at 2.5 km spatial grid for the Cleveland Metropolitan Statistical Area, 2000 to 2009. Our validation and cross-validation suggest that MCK achieved robust prediction of spatiotemporal random effects and underlying hierarchical and nonstationary spatiotemporal structure in air pollution data. MCK has important implications for environmental epidemiology and environmental sciences for exposure quantification and collocation of data from different sources, available at different spatiotemporal scales.

  4. Time-space Kriging to address the spatiotemporal misalignment in the large datasets

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dong; Kumar, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a Bayesian hierarchical spatiotemporal method of interpolation, termed as Markov Cube Kriging (MCK). The classical Kriging methods become computationally prohibitive, especially for large datasets due to the O(n3) matrix decomposition. MCK offers novel and computationally efficient solutions to address spatiotemporal misalignment, mismatch in the spatiotemporal scales and missing values across space and time in large spatiotemporal datasets. MCK is flexible in that it allows for non-separable spatiotemporal structure and nonstationary covariance at the hierarchical spatiotemporal scales. Employing MCK we developed estimates of daily concentration of fine particulates matter ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) at 2.5 km spatial grid for the Cleveland Metropolitan Statistical Area, 2000 to 2009. Our validation and cross-validation suggest that MCK achieved robust prediction of spatiotemporal random effects and underlying hierarchical and nonstationary spatiotemporal structure in air pollution data. MCK has important implications for environmental epidemiology and environmental sciences for exposure quantification and collocation of data from different sources, available at different spatiotemporal scales. PMID:24039539

  5. Concepted design of a surface measurement system for large deployable space antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1982-03-01

    The sensor system is in essence a point design, specifically interfacing with the Harris, Inc., 1000 meter deployable mesh communication antenna. The design can, without large modification, be adapted to other large deployable antennas such as the Lockheed Wrap-rib, the General Dynamics Precision Erectable Truss and the TRW Advanced Sunflower antennas. Measurements are optical displacements. The elements of the system are a central cluster of receivers near the apex of the antenna and active bright targets at the antenna. The cluster defines a single coordinate frame from which all surface positions are referenced. The receivers continuously observe an extended array of sample points located throughout the reflecting surface and its supporting structure. For the Harris antenna, the surface samples are at the mesh gore lines and at the supporting hoop. Output data is in real-time, compatible with on-board processing and active control of antenna figure. Lifetime of the system is at least 10 years continuous operation in space.

  6. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Key Technologies and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew Ryan; Stahle, Carl M.; Balasubramaniam, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.; Mosier, Gary E.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David C.; Rioux, Norman M.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Stahl, H. Philip; Thronson, Harley A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 20 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  7. The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, Carl; Balasubramanian, K.; Bolcar, M.; Clampin, M.; Feinberg, L.; Hartman, K.; Mosier, C.; Quijada, M.; Rauscher, B.; Redding, D.; Shaklan, S.; Stahl, P.; Thronson, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 40 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  8. Real-time holographic compensation of large optics for deployment in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthals, Dennis M.; Sox, Daniel; Joswick, Michael D.; Rodney, Paul J.

    2000-11-01

    Large deployable space-based optical systems will likely require complex structure position controls in conjunction with an adaptive optic to maintain optical tolerances necessary for near diffraction-limited performance. A real- time holographic (RTH) compensation system can greatly reduce the requirements and complexity of the position control system and enable the use of novel or imperfect optical components for large mirror surfaces. A hologram of the distorted primary is recorded with a local beacon at 532 nm (approximately 100 nJ/exposure) on an optically addressed spatial light modulator and transferred as a phase grating to a ferroelectric liquid crystal layer. The hologram is played back with target light containing the same optical distortion. A corrected image is obtained in the conjugate diffracted order where the phase of the optical distortion is subtracted from the distorted image. We report recent test results and analysis of a RTH- compensated deformed mirror of 0.75 m diameter. The short exposure hologram is recorded at video frequencies (30 Hz) at bandwidths up to 5 kHz. Correction for tens of waves of static and dynamic optical distortions including mechanical and thermal warp, mechanical vibration, and air turbulence are shown for monochromatic (532 nm) and broadband (532 +/- 40 nm) illuminated targets. We also report on the generation of blazed gratings in electrically addressed spatial light modulators to achieve greatly enhanced diffraction efficiencies and to perform beam steering.

  9. Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Flight Engineering Model: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Godfrey, G.; Williams, S. M.; Grove, J. E.; Mizuno, T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Kamae, T.; Ampe, J.; Briber, Stuart; Dann, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-production high-energy (greater than 20 MeV) gamma-ray telescope being built by an international partnership of astrophysicists and particle physicists for a satellite launch in 2006, designed to study a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. As part of the development effort, the collaboration has built a Balloon Flight Engineering Model (BFEM) for flight on a high-altitude scientific balloon. The BFEM is approximately the size of one of the 16 GLAST-LAT towers and contains all the components of the full instrument: plastic scintillator anticoincidence system (ACD), high-Z foil/Si strip pair-conversion tracker (TKR), CsI hodoscopic calorimeter (CAL), triggering and data acquisition electronics (DAQ), commanding system, power distribution, telemetry, real-time data display, and ground data processing system. The principal goal of the balloon flight was to demonstrate the performance of this instrument configuration under conditions similar to those expected in orbit. Results from a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, on August 4, 2001, show that the BFEM successfully obtained gamma-ray data in this high-background environment.

  10. Large Space Telescopes Using Fresnel Lens for Power Beaming, Astronomy and Sail Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J T

    2002-10-15

    The concept of using Fresnel optics as part of power beaming, astronomy or sail systems has been suggested by several authors. The primary issues for large Fresnel optics are the difficulties in fabricating these structures and deploying them in space and for astronomy missions the extremely narrow frequency range of these optics. In proposals where the telescope is used to transmit narrow frequency laser power, the narrow bandwidth has not been an issue. In applications where the optic is to be used as part of a telescope, only around 10{sup -5} to limited frequency response of a Fresnel optic is addressed by the use of a corrective optic that will broaden the frequency response of the telescope by three or four orders of magnitude. This broadening will dramatically increase the optical power capabilities of the system and will allow some spectroscopy studies over a limited range. Both the fabrication of Fresnel optics as large as five meters and the use of corrector optics for telescopes have been demonstrated at LLNL. For solar and laser sail missions the use of Fresnel amplitude zone plates made of very thin sail material is also discussed.

  11. What limits the achievable areal densities of large aperture space telescopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Lee D.; Hinkle, Jason D.

    2005-08-01

    This paper examines requirements trades involving areal density for large space telescope mirrors. A segmented mirror architecture is used to define a quantitative example that leads to relevant insight about the trades. In this architecture, the mirror consists of segments of non-structural optical elements held in place by a structural truss that rests behind the segments. An analysis is presented of the driving design requirements for typical on-orbit loads and ground-test loads. It is shown that the driving on-orbit load would be the resonance of the lowest mode of the mirror by a reaction wheel static unbalance. The driving ground-test load would be dynamics due to ground-induced random vibration. Two general conclusions are derived from these results. First, the areal density that can be allocated to the segments depends on the depth allocated to the structure. More depth in the structure allows the allocation of more mass to the segments. This, however, leads to large structural depth that might be a significant development challenge. Second, the requirement for ground-test-ability results in an order of magnitude or more depth in the structure than is required by the on-orbit loads. This leads to the proposition that avoiding ground test as a driving requirement should be a fundamental technology on par with the provision of deployable depth. Both are important structural challenges for these future systems.

  12. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Analysis of space station requirements for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Vinkey, Victor F.; Runge, Fritz C.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) might benefit from the use of the space station for assembly, checkout, deployment, servicing, refurbishment, and technology development. Requirements that must be met by the space station to supply benefits for a selected scenario are summarized. Quantitative and qualitative data are supplied. Space station requirements for LDR which may be utilized by other missions are identified. A technology development mission for LDR is outlined and requirements summarized. A preliminary experiment plan is included. Space Station Data Base SAA 0020 and TDM 2411 are updated.

  13. A Large Aperture Lidar Observatory for Exploring the Interaction of Our Atmosphere with Space (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, J. P.; Gardner, C. S.; Swenson, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The mesopause region has been the subject of intensive study during the past decade because it is recognized as a critical region connecting our sensible atmosphere to the near-space environment. Processes in this region include a host of wave dynamics, heat and constituent transport, turbulence, polar mesospheric cloud formation, and the influx of meteoric material. Moreover, the neutral gas properties above the mesopause from 100 - 200 km altitude are poorly characterized and are influenced by additional processes that include solar EUV absorption / ionization, eddy to molecular diffusion, neutral wind dynamo action, and geomagnetic activity. Thus, this altitude region is a complex confluence of space and atmosphere processes that ultimately determine its properties. Fundamentally these processes are operating in any planetary atmosphere and must be understood in order to advance understanding of habitability and sustainability of a planetary system. While observational and modeling capabilities are evolving, progress in characterizing neutral properties and related processes in the mesopause region and above has been inhibited because they cannot be observed in sufficient detail and at high enough altitudes with existing instrumentation. This is especially true of the neutral atmosphere from 50 - 1000 km, where observations of its properties, dynamics and thermal structure are either sparse or nonexistent. A Large-Aperture Lidar Observatory (LALO) would enable significant progress by providing critical measurements of atmospheric constituents and parameters at greatly enhanced resolution and at much higher altitudes than is possible today. A large telescope in combination with modern high-power lasers, would enable observations of the neutral atmosphere to 1000 km altitude with a sensitivity and resolution approximately 1000 times better than can be achieved with the most powerful lidar systems in operation today. There are no technology barriers to realizing

  14. Flight Qualification And Production Results With Large Area Space Solar Cells And Panel Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Hanley, James; Jun, Bogim; Bardfield, Rina; Stone, Beth

    2011-10-01

    Spectrolab's product roadmap provides improvement in product performance in parallel with continuous cost reduction to maintain competitive standing in our industry. Product performance improvement is achieved by developing higher efficiency solar cells (e.g. 29.5% XTJ and 33% IMM cells).Reduced product cost is achieved historically through a variety of means including yield improvements, direct material cost reductions, process changes, and most recently, a transition to large area cell configurations (e.g. "LEONE" at 59.65 cm2). Spectrolab has successfully completed the qualification of its latest triple junction space solar cell, the 29.5% 2 XTJ (26.62 cm ), per AIAA-S-111-2005 - augmented by additional Spectrolab testing. Large area LEONE UTJ and XTJ cells (59.65 cm2 from 100 mm diameter germanium wafer) have also been qualified. Use of these large area cells has resulted in the reduction of solar panel cost, add-on mass and manufacturing cycle time for programs. This evolution to larger area cells is the result of a strategic cost reduction effort initiated in 2006; the first step of which was to manufacture the largest possible cells (LEONE) using the 100 mm germanium (Ge) wafer. In flight production since 2007, the LEONE UTJ cell has now completed rigorous qualification testing to 15,549 GEO (Geosynchronous orbit) and 66,060 LEO (Low Earth Orbit) thermal cycles. Over 53,000 LEONE UTJ cells, including more than 27,000 cells on panels delivered to flight programs, have been produced to date. The on-orbit performance of the LEONE UTJ cells is nominal. Finally, progress on the second step of our strategic cost reduction effort towards larger cells and less piece part handling is presented. This effort involves the establishment of a 150 mm Ge -based manufacturing infrastructure.

  15. New Sofradir VISIR-SWIR large format detector for next generation space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieque, Bruno; Jamin, Nicolas; Chorier, Philippe; Pidancier, Patricia; Baud, Laurent; Terrier, Bertrand

    2012-09-01

    For now more than 10 years, Sofradir is involved in SWIR detector manufacturing, developing and improving its SWIR detectors technology, leading to a mature technology that enables to address most of missions needs in term of performances, but also with respect to hard environmental constraints. SWIR detection range at Sofradir has been qualified for space applications thanks to various programs already run (APEX or Bepi-Colombo programs) or currently running (Sentinel 2, PRISMA mission). Recently, for PRISMA mission, Sofradir is extending its Visible-Near infra-red technology, called VISIR, to 1000x256 hyperspectral arrays. This technology has the huge advantage to enable detection in both visible range and SWIR detection range (0.4μm up to 2.5μm). As part of the development of large format infrared detectors, Sofradir has developed Jupiter 1280x1024, 15μm pixel pitch detector in mid 2000s and this detector is available at production level since the end of year 2000s. Based on the experiences acquired in SWIR and VISIR technologies as well as in the development of large format infrared detectors, since 2011, in the frame of an ESA program (named Next Generation Panchromatic detector), Sofradir is developing a new VISIR 1kx1k detector. This new detector has a format of 1024x1024 pixels with a 15 μm pixel pitch and it is adapted to spectral range from UV to SWIR domain. This development contains mainly two challenges: - the extension of the detector sensitivity down to UV spectral range - the development of a large format Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) with 15μm pixel pitch adapted to VISIR and SWIR spectral range involving in particular low input fluxes. In this paper, we will describe the architecture and functionalities of this new detector. The expected performances will be presented as well. Finally, main applications of this kind of detectors and expected spatial missions will be presented.

  16. A self pulsed laser ranging system under development at 'JPL'. [for onboard measurement of large space deployable reflector surface distortions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, M.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of large space deployable antenna reflectors to be used for broad-based communications systems is largely dependent on the accuracy with which the surface figure can be constructed and maintained. The paper examines various surface distortion tolerance and measurement requirements for various classes of communication antennas. Several surface measuring methods are described including a self-pulsed laser ranging system.

  17. Thermal Influence of a Large Green Space on a Hot Urban Environment.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Shogo; Takahashi, Hideo; Hagiwara, Shinsuke; Narita, Ken-Ichi; Mikami, Takehiko; Hirano, Tatsuki

    2016-01-01

    City-scale warming is becoming a serious problem in terms of human health. Urban green spaces are expected to act as a countermeasure for urban warming, and therefore better understanding of the micro-climate benefits of urban green is needed. This study quantified the thermal influence of a large green park in Tokyo, Japan on the surrounding urban area by collecting long-term measurements. Apparent variations in the temperature difference between the park and surrounding town were found at both the diurnal and seasonal scales. Advection by regional-scale wind and turbulent mixing transfers colder air from the park to urban areas in its vicinity. The extent of the park's thermal influence on the town was greater on the downwind side of the park (450 m) than on the upwind side (65 m). The extent was also greater in an area where the terrain slopes down toward the town. Even on calm nights, the extent of the thermal influence extended by the park breeze to an average of 200 m from the park boundary. The park breeze was characterized by its divergent flow in a horizontal plane, which was found to develop well in calm conditions late at night (regional scale wind <1.5 m s and after 02:00 LST). The average magnitude of the cooling effect of the park breeze was estimated at 39 Wm. This green space tempered the hot summer nights on a city block scale. These findings can help urban planners in designing a heat-adapted city.

  18. Identifying Space Use at Foraging Arena Scale within the Home Ranges of Large Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Owen-Smith, Norman; Martin, Jodie

    2015-01-01

    An intermediate spatiotemporal scale of food procurement by large herbivores is evident within annual or seasonal home ranges. It takes the form of settlement periods spanning several days or weeks during which foraging activity is confined to spatially discrete foraging arenas, separated by roaming interludes. Extended by areas occupied for other activities, these foraging arenas contribute towards generating the home range structure. We delineated and compared the foraging arenas exploited by two African large herbivores, sable antelope (a ruminant) and plains zebra (a non-ruminant), using GPS-derived movement data. We developed a novel approach to specifically delineate foraging arenas based on local change points in distance relative to adjoining clusters of locations, and compared its output with modifications of two published methods developed for home range estimation and residence time estimation respectively. We compared how these herbivore species responded to seasonal variation in food resources and how they differed in their spatial patterns of resource utilization. Sable antelope herds tended to concentrate their space use locally, while zebra herds moved more opportunistically over a wider set of foraging arenas. The amalgamated extent of the foraging arenas exploited by sable herds amounted to 12-30 km2, compared with 22-100 km2 for the zebra herds. Half-day displacement distances differed between settlement periods and roaming interludes, and zebra herds generally shifted further over 12h than sable herds. Foraging arenas of sable herds tended to be smaller than those of zebra, and were occupied for period twice as long, and hence exploited more intensively in days spent per unit area than the foraging arenas of zebra. For sable both the intensity of utilization of foraging arenas and proportion of days spent in foraging arenas relative to roaming interludes declined as food resources diminished seasonally, while zebra showed no seasonal variation

  19. Identifying Space Use at Foraging Arena Scale within the Home Ranges of Large Herbivores.

    PubMed

    Owen-Smith, Norman; Martin, Jodie

    2015-01-01

    An intermediate spatiotemporal scale of food procurement by large herbivores is evident within annual or seasonal home ranges. It takes the form of settlement periods spanning several days or weeks during which foraging activity is confined to spatially discrete foraging arenas, separated by roaming interludes. Extended by areas occupied for other activities, these foraging arenas contribute towards generating the home range structure. We delineated and compared the foraging arenas exploited by two African large herbivores, sable antelope (a ruminant) and plains zebra (a non-ruminant), using GPS-derived movement data. We developed a novel approach to specifically delineate foraging arenas based on local change points in distance relative to adjoining clusters of locations, and compared its output with modifications of two published methods developed for home range estimation and residence time estimation respectively. We compared how these herbivore species responded to seasonal variation in food resources and how they differed in their spatial patterns of resource utilization. Sable antelope herds tended to concentrate their space use locally, while zebra herds moved more opportunistically over a wider set of foraging arenas. The amalgamated extent of the foraging arenas exploited by sable herds amounted to 12-30 km2, compared with 22-100 km2 for the zebra herds. Half-day displacement distances differed between settlement periods and roaming interludes, and zebra herds generally shifted further over 12h than sable herds. Foraging arenas of sable herds tended to be smaller than those of zebra, and were occupied for period twice as long, and hence exploited more intensively in days spent per unit area than the foraging arenas of zebra. For sable both the intensity of utilization of foraging arenas and proportion of days spent in foraging arenas relative to roaming interludes declined as food resources diminished seasonally, while zebra showed no seasonal variation

  20. Optimization of large area solar cells for low cost space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthei, K. W.; Zemmrich, D. K.; Webb, M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of large-area solar cell manufacturing techniques for production of up to 10 kW/month of cells for use on the Shuttle Power Extension Package is detailed. Design goals for the cells were 14% efficiency at 135.3 mW/sq cm AM0 illumination for a 10 ohm-cm BSF/reflector cell, or 12.8% for a 2 ohm-cm BSR cell. Use of terrestrial cell technology to produce CVD SiO2 dielectric insulators for 3-in. ingot cells yielded satisfactory contact integrity. Fused silica coverings with thicknesses of 0.004 in. have allowed exploration of conventional and wraparound cell configurations due to inherent flexibilities of the frosted covers. One production run can now handle 108 3-in. wafers for the wraparound form or 216 in one-sided contact evaporations, with both processes taking 70 mins. Current contact grid designs for space use production permits average efficiencies of 12.8%.

  1. Passive damping augmentation of flexible beam-like lattice trusses for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, K.; Weller, T.

    1992-01-01

    A Timoshenko beam continuum model is developed to determine the transient response of a beam-like latticed large space structure, subjected to a unit impulse. It is demonstrated that an increase in diagonal stiffness, on account of the stiffness of the vertical girder, leads to a rise in the transverse shear rigidity. This results in higher natural frequencies and reduction in peak displacement. In addition, in an asymmetrical truss configuration, coupling between the extensional and shear modes raises the maximum peak displacement compared with that obtained for a symmetrical truss. The model is modified to investigate the introduction of passive damping in the form of several dynamic vibration absorbers. A unique absorber parameter optimization procedure, based on the classical steady-state criteria, is used to tune the absorbers, having a total allocated mass budget of 10%, to the first two frequencies of the latticed structure. It is found that inclusion of transverse shear rigidity as a design parameter in damping augmentation studies reduces settling time for predetermined maximum peak displacements.

  2. STAMP: A New Data Acquisition System For ESA's Large Space Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guijt, H.; Popovitch, A.

    2004-08-01

    STAMP is an advanced data acquisition, analysis and presentation system for thermal testing. To meet the increasingly complex requirements for modern spacecraft testing, STAMP was designed to be a flexible system that supports thousands of sensors and hundreds of power supplies. A high-performance, feature-rich presentation system is used to manipulate and present the acquired data in real time. The system runs on cheap computer hardware and supports multiple users. STAMP is currently used with the Large Space Simulator at ESTEC (see Fig. 1) and several other test facilities. Key features are: powerful data presentation capabilities, including various table formats and graphs, alarm generation, equilibrium detection, and output to Excel; extensive formula system to manipulate acquired data; able to acquire data from many thousands of sensors of virtually any type, including thermocouples, thermistors, and digital lines; able to control hundreds of power supplies; able to interface with customer EGSE and spacecraft hardware; high degree of flexibility with respect to thermal test configuration.

  3. Solution of the flyby problem for large space debris at sun-synchronous orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.; Grishko, D. A.; Medvedevskikh, V. V.; Lapshin, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    the paper considers the flyby problem related to large space debris (LSD) objects at low earth orbits. The data on the overall dimensions of known last and upper stages of launch vehicles makes it possible to single out five compact groups of such objects from the NORAD catalog in the 500-2000 km altitude interval. The orbits of objects of each group have approximately the same inclinations. The features of the mutual distribution of the orbital planes of LSD objects in the group are shown in a portrait of the evolution of deviations of the right ascension of ascending nodes (RAAN). In the case of the first three groups (inclinations of 71°, 74°, and 81°), the straight lines of relative RAAN deviations of object orbits barely intersect each other. The fourth (83°) and fifth (97°-100°) LSD groups include a considerable number of objects whose orbits are described by straight lines (diagonals), which intersect other lines many times. The use of diagonals makes it possible to significantly reduce the temporal and total characteristic velocity expenditures required for object flybys, but it complicates determination of the flyby sequence. Diagonal solutions can be obtained using elements of graph theory. A solution to the flyby problem is presented for the case of group 5, formed of LSD objects at sun-synchronous orbits.

  4. A time and space correlated turbulence synthesis method for Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Hugo G.; Paz, Rodrigo R.

    2013-02-01

    In the present work the problem of generating synthesized turbulence at inflow boundaries of the simulation domain is addressed in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method. To represent adequately certain statistical properties of a turbulent process, we propose a synthesized turbulence method which is based on previous works (Huang et al., 2010; Smirnov et al., 2001) [15,28]. For this purpose, time and space correlations are introduced strictly in the mathematical formulation of the synthetic turbulence inflow data. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach inherits the properties of the methods on which it is based while presents some particular advantages as well. The strategy of imposing conditions on the inlet velocity field through turbulence synthesis is implemented in the parallel multiphysics code called PETSc-FEM (http://www.cimec.org.ar/petscfem) primarily targeted to calculations throughout finite elements on general unstructured 2D and 3D grids. We present several numerical tests in order to validate and evaluate the method describing the dynamic phenomena that take place in “real-life” problems, such as a swirling turbulent flow inside a diffuser and the airflow around a vehicle model inside a wind tunnel at high Reynolds number.

  5. A Very Large Area Network (VLAN) knowledge-base applied to space communication problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, Carol S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper first describes a hierarchical model for very large area networks (VLAN). Space communication problems whose solution could profit by the model are discussed and then an enhanced version of this model incorporating the knowledge needed for the missile detection-destruction problem is presented. A satellite network or VLAN is a network which includes at least one satellite. Due to the complexity, a compromise between fully centralized and fully distributed network management has been adopted. Network nodes are assigned to a physically localized group, called a partition. Partitions consist of groups of cell nodes with one cell node acting as the organizer or master, called the Group Master (GM). Coordinating the group masters is a Partition Master (PM). Knowledge is also distributed hierarchically existing in at least two nodes. Each satellite node has a back-up earth node. Knowledge must be distributed in such a way so as to minimize information loss when a node fails. Thus the model is hierarchical both physically and informationally.

  6. Structural Feasibility Analysis of a Robotically Assembled Very Large Aperture Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William Keats; Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilcox, Brian H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of robotically constructing a very large aperture optical space telescope on-orbit. Since the largest engineering challenges are likely to reside in the design and assembly of the 150-m diameter primary reflector, this preliminary study focuses on this component. The same technology developed for construction of the primary would then be readily used for the smaller optical structures (secondary, tertiary, etc.). A reasonable set of ground and on-orbit loading scenarios are compiled from the literature and used to define the structural performance requirements and size the primary reflector. A surface precision analysis shows that active adjustment of the primary structure is required in order to meet stringent optical surface requirements. Two potential actuation strategies are discussed along with potential actuation devices at the current state of the art. The finding of this research effort indicate that successful technology development combined with further analysis will likely enable such a telescope to be built in the future.

  7. Enabling Opportunities for Large Space Telescopes in the Era of the Exploration Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D. F.; Moe, R. V.; Derkowski, B. J.; Friedman, E. J.; Espero, T.; Lillie, C. F.

    2005-05-01

    We discuss enabling opportunities and implementation strategies for human and robotic servicing of a large space telescope operating at the Earth-Sun L2 location. The NASA SAFIR (Single Aperture Far Infrared) Vision Mission is used as a representative strawman case. Following earlier agency studies, we consider "gateway" operations at the Earth-Moon L1 location in a scenario that might involve a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). We assess requirements for that vehicle that would permit such servicing operations. We consider propulsion-economical observatory transfer between L1 and L2, the importance of subsystem modularity, strategies for contamination mitigation and on-orbit integration and test, and the functional relationship of humans and robots, including latency issues for telerobotics. Issues of safety and risk to observatory and personnel are reviewed. Options for in situ servicing at L2 are briefly considered. Opportunities are discussed in the context of value that such an L1 gateway might have to lunar surface efforts and other exploration goals. This work is supported by the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Space-charge limited transport in large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Mahvash, Farzaneh; Paradis, Etienne; Drouin, Dominique; Szkopek, Thomas; Siaj, Mohamed

    2015-04-08

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a wide-gap material that has attracted significant attention as an ideal dielectric substrate for 2D crystal heterostructures. We report here the first observation of in-plane charge transport in large-area monolayer hBN, grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quadratic scaling of current with voltage at high bias corresponds to a space-charge limited conduction mechanism, with a room-temperature mobility reaching up to 0.01 cm(2)/(V s) at electric fields up to 100 kV/cm in the absence of dielectric breakdown. The observation of in-plane charge transport highlights the semiconducting nature of monolayer hBN, and identifies hBN as a wide-gap 2D crystal capable of supporting charge transport at high field. Future exploration of charge transport in hBN is motivated by the fundamental study of UV optoelectronics and the massive Dirac fermion spectrum of hBN.

  9. Micro-precision control/structure interaction technology for large optical space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirlin, Samuel W.; Laskin, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The CSI program at JPL is chartered to develop the structures and control technology needed for sub-micron level stabilization of future optical space systems. The extreme dimensional stability required for such systems derives from the need to maintain the alignment and figure of critical optical elements to a small fraction (typically 1/20th to 1/50th) of the wavelength of detected radiation. The wavelength is about 0.5 micron for visible light and 0.1 micron for ultra-violet light. This lambda/50 requirement is common to a broad class of optical systems including filled aperture telescopes (with monolithic or segmented primary mirrors), sparse aperture telescopes, and optical interferometers. The challenge for CSI arises when such systems become large, with spatially distributed optical elements mounted on a lightweight, flexible structure. In order to better understand the requirements for micro-precision CSI technology, a representative future optical system was identified and developed as an analytical testbed for CSI concepts and approaches. An optical interferometer was selected as a stressing example of the relevant mission class. The system that emerged was termed the Focus Mission Interferometer (FMI). This paper will describe the multi-layer control architecture used to address the FMI's nanometer level stabilization requirements. In addition the paper will discuss on-going and planned experimental work aimed at demonstrating that multi-layer CSI can work in practice in the relevant performance regime.

  10. Study of auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    An insight into auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements for large space systems (LSS) launchable by a single shuttle is presented. In an effort to scope the APS requirements for LSS, a set of generic LSSs were defined. For each generic LSS class a specific structural configuration, representative of that most likely to serve the needs of the 1980's and 1990's was defined. The environmental disturbance forces and torques which would be acting on each specific structural configuration in LEO and GEO orbits were then determined. Auxiliary propulsion requirements were determined as a function of: generic class specific configuration, size and openness of structure, orbit, angle of orientation, correction frequency, duty cycle, number and location of thrusters and direction of thrusters and APS/LSS interactions. The results of this analysis were used to define the APS characteristics of: (1) number and distribution of thrusters, (2) thruster modulation, (3) thrust level, (4) mission energy requirements, (5) total APS mass component breakdown, and (6) state of the art adequacy/deficiency.

  11. A large-amplitude traveling ionospheric disturbance excited by the space shuttle during launch

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, S.T. )

    1990-11-01

    The ionosphere was monitored during the fourth space shuttle (STS 4) launch in June 1982 by the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar. A long-lived, large-amplitude, traveling ionospheric disturbance with dominant wave moles of {approximately} 15 and 75 min was observed shortly after the launch. The disturbance wave train is likely the product of a variety of wave modes. The disturbance front traveled with an average group speed of >628 m/s. Such speeds are typical of fast moving shock waves and ducted gravity waves. Either one or both could be responsible for the signatures observed near the leading edge of the STS 4 wave train. Later arriving waves, with their inherently lower propagation speeds, are attributed to additional gravity wave modes. These waves, however, were not explicitly identified in this study. Although atmospheric waves are excited along the entire flight path, the most intense region of excitation is located along a relatively short flight segment ({approximately}70 km) near the launch site where all primary thrusters are firing and over 70% of the propellants are expended. Not since the nuclear bomb tests of the late 1950s and early 1960s has an artificial source of atmospheric gravity waves been more available for upper atmospheric studies. The routine launching of high thrust vehicles provides an excellent opportunity to observe the propagation characteristics of atmospheric waves under controlled conditions and to acquire information on the nature of the upper atmosphere.

  12. Lessons from and methods for surveying large areas with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John W.; Momcheva, Ivelina

    2016-07-01

    Although the imagers on the Hubble Space Telescope only provide fields of view of a few square arc minutes, the telescope has been extensively used to conduct large surveys. These range from relatively shallow mappings in a single filter, multi-filter and multi-epoch surveys, and a series of increasingly deep exposures in several carefully selected fields. HST has also conducted extensive "parallel" surveys either coordinated with a prime instrument (typically using two cameras together) or as "pure" parallel observations to capture images of areas on the sky selected by another science programs (typically spectroscopic observations). Recently, we have tested an approach permitting much faster mapping with the WFC3/IR detector under GYRO pointing control and avoiding the overhead associated with multiple target observations. This results in a four to eight fold increase in mapping speed (at the expense of shallower exposures). This approach enables 250-300 second exposures (reaching H 25th magnitude) covering one square degree in 100 orbits.

  13. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures - 12, supplement 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, Peter M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Li, Feiyue; Xu, Jianke

    1989-01-01

    The rapid 2-D slewing and vibrational control of the unsymmetrical flexible SCOLE (Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment) with multi-bounded controls is considered. Pontryagin's Maximum Principle is applied to the nonlinear equations of the system to derive the necessary conditions for the optimal control. The resulting two point boundary value problem is then solved by using the quasilinearization technique, and the near minimum time is obtained by sequentially shortening the slewing time until the controls are near the bang-bang type. The tradeoff between the minimum time and the minimum flexible amplitude requirements is discussed. The numerical results show that the responses of the nonlinear system are significantly different from those of the linearized system for rapid slewing. The SCOLE station-keeping closed loop dynamics are re-examined by employing a slightly different method for developing the equations of motion in which higher order terms in the expressions for the mast modal shape functions are now included. A preliminary study on the effect of actuator mass on the closed loop dynamics of large space systems is conducted. A numerical example based on a coupled two-mass two-spring system illustrates the effect of changes caused in the mass and stiffness matrices on the closed loop system eigenvalues. In certain cases the need for redesigning control laws previously synthesized, but not accounting for actuator masses, is indicated.

  14. Study on spatial structure of large scale retail stores based on space syntax: case study in Wuhan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Qingming; Zhou, Jingnan; Sliuzas, Richard

    2009-10-01

    This research analyzes the spatial pattern of large-scale stores based on space syntax theory and explores the correlation between the variations in syntax accessibility and the spatial pattern of large-scale stores. This research develops a framework of spatial topology analysis based on the space syntax theory, which includes the following modifications: the trail to break the traditional long axial line network of space syntax and apply this partitioned network in the topological analysis; the trail to analyze the bus route network; By taking both the syntax accessibility of road and bus network into consideration, we produce the scopes of urban syntax centers of city level, local level and sub local level respectively. In the analysis of the retail distribution pattern, the city level, local level and sub local level urban retail centers are suggested respectively according to the spatial distributions of the quantity and scale of the retail stores. The spatial distribution pattern of each retail format is studied as spatial correlations between the retail locations and the urban space syntax centers based on a case study in Wuhan, China. The Space Syntax can be a useful tool to explain the allocation logic of urban retail space in large cities. We suggest to apply the partitioned transportation network instead of the traditional long axial line network.

  15. Large Plant Growth Chambers: Flying Soon on a Space Station near You!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Morrow, Robert C.; Levine, Howard G.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) now has platforms for conducting research on horticultural plant species, and those capabilities continue to grow. The Veggie vegetable production system will be deployed to the ISS in Spring of 2014 to act as an applied research platform with goals of studying food production in space, providing the crew with a source of fresh food, allowing behavioral health and plant microbiology experimentation, and being a source of recreation and enjoyment for the crew. Veggie was conceived, designed, and constructed by Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC, Madison, WI). Veggie is the largest plant growth chamber that NASA has flown to date, and is capable of growing a wide array of horticultural crops. It was designed for low energy usage, low launch mass and stowage volume, and minimal crew time requirements. The Veggie flight hardware consists of a light cap containing red (630 nanometers), blue, (455 nanometers) and green (530 nanometers) light emitting diodes. Interfacing with the light cap is an extendable bellows baseplate secured to the light cap via magnetic closures and stabilized with extensible flexible arms. The baseplate contains vents allowing air from the ISS cabin to be pulled through the plant growth area by a fan in the light cap. The baseplate holds a Veggie root mat reservoir that will supply water to plant pillows attached via elastic cords. Plant pillows are packages of growth media and seeds that will be sent to ISS dry and installed and hydrated on orbit. Pillows can be constructed in various sizes for different plant types. Watering will be via passive wicking from the root mat to the pillows. Science procedures will include photography or videography, plant thinning, pollination, harvesting, microbial sampling, water sampling, etcetera. Veggie is one of the ISS flight options currently available for research investigations on plants. The Plant Habitat (PH) is being designed and constructed through a NASA

  16. Digital holographic interferometry with CO2 lasers and diffuse illumination applied to large space reflector metrology [Invited].

    PubMed

    Georges, Marc P; Vandenrijt, Jean-François; Thizy, Cédric; Stockman, Yvan; Queeckers, Patrick; Dubois, Frank; Doyle, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    Digital holographic interferometry in the long-wave infrared domain has been developed by combining a CO(2) laser and a microbolometer array. The long wavelength allows large deformation measurements, which are of interest in the case of large space reflectors undergoing thermal changes when in orbit. We review holography at such wavelengths and present some specific aspects related to this spectral range on our measurements. For the design of our digital holographic interferometer, we studied the possibility of illuminating specular objects by a reflective diffuser. We discuss the development of the interferometer and the results obtained on a representative space reflector, first in the laboratory and then during vacuum cryogenic test.

  17. Utilization of lunar materials and expertise for large scale operations in space: Abstracts. [lunar bases and space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    The practicality of exploiting the moon, not only as a source of materials for large habitable structures at Lagrangian points, but also as a base for colonization is discussed in abstracts of papers presented at a special session on lunar utilization. Questions and answers which followed each presentation are included after the appropriate abstract. Author and subject indexes are provided.

  18. High-Precision Shape Control of In-Space Deployable Large Membrane/Thin-Shell Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This innovation has been developed to improve the resolutions of future spacebased active and passive microwave antennas for earth-science remote sensing missions by maintaining surface figure precisions of large membrane/thin-shell reflectors during orbiting. The intention is for these sensing instruments to be deployable at orbit altitudes one or two orders of magnitude higher than Low Earth Orbit (LEO), but still being able to acquire measurements at spatial resolution and sensitivity similar to those of LEO. Because active and passive microwave remote sensors are able to penetrate through clouds to acquire vertical profile measurements of geophysical parameters, it is desirable to elevate them to the higher orbits to obtain orbital geometries that offer large spatial coverage and more frequent observations. This capability is essential for monitoring and for detailed understanding of the life cycles of natural hazards, such as hurricanes, tropical storms, flash floods, and tsunamis. Major components of this high-precision antenna-surface-control system include a membrane/thin shell reflector, a metrology sensor, a controller, actuators, and corresponding power amplifier and signal conditioning electronics (see figure). Actuators are attached to the back of the reflector to produce contraction/ expansion forces to adjust the shape of the thin-material reflector. The wavefront-sensing metrology system continuously measures the surface figure of the reflector, converts the surface figure to digital data and feeds the data to the controller. The controller determines the control parameters and generates commands to the actuator system. The flexible, piezoelectric polymer actuators are thus activated, providing the control forces needed to correct any distortions that exist in the reflector surface. Piezoelectric polymer actuators are very thin and flexible. They can be implemented on the back of the membrane/thin-shell reflector without introducing significant

  19. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  20. Conceptual Design Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Tower Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Chad

    2002-07-18

    The main objective of this work was to develop a conceptual design and engineering prototype for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) tower structure. This thesis describes the conceptual design of a GLAST tower and the fabrication and testing of a prototype tower tray. The requirements were that the structure had to support GLAST's delicate silicon strip detector array through ground handling, launch and in orbit operations as well as provide for thermal and electrical pathways. From the desired function and the given launch vehicle for the spacecraft that carries the GLAST detector, an efficient structure was designed which met the requirements. This thesis developed in three stages: design, fabrication, and testing. During the first stage, a general set of specifications was used to develop the initial design, which was then analyzed and shown to meet or exceed the requirements. The second stage called for the fabrication of prototypes to prove manufacturability and gauge cost and time estimates for the total project. The last step called for testing the prototypes to show that they performed as the analysis had shown and prove that the design met the requirements. As a spacecraft engineering exercise, this project required formulating a solution based on engineering judgment, analyzing the solution using advanced engineering techniques, then proving the validity of the design and analysis by the manufacturing and testing of prototypes. The design described here met all the requirements set out by the needs of the experiment and operating concerns. This strawman design is not intended to be the complete or final design for the GLAST instrument structure, but instead examines some of the main challenges involved and demonstrates that there are solutions to them. The purpose of these tests was to prove that there are solutions to the basic mechanical, electrical and thermal problems presented with the GLAST project.

  1. Across space and time: social responses to large-scale biophysical systems.

    PubMed

    MacMynowski, Dena P

    2007-06-01

    The conceptual rubric of ecosystem management has been widely discussed and deliberated in conservation biology, environmental policy, and land/resource management. In this paper, I argue that two critical aspects of the ecosystem management concept require greater attention in policy and practice. First, although emphasis has been placed on the "space" of systems, the "time" -- or rates of change -- associated with biophysical and social systems has received much less consideration. Second, discussions of ecosystem management have often neglected the temporal disconnects between changes in biophysical systems and the response of social systems to management issues and challenges. The empirical basis of these points is a case study of the "Crown of the Continent Ecosystem," an international transboundary area of the Rocky Mountains that surrounds Glacier National Park (USA) and Waterton Lakes National Park (Canada). This project assessed the experiences and perspectives of 1) middle- and upper-level government managers responsible for interjurisdictional cooperation, and 2) environmental nongovernment organizations with an international focus. I identify and describe 10 key challenges to increasing the extent and intensity of transboundary cooperation in land/resource management policy and practice. These issues are discussed in terms of their political, institutional, cultural, information-based, and perceptual elements. Analytic techniques include a combination of environmental history, semistructured interviews with 48 actors, and text analysis in a systematic qualitative framework. The central conclusion of this work is that the rates of response of human social systems must be better integrated with the rates of ecological change. This challenge is equal to or greater than the well-recognized need to adapt the spatial scale of human institutions to large-scale ecosystem processes and transboundary wildlife.

  2. ATLAST-9.2: A Deployable Large Aperture UVOIR Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Feinberg, L.; Purves, L.; Hyde, T.; Thronson, H.; Townsend, J.; Postman, M.; Bolcar, M.; Budinoff, J.; Dean, B.; Clampin, N.; Ebbets, D.; Gong, Q.; Gull, T.; Howard, J.; Jones, A.; Lyon, R.; Pasquale, B.; Perrygo, C.; Smith, S.; Thompson, P.; Woodgate, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a study of a deployable version of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) that could be launched on an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). ATLAST is a concept for a next-generation UVOIR observatory to follow HST and JWST. The observatory retains significant heritage from JWST, thereby taking advantage of technologies and engineering already developed for that mission. At the same time, we have identified several design changes to the JWST architecture, some of which are required due to the demanding wavefront error requirements at visible wavelengths. The optical telescope assembly has a segmented 9.2-meter aperture and consists of 36 hexagonal glass mirrors, each of which is I.3l5m in size (flat-to-flat). The telescope can be folded to fit in the 6.5m fairing on the planned upgrade to the Delta-IV heavy launch vehicle. Near-real time wavefront sensing and control is performed on-board the telescope using stars in the field of view to deliver diffraction limited imaging performance at 500nm wavelength. The optical design of the telescope provides an 8x20 arcmin FOV in which 4-5 instruments can be accommodated, plus fine guidance and wavefront sensors. Unlike JWST, the OTA sits at the end of a multi-gimbaled arm, allowing pitch and roll motion, and is isolated from the sunshield and spacecraft bus by an active isolation system. Our design permits servicing in order to extend the life of the observatory.

  3. Reflections on the discovery space for a large ultraviolet-visible telescope: inputs from the European-led EUVO exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez de Castro, Ana I.; Gaensicke, Boris; Neiner, Coralie; Barstow, Martin A.

    2016-10-01

    The solutions to a number of astrophysical problems require access to the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared from space-based facilities, with capabilities beyond those available with Hubble Space Telescope or James Webb Space Telescope. A large ultraviolet-optical-infrared telescope will need to have a large collecting area and milliarcsecond angular resolution capabilities plus highly efficient instruments, providing a revolutionary enhancement in capability. During 2013, the European astronomical community was involved in an exercise to outline the big science that could be achieved with such a facility; the proposal was called EUVO (as per European Ultraviolet-Visible Observatory). Inspired by that work, we describe a proposal on future science and instrumentation to be carried out with a 10-m class telescope.

  4. Stochastic model of the NASA/MSFC ground facility for large space structures with uncertain parameters: The maximum entropy approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, Wei-Shen

    1987-01-01

    A stochastic control model of the NASA/MSFC Ground Facility for Large Space Structures (LSS) control verification through Maximum Entropy (ME) principle adopted in Hyland's method was presented. Using ORACLS, a computer program was implemented for this purpose. Four models were then tested and the results presented.

  5. Advanced electro-optical imaging techniques. [conference papers on sensor technology applicable to Large Space Telescope program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, S. (Editor); Wampler, E. J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The papers presented at the symposium are given which deal with the present state of sensors, as may be applicable to the Large Space Telescope (LST) program. Several aspects of sensors are covered including a discussion of the properties of photocathodes and the operational imaging camera tubes.

  6. Proceedings of the Workshop on Applications of Distributed System Theory to the Control of Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Two general themes in the control of large space structures are addressed: control theory for distributed parameter systems and distributed control for systems requiring spatially-distributed multipoint sensing and actuation. Topics include modeling and control, stabilization, and estimation and identification.

  7. Development of space stable thermal control coatings for use on large space vehicles. [effects of ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Harada, Y.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a large scale manufacturing method for the production of a stable zinc orthotitanate pigment is discussed. Major emphasis was placed on the evaluation of ultraviolet radiation stability tests of pigments derived from coprecipitated and individually precipitated oxalates. Emphasis was also placed on an investigation of the conditions (time and temperature) leading to high reflectance and high optical stability. Paints were formulated in OI-650 and in OI-650G vehicles from pigments which were prepared at various temperatures. Analyses of ultraviolet irradiation test data were conducted regarding optimum pigment preparation parameters and treatment conditions.

  8. Measures for minimizing radiation hazardous to the environment in the advent of large-scale space commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, S. Nataraja

    The nature of hazardous effects from radio-frequency (RF), light, infrared, and nuclear radiation on human and other biological species in the advent of large-scale space commercialization is considered. Attention is focused on RF/microwave radiation from earth antennas and domestic picture phone communication links, exposure to microwave radiation from space solar-power satellites, and the continuous transmission of information from spacecraft as well as laser radiation from space. Measures for preventing and/or reducing these effects are suggested, including the use of interlocks for cutting off radiation toward ground, off-pointing microwave energy beams in cases of altitude failure, limiting the satellite off-axis gain data-rate product, the use of reflective materials on buildings and in personnel clothing to protect from space-borne lasers, and underwater colonies in cases of high-power lasers. For nuclear-power satellites, deposition in stable points in the solar system is proposed.

  9. An Extensible Space-Based Coordination Approach for Modeling Complex Patterns in Large Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Eva; Mordinyi, Richard; Schreiber, Christian

    Coordination is frequently associated with shared data spaces employing Linda coordination. But in practice, communication between parallel and distributed processes is carried out with message exchange patterns. What, actually, do shared data spaces contribute beyond these? In this paper we present a formal representation for a definition of shared spaces by introducing an "extensible tuple model", based on existing research on Linda coordination, some Linda extensions, and virtual shared memory. The main enhancements of the extensible tuple model comprise: means for structuring of spaces, Internet- compatible addressing of resources, more powerful coordination capabilities, a clear separation of user data and coordination information, support of symmetric peer application architectures, and extensibility through programmable aspects. The advantages of the extensible tuple model (XTM) are that it allows for a specification of complex coordination patterns.

  10. Pioneering space research in the ussr and mathematical modelling of large problem of radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkevich, T. A.

    2011-09-01

    This review is to recall to scientists of the older generation about some historical pages of our memory and about many famous researchers, teachers and colleagues. As to the younger researchers and foreign colleagues, it will be useful for them to get to know about pioneer advancements of the Soviet scientists in the field of information and mathematical supply for cosmonautic problems on the eve of the space era. Main attention is paid down to the scientific experiments conducted on the piloted space vehicles and the research collectives who created the information and mathematical tools for the first space projects. The role of Mstislav Vsevolodovich Keldysh, the Major Theoretician of cosmonautics, is in particular emphasized, who determined in the most degree the basic directions of development of space research and remote sensing of the Earth and planets that are shortly called as REMOTE SENSING.

  11. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  12. Design and fabrication of large-scale lightweight SiC space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhan; Zhang, Yumin; Han, Jiecai; He, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2006-02-01

    Silicon carbide is a new type of optics material developed in recent years because it offered some advantages over other traditional optical substrate materials such as low density, low thermal expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, big special heat, big modulus of elasticity and potential cost and schedule. So in this paper, the silicon carbide space mirror was fabricated by both reaction bonded (RB) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The green body of the space mirror was prepared by silicon carbide powder, carbon powder, dilution and solidified agent using slip casting method. The space mirror blank was prepared by green body and pure silicon powder. They were laid in vacuum sintering furnace and sintered at 1500°C. In this temperature, silicon was melting then infiltrated in SiC green body and reacted with carbon to generate the new SiC, at the same time, bonded original SiC powder, in the end, the nonporous SiC/Si space mirror blank was fabricated. The reaction bonded silicon carbide (RBSiC) was consistent with original SiC powder, new generated SiC and unreacted Si. Because RBSiC was SiC/Si two-phase structure, the hardness difference between SiC and Si made the space mirror difficult to achieve precision optical surface by grinding. So a full density SiC thin film was coated on the surface of space mirror blank with RBSiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The raw material was CH3SiCl3. The hydrogen (H2) was catalyst. The deposition temperature was 1300°C. The cooling rate could be controlled. The SiC space mirror was honeycomb open back lightweight structure. The honeycomb cellar could be triangle, rectangle, hexogen and sector. The biggest diameter of SiC space mirror blank which has been fabricated is approach one meter by forgoing process. In order to the forgoing process was feasible, a flat round SiC space mirror with 250mm diameter. The space mirror was composed of a 4mm thick round plane faceplate and hexagonal cellar

  13. Resolved rate and torque control schemes for large scale space based kinematically redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Quiocho, Leslie J.

    1991-01-01

    Resolved rate control of kinematically redundant ground based manipulators is a challenging problem. The structural, actuator, and control loop frequency characteristics of industrial grade robots generally allow operation with resolved rate control; a rate command is achievable with good accuracy. However, space based manipulators are different, typically have less structural stiffness, more motor and joint friction, and lower control loop cycle frequencies. These undesirable characteristics present a considerable Point of Resolution (POR) control problem for space based, kinematically redundant manipulators for the following reason: a kinematically redundant manipulator requires an arbitrary constraint to solve for the joint rate commands. A space manipulator will not respond to joint rate commands because of these characteristics. A space based manipulator simulation, including free end rigid body dynamics, motor dynamics, motor striction/friction, gearbox backlash, joint striction/friction, and Space Station Remote Manipulator System type configuration parameters, is used to evaluate the performance of a documented resolved rate control law. Alternate schemes which include torque control are also evaluated.

  14. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (e.g., Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate its feasibility.

  15. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid, segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (eg, Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate it s feasibility.

  16. An application of MSC/NASTRAN in the interdisciplinary analysis of large space-based structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.; Chambers, Mareta W.; Cooper, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    The Integrated Multidisciplinary Analysis Tool (IMAT), a computer software system developed at NASA Langley to analyze and simulate the dynamics of space-structure/control-system interactions, is described, and its application to the MAST problem (a 60-m truss with fundamental frequency less than 200 mHz and equipped with linear proof-mass actuators, to be deployed from the Space Shuttle as part of COFS-I flight experiment) is demonstrated. Particular attention is given to the IMAT procedures which facilitate the use of the MCS/NASTRAN code to recover physical results from time-domain state-space solutions obtained with an FEM control-design code. Diagrams, drawings, and graphs are provided.

  17. Contact finite element analysis of hinge joints for large deployable antenna in space satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, K.; Takaki, R.

    Various malfunctions have been observed in space structures. These include failure of precise positioning control, such as the failure of the ASTRO-G parabolic antenna, failure of piston sliding parts, and instability due to incomplete expansion of IKAROS' membrane. One reason for such failures is the friction at the contact points. Owing to the presence of various particles in air, an adhesive layer of particles is formed on metal surfaces. When metals get rubbed with each other, these particles are removed from the metal surfaces. In the atmosphere, the adhesive particle layer forms again on the metal surface. However, this layer cannot be formed in space. Therefore, the coefficient of friction in vacuum is larger than that in air. Generally, the coefficient of friction between metals is about 0.3. In vacuum, the coefficient of friction between metals may exceed 1.0. In the design stage, it is important to understand the friction behavior of a hinge joint in vacuum. Many parts of space structures are attached to each other via hinged joints. The frictional force on the contacts is used to fix the positions of these parts. The mechanical behavior of space structures varies with the friction of the hinge joints. The reliability of the space structure depends on these hinge joints. In 2012, it has become possible to conduct a detailed analysis owing to the improvements in computational performance and numerical simulation techniques. The entire space structure can be computed, including the friction model of the contacts of hinge joints. To develop high-reliability satellites, we attempted the development of contact modeling techniques by using a high-performance computer (JSS) and the Advance/FrontSTR in this study. The contact behaviors were verified by using computational models of the hinge joints.

  18. Near-Space TOPSAR Large-Scene Full-Aperture Imaging Scheme Based on Two-Step Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianghui; Wu, Junjie; Li, Wenchao; Huang, Yulin; Yang, Jianyu; Yang, Haiguang

    2016-01-01

    Free of the constraints of orbit mechanisms, weather conditions and minimum antenna area, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) equipped on near-space platform is more suitable for sustained large-scene imaging compared with the spaceborne and airborne counterparts. Terrain observation by progressive scans (TOPS), which is a novel wide-swath imaging mode and allows the beam of SAR to scan along the azimuth, can reduce the time of echo acquisition for large scene. Thus, near-space TOPS-mode SAR (NS-TOPSAR) provides a new opportunity for sustained large-scene imaging. An efficient full-aperture imaging scheme for NS-TOPSAR is proposed in this paper. In this scheme, firstly, two-step processing (TSP) is adopted to eliminate the Doppler aliasing of the echo. Then, the data is focused in two-dimensional frequency domain (FD) based on Stolt interpolation. Finally, a modified TSP (MTSP) is performed to remove the azimuth aliasing. Simulations are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed imaging scheme for near-space large-scene imaging application. PMID:27472341

  19. Near-Space TOPSAR Large-Scene Full-Aperture Imaging Scheme Based on Two-Step Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianghui; Wu, Junjie; Li, Wenchao; Huang, Yulin; Yang, Jianyu; Yang, Haiguang

    2016-07-27

    Free of the constraints of orbit mechanisms, weather conditions and minimum antenna area, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) equipped on near-space platform is more suitable for sustained large-scene imaging compared with the spaceborne and airborne counterparts. Terrain observation by progressive scans (TOPS), which is a novel wide-swath imaging mode and allows the beam of SAR to scan along the azimuth, can reduce the time of echo acquisition for large scene. Thus, near-space TOPS-mode SAR (NS-TOPSAR) provides a new opportunity for sustained large-scene imaging. An efficient full-aperture imaging scheme for NS-TOPSAR is proposed in this paper. In this scheme, firstly, two-step processing (TSP) is adopted to eliminate the Doppler aliasing of the echo. Then, the data is focused in two-dimensional frequency domain (FD) based on Stolt interpolation. Finally, a modified TSP (MTSP) is performed to remove the azimuth aliasing. Simulations are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed imaging scheme for near-space large-scene imaging application.

  20. Evaluation of the need for a large primate research facility in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    In the summer of 1983, an advisory committee was organized that would be able to evaluate NASA's current and future capabilities for nonhuman primate research in space. Individuals were chosen who had experience in four key research areas: cardiovascular physiology, vestibular neurophysiology, musculo-skeletal physiology, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Recommendations of the committee to NASA are discussed.

  1. Attitude control/momentum management of the Space Station Freedom for large angle torque-equilibrium-attitude configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    An attitude-control and momentum-management (ACMM) system for the Space Station in a large-angle torque-equilibrium-attitude (TEA) configuration is developed analytically and demonstrated by means of numerical simulations. The equations of motion for a rigid-body Space Station model are outlined; linearized equations for an arbitrary TEA (resulting from misalignment of control and body axes) are derived; the general requirements for an ACMM are summarized; and a pole-placement linear-quadratic regulator solution based on scheduled gains is proposed. Results are presented in graphs for (1) simulations based on configuration MB3 (showing the importance of accounting for the cross-inertia terms in the TEA estimate) and (2) simulations of a stepwise change from configuration MB3 to the 'assembly complete' stage over 130 orbits (indicating that the present ACCM scheme maintains sufficient control over slowly varying Space Station dynamics).

  2. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers, Technology Developments, and Synergies with Other Future Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  3. Magnetoplasma sheath waves on a conducting tether in the ionosphere with applications to EMI propagation on large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balmain, K. G.; James, H. G.; Bantin, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A recent space experiment confirmed sheath-wave propagation of a kilometer-long insulated wire in the ionosphere, oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field. This space tether experiment, Oedipus-A, showed a sheath-wave passband up to about 2 MHz and a phase velocity somewhat slower than the velocity of light in a vacuum, and also demonstrated both ease of wave excitation and low attenuation. The evidence suggests that, on any large structure in low Earth orbit, transient or continuous wave electromagnetic interference, once generated, could propagate over the structure via sheath waves, producing unwanted signal levels much higher than in the absence of the ambient plasma medium. Consequently, there is a need for a review of both electromagnetic interference/electromagnetic compatibility standards and ground test procedures as they apply to large structures in low Earth orbit.

  4. Visual Data Mining of Astronomic Data With Virtual Reality Spaces: Understanding the Underlying Structure of Large Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    The information explosion in astronomy requires the development of data mining procedures that speed up the process of scientific discovery, and the in-depth understanding of the internal structure of the data. This is crucial for the identification of valid, novel, potentially useful, and understandable patterns (regularities, oddities, etc.). A Virtual Reality (VR) approach for large heterogeneous, incomplete and imprecise information is introduced for the problem of visualizing and analyzing astronomic data. The method is based on mappings between one heterogeneous space representing the data, and a homogeneous virtual reality space. This VR-based visual data mining technique allows the incorporation of the unmatched geometric capabilities of the human brain into the knowledge discovery process, and helps in understanding data structure and patterns. This approach has been applied successfully to a wide variety of real-world domains, and it has a large potential in astronomy. Examples are presented from the domain of galaxy research.

  5. Pros and Cons of Using Arrays of Small Antennas Versus Large Single Dish Antennas for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagri, Durgadas S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly describes pros and cons of using arrays of small antennas instead of large single dish antennas for spacecraft telemetry, command, and tracking (TT and C) - communications and navigation (C and N) - and science support that the Deep Space Network (DSN) normally provides. It considers functionality and performance aspects, mainly for TT and C, though it also considers science. It only briefly comments on the cost aspects that seem to favor arrays of small antennas over large single antennas, at least for receiving (downlinks).

  6. Optimal maneuvering and fine pointing control of large space telescope with a new magnetically suspended, single gimballed momentum storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.; Joshi, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    This paper considers the application of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) to both fine pointing and large-angle maneuvering of a large space telescope (LST). The AMCD, which consists principally of a spinning rim suspended in noncontacting electromagnetic bearings, represents a new development in momentum storage devices. A nonlinear mathematical model of the AMCD/LST system is derived. An optimal stochastic fine-pointing controller is designed via LQG theory and the minimum-energy maneuvering problem is solved via a gradient technique. Number of state variable and control variable constraints, as well as all trigonometric nonlinearities, are considered in the latter part.

  7. Novel cross-linked polystyrenes with large space network as tailor-made catalyst supports for sustainable media

    DOE PAGES

    Marrocchi, Assunta; Adriaensens, Peter; Bartollini, Elena; ...

    2015-10-09

    For a novel class of polystyrene-based gel-type resins (SPACeR, SP), containing the large 1,4-bis (4-vinylphenoxy)benzene cross-linker, is introduced; SP-immobilized 1,5,7-triazabicyclo [4.4.0]dec-5-ene (TBD) and triethylamine (TEA) bases are synthesized and characterized in terms of their structural, thermal and morphological features, and their catalytic efficiency in a series of fundamental chemical transformations under solvent-free conditions is investigated.

  8. CMG-induced LST dynamics. [application of control moment gyroscope to pointing and control systems of large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The application of control moment gyroscopes to the pointing and control system of the large space telescope is discussed. The parameter plane analysis technique is used to present the nonlinearity representing the control moment gyroscope gimbal bearing friction. The technique affords both analytic and graphic portrayal of the effects of variations is selected system parameters. Diagrams of the systems involved in the tests are presented.

  9. Preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in space - Polymerization kinetics and process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.; Kornfeld, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Monodisperse polystyrene latexes are prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization; however, sizes larger than 2 microns are difficult to prepare because of the creaming and settling of the particles and their sensitivity to mechanical shear. Preparation in space would obviate the creaming and settling, and allow agitation just sufficient for good heat transfer and mixing. Three polymerizations yielding 3-5 micron size particles were carried out successfully on the third flight of the 'Columbia' launched Mar. 22, 1982; however, four polymerizations yielding sizes up to 10 microns on the fourth flight launched June 27, 1982 were incomplete owing to apparatus malfunction. The results of these polymerizations and the prospects of developing a preparative space process are reviewed.

  10. Excited calculations of large scale multiwalled nanotubes using real-space pseudopotential methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, Charles; Chelikowsky, James; Deslippe, Jack; Saad, Yousef; Yang, Chao; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    One method for calculating excited states is the GW method. The GW method has many computational requirements. One of the bottlenecks is the calculation of numerous empty states. Within density functional theory, we use a real-space pseudopotential method (PARSEC) to calculate these empty states for multiwalled nanotubes. We illustrate the use of these empty states for calculating excited states using the GW method (BerkeleyGW). We demonstrate why using real-space density functional theory is advantageous for calculating empty states. Support provided by the SciDAC program, Department of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Basic Energy Sciences. Grant Numbers DE-SC0008877 (Austin) and DE-FG02-12ER4 (Berkeley)

  11. Large motion high cycle high speed optical fibers for space based applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Stromberg, Peter G.; Tandon, Rajan; Gibson, Cory S.; Reedlunn, Benjamin; Rasberry, Roger David; Rohr, Garth David

    2014-10-01

    Future remote sensing applications will require higher resolution and therefore higher data rates (up to perhaps 100 gigabits per second) while achieving lower mass and cost. A current limitation to the design space is high speed high bandwidth data does not cross movable gimbals because of cabling issues. This requires the detectors to be off gimbal. The ability to get data across the gimbal would open up efficiencies in designs where the detectors and the electronics can be placed anywhere on the system. Fiber optic cables provide light weight high speed high bandwidth connections. Current options are limited to 20,000 cycles as opposed to the 1,000,000 cycles needed for future space based applications. To extend this to the million+ regime, requires a thorough understanding of the failure mechanisms and the materials, proper selection of materials (e.g., glass and jacket material) allowable geometry changes to the cable, radiation hardness, etc.

  12. Design of a secondary debris containment shield for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1989-01-01

    All long-duration spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbiting space debris. Such impacts are expected to occur at extremely high speeds and can damage internal and external flight-critical systems of spacecraft. An effective mechanism is developed to protect external spacecraft subsystems against damage by ricochet particles formed during such impacts. Equations and design procedures for protective shield panels are developed based on observed ricochet phenomena and calculated ricochet particle sizes and speeds. Panel dimensions are shown to be strongly dependent on their inclination and on their distribution around a spacecraft module. It is concluded that obliquity effects of high-speed impacts must be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  13. Children's Cognitive Maps of Large-Scale Spaces: Effects of Exploration, Direction, and Repeated Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, James F.

    1980-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to examine the particular aspects of repeated experiences in a large-scale environment on the development of children's cognitive maps. Subjects were kindergartners and third graders. (MP)

  14. Coarse-Grain Bandwidth Estimation Techniques for Large-Scale Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Kar-Ming; Jennings, Esther

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a top-down analysis and simulation approach to size the bandwidths of a store-andforward network for a given network topology, a mission traffic scenario, and a set of data types with different latency requirements. We use these techniques to estimate the wide area network (WAN) bandwidths of the ground links for different architecture options of the proposed Integrated Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Network.

  15. Wide field/planetary camera optics study. [for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design feasibility of the baseline optical design concept was established for the wide field/planetary camera (WF/PC) and will be used with the space telescope (ST) to obtain high angular resolution astronomical information over a wide field. The design concept employs internal optics to relay the ST image to a CCD detector system. Optical design performance predictions, sensitivity and tolerance analyses, manufacturability of the optical components, and acceptance testing of the two mirror Cassegrain relays are discussed.

  16. Large Diameter, High Speed InGaAs Receivers for Free-Space Lasercom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    space optical communication ( FSO ) systems, it is usually desirable to have the sensitivity of the detector as high as possible to reduce the required...generator of an Agilent 86130A 3.6Gbps Error Performance Analyzer provided a pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) input to a commercial OC-48 transmitter...the receiver was applied to the error detector of the Agilent 86130A, while the negative output was applied to a Tektronix model TDS5054 digital

  17. Literature survey for suppression of scattered light in large space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tifft, W. G.; Fannin, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    A literature survey is presented of articles dealing with all aspects of predicting, measuring, and controlling unwanted scattered (stray) light. The survey is divided into four broad classifications: (1) existing baffle/telescope designs; (2) computer programs for the analysis/design of light suppression systems; (3) the mechanism, measurement, and control of light scattering; and (4) the advantages and problems introduced by the space environment for the operation of diffraction-limited optical systems.

  18. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems, volume 2, chapters 7-14 and appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Production and support equipment specifications are described for the space manufacturing facility (SMF). Defined production equipment includes electromagnetic pumps for liquid metal, metal alloying furnaces, die casters, electron beam welders and cutters, glass forming for structural elements, and rolling. A cost analysis is presented which includes the development, the aquisition of all SMF elements, initial operating cost, maintenance and logistics cost, cost of terrestrial materials, and transportation cost for each major element. Computer program listings and outputs are appended.

  19. The survivability of large space-borne reflectors under atomic oxygen and micrometeoroid impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.

    1987-01-01

    Solar dynamic power system mirrors for use on Space Station and other spacecraft flown in low earth orbit (LEO) are exposed to the harshness of the LEO environment. Both atomic oxygen and micrometeoroids/space debris can degrade the performance of such mirrors. Protective coatings will be required to protect oxidizable reflecting media, such as silver and aluminum, from atomic oxygen attack. Several protective coating materials have been identified as good candidates for use in this application. The durability of these coating/mirror systems after pinhole defects have been inflicted during their fabrication and deployment or through micrometeoroid/space debris impact once on-orbit is of concern. Studies of the effect of an oxygen plasma environment on protected mirror surfaces with intentionally induced pinhole defects have been conducted at NASA Lewis and are reviewed. It has been found that oxidation of the reflective layer and/or the substrate in areas adjacent to a pinhole defect, but not directly exposed by the pinhole, can occur.

  20. The survivability of large space-borne reflectors under atomic oxygen and micrometeoroid impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    Solar dynamic power system mirrors for use on space station and other spacecraft flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) are exposed to the harshness of the LEO environment. Both atomic oxygen and micrometeoroids/space debris can degrade the performance of such mirrors. Protective coatings will be required to protect oxidizable reflecting media, such as silver and aluminum, from atomic oxygen attack. Several protective coating materials have been identified as good candidates for use in this application. The durability of these coating/mirror systems after pinhole defects have been inflicted during their fabrication and deployment or through micrometeoroid/space debris impact once on-orbit is of concern. Studies of the effect of an oxygen plasma environment on protected mirror surfaces with intentionally induced pinhole defects have been conducted at NASA Lewis and are reviewed. It has been found that oxidation of the reflective layer and/or the substrate in areas adjacent to a pinhole defect, but not directly exposed by the pinhole, can occur.