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Sample records for large swedish family

  1. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia in a large Swedish family: phenotypic spectrum and natural course.

    PubMed

    Grigelioniene, Giedre; Geiberger, Stefan; Horemuzova, Eva; Moström, Eva; Jäntti, Nina; Neumeyer, Lo; Åström, Eva; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Nordgren, Ann; Mäkitie, Outi

    2014-07-01

    Autosomal dominant brachyolmia (Type 3, OMIM #113500) belongs to a group of skeletal dysplasias caused by mutations in the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 4 (TRPV4) gene, encoding a Ca++-permeable, non-selective cation channel. The disorder is characterized by disproportionate short stature with short trunk, scoliosis and platyspondyly. The phenotypic variability and long-term natural course remain inadequately characterized. The purpose of this study was to describe a large Swedish family with brachyolmia type 3 due to a heterozygous TRPV4 mutation c.1847G>A (p.R616Q) in 11 individuals. The mutation has previously been detected in another family with autosomal dominant brachyolmia [Rock et al., 2008]. Review of hospital records and patient assessments indicated that clinical symptoms of brachyolmia became evident by school age with chronic pain in the spine and hips; radiographic changes were evident earlier. Growth was not affected during early childhood but deteriorated with age in some patients due to increasing spinal involvement. Affected individuals had a wide range of subjective symptoms with chronic pain in the extremities and the spine, and paresthesias. Our findings indicate that autosomal dominant brachyolmia may be associated with significant long-term morbidity, as seen in this family.

  2. Swedish Family Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrstrom, Staffan

    1986-01-01

    Family policy remains one of the leading issues of Swedish domestic politics. All parties are agreed that families with children must be given a better deal in the wake of the economic crisis. But how is this to be done and how quickly can it be achieved? Is the expansion of day nursery facilities to be speeded up, or are parents to be given a…

  3. Assessing family resources: validation of the Swedish version of the Family Hardiness Index.

    PubMed

    Persson, Carina; Benzein, Eva; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2016-12-01

    All families face normative transitions. Some are perceived as stressful and calls for family resources to maintain or restore family well-being. In times of illness, families also need to develop strengths and capabilities to enhance family well-being. The way these are developed is related to family hardiness. Family hardiness is thus seen as a family resource, and the Family Hardiness Index (FHI) was developed to measure family stress resistance and adaptation resources. The index was not available in Swedish and no extensive international psychometric evaluation was found. Therefore, the aim was to translate and validate the Swedish version of the FHI. The study was approved by a Regional Ethical Review Board. Data from 174 Swedish participants, family members to persons with cognitive dysfunctions (n = 95) and nursing students (n = 79) were included. Family members were enrolled in outpatient clinics in primary care and rehabilitation, and nursing students at a nursing school. Psychometric properties were evaluated through calculations of missing data, distributions of item and scale scores, item correlations, Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analyses and correlations with theoretically related constructs. Sample scores had acceptable data quality, internal consistency for the FHI total scale was satisfactory (α = 0.86), and construct validity was supported. Our findings cast some doubt on the intended interpretation since confirmatory factor analyses showed that a modified four-subscale version, excluding one subscale, showed best fit. The Control subscale lacked important psychometric properties in terms of homogeneity, internal consistency and construct validity. The sample size was probably sufficiently large for the factor analyses, but the subgroup analyses should be treated with caution. The conclusion is that the Swedish version of the FHI is a promising scale for assessing family hardiness, but more solid evidence for the factor structure in

  4. Genome scan on Swedish Alzheimer's disease families.

    PubMed

    Sillén, A; Forsell, C; Lilius, L; Axelman, K; Björk, B F; Onkamo, P; Kere, J; Winblad, B; Graff, C

    2006-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disease, which affects approximately 40% of the population at an age above 90 years. The heritability is estimated to be greater than 60% and there are rare autosomal dominant forms indicating a significant genetic influence on the disease process. Despite the successes in the early 1990s when four genes were identified, which directly cause the disease (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2) or greatly increase the risk of disease development (APOE), it has proved exceedingly difficult to identify additional genes involved in the pathogenesis. However, several linkage and association studies have repeatedly supported the presence of susceptibility genes on chromosomes (chrms) 9, 10 and 12. The study populations have, however, mostly been of great genetic heterogeneity, and this may have contributed to the meagre successes in identifying the disease associated genetic variants. In this study, we have performed a genome wide linkage study on 71 AD families from the relatively genetically homogeneous Swedish population where it is also possible to study the genetic ancestry in public databases. We have performed nonparametric linkage analyses in the total family material as well as stratified the families with respect to the presence or absence of APOE varepsilon4. Our results suggest that the families included in this study are tightly linked to the APOE region, but do not show evidence of linkage to the previously reported linkages on chrms 9, 10 and 12. Instead, we observed the next highest LOD score on chromosome 5q35 in the total material. Further, the data suggest that the major fraction of families linked to this region is APOE varepsilon4 positive.

  5. Family nursing research for practice: the Swedish perspective.

    PubMed

    Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2010-02-01

    This article offers a synthesis of the significant developments and progress of family nursing in Sweden. A review was conducted to locate Swedish family nursing research produced over the past 10 years. CINAHL, Medline, and PubMed were the primary databases used to locate approximately 75 family nursing studies conducted in Sweden. The majority of the studies used descriptive methods with data collected from surveys and interviews involving nurses and family members either together or individually. Only a few of the studies examined family nursing interventions. This article also reports the results of a recent survey of Swedish nurses that examined how family nursing is used in practice. After 10 years of creating a strong foundation for family-focused nursing in Sweden, there is still a need for nurse researchers, educators, and administrators to collaborate in the implementation of family nursing to practice.

  6. Homework as Serious Family Business: Power and Subjectivity in Negotiations about School Assignments in Swedish Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsberg, Lucas

    2007-01-01

    Most previous research on parental involvement in children's homework has focused on the pedagogical advantages or disadvantages of school assignments while neglecting the practice in its social context, family life. By studying parent-child homework negotiations in Swedish families, this paper examines how family members position themselves and…

  7. Integration of Refugee Children and Their Families in the Swedish Preschool: Strategies, Objectives and Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunneblad, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    This article is from a study about the integration of refugee children (aged one to five) and their families in Sweden. Refugee children and parents who have received a residence permit are entitled to be introduced into the Swedish society. One of the first encounters refugee children and families have with Swedish society is with the preschool.…

  8. Sleep characteristics and cardiovascular events in a large Swedish cohort.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Anna; Bellocco, Rino; Sundström, Johan; Adami, Hans-Olov; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva

    2013-06-01

    Limited evidence suggests that the association between sleep duration and cardiovascular events is strongest in individuals who also report sleep disturbances. We investigated sleep duration and insomnia symptoms in relation to incident cardiovascular events in the Swedish National March Cohort comprising 41,192 adults. Habitual sleep duration and difficulty falling asleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, and nonrestorative sleep were self-reported in 1997. During 13.2 years of follow-up, we identified 4,031 events (myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or death from cardiovascular disease) in the Swedish National Patient Register and the Cause of Death Register. After adjustment for potential confounders, short sleep duration (≤5 h) was associated with slightly increased risks of overall cardiovascular events and, specifically, myocardial infarction: hazard ratio, HR (95% confidence interval) 1.24 (1.06-1.44) and 1.42 (1.15-1.76), respectively. These HRs were attenuated as we included BMI, depressive symptoms and other relevant covariates in our analysis. Insomnia symptoms per se were unrelated to risk. However, in a joint analysis, there was some evidence that short sleepers who reported frequent insomnia symptoms had the highest HRs (1.26-1.39) of overall cardiovascular events. Short sleep or insomnia symptoms without the other conferred no increased risk. Our results suggest that symptoms of sleep disturbance should be taken into account when assessing the association between short sleep and cardiovascular disease.

  9. Cultural Adaptation of the Strengthening Families Programme to a Swedish Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarstrand, Eva; Larsson, Jorgen; Andreasson, Sven

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the adaptation and programme development of the Strengthening Families Programme to a Swedish setting. Design/methodology/approach: A descriptive approach was employed with a focus on the cultural adaptation and programme development. This included meetings with two reference groups, a telephone…

  10. Quality Aspects of Swedish Family Day Care and Center Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmerus, Kerstin

    This paper presents data concerning the use and costs of center and family day care programs in Sweden. The typical center provides full-time care and has 4 sections, each with 2 preschool teachers, 1 attendant, and up to 20 children. In the family day care system, municipalities employ caregivers and parents pay the municipality. This paper…

  11. Detecting Large Copy Number Variants Using Exome Genotyping Arrays In a Large Swedish Schizophrenia Sample

    PubMed Central

    Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Neale, Benjamin M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Fromer, Menachem; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Chambert, Kimberly; Kähler, Anna; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Hultman, Christina M.; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steven A.; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Although copy number variants (CNVs) are important in genomic medicine, CNVs have not been systematically assessed for many complex traits. Several large rare CNVs increase risk for schizophrenia (SCZ) and autism and often demonstrate pleiotropic effects; however, their frequencies in the general population and other complex traits are unknown. Genotyping large numbers of samples is essential for progress. Large cohorts from many different diseases are being genotyped using exome-focused arrays designed to detect uncommon or rare protein-altering sequence variation. Although these arrays were not designed for CNV detection, the hybridization intensity data generated in each experiment could, in principle, be used for gene-focused CNV analysis. Our goal was to evaluate the extent to which CNVs can be detected using data from one particular exome array (the Illumina Human Exome Bead Chip). We genotyped 9, 100 Swedish subjects (3, 962 cases with SCZ and 5, 138 controls) using both standard GWAS arrays and exome arrays. In comparison to CNVs detected using GWAS arrays, we observed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting genic CNVs ≥400 kb including known pathogentic CNVs along with replicating the literature finding that cases with SCZ had greater enrichment for genic CNVs. Our data confirm the association of SCZ with 16p11.2 duplications and 22q11.2 deletions and suggest a novel association with deletions at 11q12.2. Our results suggest the utility of exome focused arrays in surveying large genic CNVs in very large samples; and thereby open the door for new opportunities such as conducting well-powered CNV assessment and comparisons between different diseases. The use of a single platform also minimizes potential confounding factors that could impact accurate detection. PMID:23938935

  12. Family-centered developmentally supportive care: the Swedish example.

    PubMed

    Westrup, B

    2015-10-01

    The prematurely born infant is probably the most vulnerable patient in our hospitals due to the immaturity of all organ systems including the brain. Over recent years, the importance of neurodevelopmentally supportive care has been clarified. In addition, to provide the best possible treatment and environmental conditions for the vital functions of the infant to properly develop, we also must support the psychological processes of bonding and attachment between parents and their newborn infant, which is so crucial for long-term health and development. By integrating scientific findings from natural and behavioral science in multidisciplinary developmentally supportive intervention programs, recommendations for redesigning nurseries and integrating families have developed to meet these challenges. It not only is "baby- and family-friendly" but also has economic benefits and improves the long-term development of the child. The basis of family-centered developmentally supportive care interventions is the recognition that the newborn infant is a human being in his or her own right, and letting the caregivers be guided by the current needs of the individual infant and family. In this context, the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) is unique since it is the only program designed to be implemented from the moment the infant is born. Different strategies can be used to support the nursing and medical teams to help the family become the primary caregivers of their own infants. Sweden has a long tradition of engaging parents in the actual care and of around-the-clock visiting hours. Nurseries have, or are remodeling to have, the facilities enabling parents to live in the units throughout the entire hospital stay. Skin-to-skin contact is widely implemented. In order to ensure that these strategies are in tune with the individual needs of the infant and the families, all major nurseries have trained NIDCAP professionals. Care and

  13. Assessment of family functioning: evaluation of the General Functioning Scale in a Swedish Bariatric Sample.

    PubMed

    Bylund, Ami; Årestedt, Kristofer; Benzein, Eva; Thorell, Anders; Persson, Carina

    2016-09-01

    The General Functioning Scale (GFS) was developed to assess self-perceived overall family functioning. The scale has satisfactory psychometric properties, is internationally recognised and has been used in different contexts. However, no validated Swedish version is available. Healthy family functioning can support patients and help them adhere to treatment regimens. Moreover, it maintains the physical and emotional health and that of the family as a unit. Yet, there is limited information regarding family functioning postgastric bypass surgery. Thus, it is important to use validated instruments to understand family functioning in bariatric contexts. To evaluate aspects of reliability and validity in GFS in a Swedish bariatric sample, focusing on factor structure. The Swedish version of the GFS (S-GFS) was administered on two occasions to 163 participants who had undergone gastric bypass surgery 6-8 weeks prior to testing. Internal consistency, temporal stability and construct validity were assessed. Data were positively skewed. The S-GFS showed good internal consistency (ordinal α = 0.92) with a sufficient overall mean interitem correlation (0.500) and adequate temporal stability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.833). After modifying response alternatives, confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable fit for a one-factor model. The scale is a promising tool for assessing family functioning in bariatric settings. The S-GFS showed satisfactory reliability - consistent with prior research - and acceptable validity in the study sample. This study contributes to the limited research on the scale's validity. However, the S-GFS needs to be evaluated in different cultural and clinical contexts, focusing on various aspects of validity and responsiveness (sensitivity to detect significant change over time) in different samples. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database 2009: prospects for histology-specific and immigrant studies.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Ji, Jianguang; Brandt, Andreas; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Sundquist, Jan

    2010-05-15

    The Swedish Family-Cancer Database comprises a total of 11.8 million individuals covering the Swedish population of the past 100 years. Version VIII of the Database is described in the present article. Cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry for the period 1958-2006, including more than 1 million first primary cancers. The number of familial cancers in offspring is 14,000 when a parent was diagnosed with a concordant (same) cancer and the number of concordant siblings was 6,000. From the year 1993 onwards histopathological data according to the SNOMED classification were used, which entails advantages for certain cancers, such as breast cancer. Even though the specific morphological classification only covers a limited number of years, it does cover most familial cancers in the offspring generation. The Database records the country of birth for each subject. A total of 1.79 million individuals were foreign born, Finns and other Scandinavians being the largest immigrant groups. The cancer incidence in the first-generation immigrants was compared to that in native Swedes using standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) to measure relative risk. The SIRs ranged widely between the immigrant groups, from 1.9-fold for myeloma to 25-fold for melanoma. The differences in SIRs were smaller in the second-generation immigrants. The usefulness and the possible applications of the Family-Cancer Database have increased with increasing numbers of cases, and the numerous applications have been described in some 300 publications. Familial cancer studies are in the stimulating interphase of the flourishing disciplines of genetics and epidemiology.

  15. Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish language Person-centred Climate Questionnaire-family version.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Jeanette; Elmqvist, Carina; Thulesius, Hans; Edvardsson, David

    2015-12-01

    In a holistic view of care, the family is important for the patient as well as for the staff and integration of family members in health care is a growing trend. Yet, family participation in the care is sparsely investigated and valid assessment instruments are needed. Data were collected from 200 family members participating in an intervention study at an emergency department (ED) in Sweden. The Person-centred Climate Questionnaire-Family (PCQ-F) is a measure for how family members perceive the psychosocial climate. PCQ-F is a self-report instrument that contains 17 items assessing safety, everydayness and hospitality--three subscale dimensions that mirror the Swedish patient version of the questionnaire, the PCQ-P. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the PCQ-F in an ED context. The psychometric properties of the PCQ-F were evaluated using statistical estimates of validity and reliability and showed high content validity and internal consistency. Cronbach's Alpha was >0.7 and item-total correlations were >0.3 and <0.7. In terms of psychometrics, the findings in this study indicate that the PCQ-F can be used with satisfactory validity and reliability to explore to what degree family members perceive ED settings as being person-centred, safe, welcoming and hospitable within an everyday and decorated physical environment. As the PCQ already exists in a valid and reliable patient (PCQ-P) and staff (PCQ-S) version, this new family member version is a significant addition to the literature as it enables further comparative studies of how diverse care settings are perceived by different stakeholders. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. Exclusion of linkage between the serotonin2 receptor and schizophrenia in a large Swedish kindred.

    PubMed

    Hallmayer, J; Kennedy, J L; Wetterberg, L; Sjögren, B; Kidd, K K; Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1992-03-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies suggest that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Detection of single gene(s) involved in a higher susceptibility to a hereditary disease is possible with linkage analysis. The effects of serotonin2-receptor antagonists on symptoms of schizophrenia suggest that a mutation in the gene coding for this receptor subtype might be involved in the pathophysiology of this disease. Recently a copy DNA encoding the serotonin 5-HT2 receptor has been isolated and with a human 5-HT2 receptor copy DNA probe the HTR2 locus has been mapped to chromosome 13. Using multipoint linkage analysis between schizophrenia and genetic markers spanning the region of the HTR2 locus, we were able to exclude linkage between this candidate gene and schizophrenia in a Swedish kindred. Given this result, we conclude that the serotonin 5-HT2 receptor gene itself is not a major susceptibility gene for schizophrenia in this family.

  17. Reasons for rejection of food items in Swedish families with children aged 2-17.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, U K; Sjödén, P O

    1996-02-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate family members' reasons for rejection of foods served in the family, the reasons for not serving specific foods, children's reasons for liking/disliking foods and the use of parental mealtime practices to encourage child eating. Also, the relationships between child/parental neophobia and (1) the reasons for not serving specific foods and (2) the use of mealtime practices were studied. A group of randomly selected families (n = 370) with children aged 2-17 years from two Swedish towns (stratified, 185 from each) were invited and 57 participated. The results are based on an ad hoc food-frequency questionnaire, a mealtime-practices questionnaire, the Food and Neophobia Scale (Pliner & Hobden, 1992), parental ratings of child food neophobia and on a child interview. The main reason for family members rejecting the foods and the main reason for children's dislikes was "distaste". The most frequent reason for children's likings was "good taste". The most frequent reasons for not serving the specific foods were "distaste", the "food did not occur to me", "seasonal/availability" and "habit". The mothers' total Food Neophobia score was significantly correlated with "did not occur to me". Parental ratings of child food neophobia were significantly correlated with mealtime-practice factors "postpone meals" and "child decides portion".

  18. Reproductive health and reproductive freedom: maternal health care and family planning in the Swedish health system.

    PubMed

    Sundström-Feigenberg, K

    1988-01-01

    Health care for mothers and children has been a cornerstone of the Swedish system of health care for many years, starting in the 1930s, when a national network of maternal health centers offered a variety of free prenatal services. This paper describes modern maternal health services whose primary goal is preventive care. Instruments for attaining this goal are regular check-ups for early detection of problems and for maintenance of good health; social and psychological support to expectant parents; information and training to prepare parents for delivery and parenting; information and education about risk factors in the parents' local environment and in society in general. Details of how these programs were developed, delivered and evaluated are provided by the author, a former Senior Medical Officer at the National Board of Health and Welfare, responsible for maternal health care and family planning on a national level.

  19. Genetic and environmental influences on adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: a large Swedish population-based study of twins.

    PubMed

    Larsson, H; Asherson, P; Chang, Z; Ljung, T; Friedrichs, B; Larsson, J-O; Lichtenstein, P

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently persists into adulthood. Family and twin studies delineate a disorder with strong genetic influences among children and adolescents based on parent- and teacher-reported data but little is known about the genetic and environmental contribution to DSM-IV ADHD symptoms in adulthood. We therefore aimed to investigate the impact of genetic and environmental influences on the inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms of ADHD in adults. Twin methods were applied to self-reported assessments of ADHD symptoms from a large population-based Swedish twin study that included data from 15 198 Swedish male and female twins aged 20 to 46 years. The broad heritability [i.e., A + D, where A is an additive genetic factor and D (dominance) a non-additive genetic factor] was 37% (A = 11%, D = 26%) for inattention and 38% (A = 18%, D = 20%) for hyperactivity-impulsivity. The results also indicate that 52% of the phenotypic correlation between inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity (r = 0.43) was explained by genetic influences whereas the remaining part of the covariance was explained by non-shared environmental influences. These results were replicated across age strata. Our findings of moderate broad heritability estimates are consistent with previous literature on self-rated ADHD symptoms in older children, adolescents and adults and retrospective reports of self-rated childhood ADHD by adults but differ from studies of younger children with informant ratings. Future research needs to clarify whether our data indicate a true decrease in the heritability of ADHD in adults compared to children, or whether this relates to the use of self-ratings in contrast to informant data.

  20. Hereditary ring sideroblastic anaemia and Christmas disease in a Swedish family.

    PubMed

    Hast, R; Miale, T; Westin, J; Birgegård, G; Möller, E; Reizenstein, P; Teger-Nilsson, A C; Wetterberg, L

    1983-05-01

    The association of hereditary ring sideroblastic anaemia with Christmas disease in a Swedish family is described. We have studied the transmission of the sideroblastic trait, in relation to HLA groups and Christmas disease, and also evaluated the erythrocyte morphology, uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase activity and S-ferritin for the detection of latent cases of ring sideroblastic anaemia. The proband had ring sideroblastic anaemia, Christmas disease and haemochromatosis. 3 cases of ring sideroblastic anaemia were found among the 12 family members studied. Using the factor IX deficiency as a marker of the X chromosome, it appeared that autosomal transmission of the sideroblastic trait was most likely. The sideroblastic trait did not seem to be linked to HLA-A3-alloantigen. Erythrocyte morphology was normal in all non-anaemic subjects. S-ferritin was found to be increased in all 3 cases of sideroblastic anaemia as well as in 1 non-anaemic relative. Erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase was elevated in 10 of the 12 family members; those with sideroblastic anaemia had the highest values indicating that uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase is of importance in the disturbed haem-synthesis of ring sideroblastic anaemia. This interpretation is supported by the positive correlation between S-ferritin values and the uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase activity.

  1. Insufficient Sleep and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Large Swedish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Markt, Sarah C.; Grotta, Alessandra; Nyren, Olof; Adami, Hans-Olov; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A.; Stattin, Pär; Bellocco, Rino; Lagerros, Ylva Trolle

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: There are some data to suggest that insufficient sleep, including short sleep duration and sleep disruption, may be associated with an increased risk of cancer. We investigated the association between sleep duration and sleep disruption and risk of prostate cancer. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Sweden. Participants: A total of 14,041 men in the Swedish National March Cohort. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Habitual sleep duration and sleep disruption were self-reported in 1997. Prostate cancer diagnoses, including lethal (metastases at diagnosis or death from prostate cancer) and advanced (stage T4, N1, or M1 at diagnosis or death from prostate cancer), were determined from linkage to nationwide cancer registries through 2010. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for potential confounding variables. During 13 years of follow-up, we identified 785 cases of incident prostate cancer, including 118 lethal and 127 advanced cases. Four percent of men reported sleeping 5 h or less a night, and 2% reported sleeping 9 h or more per night. We found no association between sleep duration and risk of prostate cancer overall or for advanced/lethal disease. We also did not find an association between prostate cancer and sleep disruption, as defined by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, sleep quality, and restorative power of sleep. Conclusions: In this large prospective study from Sweden, we found no association between habitual sleep duration or sleep disruption and risk of prostate cancer. Citation: Markt SC, Grotta A, Nyren O, Adami HO, Mucci LA, Valdimarsdottir UA, Stattin P, Bellocco R, Lagerros YT. Insufficient sleep and risk of prostate cancer in a large Swedish cohort. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1405–1410. PMID:26118562

  2. Clinical characterization and the mutation spectrum in Swedish adenomatous polyposis families

    PubMed Central

    Kanter-Smoler, Gunilla; Fritzell, Kaisa; Rohlin, Anna; Engwall, Yvonne; Hallberg, Birgitta; Bergman, Annika; Meuller, Johan; Grönberg, Henrik; Karlsson, Per; Björk, Jan; Nordling, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Background The dominantly inherited condition familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the APC gene. Finding the causative mutations has great implications for the families. Correlating the genotypes to the phenotypes could help to improve the diagnosis and follow-up of patients. Methods Mutation screening of APC and the clinical characterization of 96 unrelated FAP patients from the Swedish Polyposis Registry was performed. In addition to generally used mutation screening methods, analyses of splicing-affecting mutations and investigations of the presence of low-frequency mutation alleles, indicating mosaics, have been performed, as well as quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect lowered expression of APC. Results Sixty-one different APC mutations in 81 of the 96 families were identified and 27 of those are novel. We have previously shown that 6 of the 96 patients carried biallelic MUTYH mutations. The 9 mutation-negative cases all display an attenuated or atypical phenotype. Probands with a genotype (codon 1250–1464) predicting a severe phenotype had a median age at diagnosis of 21.8 (range, 11–49) years compared with 34.4 (range, 14–57) years among those with mutations outside this region (P < 0.017). Dense polyposis (> 1000) occurred in 75% of the probands with a severe phenotype compared with 30% in those with mutations outside this region. The morbidity in colorectal cancer among probands was 25% at a mean age of 37.5 years and 29% at a mean age of 46.6 years. Conclusion Using a variety of mutation-detection techniques, we have achieved a 100% detection frequency in classical FAP. Probands with APC mutations outside codon 1250–1464, although exhibiting a less-severe phenotype, are at high risk of having a colorectal cancer at diagnosis indicating that age at diagnosis is as important as the severity of the disease for colorectal cancer morbidity. PMID:18433509

  3. Genomewide Scan for Affective Disorder Susceptibility Loci in Families of a Northern Swedish Isolated Population

    PubMed Central

    Venken, Tine; Claes, Stephan; Sluijs, Samuël; Paterson, Andrew D.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Adolfsson, Rolf; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed nine multigenerational families with ascertained affective spectrum disorders in northern Sweden's geographically isolated population of Västerbotten. This northern Swedish population, which originated from a limited number of early settlers ∼8,000 years ago, is genetically more homogeneous than outbred populations. In a genomewide linkage analysis, we identified three chromosomal loci with multipoint LOD scores (MPLOD) ⩾2 at 9q31.1-q34.1 (MPLOD 3.24), 6q22.2-q24.2 (MPLOD 2.48), and 2q33-q36 (MPLOD 2.26) under a recessive affected-only model. Follow-up genotyping with application of a 2-cM density simple-tandem-repeat (STR) map confirmed linkage at 9q31.1-q34.1 (MPLOD 3.22), 6q23-q24 (MPLOD 3.25), and 2q33-q36 (MPLOD 2.2). In an initial analysis aimed at identification of the underlying susceptibility genes, we focused our attention on the 9q locus. We fine mapped this region at a 200-kb STR density, with the result of an MPLOD of 3.70. Genealogical studies showed that three families linked to chromosome 9q descended from common founder couples ∼10 generations ago. In this ∼10-generation pedigree, a common ancestral haplotype was inherited by the patients, which reduced the 9q candidate region to 1.6 Mb. Further, the shared haplotype was observed in 4.2% of patients with bipolar disorder with alternating episodes of depression and mania, but it was not observed in control individuals in a patient-control sample from the Västerbotten isolate. These results suggest a susceptibility locus on 9q31-q33 for affective disorder in this common ancestral region. PMID:15614721

  4. Food and general neophobia in Swedish families: parent-child comparisons and relationships with serving specific foods.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, U K; Sjödén, P O

    1996-04-01

    The aims were to investigate the occurrence of food and general neophobia in Swedish families with children 2-17 years of age, parent-child correlations with respect to neophobia and the relationships between neophobia and the reported serving of specific foods in the family. A group of 370 randomly selected families from two Swedish towns (stratified, 185 from each) were invited and 57 (15%) participated. The results are based on the Food and General Neophobia Scales (Pliner & Hobden, 1992), parental ratings of child food neophobia and an ad hoc Food Frequency Questionnaire. The overall levels of neophobia were relatively low for both children and parents. There were only a few significant gender differences with respect to Food Neophobia but fathers and boys scored numerically higher than did mothers and girls on several items in the Food Neophobia Scale. The children, particularly boys, showed significantly higher Food and General Neophobia than their parents. Both Food and General Neophobia tended to decrease with increasing age among the children. Families were divided according to whether specific foods had been served or not. This classification showed virtually no relationship with the degree of food neophobia of family members. However, the higher the food neophobia in mothers and children, the fewer of the listed uncommon foods had been served in the family.

  5. Insufficient Sleep and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Large Swedish Cohort.

    PubMed

    Markt, Sarah C; Grotta, Alessandra; Nyren, Olof; Adami, Hans-Olov; Mucci, Lorelei A; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A; Stattin, Pär; Bellocco, Rino; Lagerros, Ylva Trolle

    2015-09-01

    There are some data to suggest that insufficient sleep, including short sleep duration and sleep disruption, may be associated with an increased risk of cancer. We investigated the association between sleep duration and sleep disruption and risk of prostate cancer. Prospective cohort study. Sweden. A total of 14,041 men in the Swedish National March Cohort. None. Habitual sleep duration and sleep disruption were self-reported in 1997. Prostate cancer diagnoses, including lethal (metastases at diagnosis or death from prostate cancer) and advanced (stage T4, N1, or M1 at diagnosis or death from prostate cancer), were determined from linkage to nationwide cancer registries through 2010. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for potential confounding variables. During 13 years of follow-up, we identified 785 cases of incident prostate cancer, including 118 lethal and 127 advanced cases. Four percent of men reported sleeping 5 h or less a night, and 2% reported sleeping 9 h or more per night. We found no association between sleep duration and risk of prostate cancer overall or for advanced/lethal disease. We also did not find an association between prostate cancer and sleep disruption, as defined by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, sleep quality, and restorative power of sleep. In this large prospective study from Sweden, we found no association between habitual sleep duration or sleep disruption and risk of prostate cancer. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  6. Familial infantile cortical hyperostosis in a large Canadian family.

    PubMed Central

    Maclachlan, A. K.; Gerrard, J. W.; Houston, C. S.; Ives, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Infantile cortical hyperostosis is a rare proliferative bone disease affecting infants under the age of 6 months. In 1961 a large family of French-Canadian origin in which 14 children in three generations were affected was described. Since then 20 new cases have been found in this family. This is the largest familial aggregation of this disease reported in the literature to date. On the basis of the findings in this pedigree, the familial form of the disease appears to be transmitted by a single autosomal dominant gene with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6370402

  7. Allelic association but only weak evidence for linkage to the apolipoprotein E locus in late-onset Swedish Alzheimer families

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Forsell, C.; Lilius, L.

    1996-05-31

    An association between the {epsilon}4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) and late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) was recently demonstrated. In order to confirm the association and to gauge the ability of standard genetic linkage methods to identify susceptibility genes, we investigated 15 Swedish late-onset AD families. We found an association of familial AD to the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (P = 0.01) but no indication of linkage to the APOE region using 2-point linkage analysis, and only weak evidence using the affected pedigree-member (APM) method. Our results confirm an APOE {epsilon}4 association with late-onset familial AD and indicate that susceptibility genes can easily be missed when using standard lod score and APM genetic linkage analysis. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Immigrants with dementia in Swedish residential care: an exploratory study of the experiences of their family members and Nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Rosendahl, Sirpa Pietilä; Söderman, Mirkka; Mazaheri, Monir

    2016-01-16

    Worldwide, there is a growing population of older people who develop dementia in a country other than that of their origin. When their dementia has reached an advanced stage, residential care is most often needed. People with dementia in Sweden are often cared for in group homes. For immigrants, this may mean a linguistically challenging care environment for both healthcare staff and the patients' family members. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of family members and professional caregivers regarding the care provided to immigrants with dementia in group homes in Sweden. An exploratory, descriptive study with a qualitative approach was chosen. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine professional caregivers and five family members of people with dementia with Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian and Ingrian backgrounds; all were chosen purposefully. All people with dementia had lost their Swedish language skills as their second language. The data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three main categories and seven subcategories were identified. The first main category: A new living situation comprised the subcategories: adjusting to new living arrangements and expectations regarding activities and traditional food at the group home, the second main category: Challenges in communication with the subcategories: limited communication between the immigrant with dementia and the Swedish-speaking nursing staff and the consequences of linguistic misunderstandings and nuanced communication in a common language and the third main category: The role of the family member at the group home with the subcategories: a link to the healthy life story of the family member with dementia and an expert and interpreter for the nursing staff. The family member played a crucial role in the lives of immigrants with dementia living in a group home by facilitating communication between the nursing staff and the PWD and also by making

  9. Environmental influences on familial resemblance for drug abuse in first-cousin pairs: a Swedish national study

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, K. S.; Ohlsson, H.; Sundquist, K.; Sundquist, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Using three independent methods, prior studies in Swedish sibling pairs indicate that environmental factors contribute substantially to familial aggregation for drug abuse (DA). Could we replicate these results in cousin pairs? Method Using multiple Swedish public databases (1964–2011), we defined DA using medical, legal or pharmacy registry records and examined concordance in full cousin pairs as a function of age differences, younger–older relationships and geographical proximity while growing up. Results Replicating prior results in siblings, cousin pairs were significantly more similar in their history of DA if they were (i) closer versus more distant in age and (ii) grew up in high versus low geographical proximity to one another. Furthermore, controlling for background factors, having an older cousin with DA conveys a greater risk for DA than having a younger drug-abusing cousin. The greater transmission of DA from older to younger versus younger to older cousin was more prominent in pairs who grew up close to one another. In age difference and geographical proximity analyses, effects were consistently strongest in male–male cousin pairs. In analyses of older → younger versus younger → older transmission, effects were stronger in male–male and male–female than in female–female or female–male relative pairs. Conclusions In accord with prior results in siblings, environmental factors contribute substantially to the familial aggregation of DA in cousins and these effects are, in general, stronger in males than in females. PMID:23611305

  10. Within-family environmental transmission of drug abuse: a Swedish national study.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan

    2013-02-01

    CONTEXT Drug abuse (DA) strongly runs in families. Does this result solely from genetic factors or does the family environment contribute? OBJECTIVE To determine the familial environmental contribution to the risk for DA. DESIGN Follow-up in 9 public databases (1961-2009) in siblings and spouses. SETTING Sweden. PARTICIPANTS A total of 137 199 sibling pairs and 7561 spousal pairs containing a proband with DA and matched control probands. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Drug abuse recorded in medical, legal, or pharmacy registry records. RESULTS In the best-fit model, which contained significant linear, quadratic, and cubic effects, among full sibling pairs containing a proband with DA, the relative risk for DA in the sibling declined from more than 6.0 for siblings born within 2 years of each other to less than 4.5 when born 10 years apart. Controlling for age differences in full sibling pairs, the hazard rate for DA in a sibling when the affected proband was older vs younger was 1.42 (95% CI, 1.31-1.54). In the best-fit model, which contained significant linear, quadratic, and cubic effects, among spousal pairs containing a proband with DA, the relative risk for DA in the spouse declined from more than 25.0 within 1 year of proband DA registration to 6.0 after 5 years. CONCLUSIONS Controlling for genetic effects by examining only full siblings, sibling resemblance for the risk for DA was significantly greater in pairs closer vs more distant in age. Older siblings more strongly transmitted the risk for DA to their younger siblings than vice versa. After one spouse is registered for DA, the other spouse has a large short-lived increase in DA risk. These results support strong familial environmental influences on DA at various life stages. A complete understanding of the familial transmission of DA will require knowledge of how genetic and familial environmental risk factors act and interact over development.

  11. Reading problems and major mental disorders - co-occurrences and familial overlaps in a Swedish nationwide cohort.

    PubMed

    Cederlöf, Martin; Maughan, Barbara; Larsson, Henrik; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Plomin, Robert

    2017-03-21

    Reading problems often co-occur with ADHD and conduct disorder. However, the patterns of co-occurrence and familial overlap between reading problems and other psychiatric disorders have not been systematically explored. We conducted a register-based cohort study including 8719 individuals with reading problems and their siblings, along with matched comparison individuals. Conditional logistic regressions estimated risks for ADHD, autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anorexia nervosa, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, substance use disorder, and violent/non-violent criminality in individuals with reading problems and their siblings. Diagnoses of psychiatric disorders were physician-assigned and ascertained from the Swedish National Patient Register, and crime convictions from the Swedish National Crime Register. We found that individuals with reading problems had excess risks for all psychiatric disorders (except anorexia nervosa) and criminality, with risk ratios between 1.34 and 4.91. Siblings of individuals with reading problems showed excess risks for ADHD, autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, substance use disorder, and non-violent criminality, with risk ratios between 1.14 and 1.70. In summary, individuals with reading problems had increased risks of virtually all psychiatric disorders, and criminality. The origin of most of these overlaps was familial, in that siblings of individuals with reading problems also had elevated risks of ADHD, autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, substance use disorder, and non-violent criminality. These findings have implications for gene-searching efforts, and suggest that health care practitioners should be alert for signs of psychiatric disorders in families where reading problems exist.

  12. Characterization of macular structure and function in two Swedish families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Abdulridha-Aboud, Wissam; Kjellström, Ulrika; Andréasson, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the phenotype in two families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) focusing on macular structure and function. Methods Clinical data were collected at the Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, Sweden, for affected and unaffected family members from two pedigrees with adRP. Examinations included optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field electroretinography (ffERG), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Molecular genetic screening was performed for known mutations associated with adRP. Results The mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant in both families. The members of the family with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene had clinical features characteristic of RP, with severely reduced retinal rod and cone function. The degree of deterioration correlated well with increasing age. The mfERG showed only centrally preserved macular function that correlated well with retinal thinning on OCT. The family with a mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene had an extreme intrafamilial variability of the phenotype, with more severe disease in the younger generations. OCT showed pathology, but the degree of morphological changes was not correlated with age or with the mfERG results. The mother, with a de novo mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene, had a normal ffERG, and her retinal degeneration was detected merely with the reduced mfERG. Conclusions These two families demonstrate the extreme inter- and intrafamilial variability in the clinical phenotype of adRP. This is the first Swedish report of the clinical phenotype associated with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene. Our results indicate that methods for assessment of the central retinal structure and function may improve the detection and characterization of the RP phenotype. PMID:27212874

  13. Work-family conflict and health in Swedish working women and men: a 2-year prospective analysis (the SLOSH study).

    PubMed

    Leineweber, Constanze; Baltzer, Maria; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Westerlund, Hugo

    2013-08-01

    Research has suggested that gender is related to perceptions of work-family conflict (WFC) and an underlying assumption is that interference of paid work with family life will burden women more than men. There is, however, mixed evidence as to whether men and women report different levels of WFC. Even less studies investigate gender differences in health outcomes of WFC. Also the number of longitudinal studies in this field is low. Based on the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health, we prospectively examined the effects of WFC on three different health measures representing a wide spectrum off ill health (i.e. self-rated health, emotional exhaustion and problem drinking). Logistic regression analyses were used to analyse multivariate associations between WFC in 2008 and health 2 years later. The results show that WFC was associated with an increased risk of emotional exhaustion among both men and women. Gender differences are suggested as WFC was related to an increased risk for poor self-rated health among women and problem drinking among men. Interaction analyses revealed that the risk of poor self-rated health was substantially more influenced by WFC among women than among men. We conclude that, despite the fact that women experience conflict between work and family life slightly more often than men, both men's and women's health is negatively affected by this phenomenon.

  14. Time-for-Money Exchanges between Older and Younger Generations in Swedish Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennartsson, Carin; Silverstein, Merril; Fritzell, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the maturation of welfare states, family solidarity continues to be strong and a growing body of research has shown that substantial financial transfers are passed from older to younger generations within the family. At the same time, family solidarity in terms of instrumental and social support is found to be mutual. This study examines…

  15. Time-for-Money Exchanges between Older and Younger Generations in Swedish Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennartsson, Carin; Silverstein, Merril; Fritzell, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the maturation of welfare states, family solidarity continues to be strong and a growing body of research has shown that substantial financial transfers are passed from older to younger generations within the family. At the same time, family solidarity in terms of instrumental and social support is found to be mutual. This study examines…

  16. Work and family: associations with long-term sick-listing in Swedish women - a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sandmark, Hélène

    2007-10-11

    The number of Swedish women who are long-term sick-listed is high, and twice as high as for men. Also the periods of sickness absence have on average been longer for women than for men. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between factors in work- and family life and long-term sick-listing in Swedish women. This case-control study included 283 women on long-term sick-listing > or =90 days, and 250 female referents, randomly chosen, living in five counties in Sweden. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses with odds ratios were calculated to estimate the associations between long-term sick-listing and factors related to occupational work and family life. Long-term sick-listing in women is associated with self-reported lack of competence for work tasks (OR 2.42 1.23-11.21 log reg), workplace dissatisfaction (OR 1.89 1.14-6.62 log reg), physical workload above capacity (1.78 1.50-5.94), too high mental strain in work tasks (1.61 1.08-5.01 log reg), number of employers during work life (OR 1.39 1.35-4.03 log reg), earlier part-time work (OR 1.39 1.18-4.03 log reg), and lack of influence on working hours (OR 1.35 1.47-3.86 log reg). A younger age at first child, number of children, and main responsibility for own children was also found to be associated with long-term sick-listing. Almost all of the sick-listed women (93%) wanted to return to working life, and 54% reported they could work immediately if adjustments at work or part-time work were possible. Factors in work and in family life could be important to consider to prevent women from being long-term sick-listed and promote their opportunities to remain in working life. Measures ought to be taken to improve their mobility in work life and control over decisions and actions regarding theirs lives.

  17. Health-related quality of life in Swedish pediatric burn patients and associations with burn and family characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sveen, J; Sjöberg, F; Öster, C

    2014-08-01

    Although many children with burns recover well and have a satisfying quality of life after the burn, some children do not adjust as well. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) focuses on the impact health status has on quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess HRQoL with the American Burn Association/Shriners Hospitals for Children Burn Outcomes Questionnaire (BOQ) in a nationwide Swedish sample of children with burns 0.3-9.0 years after injury. Participants were parents (n=109) of children aged up to 18 years at the time of investigation who were treated at the Linköping or Uppsala Burn Center between 2000 and 2008. The majority of children did not have limitations in physical function and they did not seem to experience much pain. However, there were indications of psychosocial problems. Parents of preschool children reported most problems with the children's behavior and family disruption, whereas parents of children aged 5-18 years reported most problems with appearance and emotional health. There were mainly burn-related variables associated with suboptimal HRQoL in children aged 5-18 years, while family-related variables did not contribute as much. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic and family and community environmental effects on drug abuse in adolescence: a Swedish national twin and sibling study.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Maes, Hermine H; Sundquist, Kristina; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan

    2014-02-01

    Using Swedish nationwide registry data, the authors investigated genetic and environmental risk factors in the etiology of drug abuse by twin sibling modeling. The authors followed up with epidemiological analyses to identify shared environmental influences on drug abuse. Drug abuse was defined using public medical, legal, or pharmacy records. Twin and sibling pairs were obtained from the national twin and genealogical registers. Information about sibling pair residence within the same household, small residential area, or municipality was obtained from Statistics Sweden. The authors predicted concordance for drug abuse by years of co-residence until the older sibling turned 21 and risk for future drug abuse in adolescents living with parental figures as a function of family-level socioeconomic status and neighborhood social deprivation. The best twin sibling fit model predicted substantial heritability for drug abuse in males (55%) and females (73%), with environmental factors shared by siblings operating only in males and accounting for 23% of the variance in liability. For each year of living in the same household, the probability of sibling concordance for drug abuse increased 2%-5%. When not residing in the same household, concordance was predicted from residence in the same small residential area or municipality. Risk for drug abuse was predicted both by family socioeconomic status and neighborhood social deprivation. Controlling for family socioeconomic status, each year of living in a high social deprivation neighborhood increased the risk for drug abuse by 2%. Using objective registry data, the authors found that drug abuse is highly heritable. A substantial proportion of the shared environmental effect on drug abuse comes from community-wide rather than household-level influences. Genetic effects demonstrated in twin studies have led to molecular analyses to elucidate biological pathways. In a parallel manner, environmental effects can be followed up by

  19. Genetic and familial environmental influences on the risk for drug abuse: a national Swedish adoption study.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Sundquist, Kristina; Ohlsson, Henrik; Palmér, Karolina; Maes, Hermine; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Prior research suggests that drug abuse (DA) is strongly influenced by both genetic and familial environmental factors. No large-scale adoption study has previously attempted to verify and integrate these findings. To determine how genetic and environmental factors contribute to the risk for DA. Follow-up in 9 public databases (1961-2009) of adopted children and their biological and adoptive relatives. Sweden. The study included 18 115 adopted children born between 1950 and 1993; 78,079 biological parents and siblings; and 51,208 adoptive parents and siblings. Drug abuse recorded in medical, legal, or pharmacy registry records. Risk for DA was significantly elevated in the adopted offspring of biological parents with DA (odds ratio, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.66-2.62), in biological full and half siblings of adopted children with DA (odds ratio, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.28-2.64; and odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.19-1.67, respectively), and in adoptive siblings of adopted children with DA (odds ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.43-2.65). A genetic risk index (including biological parental or sibling history of DA, criminal activity, and psychiatric or alcohol problems) and an environmental risk index (including adoptive parental history of divorce, death, criminal activity, and alcohol problems, as well as an adoptive sibling history of DA and psychiatric or alcohol problems) both strongly predicted the risk for DA. Including both indices along with sex and age at adoption in a predictive model revealed a significant positive interaction between the genetic and environmental risk indices. Drug abuse is an etiologically complex syndrome strongly influenced by a diverse set of genetic risk factors reflecting a specific liability to DA, by a vulnerability to other externalizing disorders, and by a range of environmental factors reflecting marital instability, as well as psychopathology and criminal behavior in the adoptive home. Adverse environmental effects on DA are more pathogenic in individuals

  20. Genetic homogeneity in Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome: Linkage to chromosome 17p in families of different non-Swedish ethnic origins

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.R.; Lee, M.; Compton, J.G.

    1995-11-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia or tetraplegia. Three United States families, three Egyptian families, and one Israeli Arab family were investigated for linkage of the SLS gene to a region of chromosome 17. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis with nine markers mapped the SLS gene to the same region of the genome as that reported in Swedish SLS pedigrees. Examination of recombinants by haplotype analysis showed that the gene lies in the region containing the markers D17S953, D17S805, D17S689, and D17S842. D17S805 is pericentromeric on 17p. Patients in two consanguineous Egyptian families were homozygous at the nine marker loci tested, and another patient from a third family was homozygous for eight of the nine, suggesting that within each of these families the region of chromosome 17 carrying the SLS gene is identical by descent. Linkage of the SLS gene to chromosome 17p in families of Arabic, mixed European, Native American, and Swedish descent provides evidence for a single SLS locus and should prove useful for diagnosis and carrier detection in worldwide cases. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Psychometric properties of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, HSOPSC, applied on a large Swedish health care sample.

    PubMed

    Hedsköld, Mats; Pukk-Härenstam, Karin; Berg, Elisabeth; Lindh, Marion; Soop, Michael; Øvretveit, John; Sachs, Magna Andreen

    2013-08-22

    A Swedish version of the USA Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" (S-HSOPSC) was developed to be used in both hospitals and primary care. Two new dimensions with two and four questions each were added as well as one outcome measure. This paper describes this Swedish version and an assessment of its psychometric properties which were tested on a large sample of responses from personnel in both hospital and primary care. The questionnaire was mainly administered in web form and 84215 forms were returned (response rate 60%) between 2009 and 2011. Eleven per cent of the responses came from primary care workers and 46% from hospital care workers. The psychometric properties were analyzed using both the total sample and the hospital and primary care subsamples by assessment of construct validity and internal consistency. Construct validity was assessed by confirmatory (CFA) and exploratory factor (EFA) analyses and internal consistency was established by Cronbachs's α. CFA of the total, hospital and primary care samples generally showed a good fit while the EFA pointed towards a 9-factor model in all samples instead of the 14-dimension S-HSOPSC instrument. Internal consistency was acceptable with Cronbach's α values above 0.7 in a major part of the dimensions. The S-HSOPSC, consisting of 14 dimensions, 48 items and 3 single-item outcome measures, is used both in hospitals and in primary care settings in Sweden for different purposes. This version of the original American instrument has acceptable construct validity and internal consistency when tested on large datasets of first-time responders from both hospitals and primary care centres. One common instrument for measurements of patient safety culture in both hospitals and primary care settings is an advantage since it enables comparisons between sectors and assessments of national patient safety improvement programs. Future research into this version of the instrument

  2. Strategies for Learning Experiences in Family Child Care: American and Swedish Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ramona; Karlsson, Fil dr Malene

    2012-01-01

    The outlook for teaching and learning in the homes of family child care (also called "day care" and "child minding" [the latter term is used in the United Kingdom]) is both promising and precarious. The authors believe such programs hold potential for high-quality learning, yet they suffer from lack of recognition and support.…

  3. Child health care utilisation in families with young or single mothers in a Swedish county.

    PubMed

    Wallby, Thomas; Modin, Bitte; Hjern, Anders

    2013-03-01

    Young age and lone parenthood are risk factors for impaired health among mothers and their children. Due to the higher risks of negative influences on physical and mental health, young and single mothers should be of special concern to the Child Health Services (CHS). In the present study, we investigated consumption patterns of child health care services among young and single mothers in Uppsala County, Sweden to study whether they are reached by the universal CHS program and if selective or indicative measures were administered in daily CHS practice. Register data on CHS contacts and socio-demographic indicators were collected for 10692 infants, born in 1998-2006. Results show small differences in contact pattern and immunization status, between children of young versus older, and single versus cohabiting mothers. However, both young (RR 0.64) and single (RR 0.80) mothers had significantly lower rates of participation in parental group. The CHS were consequently successful in implementing the universal preventive child health programme for all families, including families with young or single mothers. There was no indication, however, of an established selective preventive strategy aimed at these high risk families. Programs for strengthening the support provided to vulnerable families by the CHS are needed. © The Author(s) 2012.

  4. Strategies for Learning Experiences in Family Child Care: American and Swedish Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ramona; Karlsson, Fil dr Malene

    2012-01-01

    The outlook for teaching and learning in the homes of family child care (also called "day care" and "child minding" [the latter term is used in the United Kingdom]) is both promising and precarious. The authors believe such programs hold potential for high-quality learning, yet they suffer from lack of recognition and support.…

  5. Large Constituent Families Help Children Parse Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krott, Andrea; Nicoladis, Elena

    2005-01-01

    The family size of the constituents of compound words, or the number of compounds sharing the constituents, has been shown to affect adults' access to compound words in the mental lexicon. The present study was designed to see if family size would affect children's segmentation of compounds. Twenty-five English-speaking children between 3;7 and…

  6. Rett syndrome from a family perspective: The Swedish Rett Center survey.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Gunilla; Lindström, Britta; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to make a description of the early development in individuals with the diagnosis Rett syndrome using parents' information. Information received from 125 cases of Rett syndrome in Sweden in 1997 provided us with families' description of early development in gross motor function, fine motor function and communication/social interplay. Best abilities before regression were presented, 62% lost their best abilities, 22% kept them and 5% kept them with deterioration. Seventy-three percent learnt to walk, 20% stopped walking and 2% retrained walking. Concerning feeding, 69% learnt to feed themselves, 57% lost this ability, 7% retrained the ability and 5% learnt to feed after regression. Sixty-four percent were one year or younger when there was a deviation in development. Sixty answers reported the girl was late in developing functions while 35 reported sudden loss of reached abilities. Seventy-four percent developed a scoliosis and 83% reported other deformities; of these, deformities in feet were the most common. Postural control was poor since all but 15 girls/women learnt in different directions when sitting. Transitional movements were difficult to perform. In 80% of cases, the families were those who suspected early that something was wrong in the child's development. Because of this it is essential that medical staff is aware of the different ways RS develops in order to give families early appropriate support and a plan for intervention. Since there is not only loss of function in this group but also kept abilities, retrained abilities and abilities achieved after regression, more research has to be focused on management and treatment to help persons with Rett syndrome keep and develop abilities according to their individual resources.

  7. Health and social outcomes among children in low-income families and families receiving social assistance--a Swedish national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ringbäck Weitoft, Gunilla; Hjern, Anders; Batljan, Ilija; Vinnerljung, Bo

    2008-01-01

    We examined health and social outcomes among children related to parental disposable income and receipt of social assistance. Swedish national registry data were used in a longitudinal design. We estimated relative risks and odds ratios for health and social outcomes in Poisson and logistic regressions among 1.2 million children between 1993 and 2002, and adjusted for factors that might affect the associations. Children in families receiving long-term social assistance showed considerably less satisfactory future prospects regarding health-related outcomes--all-cause mortality, suicide attempt, alcohol and drug misuse. Also, and to an even greater extent, the children experienced low educational attainment and social assistance in young adulthood compared with the rest of the population, and also in comparison with other low-income families. Low income was also associated with risk increases, but to a lesser extent. After taking into account the greater proportion of social-assistance recipients in low-income groups, attenuated risk increases remained only regarding future prospects of low education and social assistance. Regarding both low income and months receiving social assistance there was a gradient, at least in the age-adjusted analyses; there were greater risk increases among long-term recipients and among those with low incomes, and lower risk increases among short-term recipients and among those with high incomes. The results indicate that growing up in a family on long-term social assistance is a robust risk marker for compromised long-term development. A policy whereby children and parents receiving long-term assistance are offered access to evidence-based prevention programs in the areas of health, education and skills training appears to be important.

  8. Structural considerations in the contemporary Taiwanese farm family: survival of the large family ideal.

    PubMed

    Devoe, P A

    1987-01-01

    The structure of farm families in an industrializing rural area in west-central Taiwan is explored using data for 96 households in Hsiu-Shui district. The results suggest that despite modernization and social change, "the large family ideal still persists and expresses itself as a compartmental family which offers both the individual freedom of a nuclear family and the support and security of a large extended family." excerpt

  9. Reproductive toxicity of seafood contaminants: Prospective comparisons of Swedish east and west coast fishermen's families

    PubMed Central

    Axmon, Anna; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Cohorts comprising fishermen's families on the east coast of Sweden have been found to have a high consumption of contaminated fish as well as high body burdens of persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs). Their west coast correspondents are socio-economically similar, but with considerably lower POP exposure since the fish caught on the west coast is far less contaminated. The rationale for this was that the cohorts residing on the east coast of Sweden have been found to have a high consumption of contaminated fish as well as high body burdens of POPs, whereas their west coast correspondents are socio-economically similar, but with considerably lower POP exposure since the fish caught on the west coast is far less contaminated. Among the reproductive outcomes investigated are included both male and female parameters, as well as couple fertility and effects on the fetus. A range of exposure measures, including both questionnaire assessments of fish consumption and biomarkers, have been used. The most consistent findings of the studies are those related to the fetus, where a decreased birth weight was found across all measures of exposure, which is in agreement with studies from other populations. Some markers for male reproduction function, i.e. sperm motility, sperm chromatin integrity, and Y:X chromosome ratio, were associated with POP exposure, whereas others, such as sperm concentration and semen volume, were not. With respect to couple fertility and female reproductive parameters, no support was given for associations with POP exposure. Although some associations may have been affected by beneficial effects of essential nutrients in seafood, the overall findings are meaningful in the context of reproductive toxicity and support the usefulness of the epidemiological design. PMID:18507855

  10. Does population density and neighborhood deprivation predict schizophrenia? A nationwide Swedish family-based study of 2.4 million individuals.

    PubMed

    Sariaslan, Amir; Larsson, Henrik; D'Onofrio, Brian; Långström, Niklas; Fazel, Seena; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2015-03-01

    People living in densely populated and socially disorganized areas have higher rates of psychiatric morbidity, but the potential causal status of such factors is uncertain. We used nationwide Swedish longitudinal registry data to identify all children born 1967-1989 (n = 2361585), including separate datasets for all cousins (n = 1715059) and siblings (n = 1667894). The nature of the associations between population density and neighborhood deprivation and individual risk for a schizophrenia diagnosis was investigated while adjusting for unobserved familial risk factors (through cousin and sibling comparisons) and then compared with similar associations for depression. We generated familial pedigree structures using the Multi-Generation Registry and identified study participants with schizophrenia and depression using the National Patient Registry. Fixed-effects logistic regression models were used to study within-family estimates. Population density, measured as ln(population size/km(2)), at age 15 predicted subsequent schizophrenia in the population (OR = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.09; 1.11). Unobserved familial risk factors shared by cousins within extended families attenuated the association (1.06; 1.03; 1.10), and the link disappeared entirely within nuclear families (1.02; 0.97; 1.08). Similar results were found for neighborhood deprivation as predictor and for depression as outcome. Sensitivity tests demonstrated that timing and accumulation effects of the exposures (mean scores across birth, ages 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 years) did not alter the findings. Excess risks of psychiatric morbidity, particularly schizophrenia, in densely populated and socioeconomically deprived Swedish neighborhoods appear, therefore, to result primarily from unobserved familial selection factors. Previous studies may have overemphasized the etiological importance of these environmental factors.

  11. Does Population Density and Neighborhood Deprivation Predict Schizophrenia? A Nationwide Swedish Family-Based Study of 2.4 Million Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sariaslan, Amir; Larsson, Henrik; D’Onofrio, Brian; Långström, Niklas; Fazel, Seena; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2015-01-01

    People living in densely populated and socially disorganized areas have higher rates of psychiatric morbidity, but the potential causal status of such factors is uncertain. We used nationwide Swedish longitudinal registry data to identify all children born 1967–1989 (n = 2361585), including separate datasets for all cousins (n = 1715059) and siblings (n = 1667894). The nature of the associations between population density and neighborhood deprivation and individual risk for a schizophrenia diagnosis was investigated while adjusting for unobserved familial risk factors (through cousin and sibling comparisons) and then compared with similar associations for depression. We generated familial pedigree structures using the Multi-Generation Registry and identified study participants with schizophrenia and depression using the National Patient Registry. Fixed-effects logistic regression models were used to study within-family estimates. Population density, measured as ln(population size/km2), at age 15 predicted subsequent schizophrenia in the population (OR = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.09; 1.11). Unobserved familial risk factors shared by cousins within extended families attenuated the association (1.06; 1.03; 1.10), and the link disappeared entirely within nuclear families (1.02; 0.97; 1.08). Similar results were found for neighborhood deprivation as predictor and for depression as outcome. Sensitivity tests demonstrated that timing and accumulation effects of the exposures (mean scores across birth, ages 1–5, 6–10, and 11–15 years) did not alter the findings. Excess risks of psychiatric morbidity, particularly schizophrenia, in densely populated and socioeconomically deprived Swedish neighborhoods appear, therefore, to result primarily from unobserved familial selection factors. Previous studies may have overemphasized the etiological importance of these environmental factors. PMID:25053652

  12. Enhanced amyloidogenic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein in gene-targeted mice bearing the Swedish familial Alzheimer's disease mutations and a "humanized" Abeta sequence.

    PubMed

    Reaume, A G; Howland, D S; Trusko, S P; Savage, M J; Lang, D M; Greenberg, B D; Siman, R; Scott, R W

    1996-09-20

    The processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in vivo has been characterized in a novel animal model that recapitulates, in part, the APP genotype of a familial form of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A gene-targeting strategy was used to introduce the Swedish familial AD mutations and convert mouse Abeta to the human sequence. The mutant APP is expressed at normal levels in brain, and cleavage at the mutant beta-secretase site is both accurate and enhanced. Furthermore, human Abeta production is significantly increased to levels 9-fold greater than those in normal human brain while nonamyloidogenic processing is depressed. The results on Abeta production extend similar findings obtained in cell culture to the brain of an animal and substantiate Abeta as a etiological factor in Swedish familial AD. These animals provide several distinguishing features over others created by conventional transgenic methodologies. The spatial and temporal expression patterns of human Abeta are expected to be faithfully reproduced because the gene encoding the mutant APP remains in its normal chromosomal context. Thus, the neuropathological consequences of human Abeta overproduction can be evaluated longitudinally in the absence of potential mitigating effects of APP overexpression or presence of the mouse Abeta peptide.

  13. Popliteal pterygium syndrome in a Swedish family--clinical findings and genetic analysis with the van der Woude syndrome locus at 1q32-q41.

    PubMed

    Wong, F K; Gustafsson, B

    2000-04-01

    The present study describes a Swedish family in which the mother and her son were affected with signs of popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS, OMIM 119500). Both individuals had bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, oral synechiae, paramedian pits on the lower lip, toe syndactyly and a piece of triangular skin overgrowth on the great toes. The son also presented with soft tissue syndactyly of the 2nd and 3rd fingers. Although popliteal pterygium was not found, the above clinical features were diagnostic for PPS. Chromosomal abnormalities were not revealed in either case by cytogenetic analyses. A test for microdeletion in the VWS region at 1q32-q41 was performed in the family using 5 polymorphic microsatellite markers from the region. The affected son was found to be heterozygous for all 5 markers, suggesting that microdeletion at the VWS region was unlikely. The VWS locus, however, was not excluded by haplotype analysis of the family.

  14. Little Brother Joins the Large Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    On the night of 15 December 2006, the fourth and last-to-be-installed VLTI Auxiliary Telescope (AT4) obtained its 'First Light'. The first images demonstrate that AT4 will be able to deliver the excellent image quality already delivered by the first three ATs. It will soon join its siblings to perform routinely interferometric measurements. ESO PR Photo 51a/06 ESO PR Photo 51a/06 VLT Auxiliary Telescope The VLT is composed of four 8.2-m Unit Telescope (Antu, Kueyen, Melipal and Yepun). They have been progressively put into service together with a vast suite of the most advanced astronomical instruments and are operated every night in the year. Contrary to other large astronomical telescopes, the VLT was designed from the beginning with the use of interferometry as a major goal. The VLT Interferometer (VLTI) combines starlight captured by two or three 8.2- VLT Unit Telescopes, dramatically increasing the spatial resolution and showing fine details of a large variety of celestial objects. ESO PR Photo 51b/06 ESO PR Photo 51b/06 One AT Under the Sky However, most of the time the large telescopes are used for other research purposes. They are therefore only available for interferometric observations during a limited number of nights every year. Thus, in order to exploit the VLTI each night and to achieve the full potential of this unique setup, some other (smaller), dedicated telescopes were included into the overall VLT concept. These telescopes, known as the VLTI Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs), are mounted on tracks and can be placed at precisely defined "parking" observing positions on the observatory platform. From these positions, their light beams are fed into the same common focal point via a complex system of reflecting mirrors mounted in an underground system of tunnels. The Auxiliary Telescopes are real technological jewels. They are placed in ultra-compact enclosures, complete with all necessary electronics, an air conditioning system and cooling liquid for

  15. Family environment and the malleability of cognitive ability: a Swedish national home-reared and adopted-away cosibling control study.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Turkheimer, Eric; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-04-14

    Cognitive ability strongly aggregates in families, and prior twin and adoption studies have suggested that this is the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used a powerful design--home-reared and adopted-away cosibling controls--to investigate the role of the rearing environment in cognitive ability. We identified, from a complete national Swedish sample of male-male siblings, 436 full-sibships in which at least one member was reared by one or more biological parents and the other by adoptive parents. IQ was measured at age 18-20 as part of the Swedish military service conscription examination. Parental educational level was rated on a 5-point scale. Controlling for clustering of offspring within biological families, the adopted siblings had an IQ 4.41 (SE = 0.75) points higher than their nonadopted siblings. Each additional unit of rearing parental education was associated with 1.71 (SE = 0.44) units of IQ. We replicated these results in 2,341 male-male half-sibships, in which, controlling for clustering within families, adoption was associated with a gain of IQ of 3.18 (SE = 0.34) points. Each additional unit of rearing parental education was associated with 1.94 (SE = 0.18) IQ units. Using full- and half-sibling sets matched for genetic background, we found replicated evidence that (i) rearing environment affects IQ measured in late adolescence, and (ii) a portion of the IQ of adopted siblings could be explained by the educational level of their adoptive parents.

  16. Perinatal and Family Risk Factors for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Early Life: A Swedish National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sundquist, Kristina; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Sundquist, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in early life has increased in recent decades, but the relevant risk factors remain largely unknown. We examined perinatal and family risk factors for NHL in childhood through young adulthood. Methods We conducted a national cohort study of 3 571 574 individuals born in Sweden in 1973–2008 who were followed for incidence of NHL through 2009 (ages 0–37 years). Detailed information on perinatal and family characteristics and NHL diagnoses were obtained from national birth and cancer registries. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between perinatal and family variables and NHL; P values are from two-sided tests. Results There were 936 NHL case patients identified in 66.3 million person-years of follow-up. Independent risk factors for NHL included family history of NHL in either a sibling (adjusted HR = 9.84; 95% CI = 2.46 to 39.41; P = .001) or parent (adjusted HR = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.27 to 4.38; P = .007); high fetal growth (for ≥2 SDs relative to 0 to <1 SD from the mean: adjusted HR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.25; P = .002); older maternal age (adjusted HR for each 5-year increment = 1.11; 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.19; P trend = .004); low birth order (adjusted HR for each increment of one birth = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.84 to 0.99; P trend = .02); and male sex (adjusted HR = 1.58; 95% CI = 1.38 to 1.80; P < .001). Male sex was associated with onset of NHL before 15 years of age but not with later-onset NHL, whereas the other risk factors did not vary by age at diagnosis. No association was found between gestational age at birth, twinning, paternal age, or parental education and NHL. Conclusion In this large national cohort study, family history of NHL, high fetal growth, older maternal age, low birth order, and male sex were independent risk factors for NHL in early life. PMID:22623506

  17. Associations between calf mortality during days 1 to 90 and herd-level cow and production variables in large Swedish dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Torsein, M; Jansson-Mörk, M; Lindberg, A; Hallén-Sandgren, C; Berg, C

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to describe large Swedish dairy herds with high and low mortality risk in calves during the first 90 d of life, using herd-level data, and to evaluate if high calf mortality risk is associated with other herd-level management variables that influence cow health. A total of 57 Swedish dairy herds met the inclusion criteria of affiliation to the Swedish official milk recording scheme, herd size of ≥140 and ≥160 cows in 2008/2009 and 2009/2010, and calf mortality risks, classified as high (HM; calf mortality risk at least 3.5% in 2008/2009 and 5.5% in 2009/2010; n=28) or low (LM; calf mortality risk less than <1.5% in 2008/2009 and 2009/2010; n=29), and were thus included in the study. The data used in this study were collected from the Swedish Dairy association during the milking year 2009/2010. For LM herds, the calf mortality risk ranged from 0 to 1.46 (median=0.66) in 2008/2009 and from 0 to 1.48 (median=0.67) in 2009/2010. For HM herds, the calf mortality risk ranged from 3.57 to 11.52 (median=6.15) in 2008/2009 and from 5.88 to 18.23 (median=8.39) in 2009/2010. Median age at death was 28 d for HM and 37 d for LM herds. Associations between type of herd (HM or LM) and the production variables were evaluated using multi-correspondence analysis and logistic regression models covering the areas "mortality and culling," "health," "herd/production variables," and "fertility." Herds with HM risks during d 1 to 90 were associated with higher on-farm mortality rate in cows, lower average milk yield, higher incidence of antibiotic treatment, and a higher proportion of purchased animals. These results indicate that herds with HM risk during d 1 to 90 have coexisting issues concerning cow management and health. Future research is needed to evaluate if identifying HM herds and working with advisory and preventive manners at these herds also can be positive for a reduction of on-farm mortality and antibiotic usage, which are important issues from

  18. Exploring the relationship between safety culture and reported dispensing errors in a large sample of Swedish community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Nordén-Hägg, Annika; Kälvemark-Sporrong, Sofia; Lindblad, Åsa Kettis

    2012-08-13

    The potential for unsafe acts to result in harm to patients is constant risks to be managed in any health care delivery system including pharmacies. The number of reported errors is influenced by a various elements including safety culture. The aim of this study is to investigate a possible relationship between reported dispensing errors and safety culture, taking into account demographic and pharmacy variables, in Swedish community pharmacies. A cross-sectional study was performed, encompassing 546 (62.8%) of the 870 Swedish community pharmacies. All staff in the pharmacies on December 1st, 2007 were included in the study. To assess safety culture domains in the pharmacies, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was used. Numbers of dispensed prescription items as well as dispensing errors for each pharmacy across the first half year of 2008 were summarised. Intercorrelations among a number of variables including SAQ survey domains, general properties of the pharmacy, demographic characteristics, and dispensing errors were calculated. A negative binomial regression model was used to further examine the relationship between the variables and dispensing errors. The first analysis demonstrated a number of significant correlations between reported dispensing errors and the variables examined. Negative correlations were found with SAQ domains Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Job Satisfaction as well as mean age and response rates. Positive relationships were demonstrated with Stress Recognition (SAQ), number of employees, educational diversity, birth country diversity, education country diversity and number of dispensed prescription items. Variables displaying a significant relationship to errors in this analysis were included in the regression analysis. When controlling for demographic variables, only Stress Recognition, mean age, educational diversity and number of dispensed prescription items and employees, were still associated with dispensing errors. This study

  19. Exploring the relationship between safety culture and reported dispensing errors in a large sample of Swedish community pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The potential for unsafe acts to result in harm to patients is constant risks to be managed in any health care delivery system including pharmacies. The number of reported errors is influenced by a various elements including safety culture. The aim of this study is to investigate a possible relationship between reported dispensing errors and safety culture, taking into account demographic and pharmacy variables, in Swedish community pharmacies. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed, encompassing 546 (62.8%) of the 870 Swedish community pharmacies. All staff in the pharmacies on December 1st, 2007 were included in the study. To assess safety culture domains in the pharmacies, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was used. Numbers of dispensed prescription items as well as dispensing errors for each pharmacy across the first half year of 2008 were summarised. Intercorrelations among a number of variables including SAQ survey domains, general properties of the pharmacy, demographic characteristics, and dispensing errors were calculated. A negative binomial regression model was used to further examine the relationship between the variables and dispensing errors. Results The first analysis demonstrated a number of significant correlations between reported dispensing errors and the variables examined. Negative correlations were found with SAQ domains Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Job Satisfaction as well as mean age and response rates. Positive relationships were demonstrated with Stress Recognition (SAQ), number of employees, educational diversity, birth country diversity, education country diversity and number of dispensed prescription items. Variables displaying a significant relationship to errors in this analysis were included in the regression analysis. When controlling for demographic variables, only Stress Recognition, mean age, educational diversity and number of dispensed prescription items and employees, were still associated with

  20. Growing gaps: The importance of income and family for educational inequalities in mortality among Swedish men and women 1990-2009.

    PubMed

    Östergren, Olof

    2015-08-01

    Although absolute levels of mortality have decreased among Swedish men and women in recent decades, educational inequalities in mortality have increased, especially among women. The aim of this study is to disentangle the role of income and family type in educational inequalities in mortality in Sweden during 1990-2009, focusing on gender differences. Data on individuals born in Sweden between the ages of 30 and 74 years were collected from total population registries, covering a total of 529,275 deaths and 729 million person-months. Temporary life expectancies (age 30-74 years) by education were calculated using life tables, and rate ratios were estimated with Poisson regression with robust standard errors. Temporary life expectancy improved among all groups except low educated women. Relative educational inequalities in mortality (RRs) increased from 1.79 to 1.98 among men and from 1.78 to 2.10 among women. Variation in family type explained some of the inequalities among men, but not among women, and did not contribute to the trend. Variation in income explained a larger part of the educational inequalities among men compared to women and also explained the increase in educational inequalities in mortality among men and women. Increasing educational inequalities in mortality in Sweden may be attributed to the increase in income inequalities in mortality. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  1. Criminal offending and the family environment: Swedish national high-risk home-reared and adopted-away co-sibling control study.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Morris, Nancy A; Ohlsson, Henrik; Lönn, Sara Larsson; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2016-10-01

    Criminal offending is strongly transmitted across generations. To clarify the contribution of rearing environment to cross-generational transmission of crime. Using Swedish national registries, we identified 1176 full-sibling and 3085 half-sibling sets from high-risk families where at least one sibling was adopted and the other raised by the biological parents. Risk for criminal conviction was substantially lower in the full- and half-siblings who were adopted v. home-reared (hazard ratios (HR) = 0.56, 95% CI 0.50-0.64 and 0.60, 95% CI 0.56-0.65, respectively). The protective effect of adoption was significantly stronger in sibships with two v. one high-risk parent. Using matched high-risk full- and half-siblings, we found replicated evidence that (a) rearing environment has a strong impact on risk for criminal conviction, (b) high-quality rearing environments have especially strong effects in those at high familial risk for criminal offending and (c) the protective effects of adoption are stronger for more severe crimes and for repeated offending. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  2. Swedish Orienteers: A Survey Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottosson, Torgny

    1995-01-01

    A survey questionnaire was sent to 1,200 members of Swedish orienteering clubs. Some common beliefs about orienteers were verified. Respondents identifying themselves as active orienteers were often well educated and in the upper middle class, had a healthy lifestyle, and tended to participate as families. (Author/TD)

  3. How are social capital and sense of coherence associated with hazardous alcohol use? Findings from a large population-based Swedish sample of adults.

    PubMed

    Larm, Peter; Åslund, Cecilia; Starrin, Bengt; Nilsson, K W

    2016-07-01

    This study examined whether social capital and a sense of coherence are associated with hazardous alcohol use in a large population-based Swedish sample. In particular, the objectives were (a) to examine which of five subdimensions of social capital is associated with hazardous alcohol use, (b) to investigate the moderating role of sense of coherence and (c) to examine possible sex differences. A postal survey was distributed to a sample of respondents (aged 18-84 years) from five Swedish counties that was stratified by sex, age and city; 40,674 (59.2%) participants responded, of which 45.5% were men and 54.5% were women with a mean±SD age of 53.8±17.9 years. Structural dimensions of social capital were associated with an increased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women, whereas the increased probability associated with cognitive dimensions occurred mostly among women. Sense of coherence was robustly associated with a decreased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women. There were few moderating effects of sense of coherence and sex differences emerged mainly for the cognitive dimension of social capital. CONCLUSIONS ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN SOCIAL CAPITAL DIMENSIONS AND HAZARDOUS ALCOHOL USE WERE PARTLY SEX-SPECIFIC, WHEREAS THE BENEFITS OF A SENSE OF COHERENCE ACCRUED TO BOTH SEXES SOCIAL CAPITAL DIMENSIONS AND SENSE OF COHERENCE WERE GENERALLY UNRELATED TO EACH OTHER ONLY ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN THE COGNITIVE DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL CAPITAL AND HAZARDOUS ALCOHOL USE DIFFERED BY SEX. © 2016 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  4. Long term mental health outcomes of Finnish children evacuated to Swedish families during the second world war and their non-evacuated siblings: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa S; Gilman, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare the risks of admission to hospital for any type of psychiatric disorder and for four specific psychiatric disorders among adults who as children were evacuated to Swedish foster families during the second world war and their non-evacuated siblings, and to evaluate whether these risks differ between the sexes. Design Cohort study. Setting National child evacuation scheme in Finland during the second world war. Participants Children born in Finland between 1933 and 1944 who were later included in a 10% sample of the 1950 Finnish census ascertained in 1997 (n=45 463; women: n=22 021; men: n=23 442). Evacuees in the sample were identified from war time government records. Main outcome measure Adults admitted to hospital for psychiatric disorders recorded between 1971 and 2011 in the Finnish hospital discharge register. Methods We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the association between evacuation to temporary foster care in Sweden during the second world war and admission to hospital for a psychiatric disorder between ages 38 and 78 years. Fixed effects methods were employed to control for all unobserved social and genetic characteristics shared among siblings. Results Among men and women combined, the risk of admission to hospital for a psychiatric disorder did not differ between Finnish adults evacuated to Swedish foster families and their non-evacuated siblings (hazard ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.26). Evidence suggested a lower risk of admission for any mental disorder (0.67, 0.44 to 1.03) among evacuated men, whereas for women there was no association between evacuation and the overall risk of admission for a psychiatric disorder (1.21, 0.80 to 1.83). When admissions for individual psychiatric disorders were analyzed, evacuated girls were significantly more likely than their non-evacuated sisters to be admitted to hospital for a mood disorder as an adult (2.19, 1.10 to 4.33). Conclusions The Finnish

  5. Long term mental health outcomes of Finnish children evacuated to Swedish families during the second world war and their non-evacuated siblings: cohort study.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Torsten; Santavirta, Nina; Betancourt, Theresa S; Gilman, Stephen E

    2015-01-05

    To compare the risks of admission to hospital for any type of psychiatric disorder and for four specific psychiatric disorders among adults who as children were evacuated to Swedish foster families during the second world war and their non-evacuated siblings, and to evaluate whether these risks differ between the sexes. Cohort study. National child evacuation scheme in Finland during the second world war. Children born in Finland between 1933 and 1944 who were later included in a 10% sample of the 1950 Finnish census ascertained in 1997 (n = 45,463; women: n = 22,021; men: n = 23,442). Evacuees in the sample were identified from war time government records. Adults admitted to hospital for psychiatric disorders recorded between 1971 and 2011 in the Finnish hospital discharge register. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the association between evacuation to temporary foster care in Sweden during the second world war and admission to hospital for a psychiatric disorder between ages 38 and 78 years. Fixed effects methods were employed to control for all unobserved social and genetic characteristics shared among siblings. Among men and women combined, the risk of admission to hospital for a psychiatric disorder did not differ between Finnish adults evacuated to Swedish foster families and their non-evacuated siblings (hazard ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.26). Evidence suggested a lower risk of admission for any mental disorder (0.67, 0.44 to 1.03) among evacuated men, whereas for women there was no association between evacuation and the overall risk of admission for a psychiatric disorder (1.21, 0.80 to 1.83). When admissions for individual psychiatric disorders were analyzed, evacuated girls were significantly more likely than their non-evacuated sisters to be admitted to hospital for a mood disorder as an adult (2.19, 1.10 to 4.33). The Finnish evacuation policy was not associated with an increased overall risk of admission to hospital

  6. Paradigms in Swedish as a Second Language--Curricula for Primary School and Secondary School in Swedish as a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnusson, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes and compares the curricula of Swedish and Swedish as a second language for primary and secondary school. The school subject of Swedish as a second language is young, and its ideological foundation has not been debated to any large extent, in contrast to Swedish. This article analyzes the curricula of both subjects in terms of…

  7. Swedish views on selenium.

    PubMed

    Bruce, A

    1986-01-01

    For a long time selenium was known only for its toxic characteristics. During the last few decades selenium deficiency has been recognized as an important agricultural problem in Sweden. On average, grains and pastures only contain one tenth of the amount of selenium considered necessary to avoid symptoms of deficiency. However, the incidence of muscle degeneration among the animals has been low, probably due to imported animal feed. Since 1980 selenium has been added to animal feed, but only minor changes in the selenium content of Swedish food stuffs have been recorded. Some studies have shown that the average Swedish dietary intake of selenium is 10-70 micrograms/day. The lowest levels were found in vegan diets, based on locally-grown products. Swedish studies have found depressed glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) levels in patients with various skin disorders, including acne; myotonic dystrophy and rheumatic arthritis. Clinical trials with selenium supplementation have given positive results in some of these disorders as well as in some patients with disabling muscular and joint pains. Today there is a large sale of selenium tablets sometimes with additional vitamin E. The marketing of these tablets, however, is often based on unsubstantiated claims.

  8. Non-DYT1 dystonia in a large Italian family.

    PubMed Central

    Bentivoglio, A R; Del Grosso, N; Albanese, A; Cassetta, E; Tonali, P; Frontali, M

    1997-01-01

    A large non-Jewish Italian family affected by idiopathic torsion dystonia with autosomal dominant transmission and almost complete penetrance is reported. The prevalent phenotype was characterised by early onset with cranial-cervical involvement and progression to a segmental distribution; progression to generalisation was also found. Among 45 people examined, 14 were considered definitely or probably affected by idiopathic torsion dystonia. Eight definitely affected members had mean age (SD) at onset of 15.6 (12.5); idiopathic torsion dystonia started in the cranial-cervical region in six of them, in the upper limbs in two; in four cases dystonia progressed to other body regions, in two cases a generalisation was seen. Linkage analysis with 9q34 markers excluded the region containing the DYT1 locus in this family; linkage to the dopa-responsive dystonia markers was also excluded. A comparison of the phenotype in the present family and other non-DYT1 families shows striking overlapping features differing from those of DYT1 idiopathic torsion dystonia. PMID:9120448

  9. Family-specific aggregation of lipid GWAS variants confers the susceptibility to familial hypercholesterolemia in a large Austrian family.

    PubMed

    Nikkola, Elina; Ko, Arthur; Alvarez, Marcus; Cantor, Rita M; Garske, Kristina; Kim, Elliot; Gee, Stephanie; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Muxel, Reinhard; Matikainen, Niina; Söderlund, Sanni; Motazacker, Mahdi M; Borén, Jan; Lamina, Claudia; Kronenberg, Florian; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Palotie, Aarno; Laakso, Markku; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2017-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia confers susceptibility to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Both serum total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) exhibit a strong genetic component (heritability estimates 0.41-0.50). However, a large part of this heritability cannot be explained by the variants identified in recent extensive genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on lipids. Our aim was to find genetic causes leading to high LDL-C levels and ultimately CVD in a large Austrian family presenting with what appears to be autosomal dominant inheritance for familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). We utilized linkage analysis followed by whole-exome sequencing and genetic risk score analysis using an Austrian multi-generational family with various dyslipidemias, including elevated TC and LDL-C, and one family branch with elevated lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)). We did not find evidence for genome-wide significant linkage for LDL-C or apparent causative variants in the known FH genes rather, we discovered a particular family-specific combination of nine GWAS LDL-C SNPs (p = 0.02 by permutation), and putative less severe familial hypercholesterolemia mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes in a subset of the affected family members. Separately, high Lp(a) levels observed in one branch of the family were explained primarily by the LPA locus, including short (<23) Kringle IV repeats and rs3798220. Taken together, some forms of FH may be explained by family-specific combinations of LDL-C GWAS SNPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Blueprints in Sweden. Symptom load in Swedish adolescents in studies of Functional Family Therapy (FFT), Multisystemic Therapy (MST) and Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC).

    PubMed

    Gustle, Lars-Henry; Hansson, Kjell; Sundell, Knut; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar; Löfholm, Cecilia Andrée

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare symptom load in youth groups treated with three Swedish Blueprint programmes - Functional Family Therapy (FFT), Multisystemic Therapy (MST) and Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) - to see if symptom load matches the intensity of the treatment model as expected. These youth groups were also compared with in- and outpatients from child and adolescent psychiatry, and a normal comparison group. In addition, we compared the symptom load of their mothers. Symptom load was measured by the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) in the adolescents, and by the Symptom Checklist 90 in their mothers. The results showed that youth in the MST and MTFC studies had a higher symptom load than in the FFT study, and the same pattern of results was found in their mothers. It is concluded that there seems to be a reasonable correspondence between the offered resources and the symptom load among youth and parents; treatment methods with higher intensity have been offered to youth with higher symptom load. The correlation between internalized and externalized symptoms was high in all study groups. The MST and MTFC groups had an equally high total symptom load as the psychiatric inpatient sample.

  11. Glycogenosis type VII (Tarui disease) in a Swedish family: Two novel mutations in muscle phosphofructokinase gene (PFK-M) resulting in intron retentions

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.C.; Exelbert, R.; Plotz, P.H.

    1996-07-01

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) plays a major role in glycolysis. Human PFK is composed of three isoenzyme subunits (muscle [M], liver [L], and platelet [P]), which are encoded by different genes. Deficiency of muscle isoenzyme (PFK-M), glycogenosis type VII (Tarui disease), is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an exertional myopathy and hemolytic syndrome. Several disease-causing mutations have been identified in the PFK-M gene in Japanese, Ashkenazi Jewish, Italian, French Canadian, and Swiss patients. We describe the genetic defect in a Swedish family with affected individuals in two generations. The patients are compound heterozygotes: two different mutations result in retention of intron 13 or intron 16 sequences into mRNA. A G1127A transition destroys the 5{prime} donor site of intron 13, resulting in a 155-nt retention of the intronic sequence. An a-to-g base change in intron 16 creates a new acceptor splice site, resulting in a 63-nt retention of intronic sequence. Both mutations are predicted to result in premature termination of translation. Some of the transcripts generated from the intron 16 mutated allele also contain intron 10 sequence unspliced. 34 refs., 6 figs.

  12. The PSEN1 I143T mutation in a Swedish family with Alzheimer's disease: clinical report and quantification of Aβ in different brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lina; Welander, Hedvig; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Tjernberg, Lars O; Nennesmo, Inger; Wallin, Åsa K; Graff, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Early-onset dominantly inherited forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are rare, but studies of such cases have revealed important information about the disease mechanisms. Importantly, mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN1) and PSEN2, alter the APP processing and lead to an increased amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) 42/40 ratio. This, together with other studies on pathogenic mechanisms, show that Aβ42 is a major player in the etiology of AD. Here, we present a clinical and neuropathological description of a Swedish family with an I143T mutation in the PSEN1 gene, which gives rise to a severe form of AD. We also performed an extensive investigation on the concentration and distribution of Aβ species of different lengths in six brain regions from two mutation carriers. Our study showed that Aβ42 and a longer peptide, Aβ43, were present both in plaque cores and in total amyloid preparations, and were each clearly more frequent than Aβ40 in all examined regions, as shown by both mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. PMID:20628413

  13. In-utero exposure to maternal smoking is not linked to tobacco use in adulthood after controlling for genetic and family influences: a Swedish sibling study.

    PubMed

    Rydell, Mina; Granath, Fredrik; Cnattingius, Sven; Magnusson, Cecilia; Galanti, Maria Rosaria

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have linked maternal smoking during pregnancy with regular tobacco use in offspring, but findings are not consistent and confounding from genetic and environmental factors have not fully been taken into account. A comparison between siblings discordant for prenatal smoking exposure adjusts for confounding by shared familial (i.e., genetic and environmental) factors. We investigated the association between prenatal exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of regular smoking or snus (Swedish moist smokeless tobacco) use in young adult offspring, using a population based matched cohort study. The cohort consisted of 1,538 randomly sampled same-sex sibling pairs, discordant for maternal smoking during pregnancy, 19-27 years old, participating in a survey conducted in Sweden 2010-2011. Lifetime and current history of tobacco use was self-reported in the survey, and information about maternal smoking during pregnancy was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Conditional logistic regression and stratified Cox proportional hazards regression were used to calculate odds ratios, hazard ratios, and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Analyses of exposure-discordant siblings did not reveal significant associations between prenatal exposure to maternal smoking and lifetime or current daily tobacco use, intensity of use, or time to onset of daily tobacco use. These findings suggest that the previously reported higher risks of tobacco use in offspring of mothers who smoked during pregnancy, compared with offspring of non-smoking mothers, were likely due to confounding from genetic or environmental factors.

  14. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  15. Using the Swedish Model to Motivate the Development of Family/Ethnic Backgrounds as Educational Resources in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernick, Walter

    Educators rarely attempt to exploit the positive features of their students' family and ethnic backgrounds as helpful resources for instruction. Rather, they seek out students' individual differences only when problems arise. Thinking positively about the influences of particular features becomes lost in problem-centered efforts to maintain test…

  16. Reduction, alignment and visualisation of large diverse sequence families.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William R

    2016-08-02

    Current volumes of sequence data can lead to large numbers of hits identified on a search, typically in the range of 10s to 100s of thousands. It is often quite difficult to tell from these raw results whether the search has been a success or has picked-up sequences with little or no relationship to the query. The best approach to this problem is to cluster and align the resulting families, however, existing methods concentrate on fast clustering and either do not align the sequences or only perform a limited alignment. A method (MULSEL) is presented that combines fast peptide-based pre-sorting with a following cascade of mini-alignments, each of which are generated with a robust profile/profile method. From these mini-alignments, a representative sequence is selected, based on a variety of intrinsic and user-specified criteria that are combined to produce the sequence collection for the next cycle of alignment. For moderate sized sequence collections (10s of thousands) the method executes on a laptop computer within seconds or minutes. MULSEL bridges a gap between fast clustering methods and slower multiple sequence alignment methods and provides a seamless transition from one to the other. Furthermore, it presents the resulting reduced family in a graphical manner that makes it clear if family members have been misaligned or if there are sequences present that appear inconsistent.

  17. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy - 4 Swedish families with an associated PKP2 c.2146-1G>C variant

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Anneli; Åström-Aneq, Meriam; Widlund, Kjerstin Ferm; Fluur, Christina; Green, Anna; Rehnberg, Malin; Gunnarsson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the genotype-phenotype correlations in four unrelated families with a PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant were studied. Our primary aim was to determine the carriers that fulfilled the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) diagnostic criteria of 2010. Our secondary aim was to investigate whether any specific clinical characteristics can be attributed to this particular gene variant. Index patients were assessed using next generation ARVC panel sequencing technique and their family members were assessed by Sanger sequencing targeted at the PKP2 c.2146-1G>C variant. The gene variant carriers were offered a clinical follow-up, with evaluation based on the patient’s history and a standard set of non-invasive testing. The PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant was found in 23 of 41 patients who underwent the examination. Twelve of the 19 family members showed “possible ARVC”. One with “borderline ARVC” and the rest with “definite ARVC” demonstrated re-polarization disturbances, but arrhythmia was uncommon. A lethal event occurred in a 14-year-old boy. In the present study, no definitive genotype-phenotype correlations were found, where the majority of the family members carrying the PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant were diagnosed with “possible ARVC”. These individuals should be offered a long-term follow-up since they are frequently symptomless but still at risk for insidious sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:27335691

  18. Triparental families: a new genetic-epidemiological design applied to drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior in a Swedish national sample.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-06-01

    The authors sought to clarify the sources of parent-offspring resemblance for drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior, using a novel genetic-epidemiological design. Using national registries, the authors identified rates of drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior in 41,360 Swedish individuals born between 1960 and 1990 and raised in triparental families comprising a biological mother who reared them, a "not-lived-with" biological father, and a stepfather. When each syndrome was examined individually, hazard rates for drug abuse in offspring of parents with drug abuse were highest for mothers (2.80, 95% CI=2.23-3.38), intermediate for not-lived-with fathers (2.45, 95% CI=2.14-2.79), and lowest for stepfathers (1.99, 95% CI=1.55-2.56). The same pattern was seen for alcohol use disorders (2.23, 95% CI=1.93-2.58; 1.84, 95% CI=1.69-2.00; and 1.27, 95% CI=1.12-1.43) and criminal behavior (1.55, 95% CI=1.44-1.66; 1.46, 95% CI=1.40-1.52; and 1.30, 95% CI=1.23-1.37). When all three syndromes were examined together, specificity of cross-generational transmission was highest for mothers, intermediate for not-lived-with fathers, and lowest for stepfathers. Analyses of intact families and other not-lived-with parents and stepparents showed similar cross-generation transmission for these syndromes in mothers and fathers, supporting the representativeness of results from triparental families. A major strength of the triparental design is its inclusion, within a single family, of parents who provide, to a first approximation, their offspring with genes plus rearing, genes only, and rearing only. For drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior, the results of this study suggest that parent-offspring transmission involves both genetic and environmental processes, with genetic factors being somewhat more important. These results should be interpreted in the context of the strengths and limitations of national registry data.

  19. Triparental Families: A New Genetic-Epidemiological Design Applied to Drug Abuse, Alcohol Use Disorders, and Criminal Behavior in a Swedish National Sample

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, Kenneth S.; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective The authors sought to clarify the sources of parent-offspring resemblance for drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior, using a novel genetic-epidemiological design. Method Using national registries, the authors identified rates of drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior in 41,360 Swedish individuals born between 1960 and 1990 and raised in triparental families comprising a biological mother who reared them, a “not-lived-with” biological father, and a stepfather. Results When each syndrome was examined individually, hazard rates for drug abuse in offspring of parents with drug abuse were highest for mothers (2.80, 95% CI=2.23–3.38), intermediate for not-lived-with fathers (2.45,95%CI=2.14–2.79), and lowest for stepfathers (1.99, 95% CI=1.55–2.56). The same pattern was seen for alcohol use disorders (2.23, 95% CI=1.93–2.58; 1.84, 95% CI=1.69–2.00; and 1.27, 95% CI=1.12–1.43) and criminal behavior (1.55, 95% CI=1.44–1.66; 1.46, 95%CI=1.40–1.52; and1.30, 95% CI=1.23–1.37). When all three syndromes were examined together, specificity of cross-generational transmission was highest for mothers, intermediate for not-lived-with fathers, and lowest for stepfathers. Analyses of intact families and other not-lived-with parents and stepparents showed similar cross-generation transmission for these syndromes in mothers and fathers, supporting the representativeness of results from triparental families. Conclusions A major strength of the triparental design is its inclusion, within a single family, of parents who provide, to a first approximation, their offspring with genes plus rearing, genes only, and rearing only. For drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior, the results of this study suggest that parent-offspring transmission involves both genetic and environmental processes, with genetic factors being somewhat more important. These results should be interpreted in the context of the strengths

  20. Social capital in relation to depression, musculoskeletal pain, and psychosomatic symptoms: a cross-sectional study of a large population-based cohort of Swedish adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Social capital has lately received much attention in health research. The present study investigated whether two measures of subjective social capital were related to psychosomatic symptoms, musculoskeletal pain, and depression in a large population of Swedish adolescents. Methods A total of 7757 13-18 year old students anonymously completed the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland 2008 which included questions on sociodemographic background, neighbourhood social capital, general social trust, and ill health. Results Low neighbourhood social capital and low general social trust were associated with higher rates of psychosomatic symptoms, musculoskeletal pain, and depression. Individuals with low general social trust had more than three times increased odds of being depressed, three times increased odds of having many psychosomatic symptoms, and double the odds of having many symptoms of musculoskeletal pain. Conclusions The findings make an important contribution to the social capital - health debate by demonstrating relations between social capital factors and self-reported ill health in a young population. PMID:21092130

  1. Family History of Education Predicts Eating Disorders across Multiple Generations among 2 Million Swedish Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Anna; Heshmati, Amy; Koupil, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate which facets of parent and grandparent socio-economic position (SEP) are associated with eating disorders (ED), and how this varies by ED subtype and over time. Methods Total-population cohort study of 1,040,165 females and 1,098,188 males born 1973–1998 in Sweden, and followed for inpatient or outpatient ED diagnoses until 2010. Proportional hazards models estimated associations with parental education, income and social class, and with grandparental education and income. Results 15,747 females and 1051 males in our sample received an ED diagnosis, with rates increasing in both sexes over time. ED incidence in females was independently predicted by greater educational level among the father, mother and maternal grandparents, but parent social class and parental income showed little or no independent effect. The associations with education were equally strong for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and ED not-otherwise-specified, and had increased over time. Among males, an apparently similar pattern was seen with respect to anorexia nervosa, but non-anorexia ED showed no association with parental education and an inverse association with parental income. Conclusions Family history of education predicts ED in gender- and disorder-specific ways, and in females the effect is observed across multiple generations. Particularly given that these effects may have grown stronger in more recent cohorts, these findings highlight the need for further research to clarify the underlying mechanisms and identify promising targets for prevention. Speculatively, one such mechanism may involve greater internal and external demands for academic success in highly educated families. PMID:25162402

  2. Family history of education predicts eating disorders across multiple generations among 2 million Swedish males and females.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Anna; Heshmati, Amy; Koupil, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    To investigate which facets of parent and grandparent socio-economic position (SEP) are associated with eating disorders (ED), and how this varies by ED subtype and over time. Total-population cohort study of 1,040,165 females and 1,098,188 males born 1973-1998 in Sweden, and followed for inpatient or outpatient ED diagnoses until 2010. Proportional hazards models estimated associations with parental education, income and social class, and with grandparental education and income. 15,747 females and 1051 males in our sample received an ED diagnosis, with rates increasing in both sexes over time. ED incidence in females was independently predicted by greater educational level among the father, mother and maternal grandparents, but parent social class and parental income showed little or no independent effect. The associations with education were equally strong for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and ED not-otherwise-specified, and had increased over time. Among males, an apparently similar pattern was seen with respect to anorexia nervosa, but non-anorexia ED showed no association with parental education and an inverse association with parental income. Family history of education predicts ED in gender- and disorder-specific ways, and in females the effect is observed across multiple generations. Particularly given that these effects may have grown stronger in more recent cohorts, these findings highlight the need for further research to clarify the underlying mechanisms and identify promising targets for prevention. Speculatively, one such mechanism may involve greater internal and external demands for academic success in highly educated families.

  3. Familial pattern of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Hazmi, Mohd; Ab Aziz, A.; Asma, A.

    2013-01-01

    Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS) is the most common radiographic malformation in children with early onset of hearing loss. Usually its occurrence is non-familial, however intriguingly a portion of patients with LVAS is found to have evidence of genetic predisposition. We described cases of LVAS in two siblings of a Chinese family. The elder sister first presented with reduced hearing since childhood and her brother has a similar complaint upon further questioning. Their hearing test showed bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and computed tomography (CT) of temporal bone showed enlarged vestibular aqueduct in both patients. We described an approach to diagnosis of LVAS and highlight the importance of hearing assessment in genetic link hearing loss. PMID:27034633

  4. Clinical and genetic study of a large Chinese family presented with familial spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Xing, Huajie; Liu, Yanguo; Jiang, Guanchao; Li, Xiao; Hou, Yanyan; Yang, Fan; Wang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Familial spontaneous pneumothorax (FSP) is an inherited disease, and Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is its leading cause. BHD syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, renal cancer, and skin fibrofolliculomas. It is caused by germline mutations in the FLCN gene. Thus far a variety of mutations have been reported; however, the unique characteristics of BHD syndrome-related FSP are still unclear. We reviewed the family history of a large Chinese family that presented with FSP. Genetic testing of the FLCN gene was performed and the special clinical characteristics of BHD syndrome-related FSP were discussed. This family comprised 5 generations and 76 members. Six of these had experienced pneumothorax episodes and 35 members had undergone genetic analysis of the FLCN gene, except for one member who had pneumothorax. Among the 35 members, 17 had the mutation in the FLCN gene. All five members with pneumothorax had the mutation. Frequency of pneumothorax in the mutation members was 29.4% (5/17). Clinical characteristics of the BHD syndrome-related pneumothorax differed from those of primary spontaneous pneumothorax, which typically affects tall, thin young men, and the recurrence rate of BHD syndrome-related pneumothorax after observation, needle aspiration or tube drainage was higher than that of primary spontaneous pneumothorax, and higher than that observed after VATS bullectomy and mechanical pleurodesis. We reported the largest single family that presented with FSP from China. The clinical and genetic characteristics of the BHD syndrome-related pneumothorax differ from those of primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

  5. Design of a protocol for large-scale epidemiological studies in individual sports: the Swedish Athletics injury study.

    PubMed

    Jacobsson, Jenny; Timpka, Toomas; Ekberg, Joakim; Kowalski, Jan; Nilsson, Sverker; Renström, Per

    2010-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have mainly been performed on team sports. The authors set out to develop a protocol for large-scale epidemiological studies of injuries among elite athletics athletes. An argument-based method for investigation of complex design problems was used to structure the collection and analysis of data. Specification of the protocol was preceded by an examination of requirements on injury surveillance in individual sports and iterated drafting of protocol specifications, and followed by formative evaluations. The requirements analysis shows that the central demand on the protocol is to allow for detailed epidemiological analyses of overuse injuries, which subsequently requires regular collection of self-reported data from athletes. The resulting study protocol is centred on a web-based weekly athlete e-diary enabling continual collection of individual-level data on exposure and injuries. To be able to interpret the self-reported data on injury events, collection of a wide range of personal baseline data from the athlete, including a psychological profile, is included in the protocol. The resulting protocol can be employed in intervention programmes that can prevent suffering among both adult elite and youth talent athletes who have made considerable life investments in their sport.

  6. Are families poor because they are large or are they large because they are poor?

    PubMed

    Pernia, E M

    1982-01-01

    In the Philippines time allocation studies suggest that children cost considerable amounts of time and energy on the part of the mother and other siblings in addition to direct financial outlays which figure prominently. Yet, these costs seem to be compensated for by economic and noneconomic benefits. The time costs of children are moderated to the extent that mother's time has a low opportunity cost, given lack of marketable skills or sheer absence of employment opportunities. It is at the expense of investment in human capital (in terms of education and health) that economic benefits from child labor are forthcoming. As neither unemployment of the mother nor child labor is desirable, it would seem that economic benefits from children are expensive. The child's mental and physical development tends to be impaired due to deficient health, nutrition, and education inputs because family resources and parental care have to be spread so thinly among the many competing demands of the large family. Mother's health is negatively affected by frequent and closely spaced pregnancies, and she is effectively prevented from actual or potential participation in development. It is to these less immediate and not directly observable disadvantages of a large family that parents must be sensitized so that they will realize the need to limit family size. From the social perspective, the population program may be viewed as a strategy for human resource development. The challenge to policymakers has become formidable. Due to rapidly increasing population, the need to telescope the reduction of income inequality and poverty has become urgent. Continuing population growth tends to nullify whatever advances are made toward the distributional objective. Population and development policy needs to be directed to the poor in rural areas in general and more specifically to the rural poor in the backward regions of the Visayas, Bicol, Bocos, and Northern Mindanao. Given the extreme poverty of

  7. A family of dynamic models for large-eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Jansen, K.; Lund, T.

    1995-01-01

    Since its first application, the dynamic procedure has been recognized as an effective means to compute rather than prescribe the unknown coefficients that appear in a subgrid-scale model for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The dynamic procedure is usually used to determine the nondimensional coefficient in the Smagorinsky (1963) model. In reality the procedure is quite general and it is not limited to the Smagorinsky model by any theoretical or practical constraints. The purpose of this note is to consider a generalized family of dynamic eddy viscosity models that do not necessarily rely on the local equilibrium assumption built into the Smagorinsky model. By invoking an inertial range assumption, it will be shown that the coefficients in the new models need not be nondimensional. This additional degree of freedom allows the use of models that are scaled on traditionally unknown quantities such as the dissipation rate. In certain cases, the dynamic models with dimensional coefficients are simpler to implement, and allow for a 30% reduction in the number of required filtering operations.

  8. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 – Goddard Center Director Chris Scolese greets His Majesty Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden outside the entrance to Building 28 at GSFC. The king’s visit came as part his participation in a large delegation that also included the Swedish Ambassador to the United States, both the chairman and president of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, as well as distinguished members of Sweden’s industrial, academia and professional organizations. For the arrival, approximately 60 children from the Goddard Child Development Center were on hand to greet the Swedish delegation. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. Mismatches in genetic markers in a large family study.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, G C

    1980-01-01

    The Hawaii Family Study of Cognition provided an opportunity to investigate the frequency and implications of non-agreement, or mismatches, between observed and expected genetic marker phenotypes of husbands, wives, and children. Mismatch data from 68 families in which one or both spouses were known not to be a biological parent were used to determine the rate of undeclared nonparentage in 1,748 families in which conventional relationships were claimed. Two independent approaches gave consistent estimates, suggesting that approximately 2.3% of the 2,839 tested children from these families were probably the result of infidelity, concealed adoption, or another event. About two-thirds of the mismatches detected were probably due to properties of the techniques employed. PMID:6930820

  10. Large family of quantum weak coin-flipping protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Mochon, Carlos

    2005-08-15

    Each classical public-coin protocol for coin flipping is naturally associated with a quantum protocol for weak coin flipping. The quantum protocol is obtained by replacing classical randomness with quantum entanglement and by adding a cheat detection test in the last round that verifies the integrity of this entanglement. The set of such protocols defines a family which contains the protocol with bias 0.192 previously found by the author, as well as protocols with bias as low as 1/6 described herein. The family is analyzed by identifying a set of optimal protocols for every number of messages. In the end, tight lower bounds for the bias are obtained which prove that 1/6 is optimal for all protocols within the family.

  11. Mortality among Swedish Journalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furhoff, Anna-Karin; Furhoff, Lars

    1987-01-01

    Charts the various environmental factors that might influence the mortality rate of Swedish journalists. Concludes that, although there may be a slightly higher death rate among Swedish journalists in the 50-59 age group, the death rate for journalists is the same as for the population in general. (MM)

  12. Expressing Communicative Intents in Estonian, Finnish, and Swedish Mother-Adolescent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulviste, Tiia; Mizera, Luule; De Geer, Boel

    2004-01-01

    The present article focused on two types of communicative intent (directing behaviour vs. eliciting talk) expressed by mothers and teenagers during everyday family interactions in Estonian, Finnish, and Swedish mono- and bicultural families. Three monocultural groups consisted of 17 Estonian, 19 Swedish, and 18 Finnish families living in their…

  13. Reports on Swedish Projects Relevant to the Study of Impromptu Speech: Talsyntax.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loman, Bengt

    The project Talsyntax (Syntax of Spoken Swedish), part of a large-scale study of modern Swedish language usage, examined the general characteristics and peculiarities of spoken Swedish. Three important aspects of the study are data collection, methodological results, and empirical results. The data collection effort has produced an archive of…

  14. Sentence intonation in Swedish.

    PubMed

    Gårding, E

    1979-01-01

    In 'A Prosodic Typology for Swedish Dialects' (Nordic Prosody 1978), BRUCE and GARDING proposed a schema for generating fundamental frequency patterns of statements in four Swedish dialects. Dialectal variation was obtained by timing word accents and sentence accent differently in a common frame expressing statement intonation. In addition to presenting the method, this paper also shows how it can be applied to two different interrogative frames, one for yes/no questions with non-inverted word order and one for inverted order.

  15. Broad scan linkage analysis in a large Tourette family pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Peiffer, A.; Leppert, M.; Wetering, B.J.M. van der

    1994-09-01

    Attempts to find a gene causing Tourette syndrome (TS) using linkage analysis have been unsuccessful even though as much as 65% of the autosomal genetic map has been excluded by the pooled results from several laboratories collaborating worldwide. One reason for this failure may be the misclassification of affection status of marry-in spouses. Specifically, we have found that six unrelated spouses in our Utah TS pedigree suffer from TS, obsessive-compulsive disorder or chronic motor tics. In light of these findings we decided to conduct a complete genomic scan from this Utah kindred with polymorphic markers in three related sibships in which there was no assortative mating. A linkage study assuming autosomal dominant inheritance was done using tetranucleotide repeat markers developed at the University of Utah. We selected markers that were less than 300 bp in size and that gave a heterozygosity of over 70% upon analysis in 4 CEPH families. Results to date with 95 markers run at an interval of 30 cM (covering 61% of the genome) show no evidence of linkage. We intend to extend the coverage to 100% of the genome. Pending completion of this scan, failure to provide evidence of linkage in our TS pedigree might then be attributed to phenotypic misclassification or erroneous assumptions regarding the genetic model of transmission.

  16. Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancers among Patients with Appendectomy: A Large-Scale Swedish Register-Based Cohort Study during 1970-2009

    PubMed Central

    Song, Huan; Abnet, Christian C.; Andrén-Sandberg, Åke; Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Ye, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Background Removal of the appendix might induce physiological changes in the gastrointestinal tract, and subsequently play a role in carcinogenesis. Therefore, we conducted a nationwide register-based cohort study in Sweden to investigate whether appendectomy is associated with altered risks of gastrointestinal cancers. Methods A population-based cohort study was conducted using the Swedish national registries, including 480,382 eligible patients followed during the period of 1970–2009 for the occurrence of site-specific gastrointestinal cancer (esophageal/gastric/colon/rectal cancer). Outcome and censoring information was collected by linkage to health and demography registers. We examined the incidence of appendectomy in Sweden using data from 1987–2009. We also calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to estimate the relative gastrointestinal cancer risk through comparison to the general population. Results We noted an overall decrease in the age-standardized incidence of appendectomy among the entire Swedish population from 189.3 to 105.6 per 100,000 individuals between 1987 and 2009. Grouped by different discharge diagnosis, acute appendicitis, incidental appendectomy, and entirely negative appendectomy continuously decreased over the study period, while the perforation ratio (18%–23%) stayed relatively constant. Compared to the general population, no excess cancer risk was observed for gastrointestinal cancers under study with the exception of a marginally elevated risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma (SIR 1.32, 95% CI 1.09–1.58). Conclusions In Sweden, the incidence of appendectomy and acute appendicitis has decreased during 1987–2009. No excess gastrointestinal cancer risks were observed among these appendectomized patients, with the possible exception of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26959234

  17. Fertility Related Attitudes of Minority Mothers with Large and Small Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    The relationship between certain attitudes and the levels of fertility in five cultural groups was explored in this study. The group studied were blacks, Cubans, American Indians, migrant Chicanos, and white Protestants. Mothers, aged 35-45, with one or two children (small family) or five children (large family) were compared. Attitudes measured…

  18. The Swedish space programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helger, Arne

    The Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) under the Ministry of Industry is the central governmental agency responsible for the goverment-funded Swedish national and international space and remote sensing activities. The technical implementation is mainly contracted by the Board to the state-owned Swedish Space Corporation (SSC). International cooperation is a cornerstone in the Swedish space activities, absorbing more than 80% of the total national budget. Within ESA, Sweden participates in practically all infrastructure and applications programs. Basic research, mainly concentrated to the near earth space physics, microgravity and remote sensing are important elements in the Swedish space program. Sweden participates in the French Spot program. At Esrange, data reception, and satellite control, and tracking, telemetry command (TT&C) are performed for many international satellite projects. An SSC subsidiary, SATELLITBILD, is archiving, processing and distributing remote sensing data worldwide. The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has established a portable TT&C station for JERS-1 at Esrange, Kiruna. A center for international research on the ozone problem has been established at Esrange and Kiruna. A new sounding rocket for 15 minutes of microgravity research, MAXUS, has been developed by SSC in cooperation with Germany. A national scientific satellite, FREJA, is planned to be launched late 1992.

  19. Malaysia: where big is still better. For Malays, large families are part of the plan.

    PubMed

    1993-11-03

    The benefits of various-sized families in Malaysia were discussed by several women and supplemented with official statements on family planning (FP). The Director of the National Population and Family Development, Dr. Raj Karim, advised that maternal health is jeopardized when women have more than five children. About 30% of reproductive age women in Malaysia have five or more children. A Federation of FP Associations spokesperson agreed that women should be advised of the dangers of bearing over five children, of the importance of spacing births two to four years apart, and of the ideal age of childbearing (21-39 years). The government lacks an official policy on family size. The government position is, however, compatible with Islamic teachings on spacing in order to protect the health of the mother and child. Islamic law does not permit sterilization or abortion. The "fatwas" of Islamic teaching may have been misconstrued by those not using any form of contraception. Dr. Karim, who has five children, reported that having a large family can be difficult for a woman with a job, a career, and a husband or when both parents work. Most Malays desire large families. The average Malay family size was 4.1 children in 1990; Malaysian Chinese have fertility of 2.3 children and Malaysian Indians have 2.6 children. People say that the benefits outweigh the hardships of a large family.

  20. Observed Cognitive Performance and Deviation From Familial Cognitive Aptitude at Age 16 Years and Ages 18 to 20 Years and Risk for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Illness in a Swedish National Sample.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Ohlsson, Henrik; Mezuk, Briana; Sundquist, Jan O; Sundquist, Kristina

    2016-05-01

    Proposal of an innovative approach to clarify the mechanism through which poor cognitive performance in adolescence impacts risk for schizophrenia (SZ). To determine whether the developmental processes that predispose to SZ are better reflected by the observed cognitive performance in adolescence or the deviation of that performance from the individual's familial cognitive aptitude (FCA). A prospective cohort design. Risk for SZ and bipolar illness (BPI) are predicted by school achievement (SA) at age 16 years and IQ at ages 18 to 20 years and the deviation of that performance from an individual's FCA. Familial cognitive aptitude is calculated from the SA, IQ, and educational attainment in biological relatives. Diagnoses of SZ or BPI in the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and the Swedish Outpatient Register. Participants were 996 886 individuals with recorded SA and 106 187 individuals with recorded IQ born in Sweden between January 1, 1972, and December 31, 1990, with sufficient numbers of biological relatives to calculate their FCA. The first cohort is 48.7% female, and the second is all male. Risk for SZ was strongly predicted by the deviation of SA from the FCA (hazard ratio [HR], 0.56; 95% CI, 0.49-0.63) but not with the observed SA (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.91-1.13). Similar results were obtained for IQ (HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37-0.77 for the deviation from the FCA and HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.78-1.46 for the observed IQ). After matching SZ and control probands on cognitive performance, the siblings of the SZ probands had SA and IQs that did not differ from population means and were significantly higher in cognitive performance than for the siblings of control probands. Correlations in SA and IQs between the pre-SZ probands and their siblings were significantly lower than those observed between the matched control probands and their siblings. Risk for BPI was more weakly predicted by deviations from the FCA. No differences were found in the SA and IQs of siblings

  1. A large family of anti‐activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Michael B.; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H.; Kendall, Melissa M.; Ruiz‐Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down‐regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram‐negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR‐activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC‐like member AggR. ANR‐AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR‐DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α‐helices. Site‐directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α‐helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  2. A large family of anti-activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Yan, Michael B; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H; Kendall, Melissa M; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P

    2016-07-01

    AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down-regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR-activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC-like member AggR. ANR-AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR-DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α-helices. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α-helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners.

  3. Models of population-based analyses for data collected from large extended families.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Fabsitz, Richard R; Devereux, Richard B; MacCluer, Jean W; Laston, Sandra; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Shara, Nawar M; Welty, Thomas K

    2010-12-01

    Large studies of extended families usually collect valuable phenotypic data that may have scientific value for purposes other than testing genetic hypotheses if the families were not selected in a biased manner. These purposes include assessing population-based associations of diseases with risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics such as disease prevalence and incidence. Relatedness among participants however, violates the traditional assumption of independent observations in these classic analyses. The commonly used adjustment method for relatedness in population-based analyses is to use marginal models, in which clusters (families) are assumed to be independent (unrelated) with a simple and identical covariance (family) structure such as those called independent, exchangeable and unstructured covariance structures. However, using these simple covariance structures may not be optimally appropriate for outcomes collected from large extended families, and may under- or over-estimate the variances of estimators and thus lead to uncertainty in inferences. Moreover, the assumption that families are unrelated with an identical family structure in a marginal model may not be satisfied for family studies with large extended families. The aim of this paper is to propose models incorporating marginal models approaches with a covariance structure for assessing population-based associations of diseases with their risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics for epidemiological studies while adjusting for the complicated relatedness among outcomes (continuous/categorical, normally/non-normally distributed) collected from large extended families. We also discuss theoretical issues of the proposed models and show that the proposed models and covariance structure are appropriate for and capable of achieving the aim.

  4. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  5. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure, and function-based clustering.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-08-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects.

  6. Finnish type of familial amyloidosis: cosegregation of Asp187----Asn mutation of gelsolin with the disease in three large families.

    PubMed Central

    Hiltunen, T; Kiuru, S; Hongell, V; Heliö, T; Palo, J; Peltonen, L

    1991-01-01

    Familial amyloidosis of Finnish type (FAF) is one of the familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) syndromes, a group of inherited disorders characterized by extracellular accumulation of amyloid and by clinical symptoms and signs of polyneuropathy. FAF, an autosomal dominant trait, belongs to those rare monogenic disorders which occur with increased frequency in the Finnish population: only single FAF cases have been reported from other populations. In most types of FAP syndromes the accumulating protein is a transthyretin variant. However, recent evidence has suggested that the amyloid peptides in FAF are related to gelsolin, an actin modulating protein. The gelsolin fragments isolated from at least one patient with amyloidosis have been reported to have an amino acid substitution, with asparagine replacing aspartic acid at position 187 of the plasma gelsolin. In this study allele-specific oligonucleotides were used to analyze three large FAF families with multiple affected individuals as well as healthy family members. We found the corresponding G-A mutation in nucleotide 654 of the plasma gelsolin gene to cosegregate with the disease. The result was confirmed by sequencing and strongly suggests that the mutation has caused all the FAF cases of these families. Since the disease is clustered in restricted areas on the southern coast of Finland, this mutation most probably causes the majority, if not all, of FAF cases in Finland. Images Figure 2 PMID:1652889

  7. A novel pathogenic large germline deletion in adenomatous polyposis coli gene in a Chinese family with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Liang, Shengran; Huang, Hui; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Xipeng; Wu, Jing; Chen, Huishuang; Wang, Yanyan; Rong, Tingting; Zhou, Yulin; Banerjee, Santasree

    2016-08-02

    Germline mutations of the APC gene are associated with an autosomal dominant precancerous condition, termed familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). FAP is clinically manifested by the presence of multiple colorectal adenomas or polyps. Gradually, these colorectal adenomas or polyps inevitably result in colorectal cancer by the third-to fourth decade of life. Surgical interventions or total proctocolectomy is the best possible treatment for FAP. Here, we present a clinical molecular study of a five generation Chinese family with FAP. Diagnosis of FAP was made on the basis of clinical manifestations, family history and medical (colonoscopy and histopathology) records. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Genetic screening of the APC gene was performed by targeted next-generation sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. Targeted next generation sequencing identified a novel heterozygous large deletion [exon5-exon16; c.423_8532del] of APC gene, which segregated with the FAP phenotypes in the proband and in all the affected family members. Unaffected family members and normal controls did not carry this deletion. In the Chinese population, most of the previously reported APC gene mutations are missense mutations. This is the first report describing the largest deletion of the APC gene in the Chinese population associated with FAP.

  8. A novel pathogenic large germline deletion in adenomatous polyposis coli gene in a Chinese family with familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Xipeng; Wu, Jing; Chen, Huishuang; Wang, Yanyan; Rong, Tingting; Zhou, Yulin; Banerjee, Santasree

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations of the APC gene are associated with an autosomal dominant precancerous condition, termed familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). FAP is clinically manifested by the presence of multiple colorectal adenomas or polyps. Gradually, these colorectal adenomas or polyps inevitably result in colorectal cancer by the third-to fourth decade of life. Surgical interventions or total proctocolectomy is the best possible treatment for FAP. Here, we present a clinical molecular study of a five generation Chinese family with FAP. Diagnosis of FAP was made on the basis of clinical manifestations, family history and medical (colonoscopy and histopathology) records. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Genetic screening of the APC gene was performed by targeted next-generation sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. Targeted next generation sequencing identified a novel heterozygous large deletion [exon5-exon16; c.423_8532del] of APC gene, which segregated with the FAP phenotypes in the proband and in all the affected family members. Unaffected family members and normal controls did not carry this deletion. In the Chinese population, most of the previously reported APC gene mutations are missense mutations. This is the first report describing the largest deletion of the APC gene in the Chinese population associated with FAP. PMID:27391059

  9. Association between neighbourhood air pollution concentrations and dispensed medication for psychiatric disorders in a large longitudinal cohort of Swedish children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bråbäck, Lennart; Åström, Daniel Oudin; Strömgren, Magnus; Forsberg, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between exposure to air pollution and child and adolescent mental health. Design Observational study. Setting Swedish National Register data on dispensed medications for a broad range of psychiatric disorders, including sedative medications, sleeping pills and antipsychotic medications, together with socioeconomic and demographic data and a national land use regression model for air pollution concentrations for NO2, PM10 and PM2.5. Participants The entire population under 18 years of age in 4 major counties. We excluded cohort members whose parents had dispensed a medication in the same medication group since the start date of the register. The cohort size was 552 221. Main outcome measures Cox proportional hazards models to estimate HRs and their 95% CIs for the outcomes, adjusted for individual-level and group-level characteristics. Results The average length of follow-up was 3.5 years, with an average number of events per 1000 cohort members of ∼21. The mean annual level of NO2 was 9.8 µg/m3. Children and adolescents living in areas with higher air pollution concentrations were more likely to have a dispensed medication for a psychiatric disorder during follow-up (HR=1.09, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.12, associated with a 10 µg/m3 increase in NO2). The association with NO2 was clearly present in 3 out of 4 counties in the study area; however, no statistically significant heterogeneity was detected. Conclusion There may be a link between exposure to air pollution and dispensed medications for certain psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents even at the relatively low levels of air pollution in the study regions. The findings should be corroborated by others. PMID:27259522

  10. Predominant discourses in Swedish nursing.

    PubMed

    Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth; Pilhammar-Anderson, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the predominant discourse in the field of Swedish nursing in 2000, 25 years after nursing was introduced as an academic discipline in Sweden. The method used was content analysis and deconstructive analysis of discourses. Laws, statutes, regulations, and examination requirements, including official reports, recruitment campaigns, and media coverage, were analyzed. The findings uncovered competing discourses striving to gain hegemony. In the public sector, official requirements competed against the media fixation on gender stereotypes and the realities of local recruitment campaigns. Media has a major role in disseminating prevailing conceptions and conventions pertaining to the nursing profession. As a result, decision makers, students, patients, and family members could get lower expectations of the professional competence of nursing practitioners than would otherwise have been the case in the absence of media exposure.

  11. Marfan syndrome in a large family: response of family members to a screening programme.

    PubMed

    Bridges, A B; Faed, M; Boxer, M; Gray, J R; Bundy, C; Murray, A

    1992-02-01

    Reaction to medical, social, and genetic implications of Marfan syndrome was evaluated by means of two questionnaires, the first after various tests before discussion of the diagnosis, the second after full discussion of the patient's diagnosis. Thirty-seven members of a family known to be at risk for Marfan syndrome attended for both questionnaires. All patients claimed to be satisfied with the way they were informed of the results of screening; 41% of patients were more worried about their health and 48% were more worried about the future after diagnosis. Apart from 50% of the smokers reducing or stopping their intake of cigarettes there were only very minor changes in lifestyle over the first month despite the increased level of expressed anxiety. If a definitive screening test was available, 96% of patients claimed they would have chosen it, 45% felt it would have an influence on their future plans, and 78% would choose to use a method of prenatal diagnosis for Marfan syndrome if it were available.

  12. Swedish Successful Schools Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoog, Jonas; Johansson, Olof; Olofsson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a follow-up study of two Swedish schools in which, five years previously, the principals had been successful leaders. Had this success been maintained? Design/methodology/approach: Two schools were revisited to enable the authors to interview principals and teachers as well as…

  13. Prevention of beta-thalassemia in a large Pakistani family through cascade testing.

    PubMed

    Baig, S M; Din, M A; Hassan, H; Azhar, A; Baig, J M; Aslam, M; Anjum, I; Farooq, M; Hussain, M S; Rasool, M; Nawaz, S; Qureshi, J A; Zaman, T

    2008-01-01

    We report cascade testing of a large Pakistani family for beta-thalassemia alleles. The family was still practicing consanguineous marriages and was at risk of having more affected births. The objective of this study was to show that identification of disease carriers in families with index cases in order to create awareness about disease and provide genetic counseling would result in reduction of the frequency of beta-thalassemia in Pakistan. In this large family with an index case, 27 available living members were tested for beta-thalassemia. Carriers of the disease were detected by measuring hemoglobin indices, and amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction was used for mutation analysis. Genetic counseling was provided to members of this family. There were already 3 marriages between the carrier members and 1 between a carrier and noncarrier in this large family; 12 (44.4%) members were found to carry the mutant gene, representing a very high carrier rate compared to the 5.4% carrier frequency of beta-thalassemia in the general population of Pakistan. The family was counseled for prevention of affected births. The initially reluctant family gradually became cooperative and seriously attended the genetic counseling sessions. Cascade testing is more practical than general population screening in a country with limited health facilities where consanguineous marriages are practiced. This report emphasizes the need of extensive testing within families with index cases to identify the carriers of beta-thalassemia in order to reduce disease occurrence through awareness and genetic counseling. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Structure and evolutionary history of a large family of NLR proteins in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Julia; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes have evolved a range of mechanisms for immune recognition. A widespread family involved in innate immunity are the NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR) proteins. Mammals have small numbers of NLR proteins, whereas in some species, mostly those without adaptive immune systems, NLRs have expanded into very large families. We describe a family of nearly 400 NLR proteins encoded in the zebrafish genome. The proteins share a defining overall structure, which arose in fishes after a fusion of the core NLR domains with a B30.2 domain, but can be subdivided into four groups based on their NACHT domains. Gene conversion acting differentially on the NACHT and B30.2 domains has shaped the family and created the groups. Evidence of positive selection in the B30.2 domain indicates that this domain rather than the leucine-rich repeats acts as the pathogen recognition module. In an unusual chromosomal organization, the majority of the genes are located on one chromosome arm, interspersed with other large multigene families, including a new family encoding zinc-finger proteins. The NLR-B30.2 proteins represent a new family with diversity in the specific recognition module that is present in fishes in spite of the parallel existence of an adaptive immune system. PMID:27248802

  15. Structure and evolutionary history of a large family of NLR proteins in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Howe, Kerstin; Schiffer, Philipp H; Zielinski, Julia; Wiehe, Thomas; Laird, Gavin K; Marioni, John C; Soylemez, Onuralp; Kondrashov, Fyodor; Leptin, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes have evolved a range of mechanisms for immune recognition. A widespread family involved in innate immunity are the NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR) proteins. Mammals have small numbers of NLR proteins, whereas in some species, mostly those without adaptive immune systems, NLRs have expanded into very large families. We describe a family of nearly 400 NLR proteins encoded in the zebrafish genome. The proteins share a defining overall structure, which arose in fishes after a fusion of the core NLR domains with a B30.2 domain, but can be subdivided into four groups based on their NACHT domains. Gene conversion acting differentially on the NACHT and B30.2 domains has shaped the family and created the groups. Evidence of positive selection in the B30.2 domain indicates that this domain rather than the leucine-rich repeats acts as the pathogen recognition module. In an unusual chromosomal organization, the majority of the genes are located on one chromosome arm, interspersed with other large multigene families, including a new family encoding zinc-finger proteins. The NLR-B30.2 proteins represent a new family with diversity in the specific recognition module that is present in fishes in spite of the parallel existence of an adaptive immune system. © 2016 The Authors.

  16. Ultra Large Gene Families: A Matter of Adaptation or Genomic Parasites?

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Philipp H.; Gravemeyer, Jan; Rauscher, Martina; Wiehe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism of molecular evolution. It offers a fast track to modification, diversification, redundancy or rescue of gene function. However, duplication may also be neutral or (slightly) deleterious, and often ends in pseudo-geneisation. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic distribution of ultra large gene families on long and short evolutionary time scales. In particular, we focus on a family of NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR)-genes, which we previously found in large numbers to occupy one chromosome arm of the zebrafish genome. We were interested to see whether such a tight clustering is characteristic for ultra large gene families. Our data reconfirm that most gene family inflations are lineage-specific, but we can only identify very few gene clusters. Based on our observations we hypothesise that, beyond a certain size threshold, ultra large gene families continue to proliferate in a mechanism we term “run-away evolution”. This process might ultimately lead to the failure of genomic integrity and drive species to extinction. PMID:27509525

  17. Genetic screening in a large family with juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Booth, A.; Anwar, R.; Chen, H.; Churchill, A.; Jay, J.; Polansky, J.; Nguyen, T.; Markham, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—A number of genetic loci have been implicated in the pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). The aim of this study was to identify the genetic cause of POAG in a large Scottish family and, if possible, offer genetic screening and advice to family members.
METHODS—Family members were examined to determine their disease status. Base excision sequence scanning was carried out in order to test for the presence of a POAG causing mutation at known genetic loci. Direct DNA sequencing was performed in order to determine the mutation sequence.
RESULTS—All family members of known affected disease status and two family members of unknown disease status were found to have a mutation in the TIGR gene. The mutation resulted in the substitution of a glycine residue with an arginine residue at codon 252 (Gly252Arg). No other sequence variations were present in any members of the family.
CONCLUSION—The Gly252Arg mutation in the TIGR gene results in the development of POAG in this family. It was possible to identify younger, currently unaffected, members of the family who carry the mutation and who are therefore at a very high risk of developing POAG themselves. This is the first demonstration that Gly252Arg can be a disease causing mutation rather than a benign polymorphism. The possible pathogenic mechanisms and wider implications of the mutation are considered.

 PMID:10873982

  18. Evidence for ASD recurrence rates and reproductive stoppage from large UK ASD research family databases.

    PubMed

    Wood, Claire L; Warnell, Frances; Johnson, Mary; Hames, Annette; Pearce, Mark S; McConachie, Helen; Parr, Jeremy R

    2015-02-01

    Following a diagnosis of a developmental disorder such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in early childhood, parents may decide to have fewer children than previously planned. The tendency for families to halt reproduction after receiving a diagnosis for one child is known as reproductive stoppage. Stoppage may lead to an underestimate of recurrence risk estimates of parents having more than one child with ASD. Using two large UK ASD family databases, we investigated recurrence rates for ASD and evidence for reproductive stoppage for both ASD and undiagnosed ASD/broader autism phenotype in a subgroup of families. Reproductive stoppage was tested for using the Mann-Whitney U-test to disprove the null hypothesis that affected and nonaffected children were distributed randomly by birth order. Dahlberg's later-sib method was used to estimate recurrence risk and take stoppage into account. Data were available from 299 families (660 children) including 327 with ASD. Ten percent of the complete families had more than one child with an ASD. Using Dahlberg's later-sib method, the recurrence risk for ASD was 24.7% overall and 50.0% in families with two or more older siblings with ASD. Children with ASD were born significantly later in families than those without ASD in all sibship combinations. This study shows strong evidence that ASD is associated with reproductive stoppage. These data have important implications for family planning and genetic counseling.

  19. Biomarkers Associated with Clinical Phenotypes of Hand Osteoarthritis in a Large Multigenerational Family: the CARRIAGE Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiang-Cheng; Shah, Svati; Stabler, Thomas V; Li, Yi-Ju; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate biological markers as potential quantitative traits of clinical osteoarthritis (OA) in a large multigenerational family in the Carolinas of the U.S. known as the CARRIAGE family. Methods During a series of three family reunions over 6 years, we ascertained 365 family members. We performed clinical hand examinations (n=287), and obtained sera (n=278) for seven OA-related biomarkers (PIIANP, CPII, C2C, COMP, HA, hs-CRP and glycated serum protein). Three hand OA definitions were evaluated - clinical ACR and GOGO criteria, and any single hand joint involvement. Non-hand OA was defined as a negative hand examination for OA but varying prevalence of joint symptoms; the control group was defined as having neither symptoms nor evidence for clinical hand OA. Results Mean ln HA, ln COMP, and ln hs-CRP were significantly higher in the hand OA group, compared with the non-hand OA or control group. Adjusted for age and sex, mean ln PIIANP (a collagen II synthesis marker) was significantly lower in the hand OA group compared with the other groups. Among those without clinical hand OA, Glycated serum protein was associated with hand joint symptoms. Conclusions This is the first report, to our knowledge, showing an association of OA biomarkers and hand OA based on physical examination alone. Analyses using these biomarkers as quantitative traits could reveal novel genetic loci and facilitate exploration of the genetic susceptibility to OA. PMID:18291686

  20. The Trp64Arg mutation of the beta3 adrenergic receptor gene has no effect on obesity phenotypes in the Québec Family Study and Swedish Obese Subjects cohorts.

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, J; Mauriège, P; Roy, S; Sjöström, D; Chagnon, Y C; Dionne, F T; Oppert, J M; Pérusse, L; Sjöström, L; Bouchard, C

    1996-01-01

    The beta adrenergic system plays a key role in regulating energy balance through the stimulation of both thermogenesis and lipid mobilization in brown and white adipose tissues in human and various animal models. Recent studies have suggested that a missense Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3 adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) gene was involved in obesity and insulin resistance. We have investigated the effect of this mutation on obesity-related phenotypes in two cohorts: the Québec Family Study (QFS) and the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS). In QFS, no association was found between this mutation and body mass index (BMI), body fat including abdominal visceral fat, resting metabolic rate, various diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors, and changes in body weight and body fat over a 12-yr period. With the exception of RMR (P = 0.04), no evidence of linkage was detected between the mutation and phenotypes of QFS based on sib-pair data. In SOS, the frequency of the Trp64Arg allele was not significantly different between nonobese and obese female subjects and no association was found between the mutation and body weight gain over time. These findings do not support the view that there is an association between the Trp64Arg mutation in the ADRB3 gene and obesity. PMID:8903328

  1. A large Norwegian family with inherited malignant melanoma, multiple atypical nevi, and CDK4 mutation.

    PubMed

    Molven, Anders; Grimstvedt, Magne B; Steine, Solrun J; Harland, Mark; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Hayward, Nicholas K; Akslen, Lars A

    2005-09-01

    Mutations in two loci encoding cell-cycle-regulatory proteins have been shown to cause familial malignant melanoma. About 20% of melanoma-prone families bear a mutation in the CDKN2A locus, which encodes two unrelated proteins, p16INK4A and p14ARF. Mutations in the other locus, CDK4, are much rarer and have been linked to the disease in only three families worldwide. In the 1960s, a large Norwegian pedigree with multiple atypical nevi and malignant melanomas was identified. Subsequently, six generations and more than 100 family members were traced and 20 cases of melanoma verified. In this article, we report that CDK4 codon 24 is mutated from CGT to CAT (Arg24His) in this unusually large melanoma kindred. Intriguingly, one of the family members had ocular melanoma, but the CDK4 mutation could not be detected in archival tissue samples from this subject. Thus, the case of ocular melanoma in this family was sporadic, suggesting an etiology different from that of the skin tumors. The CDK4 mutation in the Norwegian family was identical to that in melanoma families in France, Australia, and England. Haplotype analysis using microsatellite markers flanking the CDK4 gene and single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene did not support the possibility that there was a common founder, but rather indicated at least two independent mutational events. All CDK4 melanoma families known to date have a substitution of amino acid 24. In addition to resulting from selection pressure, this observation may be explained by the CG dinucleotide of codon 24 representing a mutational hot spot in the CDK4 gene.

  2. Attention Interchanges at Story-Time: A Case Study from a Deaf and Hearing Twin Pair Acquiring Swedish Sign Language in Their Deaf Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer-Wolrath, Emelie

    2012-01-01

    This case study longitudinally analyzes and describes the changes of attentional expressions in interchanges between a pair of fraternal twins, 1 deaf and 1 hearing, from the age of 10-40 months, and their Deaf family members. The video-observed attentional expressions of initiating and reestablishing interchange were grouped in 5 functional…

  3. Attention Interchanges at Story-Time: A Case Study from a Deaf and Hearing Twin Pair Acquiring Swedish Sign Language in Their Deaf Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer-Wolrath, Emelie

    2012-01-01

    This case study longitudinally analyzes and describes the changes of attentional expressions in interchanges between a pair of fraternal twins, 1 deaf and 1 hearing, from the age of 10-40 months, and their Deaf family members. The video-observed attentional expressions of initiating and reestablishing interchange were grouped in 5 functional…

  4. Greek immigrant children in southern Sweden in comparison with Greek and Swedish children. I. General living conditions.

    PubMed

    Neiderud, J

    1989-01-01

    Greek immigrant children belonging to the second generation of immigrants in Sweden have been compared with Swedish children and Greek children in Greece regarding general living conditions. Interviews were performed in the homes of all participants. The parents in the two Greek groups had the lowest educational level. The yearly salary of immigrant families was similar to that of the Swedish families. Immigrant and Swedish parents worked outside their homes to the same extent, Greek immigrant mothers fulltime, Swedish mothers mostly part time. For economical reasons the immigrant parents looked after their children within the family while the Swedish families almost always utilized community day care facilities. The immigrant families had fewer children than the Swedish and Greek rural families and their dwellings were smaller. Corporal punishment was a common method of upbringing in Greece and among the immigrants. The immigrant families had extremely few contacts with Swedish families. A majority of the immigrant families were unsure about their future in Sweden, whether or not to stay. In conclusion, the Greek immigrant group in many respects had adapted to Swedish customs but they had also at the same time retained much of the Greek cultural characteristics.

  5. Large genomic deletions inactivate the BRCA2 gene in breast cancer families

    PubMed Central

    Agata, S; Dalla, P; Callegaro, M; Scaini, M; Menin, C; Ghiotto, C; Nicoletto, O; Zavagno, G; Chieco-Bianchi, L; D'Andrea, E; Montagna, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two major genes responsible for the breast and ovarian cancers that cluster in families with a genetically determined predisposition. However, regardless of the mutation detection method employed, the percentage of families without identifiable alterations of these genes exceeds 50%, even when applying stringent criteria for family selection. A small but significant increase in mutation detection rate has resulted from the discovery of large genomic alterations in BRCA1. A few studies have addressed the question of whether BRCA2 might be inactivated by the same kinds of alteration, but most were either done on a relatively small number of samples or employed cumbersome mutation detection methods of variable sensitivity. Objective: To analyse 121 highly selected families using the recently available BRCA2 multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique. Results: Three different large genomic deletions were identified and confirmed by analysis of the mutant transcript and genomic characterisation of the breakpoints. Conclusions: Contrary to initial suggestions, the presence of BRCA2 genomic rearrangements is worth investigating in high risk breast or ovarian cancer families. PMID:16199546

  6. Genetic heterogeneity in psoriasis vulgaris based on linkage analyses of a large family material

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlstroem, J.; Swanbeck, G.; Inerot, A.

    1994-09-01

    Information on psoriasis among parents and siblings in 14,008 families has been collected. On the basis of this material, evidence for monogenetic autosomal recessive inheritance of psoriasis has recently been presented. Indications from more than one type of non-pustular psoriasis has been obtained from the population genetic data. Molecular genetic linkage analysis of psoriasis to a number of polymorphic genetic markers for a large number of families has been made. It is apparent that there is genetic heterogeneity in a psoriasis population with regard to psoriasis genes. Using the computer program Linkage 5.0 and a formula for heterogeneity, a lodscore over 3.0 for one locus has been obtained. This locus has further been confirmed by several other markers in the vicinity. The locus found is linked to slightly over half of the families, indicating that there are more genetically independent types of psoriasis. The age at onset of those families that are apparently linked to this locus have a slightly higher age at onset than those not linked to that locus but with a considerable overlap. In spite of close coverage of the whole chromosomes number 6 and 17, no linkage has been found in this regions. This indicates that neither the HLA region nor the region earlier found to be involved in one family with psoriasis are primarily involved in our families.

  7. Structural, functional, and evolutionary analysis of the unusually large stilbene synthase gene family in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Parage, Claire; Tavares, Raquel; Réty, Stéphane; Baltenweck-Guyot, Raymonde; Poutaraud, Anne; Renault, Lauriane; Heintz, Dimitri; Lugan, Raphaël; Marais, Gabriel A B; Aubourg, Sébastien; Hugueney, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Stilbenes are a small family of phenylpropanoids produced in a number of unrelated plant species, including grapevine (Vitis vinifera). In addition to their participation in defense mechanisms in plants, stilbenes, such as resveratrol, display important pharmacological properties and are postulated to be involved in the health benefits associated with a moderate consumption of red wine. Stilbene synthases (STSs), which catalyze the biosynthesis of the stilbene backbone, seem to have evolved from chalcone synthases (CHSs) several times independently in stilbene-producing plants. STS genes usually form small families of two to five closely related paralogs. By contrast, the sequence of grapevine reference genome (cv PN40024) has revealed an unusually large STS gene family. Here, we combine molecular evolution and structural and functional analyses to investigate further the high number of STS genes in grapevine. Our reannotation of the STS and CHS gene families yielded 48 STS genes, including at least 32 potentially functional ones. Functional characterization of nine genes representing most of the STS gene family diversity clearly indicated that these genes do encode for proteins with STS activity. Evolutionary analysis of the STS gene family revealed that both STS and CHS evolution are dominated by purifying selection, with no evidence for strong selection for new functions among STS genes. However, we found a few sites under different selection pressures in CHS and STS sequences, whose potential functional consequences are discussed using a structural model of a typical STS from grapevine that we developed.

  8. Large, rapidly evolving gene families are at the forefront of host-parasite interactions in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Reid, Adam J

    2015-02-01

    The Apicomplexa is a phylum of parasitic protozoa, which includes the malaria parasite Plasmodium, amongst other species that can devastate human and animal health. The past decade has seen the release of genome sequences for many of the most important apicomplexan species, providing an excellent basis for improving our understanding of their biology. One of the key features of each genome is a unique set of large, variant gene families. Although closely related species share the same families, even different types of malaria parasite have distinct families. In some species they tend to be found at the ends of chromosomes, which may facilitate aspects of gene expression regulation and generation of sequence diversity. In others they are scattered apparently randomly across chromosomes. For some families there is evidence they are involved in antigenic variation, immune regulation and immune evasion. For others there are no known functions. Even where function is unknown these families are most often predicted to be exposed to the host, contain much sequence diversity and evolve rapidly. Based on these properties it is clear that they are at the forefront of host-parasite interactions. In this review I compare and contrast the genomic context, gene structure, gene expression, protein localization and function of these families across different species.

  9. Evaluating the feasibility of using candidate DNA barcodes in discriminating species of the large Asteraceae family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Five DNA regions, namely, rbcL, matK, ITS, ITS2, and psbA-trnH, have been recommended as primary DNA barcodes for plants. Studies evaluating these regions for species identification in the large plant taxon, which includes a large number of closely related species, have rarely been reported. Results The feasibility of using the five proposed DNA regions was tested for discriminating plant species within Asteraceae, the largest family of flowering plants. Among these markers, ITS2 was the most useful in terms of universality, sequence variation, and identification capability in the Asteraceae family. The species discriminating power of ITS2 was also explored in a large pool of 3,490 Asteraceae sequences that represent 2,315 species belonging to 494 different genera. The result shows that ITS2 correctly identified 76.4% and 97.4% of plant samples at the species and genus levels, respectively. In addition, ITS2 displayed a variable ability to discriminate related species within different genera. Conclusions ITS2 is the best DNA barcode for the Asteraceae family. This approach significantly broadens the application of DNA barcoding to resolve classification problems in the family Asteraceae at the genera and species levels. PMID:20977734

  10. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy: an investigation in a rare and large Chinese family.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Zhipeng; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Weili; Li, Dezhong; Liu, Wanhong; He, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP), mainly associated with the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene, is generally an autosomal-dominant inherited peripheral neuropathy. The present large family including four generations provides an exciting opportunity to gain important insights into HNPP in China. A large 43-member family with ten members suspected to be affected by HNPP was studied. Neurologic examinations, electrophysiological and neuropathological studies and molecular genetic testing were used for these kindred. Clinically, the proband had limb hyposthenia and atrophy, and his mother showed declined tendon reflexes in the right lower limb. Electrophysiologically, sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities were generalized reduced. Sural nerve biopsy for the proband showed focal thickesning of the myelin sheaths. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that the PMP22 gene has a higher Ct value than reference gene in all suspected patients. These results indicated that the family is indeed a rare and large pedigree of HNPP caused by the deletion of PMP22 gene. Given that the suspected patient in the fourth generation is absent, this family is still worthy of further follow-up study. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Season of diagnosis is associated with overall survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma but not with Hodgkin's lymphoma - A population-based Swedish Lymphoma Register study.

    PubMed

    Székely, Elisabeth; Lindén, Ola; Peterson, Stefan; Jerkeman, Mats

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of season of diagnosis on the outcome of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). In this study, we included curatively treated DLBCL (n = 5875) and HL (n = 1693) patients, diagnosed between 2000 and 2011, based on data from the Swedish Lymphoma Register. Overall survival was significantly better for patients diagnosed with DLBCL during the summer months, but not for patients diagnosed with HL. The difference remained in a multivariable analysis adjusted for age, stage, performance status, number of extra nodal sites and year of diagnosis (HR 1.08; 95% CI 1.02-1.14, P = 0.0069). When analyzing the DLBCL patients according to gender in the multivariable model, the effect of season was shown to be restricted to male patients (HR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.17, P = 0.0269. In summary, season of diagnosis was shown to have impact on overall survival in male patients with DLBCL. Possible explanations of our results are the higher vitamin D level during the summer months, the effects of sunlight on the circadian rhythm and the immune system, or the lower risk of infectious disease during the summer. Further investigations are needed to explore these hypotheses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The CHAP domain: a large family of amidases including GSP amidase and peptidoglycan hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alex; Rawlings, Neil D

    2003-05-01

    Cleavage of peptidoglycan plays an important role in bacterial cell division, cell growth and cell lysis. Here, we reveal that several known peptidoglycan amidases fall into a family, which includes many proteins of previously unknown function. The family includes two different peptidoglycan cleavage activities: L-muramoyl-L-alanine amidase and D-alanyl-glycyl endopeptidase activity. The family includes the amidase portion of the bifunctional glutathionylspermidine synthase/amidase enzyme from bacteria and pathogenic trypanosomes. The glutathionylspermidine synthase is thought to be a key component of the alternative pathway in trypanosomes for protection from oxygen-radical damage and has been proposed as a potential drug target. The CHAP (cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases) domain is often found in association with other domains that cleave peptidoglycan. The large number of multifunctional hydrolases suggests that they might act in a cooperative manner to cleave specialized substrates.

  13. Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017. His Majesty Car

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-03

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017. His Majesty Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden. The king’s visit came as part his participation in a large delegation that also included the Swedish Ambassador to the United States; both the chairman and president of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences; as well as distinguished members of Sweden’s industrial, academia and professional organizations. Building 13 Network Integration Center.

  14. Environmental Management at Swedish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvidsson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Since 1996, all Swedish public authorities, which includes most universities, have been made responsible for contributing to the sustainable development of the society. Swedish universities are thus required to submit annual environmental reports about their policies, structures and actions. This study provides a review of the activities that…

  15. Environmental Management at Swedish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvidsson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Since 1996, all Swedish public authorities, which includes most universities, have been made responsible for contributing to the sustainable development of the society. Swedish universities are thus required to submit annual environmental reports about their policies, structures and actions. This study provides a review of the activities that…

  16. Familiar Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in a Large Brazilian Family Is Not Associated with Succinate Dehydrogenase Defects

    PubMed Central

    Accordi, Elen Dias; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Azevedo, Bruna; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Frasson, Carla; Gantzel, Siliane Marie; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Angelousi, Anna; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Sotomaior, Vanessa Santos; Faucz, Fabio R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine gland malignancy. Advances in understanding the genetic basis for thyroid cancer revealed the potential involvement of several genes in the formation of thyroid tumors. Mutations in the gene coding for succinate dehydrogenase subtype B (SDHB) have been implicated in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a heterotetrameric protein composed of four subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD, and participates in both the electron transport chain and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between variants in the SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD genes and familiar PTC in a large Brazilian family. Method Four patients with PTC, 1 patient with PTC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 1 patient with GIST, and their relatives - several of them with different thyroid problems - from a large Brazilian family were screened for genetic variations of SDHx genes with the use of polymerase chain reaction-single-stranded conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing. Results Only one rare variation in SDHA was found in some of the family members, but not segregating with the disease. No other genetic variants of these genes were detected in the family members that presented with PTC and/or GIST. Conclusion Familiar PTC and a GIST were not associated with SDHx mutations; additional genetic defects, yet unknown, may be responsible for the development of tumor. PMID:27493882

  17. A novel approach to screening for familial hypercholesterolemia in a large public venue.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Megan; Humanki, Jessa; Zierhut, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to test the feasibility of a public health screening program to identify individuals at high risk of familial hypercholesterolemia through a novel screening approach at a large public venue. A finger-prick, non-fasting lipid panel was obtained, and a survey which consisted of 44 open- and close-ended questions divided into four sections: medical and family history of FH, opinions of cascade genetic testing, patient activation, and demographics was completed. A total of 971 participants met criteria and completed a cholesterol screen. In total, five individuals met either the Simon Broome Register or the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network criteria for possible familial hypercholesterolemia. Participants were generally positive towards genetic testing, and the vast majority listed they had no barriers to communication of genetic testing information to family members. However, the most common barrier listed was lack of communication skills. Our results suggest that a public health screening program for FH is viable at a large public venue. We argue that further research is needed to expand this study to a fully operational screening program.

  18. Clinical and linkage study of a large family with simple ectopia lentis linked to FBN1

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.J.; Roberts, J.; Partington, M.W.; Colley, P.W.; Hollway, G.E.; Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-10-15

    Simple ectopia lentis (EL) was studied in a large family, by clinical examination and analysis of linkage to markers in the region of FBN1, the gene for fibrillin which causes Marfan syndrome on chromosome 15. No patient had clinical or echocardiographic evidence of Marfan syndrome, although there was a trend towards relatively longer measurements of height; lower segment; arm span; middle finger, hand, and foot length in the affected members of the family, compared with unaffected sibs of the same sex. Analysis of linkage to intragenic FBN1 markers was inconclusive because they were relatively uninformative. Construction of a multipoint background map from the CEPH reference families identified microsatellite markers linked closely to FBN1 which could demonstrate linkage of EL in this family to the FBN1 region. LINKMAP analysis detected a multipoint lod score of 5.68 at D15S119, a marker approximately 6 cM distal to FBN1, and a multipoint lod score of 5.04 at FBN1. The EL gene in this family is likely to be allelic to Marfan syndrome, and molecular characterization of the FBN1 mutation should now be possible. 25 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Risk Selection into Consumer-Directed Health Plans: An Analysis of Family Choices within Large Employers

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Roland D; Haviland, Amelia M; Lore, Ryan; Laudenberger, Laura; Eisenberg, Matthew; Sood, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the degree of selection into consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs) versus traditional plans over time, and factors that influence choice and temper risk selection. Data Sources/Study Setting Sixteen large employers offering both CDHP and traditional plans during the 2004–2007 period, more than 200,000 families. Study Design We model CDHP choice with logistic regression; predictors include risk scores, in addition to family, choice setting, and plan characteristics. Additional models stratify by account type or single enrollee versus family. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Risk scores, family characteristics, and enrollment decisions are derived from medical claims and enrollment files. Interviews with human resources executives provide additional data. Principal Findings CDHP risk scores were 74 percent of traditional plan scores in the first year, and this difference declined over time. Employer contributions to accounts and employee premium savings fostered CDHP enrollment and reduced risk selection. Having to make an active choice of plan increased CDHP enrollment but also increased risk selection. Risk selection was greater for singles than families and did not differ between HRA and HSA-based CDHPs. Conclusions Risk selection was not severe and it was well managed. Employers have effective methods to encourage CDHP enrollment and temper selection against traditional plans. PMID:24800305

  20. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-22

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses.

  1. A large multigene family codes for the polypeptides of the crystalline trichocyst matrix in Paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, L; Gautier, M C; Vayssié, L; Houari, A; Sperling, L

    1995-01-01

    The secretory granules (trichocysts) of Paramecium are characterized by a highly constrained shape that reflects the crystalline organization of their protein contents. Yet the crystalline trichocyst content is composed not of a single protein but of a family of related polypeptides that derive from a family of precursors by protein processing. In this paper we show that a multigene family, of unusually large size for a unicellular organism, codes for these proteins. The family is organized in subfamilies; each subfamily codes for proteins with different primary structures, but within the subfamilies several genes code for nearly identical proteins. For one subfamily, we have obtained direct evidence that the different members are coexpressed. The three subfamilies we have characterized are located on different macronuclear chromosomes. Typical 23-29 nucleotide Paramecium introns are found in one of the regions studied and the intron sequences are more variable than the surrounding coding sequences, providing gene-specific markers. We suggest that this multigene family may have evolved to assure a microheterogeneity of structural proteins necessary for morphogenesis of a complex secretory granule core with a constrained shape and dynamic properties: genetic analysis has shown that correct assembly of the crystalline core is necessary for trichocyst function. Images PMID:7579685

  2. RET mutations in a large indian family with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, D. M.; Nehru, Arun G.; Seshadri, M. S.; Thomas, Nihal; Nair, Aravindan; Pai, Rekha; Rajaratnam, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a tumor arising from the para follicular (C) cells of the thyroid gland and can occur either sporadically or as part of an inherited syndrome. A proportion of these cases carry an autosomal dominant mutation in the RET (REarranged during Transfection) proto-oncogene. Screening for these mutations in the affected patients and the carriers “at risk” which includes the first-degree relatives is of utmost importance for early detection and prompt treatment including prophylactic thyroidectomy in cases that harbor these mutations. Results: This report presents details of screening and subsequent follow-up of a large Indian family, where the index case was found to carry p. Cys634Ser mutation involving exon 11 of the RET gene. These data are of value considering the paucity of information within the region in context of screening large families affected by these mutations. PMID:25143909

  3. The advantages of dense marker sets for linkage analysis with very large families.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Russell; Quinn, Stephen; McKay, James; Silver, Jeremy; Bahlo, Melanie; FitzGerald, Liesel; Foote, Simon; Dickinson, Jo; Stankovich, Jim

    2007-05-01

    Dense sets of hundreds of thousands of markers have been developed for genome-wide association studies. These marker sets are also beneficial for linkage analysis of large, deep pedigrees containing distantly related cases. It is impossible to analyse jointly all genotypes in large pedigrees using the Lander-Green Algorithm, however, as marker density increases it becomes less crucial to analyse all individuals' genotypes simultaneously. In this report, an approximate multipoint non-parametric technique is described, where large pedigrees are split into many small pedigrees, each containing just two cases. This technique is demonstrated, using phased data from the International Hapmap Project to simulate sets of 10,000, 50,000 and 250,000 markers, showing that it becomes increasingly accurate as more markers are genotyped. This method allows routine linkage analysis of large families with dense marker sets and represents a more easily applied alternative to Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods.

  4. Injuries in Swedish skydiving

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Anton; Björnstig, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    Objective To create a basis for prevention of modern skydiving injuries. Design Descriptive epidemiological study. Setting National total material. Patients Data on all reported injury events (n = 257) in Swedish skydiving 1999–2003 (total 539 885 jumps) were retrieved from the Swedish Parachute Association. Non‐fatally injured skydivers were sent a questionnaire asking for event and injury details (response rate 89%), and supplementary hospital records were retrieved for the most serious injuries (n = 85). Human, equipment and environmental factors were assessed for risk. Main Outcome Measurements Frequency and severity of injuries. Results Incidence of non‐fatal injury events was 48 per 100 000 jumps. The lower extremities, spine and shoulders were important regions of injury. The most serious injuries were experienced by licensed skydivers, but students in training had a higher injury rate and more often left the sport because of the injury. Of two student‐training systems, one had an incidence less than half that of the other. Conclusions A basis for prevention was created, showing a potential for reduction of frequency and severity of injuries with training and technical interventions. PMID:17224436

  5. Swedish small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundahl, K.; von Scheele, F.

    2004-11-01

    In 1986 the first Swedish small satellite VIKING was launched on the Ariane 1 rocket together with the French remote sensing satellite SPOT-1. This paper describes the development of Swedish small satellites in an international framework. The satellites have delivered excellent scientific data to a low cost by using e.g. streamlined project organisations, competitive procurement programs and piggy-back launch opportunities. The first micro satellite Astrid-1 was launched in January 1995 and was followed by the launch of Astrid-2 in December 1998. The capable Odin small satellite was launched in February 2001. SSC was also contracted for ESA's SMART-1 probe destined to the Moon. SMART-1, launched in September 2003, is used for both research and as a technology demonstrator for future projects. Future proposed projects include micro and small satellites for climate research as the Atmosphere and Climate Explorer Plus (ACE+), the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange And climate Monitor (STEAM) and PRISMA, a technology demonstrator for formation flying, new propulsion system and commercial development methods.

  6. Genome-scale phylogenetic function annotation of large and diverse protein families.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Barbara E; Jordan, Michael I; Srouji, John R; Brenner, Steven E

    2011-11-01

    The Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships (SIFTER) framework uses a statistical graphical model that applies phylogenetic principles to automate precise protein function prediction. Here we present a revised approach (SIFTER version 2.0) that enables annotations on a genomic scale. SIFTER 2.0 produces equivalently precise predictions compared to the earlier version on a carefully studied family and on a collection of 100 protein families. We have added an approximation method to SIFTER 2.0 and show a 500-fold improvement in speed with minimal impact on prediction results in the functionally diverse sulfotransferase protein family. On the Nudix protein family, previously inaccessible to the SIFTER framework because of the 66 possible molecular functions, SIFTER achieved 47.4% accuracy on experimental data (where BLAST achieved 34.0%). Finally, we used SIFTER to annotate all of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins with experimental functional characterizations, based on annotations from proteins in 46 fungal genomes. SIFTER precisely predicted molecular function for 45.5% of the characterized proteins in this genome, as compared with four current function prediction methods that precisely predicted function for 62.6%, 30.6%, 6.0%, and 5.7% of these proteins. We use both precision-recall curves and ROC analyses to compare these genome-scale predictions across the different methods and to assess performance on different types of applications. SIFTER 2.0 is capable of predicting protein molecular function for large and functionally diverse protein families using an approximate statistical model, enabling phylogenetics-based protein function prediction for genome-wide analyses. The code for SIFTER and protein family data are available at http://sifter.berkeley.edu.

  7. Genome-scale phylogenetic function annotation of large and diverse protein families

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Jordan, Michael I.; Srouji, John R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2011-01-01

    The Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships (SIFTER) framework uses a statistical graphical model that applies phylogenetic principles to automate precise protein function prediction. Here we present a revised approach (SIFTER version 2.0) that enables annotations on a genomic scale. SIFTER 2.0 produces equivalently precise predictions compared to the earlier version on a carefully studied family and on a collection of 100 protein families. We have added an approximation method to SIFTER 2.0 and show a 500-fold improvement in speed with minimal impact on prediction results in the functionally diverse sulfotransferase protein family. On the Nudix protein family, previously inaccessible to the SIFTER framework because of the 66 possible molecular functions, SIFTER achieved 47.4% accuracy on experimental data (where BLAST achieved 34.0%). Finally, we used SIFTER to annotate all of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins with experimental functional characterizations, based on annotations from proteins in 46 fungal genomes. SIFTER precisely predicted molecular function for 45.5% of the characterized proteins in this genome, as compared with four current function prediction methods that precisely predicted function for 62.6%, 30.6%, 6.0%, and 5.7% of these proteins. We use both precision-recall curves and ROC analyses to compare these genome-scale predictions across the different methods and to assess performance on different types of applications. SIFTER 2.0 is capable of predicting protein molecular function for large and functionally diverse protein families using an approximate statistical model, enabling phylogenetics-based protein function prediction for genome-wide analyses. The code for SIFTER and protein family data are available at http://sifter.berkeley.edu. PMID:21784873

  8. Genetic diagnosis of polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and thalassemia minor in a large Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yun; Xiong, Jun; Zhang, Xuelian; Huang, Huajie; Yu, Lixin; Chen, Jianfan; Deng, Wenfeng; Xu, Huiling; Liu, Rumin; Xiang, Chenglin; Xu, Xiangmin; Xiong, Fu

    2017-10-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and Alport syndrome (AS) are serious inherited disorders associated with renal disease, and thalassemia is a hereditary blood disease with a high prevalence in south China. Here, we report an exceptional PKD coincidence of thalassemia minor and AS (diagnosed genetically) in a large Chinese family. Whole genome next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed on the proband, and all family members underwent clinical evaluation. Sanger sequencing was used to validate the mutations distinguished by NGS. The pathogenic potential of the variants were evaluated by Polymorphism Phenotyping v2 (PolyPhen-2), Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) algorithm, and MutationTaster. Immunohistochemical, Western blot, immunofluorescent, and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) analyses were performed to investigate polycystin 1 (PC1) expression, and cell proliferation and apoptosis in kidney tissues from the proband and normal control. A novel frameshift polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) mutation (c.3903delC, p.A1302Pfs) was identified to be responsible for renal disease in this family. PC1 expression, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were significantly increased in the kidney tissues of the proband. Moreover, a deletion of approximately 19.3 kb of DNA with α-globin genes ((_ _SEA)) was associated with thalassemia minor in the family. In addition, a collagen type IV α 5 chain (COL4A5) variant (c.2858G>T, rs78972735), annotated as a pathogenic mutation in dbSNP and human gene mutation database (HGMD), was found in four family members with no clinical traits of AS. A novel pathogenic PKD1 mutation (c.3903delC) and ((_ _SEA)) thalassemia deletion were found to be responsible for the clinical symptoms in this family. The reported pathogenic COL4a5 variant (c.2858G>T, rs78972735) was not pathogenic alone. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Identification of a very large Rab GTPase family in the parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Lal, Kalpana; Field, Mark C; Carlton, Jane M; Warwicker, Jim; Hirt, Robert P

    2005-10-01

    Rab proteins are pivotal components of the membrane trafficking machinery in all eukaryotes. Distinct Rab proteins locate to specific endomembrane compartments and genomic studies suggest that Rab gene diversity correlates with endomembrane system complexity; for example unicellular organisms generally possess 5-20 Rab family members and the size of the repertoire increases to 25-60 in multicellular systems. Here we report 65 open reading frames from the unicellular protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis that encode distinct Rab proteins (TvRabs), indicating a family with complexity that rivals Homo sapiens in number. The detection of gene transcripts for the majority of these genes and conservation of functional motifs strongly suggests that TvRabs retain functionality and likely roles in membrane trafficking. The T. vaginalis Rab family includes orthologues of the conserved subfamilies, Rab1, Rab5, Rab6, Rab7 and Rab11, but the majority of TvRabs are not represented by orthologues in other systems and includes six novel T. vaginalis specific Rab subfamilies (A-F). The extreme size of the T. vaginalis Rab family, the presence of novel subfamilies plus the divergent nature of many TvRab sequences suggest both the presence of a highly complex endomembrane system within Trichomonas and potentially novel Rab functionality. A family of more than 65 Rab genes in a unicellular genome is unexpected, but may be a requirement for progression though an amoeboid life-cycle phase as both Dictyostelium discoideum and Entamoeba histolytica share with T. vaginalis both an amoeboid life cycle stage and very large Rab gene families.

  10. Genomic Selection For Bacterial Cold Water Disease Resistance In Rainbow Trout Reveals Large Within-Family Variation That Cannot Be Exploited In Traditional Family-based Selective Breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective breeding is an effective strategy to improve resistance to specific pathogens, and thus has the potential to mitigate antibiotic use in aquaculture. Large family sizes of aquaculture species permits family-based selective breeding programs, but the need for specific-pathogen-free nucleus p...

  11. Clinical and genetic identification of a large chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yezhen; Tian, Di; Lee, Janet; Zeng, Jing; Zhang, Huiming; Chen, Siying; Guo, Hui; Xiong, Zhiming; Xia, Kun; Hu, Zhengmao; Luo, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by night blindness, progressive peripheral visual field loss, and loss of central vision. Fifty-three RP pathogenic genes are responsible for RP. Pre-mRNA processing factor 31(PRPF31) gene is the third most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), and so far more than 40 mutations in PRPF31 have been detected. To identify the underlying genetic defect in a five-generation Chinese family affected with adRP and to study the genotype-phenotype relationship of this family. Detailed clinical investigations were undertaken and peripheral blood samples were collected from 25 individuals. Microsatellite (STR) markers tightly linked to genes known to be responsible for adRP were selected for linkage analysis. Exons and adjacent splice junctions of the candidate gene were amplified and sequenced. This adRP family exhibited an incomplete penetrance of the RP phenotype. In affected individuals, age of disease onset was from infancy to 4 years of age. Typical RP features were associated with this mutation. Linkage analysis identified a maximum two-point LOD score of 3.20 with D19S418, which is close to PRPF31. A mutation PRPF31: (c.358-359 del AA) was identified by linkage analysis. A PRPF31 mutation was identified to be responsible for adRP in a large Chinese family. Our findings expand the mutation spectrum of RP in the Chinese population.

  12. Clinical expression of developmental coordination disorder in a large Canadian family.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Robin; Collins, David; Boycott, Kym; Missiuna, Cheryl; Delaat, Denise; Soucie, Helen

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies of the phenotype of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have largely concentrated on population-based samples. The present study reports on an in-depth examination of a large Canadian family with eight children, after three children who were suspected to have DCD were referred for evaluation. Subsequently, five of the six children whose motor impairments could be measured, and the mother, met the diagnostic criteria for DCD as per the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - fourth edition. The family members diagnosed with DCD showed remarkably similar profiles of motor difficulties. Additionally, the five children diagnosed with DCD had current speech articulation difficulties, with four of them having visited speech/language pathologists; the mother had a lateral lisp. More in-depth testing for three children revealed intact intellectual, academic and language comprehension skills. Three of the children diagnosed with DCD were obese. The present report highlights familial clustering of DCD and the presence of comorbid conditions in the affected children.

  13. Protocol design for large-scale cross-sectional studies of sexual abuse and associated factors in individual sports: feasibility study in Swedish athletics.

    PubMed

    Timpka, Toomas; Janson, Staffan; Jacobsson, Jenny; Ekberg, Joakim; Dahlström, Örjan; Kowalski, Jan; Bargoria, Victor; Mountjoy, Margo; Svedin, Carl G

    2015-03-01

    A research protocol for cross-sectional epidemiological studies of sexual abuse in athletics was designed and its feasibility evaluated.The definition of sexual abuse, ethical soundness of the protocol, reference populations and study of co-morbidity, and means for athlete-level data collection were in requirements analyses identified as particularly complex design issues.The feasibility evaluation showed a high non-participation rate (61%), but also that the large majority of participants found the study important and that questions were answered truthfully.Responding that partaking in the study was not personally gratifying was associated with training more hours.When implementing cross-sectional epidemiological studies of sexual abuse in athletics, it is necessary to promote and facilitate athlete participation.

  14. Protocol Design for Large-Scale Cross-Sectional Studies of Sexual Abuse and Associated Factors in Individual Sports: Feasibility Study in Swedish Athletics

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, Toomas; Janson, Staffan; Jacobsson, Jenny; Ekberg, Joakim; Dahlström, Örjan; Kowalski, Jan; Bargoria, Victor; Mountjoy, Margo; Svedin, Carl G.

    2015-01-01

    research protocol for cross-sectional epidemiological studies of sexual abuse in athletics was designed and its feasibility evaluated. The definition of sexual abuse, ethical soundness of the protocol, reference populations and study of co-morbidity, and means for athlete-level data collection were in requirements analyses identified as particularly complex design issues. The feasibility evaluation showed a high non-participation rate (61%), but also that the large majority of participants found the study important and that questions were answered truthfully. Responding that partaking in the study was not personally gratifying was associated with training more hours. When implementing cross-sectional epidemiological studies of sexual abuse in athletics, it is necessary to promote and facilitate athlete participation. PMID:25729306

  15. Towards identification of an epilepsy gene in a large family with idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Roussear, M.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Berkovic, S.F.

    1994-09-01

    To identify the disease gene in a large, multiplex family segregating an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The IGEs have been recognized for several decades as being genetically determined. However, large pedigrees with a clear Mendelian inheritance are not commonly available. This, and the presence of locus heterogeneity have been obstacles to the identification of linkage in several IGE syndromes. We have identified a large IGE kindred with fifty-eight living individuals, including 26 affecteds, showing a clear autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Forty-fur informative individuals, including 23 affecteds, were selected for the linkage studies. We have chosen 200 polymorphic microsatellite markers, about 20 cM apart, throughout the human autosomes as a genome-search linkage strategy. To date, 47 markers, representing 30% of the human genome, have been excluded for linkage in the Australian kindred. As our study progresses, we will report up-to-date results.

  16. Genetic analysis of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome in a large cohort of families.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lacey S; Demir Eksi, Durkadin; Shen, Yiping; Lossie, Amy C; Chorich, Lynn P; Sullivan, Megan E; Phillips, John A; Erman, Munire; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Alper, Ozgul M; Layman, Lawrence C

    2017-07-01

    To study the genetic cause of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH). Although a few candidate genes and genomic domains for have been reported for MRKH, the genetic underpinnings remain largely unknown. Some of the top candidate genes are WNT4, HNF1B, and LHX1. The goals of this study were to: 1) determine the prevalence of WNT4, HNF1B, and LHX1 point mutations, as well as new copy number variants (CNVs) in people with MRKH; and 2) identify and characterize MRKH cohorts. Laboratory- and community-based study. Academic medical centers. A total of 147 MRKH probands and available family members. DNA sequencing of WNT4, HNF1B, and LHX1 in 100 MRKH patients, chromosomal microarray analysis in 31 North American MRKH patients, and characterization and sample collection of 147 North American and Turkish MRKH probands and their families. DNA sequence variants and CNVs; pedigree structural analysis. We report finding CNVs in 6/31 people (∼19%) with MRKH, but no point mutations or small indels in WNT4, HNF1B, or LHX1 in 100 MRKH patients. Our MRKH families included 43 quads, 26 trios, and 30 duos. Of our MRKH probands, 87/147 (59%) had MRKH type 1 and 60/147 (41%) had type 2 with additional anomalies. Although the prevalence of WNT4, HNF1B, and LHX1 point mutations is low in people with MRKH, the prevalence of CNVs was ∼19%. Further analysis of our large familial cohort of patients will facilitate gene discovery to better understand the complex etiology of MRKH. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. Electron counting and a large family of two-dimensional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Maosheng; Botana, Jorge; Zurek, Eva; Liu, Jingyao; Yang, Wen

    Two-dimensional semiconductors (2DSC) are currently the focus of many studies, thanks to their novel and superior transport properties that may greatly influence future electronic devices. The potential applications of 2DSCs range from low-dimensional electronics, topological insulators and vallytronics all the way to novel photolysis. However, compared with the conventional semiconductors that are comprised of main group elements and cover a large range of band gaps and lattice constants, the choice of 2D materials is very limited. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a large family of 2DSCs, all adopting the same structure and consisting of only main group elements. Using advanced density functional calculations, we demonstrate the attainability of these materials, and show that they cover a large range of lattice constants, band gaps and band edge states, making them good candidate materials for heterojunctions. This family of two dimensional materials may be instrumental in the fabrication of 2DSC devices that may rival the currently employed 3D semiconductors.

  18. Prosody Intervention: A Single Subject Study of a Swedish Boy with Prosodic Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsson, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Swedish has a complicated prosodic system, compared, for example, with English. A large proportion of Swedish children with language impairment (LI) have prosodic problems to some extent. There are few descriptions in the literature of prosody intervention, which means that clinicians must rely on their overall linguistic and therapeutic knowledge…

  19. Prosody Intervention: A Single Subject Study of a Swedish Boy with Prosodic Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsson, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Swedish has a complicated prosodic system, compared, for example, with English. A large proportion of Swedish children with language impairment (LI) have prosodic problems to some extent. There are few descriptions in the literature of prosody intervention, which means that clinicians must rely on their overall linguistic and therapeutic knowledge…

  20. Swedish nuclear waste efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

  1. Religious support, motives for having large families, and psychological functioning among religious Jewish mothers.

    PubMed

    Bjorck, Jeffery P; Lazar, Aryeh

    2011-03-01

    The effects of religious support, maternal motivations for having large families, and their interactions on psychological functioning were assessed in a sample of 79 religious Israeli Jewish mothers of six or more children. Religious support from religious leaders, community, and G-d--as well as faith-focused maternal motivation--were all positively related to adaptive psychological functioning. In contrast, self-focused maternal motivation was negatively related to adaptive functioning. Moreover, religious support and maternal motivation were both related to psychological functioning even after controlling for social support. Finally, several significant interactions between religious support and maternal motivation emerged and are also discussed.

  2. QuickProbs 2: Towards rapid construction of high-quality alignments of large protein families

    PubMed Central

    Gudyś, Adam; Deorowicz, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The ever-increasing size of sequence databases caused by the development of high throughput sequencing, poses to multiple alignment algorithms one of the greatest challenges yet. As we show, well-established techniques employed for increasing alignment quality, i.e., refinement and consistency, are ineffective when large protein families are investigated. We present QuickProbs 2, an algorithm for multiple sequence alignment. Based on probabilistic models, equipped with novel column-oriented refinement and selective consistency, it offers outstanding accuracy. When analysing hundreds of sequences, Quick-Probs 2 is noticeably better than ClustalΩ and MAFFT, the previous leaders for processing numerous protein families. In the case of smaller sets, for which consistency-based methods are the best performing, QuickProbs 2 is also superior to the competitors. Due to low computational requirements of selective consistency and utilization of massively parallel architectures, presented algorithm has similar execution times to ClustalΩ, and is orders of magnitude faster than full consistency approaches, like MSAProbs or PicXAA. All these make QuickProbs 2 an excellent tool for aligning families ranging from few, to hundreds of proteins. PMID:28139687

  3. The Swedish duty hour enigma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Swedish resident duty hour limit is regulated by Swedish and European legal frameworks. With a maximum average of 40 working hours per week, the Swedish duty hour regulation is one of the most restrictive in the world. At the same time, the effects of resident duty hour limits have been neither debated nor researched in the Swedish context. As a result, little is known about the Swedish conceptual framework for resident duty hours, their restriction, or their outcomes: we call this “the Swedish duty hour enigma.” This situation poses a further question: How do Swedish residents themselves construct a conceptual framework for duty hour restrictions? Methods A case study was conducted at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm – an urban, research-intensive hospital setting. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 34 residents currently in training in 6 specialties. The empirical data analysis relied on theoretical propositions and was conducted thematically using a pattern-matching technique. The interview guide was based on four main topics: the perceived effect of duty hour restrictions on (1) patient care, (2) resident education, (3) resident well-being, and (4) research. Results The residents did not perceive the volume of duty hours to be the main determinant of success or failure in the four contextual domains of patient care, resident education, resident well-being, and research. Instead, they emphasized resident well-being and a desire for flexibility. Conclusions According to Swedish residents’ conceptual framework on duty hours, the amount of time spent on duty is not a proxy for the quality of resident training. Instead, flexibility, organization, and scheduling of duty hours are considered to be the factors that have the greatest influence on resident well-being, quality of learning, and opportunities to attain the competence needed for independent practice. PMID:25559074

  4. The Swedish duty hour enigma.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Kristina; Frydén, Hanna; Kihlström, Lars; Nordquist, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The Swedish resident duty hour limit is regulated by Swedish and European legal frameworks. With a maximum average of 40 working hours per week, the Swedish duty hour regulation is one of the most restrictive in the world. At the same time, the effects of resident duty hour limits have been neither debated nor researched in the Swedish context. As a result, little is known about the Swedish conceptual framework for resident duty hours, their restriction, or their outcomes: we call this "the Swedish duty hour enigma." This situation poses a further question: How do Swedish residents themselves construct a conceptual framework for duty hour restrictions? A case study was conducted at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm--an urban, research-intensive hospital setting. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 34 residents currently in training in 6 specialties. The empirical data analysis relied on theoretical propositions and was conducted thematically using a pattern-matching technique. The interview guide was based on four main topics: the perceived effect of duty hour restrictions on (1) patient care, (2) resident education, (3) resident well-being, and (4) research. The residents did not perceive the volume of duty hours to be the main determinant of success or failure in the four contextual domains of patient care, resident education, resident well-being, and research. Instead, they emphasized resident well-being and a desire for flexibility. According to Swedish residents' conceptual framework on duty hours, the amount of time spent on duty is not a proxy for the quality of resident training. Instead, flexibility, organization, and scheduling of duty hours are considered to be the factors that have the greatest influence on resident well-being, quality of learning, and opportunities to attain the competence needed for independent practice.

  5. Autosomal dominant congenital fibre type disproportion: a clinicopathological and imaging study of a large family.

    PubMed

    Sobrido, M J; Fernández, J M; Fontoira, E; Pérez-Sousa, C; Cabello, A; Castro, M; Teijeira, S; Alvarez, S; Mederer, S; Rivas, E; Seijo-Martínez, M; Navarro, C

    2005-07-01

    Congenital fibre type disproportion (CFTD) is considered a non-progressive or slowly progressive muscle disease with relative smallness of type 1 fibres on pathological examination. Although generally benign, CFTD has a variable natural course and severe progression has been observed in some patients. The pathogenesis of the disorder is unknown and many authors consider CFTD a syndrome with multiple aetiologies rather than a separate clinical entity. A positive family history has been reported in about 40% of cases, but the inheritance pattern is not clear. Both autosomal recessive and dominant modes of inheritance have been suggested. The present paper describes a large, multigenerational kindred that has an inherited myopathy fulfilling the histological criteria of CFTD, with autosomal dominant transmission and high penetrance. The clinical picture, remarkably similar in all affected family members, started in early infancy with mild limb muscle weakness. There was slow progression of symptoms into adulthood, with moderate to severe, mainly proximal, muscle weakness without loss of ambulation. Muscle biopsy from two affected individuals demonstrated predominance of small type 1 muscle fibres without other significant findings. Nerve conduction studies were normal and needle electromyography showed a myopathic pattern. MRI examination performed on three patients from successive generations showed involvement of proximal limb and paraspinal muscles. The clinical and pathological homogeneity in the present family, together with the lack of additional histological abnormalities after decades of disease progression in two affected individuals, supports this being a distinct myopathy with fibre type disproportion. Whether the disease in this family can be regarded as a form of the congenital myopathy known as CFTD or rather a unique condition sharing histological features with CFTD needs further investigation. This is, to our knowledge, the largest kindred with muscle

  6. Clinical presentation and mutation analysis of VHL disease in a large Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Li, De-Ling; Kang, Peng; Ji, Nan; Yang, Jun; Liu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Li-Wei; Jia, Gui-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited neoplastic disorder characterized by marked phenotypic variability and age-dependent penetrance. This disease is caused by germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. Systematic physical examinations, imaging assessments and molecular genetic tests for the VHL gene were performed in a large Chinese VHL family. The examined Chinese VHL family, which has 25 members from four generations, including 7 diagnosed VHL patients and 2 asymptomatic mutation carriers. The average ages of first onset for generations I, II, and III were 37, 30 and 16, respectively. The male:female ratio among VHL patients was 6:1. Molecular genetic investigations detected the c.433C>T [p.Q145X] nonsense mutation in the VHL gene. Molecular modeling of the VHL-ElonginC- ElonginB-HIF-1α complex predicted that the p.Q145X mutation markedly alters the L7 loop structure of the β-domain of the VHL protein (pVHL), destabilizes the VHL-HIF-1αcomplex, and induces the truncation of pVHL. We speculate that the p.Q145X nonsense mutation leads to relatively obvious familial aggregation. This mutation causes the type I phenotype of VHL disease and is associated with a high risk of retinal and central nervous system (CNS) hemangioblastomas (HGBs) and visceral cysts, but a low risk of renal cell carcinoma. Moreover, within a VHL family, the average ages of first onset became younger in successive generations, and the CNS HGBs are more likely to occur in male patients.

  7. Adaptive evolution in two large families of ubiquitin-ligase adapters in nematodes and plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, James H

    2006-08-01

    Host-pathogen arms races can result in adaptive evolution (positive selection) of host genes that mediate pathogen recognition and defense. To identify such genes in nematodes, I used maximum-likelihood analysis of codon evolution to survey all paralogous gene groups in Caenorhabditis elegans. This survey found robust evidence of positive selection in two classes of genes not previously implicated in pathogen defense. Both classes of genes encode ubiquitin-dependent proteasome adapters, which recruit diverse substrate proteins for poly-ubiquitination and proteolysis by Cullin-E3 ubiquitin-ligase complexes. The adapter proteins are members of the F-box superfamily and the MATH-BTB family, which consist of a conserved Cullin-binding domain and a variable substrate-binding domain. Further analysis showed that most of the approximately 520 members of the F-box superfamily and approximately 50 members of the MATH-BTB family in C. elegans are under strong positive selection at sites in their substrate-binding domains but not in their Cullin-binding domains. Structural modeling of positively selected sites in MATH-BTB proteins suggests that they are concentrated in the MATH peptide-binding cleft. Comparisons among three Caenorhabditis species also indicate an extremely high rate of gene duplication and deletion (birth-death evolution) in F-box and MATH-BTB families. Finally, I found strikingly similar patterns of positive selection and birth-death evolution in the large F-box superfamily in plants. Based on these patterns of molecular evolution, I propose that most members of the MATH-BTB family and the F-box superfamily are adapters that target foreign proteins for proteolysis. I speculate that this system functions to combat viral pathogens or bacterial protein toxins.

  8. Adaptive evolution in two large families of ubiquitin-ligase adapters in nematodes and plants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Host–pathogen arms races can result in adaptive evolution (positive selection) of host genes that mediate pathogen recognition and defense. To identify such genes in nematodes, I used maximum-likelihood analysis of codon evolution to survey all paralogous gene groups in Caenorhabditis elegans. This survey found robust evidence of positive selection in two classes of genes not previously implicated in pathogen defense. Both classes of genes encode ubiquitin-dependent proteasome adapters, which recruit diverse substrate proteins for poly-ubiquitination and proteolysis by Cullin-E3 ubiquitin-ligase complexes. The adapter proteins are members of the F-box superfamily and the MATH-BTB family, which consist of a conserved Cullin-binding domain and a variable substrate-binding domain. Further analysis showed that most of the ∼520 members of the F-box superfamily and ∼50 members of the MATH-BTB family in C. elegans are under strong positive selection at sites in their substrate-binding domains but not in their Cullin-binding domains. Structural modeling of positively selected sites in MATH-BTB proteins suggests that they are concentrated in the MATH peptide-binding cleft. Comparisons among three Caenorhabditis species also indicate an extremely high rate of gene duplication and deletion (birth–death evolution) in F-box and MATH-BTB families. Finally, I found strikingly similar patterns of positive selection and birth–death evolution in the large F-box superfamily in plants. Based on these patterns of molecular evolution, I propose that most members of the MATH-BTB family and the F-box superfamily are adapters that target foreign proteins for proteolysis. I speculate that this system functions to combat viral pathogens or bacterial protein toxins. PMID:16825662

  9. Evolutionary mechanisms driving the evolution of a large polydnavirus gene family coding for protein tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene duplications have been proposed to be the main mechanism involved in genome evolution and in acquisition of new functions. Polydnaviruses (PDVs), symbiotic viruses associated with parasitoid wasps, are ideal model systems to study mechanisms of gene duplications given that PDV genomes consist of virulence genes organized into multigene families. In these systems the viral genome is integrated in a wasp chromosome as a provirus and virus particles containing circular double-stranded DNA are injected into the parasitoids’ hosts and are essential for parasitism success. The viral virulence factors, organized in gene families, are required collectively to induce host immune suppression and developmental arrest. The gene family which encodes protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) has undergone spectacular expansion in several PDV genomes with up to 42 genes. Results Here, we present strong indications that PTP gene family expansion occurred via classical mechanisms: by duplication of large segments of the chromosomally integrated form of the virus sequences (segmental duplication), by tandem duplications within this form and by dispersed duplications. We also propose a novel duplication mechanism specific to PDVs that involves viral circle reintegration into the wasp genome. The PTP copies produced were shown to undergo conservative evolution along with episodes of adaptive evolution. In particular recently produced copies have undergone positive selection in sites most likely involved in defining substrate selectivity. Conclusion The results provide evidence about the dynamic nature of polydnavirus proviral genomes. Classical and PDV-specific duplication mechanisms have been involved in the production of new gene copies. Selection pressures associated with antagonistic interactions with parasitized hosts have shaped these genes used to manipulate lepidopteran physiology with evidence for positive selection involved in adaptation to host targets. PMID

  10. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    PubMed

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members.

  11. J Domain-Independent Regulation of the Rb Family by Polyomavirus Large T Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Qing; Love, Tara M.; Schaffhausen, Brian

    2000-01-01

    The ability of polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) to promote cell cycling, to immortalize primary cells, and to block differentiation has been linked to its effects on tumor suppressors of the retinoblastoma susceptibility (Rb) gene family. Our previous studies have shown that LT requires an intact N-terminal DnaJ domain, in addition to an Rb binding site, for activation of simple E2F-containing promoters and stimulation of cell cycle progression. Here we show that some LT effects dependent on interaction with the Rb family are largely DnaJ independent. In differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, overexpression of LT caused apoptosis. Although this activity of LT completely depended on Rb binding, LTs with mutations in the J domain remained able to kill. Comparisons of Rb− and J− LTs revealed additional differences. Wild-type but not Rb− LT activated the cyclin A promoter under serum starvation conditions. Genetic analysis of the promoter linked the Rb requirement to an E2F site in the promoter. LTs with mutations in the J domain were still able to activate the promoter. Finally, J mutant LTs caused changes in phosphorylation of both pRb and p130. In the case of p130, Thr-986 was shown to be a site that is regulated by J mutant LT. Taken together, these observations reveal that LT regulation of Rb function can be separated into both DnaJ-dependent and DnaJ-independent pathways. PMID:10799605

  12. Childhood social class and cognitive aging in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Cecilia; Fors, Stefan; Dahl Aslan, Anna K.; Zavala, Catalina; Reynolds, Chandra A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    In this report we analyzed genetically informative data to investigate within-person change and between-person differences in late-life cognitive abilities as a function of childhood social class. We used data from nine testing occasions spanning 28 y in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging and parental social class based on the Swedish socioeconomic index. Cognitive ability included a general factor and the four domains of verbal, fluid, memory, and perceptual speed. Latent growth curve models of the longitudinal data tested whether level and change in cognitive performance differed as a function of childhood social class. Between–within twin-pair analyses were performed on twins reared apart to assess familial confounding. Childhood social class was significantly associated with mean-level cognitive performance at age 65 y, but not with rate of cognitive change. The association decreased in magnitude but remained significant after adjustments for level of education and the degree to which the rearing family was supportive toward education. A between-pair effect of childhood social class was significant in all cognitive domains, whereas within-pair estimates were attenuated, indicating genetic confounding. Thus, childhood social class is important for cognitive performance in adulthood on a population level, but the association is largely attributable to genetic influences. PMID:28630290

  13. Measurement precision in a series of visual fields acquired by the standard and fast versions of the Swedish interactive thresholding algorithm: analysis of large-scale data from clinics.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Luke J; Russell, Richard A; Crabb, David P

    2015-01-01

    Swedish Interactive Thresholding Algorithm (SITA) testing strategies for the Humphrey Field Analyzer have become a clinical standard. Measurements from SITA Fast are thought to be more variable than SITA Standard, yet some clinics routinely use SITA Fast because it is quicker. To examine the measurement precision of the 2 SITA strategies across a range of sensitivities using a large number of visual field (VF) series from 4 glaucoma clinics in England. Retrospective cohort study at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London, England; Gloucestershire Eye Unit at Cheltenham General Hospital; Queen Alexandra Hospital in Portsmouth, England; and the Calderdale and Huddersfield National Health Service Foundation Trust that included 66,974 Humphrey 24-2 SITA Standard VFs (10,124 eyes) and 19,819 Humphrey 24-2 SITA Fast VFs (3654 eyes) recorded between May 20, 1997, and September 20, 2012. Pointwise ordinary least squares linear regression of measured sensitivity over time was conducted using VF series of 1 random eye from each patient. Residuals from the regression were pooled according to fitted sensitivities. For each sensitivity (decibel) level, the standard deviation of the residuals was used to estimate measurement precision and were compared for SITA Standard and SITA Fast. Simulations of progression from different VF baselines were used to evaluate how different levels of precision would affect time to detect VF progression. Median years required to detect progression. Median (interquartile range) patient age, follow-up, and series lengths for SITA Standard were 64 (53-72) years, 6.0 (4.0-8.5) years, and 6 (4-8) VFs, respectively; for SITA Fast, medians (interquartile range) were 70 (61-78) years, 5.1 (3.2-7.3) years, and 5 (4-6) VFs. Measurement precision worsened as sensitivity decreased for both test strategies. In the 20 to 5 dB range, SITA Fast was less precise than SITA Standard; this difference was largest between 15 to 10 dB, where variability in both methods

  14. A large and functionally diverse family of Fad2 genes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

    PubMed

    Cao, Shijiang; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Wood, Craig C; Green, Allan G; Singh, Surinder P; Liu, Lixia; Liu, Qing

    2013-01-07

    The application and nutritional value of vegetable oil is highly dependent on its fatty acid composition, especially the relative proportion of its two major fatty acids, i.e oleic acid and linoleic acid. Microsomal oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase encoded by FAD2 gene is known to introduce a double bond at the Δ12 position of an oleic acid on phosphatidylcholine and convert it to linoleic acid. The known plant FAD2 enzymes are encoded by small gene families consisting of 1-4 members. In addition to the classic oleate Δ12-desaturation activity, functional variants of FAD2 that are capable of undertaking additional or alternative acyl modifications have also been reported in a limited number of plant species. In this study, our objective was to identify FAD2 genes from safflower and analyse their differential expression profile and potentially diversified functionality. We report here the characterization and functional expression of an exceptionally large FAD2 gene family from safflower, and the temporal and spatial expression profiles of these genes as revealed through Real-Time quantitative PCR. The diversified functionalities of some of the safflower FAD2 gene family members were demonstrated by ectopic expression in yeast and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CtFAD2-1 and CtFAD2-10 were demonstrated to be oleate desaturases specifically expressed in developing seeds and flower head, respectively, while CtFAD2-2 appears to have relatively low oleate desaturation activity throughout the plant. CtFAD2-5 and CtFAD2-8 are specifically expressed in root tissues, while CtFAD2-3, 4, 6, 7 are mostly expressed in the cotyledons and hypocotyls in young safflower seedlings. CtFAD2-9 was found to encode a novel desaturase operating on C16:1 substrate. CtFAD2-11 is a tri-functional enzyme able to introduce a carbon double bond in either cis or trans configuration, or a carbon triple (acetylenic) bond at the Δ12 position. In this study, we isolated

  15. A large and functionally diverse family of Fad2 genes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The application and nutritional value of vegetable oil is highly dependent on its fatty acid composition, especially the relative proportion of its two major fatty acids, i.e oleic acid and linoleic acid. Microsomal oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase encoded by FAD2 gene is known to introduce a double bond at the Δ12 position of an oleic acid on phosphatidylcholine and convert it to linoleic acid. The known plant FAD2 enzymes are encoded by small gene families consisting of 1-4 members. In addition to the classic oleate Δ12-desaturation activity, functional variants of FAD2 that are capable of undertaking additional or alternative acyl modifications have also been reported in a limited number of plant species. In this study, our objective was to identify FAD2 genes from safflower and analyse their differential expression profile and potentially diversified functionality. Results We report here the characterization and functional expression of an exceptionally large FAD2 gene family from safflower, and the temporal and spatial expression profiles of these genes as revealed through Real-Time quantitative PCR. The diversified functionalities of some of the safflower FAD2 gene family members were demonstrated by ectopic expression in yeast and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CtFAD2-1 and CtFAD2-10 were demonstrated to be oleate desaturases specifically expressed in developing seeds and flower head, respectively, while CtFAD2-2 appears to have relatively low oleate desaturation activity throughout the plant. CtFAD2-5 and CtFAD2-8 are specifically expressed in root tissues, while CtFAD2-3, 4, 6, 7 are mostly expressed in the cotyledons and hypocotyls in young safflower seedlings. CtFAD2-9 was found to encode a novel desaturase operating on C16:1 substrate. CtFAD2-11 is a tri-functional enzyme able to introduce a carbon double bond in either cis or trans configuration, or a carbon triple (acetylenic) bond at the Δ12 position

  16. Two distinct SSB protein families in nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Venclovas, Česlovas

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Eukaryote-infecting nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) feature some of the largest genomes in the viral world. These viruses typically do not strongly depend on the host DNA replication systems. In line with this observation, a number of essential DNA replication proteins, such as DNA polymerases, primases, helicases and ligases, have been identified in the NCLDVs. One other ubiquitous component of DNA replisomes is the single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) protein. Intriguingly, no NCLDV homologs of canonical OB-fold-containing SSB proteins had previously been detected. Only in poxviruses, one of seven NCLDV families, I3 was identified as the SSB protein. However, whether I3 is related to any known protein structure has not yet been established. Results: Here, we addressed the case of ‘missing’ canonical SSB proteins in the NCLDVs and also probed evolutionary origins of the I3 family. Using advanced computational methods, in four NCLDV families, we detected homologs of the bacteriophage T7 SSB protein (gp2.5). We found the properties of these homologs to be consistent with the SSB function. Moreover, we implicated specific residues in single-stranded DNA binding. At the same time, we found no evolutionary link between the T7 gp2.5-like NCLDV SSB homologs and the poxviral SSB protein (I3). Instead, we identified a distant relationship between I3 and small protein B (SmpB), a bacterial RNA-binding protein. Thus, apparently, the NCLDVs have the two major distinct sets of SSB proteins having bacteriophage and bacterial origins, respectively. Contact: venclovas@ibt.lt Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23097418

  17. Members of a Large Retroposon Family Are Determinants of Post-Transcriptional Gene Expression in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Smith, Martin; Rochette, Annie; El-Sayed, Najib M. A; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Ghedin, Elodie

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular protists that include the human pathogens Leishmania spp. (leishmaniasis), Trypanosoma brucei (sleeping sickness), and Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease). Analysis of their recently completed genomes confirmed the presence of non–long-terminal repeat retrotransposons, also called retroposons. Using the 79-bp signature sequence common to all trypanosomatid retroposons as bait, we identified in the Leishmania major genome two new large families of small elements—LmSIDER1 (785 copies) and LmSIDER2 (1,073 copies)—that fulfill all the characteristics of extinct trypanosomatid retroposons. LmSIDERs are ∼70 times more abundant in L. major compared to T. brucei and are found almost exclusively within the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of L. major mRNAs. We provide experimental evidence that LmSIDER2 act as mRNA instability elements and that LmSIDER2-containing mRNAs are generally expressed at lower levels compared to the non-LmSIDER2 mRNAs. The considerable expansion of LmSIDERs within 3′UTRs in an organism lacking transcriptional control and their role in regulating mRNA stability indicate that Leishmania have probably recycled these short retroposons to globally modulate the expression of a number of genes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in eukaryotes of the domestication and expansion of a family of mobile elements that have evolved to fulfill a critical cellular function. PMID:17907803

  18. Segregation of FRAXE in a large family: Clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular data

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Smits, A.P.T.; Smeets, F.C.M.; Schoute, F.; Assman-Hulsmans, C.F.C.H.; Graaff, E. de; Eussen, B.H.J.; Oostra, B.A.; Knight, S.J.L.

    1994-11-01

    During an ongoing study on X-linked mental retardation, we ascertained a large family in which mild mental retardation was cosegregating with a fragile site at Xq27-28. Clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular studies were performed. Apart from mild mental retardation, affected males and females did not show a specific clinical phenotype. Psychometric assessment of four representative affected individuals revealed low academic achievements, with verbal and performance IQs of 61-75 and 70-82, respectively. Cytogenetically the fragile site was always present in affected males and was not always present in affected females. With FISH the fragile site was located within the FRAXE region. The expanded GCC repeat of FRAXE was seen in affected males and females either as a discrete band or as a broad smear. No expansion was seen in unaffected males, whereas three unaffected females did have an enlarged GCC repeat. Maternal transmission of FRAXE may lead to expansion or contraction of the GCC repeat length, whereas in all cases of paternal transmission contraction was seen. In striking contrast to the situation in fragile X syndrome, affected males may have affected daughters. In addition, there appears to be no premutation of the FRAXE GCC repeat, since in the family studied here all males lacking the normal allele were found to be affected. 41 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Segregation of FRAXE in a large family: clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular data.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, B. C.; Smits, A. P.; de Graaff, E.; Smeets, D. F.; Schoute, F.; Eussen, B. H.; Knight, S. J.; Davies, K. E.; Assman-Hulsmans, C. F.; Oostra, B. A.

    1994-01-01

    During an ongoing study on X-linked mental retardation, we ascertained a large family in which mild mental retardation was cosegregating with a fragile site at Xq27-28. Clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular studies were performed. Apart from mild mental retardation, affected males and females did not show a specific clinical phenotype. Psychometric assessment of four representative affected individuals revealed low academic achievements, with verbal and performance IQs of 61-75 and 70-82, respectively. Cytogenetically the fragile site was always present in affected males and was not always present in affected females. With FISH the fragile site was located within the FRAXE region. The expanded GCC repeat of FRAXE was seen in affected males and females either as a discrete band or as a broad smear. No expansion was seen in unaffected males, whereas three unaffected females did have an enlarged GCC repeat. Maternal transmission of FRAXE may lead to expansion or contraction of the GCC repeat length, whereas in all cases of paternal transmission contraction was seen. In striking contrast to the situation in fragile X syndrome, affected males may have affected daughters. In addition, there appears to be no premutation of the FRAXE GCC repeat, since in the family studied here all males lacking the normal allele were found to be affected. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7977354

  20. [The economic-financial sustainability of the Family Health Strategy in large municipalities].

    PubMed

    Portela, Gustavo Zoio; Ribeiro, José Mendes

    2011-03-01

    The universalization of basic care and commitment budget of the Ministry of Health with the Family Health Strategy (ESF) through new systematic financing incentives have been highlighted in the Brazilian health policy scenario. One of the great problems observed is the expansion of the strategy for large urban centres. This paper studies the economic-financial sustainability of ESF in Brazilian municipalities of more than 100 thousand inhabitants according to some selected indicators, considering the geographical region to which they belong, their population size and participation in Project for the Expansion and Consolidation Family Health (Proesf). Municipalities belonging to the Southeast region, more developed of the country, have on average better economic-financial performance, but lower average values of coverage of ESF. Municipalities from the North and Northeast, with the lowest average for economic-financial sustainability indicators, were the ones that made more effort to developments in the period. Thus, we observed the dynamics between bigger fiscal capacity and budgetary commitment with the Health Sector for biggest municipalities and in more economically developed regions, and greater vulnerability and dependence of federative transferences for municipalities with less people, in less developed areas.

  1. Comparative Proteomics of Mouse Tears and Saliva: Evidence from Large Protein Families for Functional Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Robert C.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    We produced a tear proteome of the genome mouse, C57BL/6, that contained 139 different protein identifications: 110 from a two-dimensional (2D) gel with subsequent trypsin digestion, 19 from a one-dimensional (1D) gel with subsequent trypsin digestion and ten from a 1D gel with subsequent Asp-N digestion. We compared this tear proteome with a C57BL/6 mouse saliva proteome produced previously. Sixteen of the 139 tear proteins are shared between the two proteomes, including six proteins that combat microbial growth. Among the 123 other tear proteins, were members of four large protein families that have no counterparts in humans: Androgen-binding proteins (ABPs) with different members expressed in the two proteomes, Exocrine secreted peptides (ESPs) expressed exclusively in the tear proteome, major urinary proteins (MUPs) expressed in one or both proteomes and the mouse-specific Kallikreins (subfamily b KLKs) expressed exclusively in the saliva proteome. All four families have members with suggested roles in mouse communication, which may influence some aspect of reproductive behavior. We discuss this in the context of functional adaptation involving tear and saliva proteins in the secretions of mouse lacrimal and salivary glands, respectively.

  2. Large scale in silico identification of MYB family genes from wheat expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongsheng; Tian, Shan; Dong, Hansong

    2012-10-01

    The MYB proteins constitute one of the largest transcription factor families in plants. Much research has been performed to determine their structures, functions, and evolution, especially in the model plants, Arabidopsis, and rice. However, this transcription factor family has been much less studied in wheat (Triticum aestivum), for which no genome sequence is yet available. Despite this, expressed sequence tags are an important resource that permits opportunities for large scale gene identification. In this study, a total of 218 sequences from wheat were identified and confirmed to be putative MYB proteins, including 1RMYB, R2R3-type MYB, 3RMYB, and 4RMYB types. A total of 36 R2R3-type MYB genes with complete open reading frames were obtained. The putative orthologs were assigned in rice and Arabidopsis based on the phylogenetic tree. Tissue-specific expression pattern analyses confirmed the predicted orthologs, and this meant that gene information could be inferred from the Arabidopsis genes. Moreover, the motifs flanking the MYB domain were analyzed using the MEME web server. The distribution of motifs among wheat MYB proteins was investigated and this facilitated subfamily classification.

  3. Molecular analysis of hereditary hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome in a large Basque family.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Nanclares, G; Castaño, L; Martul, P; Rica, I; Vela, A; Sanjurjo, P; Aldamiz-Echevarría, K; Martínez, R; Sarrionandia, M J

    2001-03-01

    Hereditary hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by constitutively increased serum ferritin values in the absence of iron overload and by bilateral cataract. It has been demonstrated that mutations in the stem loop structure of the iron regulatory element (IRE) located in the 5'-untranslated region of the ferritin L-subunit gene (19q13.1) are responsible for the anomalous expression of this protein. Although not clearly explained, cataract formation seems secondary to the increased levels of ferritin in the lens. We analyzed a large Basque family in order to identify possible germline alterations of the iron regulatory element of the ferritin-L gene in affected individuals and first-degree relatives. All members of the family presented hyperferritinemia and cataract except a young child who had hyperferritinemia but did not present cataract. Sequence analysis permitted the identification of an A40-->G mutation in all members, including this child. This could demonstrate that cataract formation is a consequence of ferritin accumulation in the lens.

  4. A Study of Breast Feeding Practices Among Families of Armed Forces Personnel in a Large Cantonment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pmp; Bhalwar, R

    2002-10-01

    A cross sectional epidemiological study design was undertaken on a randomly selected sample of 175 families of Armed Forces personnel staying in a large cantonment and having at least one child in the age group 3 to 24 months. The mean duration of lactational amenorrhoea was found to be 6.24 months (SD ± 3.25 months) and that of breast feeding was found to be 11.14 months (SD ± 6.37 month). The present study observed positive association between the duration of exclusive breast feeding and the duration of lactational amenorrhoea, as well as between the lack of practice of exclusive breast feeding and number of spells of upper respiratory tract infection and acute gastroenteritis. Based on the findings of the study, certain measures to promote the practice of exclusive breast feeding for the first 4-6 months of life have been suggested.

  5. Work environment and production development in Swedish manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Swedish manufacturing industry has previous held a leading position regarding the development of attractive industrial work environments, but increasing market competition has changed the possibilities to maintain the position. The purpose of this literature study is therefore to describe and analyze how Swedish manufacturing industry manages work environment and production development in the new millennium. The description and analysis is based on recently reported Swedish research and development. The gathered picture of how production systems generally are developed in Sweden strongly contrasts against the idealized theoretical and legal view of how production systems should be developed. Even if some of the researchers' and authorities' ambitions and demands may seem unrealistically high today, there still is a very large potential for improving the processes and tools for designing production systems and work environment.

  6. Is the Swedish FRAX model appropriate for Swedish immigrants?

    PubMed

    Johansson, H; Odén, A; Lorentzon, M; McCloskey, E; Kanis, J A; Harvey, N C; Karlsson, M K; Mellström, D

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of hip fracture in Sweden is substantially lower in immigrants than in the population born in Sweden. Thus, the use of a FRAX® model in immigrants overestimates the risk of fracture, and the use of country of origin-specific models may be more appropriate. Age-specific fracture and mortality rates vary between countries so that FRAX tools are country-specific. In the case of immigrants, it is not known whether the model for the original or the new country is most appropriate. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of hip fractures in foreign-born and Swedish-born individuals residing in Sweden. We studied the incidence of hip fracture in all men and women aged 50 years or more in Sweden between 1987 and 2002. The population comprised 2.8 million Swedish-born and 270,000 foreign-born individuals. Incident hip fractures occurred in 239,842 Swedish-born and 12,563 foreign-born individuals. The hip fracture incidence rose with age for both groups and was higher for women than men amongst both Swedish-born and foreign-born individuals. The hip fracture incidence for the Swedish-born cohort was approximately twice that of immigrants. For example, at the age of 70 years, the annual hip fracture incidence (per 100,000) was 450 (95 % CI 446-454) for a Swedish-born woman and 239 (95 % CI 223-257) for a foreign-born woman at the time of immigration. The hip fracture incidence rose slowly with time from immigration (0.6 % per annum, 95 % CI 0.5-0.8 %) but remained significantly lower than for Swedish-born individuals even after 40 years of residence. The incidence of hip fracture in Sweden is substantially lower in immigrants than in the population native to Sweden. Although there was a small rise in age- and sex-specific incidence after immigration, the incidence remained markedly lower than that observed in Swedish-born individuals. Thus, the use of a FRAX model for Sweden will overestimate the risk of fracture for foreign-born individuals living

  7. Novel KCNQ3 Mutation in a Large Family with Benign Familial Neonatal Epilepsy: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Maljevic, Snezana; Vejzovic, Sabina; Bernhard, Matthias K.; Bertsche, Astrid; Weise, Sebastian; Döcker, Miriam; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R.; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Syrbe, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Benign familial neonatal seizures (BFNS) present a rare familial epilepsy syndrome caused by genetic alterations in the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv7.2 and Kv7.3, encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. While most BFNS families carry alterations in KCNQ2, mutations in KCNQ3 appear to be less common. Here, we describe a family with 6 individuals presenting with neonatal focal and generalized seizures. Genetic testing revealed a novel KCNQ3 variant, c.835G>T, cosegregating with seizures in 4 tested individuals. This variant results in a substitution of the highly conserved amino acid valine localized within the pore-forming transmembrane segment S5 (p.V279F). Functional investigations in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a loss of function, which supports p.V279F as a pathogenic mutation. When p.V279F was coexpressed with the wild-type (WT) Kv7.2 subunits, the resulting potassium currents were about 10-fold reduced compared to the WT Kv7.3 and Kv7.2 coexpression. Genotype-phenotype correlation shows an incomplete penetrance of p.V279F. Response to antiepileptic treatment was variable, but evaluation of treatment response remained challenging due to the self-limiting character of the disease. The identification of the pathogenic variant helped to avoid unnecessary investigations in affected family members and allowed guided therapy. PMID:27781029

  8. Novel KCNQ3 Mutation in a Large Family with Benign Familial Neonatal Epilepsy: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Seizures.

    PubMed

    Maljevic, Snezana; Vejzovic, Sabina; Bernhard, Matthias K; Bertsche, Astrid; Weise, Sebastian; Döcker, Miriam; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Syrbe, Steffen

    2016-09-01

    Benign familial neonatal seizures (BFNS) present a rare familial epilepsy syndrome caused by genetic alterations in the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv7.2 and Kv7.3, encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. While most BFNS families carry alterations in KCNQ2, mutations in KCNQ3 appear to be less common. Here, we describe a family with 6 individuals presenting with neonatal focal and generalized seizures. Genetic testing revealed a novel KCNQ3 variant, c.835G>T, cosegregating with seizures in 4 tested individuals. This variant results in a substitution of the highly conserved amino acid valine localized within the pore-forming transmembrane segment S5 (p.V279F). Functional investigations in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a loss of function, which supports p.V279F as a pathogenic mutation. When p.V279F was coexpressed with the wild-type (WT) Kv7.2 subunits, the resulting potassium currents were about 10-fold reduced compared to the WT Kv7.3 and Kv7.2 coexpression. Genotype-phenotype correlation shows an incomplete penetrance of p.V279F. Response to antiepileptic treatment was variable, but evaluation of treatment response remained challenging due to the self-limiting character of the disease. The identification of the pathogenic variant helped to avoid unnecessary investigations in affected family members and allowed guided therapy.

  9. Love and sex in the Swedish media.

    PubMed

    Boethius, C G

    1986-01-01

    Attitudes toward teenage sexuality are markedly different in Sweden and the US. The more accepting attitude toward adolescent sexuality and the greater availability of family planning information and services may explain why Sweden has a lower adolescent pregnancy, abortion, and childbirth rate than the US. In contrast to the situation in the US, the Swedish mass media presents a realistic view of sexuality to the youth of the nation. It stresses the responsible use of contraception and the need to protect against sexually transmitted diseases in both its entertainment and educational shows. No commercials are aired on Swedish TV; therefore, Swedish youth are not exposed to the blatant and irresponsible image of sex frequently conveyed by commercials in the US. Moreover, in Sweden, parents accept the fact that their older teenagers will engage in sexual activity and help their children prepare for this activity. As a result, teenagers are reassured that their parents understand their feelings and emotions. These teenagers, in turn, are likely to accept their parents' advice about engaging in responsible sexual behavior. In contrast, in societies like the US, which are nonaccepting of adolescent sexual behavior, teenagers are likely to feel their parents and the larger society do not understand their feelings. These teenagers are likely to reject parental or societal advice on sexual matters. Sweden's accepting attitude toward adolescent sexuality is relatively recent. Prior to the 1960s, attitudes in Sweden were similar to those of present day American society. Eventually the government, the schools, and the parents recognized that they were creating a breach between the generations, and they gradually adopted a more realistic and accepting stance on sexual matters. By 1970, all Swedish children were receiving sex education in school. Television programing in sex education began in the 1960s. The broad distribution of printed sex education materials also began in

  10. Functional divergence of the glutathione S-transferase supergene family in Physcomitrella patens reveals complex patterns of large gene family evolution in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jing; Han, Xue-Min; Ren, Lin-Ling; Yang, Hai-Ling; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2013-02-01

    Plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional proteins encoded by a large gene family that play major roles in the detoxification of xenobiotics and oxidative stress metabolism. To date, studies on the GST gene family have focused mainly on vascular plants (particularly agricultural plants). In contrast, little information is available on the molecular characteristics of this large gene family in nonvascular plants. In addition, the evolutionary patterns of this family in land plants remain unclear. In this study, we identified 37 GST genes from the whole genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens, a nonvascular representative of early land plants. The 37 P. patens GSTs were divided into 10 classes, including two new classes (hemerythrin and iota). However, no tau GSTs were identified, which represent the largest class among vascular plants. P. patens GST gene family members showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, gene expression responses to abiotic stressors, enzymatic characteristics, and the subcellular locations of the encoded proteins. A joint phylogenetic analysis of GSTs from P. patens and other higher vascular plants showed that different class GSTs had distinct duplication patterns during the evolution of land plants. By examining multiple characteristics, this study revealed complex patterns of evolutionary divergence among the GST gene family in land plants.

  11. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 –Goddard Space Flight Center senior management and members of the Royal Swedish Academy walk towards Building 29 as part of the Swedish delegation’s tour of the center. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  12. Immigrant Children's Swedish--A New Variety?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsinas, Ulla-Britt

    1988-01-01

    Posits two hypotheses arising from the great immigration to Sweden and the immigrants' use and learning of Swedish: (1) Swedish as used by immigrant children may show certain features, related to a creolization process; and (2) the Swedish language may in future show signs of influence from the varieties used by persons with immigrant background.…

  13. Swedish Theatre in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Anne-Charlotte Hanes

    The Swedish ethnic theatre in the United States flourished and provided a vigorous cultural expression among Swedish immigrants for over five decades beginning in San Francisco in 1863. Swedes in Chicago alone produced between 9 and 24 plays per season from 1888 to 1915. All over the United States, Swedish settlements had their own Swedish…

  14. The Expanding Family of Natural Anion Channelrhodopsins Reveals Large Variations in Kinetics, Conductance, and Spectral Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Govorunova, Elena G.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Rodarte, Elsa M.; Janz, Roger; Morelle, Olivier; Melkonian, Michael; Wong, Gane K.-S.; Spudich, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Natural anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) discovered in the cryptophyte alga Guillardia theta generate large hyperpolarizing currents at membrane potentials above the Nernst equilibrium potential for Cl− and thus can be used as efficient inhibitory tools for optogenetics. We have identified and characterized new ACR homologs in different cryptophyte species, showing that all of them are anion-selective, and thus expanded this protein family to 20 functionally confirmed members. Sequence comparison of natural ACRs and engineered Cl−-conducting mutants of cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs) showed radical differences in their anion selectivity filters. In particular, the Glu90 residue in channelrhodopsin 2, which needed to be mutated to a neutral or alkaline residue to confer anion selectivity to CCRs, is nevertheless conserved in all of the ACRs identified. The new ACRs showed a large variation of the amplitude, kinetics, and spectral sensitivity of their photocurrents. A notable variant, designated “ZipACR”, is particularly promising for inhibitory optogenetics because of its combination of larger current amplitudes than those of previously reported ACRs and an unprecedentedly fast conductance cycle (current half-decay time 2–4 ms depending on voltage). ZipACR expressed in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons enabled precise photoinhibition of individual spikes in trains of up to 50 Hz frequency. PMID:28256618

  15. Family Ratings of Communication Largely Reflect Expressive Language and Conversation-Level Ability in People With Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Fucetola, Robert; Tabor Connor, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    Family ratings of communication and social interactions represent an important source of information about people with aphasia. Because of the reliance on family/partner ratings as an outcome measure in many aphasia treatment studies and in the clinic, there is a great need for the validation of commonly used family/partner rating measures, and a better understanding of predictors of family ratings of communication. The communication ability of 130 individuals with aphasia due to neurologic illness was rated by family members/partners on the Communicative Effectiveness Index (CETI; Lomas et al., 1989). Information on aphasia severity, mood, quality of life, nonverbal cognitive functioning, and various demographic factors was collected. Principal component analysis confirmed a 2-factor model best represents the relationships among CETI rating items, and this model largely consists of a conversation-level ability factor. Family ratings were largely predicted by the patient's expressive (not receptive) language but also patient self-perceived quality of communication life. Family/partners typically rate the effectiveness of communication based largely on expressive language, despite the fact that other aspects of the aphasia (e.g., listening comprehension) are as important for everyday communication.

  16. The Role of Family Environment in Depressive Symptoms among University Students: A Large Sample Survey in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunmiao; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Lu; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Zhou, Jiawei; Pan, Hui; Ban, Bo; Zhu, Xiongzhao; He, Jincai; Ding, Yongqing; Bai, Bing

    2015-01-01

    To explore the relationship between family environment and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the influence of hard and soft family environmental factors on depression levels in a large sample of university students in China. A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select 6,000 participants. The response rate was 88.8%, with 5,329 students completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Family Environment Scale Chinese Version (FES-CV), which was adapted for the Chinese population. Differences between the groups were tested for significance by the Student's t-test; ANOVA was used to test continuous variables. The relationship between soft family environmental factors and BDI were tested by Pearson correlation analysis. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to model the effects of hard environmental factors and soft environmental factors on depression in university students. A total of 11.8% of students scored above the threshold of moderate depression (BDI≧14). Hard family environmental factors such as parent relationship, family economic status, level of parental literacy and non-intact family structure were associated with depressive symptoms. The soft family environmental factors--conflict and control--were positively associated with depression, while cohesion was negatively related to depressive symptom after controlling for other important associates of depression. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the soft family environment correlates more strongly with depression than the hard family environment. Soft family environmental factors--especially cohesion, conflict and control--appeared to play an important role in the occurrence of depressive symptoms. These findings underline the significance of the family environment as a source of risk factors for depression among university students in China and suggest that family-based interventions and improvement are very important to reduce depression among

  17. The Role of Family Environment in Depressive Symptoms among University Students: A Large Sample Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Lu; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Zhou, Jiawei; Pan, Hui; Ban, Bo; Zhu, Xiongzhao; He, Jincai; Ding, Yongqing; Bai, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between family environment and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the influence of hard and soft family environmental factors on depression levels in a large sample of university students in China. Methods A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select 6,000 participants. The response rate was 88.8%, with 5,329 students completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Family Environment Scale Chinese Version (FES-CV), which was adapted for the Chinese population. Differences between the groups were tested for significance by the Student’s t-test; ANOVA was used to test continuous variables. The relationship between soft family environmental factors and BDI were tested by Pearson correlation analysis. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to model the effects of hard environmental factors and soft environmental factors on depression in university students. Results A total of 11.8% of students scored above the threshold of moderate depression(BDI≧14). Hard family environmental factors such as parent relationship, family economic status, level of parental literacy and non-intact family structure were associated with depressive symptoms. The soft family environmental factors—conflict and control—were positively associated with depression, while cohesion was negatively related to depressive symptom after controlling for other important associates of depression. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the soft family environment correlates more strongly with depression than the hard family environment. Conclusions Soft family environmental factors—especially cohesion, conflict and control—appeared to play an important role in the occurrence of depressive symptoms. These findings underline the significance of the family environment as a source of risk factors for depression among university students in China and suggest that family-based interventions and improvement are very

  18. A century of mortality in five large families with polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Florijn, K W; Noteboom, W M; van Saase, J L; Chang, P C; Breuning, M H; Vandenbroucke, J P

    1995-03-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) characteristically leads to end-stage renal failure in the fifth or sixth decade of life, which in the absence of therapeutic measures will lead to premature death. To determine excess mortality relative to the general population and chromosome 16-linked ADPKD patients, we studied 348 individuals who belonged to five large ADPKD families and who had at least a 50% probability of carrying the gene; the study data derive from a time span of approximately one century. Assessment of the diagnosis of ADPKD in the present generation was based on the characteristic roentgenographic appearance of polycystic kidneys and was confirmed by DNA analysis with flanking polymorphic markers around the polycystic gene. In the previous generation, we used Mendelian reasoning after pedigree analysis to identify persons with a 50% or 100% probability of carrying the polycystic gene. During the study period (1889 to 1992), 83 deaths occurred in 10,279 person-years. Mortality was increased 1.6-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 2.0) relative to the general population and was independent of the gender of the affected family member as well as the gender of the transmitting parent. The increased mortality was strongest in the 50 to 59 year age group (relative mortality, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.0 to 4.8), but decreased after the 1970s, probably as a result of improvements in supportive care and, eventually, renal replacement therapy. In conclusion, the total life-span in ADPKD patients is improving, but remains low in comparison to the general population, and the gender of the transmitting parent or of the affected individual does not influence relative mortality.

  19. The Swedish Schools Inspectorate's View of Swedish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindström, Lisbeth; Perdahl, Solange

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to shed some light on and give some examples of how the Swedish schools have interpreted their mission of educating young people and preparing them for the role of active citizens. More specifically, we are interested in how the "good" or "aspirational" school is presented in the reports published…

  20. The Oregon Model of Behavior Family Therapy: From Intervention Design to Promoting Large-Scale System Change

    PubMed Central

    Dishion, Thomas; Forgatch, Marion; Chamberlain, Patricia; Pelham, William E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the evolution of the Oregon model of family behavior therapy over the past four decades. Inspired by basic research on family interaction and innovation in behavior change theory, a set of intervention strategies were developed that were effective for reducing multiple forms of problem behavior in children (e.g., Patterson, Chamberlain, & Reid, 1982). Over the ensuing decades, the behavior family therapy principles were applied and adapted to promote children’s adjustment to address family formation and adaptation (Family Check-Up model), family disruption and maladaptation (Parent Management Training–Oregon model), and family attenuation and dissolution (Treatment Foster Care–Oregon model). We provide a brief overview of each intervention model and summarize randomized trials of intervention effectiveness. We review evidence on the viability of effective implementation, as well as barriers and solutions to adopting these evidence-based practices. We conclude by proposing an integrated family support system for the three models applied to the goal of reducing the prevalence of severe problem behavior, addiction, and mental problems for children and families, as well as reducing the need for costly and largely ineffective residential placements. PMID:27993335

  1. The Swedish fracture register: 103,000 fractures registered.

    PubMed

    Wennergren, David; Ekholm, Carl; Sandelin, Anna; Möller, Michael

    2015-11-06

    Although fractures consume large social and financial resources, little is known about their actual numbers, treatment methods or outcomes. The scarcity of data calls for a high-quality, population-based register. No previous registers have prospectively collected data and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) on fractures of all types. The Swedish Fracture Register was recently created to fill this gap in knowledge. Its purpose is to provide information on fractures of all types, whether treated by surgery or otherwise. The aim of this article is to describe how the register was developed and its current use. The Swedish Fracture Register was developed during a 4-year period, 2007-2010. Data collection started in 2011. The register currently collects data on all extremity, pelvic and spine fractures in adults who have been diagnosed or treated at the affiliated departments. Data entry is fully web based, including date, cause of injury, classification and treatment. It is performed by the attending physician. Patients fill out PROMs - EQ-5D-3L and the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) - relating to health status and level of functioning before the fracture and one year later. Surgeon-reported outcome measures are registered as reoperation rates. The Swedish Fracture Register is now functioning effectively and is used in clinical routine. From January 2011 to September 2015, more than 103,000 fractures have been entered at 26 Swedish orthopedic departments. The Swedish Fracture Register is already a well-functioning, population-based fracture register that covers fractures of all types, regardless of treatment, and collects both surgeon- and patient-reported outcome measures. In the future the Swedish Fracture Register will be able to present both results of fracture treatment and valuable epidemiological data.

  2. From new genetics to everyday knowledge: Ideas about how genetic diseases are transmitted in two large Brazilian families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-07-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected with a neurodegenerative disorder, SPOAN syndrome (spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy), and 40 individuals of another family living with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results indicate that families here studied have built narratives to explain the origin of genetic diseases, saying that an ancestor infected with syphilis gave rise to disorders and birthmarks transmitted to descendents.

  3. Swedish Professionals and Gender Inequalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Charles W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Among 1,359 Swedish professionals surveyed, women had only 68% of the supervisory positions that men had, and only 77% of earnings. Although gender differences in human capital and structural resources partly explained the gaps, the major explanatory factor was occupational segregation. However, men's advantage persisted even when occupation and…

  4. Emergence of switch-like behavior in a large family of simple biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Siegal-Gaskins, Dan; Mejia-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Smith, Gregory D; Grotewold, Erich

    2011-05-01

    Bistability plays a central role in the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) controlling many essential biological functions, including cellular differentiation and cell cycle control. However, establishing the network topologies that can exhibit bistability remains a challenge, in part due to the exceedingly large variety of GRNs that exist for even a small number of components. We begin to address this problem by employing chemical reaction network theory in a comprehensive in silico survey to determine the capacity for bistability of more than 40,000 simple networks that can be formed by two transcription factor-coding genes and their associated proteins (assuming only the most elementary biochemical processes). We find that there exist reaction rate constants leading to bistability in ∼90% of these GRN models, including several circuits that do not contain any of the TF cooperativity commonly associated with bistable systems, and the majority of which could only be identified as bistable through an original subnetwork-based analysis. A topological sorting of the two-gene family of networks based on the presence or absence of biochemical reactions reveals eleven minimal bistable networks (i.e., bistable networks that do not contain within them a smaller bistable subnetwork). The large number of previously unknown bistable network topologies suggests that the capacity for switch-like behavior in GRNs arises with relative ease and is not easily lost through network evolution. To highlight the relevance of the systematic application of CRNT to bistable network identification in real biological systems, we integrated publicly available protein-protein interaction, protein-DNA interaction, and gene expression data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified several GRNs predicted to behave in a bistable fashion.

  5. Intense paramagnon excitations in a large family of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tacon, Mathieu

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the search for the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity, an intense research effort has been focused on the evolution of the spin excitation spectrum upon doping from the antiferromagnetic insulating to the superconducting states of the cuprates. Because of technical limitations, however, the experimental investigation of doped cuprates has been largely focused on excitations with energies <=100 meV in a small range of momentum space [1]. Here we take advantage of the recent developments of high-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering [2,3] to show that a large family of superconductors, encompassing the model compounds YBa2Cu4O8 and YBa2Cu3O7, exhibits damped spin excitations - or paramagnons - with dispersions and spectral weights closely similar to those of magnons in undoped, antiferromagnetically ordered cuprates over much of the Brillouin zone. The results are in excellent agreement with the spin excitations obtained by exact diagonalization of the t-J Hamiltonian on finite-sized clusters. A numerical solution of the Eliashberg equations based on the experimental spin excitation spectrum of YBa2Cu3O7 reproduces its superconducting transition temperature Tc within a factor of two. The discovery of a well-defined, surprisingly simple spin excitation branch over a wide range of doping levels thus strongly supports magnetic Cooper pairing models for the cuprates [4]. [4pt] [1] M. Fujita et al. arXiv/condmat:1108.4431[0pt] [2] G. Ghiringhelli et al., Review of Scientific Instruments, 77, (2006).[0pt] [3] L. Braicovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 104, 077002 (2010).[0pt] [4] M. Le Tacon et al., Nature Physics 7, 725 (2011).

  6. Emergence of Switch-Like Behavior in a Large Family of Simple Biochemical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Siegal-Gaskins, Dan; Mejia-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Smith, Gregory D.; Grotewold, Erich

    2011-01-01

    Bistability plays a central role in the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) controlling many essential biological functions, including cellular differentiation and cell cycle control. However, establishing the network topologies that can exhibit bistability remains a challenge, in part due to the exceedingly large variety of GRNs that exist for even a small number of components. We begin to address this problem by employing chemical reaction network theory in a comprehensive in silico survey to determine the capacity for bistability of more than 40,000 simple networks that can be formed by two transcription factor-coding genes and their associated proteins (assuming only the most elementary biochemical processes). We find that there exist reaction rate constants leading to bistability in ∼90% of these GRN models, including several circuits that do not contain any of the TF cooperativity commonly associated with bistable systems, and the majority of which could only be identified as bistable through an original subnetwork-based analysis. A topological sorting of the two-gene family of networks based on the presence or absence of biochemical reactions reveals eleven minimal bistable networks (i.e., bistable networks that do not contain within them a smaller bistable subnetwork). The large number of previously unknown bistable network topologies suggests that the capacity for switch-like behavior in GRNs arises with relative ease and is not easily lost through network evolution. To highlight the relevance of the systematic application of CRNT to bistable network identification in real biological systems, we integrated publicly available protein-protein interaction, protein-DNA interaction, and gene expression data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified several GRNs predicted to behave in a bistable fashion. PMID:21589886

  7. An exceptional mutational event leading to Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome in a large consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Samuelov, L; Fuchs-Telem, D; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E

    2011-06-01

    Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS) is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder featuring congenital ichthyosis combined with pleiomorphic visceral manifestations associated with tissue accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Mutations in the ABHD5 gene, encoding a crucial cofactor for adipose triglyceride lipase, have been found to underlie all CDS cases reported to date. The purposed of this study was to ascertain the genetic defect underlying CDS in a large multigenerational family. We used a combination of direct sequencing, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and microsatellite marker genotyping to identify a novel CDS-causing mutation in ABHD5. Although no pathogenic mutation could be identified in the coding sequence of the ABHD5 gene, polymorphic marker genotyping analysis supported linkage to this gene locus. Accordingly, direct sequencing of RT-PCR amplification products generated from patient skin-derived total RNA, revealed in all four patients the presence of a 101 bp insertion between exon 3 and exon 4. Bioinformatic analysis and direct sequencing indicated that this insertion resulted from an exceptional mutational event, namely, the insertion of a LINE element into intron 3 of the ABHD5 gene, leading to aberrant splicing out of the mutant intron 3. Our results confirm genetic homogeneity in CDS and underscore the importance of RNA studies in the molecular diagnosis of genodermatoses. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required.

  9. Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome: review and report of a large family

    PubMed Central

    Stiehm, E. R.; McIntosh, R. M.

    1967-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome is a sex-linked recessive antibody-deficiency syndrome characterized by thrombocytopenia, eczema and increased susceptibility to infection. All forms of therapy are notably unsuccessful and these patients succumb in the first decade. Three cases of this syndrome are presented from a large family in which nine male infants have succumbed with manifestations of this disease. Two of the infants died at ages 10 months and 4 years respectively. A third child is alive at age 2. Serial quantitative immune globulin studies performed in two cases demonstrated markedly elevated γA, decreased γM and normal γG; levels of γM were initially normal but fell progressively as γA levels increased. The low levels of γM are probably a factor in their low or absent isoagglutinins, poor response to injected antigens, and increased susceptibility to infection; elevated γA levels may indicate immunologic unresponsiveness and/or a compensatory mechanism for the defect in γM synthesis. In two of these patients prolonged trials (17 and 23 months) of periodic plasma infusions (15 ml/kg at 6-week intervals), accompanied by γ-globulin injections (0·1 ml/kg) were undertaken. Although no remarkable effects on the platelets or their resistance to infection was noted, we feel that some benefit might have accrued and that further trails are indicated. PMID:4166240

  10. Revisiting Myosin Families Through Large-scale Sequence Searches Leads to the Discovery of New Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Shaik Naseer; Meenakshi, Iyer; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins involved in many cellular movements. It is interesting to study the evolutionary patterns and the functional attributes of various types of myosins. Computational search algorithms were performed to identify putative myosin members by phylogenetic analysis, sequence motifs, and coexisting domains. This study is aimed at understanding the distribution and the likely biological functions of myosins encoded in various taxa and available eukaryotic genomes. We report here a phylogenetic analysis of around 4,064 myosin motor domains, built entirely from complete or near-complete myosin repertoires incorporating many unclassified, uncharacterized sequences and new myosin classes, with emphasis on myosins from Fungi, Haptophyta, and other Stramenopiles, Alveolates, and Rhizaria (SAR). The identification of large classes of myosins in Oomycetes, Cellular slime molds, Choanoflagellates, Pelagophytes, Eustigmatophyceae, Fonticula, Eucoccidiorida, and Apicomplexans with novel myosin motif variants that are conserved and thus presumably functional extends our knowledge of this important family of motor proteins. This work provides insights into the distribution and probable function of myosins including newly identified myosin classes. PMID:27597808

  11. Revisiting Myosin Families Through Large-scale Sequence Searches Leads to the Discovery of New Myosins.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Shaik Naseer; Meenakshi, Iyer; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins involved in many cellular movements. It is interesting to study the evolutionary patterns and the functional attributes of various types of myosins. Computational search algorithms were performed to identify putative myosin members by phylogenetic analysis, sequence motifs, and coexisting domains. This study is aimed at understanding the distribution and the likely biological functions of myosins encoded in various taxa and available eukaryotic genomes. We report here a phylogenetic analysis of around 4,064 myosin motor domains, built entirely from complete or near-complete myosin repertoires incorporating many unclassified, uncharacterized sequences and new myosin classes, with emphasis on myosins from Fungi, Haptophyta, and other Stramenopiles, Alveolates, and Rhizaria (SAR). The identification of large classes of myosins in Oomycetes, Cellular slime molds, Choanoflagellates, Pelagophytes, Eustigmatophyceae, Fonticula, Eucoccidiorida, and Apicomplexans with novel myosin motif variants that are conserved and thus presumably functional extends our knowledge of this important family of motor proteins. This work provides insights into the distribution and probable function of myosins including newly identified myosin classes.

  12. Large genomic rearrangement of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in familial breast cancer patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ja Young; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Choi, Su-Youn; Shin, Inkyung; Park, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jeong; Yu, Jong Han; Ko, Beom Seok; Ku, Bo Kyung; Son, Byung Ho

    2014-06-01

    We screened large genomic rearrangements of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Korean, familial breast cancer patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay was used to identify BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in 226 Korean familial breast cancer patients with risk factors for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, who previously tested negative for point mutations in the two genes. We identified only one large deletion (c.4186-1593_4676-1465del) in BRCA1. No large rearrangements were found in BRCA2. Our result indicates that large genomic rearrangement in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes does not seem like a major determinant of breast cancer susceptibility in the Korean population. A large-scale study needs to validate our result in Korea.

  13. Familiality of Co-existing ADHD and Tic Disorders: Evidence from a Large Sibling Study

    PubMed Central

    Roessner, Veit; Banaschewski, Tobias; Becker, Andreas; Buse, Judith; Wanderer, Sina; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.; Gill, Michael; Manor, Iris; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Steven V.; Asherson, Philip; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2016-01-01

    Background: The association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and tic disorder (TD) is frequent and clinically important. Very few and inconclusive attempts have been made to clarify if and how the combination of ADHD+TD runs in families. Aim: To determine the first time in a large-scale ADHD sample whether ADHD+TD increases the risk of ADHD+TD in siblings and, also the first time, if this is independent of their psychopathological vulnerability in general. Methods: The study is based on the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) study. The present sub-sample of 2815 individuals included ADHD-index patients with co-existing TD (ADHD+TD, n = 262) and without TD (ADHD–TD, n = 947) as well as their 1606 full siblings (n = 358 of the ADHD+TD index patients and n = 1248 of the ADHD-TD index patients). We assessed psychopathological symptoms in index patients and siblings by using the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the parent and teacher Conners' long version Rating Scales (CRS). For disorder classification the Parental Account of Childhood Symptoms (PACS-Interview) was applied in n = 271 children. Odds ratio with the GENMOD procedure (PROCGENMOD) was used to test if the risk for ADHD, TD, and ADHD+TD in siblings was associated with the related index patients' diagnoses. In order to get an estimate for specificity we compared the four groups for general psychopathological symptoms. Results: Co-existing ADHD+TD in index patients increased the risk of both comorbid ADHD+TD and TD in the siblings of these index patients. These effects did not extend to general psychopathology. Interpretation: Co-existence of ADHD+TD may segregate in families. The same holds true for TD (without ADHD). Hence, the segregation of TD (included in both groups) seems to be the determining factor, independent of further behavioral problems. This close relationship between ADHD and TD supports the clinical approach to carefully assess ADHD in any case

  14. Atrial fibrillation anticoagulation care in a large urban family medicine practice

    PubMed Central

    Valentinis, Alissia; Ivers, Noah; Bhatia, Sacha; Meshkat, Nazanin; Leblanc, Kori; Ha, Andrew; Morra, Dante

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in primary care achieving guideline-concordant stroke prevention treatment based on both the previous (2010) and the updated (2012) Canadian guideline recommendations. Design Retrospective chart review. Participants Primary care patients (N = 204) with AF. The mean age was 71.3 years and 53.4% were women. Setting Large urban community family practice in Toronto, Ont. Main outcome measures Patient demographic characteristics such as sex and age; a list of current cardiac medications including anticoagulants and antiplatelets; the total number of medications; relevant current and past medical history including presence of diabetes, stroke or transient ischemic attack, hypertension, and vascular disease; number of visits to the family physician and cardiologist in the past year and past 5 years, and how many of these were for AF; the number of visits to the emergency department or hospitalizations for AF, congestive heart failure, or stroke; if patients were taking warfarin, how often their international normalized ratios were recorded, and how many times they were in the reference range; CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75, diabetes mellitus, and stroke or transient ischemic attack) score, if recorded; and reason for not taking oral anticoagulants when they should have been, if recorded. Results Among those who had CHADS2 scores of 0, 64 patients (97.0%) were receiving appropriate stroke prevention in AF (SPAF) treatment according to the 2010 guidelines. When the 2012 guidelines were applied, 39 patients (59.1%) were receiving appropriate SPAF treatment (P < .001). For those with CHADS2 scores of 1, 88.4% of patients had appropriate SPAF treatment according to the 2010 guidelines, but only 55.1% were adequately treated according to the 2012 guidelines (P < .001). Of the patients at the highest risk (CHADS2 score > 1), 68.1% were adequately treated with

  15. Work-family spillover among Japanese dual-earner couples: a large community-based study.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kyoko; Shimazu, Akihito; Bakker, Arnold B; Demerouti, Evangelia; Kawakami, Norito

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of multiple types of work-family spillover (work-to-family negative spillover, WFNS; family-to-work negative spillover, FWNS; and work-family positive spillover, WFPS) on psychological distress among Japanese dual-earner couples with preschool children. 2,346 parents completed questionnaires measuring work-family spillover, work- and family-specific variables (i.e., job demands and resources, family demands and resources), and psychological distress. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted by entering demographic characteristics (gender, age, age of the youngest child, and job contract) in step 1, job demands and resources in step 2, family demands and resources in step 3, work-family spillover in step 4, and three two-way interactions between types of work-family spillover and gender in the final step. Both WFNS and FWNS were positively related to psychological distress after controlling for demographic characteristics and domain specific variables (i.e. job and family demands/resources), and FWNS (β=0.26) had a stronger relation with psychological distress than WFNS (β=0.16). Although WFPS was significantly and negatively related to psychological distress, the relationship was weak (β=-0.05). In addition, two-way interactions of WFNS and FWNS with gender were found; the impact of both WFNS and FWNS on psychological distress is stronger for females than for males. No significant interaction effect was observed between WFPS and gender. In this study of Japanese dual-earner couples with preschool children, work-family negative spillover had a stronger relationship with psychological distress than positive spillover. Gender had a moderating effect on the relationship between negative spillover and psychological distress.

  16. Family size, birth order, and intelligence in a large South American sample.

    PubMed

    Velandia, W; Grandon, G M; Page, E B

    1978-01-01

    The confluence theory, which hypothesizes a relationship between intellectual development birth order, and family size, was examined in a colombian study of more than 36,000 college applicants. The results of the study did not support the confluence theory. The confluence theory states that the intellectual development of a child is related to average mental age of the members of his family at the time of his birth. The mental age of the parents is always assigned a value of 30 and siblings are given scores equivalent to their chronological age at the birth of the subject. Therefore, the average mental age of family members for a 1st born child is 30, or 60 divided by 2. If a subject is born into a family consisting of 2 parents and a 6-year old sibling, the average mental age of family members tends, therefore, to decrease with each birth order. The hypothesis derived from the confluence theory states that there is a positive relationship between average mental age of a subject's family and the subject's performance on intelligence tests. In the Colombian study, data on family size, birth order and socioeconomic status was derived from college application forms. Intelligence test scores for each subject was obtained from college entrance exams. The mental age of each applicant's family at the time of the applicant's birth was calculated. Multiple correlation analysis and path analysis were used to assess the relationship. Results were 1) the test scores of subjects from families with 2,3,4, and 5 children were higher than test scores of the 1st born subjects; 2) the rank order of intelligence by family size was 3,4,5,2,6,1 instead of the hypothesized 1,2,3,4,5,6; and 3) only 1% of the variability in test scores was explained by the variables of birth order and family size. Further analysis indicated that socioeconomic status was a far more powerful explanatory variable than family size.

  17. A large deletion/insertion-induced frameshift mutation of the androgen receptor gene in a family with a familial complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peikuan; Ye, Yinghui; Wang, Yue; Lu, Lingping; Yong, Jing; Yu, Ping; Joseph, Kimani Kagunda; Jin, Fan; Qi, Ming

    2012-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with a normal 46, XY karyotype caused by abnormality of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. One Chinese family consisting of the proband and 5 other members with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was investigated. Mutation analysis by DNA sequencing on all 8 exons and flanking intron regions of the AR gene revealed a unique large deletion/insertion mutation in the family. A 287 bp deletion and 77 bp insertion (c.933_1219delins77) mutation at codon 312 resulted in a frameshift which caused a premature stop (p.Phe312Aspfs*7) of polypeptide formation. The proband's mother and grandmother were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The proband's father, uncle and grandfather have the normal allele. From the pedigree constructed from mutational analysis of the family, it is revealed that the probably pathogenic mutation comes from the maternal side.

  18. Familial pheochromocytoma, hypercalcemia, and von Hippel-Lindau disease. A ten year study of a large family.

    PubMed

    Atuk, N O; McDonald, T; Wood, T; Carpenter, J T; Walzak, M P; Donaldson, M; Gillenwater, J Y

    1979-05-01

    Long-term epidemiological and laboratory studies were carried out in a kindred with familial pheochromocytoma associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease. Thirteen members were affected by the syndrome and the trait appears to be transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Of 13 patients, 7 had pheochromocytoma alone. Of the remaining six patients, one had pheochromocytoma combined with von Hippel-Lindau disease, four had pheochromocytoma with retinal disease only, and a single patient had a retinal lesion without pheochromocytoma. In four patients, pheochromocytoma antedated the development of retinal lesions. Ten members also had mild hypercalcemia without accompanying elevations of PTH in the 4 patients in whom this was determined. In all, hypercalcemia was corrected with removal of tumors, and no patient had a return of hypercalcemia in the absence of recurrent increases in urinary catecholamines. The clinical presentations in 12 patients varied markedly, as did their urinary excretion rates of norepinephrine, epinephrine and their metabolites. However, an analysis of the data revealed significant correlations not previously described between the urinary excretion of free catecholamines (norepinephrine plus epinephrine), blood pressure, the free catecholamine content of the tumor and the age of the patient. Urinary excretion of free norepinephrine plus epinephrine appear to be decreased with advancing age (p less than 0.001). Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures and the age of the patient were inversely correlated (p less than 0.01). A significant inverse relationship between the tumor content of free catecholamines and the age of the patients was, although to a lesser degree, also present (p less than 0.05). As a whole, the size of the tumors and their norepinephrine content were not correlated. We present a concept that, in familial pheochromocytoma, the metabolism of catecholamines is altered by the process of aging, and that this change modifies the

  19. Improving Disease Prediction by Incorporating Family Disease History in Risk Prediction Models with Large-Scale Genetic Data.

    PubMed

    Gim, Jungsoo; Kim, Wonji; Kwak, Soo Heon; Choi, Hosik; Park, Changyi; Park, Kyong Soo; Kwon, Sunghoon; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2017-09-12

    Despite the many successes of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the known susceptibility variants identified by GWAS have modest effect sizes, leading to notable skepticism about the effectiveness of building a risk prediction model from large-scale genetic data. However, in contrast to genetic variants, the family history of diseases has been largely accepted as an important risk factor in clinical diagnosis and risk prediction. Nevertheless, the complicated structures of the family history of diseases have limited their application in clinical practice. Here, we developed a new method that enables incorporation of the general family history of diseases with a liability threshold model, and propose a new analysis strategy for risk prediction with penalized regression analysis that incorporates both large numbers of genetic variants and clinical risk factors. Application of our model to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Korean population (1846 cases and 1846 controls) demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms accounted for 32.5% of the variation explained by the predicted risk scores in the test data set, and incorporation of family history led to an additional 6.3% improvement in prediction. Our results illustrate that the family medical history is valuable information on the variation of complex diseases and improves prediction performance. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  20. Characterization of the p16 gene in the mouse: Evidence for a large gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.W.; Giendening, J.M.; Flores, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    The p16 gene product is an inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)/cyclin D complex. When uninhibited, the CDK4/cyclin D complex participates in the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and renders it inactive. Upon inactivation of the RB protein, transition from the G{sub 1} to the S phase of mitosis occurs and results in cellular proliferation. Thus, p16 is presumed to act as a negative regulator of cell growth by preventing the phosphorylation, and thereby subsequent inactivation, of RB by CDK4/cyclin D. Recently, the p16 gene (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene) has been mapped to chromosome 9p21 and found to be deleted or mutated in a number of tumor cell lines. These findings support the role of p16 as a growth inhibitor or tumor suppressor gene and suggest that the mutation of this gene may have global implications in carcinogenesis. We have chosen to test the functional significance of p16 mutations in vivo through the generation of a mouse mutant for p16. In preparation for this undertaking, eight apparently independent (as judged by restriction enzyme digestion and differential hybridization) mouse genomic embryonic stem cell clones have been identified using exon 2 from the human p16 gene as a probe. The identification of these multiple nonoverlapping clones was not entirely surprising since the reduced stringency hybridization of a zoo blot with the same probe also revealed 10-15 positive EcoRI fragments in all species tested, including human, monkey, cow, dog, cat, rabbit, hamster, mouse, chicken and D. melanogaster. Taken together, these findings suggest that the p16 gene is a member of a large gene family. The location of these genomic clones, as well as their potential expression in the mouse, is currently under investigation.

  1. Family History and Stroke Risk in China: Evidence from a Large Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Yu, Canqing; Lv, Jun; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yiping; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Zhengming; Hu, Zhibin; Li, Liming

    2017-05-01

    Large cohort studies on relationship between family history of stroke (FHS) and stroke risk are lacking in Asians. We aimed to systematically evaluate the association of FHS with stroke risk in a cohort study of 0.5 million Chinese adults. Information about FHS was self-reported. The median follow-up time was 7.16 years and the end-point of follow-up was incident stroke, which was entered directly into the China Kadoorie Biobank system. Multivariate analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazards model, and interaction analyses were carried using likelihood-ratio tests. Compared with participants without FHS, the hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval, CI) of stroke for participants with FHS was 1.50 (1.46-1.55). The HRs increased with the number of first degree relatives with stroke (HRs=1.41, 1.98 and 2.47 for 1, 2 and ≥3 relatives, respectively, Ptrend <0.001). The HRs were 1.57 (95% CI: 1.50-1.66) and 1.49 (95% CI: 1.45-1.54) for sibling history and parental history, respectively. Similar associations with offspring stroke risk were observed between paternal history (HR=1.48, 95% CI: 1.43-1.54) and maternal history (HR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.43-1.55). Moreover, significant interactions were detected between FHS and health-risk behaviors (tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking). FHS is an independent risk factor for stroke in Chinese. The more first degree relatives are affected by stroke, the higher are individuals' risk of suffering from stroke. The management of the health-risk behaviors for reducing stroke should be highlighted, especially for the individuals with FHS.

  2. Family History and Stroke Risk in China: Evidence from a Large Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Yu, Canqing; Lv, Jun; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yiping; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Zhengming; Hu, Zhibin; Li, Liming

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Large cohort studies on relationship between family history of stroke (FHS) and stroke risk are lacking in Asians. We aimed to systematically evaluate the association of FHS with stroke risk in a cohort study of 0.5 million Chinese adults. Methods Information about FHS was self-reported. The median follow-up time was 7.16 years and the end-point of follow-up was incident stroke, which was entered directly into the China Kadoorie Biobank system. Multivariate analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazards model, and interaction analyses were carried using likelihood-ratio tests. Results Compared with participants without FHS, the hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval, CI) of stroke for participants with FHS was 1.50 (1.46-1.55). The HRs increased with the number of first degree relatives with stroke (HRs=1.41, 1.98 and 2.47 for 1, 2 and ≥3 relatives, respectively, Ptrend <0.001). The HRs were 1.57 (95% CI: 1.50-1.66) and 1.49 (95% CI: 1.45-1.54) for sibling history and parental history, respectively. Similar associations with offspring stroke risk were observed between paternal history (HR=1.48, 95% CI: 1.43-1.54) and maternal history (HR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.43-1.55). Moreover, significant interactions were detected between FHS and health-risk behaviors (tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking). Conclusions FHS is an independent risk factor for stroke in Chinese. The more first degree relatives are affected by stroke, the higher are individuals’ risk of suffering from stroke. The management of the health-risk behaviors for reducing stroke should be highlighted, especially for the individuals with FHS. PMID:28592782

  3. From "New Genetics" to Everyday Knowledge: Ideas about How Genetic Diseases Are Transmitted in Two Large Brazilian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected…

  4. From "New Genetics" to Everyday Knowledge: Ideas about How Genetic Diseases Are Transmitted in Two Large Brazilian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected…

  5. Forming the Flora Family: Implications for the Near-Earth Asteroid Population and Large Terrestrial Planet Impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokrouhlický, David; Bottke, William F.; Nesvorný, David

    2017-04-01

    Formed from a catastrophic collision of a parent body larger than 150 km in diameter, the Flora family is located in the innermost part of the main belt near the {ν }6 secular resonance. Objects in this region, when pushed onto planet-crossing orbits, tend to have relatively high probabilities of striking the Earth. These factors suggest that Flora may be a primary source of present-day LL chondrite-like NEOs and Earth/Moon impactors. To investigate this possibility, we used collisional and dynamical models to track the evolution of Flora family members. We created an initial Flora family and followed test asteroids 1 and 3 km in diameter using a numerical code that accounted for both planetary perturbations and nongravitational effects. Our Flora family members reproduce the observed semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination distributions of the real family after ≃ 1 to 1.4 Gyr. A consistency with the surface age inferred from crater spatial densities found on (951) Gaspra may favor the latter age. Our combined collisional and dynamical runs indicate that the family has lost nearly 90% of its initial kilometer-sized members. At its peak, 100{--}300 {Myr} after the family-forming event, Flora family members filled NEO space with nearly 1000 D≥slant 1 {km} size bodies before fading to its present contribution of 35-50 such NEOs. Therefore, it is not currently a major source of large NEOs. We also find 700-950 and 35-47 kilometer-sized asteroids struck the Earth and Moon, respectively, most within the first 300 Myr after family formation. These results imply that Flora played a major role in providing impacts to the mid-Proterozoic Earth.

  6. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 - Members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences listen to James Pontius, Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigator (GEDI) Project Manager and Bryan Blair, GEDI Deputy Principal Investigator talk about mission and science of GEDI and the collaborative work being done with Sweden. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  7. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 - Members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences listen to Jim Jeletic, Deputy Project Manager of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) talk about telescope operations just outside the HST control center at Goddard. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 - Members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences listen to Catherine Peddie, Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Deputy Project Manager use a full-scale model of WFIRST to describe the features of the observatory. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. The Working Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethius, Monica

    1984-01-01

    The working family is today by far the most common family type in Sweden. However, just over 50 percent of the children of working parents have access to day care. Because Swedish income tax policy is based on the concept that all adults will support themselves and does not take into account the number of persons supported on an income, one parent…

  10. The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    Robertsson, O.; Ranstam, J.; Sundberg, M.; W-Dahl, A.; Lidgren, L.

    2014-01-01

    We are entering a new era with governmental bodies taking an increasingly guiding role, gaining control of registries, demanding direct access with release of open public information for quality comparisons between hospitals. This review is written by physicians and scientists who have worked with the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR) periodically since it began. It reviews the history of the register and describes the methods used and lessons learned. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:217–22. PMID:24986492

  11. Family dinner and disordered eating behaviors in a large cohort of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Haines, Jess; Gillman, Matthew W; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Field, Alison E; Austin, S Bryn

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to examine longitudinal associations between family dinner and disordered eating behaviors among adolescents. We studied 7535 females and 5913 males, 9 to 14 years of age in 1996. We performed multivariable logistic regression to assess the associations of previous year family dinner with 1-year incidence of each of 3 outcomes: purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting. Compared to those who ate family dinner "never or some days," female adolescents who ate family dinner at least most days were less likely to initiate purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting. Estimates of association among males were similar in direction and magnitude, although lower frequency of the outcomes resulted in less precise estimates and fewer statistically significant results.

  12. Family dinner and disordered eating behaviors in a large cohort of adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jess; Gillman, Matthew W.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Field, Alison E.; Austin, S. Bryn

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to examine longitudinal associations between family dinner and disordered eating behaviors among adolescents. We studied 7535 females and 5913 males, 9 to 14 years of age in 1996. We performed multivariable logistic regression to assess the associations of previous year family dinner with 1-year incidence of each of 3 outcomes: purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting. Compared to those who ate family dinner “never or some days,” female adolescents who ate family dinner at least most days were less likely to initiate purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting. Estimates of association among males were similar in direction and magnitude, although lower frequency of the outcomes resulted in less precise estimates and fewer statistically significant results. PMID:20390605

  13. What characterizes early adolescents with a positive body image? A qualitative investigation of Swedish girls and boys.

    PubMed

    Frisén, Ann; Holmqvist, Kristina

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate positive body image during adolescence. Semi-structured interviews, centring on three body image domains (satisfaction with own appearance, views on exercise, and influence from family and friends) were conducted with 30 early adolescent Swedish girls and boys who at age 10 and 13 had shown the highest level of body satisfaction in a large longitudinal sample. The data were analyzed thematically. Results revealed that the adolescents' satisfaction with their own appearance was characterized by a functional view of the body and an acceptance of the bodily imperfections that they perceived that they had. The vast majority of the adolescents were physically active and found exercise joyful and health-promoting. Finally, although some of the adolescents had received negative comments about their appearance from family and friends, such comments were not given any importance.

  14. Reconstruction of oomycete genome evolution identifies differences in evolutionary trajectories leading to present-day large gene families.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Michael F; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Govers, Francine; Snel, Berend

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomic class of oomycetes contains numerous pathogens of plants and animals but is related to nonpathogenic diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes have flexible genomes comprising large gene families that play roles in pathogenicity. The evolutionary processes that shaped the gene content have not yet been studied by applying systematic tree reconciliation of the phylome of these species. We analyzed evolutionary dynamics of ten Stramenopiles. Gene gains, duplications, and losses were inferred by tree reconciliation of 18,459 gene trees constituting the phylome with a highly supported species phylogeny. We reconstructed a strikingly large last common ancestor of the Stramenopiles that contained ~10,000 genes. Throughout evolution, the genomes of pathogenic oomycetes have constantly gained and lost genes, though gene gains through duplications outnumber the losses. The branch leading to the plant pathogenic Phytophthora genus was identified as a major transition point characterized by increased frequency of duplication events that has likely driven the speciation within this genus. Large gene families encoding different classes of enzymes associated with pathogenicity such as glycoside hydrolases are formed by complex and distinct patterns of duplications and losses leading to their expansion in extant oomycetes. This study unveils the large-scale evolutionary dynamics that shaped the genomes of pathogenic oomycetes. By the application of phylogenetic based analyses methods, it provides additional insights that shed light on the complex history of oomycete genome evolution and the emergence of large gene families characteristic for this important class of pathogens.

  15. Tumor mapping in two large multigeneration families with CYLD mutations: Implications for patient management and tumor induction

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, N; Langtry, J A A; Ashworth, A; Roberts, C; Chapman, P; Burn, J; Trainer, A H

    2010-01-01

    Objective To comprehensively ascertain the extent and severity of clinical features in multiple affected individuals from two large families with proven heterozygous mutations in the CYLD locus and to correlate these findings with the three appendageal tumor predisposition syndromes, familial cylindromatosis (FC), Brooke-Spiegler syndrome (BSS), and multiple familial trichoepitheliomas (MFT) known to be associated with such germline mutations. Design Inter- and intra-familial observational study. Setting Tertiary genetic and dermatology referral centre. Participants 32 individuals were recruited from two large multigenerational families with CYLD mutations. Clinical details, history and tumor maps were obtained from all participants whilst 18 were further corroborated with detailed clinical examination. Main outcome measures Severity of tumor density, distribution and histology, associated medical conditions, patient symptoms and impact of disease on quality of life. Results We demonstrate a wide variation in clinical presentation seen in individuals from the same family. In addition, we provide clinical evidence that correlates with hormonally stimulated hair follicles being particularly vulnerable to loss of heterozygosity and tumor induction. Conclusion In view of our findings, we propose that the burden of disease at sites other than the head and neck is underreported in the literature, but impacts greatly on quality of life. The differentiation between the clinical diagnoses has little prognostic or clinical utility in genetic counselling even within individuals from the same family. Thus, we suggest an encompassing diagnosis of “CYLD cutaneous syndrome”. Finally, our results relating to the clinical distribution of tumors suggest hormonal factors may play an important role in tumor induction in these patients. PMID:19917957

  16. BRCA1 and BRCA2 point mutations and large rearrangements in breast and ovarian cancer families in Northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Ratajska, Magdalena; Brozek, Izabela; Senkus-Konefka, Elzbieta; Jassem, Jacek; Stepnowska, Magdalena; Palomba, Grazia; Pisano, Marina; Casula, Milena; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Borg, Ake; Limon, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Sixty-four Polish families with a history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes using a combination of denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and sequencing. Two thirds (43/64; 67%) of the families were found to carry deleterious mutations, of which the most frequent were BRCA1 5382insC (n=22/43; 51%) and Cys61Gly (n=9/43; 20%). Two other recurrent mutations were BRCA1 185delAG (n=3) and 3819del5 (n=4), together accounting for 16% of the 43 mutation-positive cases. We also found three novel mutations (BRCA1 2991del5, BRCA2 6238ins2del21 and 8876delC) which combined with findings from our earlier study of 60 Northern Polish families. Moreover, screening of 43 BRCA1/2 negative families for the presence of large rearrangements by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) resulted in the finding of two additional BRCA1 mutations: a deletion of exons 1A, 1B and 2, and a deletion of exons 17-19, both present in single families. We conclude that the Polish population has a diverse mutation spectrum influenced by strong founder effects. However, families with strong breast/ovarian cancer history who are negative for these common mutations should be offered a complete BRCA gene screening, including MLPA analysis.

  17. Structural, Functional, and Evolutionary Analysis of the Unusually Large Stilbene Synthase Gene Family in Grapevine1[W

    PubMed Central

    Parage, Claire; Tavares, Raquel; Réty, Stéphane; Baltenweck-Guyot, Raymonde; Poutaraud, Anne; Renault, Lauriane; Heintz, Dimitri; Lugan, Raphaël; Marais, Gabriel A.B.; Aubourg, Sébastien; Hugueney, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Stilbenes are a small family of phenylpropanoids produced in a number of unrelated plant species, including grapevine (Vitis vinifera). In addition to their participation in defense mechanisms in plants, stilbenes, such as resveratrol, display important pharmacological properties and are postulated to be involved in the health benefits associated with a moderate consumption of red wine. Stilbene synthases (STSs), which catalyze the biosynthesis of the stilbene backbone, seem to have evolved from chalcone synthases (CHSs) several times independently in stilbene-producing plants. STS genes usually form small families of two to five closely related paralogs. By contrast, the sequence of grapevine reference genome (cv PN40024) has revealed an unusually large STS gene family. Here, we combine molecular evolution and structural and functional analyses to investigate further the high number of STS genes in grapevine. Our reannotation of the STS and CHS gene families yielded 48 STS genes, including at least 32 potentially functional ones. Functional characterization of nine genes representing most of the STS gene family diversity clearly indicated that these genes do encode for proteins with STS activity. Evolutionary analysis of the STS gene family revealed that both STS and CHS evolution are dominated by purifying selection, with no evidence for strong selection for new functions among STS genes. However, we found a few sites under different selection pressures in CHS and STS sequences, whose potential functional consequences are discussed using a structural model of a typical STS from grapevine that we developed. PMID:22961129

  18. Swedish snus and the GothiaTek® standard.

    PubMed

    Rutqvist, Lars E; Curvall, Margareta; Hassler, Thord; Ringberger, Tommy; Wahlberg, Inger

    2011-05-16

    Some smokeless tobacco products, such as Swedish snus, are today considered to be associated with substantially fewer health hazards than cigarettes. This risk differential has contributed to the scientific debate about the possibilities of harm reduction within the tobacco area. Although current manufacturing methods for snus build on those that were introduced more than a century ago, the low levels of unwanted substances in modern Swedish snus are largely due to improvements in production techniques and selection of raw materials in combination with several programs for quality assurance and quality control. These measures have been successively introduced during the past 30-40 years. In the late 1990s they formed the basis for a voluntary quality standard for Swedish snus named GothiaTek®. In recent years the standard has been accepted by the members of the trade organization European Smokeless Tobacco Council (ESTOC) so it has now evolved into an industrial standard for all smokeless tobacco products in Europe.The initial impetus for the mentioned changes of the production was quality problems related to microbial activity and formation of ammonia and nitrite in the finished products. Other contributing factors were that snus came under the jurisdiction of the Swedish Food Act in 1971, and concerns that emerged in the 1960s and 1970s about health effects of tobacco, and the significance of agrochemical residues and other potential toxicants in food stuffs.This paper summarizes the historical development of the manufacture of Swedish snus, describes the chemical composition of modern snus, and gives the background and rationale for the GothiaTek® standard, including the selection of constituents for which the standard sets limits. The paper also discusses the potential future of this voluntary standard in relation to current discussions about tobacco harm reduction and regulatory science in tobacco control.

  19. Swedish snus and the GothiaTek® standard

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Some smokeless tobacco products, such as Swedish snus, are today considered to be associated with substantially fewer health hazards than cigarettes. This risk differential has contributed to the scientific debate about the possibilities of harm reduction within the tobacco area. Although current manufacturing methods for snus build on those that were introduced more than a century ago, the low levels of unwanted substances in modern Swedish snus are largely due to improvements in production techniques and selection of raw materials in combination with several programs for quality assurance and quality control. These measures have been successively introduced during the past 30-40 years. In the late 1990s they formed the basis for a voluntary quality standard for Swedish snus named GothiaTek®. In recent years the standard has been accepted by the members of the trade organization European Smokeless Tobacco Council (ESTOC) so it has now evolved into an industrial standard for all smokeless tobacco products in Europe. The initial impetus for the mentioned changes of the production was quality problems related to microbial activity and formation of ammonia and nitrite in the finished products. Other contributing factors were that snus came under the jurisdiction of the Swedish Food Act in 1971, and concerns that emerged in the 1960s and 1970s about health effects of tobacco, and the significance of agrochemical residues and other potential toxicants in food stuffs. This paper summarizes the historical development of the manufacture of Swedish snus, describes the chemical composition of modern snus, and gives the background and rationale for the GothiaTek® standard, including the selection of constituents for which the standard sets limits. The paper also discusses the potential future of this voluntary standard in relation to current discussions about tobacco harm reduction and regulatory science in tobacco control. PMID:21575206

  20. Atypical Features in a Large Turkish Family Affected with Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, Betul; Aksoy, Durdane; Sahbaz, E. Irmak; Basak, A. Nazli

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe the clinical features of several members of the same family diagnosed with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) and cerebral lesions, demyelinating neuropathy, and late-age onset without a significant cardiac involvement and presenting with similar symptoms, although genetic testing was negative for the GAA repeat expansion in one patient of the family. The GAA repeat expansion in the frataxin gene was shown in all of the family members except in a young female patient. MRI revealed arachnoid cysts in two patients; MRI was consistent with both cavum septum pellucidum-cavum vergae and nodular signal intensity increase in one patient. EMG showed demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy in another patient. The GAA expansion-negative 11-year-old female patient had mental-motor retardation, epilepsy, and ataxia. None of the patients had significant cardiac symptoms. Description of FRDA families with different ethnic backgrounds may assist in identifying possible phenotypic and genetic features of the disease. Furthermore, the genetic heterogeneity observed in this family draws attention to the difficulty of genetic counseling in an inbred population and to the need for genotyping all affected members before delivering comprehensive genetic counseling. PMID:27668106

  1. Social determinants of infant mortality in a historical Swedish cohort.

    PubMed

    Sovio, Ulla; Dibden, Amanda; Koupil, Ilona

    2012-09-01

    Infant mortality rates have fallen considerably in the past decades. However, because of sparseness of historical data, it is unclear how social differences in infant mortality have changed over time. The aim of this study was to assess the association between prenatal social determinants and infant mortality in a Swedish cohort of 13,741 singletons born between 1915 and 1929. Associations and potential mediation of these determinants through other maternal and birth factors were studied using Cox regression. Analyses were repeated for deaths within the neonatal and post-neonatal periods. Mother's single marital status, high parity, low birthweight (LBW), low gestational age and male sex were associated with infant mortality in fully adjusted models, whereas the associations of maternal social class, region of residence and maternal age appeared to be largely mediated through other variables. Contrary to studies reporting a 'LBW paradox', no interactions between gestational age or birthweight and maternal social characteristics on infant mortality were observed in this study. High maternal age, LBW and low/high gestational age were associated with neonatal mortality, whereas single marital status, high parity, LBW, low gestational age and male sex were associated with post-neonatal mortality. An association of family social class with post-neonatal mortality was largely mediated by other maternal variables. Our findings of determinants of neonatal and post-neonatal mortality in 1915-1929 are strikingly consistent with results from contemporary cohorts. On the other hand, contrary to most recent findings, there is no evidence of a LBW paradox in this historical cohort. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. bZIPs and WRKYs: two large transcription factor families executing two different functional strategies.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Carles M; Potschin, Maren; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    bZIPs and WRKYs are two important plant transcription factor (TF) families regulating diverse developmental and stress-related processes. Since a partial overlap in these biological processes is obvious, it can be speculated that they fulfill non-redundant functions in a complex regulatory network. Here, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms that are so far described for bZIPs and WRKYs. bZIP factors need to heterodimerize for DNA-binding and regulation of transcription, and based on a bioinformatics approach, bZIPs can build up more than the double of protein interactions than WRKYs. In contrast, an enrichment of the WRKY DNA-binding motifs can be found in WRKY promoters, a phenomenon which is not observed for the bZIP family. Thus, the two TF families follow two different functional strategies in which WRKYs regulate each other's transcription in a transcriptional network whereas bZIP action relies on intensive heterodimerization.

  3. Genome-wide search for breast cancer linkage in large Icelandic non-BRCA1/2 families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A significant proportion of high-risk breast cancer families are not explained by mutations in known genes. Recent genome-wide searches (GWS) have not revealed any single major locus reminiscent of BRCA1 and BRCA2, indicating that still unidentified genes may explain relatively few families each or interact in a way obscure to linkage analyses. This has drawn attention to possible benefits of studying populations where genetic heterogeneity might be reduced. We thus performed a GWS for linkage on nine Icelandic multiple-case non-BRCA1/2 families of desirable size for mapping highly penetrant loci. To follow up suggestive loci, an additional 13 families from other Nordic countries were genotyped for selected markers. Methods: GWS was performed using 811 microsatellite markers providing about five centiMorgan (cM) resolution. Multipoint logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated using parametric and nonparametric methods. For selected markers and cases, tumour tissue was compared to normal tissue to look for allelic loss indicative of a tumour suppressor gene. Results: The three highest signals were located at chromosomes 6q, 2p and 14q. One family contributed suggestive LOD scores (LOD 2.63 to 3.03, dominant model) at all these regions, without consistent evidence of a tumour suppressor gene. Haplotypes in nine affected family members mapped the loci to 2p23.2 to p21, 6q14.2 to q23.2 and 14q21.3 to q24.3. No evidence of a highly penetrant locus was found among the remaining families. The heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) at the 6q, 2p and 14q loci in all families was 3.27, 1.66 and 1.24, respectively. The subset of 13 Nordic families showed supportive HLODs at chromosome 6q (ranging from 0.34 to 1.37 by country subset). The 2p and 14q loci overlap with regions indicated by large families in previous GWS studies of breast cancer. Conclusions: Chromosomes 2p, 6q and 14q are candidate sites for genes contributing together to high breast cancer risk. A

  4. Histone Recognition and Large-Scale Structural Analysis of the Human Bromodomain Family

    PubMed Central

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Picaud, Sarah; Mangos, Maria; Keates, Tracy; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Felletar, Ildiko; Volkmer, Rudolf; Müller, Susanne; Pawson, Tony; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Knapp, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein interaction modules that specifically recognize ε-N-lysine acetylation motifs, a key event in the reading process of epigenetic marks. The 61 BRDs in the human genome cluster into eight families based on structure/sequence similarity. Here, we present 29 high-resolution crystal structures, covering all BRD families. Comprehensive crossfamily structural analysis identifies conserved and family-specific structural features that are necessary for specific acetylation-dependent substrate recognition. Screening of more than 30 representative BRDs against systematic histone-peptide arrays identifies new BRD substrates and reveals a strong influence of flanking posttranslational modifications, such as acetylation and phosphorylation, suggesting that BRDs recognize combinations of marks rather than singly acetylated sequences. We further uncovered a structural mechanism for the simultaneous binding and recognition of diverse diacetyl-containing peptides by BRD4. These data provide a foundation for structure-based drug design of specific inhibitors for this emerging target family. PMID:22464331

  5. BoS: a large and diverse family of short interspersed elements (SINEs) in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wessler, Susan R

    2005-05-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are nonautonomous non-LTR retrotransposons that populate eukaryotic genomes. Numerous SINE families have been identified in animals, whereas only a few have been described in plants. Here we describe a new family of SINEs, named BoS, that is widespread in Brassicaceae and present at approximately 2000 copies in Brassica oleracea. In addition to sharing a modular structure and target site preference with previously described SINEs, BoS elements have several unusual features. First, the head regions of BoS RNAs can adopt a distinct hairpin-like secondary structure. Second, with 15 distinct subfamilies, BoS represents one of the most diverse SINE families described to date. Third, several of the subfamilies have a mosaic structure that has arisen through the exchange of sequences between existing subfamilies, possibly during retrotransposition. Analysis of BoS subfamilies indicate that they were active during various time periods through the evolution of Brassicaceae and that active elements may still reside in some Brassica species. As such, BoS elements may be a valuable tool as phylogenetic makers for resolving outstanding issues in the evolution of species in the Brassicaceae family.

  6. Novel homozygous large deletion including the 5' part of the SPATA7 gene in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Anja-Kathrin; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Zobor, Ditta; Bonin, Michael; Sharkia, Rajech; Wissinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family with juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (RP). DNA samples were collected from the index patient, her parents, her affected sister, and two non-affected siblings. Genome-wide linkage analysis with 250 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays was performed using DNA from the two affected patients. Owing to consanguinity in the family, we applied homozygosity mapping to identify the disease-causing gene. The candidate gene SPATA7 was screened for mutations with PCR amplifications and direct Sanger sequencing. Following high-density SNP arrays, we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the SPATA7 gene. Several mutations in SPATA7 have been reported for various forms of retinal dystrophy, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and juvenile RP. PCR-based sequence content mapping, long-distance PCR amplifications, and subsequent sequencing analysis revealed a homozygous 63.4 kb large deletion that encompasses the 5' part of the SPATA7 gene including exons 1-5. The mutation showed concordant segregation with the phenotype in the family as expected for autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and is consistent with a diagnosis of juvenile RP. We report a novel homozygous large deletion in SPATA7 associated with juvenile RP in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family. This is the first larger deletion mutation reported for SPATA7.

  7. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals a Mutation in CRYBB2 in a Large Mexican Family with Autosomal Dominant Pulverulent Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Messina-Baas, Olga; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; González-Huerta, Luz M.; Toral-López, Jaime; Cuevas-Covarrubias, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract, an important cause of reversible blindness, is due to several causes including Mendelian inheritance. Thirty percent of cataracts are hereditary with participation of the gamma crystallin genes. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with gene mutations and congenital cataract; about 40 genetic loci have been associated with hereditary cataract. In this study, we identified the underlying genetic cause of an autosomal dominant pulverulent cataract (ADPC) in a large Mexican family. Twenty-one affected patients and 20 healthy members of a family with ADPC were included. Genomic DNA was analyzed by whole exome sequencing in the proband, a normal daughter, and in an affected son, whereas DNA Sanger sequencing was performed in all members of the family. After the bioinformatics analysis, all samples were genotyped using Sanger sequencing to eliminate variants that do not cosegregate with the cataract. We observed a perfect cosegregation of a nonsense mutation c.475C>T (p.Q155*) in exon 6 of the CRYBB2 gene with ADPC. We calculated a logarithm of the odds score of 5.5. This mutation was not detected in healthy members of the family and in 100 normal controls. This is the first Mexican family with ADPC associated with a p.Q155* mutation. Interestingly, this specific mutation in the CRYBB2 gene seems to be exclusively associated with pulverulent/cerulean cataract (with some clinical variability) independent of the population's genetic background. PMID:27385965

  8. Incentivizing deceased organ donation: a Swedish priority-setting perspective.

    PubMed

    Omar, Faisal; Tinghög, Gustav; Welin, Stellan

    2011-03-01

    The established deceased organ donation models in many countries, relying chiefly on altruism, have failed to motivate a sufficient number of donors. As a consequence organs that could save lives are routinely missed leading to a growing gap between demand and supply. The aim of this paper is twofold; firstly to develop a proposal for compensated deceased organ donation that could potentially address the organ shortage; secondly to examine the compatibility of the proposal with the ethical values of the Swedish healthcare system. The proposal for compensating deceased donation is grounded in behavioural agency theory and combines extrinsic, intrinsic and signalling incentives in order to increase prosocial behaviour. Furthermore the compatibility of our proposal with the values of the Swedish healthcare system is evaluated in reference to the principles of human dignity, needs and solidarity, and cost effectiveness. Extrinsic incentives in the form of a 5,000 compensation towards funeral expenses paid to the estate of the deceased or family is proposed. Intrinsic and signalling incentives are incorporated by allowing all or part of the compensation to be diverted as a donation to a reputable charity. The decision for organ donation must not be against the explicit will of the donor. We find that our proposal for compensated deceased donation is compatible with the values of the Swedish healthcare system, and therefore merits serious consideration. It is however important to acknowledge issues relating to coercion, commodification and loss of public trust and the ethical challenges that they might pose.

  9. Care of the Dying: A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigenberg, Loma; Fulton, Robert

    1977-01-01

    This article illustrates various aspects of terminal care, and shows that rules and norms for such care do not exist today. The authors advocate the formulation of an aim for humane treatment of dying patients, and its application in a manner appropriate to Swedish medical concepts and Swedish conditions. (Author)

  10. Care of the Dying: A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigenberg, Loma; Fulton, Robert

    1977-01-01

    This article illustrates various aspects of terminal care, and shows that rules and norms for such care do not exist today. The authors advocate the formulation of an aim for humane treatment of dying patients, and its application in a manner appropriate to Swedish medical concepts and Swedish conditions. (Author)

  11. English and Swedish in CLIL Student Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Maria Lim

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates Swedish students' ability to produce the discourse of the subject history, in a situation where they had to demonstrate historical knowledge in written explanations, and where both English and Swedish are involved. The students attend a content and language integrated learning (CLIL) programme at the upper secondary school…

  12. Delivering a very brief psychoeducational program to cancer patients and family members in a large group format.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, A J; Edmonds, C V; Williams, D

    1999-01-01

    It is well established that brief psychoeducational programs for cancer patients will significantly improve mean quality of life. As this kind of adjunctive treatment becomes integrated into general cancer management, it will be necessary to devise cost-effective and efficacious programs that can be offered to relatively large numbers of patients. We have developed a very brief 4-session program that provides this service to 40-80 patients and family members per month (and seems capable of serving much larger numbers, depending on the capacity of the facility in which they assemble). Patients meet in a hospital auditorium for a large group, lecture-style program that offers training in basic coping skills: stress management, relaxation training, thought monitoring and changing, mental imagery and goal setting. Over the first year we have treated 363 patients and 150 family members. Improvements were assessed by changes in the POMS-Short Form, and both patients and family members were found to improve significantly over the course of the program. While this is not a randomized comparison, it suggests that the benefits gained from a large group in a classroom are not substantially less than the improvements that have been documented in the usual small group format, where more interactive discussions are possible.

  13. The J-domain proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana: an unexpectedly large and diverse family of chaperones.

    PubMed

    Miernyk, J A

    2001-07-01

    A total of 89 J-domain proteins were identified in the genome of the model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The deduced amino acid sequences of the J-domain proteins were analyzed for an assortment of structural features and motifs. Based on the results of sequence comparisons and structure and function predictions, 51 distinct families were identified. The families ranged in size from 1 to 6 members. Subcellular localizations of the A thaliana J-domain proteins were predicted; species were found in both the soluble and membrane compartments of all cellular organelles. Based on digital Northern analysis, the J-domain proteins could be separated into groups of low, medium, and moderate expression levels. This genomics-based analysis of the A thaliana J-domain proteins establishes a framework for detailed studies of biological function and specificity. It additionally provides a comprehensive basis for evolutionary comparisons.

  14. Lifestyle, family history, and risk of idiopathic Parkinson disease: a large Danish case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F; Ritz, Beate; Andersen, Klaus K; Christensen, Jane; Schernhammer, Eva S; Hansen, Johnni; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja H; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2015-05-15

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations of these factors with idiopathic PD among 1,808 Danish patients who were diagnosed in 1996-2009 and matched to 1,876 randomly selected population controls. Although there was a downward trend in duration of smoking, this was not observed for daily tobacco consumption. A moderate intake of caffeine (3.1-5 cups/day) was associated with a lower odds ratio for PD (0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 0.62), as was a moderate intake of alcohol (3.1-7 units/week) (odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.58, 0.84); a higher daily intake did not reduce the odds further. When these behaviors were studied in combination with smoking, the odds ratios were lower than those for each one alone. Compared with never smokers with no family history of PD, never smokers who did have a family history had an odds ratio of 2.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.91, 4.13); for smokers with a family history, the odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.23). In conclusion, duration of smoking seems to be more important than intensity in the relationship between smoking and idiopathic PD. The finding of lower risk estimates for smoking in combination with caffeine or alcohol requires further confirmation.

  15. Lifestyle, Family History, and Risk of Idiopathic Parkinson Disease: A Large Danish Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F.; Ritz, Beate; Andersen, Klaus K.; Christensen, Jane; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Hansen, Johnni; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja H.; Olsen, Jørgen H.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations of these factors with idiopathic PD among 1,808 Danish patients who were diagnosed in 1996–2009 and matched to 1,876 randomly selected population controls. Although there was a downward trend in duration of smoking, this was not observed for daily tobacco consumption. A moderate intake of caffeine (3.1–5 cups/day) was associated with a lower odds ratio for PD (0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 0.62), as was a moderate intake of alcohol (3.1–7 units/week) (odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.58, 0.84); a higher daily intake did not reduce the odds further. When these behaviors were studied in combination with smoking, the odds ratios were lower than those for each one alone. Compared with never smokers with no family history of PD, never smokers who did have a family history had an odds ratio of 2.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.91, 4.13); for smokers with a family history, the odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.23). In conclusion, duration of smoking seems to be more important than intensity in the relationship between smoking and idiopathic PD. The finding of lower risk estimates for smoking in combination with caffeine or alcohol requires further confirmation. PMID:25925389

  16. Combining family- and population-based imputation data for association analysis of rare and common variants in large pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mohamad; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2014-11-01

    In the last two decades, complex traits have become the main focus of genetic studies. The hypothesis that both rare and common variants are associated with complex traits is increasingly being discussed. Family-based association studies using relatively large pedigrees are suitable for both rare and common variant identification. Because of the high cost of sequencing technologies, imputation methods are important for increasing the amount of information at low cost. A recent family-based imputation method, Genotype Imputation Given Inheritance (GIGI), is able to handle large pedigrees and accurately impute rare variants, but does less well for common variants where population-based methods perform better. Here, we propose a flexible approach to combine imputation data from both family- and population-based methods. We also extend the Sequence Kernel Association Test for Rare and Common variants (SKAT-RC), originally proposed for data from unrelated subjects, to family data in order to make use of such imputed data. We call this extension "famSKAT-RC." We compare the performance of famSKAT-RC and several other existing burden and kernel association tests. In simulated pedigree sequence data, our results show an increase of imputation accuracy from use of our combining approach. Also, they show an increase of power of the association tests with this approach over the use of either family- or population-based imputation methods alone, in the context of rare and common variants. Moreover, our results show better performance of famSKAT-RC compared to the other considered tests, in most scenarios investigated here.

  17. Annotation and analysis of a large cuticular protein family with the R&R Consensus in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Cornman, R Scott; Togawa, Toru; Dunn, W Augustine; He, Ningjia; Emmons, Aaron C; Willis, Judith H

    2008-01-01

    Background The most abundant family of insect cuticular proteins, the CPR family, is recognized by the R&R Consensus, a domain of about 64 amino acids that binds to chitin and is present throughout arthropods. Several species have now been shown to have more than 100 CPR genes, inviting speculation as to the functional importance of this large number and diversity. Results We have identified 156 genes in Anopheles gambiae that code for putative cuticular proteins in this CPR family, over 1% of the total number of predicted genes in this species. Annotation was verified using several criteria including identification of TATA boxes, INRs, and DPEs plus support from proteomic and gene expression analyses. Two previously recognized CPR classes, RR-1 and RR-2, form separate, well-supported clades with the exception of a small set of genes with long branches whose relationships are poorly resolved. Several of these outliers have clear orthologs in other species. Although both clades are under purifying selection, the RR-1 variant of the R&R Consensus is evolving at twice the rate of the RR-2 variant and is structurally more labile. In contrast, the regions flanking the R&R Consensus have diversified in amino-acid composition to a much greater extent in RR-2 genes compared with RR-1 genes. Many genes are found in compact tandem arrays that may include similar or dissimilar genes but always include just one of the two classes. Tandem arrays of RR-2 genes frequently contain subsets of genes coding for highly similar proteins (sequence clusters). Properties of the proteins indicated that each cluster may serve a distinct function in the cuticle. Conclusion The complete annotation of this large gene family provides insight on the mechanisms of gene family evolution and clues about the need for so many CPR genes. These data also should assist annotation of other Anopheles genes. PMID:18205929

  18. The Bacterial Intimins and Invasins: A Large and Novel Family of Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jennifer C.; Yen, Ming-Ren; Castillo, Rostislav; Leyton, Denisse L.; Henderson, Ian R.; Saier, Milton H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gram-negative bacteria have developed a limited repertoire of solutions for secreting proteins from the cytoplasmic compartment to the exterior of the cell. Amongst the spectrum of secreted proteins are the intimins and invasins (the Int/Inv family; TC# 1.B.54) which are characterized by an N-terminal β-barrel domain and a C-terminal surface localized passenger domain. Despite the important role played by members of this family in diseases mediated by several species of the Enterobacteriaceae, there has been little appreciation for the distribution and diversity of these proteins amongst Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, there is little understanding of the molecular events governing secretion of these proteins to the extracellular milieu. Principal Findings In silico approaches were used to analyze the domain organization and diversity of members of this secretion family. Proteins belonging to this family are predominantly associated with organisms from the γ-proteobacteria. Whilst proteins from the Chlamydia, γ-, β- and ε-proteobacteria possess β-barrel domains and passenger domains of various sizes, Int/Inv proteins from the α-proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and chlorobi possess only the predicted β-barrel domains. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that with few exceptions these proteins cluster according to organismal type, indicating that divergence occurred contemporaneously with speciation, and that horizontal transfer was limited. Clustering patterns of the β-barrel domains correlate well with those of the full-length proteins although the passenger domains do so with much less consistency. The modular subdomain design of the passenger domains suggests that subdomain duplication and deletion have occurred with high frequency over evolutionary time. However, all repeated subdomains are found in tandem, suggesting that subdomain shuffling occurred rarely if at all. Topological predictions for the β-barrel domains are presented. Conclusion

  19. Avoiding the pitfalls of adaptive management implementation in Swedish silviculture.

    PubMed

    Rist, Lucy; Felton, Adam; Mårald, Erland; Samuelsson, Lars; Lundmark, Tomas; Rosvall, Ola

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing demand for alternatives to Sweden's current dominant silvicultural system, driven by a desire to raise biomass production, meet environmental goals and mitigate climate change. However, moving towards diversified forest management that deviates from well established silvicultural practices carries many uncertainties and risks. Adaptive management is often suggested as an effective means of managing in the context of such complexities. Yet there has been scepticism over its appropriateness in cases characterised by large spatial extents, extended temporal scales and complex land ownership-characteristics typical of Swedish forestry. Drawing on published research, including a new paradigm for adaptive management, we indicate how common pitfalls can be avoided during implementation. We indicate the investment, infrastructure, and considerations necessary to benefit from adaptive management. In doing so, we show how this approach could offer a pragmatic operational model for managing the uncertainties, risks and obstacles associated with new silvicultural systems and the challenges facing Swedish forestry.

  20. A novel deletion in TNNI2 causes distal arthrogryposis in a large Chinese family with marked variability of expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Zhao, Xiuli; Han, Weitian; Bian, Chaoying; Li, Xuefu; Wang, Ge; Ao, Yang; Li, Yunqing; Yi, Dongxu; Zhe, Yang; Lo, Wilson H Y; Zhang, Xue; Li, Jianxin

    2006-09-01

    Distal arthrogryposis (DA) is composed of a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders, characterized by multiple congenital contractures of the limbs. Point mutations in three genes encoding contractile fast-twitch myofibers, TPM2, TNNI2 and TNNT3, were recently identified in DA type 1 (DA1; MIM 108120) and DA type 2B (DA2B; MIM 601680). We have described a large Chinese DA family in which different individuals had phenotypes similar to DA1 or DA2B. To map the disease locus in this family, two-point linkage analysis was first performed using microsatellite markers selected from the genomic regions close to the TPM2, TNNI2/TNNT3 and TNNC2 genes. A positive LOD score of 3.61 at theta = 0 was obtained with the marker close to the TNNI2/TNNT3 genes, corresponding to the genetic mapping site of DA2B. Direct sequencing of the PCR-amplified DNA fragment spanning exon 8 of the TNNI2 gene showed a heterozygous deletion, c.523_525delAAG (p.K175del), in the proband. This novel mutation was confirmed to cosegregate with the DA phenotype in affected individuals but not detected in all unaffected individuals of the family and not in 50 healthy controls. In summary, we have found a novel TNNI2 mutation in a Chinese family with DA2B. Our work represents the first report on the link between TNNI2 and the DA phenotype in Chinese.

  1. A Novel PRPF31 Mutation in a Large Chinese Family with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa and Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jiyun; Shi, Yi; Lin, Ying; Gong, Bo; Zhu, Xianjun; Ma, Shi; Qiao, Lifeng; Lin, He; Cheng, Jing; Yang, Zhenglin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was intended to identify the disease causing genes in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Methods A genome scan analysis was conducted in this family for disease gene preliminary mapping. Snapshot analysis of selected SNPs for two-point LOD score analysis for candidate gene filter. Candidate gene PRPF31 whole exons' sequencing was executed to identify mutations. Results A novel nonsense mutation caused by an insertion was found in PRPF31 gene. All the 19 RP patients in 1085 family are carrying this heterozygous nonsense mutation. The nonsense mutation is in PRPF31 gene exon9 at chr19:54629961-54629961, inserting nucleotide “A” that generates the coding protein frame shift from p.307 and early termination at p.322 in the snoRNA binding domain (NOP domain). Conclusion This report is the first to associate PRPF31 gene's nonsense mutation and adRP and JMD. Our findings revealed that PRPF31 can lead to different clinical phenotypes in the same family, resulting either in adRP or syndrome of adRP and JMD. We believe our identification of the novel “A” insertion mutation in exon9 at chr19:54629961-54629961 in PRPF31 can provide further genetic evidence for clinical test for adRP and JMD. PMID:24244300

  2. Evidence of reproductive stoppage in families with autism spectrum disorder: a large, population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas J; Windham, Gayle C; Anderson, Meredith; Croen, Lisa A; Grether, Judith K; Risch, Neil

    2014-08-01

    Few studies have examined the curtailment of reproduction (ie, stoppage) after the diagnosis of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To examine stoppage in a large, population-based cohort of families in which a child has received a diagnosis of ASD. Individuals with ASD born from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 2003, were identified in the California Department of Developmental Services records, which were then linked to state birth certificates to identify full sibs and half-sibs and to obtain information on birth order and demographics. A total of 19,710 case families in which the first birth occurred within the study period was identified. These families included 39,361 individuals (sibs and half-sibs). Control individuals were randomly sampled from birth certificates and matched 2:1 to cases by sex, birth year, and maternal age, self-reported race/ethnicity, and county of birth after removal of children receiving services from the California Department of Developmental Services. Using similar linkage methods as for case families, 36,215 pure control families (including 75,724 total individuals) were identified that had no individuals with an ASD diagnosis. History of affected children. Stoppage was investigated by comparing the reproductive behaviors of parents after the birth of a child with ASD vs an unaffected child using a survival analysis framework for time to next birth and adjusting for demographic variables. For the first few years after the birth of a child with ASD, the parents' reproductive behavior was similar to that of control parents. However, birth rates differed in subsequent years; overall, families whose first child had ASD had a second child at a rate of 0.668 (95% CI, 0.635-0.701) that of control families, adjusted for birth year, birth weight, maternal age, and self-reported maternal race/ethnicity. Results were similar when a later-born child was the first affected child in the family. Reproductive curtailment was slightly

  3. Identification of a novel ZNF469 mutation in a large family with Ehlers-Danlos phenotype.

    PubMed

    Al-Owain, Mohammed; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Sunker, Asma; Shuaib, Taghreed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2012-12-15

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by extreme corneal fragility and thinning, which may lead to spontaneous or trauma-induced corneal rupture. BCS-1 and BCS-2 are caused by recessive mutations in ZNF469 and PRDM5, respectively. Both genes play a role in the regulatory pathway of corneal development and maintenance. We report a consanguineous family with five patients affected with the cardinal ocular features of BCS and significant musculoskeletal findings primarily in the form of joint hypermobility and severe kyphoscoliosis. The patients had thin velvety skin, hallux valgus, variable sensorineural hearing loss and arachnodactyly. Interestingly, one of the patients additionally had phenylketonuria and showed a milder ophthalmological and musculoskeletal phenotype than his affected siblings. The urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline concentrations and their ratios were mildly elevated indicating increased bone-collagen turnover. A novel homozygous 14 bp duplication in exon 2 of ZNF469 (c.8817_8830dup) was uncovered by direct sequencing. This family highlights the phenotypic overlap between BCS and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  4. Study of large inbred Friedreich ataxia families reveals a recombination between D9S15 and the disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Belal, S.; Ben Hamida, C.; Hentati, F.; Ben Hamida, M. ); Panayides, K.; Ioannou, P.; MIddleton, L.T. ); Sirugo, G.; Koenig, S.; Mandel, J.L ); Beckmann, J. )

    1992-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance. Precise linkage mapping of the Friedreich ataxia locus (FRDA) in 9q13-q21 should lead to the isolation of the defective gene by positional cloning. The two closest DNA markers, D9S5 and D9S15, show very tight linkage to FRDA, making difficult the ordering of the three loci. The authors present a linkage study of three large Friedreich ataxia families of Tunisian origin, with several multiallelic markers around D9S5 and D9S15. Haplotype data were used to investigate genetic homogeneity of the disease in these geographically related families. A meiotic recombination was found in a nonaffected individual, which excludes a 150-kb segment, including D9S15, as a possible location for the Freidreich ataxia gene and which should orient the search in the D9S5 region. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Phenotypic Variability Associated with a Large Recurrent 1q21.1 Microduplication in a Three-Generation Family

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Judith M.A.; de Leeuw, Nicole; Papatsonis, Dimitri N.M.; Grijseels, Els W.M.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Wessels, Marja W.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent copy number variants of the q21.1 region of chromosome 1 have been associated with variable clinical features, including developmental delay, mild to moderate intellectual disability, psychiatric and behavioral problems, congenital heart malformations, and craniofacial abnormalities. A subset of individuals is clinically unaffected. We describe a unique 3-generation family with a large recurrent 1q21.1 microduplication (BP2-BP4). Our observations underline the incomplete penetrance and phenotypic variability of this rearrangement. We also confirm the association with congenital heart malformations, chronic depression, and anxiety. Furthermore, we report a broader range of dysmorphic features. The extreme phenotypic heterogeneity observed in this family suggests that additional factors modify the clinical phenotype. PMID:26279651

  6. Description of a large family with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia associated with the APOE p.Leu167del mutation

    PubMed Central

    Marduel, Marie; Ouguerram, Khadija; Serre, Valérie; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Berge, Knut Erik; Devillers, Martine; Luc, Gérald; Lecerf, Jean-Michel; Tosolini, Laurent; Erlich, Danièle; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan; Nitchké, Patrick; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Abifadel, Marianne; Kathiresan, Sekar; Leren, Trond Paul; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Apo E mutants are associated with type III hyperlipoproteinemia characterized by high cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia (ADH), due to mutations in the LDLR, APOB or PCSK9 genes, is characterized by an isolated elevation of cholesterol due to high levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We now report an exceptionally large family including 14 members with ADH. Through genome wide mapping, analysis of regional/functional candidate genes and whole exome sequencing, we identified a mutation in the APOE gene, p.Leu167del previously reported associated with sea-blue histiocytosis and familial combined hyperlipidemia. We confirmed the involvement of the APOE p.Leu167del in ADH, with (1) a predicted destabilization of an alpha-helix in the binding domain; (2) a decreased apo E level in LDL; and (3) a decreased catabolism of LDL. Our results show that mutations in the APOE gene can be associated with bona fide ADH. PMID:22949395

  7. Large distribution and high sequence identity of a Copia-type retrotransposon in angiosperm families.

    PubMed

    Dias, Elaine Silva; Hatt, Clémence; Hamon, Serge; Hamon, Perla; Rigoreau, Michel; Crouzillat, Dominique; Carareto, Claudia Marcia Aparecida; de Kochko, Alexandre; Guyot, Romain

    2015-09-01

    Retrotransposons are the main component of plant genomes. Recent studies have revealed the complexity of their evolutionary dynamics. Here, we have identified Copia25 in Coffea canephora, a new plant retrotransposon belonging to the Ty1-Copia superfamily. In the Coffea genomes analyzed, Copia25 is present in relatively low copy numbers and transcribed. Similarity sequence searches and PCR analyses show that this retrotransposon with LTRs (Long Terminal Repeats) is widely distributed among the Rubiaceae family and that it is also present in other distantly related species belonging to Asterids, Rosids and monocots. A particular situation is the high sequence identity found between the Copia25 sequences of Musa, a monocot, and Ixora, a dicot species (Rubiaceae). Our results reveal the complexity of the evolutionary dynamics of the ancient element Copia25 in angiosperm, involving several processes including sequence conservation, rapid turnover, stochastic losses and horizontal transfer.

  8. Hereditary index finger polydactyly: phenotypic, radiological, dermatoglyphic, and genetic findings in a large family.

    PubMed Central

    Atasu, M

    1976-01-01

    Index finger polydactyly in a Turkish family is reported. The transmission of the malformation fits the pattern of regular autosomal dominant inheritance. Some of the affected individuals had one or two phalanges on their first digits, but all had triphalangeal second fingers. Subjects with polydactyly had very interesting dermatoglyphs, such as an extra a triradius under the super-numerary index finger, the proximal radiant of this triradius (an extra A-line) ending on the radial border of the hand, and arch tibials in the hallucal areas. The carpal bones, beginning with os multangulum majus, or alternatively with the extra one were articulated with two metacarpals. A similar finding was found in the feet. Images PMID:1018306

  9. Hereditary index finger polydactyly: phenotypic, radiological, dermatoglyphic, and genetic findings in a large family.

    PubMed

    Atasu, M

    1976-12-01

    Index finger polydactyly in a Turkish family is reported. The transmission of the malformation fits the pattern of regular autosomal dominant inheritance. Some of the affected individuals had one or two phalanges on their first digits, but all had triphalangeal second fingers. Subjects with polydactyly had very interesting dermatoglyphs, such as an extra a triradius under the super-numerary index finger, the proximal radiant of this triradius (an extra A-line) ending on the radial border of the hand, and arch tibials in the hallucal areas. The carpal bones, beginning with os multangulum majus, or alternatively with the extra one were articulated with two metacarpals. A similar finding was found in the feet.

  10. A large gene family in fission yeast encodes spore killers that subvert Mendel's law.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen; Jiang, Zhao-Di; Suo, Fang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; He, Wan-Zhong; Du, Li-Lin

    2017-06-20

    Spore killers in fungi are selfish genetic elements that distort Mendelian segregation in their favor. It remains unclear how many species harbor them and how diverse their mechanisms are. Here, we discover two spore killers from a natural isolate of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both killers belong to the previously uncharacterized wtf gene family with 25 members in the reference genome. These two killers act in strain-background-independent and genome-location-independent manners to perturb the maturation of spores not inheriting them. Spores carrying one killer are protected from its killing effect but not that of the other killer. The killing and protecting activities can be uncoupled by mutation. The numbers and sequences of wtf genes vary considerably between S. pombe isolates, indicating rapid divergence. We propose that wtf genes contribute to the extensive intraspecific reproductive isolation in S. pombe, and represent ideal models for understanding how segregation-distorting elements act and evolve.

  11. A novel mutation in a large family causes a unique phenotype of Mucolipidosis IV.

    PubMed

    AlBakheet, AlBandary; Qari, Aliya; Colak, Dilek; Rasheed, Anas; Kaya, Namik; Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen

    2013-09-10

    Mucolipidosis type IV is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder reported among Ashkenazi Jews and to a lesser extent in other ethnic groups. Several mutations have been reported in MCOLN1 which is the only known gene associated with the disorder. Here we report the first Saudi patient with Mucolipidosis type IV from a consanguineous family with two branches having a total of five patients carrying a novel transition mutation, c.1307A>G (p.Y436C) in exon 11. The clinical course of the patient was nonspecific and a lysosomal storage disorder was not highly suspected due to lack of coarse facial features, organomegaly and skeletal findings of dysostosis multiplex. The detailed bioinformatics analysis on the deleterious effects of the mutation is discussed. Emphasis is made on the importance of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and serum gastrin level as key clues to the diagnosis of this often subtle neurodevelopmental disorder.

  12. Maternal intrusiveness, family financial means, and anxiety across childhood in a large multiphase sample of community youth

    PubMed Central

    Cooper-Vince, Christine E.; Pincus, Donna B.; Comer, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive parenting has been positively associated with child anxiety, although examinations of this relationship to date have been largely confined to middle to upper middle class families and have rarely used longitudinal designs. With several leading interventions for child anxiety emphasizing the reduction of parental intrusiveness, it is critical to determine whether the links between parental intrusiveness and child anxiety broadly apply to families of all financial means, and whether parental intrusiveness prospectively predicts the development of child anxiety. This study employed latent growth curve analysis to evaluate the interactive effects of maternal intrusiveness and financial means on the developmental trajectory of child anxiety from 1st grade to age 15 in 1,121 children (50.7% male) and their parents from the NICHD SECCYD. The overall model was found to provide good fit, revealing that early maternal intrusiveness and financial means did not impact individual trajectories of change in child anxiety, which were stable from 1st to 5th grade, and then decrease from 5th grade to age 15. Cross-sectional analyses also examined whether family financial means moderated contemporaneous relationships between maternal intrusiveness and child anxiety in 3rd and 5th grades. The relationship between maternal intrusiveness and child anxiety was moderated by family financial means for 1st graders, with stronger links found among children of lower family financial means, but not for 3rd and 5th graders. Neither maternal intrusiveness nor financial means in 1st grade predicted subsequent changes in anxiety across childhood. Findings help elucidate for whom and when maternal intrusiveness has the greatest link with child anxiety and can inform targeted treatment efforts. PMID:23929005

  13. Exome Sequencing of 75 Individuals from Multiply Affected Coeliac Families and Large Scale Resequencing Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Vanisha; Bockett, Nicholas A.; Levine, Adam P.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Hunt, Karen A.; Ciclitira, Paul J.; Hummerich, Holger; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Simpson, Michael A.; Plagnol, Vincent; van Heel, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CeD) is a highly heritable common autoimmune disease involving chronic small intestinal inflammation in response to dietary wheat. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and 40 newer regions identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) and dense fine mapping, account for ∼40% of the disease heritability. We hypothesized that in pedigrees with multiple individuals with CeD rare [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.5%] mutations of larger effect size (odds ratios of ∼ 2–5) might exist. We sequenced the exomes of 75 coeliac individuals of European ancestry from 55 multiply affected families. We selected interesting variants and genes for further follow up using a combination of: an assessment of shared variants between related subjects, a model-free linkage test, and gene burden tests for multiple, potentially causal, variants. We next performed highly multiplexed amplicon resequencing of all RefSeq exons from 24 candidate genes selected on the basis of the exome sequencing data in 2,248 unrelated coeliac cases and 2,230 controls. 1,335 variants with a 99.9% genotyping call rate were observed in 4,478 samples, of which 939 were present in coding regions of 24 genes (Ti/Tv 2.99). 91.7% of coding variants were rare (MAF <0.5%) and 60% were novel. Gene burden tests performed on rare functional variants identified no significant associations (p<1×10−3) in the resequenced candidate genes. Our strategy of sequencing multiply affected families with deep follow up of candidate genes has not identified any new CeD risk mutations. PMID:25635822

  14. Exome sequencing of 75 individuals from multiply affected coeliac families and large scale resequencing follow up.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Vanisha; Bockett, Nicholas A; Levine, Adam P; Mirza, Muddassar M; Hunt, Karen A; Ciclitira, Paul J; Hummerich, Holger; Neuhausen, Susan L; Simpson, Michael A; Plagnol, Vincent; van Heel, David A

    2015-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CeD) is a highly heritable common autoimmune disease involving chronic small intestinal inflammation in response to dietary wheat. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and 40 newer regions identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) and dense fine mapping, account for ∼40% of the disease heritability. We hypothesized that in pedigrees with multiple individuals with CeD rare [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.5%] mutations of larger effect size (odds ratios of ∼2-5) might exist. We sequenced the exomes of 75 coeliac individuals of European ancestry from 55 multiply affected families. We selected interesting variants and genes for further follow up using a combination of: an assessment of shared variants between related subjects, a model-free linkage test, and gene burden tests for multiple, potentially causal, variants. We next performed highly multiplexed amplicon resequencing of all RefSeq exons from 24 candidate genes selected on the basis of the exome sequencing data in 2,248 unrelated coeliac cases and 2,230 controls. 1,335 variants with a 99.9% genotyping call rate were observed in 4,478 samples, of which 939 were present in coding regions of 24 genes (Ti/Tv 2.99). 91.7% of coding variants were rare (MAF <0.5%) and 60% were novel. Gene burden tests performed on rare functional variants identified no significant associations (p<1×10(-3)) in the resequenced candidate genes. Our strategy of sequencing multiply affected families with deep follow up of candidate genes has not identified any new CeD risk mutations.

  15. Age distribution of human gene families shows significant roles of both large- and small-scale duplications in vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xun; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Jianying

    2002-06-01

    The classical (two-round) hypothesis of vertebrate genome duplication proposes two successive whole-genome duplication(s) (polyploidizations) predating the origin of fishes, a view now being seriously challenged. As the debate largely concerns the relative merits of the 'big-bang mode' theory (large-scale duplication) and the 'continuous mode' theory (constant creation by small-scale duplications), we tested whether a significant proportion of paralogous genes in the contemporary human genome was indeed generated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. After an extensive search of major databases, we dated 1,739 gene duplication events from the phylogenetic analysis of 749 vertebrate gene families. We found a pattern characterized by two waves (I, II) and an ancient component. Wave I represents a recent gene family expansion by tandem or segmental duplications, whereas wave II, a rapid paralogous gene increase in the early stage of vertebrate evolution, supports the idea of genome duplication(s) (the big-bang mode). Further analysis indicated that large- and small-scale gene duplications both make a significant contribution during the early stage of vertebrate evolution to build the current hierarchy of the human proteome.

  16. Cbl-family ubiquitin ligases and their recruitment of CIN85 are largely dispensable for epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Gulzar; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Schulte, Nancy A.; Nadeau, Scott; Luan, Haitao; Zutshi, Neha; Tom, Eric; Ortega-Cava, Cesar; Tu, Chun; Sanada, Masashi; Ogawa, Seishi; Toews, Myron L.; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Casitas B-Lineage Lymphoma (Cbl) family (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) of ubiquitin ligases serve as negative regulators of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). An essential role of Cbl-family protein-dependent ubiquitination for efficient ligand-induced lysosomal targeting and degradation is now well-accepted. However, a more proximal role of Cbl and Cbl-b as adapters for CIN85-endophilin recruitment to mediate ligand-induced initial internalization of RTKs is supported by some studies but refuted by others. Overexpression and/or incomplete depletion of Cbl proteins in these studies is likely to have contributed to this dichotomy. To address the role of endogenous Cbl and Cbl-b in the internalization step of RTK endocytic traffic, we established Cbl/Cbl-b double-knockout (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and demonstrated that these cells lack the expression of both Cbl-family members as well as endophilin A, while they express CIN85. We show that ligand-induced ubiquitination of EGFR, as a prototype RTK, was abolished in DKO MEFs, and EGFR degradation was delayed. These traits were reversed by ectopic human Cbl expression. EGFR endocytosis, assessed using the internalization of 125I-labeled or fluorescent EGF, or of EGFR itself, was largely retained in Cbl/Cbl-b DKO compared to wild type MEFs. EGFR internalization was also largely intact in Cbl/Cbl-b depleted MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cell line. Inducible shRNA-mediated knockdown of CIN85 in wild type or Cbl/Cbl-b DKO MEFs had no impact on EGFR internalization. Our findings, establish that, at physiological expression levels, Cbl, Cbl-b and CIN85 are largely dispensable for EGFR internalization. Our results support the model that Cbl-CIN85-endophilin complex is not required for efficient internalization of EGFR, a prototype RTK. PMID:25449262

  17. A family of derivative-free conjugate gradient methods for large-scale nonlinear systems of equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wanyou; Xiao, Yunhai; Hu, Qing-Jie

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a family of derivative-free conjugate gradient methods for large-scale nonlinear systems of equations. They come from two modified conjugate gradient methods [W.Y. Cheng, A two term PRP based descent Method, Numer. Funct. Anal. Optim. 28 (2007) 1217-1230; L. Zhang, W.J. Zhou, D.H. Li, A descent modified Polak-Ribiére-Polyak conjugate gradient method and its global convergence, IMA J. Numer. Anal. 26 (2006) 629-640] recently proposed for unconstrained optimization problems. Under appropriate conditions, the global convergence of the proposed method is established. Preliminary numerical results show that the proposed method is promising.

  18. A large gene family in fission yeast encodes spore killers that subvert Mendel’s law

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen; Jiang, Zhao-Di; Suo, Fang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; He, Wan-Zhong; Du, Li-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Spore killers in fungi are selfish genetic elements that distort Mendelian segregation in their favor. It remains unclear how many species harbor them and how diverse their mechanisms are. Here, we discover two spore killers from a natural isolate of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both killers belong to the previously uncharacterized wtf gene family with 25 members in the reference genome. These two killers act in strain-background-independent and genome-location-independent manners to perturb the maturation of spores not inheriting them. Spores carrying one killer are protected from its killing effect but not that of the other killer. The killing and protecting activities can be uncoupled by mutation. The numbers and sequences of wtf genes vary considerably between S. pombe isolates, indicating rapid divergence. We propose that wtf genes contribute to the extensive intraspecific reproductive isolation in S. pombe, and represent ideal models for understanding how segregation-distorting elements act and evolve. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26057.001 PMID:28631610

  19. Diagnosis implications of the whole genome sequencing in a large Lebanese family with hyaline fibromatosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Zahraa; Temanni, Ramzi; Chouery, Eliane; Jitesh, Puthen; Liu, Wei; Al-Ali, Rashid; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Jalkh, Nadine; Haddad, Soha; Haidar, Wassim; Chouchane, Lotfi; Mégarbané, André

    2017-01-19

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (HFS) is a recently introduced alternative term for two disorders that were previously known as juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) and infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH). These two variants are secondary to mutations in the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene (ANTXR2) located on chromosome 4q21. The main clinical features of both entities include papular and/or nodular skin lesions, gingival hyperplasia, joint contractures and osteolytic bone lesions that appear in the first few years of life, and the syndrome typically progresses with the appearance of new lesions. We describe five Lebanese patients from one family, aged between 28 and 58 years, and presenting with nodular and papular skin lesions, gingival hyperplasia, joint contractures and bone lesions. Because of the particular clinical features and the absence of a clinical diagnosis, Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) was carried out on DNA samples from the proband and his parents. A mutation in ANTXR2 (p. Gly116Val) that yielded a diagnosis of HFS was noted. The main goal of this paper is to add to the knowledge related to the clinical and radiographic aspects of HFS in adulthood and to show the importance of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques in resolving such puzzling cases.

  20. A large family of Dscam genes with tandemly arrayed 5′ cassettes in Chelicerata

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yuan; Meng, Yijun; Ma, Hongru; Hou, Shouqing; Cao, Guozheng; Hong, Weiling; Shi, Yang; Guo, Pengjuan; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Feng; Yang, Yun; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila Dscam1 (Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecules) and vertebrate clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) are two classic examples of the extraordinary isoform diversity from a single genomic locus. Dscam1 encodes 38,016 distinct isoforms via mutually exclusive splicing in D. melanogaster, while the vertebrate clustered Pcdhs utilize alternative promoters to generate isoform diversity. Here we reveal a shortened Dscam gene family with tandemly arrayed 5′ cassettes in Chelicerata. These cassette repeats generally comprise two or four exons, corresponding to variable Immunoglobulin 7 (Ig7) or Ig7–8 domains of Drosophila Dscam1. Furthermore, extraordinary isoform diversity has been generated through a combination of alternating promoter and alternative splicing. These sDscams have a high sequence similarity with Drosophila Dscam1, and share striking organizational resemblance to the 5′ variable regions of vertebrate clustered Pcdhs. Hence, our findings have important implications for understanding the functional similarities between Drosophila Dscam1 and vertebrate Pcdhs, and may provide further mechanistic insights into the regulation of isoform diversity. PMID:27080167

  1. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion.

    PubMed Central

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W. L.; Allinson, P. S.; Blanton, S. H.; von Kap-Herr, C.; Kelly, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8651300

  2. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Application of next‑generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis in a large family with osteogenesis imperfecta type I.

    PubMed

    Ni, Mengxia; Ding, Hao; Liu, Shuaimei; Zhu, Peiran; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Weijun; Xia, Xinyi

    2017-09-07

    Increased bone fragility and low bone mass are common features of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), which is associated with connective tissue. Its type is distinguished by clinical phenotypes and molecular genetics. Although fifteen types (I‑XV) of OI have been identified at present, the majority of patients are diagnosed as OI type I‑IV. Type I collagen is responsible for OI type I‑IV, consists of α1 (I) and α2 (I) chains and is encoded by COL1A1 and COL1A2. To identify the pathogenic gene of a large Chinese family with OI type I and explain genetic heterogeneity of the patients, next‑generation sequencing (NGS) was conducted in a female with OI type I and her affected niece and daughter to search for the mutation. Subsequently, it was confirmed in other family members by Sanger sequencing. Analysis of COL1A1 gene identified a splicing mutation (c.471+1G>A, also termed IVS5+1G>A) that converted the 5' end of intron 5 from GT to AT. The current study aimed to investigate why there are different phenotypes with the same mutation observed within the same OI pedigree, and the results suggested that there may be environmental factors involved. The present study provided genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for the family members, however additionally provided insight into the phenotype‑genotype association in OI.

  4. Suicide rate among former Swedish peacekeeping personnel.

    PubMed

    Michel, Per-Olof; Lundin, Tom; Larsson, Gerry

    2007-03-01

    Increased suicide rates for military personnel suffering from post-traumatic stress disorders have been reported in various countries. Although it is known that some peacekeepers are exposed to potentially traumatic events and are thus at risk of suffering from post-traumatic stress reactions, only a few studies have examined suicide rates in this group. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the suicide rate among former Swedish peacekeeping personnel. We compared 39,768 former Swedish peacekeepers to the general population in the National General Population Registry and the Cause-of-Death Registry. A lower number of suicides was found among former Swedish peacekeepers than in the general population. In conclusion, Swedish personnel serving in international peace-keeping operations do not show a higher suicide rate than the general population. Unique problems associated with this research area are discussed.

  5. A large deletion of the AVPR2 gene causing severe nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Turkish family.

    PubMed

    Saglar, Emel; Deniz, Ferhat; Erdem, Beril; Karaduman, Tugce; Yönem, Arif; Cagiltay, Eylem; Mergen, Hatice

    2014-05-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare hereditary disease caused by mutations in arginine vasopressin type 2 receptor (AVPR2) and characterized by the production of large amounts of urine and an inability to concentrate urine in response to the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. We have identified a novel 388 bp deletion starting in intron 1 and ending in exon 2 in the AVPR2 gene in a patient with NDI and in his family. We have revealed that this mutation is a de novo mutation for the mother of the proband patient. Prospective clinical data were collected for all family members. The water deprivation test confirmed the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus. The patient has severe symptoms like deep polyuria nocturia, polydipsia, and fatigue. He was given arginine vasopressin treatment while he was a child. However, he could not get well due to his nephrogenic type of illness. Both of his nephews have the same complains in addition to failure to grow. We have sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of the AVPR2 gene of all family members. The analyses of bioinformatics and comparative genomics of the deletion were done via considering the DNA level damage. AVPR2 gene mutation results in the absence of the three transmembrane domains, two extracellular domains, and one cytoplasmic domain. Three-dimensional protein structure prediction was shown. We concluded that X-linked NDI and severity of illness in this family is caused by a novel 388 bp deletion in the AVPR2 gene that is predicted to truncate the receptor protein, and also this deletion may lead to dysfunctioning in protein activity and inefficient or inadequate binding abilities.

  6. Evolutionary expansion and divergence in a large family of primate-specific zinc finger transcription factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, A T; Huntley, S; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Baggott, D; Gordon, L; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-28

    Although most genes are conserved as one-to-one orthologs in different mammalian orders, certain gene families have evolved to comprise different numbers and types of protein-coding genes through independent series of gene duplications, divergence and gene loss in each evolutionary lineage. One such family encodes KRAB-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) genes, which are likely to function as transcriptional repressors. One KRAB-ZNF subfamily, the ZNF91 clade, has expanded specifically in primates to comprise more than 110 loci in the human genome, yielding large gene clusters in human chromosomes 19 and 7 and smaller clusters or isolated copies at other chromosomal locations. Although phylogenetic analysis indicates that many of these genes arose before the split between old world monkeys and new world monkeys, the ZNF91 subfamily has continued to expand and diversify throughout the evolution of apes and humans. The paralogous loci are distinguished by sequence divergence within their zinc finger arrays indicating a selection for proteins with different DNA binding specificities. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization data show that some of these ZNF genes can have tissue-specific expression patterns, however many KRAB-ZNFs that are near-ubiquitous could also be playing very specific roles in halting target pathways in all tissues except for a few, where the target is released by the absence of its repressor. The number of variant KRAB-ZNF proteins is increased not only because of the large number of loci, but also because many loci can produce multiple splice variants, which because of the modular structure of these genes may have separate and perhaps even conflicting regulatory roles. The lineage-specific duplication and rapid divergence of this family of transcription factor genes suggests a role in determining species-specific biological differences and the evolution of novel primate traits.

  7. Family structure and phylogenetic analysis of odorant receptor genes in the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chemosensory receptors, which are all G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), come in four types: odorant receptors (ORs), vomeronasal receptors, trace-amine associated receptors and formyl peptide receptor-like proteins. The ORs are the most important receptors for detecting a wide range of environmental chemicals in daily life. Most fish OR genes have been identified from genome databases following the completion of the genome sequencing projects of many fishes. However, it remains unclear whether these OR genes from the genome databases are actually expressed in the fish olfactory epithelium. Thus, it is necessary to clone the OR mRNAs directly from the olfactory epithelium and to examine their expression status. Results Eighty-nine full-length and 22 partial OR cDNA sequences were isolated from the olfactory epithelium of the large yellow croaker, Larimichthys crocea. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis classified the vertebrate OR genes into two types, with several clades within each type, and showed that the L. crocea OR genes of each type are more closely related to those of fugu, pufferfish and stickleback than they are to those of medaka, zebrafish and frog. The reconciled tree showed 178 duplications and 129 losses. The evolutionary relationships among OR genes in these fishes accords with their evolutionary history. The fish OR genes have experienced functional divergence, and the different clades of OR genes have evolved different functions. The result of real-time PCR shows that different clades of ORs have distinct expression levels. Conclusion We have shown about 100 OR genes to be expressed in the olfactory epithelial tissues of L. crocea. The OR genes of modern fishes duplicated from their common ancestor, and were expanded over evolutionary time. The OR genes of L. crocea are closely related to those of fugu, pufferfish and stickleback, which is consistent with its evolutionary position. The different expression levels of OR genes of large

  8. Large plasmids of Escherichia coli and Salmonella encode highly diverse arrays of accessory genes on common replicon families.

    PubMed

    Williams, Laura E; Wireman, Joy; Hilliard, Valda C; Summers, Anne O

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are important in evolution and adaptation of host bacteria, yet we lack a comprehensive picture of their own natural variation. We used replicon typing and RFLP analysis to assess diversity and distribution of plasmids in the ECOR, SARA, SARB and SARC reference collections of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Plasmids, especially large (≥30 kb) plasmids, are abundant in these collections. Host species and genotype clearly impact plasmid prevalence; plasmids are more abundant in ECOR than SAR, but, within ECOR, subgroup B2 strains have the fewest large plasmids. The majority of large plasmids have unique RFLP patterns, suggesting high variation, even within dominant replicon families IncF and IncI1. We found only four conserved plasmid types within ECOR, none of which are widely distributed. Within SAR, conserved plasmid types are primarily serovar-specific, including a pSLT-like plasmid in 13 Typhimurium strains. Conservation of pSLT contrasts with variability of other plasmids, suggesting evolution of serovar-specific virulence plasmids is distinct from that of most enterobacterial plasmids. We sequenced a conserved serovar Heidelberg plasmid but did not detect virulence or antibiotic resistance genes. Our data illustrate the high degree of natural variation in large plasmids of E. coli and Salmonella, even among plasmids sharing backbone genes.

  9. Radiological protection of the environment from the Swedish point of view.

    PubMed

    Hohm, Lars-Erik; Hubbard, Lynn; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve

    2002-09-01

    The current system of radiological protection is aimed at protecting human health, and largely neglects both the effects of radiation on the environment and the managerial aspects of environmental protection. The Swedish Radiation Protection Act was revised in 1988 and includes environmental protection as one of its aims. In practice, little guidance had been given in the regulations based on the Act until 1998, when the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) formulated environmental aims in its regulations concerning protection of human health and the environment in connection to the final management of spent nuclear fuel and waste. These regulations focus on protection of biodiversity and biological resources, based on ecosystem characterisation. In a broader perspective, the Swedish Parliament established 15 national environmental quality objectives in 1999, covering all aspects of protecting the environment, including the effects of radiation. This paper reviews the background for radiological protection of the environment from both an international and a Swedish perspective, describing the aims and current activities in establishing a system for assessing environmental effects and their consequences that can be used in decision-making. Such activities are largely a result of the European Union research project FASSET (Framework for Assessment of Environmental Impact), carried out under the 5th Framework Programme of the Union. This work is complemented at the Swedish national level by government support to initiate a national environmental monitoring and assessment programme for characterising the radiation environment, which will provide the foundation for decision-making.

  10. Mastitis control in Swedish dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, C; Emanuelson, U

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which preventive measures targeting mastitis are implemented in Swedish dairy herds with different housing and milking systems. Data were collected through a self-administered postal questionnaire sent to 898 dairy farmers, stratified by housing and milking system, in May 2011. The questionnaire contained general questions about the herd and the person responsible for the udder health of the cows, and specific questions about perceived udder health and the implementation of preventive measures. The response rate was 48%. The median herd size of participating herds was 80 cows, and the median herd average milk yield per cow was 9,586 kg of milk. External validity was assessed by comparing participating herds with nonresponders in respect to key performance indicators in the Swedish official milk recording system; no significant differences were found. When herds with combined systems had been removed, 400 herds with tiestalls and pipeline milking, freestalls and parlor milking, and freestalls with an automatic milking system remained. Differences between herd types were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Fisher's exact test. The results showed that herd types differed in their rates of implementation of different preventive measures. Freestall herds with milking parlors implemented more preventive measures related to milking hygiene and milking routines than did tiestall herds. A milking order based on the udder health status of the cows was frequently implemented in tiestall herds, but not in most herds with an automatic milking system or most freestall herds with milking parlors. Irrespective of herd type, the proportion of herds in which cows were kept standing for at least 30 min after milking was low. A substantial proportion of herds ignored the udder health status of lactating cows when grouping them, and few herds grouped dry cows according to udder health status, although this occurred more frequently in

  11. p300 family members associate with the carboxyl terminus of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lill, N L; Tevethia, M J; Eckner, R; Livingston, D M; Modjtahedi, N

    1997-01-01

    Several cellular polypeptides critical for growth regulation interact with DNA tumor virus oncoproteins. p400 is a cellular protein which binds to the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein(s). The biological function of p400 is not yet known, but it is structurally and immunologically closely related to p300 and CREB-binding protein, two known E1A-binding transcription adapters. Like p300, p400 is a phosphoprotein that binds to the simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T). In anti-T coimmunoprecipitation experiments, staggered deletions spanning the amino-terminal 250 amino acids of T did not abrogate T binding to either p400 or p300. A T species composed of residues 251 to 708 bound both p400 and p300, while a T species defective in p53 binding was unable to bind either detectably. Anti-p53 immunoprecipitates prepared from cells containing wild-type T also contained p400 and p300. Hence, both p400 and p300 can bind (directly or indirectly) to a carboxyl-terminal fragment of T which contains its p53 binding domain. Since the p53 binding domain of T contributes to its immortalizing and transforming activities, T-p400 and/or T-p300 interactions may participate in these functions. PMID:8985331

  12. The in vitro toxicology of Swedish snus

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Christopher R. E.; Ballantyne, Mark; Curvall, Margareta; Rutqvist, Lars-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Three commercial brands of Swedish snus (SWS), an experimental SWS, and the 2S3 reference moist snuff were each tested in four in vitro toxicology assays. These assays were: Salmonella reverse mutation, mouse lymphoma, in vitro micronucleus, and cytotoxicity. Water extractions of each of the 5 products were tested using several different concentrations; the experimental SWS was also extracted using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Extraction procedures were verified by nicotine determinations. Results for SWS in the mutagenicity assays were broadly negative: there were occasional positive responses, but these were effectively at the highest concentration only (concentrations well above those suggested by regulatory guidelines), and were often associated with cytotoxicity. The 2S3 reference was unequivocally positive in one of the three conditions of the micronucleus assay (MNA), at the highest concentration only. Positive controls produced the expected responses in each assay. The SWS data are contrasted with data reported for combusted tobacco in the form of cigarettes, where strongly positive responses have been routinely reported for mutagenicity and cytotoxicity. These negative findings in a laboratory setting concur with the large amount of epidemiological data from Sweden, data showing that SWS are associated with considerably lower carcinogenic potential when compared with cigarettes. PMID:22400986

  13. R47H Variant of TREM2 Associated With Alzheimer Disease in a Large Late-Onset Family

    PubMed Central

    Korvatska, Olena; Leverenz, James B.; Jayadev, Suman; McMillan, Pamela; Kurtz, Irina; Guo, Xindi; Rumbaugh, Malia; Matsushita, Mark; Girirajan, Santhosh; Dorschner, Michael O.; Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Yu, Chang-En; Brkanac, Zoran; Garden, Gwenn A.; Raskind, Wendy H.; Bird, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The R47H variant in the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 gene (TREM2), a modulator of the immune response of microglia, is a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD) and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. Objective To investigate a large family with late-onset AD (LOAD), in which R47H cosegregated with 75% of cases. Design, Setting, and Participants This study includes genetic and pathologic studies of families with LOAD from 1985 to 2014. A total of 131 families with LOAD (751 individuals) were included from the University of Washington Alzheimer Disease Research Center. To identify LOAD genes/risk factors in the LOAD123 family with 21 affected members and 12 autopsies, we sequenced 4 exomes. Candidate variants were tested for cosegregation with the disease. TREM2 R47H was genotyped in an additional 130 families with LOAD. We performed clinical and neuropathological assessments of patients with and without R47H and evaluated the variant's effect on brain pathology, cellular morphology, and expression of microglial markers. Main Outcomes and Measures We assessed the effect of TREM2 genotype on age at onset and disease duration. We compared Braak and Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease scores, presence of α-synuclein and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 aggregates, and additional vascular or Parkinson pathology in TREM2 R47H carriers vs noncarriers. Microglial activation was assessed by quantitative immunohistochemistry and morphometry. Results Twelve of 16 patients with AD in the LOAD123 family carried R47H. Eleven patients with dementia had apolipoprotein E 4 (ApoE4) and R47H genotypes. We also found a rare missense variant, D353N, in a nominated AD risk gene, unc-5 homolog C (UNC5C), in 5 affected individuals in the LOAD123 family. R47H carriers demonstrated a shortened disease duration (mean [SD], 6.7 [2.8] vs 11.1 [6.6] years; 2-tailed t test; P = .04) and more frequent α-synucleinopathy. The

  14. Improved white spruce (Picea glauca) genome assemblies and annotation of large gene families of conifer terpenoid and phenolic defense metabolism.

    PubMed

    Warren, René L; Keeling, Christopher I; Yuen, Macaire Man Saint; Raymond, Anthony; Taylor, Greg A; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Mohamadi, Hamid; Paulino, Daniel; Chiu, Readman; Jackman, Shaun D; Robertson, Gordon; Yang, Chen; Boyle, Brian; Hoffmann, Margarete; Weigel, Detlef; Nelson, David R; Ritland, Carol; Isabel, Nathalie; Jaquish, Barry; Yanchuk, Alvin; Bousquet, Jean; Jones, Steven J M; MacKay, John; Birol, Inanc; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2015-07-01

    White spruce (Picea glauca), a gymnosperm tree, has been established as one of the models for conifer genomics. We describe the draft genome assemblies of two white spruce genotypes, PG29 and WS77111, innovative tools for the assembly of very large genomes, and the conifer genomics resources developed in this process. The two white spruce genotypes originate from distant geographic regions of western (PG29) and eastern (WS77111) North America, and represent elite trees in two Canadian tree-breeding programs. We present an update (V3 and V4) for a previously reported PG29 V2 draft genome assembly and introduce a second white spruce genome assembly for genotype WS77111. Assemblies of the PG29 and WS77111 genomes confirm the reconstructed white spruce genome size in the 20 Gbp range, and show broad synteny. Using the PG29 V3 assembly and additional white spruce genomics and transcriptomics resources, we performed MAKER-P annotation and meticulous expert annotation of very large gene families of conifer defense metabolism, the terpene synthases and cytochrome P450s. We also comprehensively annotated the white spruce mevalonate, methylerythritol phosphate and phenylpropanoid pathways. These analyses highlighted the large extent of gene and pseudogene duplications in a conifer genome, in particular for genes of secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism, and the potential for gain and loss of function for defense and adaptation.

  15. Lipid transfer particle from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is a novel member of the apoB/large lipid transfer protein family[S

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Takeru; Yuasa, Masashi; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Sakudoh, Takashi; Honda, Naoko; Fugo, Hajime; Tsuchida, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer particle (LTP) is a high-molecular-weight, very high-density lipoprotein known to catalyze the transfer of lipids between a variety of lipoproteins, including both insects and vertebrates. Studying the biosynthesis and regulation pathways of LTP in detail has not been possible due to a lack of information regarding the apoproteins. Here, we sequenced the cDNA and deduced amino acid sequences for three apoproteins of LTP from the silkworm (Bombyx mori). The three subunit proteins of the LTP are coded by two genes, apoLTP-II/I and apoLTP-III. ApoLTP-I and apoLTP-II are predicted to be generated by posttranslational cleavage of the precursor protein, apoLTP-II/I. Clusters of amphipathic secondary structure within apoLTP-II/I are similar to Homo sapiens apolipoprotein B (apoB) and insect lipophorins. The apoLTP-II/I gene is a novel member of the apoB/large lipid transfer protein gene family. ApoLTP-III has a putative conserved juvenile hormone-binding protein superfamily domain. Expression of apoLTP-II/I and apoLTP-III genes was synchronized and both genes were primarily expressed in the fat body at the stage corresponding to increased lipid transport needs. We are now in a position to study in detail the physiological role of LTP and its biosynthesis and assembly. PMID:23812557

  16. A global assessment of a large monocot family highlights the need for group-specific analyses of invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Desika; Procheş, Şerban; Wilson, John R. U.

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding biological invasions recently, and one of the key findings is that the determinants of naturalization and invasion success vary from group to group. Here, we explore this variation for one of the largest plant families in the world, the Araceae. This group provides an excellent opportunity for identifying determinants of invasiveness in herbaceous plants, since it is one of the families most popular with horticulturalists, with species occupying various habitats and comprising many different life forms. We first developed a checklist of 3494 species of Araceae using online databases and literature sources. We aimed to determine whether invasiveness across the introduction–naturalization–invasion continuum is associated to particular traits within the family, and whether analyses focussed on specific life forms can reveal any mechanistic correlates. Boosted regression tree models were based on species invasion statuses as the response variables, and traits associated with human use, biological characteristics and distribution as the explanatory variables. The models indicate that biological traits such as plant life form and pollinator type are consistently strong correlates of invasiveness. Additionally, large-scale correlates such as the number of native floristic regions and number of introduced regions are also influential at particular stages in the invasion continuum. We used these traits to build a phenogram showing groups defined by the similarity of characters. We identified nine groups that have a greater tendency to invasiveness (including Alocasia, the Lemnoideae and Epipremnum). From this, we propose a list of species that are not currently invasive for which we would recommend a precautionary approach to be taken. The successful management of plant invasions will depend on understanding such context-dependent effects across taxonomic groups, and across the different stages of the invasion process

  17. Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis of Quantitative Biomarker Traits of Osteoarthritis in a Large Multigenerational Extended Family

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiang-Cheng; Kraus, Virginia Byers; Li, Yi-Ju; Nelson, Sarah; Haynes, Carol; Johnson, Jessica; Stabler, Thomas; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Gregory, Simon G.; Kraus, William E.; Shah, Svati H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The genetic contributions to the multifactorial disorder osteoarthritis (OA) have been increasingly recognized. Our goal was to use OA-related biomarkers of severity and disease burden as quantitative traits to identify genetic susceptibility loci for OA. Methods In a large multigenerational extended family (CARRIAGE family, n=350), we measured five OA-related biomarkers: HA (hyaluronan), COMP (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein), PIIANP (type IIA collagen N-propeptide), CPII (type II procollagen carboxy-propeptide), and C2C (type II collagen cleavage neoepitope). SNP markers (6,090) covering the whole genome were genotyped using the Illumina HumanLinkage-12 BeadChip. Variance components analysis as implemented in SOLAR was used to estimate heritabilities of the quantitative traits, and to calculate two-point and multi-point LOD scores using a polygenic model. Results Four of the five biomarkers showed significant heritability (p<0.01 age and sex adjusted h2r: PIIANP 0.57, HA 0.49, COMP 0.43, C2C 0.30). Fourteen of the 19 loci with multi-point LOD scores >1.5 were near or overlapped previously reported OA susceptibility loci. Four of these loci were identified by more than one biomarker. The maximum multi-point LOD scores for the heritable quantitative biomarker traits were LOD 4.3 for PIIANP (chromosome 8p23.2); LOD 3.2 for COMP (chromosome 8q11.1); LOD 2.0 for HA (chromosome 6q16.3); LOD 2.0 for C2C (chromosome 5q31.2). Conclusions We report the first evidence of genetic susceptibility loci identified by OA-related biomarkers in an extended family. Serum concentrations of PIIANP, HA, COMP and C2C have substantial heritable components and identified several genetic loci potentially contributing to the genetic diversity of OA. PMID:20187133

  18. A novel MSX1 intronic mutation associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic oligodontia in a large Chinese family pedigree.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jinjie; Gao, Qingping; Huang, Yanru; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Pu; Cram, David S; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2016-10-01

    Tooth agenesis is a common developmental dental anomaly. The aim of the study was to identify the causal genetic mutation in a four-generation Chinese family affected with non-syndromic autosomal dominant tooth agenesis. Genome-wide scanning was performed using the Illumina Linkage-12 array. Genotyping of short tandem repeat markers was used to finely map the causative locus. Haplotype analysis and Sanger sequencing was performed to precisely locate the position and nature of the gene defect. Clinical examination of the available 23 family members showed variable tooth agenesis in 10 subjects, ranging from oligodontia to mild hypodontia. Genome-wide scanning and haplotype analyses identified the 4p16.1-p16.3 region with a maximum multi-point LOD score of 3.50, which overlapped with the MSX1 gene. A single heterozygous point mutation IVS1-5 G>A in the MSX1 gene was exclusively detected in the 10 family members affected with tooth agenesis. Sequencing of MSX1 cDNA revealed that the intronic mutation did not affect the normal splicing pattern of the pre-mRNA. However, real-time qPCR analysis of lymphocyte RNA showed that the level of MSX1 mRNA was significantly decreased in individuals heterozygous for the mutation. We identified and characterized a novel intronic mutation in the MSX1 gene in a large Chinese pedigree, adding to the small repertoire of MSX1 mutations associated with autosomal dominant tooth agenesis. We hypothesize that the variable degree of tooth agenesis observed in each affected individual may be due to sub-optimal levels of MSX1 expression during critical stages tooth development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel presenilin 1 mutation (L174 M) in a large Cuban family with early onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bertoli Avella, A M; Marcheco Teruel, B; Llibre Rodriguez, J J; Gomez Viera, N; Borrajero Martinez, I; Severijnen, E A; Joosse, M; van Duijn, C M; Heredero Baute, L; Heutink, P

    2002-10-01

    We studied a Cuban family with presenile dementia (autosomal dominant) consisting of 281 members within six generations, the proband descended from a Spanish founder. Mean age at onset was 59 years of age. Memory impairment was the main symptom in all patients, additionally, ischemic episodes were described in 4 (n = 18) patients. Neuropathological examination of brain material (1 patient) revealed neuronal loss, amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Thirty DNA samples were genotyped (regions on chromosome 1, 3, 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 20, and 21). A maximum Lod score of 3.79 at theta = 0 was obtained for marker D14S43, located in a 9-cM interval in which all patients shared the same haplotype. Sequencing of the PSEN1 gene revealed a heterozygous base substitution, C520A (exon 6), which is predicted to cause an amino acid change from leucine to methionine in the TMIII of the presenilin 1 protein. The mutation was found to co-segregate with the disease phenotype and the associated disease haplotype. The C --> A change was not observed in 80 control chromosomes from the Cuban population. Leucine at position 174 is highly conserved among species and is identical in presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 proteins. We propose the L174 M mutation might lead to an abnormal N-terminal and probably C-terminal fragments and malfunction of the protein complex. In conclusion, we found a novel PSEN1 mutation in a large family with clinical and pathological diagnosis of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, which may be relevant for other Hispanic populations.

  20. Co-sleeping as a window into Swedish culture: considerations of gender and health care.

    PubMed

    Welles-Nystrom, Barbara

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the Swedish practice of co-sleeping and relate it to the cultural discourse on the gendered family and health. The Swedish study, part of the International Study of Parents, Children and Schools, focuses on some Western parents' ideas about health, child development, child-rearing goals and parental practices. It also addressed specific questions regarding parents' theories about the nature, gender and frequency of co-sleeping in Swedish families. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected with five cohorts of parents and their 60 children who ranged in age from 6 months to 8 years. The sample was balanced for sex and birth order. Parents completed batteries of standardized questionnaires and they were interviewed about their beliefs and practices related to child rearing and child development. A questionnaire about co-sleeping was sent post hoc to the families. The results showed that Swedish children often co-sleep with both their parents until school age, when more boys than girls cease the practice. This is an important finding, because much of the literature suggests that this practice exists primarily for infants in non-Western cultures who co-sleep with their mothers. Co-sleeping in Sweden is perceived as a normal family activity, which differed from the other societies studied. Thus, the study of practice has important methodological implications. When a family practice is studied, carefully documented and understood in its many dimensions, it provides a window into the culture in which the practice is embedded and may explain how gender relates to the practice. For health-care professionals who encounter families from diverse cultural backgrounds, this methodological approach illustrates how parenting practices relate to health-care issues.

  1. Birth order and physical fitness in early adulthood: evidence from Swedish military conscription data.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Kieron; Myrskylä, Mikko

    2014-12-01

    Physical fitness at young adult ages is an important determinant of physical health, cognitive ability, and mortality. However, few studies have addressed the relationship between early life conditions and physical fitness in adulthood. An important potential factor influencing physical fitness is birth order, which prior studies associate with several early- and later-life outcomes such as height and mortality. This is the first study to analyse the association between birth order and physical fitness in late adolescence. We use military conscription data on 218,873 Swedish males born between 1965 and 1977. Physical fitness is measured by a test of maximal working capacity, a measure of cardiovascular fitness closely related to V02max. We use linear regression with sibling fixed effects, meaning a within-family comparison, to eliminate the confounding influence of unobserved factors that vary between siblings. To understand the mechanism we further analyse whether the association between birth order and physical fitness varies by sibship size, parental socioeconomic status, birth cohort or length of the birth interval. We find a strong, negative and monotonic relationship between birth order and physical fitness. For example, third-born children have a maximal working capacity approximately 0.1 (p < 0.000) standard deviations lower than first-born children. The association exists both in small (3 or less children) and large families (4 or more children), in high and low socioeconomic status families, and amongst cohorts born in the 1960s and the 1970s. While in the whole population the birth order effect does not depend on the length of the birth intervals, in two-child families a longer birth interval strengthens the advantage of the first-born. Our results illustrate the importance of birth order for physical fitness, and suggest that the first-born advantage already arises in late adolescence.

  2. The association between height and birth order: evidence from 652,518 Swedish men.

    PubMed

    Myrskylä, Mikko; Silventoinen, Karri; Jelenkovic, Aline; Tynelius, Per; Rasmussen, Finn

    2013-07-01

    Birth order is associated with outcomes such as birth weight and adult socioeconomic position (SEP), but little is known about the association with adult height. This potential birth order-height association is important because height predicts health, and because the association may help explain population-level height trends. We studied the birth order-height association and whether it varies by family characteristics or birth cohort. We used the Swedish Military Conscription Register to analyse adult height among 652,518 men born in 1951-1983 using fixed effects regression models that compare brothers and account for genetic and social factors shared by brothers. We stratified the analysis by family size, parental SEP and birth cohort. We compared models with and without birth weight and birth length controls. Unadjusted analyses showed no differences between the first two birth orders but in the fixed effects regression, birth orders 2, 3 and 4 were associated with 0.4, 0.7 and 0.8 cm (p<0.001 for each) shorter height than birth order 1, respectively. The associations were similar in large and small and high-SEP and low-SEP families, but were attenuated in recent cohorts. Birth characteristics did not explain these associations. Birth order is an important determinant of height. The height difference between birth orders 3 and 1 is larger than the population-level height increase achieved over 10 years. The attenuation of the effect over cohorts may reflect improvements in living standards. Decreases in family size may explain some of the secular-height increases in countries with decreasing fertility.

  3. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere. PMID:27081534

  4. A Large Expansion of the HSFY Gene Family in Cattle Shows Dispersion across Yq and Testis-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Christine K.; Revay, Tamas; Domander, Robin; Favetta, Laura A.; King, W. Allan

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factor, Y-linked (HSFY) is a member of the heat shock transcriptional factor (HSF) family that is found in multiple copies on the Y chromosome and conserved in a number of species. Its function still remains unknown but in humans it is thought to play a role in spermatogenesis. Through real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses we determined that the HSFY family is largely expanded in cattle (∼70 copies) compared with human (2 functional copies, 4 HSFY-similar copies). Unexpectedly, we found that it does not vary among individual bulls as a copy number variant (CNV). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we found that the copies are dispersed along the long arm of the Y chromosome (Yq). HSFY expression in cattle appears restricted to the testis and its mRNA correlates positively with mRNA markers of spermatogonial and spermatocyte cells (UCHL1 and TRPC2, respectively) which suggests that HSFY is expressed (at least in part) in early germ cells. PMID:21408193

  5. Description of a large family with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia associated with the APOE p.Leu167del mutation.

    PubMed

    Marduel, Marie; Ouguerram, Khadija; Serre, Valérie; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Erik Berge, Knut; Devillers, Martine; Luc, Gérald; Lecerf, Jean-Michel; Tosolini, Laurent; Erlich, Danièle; Peloso, Gina M; Stitziel, Nathan; Nitchké, Patrick; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Abifadel, Marianne; Kathiresan, Sekar; Leren, Trond Paul; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E mutants are associated with type III hyperlipoproteinemia characterized by high cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), due to the mutations in the LDLR, APOB, or PCSK9 genes, is characterized by an isolated elevation of cholesterol due to the high levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs). We now report an exceptionally large family including 14 members with ADH. Through genome-wide mapping, analysis of regional/functional candidate genes, and whole exome sequencing, we identified a mutation in the APOE gene, c.500_502delTCC/p.Leu167del, previously reported associated with sea-blue histiocytosis and familial combined hyperlipidemia. We confirmed the involvement of the APOE p.Leu167del in ADH, with (1) a predicted destabilization of an alpha-helix in the binding domain, (2) a decreased apo E level in LDLs, and (3) a decreased catabolism of LDLs. Our results show that mutations in the APOE gene can be associated with bona fide ADH.

  6. Gene structure, chromosomal localization, and expression pattern of Capn12, a new member of the calpain large subunit gene family.

    PubMed

    Dear, T N; Meier, N T; Hunn, M; Boehm, T

    2000-09-01

    We report the identification of mouse Capn12, a new member of the calpain large subunit gene family. It possesses potential protease and calcium-binding domains, features typical of the classical calpains. In situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis demonstrate that during the anagen phase of the hair cycle the cortex of the hair follicle is the major expression site of Capn12. The gene was sequenced in its entirety and consists of 21 exons spanning 13 kb with an exon-intron structure typical of the calpain gene family. The last exon of the mouse Actn4 gene overlaps the 3' end of Capn12 but in the opposite orientation. This overlap between the two genes is conserved in the human genome. Three versions of the Capn12 mRNA transcript were identified. They occur as a result of alternative splicing, and two of these encode a protein lacking the C-terminal calmodulin-like domain. Radiation hybrid mapping localized Capn12 to mouse chromosome 7, closely linked to a marker positioned at 10.4 cM. Refined mapping of Capn5, also previously localized to chromosome 7, indicated that it was not closely linked to Capn12, mapping tightly linked to a marker positioned at 48.5 cM.

  7. Voice handicap index in Swedish.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Ann-Christine; Dotevall, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a Swedish version of the voice handicap index questionnaire (Sw-VHI). A total of 57 adult, dysphonic patients and 15 healthy controls completed the Sw-VHI and rated the degree of vocal fatigue and hoarseness on visual analogue scales. A perceptual voice evaluation was also performed. Test-retest reliability was analyzed in 38 subjects without voice complaints. Sw-VHI distinguished between dysphonic subjects and controls (P<0.001). The internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha > 0.84) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.75) were good. Only moderate or weak correlations were found between Sw-VHI and the subjective and perceptual voice ratings. The data indicate that a difference above 13 points for the total Sw-VHI score and above 6 points for the Sw-VHI subscales is significant for an individual when comparing two different occasions. In conclusion, the Sw-VHI appears to be a robust instrument for assessment of the psycho-social impact of a voice disorder. However, Sw-VHI seems to, at least partly, capture different aspects of voice function to the subjective voice ratings and the perceptual voice evaluation.

  8. Swedish students' attitudes toward abortion.

    PubMed

    Lindell, M E; Olsson, H M

    1993-01-01

    The Swedish abortion legislation of 1975 gave women the right to make a decision about abortion before the end of the 18th week of pregnancy. The number of abortions is rising in Sweden as a chosen method of birth control. The attitudes of students toward abortion were studied in 1986-1987. A questionnaire containing items on how sex education is taught, the anatomy and physiology of reproduction, contraceptives, sexually transmitted diseases, and legal abortion was answered by 421 high school students. Results pertaining to the students' attitudes toward abortion are reported. Two thirds of the students believed that the decision about an abortion should be made by the man and woman together. Nearly all respondents believed that abortion should not be considered a method of birth control. These results may be considered a guide for interventions to prevent the need for abortion. One fourth of all pregnancies in Sweden terminate in abortion. The students in the present study thought of abortion as a solution. Authors studying samples with different cultural backgrounds have reported similar attitudes.

  9. Swedish health care in perspective.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O W

    1992-01-01

    The evolution and current problems of the Swedish health services are placed in an international comparative perspective with other industrially developed democratic states as to cost control, distribution of facilities and personnel, management of waiting lists for services, and differences in use of services. All of these countries are experiencing the same aforementioned problems differing mainly in degree. It is suggested that Sweden as well as other countries needs to reconceptualize the meaning of equality of access relative to the apparent emergence of private insurance as waiting lists grow for quality of life procedures such as lens and hip replacement. A concept of a basic service for everybody and so-called luxury service for those who wish to buy it needs to be faced in political debate. It is clear that government is unable to finance and supply the range of demand of a consumption good represented by a modern medicine. In so far as Sweden has been regarded as a model it appears that no country is a model anymore. The complexities of a modern health service has overwhelmed all countries and can be regarded as a sublime loss of innocence.

  10. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2010-08-17

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  11. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2011-11-23

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 Å crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  12. Utility of large consanguineous family-based model for investigating the genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Al-Sinani, Sawsan; Hassan, Mohammed Othman; Zadjali, Fahad; Al-Yahyaee, Said; Albarwani, Sulayma; Rizvi, Syed; Jaju, Deepali; Comuzzie, Anthony; Voruganti, Venkata Saroja; Bayoumi, Riad

    2014-09-10

    This study examined the utility of a family-based model for replicating the results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In a total of 232 members of a large consanguineous Omani Arab pedigree (age: 16-80years), there were 27 diabetics and 50 prediabetics (17 with impaired fasting glucose and 33 with impaired glucose tolerance). All 232 individuals underwent anthropometric and biochemical investigations and genotyped for 14 known common gene variants of modest effect on T2D risk. Power analysis at a LOD score of 3, gave 80% power to locate a single specific locus that accounts for 52% of the total phenotypic variation. Measured genotype analysis (MGA) was used to determine heritability of various quantitative traits (QTs) which ranged 25-56%. Using MGA, some common gene variants were found to have little (<5%) but significant impact on the heritability of T2D related QTs [KCNJ11 (rs5219), p=0.004]; [IGF2BP2 (rs4402960), p=0.02]; [SLC30A8 (rs13266634), p=0.05]; [CAPN10 (rs2975760), p=0.031]; [FTO (rs8050136), p=0.023]; [FTO (rs9939609), p=0.018] and [SLC30A8 (rs13266634), p=0.05]. Sib-TDT analysis showed that some gene variants were significantly associated with T2D risk but didn't reach the level of significance after Bonferroni correction [KCNJ11 (rs5219), p=0.047] and [CAPN10 (rs41266971), p=0.035]. We have demonstrated that, in principle, a family-based model with minor limitations could be used to replicate some of the results of large GWAS case-control studies. This model could successfully be applied for the future discovery, by deep sequencing, of rare gene variants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. New Family of Quantum Spin Hall Insulators in Two-dimensional Transition-Metal Halide with Large Nontrivial Band Gaps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liujiang; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Yan; Felser, Claudia; Hu, Feiming; Shan, Guangcun; Smith, Sean C; Yan, Binghai; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-12-09

    Topological insulators (TIs) are promising for achieving dissipationless transport devices due to the robust gapless states inside the insulating bulk gap. However, currently realized two-dimensional (2D) TIs, quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators, suffer from ultrahigh vacuum and extremely low temperature. Thus, seeking for desirable QSH insulators with high feasibility of experimental preparation and large nontrivial gap is of great importance for wide applications in spintronics. On the basis of the first-principles calculations, we predict a novel family of 2D QSH insulators in transition-metal halide MX (M = Zr, Hf; X = Cl, Br, and I) monolayers, especially, which is the first case based on transition-metal halide-based QSH insulators. MX family has the large nontrivial gaps of 0.12-0.4 eV, comparable with bismuth (111) bilayer (0.2 eV), stanene (0.3 eV), and larger than ZrTe5 (0.1 eV) monolayers and graphene-based sandwiched heterstructures (30-70 meV). Their corresponding 3D bulk materials are weak topological insulators from stacking QSH layers, and some of bulk compounds have already been synthesized in experiment. The mechanism for 2D QSH effect in this system originates from a novel d-d band inversion, significantly different from conventional band inversion between s-p, p-p, or d-p orbitals. The realization of pure layered MX monolayers may be prepared by exfoliation from their 3D bulk phases, thus holding great promise for nanoscale device applications and stimulating further efforts on transition metal-based QSH materials.

  14. Do Kurdistanian and Swedish parents and children differ in their rating of competence and behavioural problems?

    PubMed

    Wahlsten, Viveka Sundelin; Ahmad, Abdulbaghi; Von Knorring, Anne-Liis

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates child self-rating of behavioural problems and competence as compared with their parents' ratings, in comparative samples of Kurdistanian refugee children in Sweden and a group of Swedish children. Kurdistanian and Swedish comparative samples composed of 32 children each matched in age, sex and trauma level, in the same community, and their parents. Among a large battery of instruments, the child behavioural checklist (CBCL) was used in separate interviews with parents and their children. When compared to the children's self-reported problems scores, the Swedish parents reported significantly lower scores than their children, compared to the Kurdistanian refugee parents. Regardless of cultural backgrounds, there were more similarities than differences in the children's reporting of their behavioural problems and competence. The discrepancy between the Swedish parents' estimation of their children's behavioural problems and the children's self-reported behavioural problems could be an effect of the individualistic nature of Swedish society compared with the more collective nature of Kurdistanian culture. However, the results should be considered hypothesis generating rather than conclusive.

  15. The Analysis Portal and the Swedish LifeWatch e-infrastructure for biodiversity research

    PubMed Central

    Käck, Martin; Karlsson, Björn; Kindvall, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background During the last years, more and more online portals were generated and are now available for ecologists to run advanced models with extensive data sets. Some examples are the Biodiversity Virtual e-Laboratory (BioVel) Portal (https://portal.biovel.eu) for ecological niche modelling and the Mobyle SNAP Workbench (https://snap.hpc.ncsu.edu) for evolutionary and population genetics analysis. Such portals have the main goal to facilitate the run of advanced models, through access to large-capacity computers or servers. In this study, we present the Analysis Portal (www.analysisportal.se), which is a part of the Swedish LifeWatch e-infrastructure for biodiversity research that combines a variety of Swedish web services to perform different kinds of dataprocessing. New information For the first time, the Swedish Analysis Portal for integrated analysis of species occurrence data is described in detail. It was launched in 2013 and today, over 60 Million Swedish species observation records can be assessed, visualized and analyzed via the portal. Datasets can be assembled using sophisticated filtering tools, and combined with environmental and climatic data from a wide range of providers. Different validation tools, for example the official Swedish taxon concept database Dyntaxa, ensure high data quality. Results can be downloaded in different formats as maps, tables, diagrams and reports. PMID:27099553

  16. Large Deviations for Stationary Probabilities of a Family of Continuous Time Markov Chains via Aubry-Mather Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Artur O.; Neumann, Adriana

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, we consider a family of continuous time symmetric random walks indexed by , . For each the matching random walk take values in the finite set of states ; notice that is a subset of , where is the unitary circle. The infinitesimal generator of such chain is denoted by . The stationary probability for such process converges to the uniform distribution on the circle, when . Here we want to study other natural measures, obtained via a limit on , that are concentrated on some points of . We will disturb this process by a potential and study for each the perturbed stationary measures of this new process when . We disturb the system considering a fixed potential and we will denote by the restriction of to . Then, we define a non-stochastic semigroup generated by the matrix , where is the infinifesimal generator of . From the continuous time Perron's Theorem one can normalized such semigroup, and, then we get another stochastic semigroup which generates a continuous time Markov Chain taking values on . This new chain is called the continuous time Gibbs state associated to the potential , see (Lopes et al. in J Stat Phys 152:894-933, 2013). The stationary probability vector for such Markov Chain is denoted by . We assume that the maximum of is attained in a unique point of , and from this will follow that . Thus, here, our main goal is to analyze the large deviation principle for the family , when . The deviation function , which is defined on , will be obtained from a procedure based on fixed points of the Lax-Oleinik operator and Aubry-Mather theory. In order to obtain the associated Lax-Oleinik operator we use the Varadhan's Lemma for the process . For a careful analysis of the problem we present full details of the proof of the Large Deviation Principle, in the Skorohod space, for such family of Markov Chains, when . Finally, we compute the entropy of the invariant probabilities on the Skorohod space associated to the Markov Chains we analyze.

  17. Migration and atopic disorder in Swedish conscripts.

    PubMed

    Hjern, A; Rasmussen, F; Johansson, M; Aberg, N

    1999-08-01

    We have studied asthma and allergic rhinitis prevalence in Swedish conscripts born 1973-1977 according to the military service conscription register in relation to the socio-economic status and country of birth of the conscripts and their parents, and age when granted residency in Sweden. There was an increase in prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis over time in all groups irrespective of country of birth or ethnic origin. Conscripts who themselves were born in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Mediterranean had a significantly lower risk for asthma and allergic rhinitis than Swedish-born conscripts. The risk of atopic disorder among the foreign-born conscripts increased with time of residency in Sweden. Conscripts with mothers from Latin America, Asia and Africa were identified as having the highest risk for atopic disorder among Swedish-born conscripts with high socio-economic status; the adjusted risk ratio (RR) for asthma was 2.6 (95% CI 1.7-4.0) and that for allergic rhinitis was 2.0 (1.5-2.6). The conscripts with mothers from the Mediterranean had the lowest risk for atopic disorders of the Swedish-born conscripts with low socio-economic status; the RR for asthma was 0.43 (0.34-0.56) and that for allergic rhinitis was 0.84 (0.76-0.93). This study demonstrates that factors related to migration and ethnicity are important determinants of atopic disorder among Swedish conscripts.

  18. Review of 103 Swedish Healthcare Quality Registries.

    PubMed

    Emilsson, L; Lindahl, B; Köster, M; Lambe, M; Ludvigsson, J F

    2015-01-01

    In the past two decades, an increasing number of nationwide, Swedish Healthcare Quality Registries (QRs) focusing on specific disorders have been initiated, mostly by physicians. Here, we describe the purpose, organization, variables, coverage and completeness of 103 Swedish QRs. From March to September 2013, we examined the 2012 applications of 103 QRs to the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR) and also studied the annual reports from the same QRs. After initial data abstraction, the coordinator of each QR was contacted at least twice between June and October 2013 and asked to confirm the accuracy of the data retrieved from the applications and reports. About 60% of the QRs covered ≥80% of their target population (completeness). Data recorded in Swedish QRs include aspects of disease management (diagnosis, clinical characteristics, treatment and lead times). In addition, some QRs retrieve data on self-reported quality of life (EQ5D, SF-36 and disease-specific measures), lifestyle (smoking) and general health status (World Health Organization performance status, body mass index and blood pressure). Detailed clinical data available in Swedish QRs complement information from government-administered registries and provide an important source not only for assessment and development of quality of care but also for research. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  19. Issues and Methodologies in Large-Scale Assessments. Special Issue 2: Measuring Students' Family Background in Large-Scale International Education Studies. IERI Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brese, Falk; Mirazchiyski, Plamen

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between students' family background and achievement is often seen as an important topic in regard to equality and equity of educational provision. The results of various education studies show that the family background of students correlates with students' academic achievement at school. This paper focuses on the measurement of…

  20. Paradoxes of Solidarity: Democracy and Colonial Legacies in Swedish Popular Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstedt, Magnus; Nordvall, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, there have been several attempts to spread the "Swedish model" of popular education, that is, study circles and folk high schools, to countries in other parts of the world. In this article, the authors analyze the large-scale project of establishing folk development colleges in Tanzania in the 1970s and 1980s, by…

  1. Governing by Partnerships: Dilemmas in Swedish Education Policy at the Turn of the Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstedt, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, governing through partnerships has become more and more common and is today reflected in a range of policy areas. In the following article, governing through partnerships is analysed in Swedish education policy around the turn of the millennium, where the notion of partnership has had a large impact. Using as its point of…

  2. Paradoxes of Solidarity: Democracy and Colonial Legacies in Swedish Popular Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstedt, Magnus; Nordvall, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, there have been several attempts to spread the "Swedish model" of popular education, that is, study circles and folk high schools, to countries in other parts of the world. In this article, the authors analyze the large-scale project of establishing folk development colleges in Tanzania in the 1970s and 1980s, by…

  3. Cause for Concern or Moral Panic? The Prospects of the Swedish Mods in Retrospect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, Susanne; Nilsson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The Swedish mods of the 1960s frightened the parental generation like few other youth cultures. Was the concern justified--was the mod culture a hotbed of social maladjustment? Or would the mods come to live conventional lives to the same extent as their peers? We present analyses from a large longitudinal study allowing for a follow-up of…

  4. Cause for Concern or Moral Panic? The Prospects of the Swedish Mods in Retrospect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, Susanne; Nilsson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The Swedish mods of the 1960s frightened the parental generation like few other youth cultures. Was the concern justified--was the mod culture a hotbed of social maladjustment? Or would the mods come to live conventional lives to the same extent as their peers? We present analyses from a large longitudinal study allowing for a follow-up of…

  5. Governing by Partnerships: Dilemmas in Swedish Education Policy at the Turn of the Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstedt, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, governing through partnerships has become more and more common and is today reflected in a range of policy areas. In the following article, governing through partnerships is analysed in Swedish education policy around the turn of the millennium, where the notion of partnership has had a large impact. Using as its point of…

  6. WISC-III Index Score Profiles of 520 Swedish Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zander, Eric; Dahlgren, Sven Olof

    2010-01-01

    WISC-III (Wechsler, 1991) index score profiles and their characteristics were examined with traditional statistics in a large Swedish sample consisting of children with autistic disorder (n = 85), Asperger's disorder (n = 341), or pervasive developmental disorders not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS; n = 94). There was a clear and significant…

  7. Genealogy, natural history, and phenotype of Alström syndrome in a large Acadian kindred and three additional families.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J D; Ludman, M D; Shea, S E; Salisbury, S R; Willi, S M; LaRoche, R G; Nishina, P M

    1997-12-12

    We describe a large Acadian kindred including 8 Alstrom Syndrome (AS) patients, with an age range of 4 to 26 at the time of clinical assessment. The affected subjects come from 5 nuclear families within this kindred. The phenotype includes early childhood retinopathy, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, truncal obesity, and acanthosis nigricans. In addition, hyperinsulinemia and hypertriglyceridemia with normal cholesterol levels were observed in most affected individuals tested. Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and growth retardation appear to be age-related manifestations that occur post-adolescence. Younger affected children are not overtly hyperglycemic and are normal or above average height for age. Although the AS patients in kindred 1 presumably carry the same mutation, many manifestations of the disease are variable. For example, of the 8 children in the Acadian kindred, 4 have scoliosis, 2 have had infantile cardiomyopathy, 2 are hypothyroid, 1 has had hepatic dysfunction and is hypertensive, and 4 have developed asthma. Seven subjects described in this kindred exhibit developmental delay. One additional manifestation not described widely in the literature, advanced bone age, was observed in all subjects tested. The clinical data from this large Acadian kindred, together with information obtained from 4 additional AS patients in 3 unrelated kindreds, confirm and extend clinical observations previously described. In addition, the Acadian kindred with multiple affected individuals, probably arising from a common founder, should allow for identification of the chromosomal localization of a gene causing AS.

  8. Chlamydia abortus YhbZ, a truncated Obg family GTPase, associates with the Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    The stringent stress response is vital for bacterial survival under adverse environmental conditions. Obligate intracellular Chlamydia lack key stringent response proteins, but nevertheless can interrupt the cell cycle and enter stasis or persistence upon amino acid starvation. A possible key protein retained is YhbZ, a homologue of the ObgE guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) superfamily connecting the stringent stress response to ribosome maturation. Curiously, chlamydial YhbZ lacks the ObgE C-terminal domain thought to be essential for binding the large ribosomal subunit. We expressed recombinant Chlamydia abortus YhbZ and showed it to be a functional GTPase, with similar activity to other Obg GTPase family members. As Chlamydia are resistant to genetic manipulation, we performed heterologous expression and gradient centrifugation experiments in Escherichia coli and found that, despite the missing C-terminal domain, C. abortus YhbZ co-fractionates with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. In addition, overexpression of chlamydial YhbZ in E. coli leads to growth defects and elongation, as reported for other Obg members. YhbZ did not complement an E. coli obgE temperature-sensitive mutant, indicating the C-terminal acidic domain may have an additional role. This data supports a role for YhbZ linking the chlamydial stress response to ribosome function and cellular growth.

  9. Swedish consumers' cognitive approaches to nutrition claims and health claims

    PubMed Central

    Svederberg, Eva; Wendin, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Aim Studies show frequent use of nutrition claims and health claims in consumers' choice of food products. The aim of the present study was to investigate how consumers' thoughts about these claims and food products are affected by various types of food-related experiences. Material and Methods The data collection comprised 30 individual interviews among Swedish consumers aged 25 to 64 years. Results The results indicated that participants who expressed special concern for their own and their families' health were eager to find out the meaning of concepts and statements made. A lack of understanding and lack of credibility of concepts and expressions often caused suspicion of the product. However, in some cases this was counterbalanced by confidence in manufacturers, retailers, and/or the Swedish food legislation. Discussion and Conclusion To achieve effective written communication of food products' health-conducive properties on food labels, there is a need to consider the importance many consumers attach to understanding the meaning of concepts and expressions used and the importance of credibility in certain expressions. Consumers' varying cognitive approaches are suggested as a basis for pre-tests of nutrition claims and health claims. PMID:21448438

  10. Redistributive effects of Swedish health care finance.

    PubMed

    Gerdtham, U G; Sundberg, G

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the redistributive effects of the Swedish health care financing system in 1980 and 1990 for four different financial sources: county council taxes, payroll taxes, direct payments and state grants. The redistributive effects are decomposed into vertical, horizontal and 'reranking' segments for each of the four financial sources. The data used are based on probability samples of the Swedish population, from the Level of Living Survey (LNU) from 1981 and 1991. The paper concludes that the Swedish health care financing system is weakly progressive, although direct payments are regressive. There is some horizontal inequity and 'reranking', which mainly comes from the county council taxes, since those tax rates vary for each county council. The implication is that, to some extent, people with equal incomes are treated unequally.

  11. Accuracy of genomic selection models in a large population of open-pollinated families in white spruce

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, J; Doerksen, T; Clément, S; MacKay, J; Bousquet, J

    2014-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) is of interest in breeding because of its potential for predicting the genetic value of individuals and increasing genetic gains per unit of time. To date, very few studies have reported empirical results of GS potential in the context of large population sizes and long breeding cycles such as for boreal trees. In this study, we assessed the effectiveness of marker-aided selection in an undomesticated white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) population of large effective size using a GS approach. A discovery population of 1694 trees representative of 214 open-pollinated families from 43 natural populations was phenotyped for 12 wood and growth traits and genotyped for 6385 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mined in 2660 gene sequences. GS models were built to predict estimated breeding values using all the available SNPs or SNP subsets of the largest absolute effects, and they were validated using various cross-validation schemes. The accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) varied from 0.327 to 0.435 when the training and the validation data sets shared half-sibs that were on average 90% of the accuracies achieved through traditionally estimated breeding values. The trend was also the same for validation across sites. As expected, the accuracy of GEBVs obtained after cross-validation with individuals of unknown relatedness was lower with about half of the accuracy achieved when half-sibs were present. We showed that with the marker densities used in the current study, predictions with low to moderate accuracy could be obtained within a large undomesticated population of related individuals, potentially resulting in larger gains per unit of time with GS than with the traditional approach. PMID:24781808

  12. Accuracy of genomic selection models in a large population of open-pollinated families in white spruce.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, J; Doerksen, T; Clément, S; MacKay, J; Bousquet, J

    2014-10-01

    Genomic selection (GS) is of interest in breeding because of its potential for predicting the genetic value of individuals and increasing genetic gains per unit of time. To date, very few studies have reported empirical results of GS potential in the context of large population sizes and long breeding cycles such as for boreal trees. In this study, we assessed the effectiveness of marker-aided selection in an undomesticated white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) population of large effective size using a GS approach. A discovery population of 1694 trees representative of 214 open-pollinated families from 43 natural populations was phenotyped for 12 wood and growth traits and genotyped for 6385 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mined in 2660 gene sequences. GS models were built to predict estimated breeding values using all the available SNPs or SNP subsets of the largest absolute effects, and they were validated using various cross-validation schemes. The accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) varied from 0.327 to 0.435 when the training and the validation data sets shared half-sibs that were on average 90% of the accuracies achieved through traditionally estimated breeding values. The trend was also the same for validation across sites. As expected, the accuracy of GEBVs obtained after cross-validation with individuals of unknown relatedness was lower with about half of the accuracy achieved when half-sibs were present. We showed that with the marker densities used in the current study, predictions with low to moderate accuracy could be obtained within a large undomesticated population of related individuals, potentially resulting in larger gains per unit of time with GS than with the traditional approach.

  13. Comprehensive clinical evaluation of a large Spanish family with Anderson-Fabry disease, novel GLA mutation and severe cardiac phenotype.

    PubMed

    San Román-Monserrat, Irene; Moreno-Flores, Victoria; López-Cuenca, David; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Elena; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Beatriz; Alegría-Fernández, Marisol; Poza-Cisneros, Gabriela; Piñero-Fernández, Juan A; Sornichero-Martínez, Javier; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R

    2014-06-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked multisystemic lysosomal-storage condition. We describe a large family with a novel GLA mutation: p.M187R/g7219 T>G. Anamnesis/physical-exam, blood/urine analysis, α-Gal-A activity and/or genetic study of at-risk individuals and multidisciplinary evaluation in confirmed cases. 4 males and 13 heterozygous-females displayed the mutation. Cardiac/renal/neurological disease was diagnosed at a mean age of 41/29/39 years in males and 51/56/46 years in females. Onset mean age was 20 years versus 42 years. 9/15 had cardiomyopathy. Delta wave suggestive of accessory pathway was identified in 1 male and 2 females. 1 female had cardiac arrest (ventricular fibrillation, 61 years). 2 females and 1 male died suddenly (63, 64 and 57 years). Cardiac-subscore of Mainz Severity-Score-Index was severe for males and females over 40 years. 4/15(26%) developed early renal disease. 2 males needed dialysis. 1 male died at 69 years in spite of kidney-heart transplant. We describe the largest genetically confirmed Spanish family using multidisciplinary evaluation and MSSI calculation. The novel mutation p.M187R/g7219 T>G is associated with a particularly malignant cardiac phenotype in males and females over 40 years. Severity was higher than that of the largest Spanish FOS-cohort. Short-PR with delta is being reported for the first time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel mutation in AlphaA-crystallin (CRYAA) caused autosomal dominant congenital cataract in a large Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Gu, Feng; Luo, Weixiao; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhuoqun; Lu, Shuang; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Baojian; Zhu, Siquan; Feng, Shan; Yan, Yong-bin; Huang, Shangzhi; Ma, Xu

    2008-05-01

    Hereditary cataract is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous lens disease that is responsible for a significant proportion of the visual impairment and blindness that occurs in children. In a five-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant inherited congenital cataract, clinical examination showed three cataract phenotypes: punctuate, nuclear, and total cataracts. Linkage analysis was performed and positive two-point LOD scores (with maximum of 4.43 and 4.27 at theta=0) were obtained for markers D21S1411 and D21S1890 on chromosome 21q22.3, flanking the CRYAA (alphaA-crystallin-encoding gene) locus. Sequencing of CRYAA revealed a novel heterozygous G>A transition (c.346G>A) in exon 3 that cosegregated with the disease phenotype and results in a conservative substitution of Arg to His at codon 116 (p.R116H). To understand the molecular basis of cataract formation, mutant and wild-type alphaA-crystallins were expressed in E. coli. RP-HPLC (reverse phase-high-performance liquid chromatography) suggested an increased hydrophobicity of the mutant recombinant protein, compared to that of wild-type alphaA-crystallins. Furthermore, loss of chaperone activity of the mutant was seen in DTT (DL-dithiothreitol)-induced insulin aggregation assay. FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) purification showed that the His-116 mutant protein had increased binding affinity to lysozyme. Gain of activated lysozyme binding, elevation of hydrophobicity and loss of chaperone activity of the mutant protein may be some of the molecular mechanisms underlying cataract in this large family.

  15. Validation of Online Versions of Tinnitus Questionnaires Translated into Swedish

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Karolina; Edvall, Niklas K.; Idrizbegovic, Esma; Huhn, Robert; Cima, Rilana; Persson, Viktor; Leineweber, Constanze; Westerlund, Hugo; Langguth, Berthold; Schlee, Winfried; Canlon, Barbara; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to the lack of objective measures for assessing tinnitus, its clinical evaluation largely relies on the use of questionnaires and psychoacoustic tests. A global assessment of tinnitus burden would largely benefit from holistic approaches that not only incorporate measures of tinnitus but also take into account associated fears, emotional aspects (stress, anxiety, and depression), and quality of life. In Sweden, only a few instruments are available for assessing tinnitus, and the existing tools lack validation. Therefore, we translated a set of questionnaires into Swedish and evaluated their reliability and validity in a group of tinnitus subjects. Methods: We translated the English versions of the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI), the Fear of Tinnitus Questionnaire (FTQ), the Tinnitus Catastrophizing Scale (TCS), the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-30), and the Tinnitus Sample Case History Questionnaire (TSCHQ) into Swedish. These translations were delivered via the internet with the already existing Swedish versions of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Hyperacusis Questionnaire (HQ), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQoL-BREF). Psychometric properties were evaluated by means of internal consistency [Cronbach's alpha (α)] and test–retest reliability across a 9-week interval [Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), Cohen's kappa] in order to establish construct as well as clinical validity using a sample of 260 subjects from a population-based cohort. Results: Internal consistency was acceptable for all questionnaires (α > 0.7) with the exception of the “social relationships” subscale of the WHOQoL-BREF. Test–retest reliability was generally acceptable (ICC > 0.70, Cohens kappa > 0.60) for the tinnitus-related questionnaires, except for the TFI “sense of control” subscale and 15 items of the TSCHQ. Spearmen rank correlations showed that

  16. The Swedish national public health policy report 2010.

    PubMed

    Linell, Anita; Richardson, Matt X; Wamala, Sarah

    2013-02-01

    National Institute of Public Health and other important stakeholders. Approaches, models and methods used in carrying out the commission to produce the public health policy report are also described. In the following chapters, the trends of important determinants of public health, in relation to the overarching aim and the 11 objective domains as grouped in the three strategic areas, are analysed. The final chapter presents the proposed prioritisation for the large number of recommendations that were made, and a presentation of the annual costs of ill health in Sweden. These are compared with the costs of implementing recommended measures. The final chapter also describes how the Public Health Policy Report 2010 was received and lists the recommendations that the Swedish Government has taken action on as of September 2012. Public health trends have generally been stable or positive, although health inequalities persist. Economic analyses demonstrate that ill-health in Sweden costs 12 billion SEK every year, yet a large amount of this ill-health can be prevented. Sixty-eight recommendations were presented in the report. The government's response to recommendations has been very positive; approximately 60% of the recommendations in the three strategic areas have been adopted less than two years after the Public Health Policy Report 2010 was published.

  17. Integration of ethnic food into Swedish food rituals. The cultural fitness of tacos.

    PubMed

    Solér, Cecilia; Plazas, Maite Creixell

    2012-06-01

    This paper explores the meaning of the Mexican dish tacos for Swedish consumers. As such, this study examines the relationship between ethnic food and food culture in light of contemporary changing food rituals. The results reveal that the Swedish food ritual of Friday dinner can be enacted through eating tacos. Friday dinner is a point in time and space at which family members gather, after a busy week following divergent schedules that keep them from eating together, and to which children's food preferences are central. Tacos fulfil all the requirements for a quick-to-cook yet social dish that enables hardworking but time-constrained families to eat together. The much-debated informal and fragmented character of food consumption in contemporary society is accommodated in the taco meal.

  18. Ambassadors of the Swedish Nation: National Images in the Teaching of the Swedish Lecturers in Germany 1918-1945

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Åkerlund, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the teaching of Swedish language lecturers active in Germany during the first half of the twentieth century. It shows the centrality of literature and literary constructions and analyses images of Swedishness and the Swedish nation present in the teaching material of that time in relation to the national image present in…

  19. Ambassadors of the Swedish Nation: National Images in the Teaching of the Swedish Lecturers in Germany 1918-1945

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Åkerlund, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the teaching of Swedish language lecturers active in Germany during the first half of the twentieth century. It shows the centrality of literature and literary constructions and analyses images of Swedishness and the Swedish nation present in the teaching material of that time in relation to the national image present in…

  20. Comparison of Topic Organization in Finnish, Swedish-Finnish, and Swedish Family Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tryggvason, Marja-Terttu

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether there are cultural differences in topic organization and role-related topic control in dinner conversations; such differences may function as a means for socialization into communicative styles. The research was designed as a comparative study of two geographically close but linguistically very…

  1. Validation and internal consistency of the Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale.

    PubMed

    Björk, Mathilda; Thyberg, Mikael; Valtersson, Eva; Katz, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to create a linguistically and culturally validated Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale. The aim was also to describe its content and concurrent validity and its internal consistency in persons with rheumatoid arthritis. The Valued Life Activities scale was translated to Swedish and culturally adapted. In order to describe the content validity, both the Swedish and original Valued Life Activities scale were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The concurrent validity and internal consistency were evaluated in 737 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. To establish concurrent validity, the scale was correlated to disease activity, activity limitations, and life satisfaction. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha. The equivalence of meaning between the Swedish and the original Valued Life Activities scale was ensured by harmonization review. Content validity was high when linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Concurrent validity showed a strong correlation with the activity limitations (r = 0.87), moderate with life satisfaction (r = -0.61), and weak with disease activity (r = 0.38). Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.97). The Swedish Valued Life Activities scale has been tested in a large and well-characterized sample and found to be a linguistically valid and culturally adapted self-reported measure of participation. Content validity of the Valued Life Activities scale was excellent, concurrent validity strong, and the internal consistency excellent. Since both individual preferences and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health concepts of disability are taken into account, the Swedish Valued Life Activities scale appears to be a promising new scale addressing important aspects of participation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Large repayments of premium subsidies may be owed to the IRS if family income changes are not promptly reported.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ken; Graham-Squire, Dave; Gould, Elise; Roby, Dylan

    2013-09-01

    Subsidies for health insurance premiums under the Affordable Care Act are refundable tax credits. They can be taken when taxes are filed or in advance, as reductions in monthly premiums that must be reconciled at tax filing. Recipients who take subsidies in advance will receive tax refunds if their subsidies were too small but will have to make repayments if their subsidies were too high. We analyzed predicted repayments and refunds for people receiving subsidies, using California as a case study. We found that many families could owe large repayments to the Internal Revenue Service at their next tax filing. If income changes were reported and credits adjusted in a timely manner throughout the tax year, the number of filers owing repayments would be reduced by 7-41 percent and the median size of repayments reduced by as much as 61 percent (depending on the level of changes reported and the method used to adjust the subsidy amounts). We recommend that the health insurance exchanges mandated by the Affordable Care Act educate consumers about how the subsidies work and the need to promptly report income changes. We also recommend that they provide tools and assistance to determine the amount of subsidies that enrollees should take in advance.

  3. An examination of the impact of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder on IQ: a large controlled family-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Joseph; Fried, Ronna; Petty, Carter; Mahoney, Laura; Faraone, Stephen V

    2012-10-01

    Although children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have, on average, lower intelligence quotient (IQ) scores than control subjects, the reasons for these deficits remain unknown. Because IQ is highly familial, we investigated whether children with ADHD have a decrement in IQ from expectations based on parental IQ. Subjects were 276 children with ADHD and 239 control subjects of similar age and sex. Expected IQ was calculated based on biological parents' estimated IQ. A significant discrepancy between observed and expected estimated IQ was defined by a child scoring 15 IQ points or more lower than expected, based on parental IQ. Compared with control subjects, children with ADHD were significantly more likely to have lower than expected estimated IQ scores based on parental IQ, though this finding was accounted for by a small subgroup of children with ADHD who had an IQ 15 points or more lower than expected, based on parental IQ. These children were more likely to be female, have higher psychopathological, neuropsychological, educational, and interpersonal deficits, as well as higher rates of perinatal complications. Group differences in IQ scores between children with and without ADHD reported in the literature may be accounted for by a subgroup of children with ADHD who have a large decrement in IQ from expectations based on parental IQ. Although perinatal complications may explain these findings, more work is needed to better understand the etiology of these IQ deficits.

  4. Large-scale screening using familial dysautonomia induced pluripotent stem cells identifies compounds that rescue IKBKAP expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gabsang; Ramirez, Christina N; Kim, Hyesoo; Zeltner, Nadja; Liu, Becky; Radu, Constantin; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Kim, Yong Jun; Choi, In Young; Mukherjee-Clavin, Bipasha; Djaballah, Hakim; Studer, Lorenz

    2012-12-01

    Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a novel system for modeling human genetic disease and could provide a source of cells for large-scale drug-discovery screens. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of performing a primary screen in neural crest precursors derived from iPSCs that were generated from individuals with familial dysautonomia (FD), a rare, fatal genetic disorder affecting neural crest lineages. We tested 6,912 small-molecule compounds and characterized eight that rescued expression of IKBKAP, the gene responsible for FD. One of the hits, SKF-86466, was found to induce IKBKAP transcription through modulation of intracellular cAMP levels and PKA-dependent CREB phosphorylation. SKF-86466 also rescued IKAP protein expression and the disease-specific loss of autonomic neuronal marker expression. Our data implicate alpha-2 adrenergic receptor activity in regulating IKBKAP expression and demonstrate that small-molecule discovery using an iPSC-based disease model can identify candidate drugs for potential therapeutic intervention.

  5. Swedish Modal Particles in a Contrastive Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aijmer, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Presents a study based on the analysis of contrastive Swedish-English data on modal particles. The article maintains that the meaning of modal particles requires an analysis of their pragmatic aspects such as the relation between the interlocutors. The analysis most accurately accounting for the multifunctionality of the particles is based on a…

  6. Are Boys Discriminated in Swedish High Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinnerich, Bjorn Tyrefors; Hoglin, Erik; Johannesson, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Girls typically have higher grades than boys in school and recent research suggests that part of this gender difference may be due to discrimination of boys in grading. We rigorously test this in a field experiment where a random sample of the same tests in the Swedish language is subject to blind and non-blind grading. The non-blind test score is…

  7. Measuring Syntactic Complexity in Spontaneous Spoken Swedish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Mikael; Frid, Johan; Horne, Merle

    2007-01-01

    Hesitation disfluencies after phonetically prominent stranded function words are thought to reflect the cognitive coding of complex structures. Speech fragments following the Swedish function word "att" "that" were analyzed syntactically, and divided into two groups: one with "att" in disfluent contexts, and the other with "att" in fluent…

  8. Leisure, Government and Governance: A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and…

  9. Swedish Research on Higher Education in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorklund, Eskil

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter reproduces a discussion between Eskil Bjorklund, former director of The Council for Studies of Higher Education in Sweden and his successor, Thorsten Nybom, concerning the Swedish Research on Higher Education Program. This program was established in 1968 to direct the organization of research on higher education and award research…

  10. Mathematics and Didactic Contract in Swedish Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delacour, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study and analyse how a teacher implements an outdoor realistic problem situation for children aged 4-5 in a Swedish preschool. By an "outdoor realistic problem situation", I mean a situation initiated by a teacher in which children come into contact with mathematical concepts and in which the outside…

  11. Swedish Modal Particles in a Contrastive Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aijmer, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Presents a study based on the analysis of contrastive Swedish-English data on modal particles. The article maintains that the meaning of modal particles requires an analysis of their pragmatic aspects such as the relation between the interlocutors. The analysis most accurately accounting for the multifunctionality of the particles is based on a…

  12. Mathematics and Didactic Contract in Swedish Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delacour, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study and analyse how a teacher implements an outdoor realistic problem situation for children aged 4-5 in a Swedish preschool. By an "outdoor realistic problem situation", I mean a situation initiated by a teacher in which children come into contact with mathematical concepts and in which the outside…

  13. Measuring Syntactic Complexity in Spontaneous Spoken Swedish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Mikael; Frid, Johan; Horne, Merle

    2007-01-01

    Hesitation disfluencies after phonetically prominent stranded function words are thought to reflect the cognitive coding of complex structures. Speech fragments following the Swedish function word "att" "that" were analyzed syntactically, and divided into two groups: one with "att" in disfluent contexts, and the other with "att" in fluent…

  14. The Swedish Rocket Corps, 1833 - 1845

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    Rockets for pyrotechnic displays used in Sweden in the 19th century are examined in terms of their use in war situations. Work done by the Swedish chemist J. J. Berzelius, who analyzed and improved the propellants of such rockets, and the German engineer, Martin Westermaijer, who researched manufacturing techniques of these rockets is also included.

  15. Second Chances for Adults: The Swedish Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henricson, Sven-Eric

    The organization of higher education in Sweden, entrance requirements, and the system for selection of applicants for higher education are summarized, as is the Swedish system of economic study assistance. Numbers of students, terms of admission, and other data are presented concerning the different types of adult education in Sweden (Municipal…

  16. The Swedish Rocket Corps, 1833 - 1845

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    Rockets for pyrotechnic displays used in Sweden in the 19th century are examined in terms of their use in war situations. Work done by the Swedish chemist J. J. Berzelius, who analyzed and improved the propellants of such rockets, and the German engineer, Martin Westermaijer, who researched manufacturing techniques of these rockets is also included.

  17. Leisure, Government and Governance: A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and…

  18. Lack of evidence for increased genetic loading for autism among families of affected females: a replication from family history data in two large samples.

    PubMed

    Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Abbacchi, Anna; Constantino, John N

    2007-05-01

    Both the broad and narrow phenotypes of autism have been consistently observed in family members of affected individuals. Additionally, autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) present four times more often in males than in females, for reasons that are currently unknown. In this study, we examined whether there were differences in familial loading of ASD among families of male versus female probands. Analyses were conducted with existing data from two distinct samples. The first sample contained 417 individuals with autism and Asperger's disorder and included information on the ASD diagnoses of their first- and second-degree relatives. The second sample consisted of 405 sibships participating in the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange, of which one or more siblings had an ASD diagnosis. Results from both samples did not suggest significant differences in the prevalence of ASD among relatives of affected males versus females.

  19. Genome-wide linkage analysis of quantitative biomarker traits of osteoarthritis in a large, multigenerational extended family.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiang-Cheng; Kraus, Virginia Byers; Li, Yi-Ju; Nelson, Sarah; Haynes, Carol; Johnson, Jessica; Stabler, Thomas; Hauser, Elizabeth R; Gregory, Simon G; Kraus, William E; Shah, Svati H

    2010-03-01

    The genetic contributions to the multifactorial disorder osteoarthritis (OA) have been increasingly recognized. The goal of the current study was to use OA-related biomarkers of severity and disease burden as quantitative traits to identify genetic susceptibility loci for OA. In a large multigenerational extended family (n = 350), we measured 5 OA-related biomarkers: hyaluronan (HA), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), N-propeptide of type IIA collagen (PIIANP), C-propeptide of type II procollagen (CPII), and type II collagen neoepitope (C2C). Single-nucleotide polymorphism markers (n = 6,090) covering the whole genome were genotyped using the Illumina HumanLinkage-12 BeadChip. Variance components analysis, as implemented in the Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines, was used to estimate heritabilities of the quantitative traits and to calculate 2-point and multipoint logarithm of odds (LOD) scores using a polygenic model. After adjusting for age and sex, we found that 4 of the 5 biomarkers exhibited significant heritability (PIIANP 0.57, HA 0.49, COMP 0.43, C2C 0.30; P < or = 0.01 for all). Fourteen of the 19 loci that had multipoint LOD scores of >1.5 were near to or overlapped with previously reported OA susceptibility loci. Four of these loci were identified by more than 1 biomarker. The maximum multipoint LOD scores for the heritable quantitative biomarker traits were 4.3 for PIIANP (chromosome 8p23.2), 3.2 for COMP (chromosome 8q11.1), 2.0 for HA (chromosome 6q16.3), and 2.0 for C2C (chromosome 5q31.2). Herein, we report the first evidence of genetic susceptibility loci identified by OA-related biomarkers in an extended family. Our results demonstrate that serum concentrations of PIIANP, HA, COMP, and C2C have substantial heritable components, and using these biomarkers, several genetic loci potentially contributing to the genetic diversity of OA were identified.

  20. Swedish attitudes towards persons with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Högberg, Torbjörn; Magnusson, Annabella; Lützén, Kim; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice

    2012-04-01

    Negative and stigmatizing attitudes towards persons with mental illness must be dealt with to facilitate the sufferers' social acceptance. The present study aimed at survey Swedish attitudes towards persons with mental illness related to factors impacting these attitudes. New CAMI-S based on the questionnaire "Community Attitudes to Mental Illness in Sweden" ([CAMI] Taylor & Dear, 1981) was developed with nine behavioral-intention items and thus comprised a total of 29 items. Of 5000 Swedish people, 2391 agreed to complete the questionnaire. Principal component analysis rendered four factors reflecting attitudes towards the mentally ill: Intention to Interact, Fearful and Avoidant, Open-minded and Pro-Integration, as well as Community Mental Health Ideology. The factors were analyzed for trends in attitudes. By MANOVA, the experience of mental illness effects on mind-set towards the sufferers was assessed. By means of logistic regression, demographic factors contributing to positive attitudes towards persons with mental illness residing in the neighborhood were assessed. By New CAMI-S, the Swedish attitudes towards the mentally ill were surveyed and trends in agreement with living next to a person with mental illness were revealed in three out of four factors derived by principal component analysis. Aspects impacting the Swedish attitudes towards persons with mental illness and willingness to have him/her residing in the neighborhood comprised experience of mental illness, female gender, age (31-50 years), born in Scandinavia or outside Europe, only 9 years of compulsory school and accommodation in flat. The New CAMI-S came out as a useful tool to screen Swedish attitudes towards persons with mental illness. Most Swedes were prepared to live next to the mentally ill.

  1. Prevalence of footrot in Swedish slaughter lambs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Footrot is a world-wide contagious disease in sheep and goats. It is an infection of the epidermis of the interdigital skin, and the germinal layers of the horn tissue of the feet. The first case of footrot in Swedish sheep was diagnosed in 2004. Due to difficulties in distinguishing benign footrot from early cases of virulent footrot and because there is no possibility for virulence testing of strains of Dichelobacter nodosus in Sweden, the diagnosis is based of the presence or absence of clinical signs of footrot in sheep flocks. Ever since the first diagnosed case the Swedish Animal Health Service has worked intensively to stop the spread of infection and control the disease at flock level. However, to continue this work effectively it is important to have knowledge about the distribution of the disease both nationally and regionally. Therefore, the aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of footrot in Swedish lambs at abattoirs and to assess the geographical distribution of the disease. Methods A prevalence study on footrot in Swedish lambs was performed by visual examination of 2000 feet from 500 lambs submitted from six slaughter houses. Each foot was scored according to a 0 to 5 scoring system, where feet with score ≥2 were defined as having footrot. Moreover, samples from feet with footrot were examined for Dichelobacter nodosus by culture and PCR. Results The prevalence of footrot at the individual sheep level was 5.8%, and Dichelobacter nodosus was found by culture and PCR in 83% and 97% of the samples from feet with footrot, respectively. Some minor differences in geographical distribution of footrot were found in this study. Conclusions In a national context, the findings indicate that footrot is fairly common in Swedish slaughter lambs, and should be regarded seriously. PMID:21492433

  2. Concordant and discordant familial cancer: Familial risks, proportions and population impact.

    PubMed

    Frank, Christoph; Sundquist, Jan; Yu, Hongyao; Hemminki, Akseli; Hemminki, Kari

    2017-04-01

    Relatives of cancer patients are at an increased risk of the same (concordant) cancer but whether they are at a risk for different (discordant) cancers is largely unknown - beyond well characterized hereditary cancer syndromes - but would be of major scientific and clinical interest. We therefore decided to resolve the issue by analyzing familial risks when family members were diagnosed with any discordant cancers. We compared the population impact of concordant to discordant familial cancer. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database (FCD) was used to calculate familial relative risks (RRs) for family members of cancer patients, for the 27 most common cancers. Population attributable fractions (PAFs) were estimated for concordant and discordant family histories. Discordant cancers in the family were detected as significant risk factors for the majority of cancers, although the corresponding RRs were modest compared to RRs for concordant cancers. Risks increased with the number of affected family members with the highest RRs for pancreatic (2.31), lung (1.69), kidney (1.98), nervous system (1.79) and thyroid cancers (3.28), when 5 or more family members were diagnosed with discordant cancers. For most cancers, the PAF for discordant family history exceeded that for concordant family history. Our findings suggest that there is an unspecific genetic predisposition to cancer with clinical consequences. We consider it unlikely that shared environmental risk factors could essentially contribute to the risks for diverse discordant cancers, which are likely driven by genetic predisposition. The identification of genes that moderately increase the risk for many cancers will be a challenge. © 2016 UICC.

  3. Mapping of a possible X-linked form of familial developmental dysphasia (FDD) in a single large pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, P.W.; Doody, R.S.; Epstein, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    Children diagnosed with developmental dysphasia develop speech very late without exhibiting sensory or motor dysfunction, and when they do begin to speak their grammar is abnormal. A large three-generation British pedigree was recently identified in which 16 out of 30 members were diagnosed as dysphasic. Assuming a dominant mode of inheritance with homogeneous phenotypic expression and complete penetrance among affected members, we showed by simulation analysis that this pedigree has the power to detect linkage to marker loci with an average maximum LOD score of 3.67 at {theta}=0.1. Given the absence of male-to-male transmission and a ratio of female to male affecteds (10/6) in this pedigree within the expected range for an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance, we decided to begin a genome-wide linkage analysis with microsatellite markers on the human X chromosome. Fifteen individuals (10 affected) from three generations were genotyped with 35 polymorphic STS`s (Research Genetics) which were approximately uniformly distributed along the X chromosome. Two-point linkage was assessed using the MLINK and ILINK programs from the LINKAGE package. Markers DXS1223, DXS987, DXS996 and DXS1060 on Xp22 showed consistent linkage to the disease locus with a maximum LOD score of 0.86 at a distance of 22 cM for DXS1060. If further analysis with additional markers and additional family members confirms X-linkage, such a localization would provide support for Lehrke`s hypothesis for X-linkage of major intellectual traits including verbal functioning.

  4. Communicability of H1N1 and seasonal influenza among household contacts of cases in large families

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Ashry G.; BinSaeed, Abdulaziz A.; Al‐Habib, Hannan; Al‐Saif, Hytham

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Mohamed et al. (2011) Communicability of H1N1 and seasonal influenza among household contacts of cases in large families. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e25–e29. Background  Quantitative knowledge of the transmissibility of influenza is crucial to its prevention and control. Objectives  To quantify the transmission of influenza A (H1N1) and seasonal influenza in household contacts of patients with influenza diagnosed in a large university hospital. Patients/Methods  A prospective study was conducted between September and October 2009 in which all confirmed cases of influenza diagnosed at King Khalid University Hospital were included. All household contacts were followed by telephone calls every other day for 12 days. They were asked about the development of influenza symptoms in addition to their age and nationality. Results  Overall, 432 household contacts of 69 influenza A (H1N1) cases and 417 contacts of 91 seasonal influenza cases were included. Suspected influenza was diagnosed in 16·9% and 14·4% of household contacts of H1N1 and seasonal influenza patients, respectively. Household reproduction numbers were 1·06 (0·84–1·28) for H1N1 and 0·66 (0·51–0·81) for seasonal influenza. Children in households were more susceptible than were adults (22·2% versus 13·7%, respectively). Evidence of coughing in the index case tripled the risk of infection in households afflicted with the H1N1 influenza [relative risk (RR) = 3·28, CI = 1·24–8·69], while evidence of a runny nose doubled it (RR = 1·89, CI = 1·19–2·92). Conclusions  Communicability of influenza in households in Riyadh is comparable to that in other countries. Children are more susceptible to influenza infection. The presence of a cough or runny nose in the index cases increases the risk of infection. PMID:22118477

  5. Screening and advanced lipid phenotyping in familial hypercholesterolemia: The Very Large Database of Lipids Study-17 (VLDL-17).

    PubMed

    Miller, P Elliott; Martin, Seth S; Toth, Peter P; Santos, Raul D; Blaha, Michael J; Nasir, Khurram; Virani, Salim S; Post, Wendy S; Blumenthal, Roger S; Jones, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant dyslipidemia characterized by defective low-density lipoprotein (LDL) clearance. The aim of this study was to compare Friedewald-estimated LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) to biologic LDL-C in individuals screening positive for FH and then further characterize FH phenotypes. We studied 1,320,581 individuals from the Very Large Database of Lipids, referred from 2009 to 2011 for Vertical Auto Profile ultracentrifugation testing. Friedewald LDL-C was defined as the cholesterol content of LDL-C, intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a) cholesterol (Lp(a)-C), with LDL-C representing biologic LDL-C. Using Friedewald LDL-C, we phenotypically categorized patients by the National Lipid Association guideline age-based screening thresholds for FH. In those meeting criteria, we categorized patients using population percentile-equivalent biologic LDL-C cutpoints and explored Lp(a)-C and remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C) levels. Overall, 3829 patients met phenotypic criteria for FH by Friedewald LDL-C screening (FH+). Of those screening FH+, 78.8% were above and 21.2% were below the population percentile-equivalent biologic LDL-C. The mean difference in Friedewald biologic LDL-C percentiles was -0.01 (standard deviation, 0.17) for those above, and 1.92 (standard deviation, 9.16) for those below, respectively. Over 1 of 3 were found to have an elevated Lp(a)-C and over 50% had RLP-C greater than 95th percentile of the entire VLDL population. Of those who screened FH+, Friedewald and biologic LDL-C levels were closely correlated. Large proportions of the FH+ group had excess levels of Lp(a)-C and RLP-C. Future studies are warranted to study these mixed phenotypic groups and determine the role for further risk stratification and treatment algorithms. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonword repetition--a clinical marker for specific language impairment in Swedish associated with parents' language-related problems.

    PubMed

    Kalnak, Nelli; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Forssberg, Hans; Sahlén, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    First, we explore the performance of nonword repetition (NWR) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing children (TD) in order to investigate the accuracy of NWR as a clinical marker for SLI in Swedish-speaking school-age children. Second, we examine the relationship between NWR, family aggregation, and parental level of education in children with SLI. A sample of 61 children with SLI, and 86 children with TD, aged 8-12 years, were administered an NWR test. Family aggregation, measured as the prevalence of language and/or literacy problems (LLP) in parents of the children with SLI, was based on family history interviews. The sensitivity and specificity of nonword repetition was analyzed in a binary logistic regression, cut-off values were established with ROC curves, and positive and negative likelihood ratios reported. Results from the present study show that NWR distinguishes well between Swedish-speaking school-children with and without SLI. We found 90.2% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity at a cut-off level of -2 standard deviations for binary scoring of nonwords. Differences between the SLI and TD groups showed large effect sizes for the two scoring measures binary (d = 2.11) and percent correct consonants (PCC) (d = 1.79). The children with SLI were split into two subgroups: those with no parents affected with LLP (n = 12), and those with one or both parents affected (n = 49). The subgroup consisting of affected parents had a significantly lower score on NWR binary (p = .037), and there was a great difference between the subgroups (d = 0.7). When compared to the TD group, the difference from the subgroup with affected parents was almost one standard deviation larger (d = 2.47) than the difference from the TD to the subgroup consisting of non-affected parents (d = 1.57). Our study calls for further exploration of the complex interaction between family aggregation, language input, and phenotypes

  7. Nonword Repetition – A Clinical Marker for Specific Language Impairment in Swedish Associated with Parents’ Language-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Kalnak, Nelli; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Forssberg, Hans; Sahlén, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    First, we explore the performance of nonword repetition (NWR) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing children (TD) in order to investigate the accuracy of NWR as a clinical marker for SLI in Swedish-speaking school-age children. Second, we examine the relationship between NWR, family aggregation, and parental level of education in children with SLI. A sample of 61 children with SLI, and 86 children with TD, aged 8–12 years, were administered an NWR test. Family aggregation, measured as the prevalence of language and/or literacy problems (LLP) in parents of the children with SLI, was based on family history interviews. The sensitivity and specificity of nonword repetition was analyzed in a binary logistic regression, cut-off values were established with ROC curves, and positive and negative likelihood ratios reported. Results from the present study show that NWR distinguishes well between Swedish-speaking school-children with and without SLI. We found 90.2% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity at a cut-off level of −2 standard deviations for binary scoring of nonwords. Differences between the SLI and TD groups showed large effect sizes for the two scoring measures binary (d = 2.11) and percent correct consonants (PCC) (d = 1.79). The children with SLI were split into two subgroups: those with no parents affected with LLP (n = 12), and those with one or both parents affected (n = 49). The subgroup consisting of affected parents had a significantly lower score on NWR binary (p = .037), and there was a great difference between the subgroups (d = 0.7). When compared to the TD group, the difference from the subgroup with affected parents was almost one standard deviation larger (d = 2.47) than the difference from the TD to the subgroup consisting of non-affected parents (d = 1.57). Our study calls for further exploration of the complex interaction between family aggregation, language input, and

  8. Decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particle size, prebeta-, and large HDL subspecies concentration in Finnish low-HDL families: relationship with intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Söderlund, Sanni; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Hiukka, Anne; Leinonen, Eeva; Alagona, Corradina; Salonen, Riitta; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2006-04-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol correlates inversely with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The precise antiatherogenic mechanisms of HDL subspecies are not thoroughly elucidated. We studied the relationship between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and HDL subspecies distribution in Finnish families with low HDL cholesterol and premature CHD. Altogether, 148 members of Finnish low-HDL families and 133 healthy control subjects participated in our study. HDL particle size was significantly smaller in affected family members (HDL < or =10th Finnish age-sex specific percentile) compared with unaffected family members and control subjects (9.1+/-0.04 nm versus 9.5+/-0.05 nm, P<0.0001, versus 9.8+/-0.03 nm, P<0.0001 [mean+/-SE]). Large HDL2b particles as well as prebeta-HDL concentration were significantly decreased among the affected family members. Mean IMT was significantly higher in the affected family members than in the control subjects (0.85+/-0.01 mm versus 0.79+/-0.01 mm; P<0.0001). Age, HDL2b, systolic blood pressure, and prebeta-HDL were significant independent determinants of mean IMT. The decreased levels of HDL2b and prebeta-HDL reflect the potentially efflux-deficient HDL subspecies profile in the affected low-HDL family members. Decreased HDL particle size caused by the decrease of plasma concentration of HDL2b and decreased prebeta-HDL levels correlate with increased IMT.

  9. The gustatory receptor family in the silkworm moth Bombyx mori is characterized by a large expansion of a single lineage of putative bitter receptors.

    PubMed

    Wanner, K W; Robertson, H M

    2008-12-01

    The gustatory receptor (Gr) family of insect chemoreceptors includes receptors for sugars and bitter compounds, as well as cuticular hydrocarbons and odorants such as carbon dioxide. We have annotated a total of 65 Gr genes from the silkworm Bombyx mori genome. The Gr family in the silkworm moth includes putative carbon dioxide receptors and sugar receptors, as well as duplicated orthologues of the orphan DmGr43a receptor. Most prominent in this 65-gene family, however, is a single large expansion of 55 Grs that we propose are predominantly 'bitter' receptors involved in perception of the large variety of secondary plant chemicals that caterpillars and moths encounter. These Grs might therefore mediate food choice and avoidance as well as oviposition site preference.

  10. Development and Two-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of a Training Workshop for the Large Preventive Positive Psychology Happy Family Kitchen Project in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lai, Agnes Y; Mui, Moses W; Wan, Alice; Stewart, Sunita M; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai-Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice and capacity-building approaches are essential for large-scale health promotion interventions. However, there are few models in the literature to guide and evaluate training of social service workers in community settings. This paper presents the development and evaluation of the "train-the-trainer" workshop (TTT) for the first large scale, community-based, family intervention projects, entitled "Happy Family Kitchen Project" (HFK) under the FAMILY project, a Hong Kong Jockey Club Initiative for a Harmonious Society. The workshop aimed to enhance social workers' competence and performance in applying positive psychology constructs in their family interventions under HFK to improve family well-being of the community they served. The two-day TTT was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team in partnership with community agencies to 50 social workers (64% women). It focused on the enhancement of knowledge, attitude, and practice of five specific positive psychology themes, which were the basis for the subsequent development of the 23 family interventions for 1419 participants. Acceptability and applicability were enhanced by completing a needs assessment prior to the training. The TTT was evaluated by trainees' reactions to the training content and design, changes in learners (trainees) and benefits to the service organizations. Focus group interviews to evaluate the workshop at three months after the training, and questionnaire survey at pre-training, immediately after, six months, one year and two years after training were conducted. There were statistically significant increases with large to moderate effect size in perceived knowledge, self-efficacy and practice after training, which sustained to 2-year follow-up. Furthermore, there were statistically significant improvements in family communication and well-being of the participants in the HFK interventions they implemented after training. This paper offers a practical example

  11. Development and Two-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of a Training Workshop for the Large Preventive Positive Psychology Happy Family Kitchen Project in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Agnes Y.; Mui, Moses W.; Wan, Alice; Stewart, Sunita M.; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai-hing; Chan, Sophia S.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice and capacity-building approaches are essential for large-scale health promotion interventions. However, there are few models in the literature to guide and evaluate training of social service workers in community settings. This paper presents the development and evaluation of the “train-the-trainer” workshop (TTT) for the first large scale, community-based, family intervention projects, entitled “Happy Family Kitchen Project” (HFK) under the FAMILY project, a Hong Kong Jockey Club Initiative for a Harmonious Society. The workshop aimed to enhance social workers’ competence and performance in applying positive psychology constructs in their family interventions under HFK to improve family well-being of the community they served. The two-day TTT was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team in partnership with community agencies to 50 social workers (64% women). It focused on the enhancement of knowledge, attitude, and practice of five specific positive psychology themes, which were the basis for the subsequent development of the 23 family interventions for 1419 participants. Acceptability and applicability were enhanced by completing a needs assessment prior to the training. The TTT was evaluated by trainees’ reactions to the training content and design, changes in learners (trainees) and benefits to the service organizations. Focus group interviews to evaluate the workshop at three months after the training, and questionnaire survey at pre-training, immediately after, six months, one year and two years after training were conducted. There were statistically significant increases with large to moderate effect size in perceived knowledge, self-efficacy and practice after training, which sustained to 2-year follow-up. Furthermore, there were statistically significant improvements in family communication and well-being of the participants in the HFK interventions they implemented after training. This paper offers a

  12. A family of 'windmill'-like {Cu6Ln12} complexes exhibiting single-molecule magnetism behavior and large magnetic entropy changes.

    PubMed

    Alexandropoulos, Dimitris I; Poole, Katye M; Cunha-Silva, Luis; Ahmad Sheikh, Javeed; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Christou, George; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2017-04-11

    A family of nanosized {Cu6Ln12} clusters with a 'windmill'-like topology was prepared from the employment of 2,6-diacetylpyridine dioxime, in conjunction with bridging N3(-), in 3d/4f-metal chemistry; the octadecanuclear compounds exhibit single-molecule magnetism behavior and large magnetic entropy changes, depending on the 4f-metal ion present.

  13. The Politics of School Choice in Two Countries with Large Private-Dependent Sectors (Spain and Chile): Family Strategies, Collective Action and Lobbying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambla, Xavier; Valiente, Oscar; Frias, Carla

    2011-01-01

    In many countries choice of school is an increasing concern for families and governments. In Spain and Chile, it is also associated with a long-standing political cleavage on the regulation of large sectors of private-dependent schools. This article analyses both the micro- and the macro-politics of choice in these two countries, where low-status…

  14. The Politics of School Choice in Two Countries with Large Private-Dependent Sectors (Spain and Chile): Family Strategies, Collective Action and Lobbying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambla, Xavier; Valiente, Oscar; Frias, Carla

    2011-01-01

    In many countries choice of school is an increasing concern for families and governments. In Spain and Chile, it is also associated with a long-standing political cleavage on the regulation of large sectors of private-dependent schools. This article analyses both the micro- and the macro-politics of choice in these two countries, where low-status…

  15. Homogeneity in mitochondrial DNA control region sequences in Swedish subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Tillmar, Andreas O; Coble, Michael D; Wallerström, Thomas; Holmlund, Gunilla

    2010-03-01

    In order to promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing in Sweden we have typed 296 Swedish males, which will serve as a Swedish mtDNA frequency database. The tested males were taken from seven geographically different regions representing the contemporary Swedish population. The complete mtDNA control region was typed and the Swedish population was shown to have high haplotype diversity with a random match probability of 0.5%. Almost 47% of the tested samples belonged to haplogroup H and further haplogroup comparison with worldwide populations clustered the Swedish mtDNA data together with other European populations. AMOVA analysis of the seven Swedish subregions displayed no significant maternal substructure in Sweden (F (ST) = 0.002). Our conclusion from this study is that the typed Swedish individuals serve as good representatives for a Swedish forensic mtDNA database. Some caution should, however, be taken for individuals from the northernmost part of Sweden (provinces of Norrbotten and Lapland) due to specific demographic conditions. Furthermore, our analysis of a small sample set of a Swedish Saami population confirmed earlier findings that the Swedish Saami population is an outlier among European populations.

  16. An investigation on the presence of Chlamydiaceae in Swedish dogs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacteria belonging to the family Chlamydiaceae cause a broad spectrum of diseases in a wide range of hosts, including man, other mammals, and birds. Upper respiratory and genital diseases are common clinical problems caused by Chlamydiaceae. Very little is known about chlamydial infections in dogs. Few clinical reports on natural disease in dogs describe mainly conjunctival and upper respiratory signs, and the role of Chlamydiaceae in genital disease is unclear. The present study aimed at studying the prevalence of Chlamydiaceae in healthy dogs and in dogs with genital or upper respiratory disease, including conjunctivitis. Methods A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Chlamydiaceae was used to detect any chlamydial species within this family. Swab samples from the conjunctiva and the mucosal membranes of the oropharynx, rectum and genital tract were taken from 79 dogs: 27 clinically healthy dogs, 25 dogs with clinical signs from the genital tract and 28 dogs with conjunctivitis. There were 52 female and 27 male dogs. From 7 of the male dogs, additional semen samples were analysed. Results No Chlamydiaceae were detected from any dog. Conclusions Although the number of dogs that was included is limited, the results suggest that cases of Chlamydiaceae in dogs probably are related to infection from other species, and that dogs in general do not harbour Chlamydiaceae. Bacteria belonging to the family Chlamydiaceae do not seem to be of major importance for genital or ocular disease in Swedish dogs. PMID:21078208

  17. Catastrophic-flood Features in Swedish Lapland as a Terrestrial Analog for Martian Channel Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossbacher, L. A.; Rhodes, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Catastrophic flooding associated with deglaciation created unusual landscapes in several areas of northern Sweden. These areas in Swedish Lapland are distinguished by the large grain-size material that forms them. The presence of boulders at both Viking landing sites suggests the relevance of this analog. The Baldakatj area of Swedish Lapland offers terrestrial analogs for erosional remnants on Mars. Although the Baldakatj features are an order of magnitude or more smaller than the Martian forms, they created in boulder-rich till that may be a good approximation of the near-surface material on Mars. The Baldakatj area also includes other landforms that could reasonably be expected to occur with the Martian outflow channels, including boulder deltas, large transported blocks, and large-scale bedforms.

  18. A psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Responses to Positive Affect questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Malin Elisabeth; Boersma, Katja; Engh, Johannes; Wurm, Matilda

    2014-11-01

    Previous research mainly focused on responses to negative affect in relation to depression, and less on responses to positive affect. Cognitive responses to positive affect are interesting in the context of emotion regulation and emotion disorders: positive rumination is associated to hypomania risk and bipolar disorder. There is to date no questionnaire in Swedish that captures the phenomena of cognitive response styles. The aim of this study was to investigate the replicability of the Responses to Positive Affect questionnaire (RPA) in a newly translated Swedish version and to test its psychometric properties. Swedish undergraduates (n = 111) completed a set of self-report questionnaires in a fixed order. The hypothesized three-factor model was largely replicated in the subscales Self-focused positive rumination, Emotion-focused positive rumination and Dampening. The two positive rumination subscales were strongly associated with each other and current positive affect. The subscales showed acceptable convergent and incremental validity with concurrent measures of depression, hypomania, anxiety, repetitive negative thinking, and positive and negative affect. The model explained 25% of the variance in hypomania, but fell short in the explanation of depression. The Swedish version of the RPA shows satisfactory reliability and initial findings from a student sample indicate that it is a valid measure comparable with the original RPA questionnaire. RESULTS give emphasis to the importance of further exploration of cognitive response styles in relation to psychopathology.

  19. Institutional profile: the national Swedish academic drug discovery & development platform at SciLifeLab.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Per I; Sandberg, Kristian; Sakariassen, Kjell S

    2017-06-01

    The Science for Life Laboratory Drug Discovery and Development Platform (SciLifeLab DDD) was established in Stockholm and Uppsala, Sweden, in 2014. It is one of ten platforms of the Swedish national SciLifeLab which support projects run by Swedish academic researchers with large-scale technologies for molecular biosciences with a focus on health and environment. SciLifeLab was created by the coordinated effort of four universities in Stockholm and Uppsala: Stockholm University, Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Uppsala University, and has recently expanded to other Swedish university locations. The primary goal of the SciLifeLab DDD is to support selected academic discovery and development research projects with tools and resources to discover novel lead therapeutics, either molecules or human antibodies. Intellectual property developed with the help of SciLifeLab DDD is wholly owned by the academic research group. The bulk of SciLifeLab DDD's research and service activities are funded from the Swedish state, with only consumables paid by the academic research group through individual grants.

  20. Institutional profile: the national Swedish academic drug discovery & development platform at SciLifeLab

    PubMed Central

    Arvidsson, Per I; Sandberg, Kristian; Sakariassen, Kjell S

    2017-01-01

    The Science for Life Laboratory Drug Discovery and Development Platform (SciLifeLab DDD) was established in Stockholm and Uppsala, Sweden, in 2014. It is one of ten platforms of the Swedish national SciLifeLab which support projects run by Swedish academic researchers with large-scale technologies for molecular biosciences with a focus on health and environment. SciLifeLab was created by the coordinated effort of four universities in Stockholm and Uppsala: Stockholm University, Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Uppsala University, and has recently expanded to other Swedish university locations. The primary goal of the SciLifeLab DDD is to support selected academic discovery and development research projects with tools and resources to discover novel lead therapeutics, either molecules or human antibodies. Intellectual property developed with the help of SciLifeLab DDD is wholly owned by the academic research group. The bulk of SciLifeLab DDD's research and service activities are funded from the Swedish state, with only consumables paid by the academic research group through individual grants. PMID:28670468

  1. Ethnic Swedish parents' experiences of minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence in Swedish paediatric care.

    PubMed

    Tavallali, Azar G; Kabir, Zarina Nahar; Jirwe, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Sweden has a population of a little more than 9.4 million. The rapid growth of immigration in Sweden has resulted in an increased number of minority ethnic patients and minority ethnic nurses in the Swedish healthcare system. This also applies to paediatric care. The purpose of this study was to explore how parents with ethnic Swedish backgrounds experience minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence and the care the nurses provide in a Swedish paediatric care context. This exploratory qualitative study is of 14 parents with an ethnic Swedish background whose child was in a ward at a children's hospital in Stockholm County Council. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews to identify parents' perceptions and experiences of minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence. The interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The analyses of the interviews led to four main categories: influence of nurses' ethnicity; significance of cross-cultural communication; cross-cultural skills; and the importance of nursing education. Nurses' ethnicity did not have much impact on parents' satisfaction with their child's care. The parents attached importance to nurses' language skills and to their adaptation and awareness of Swedish culture. They also attached weight to nurses' professional knowledge and personal attributes. The role of nursing education to increase nurses' cultural awareness was highlighted too. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Swedish nuclear dilemma: Energy and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nordhaus, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    One of the things that makes life both very frustrating and also very interesting is that accomplishing one objective frequently means backpedaling on another. Since economics is the study of tradeoffs, this means that there is generally plenty for economists to do. William Nordhaus is one of the best economists anywhere, and he has written a wonderful book about the tradeoffs faced by one country--Sweden--if and as it acts on a decision its citizens made in 1980 to phase out the use of nuclear power there. The author adds that this decision has been reaffirmed by the Swedish Parliament on several occasions since the 1980 referendum, though with some elusive qualifications. What will be both the environmental and also the economic implications of a Swedish phaseout of the use of nuclear power to generate electricity there. These are the two issues Nordhaus addresses in this book.

  3. Pendred syndrome in a large consanguineous Brazilian family caused by a homozygous mutation in the SLC26A4 gene.

    PubMed

    Lofrano-Porto, Adriana; Barra, Gustavo B; Nascimento, Paula P; Costa, Patrícia G G; Garcia, Erica C; Vaz, Rodrigo F; Batista, Ana R T; Freitas, Ana C R de; Cherulli, Bruno L B; Bahmad, Fayez; Figueiredo, Larissa G; Neves, Francisco A R; Casulari, Luiz Augusto

    2008-11-01

    Pendred Syndrome (PS) is an autossomal recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness, goiter and iodide organification defect. The hearing loss is associated with inner ear abnormalities, ranging from an isolated enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) to a typical coclear dysplasia. Mutations in the gene that encodes pendrin (SLC26A4), a chloride/iodide transporter, have been shown to be associated with PS. We describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of a large consanguineous family harboring a mutation in the SLC26A4 gene. The proband was a 26-year-old deaf Brazilian woman who presented a bulky multinodular goiter and hypothyroidism since puberty. Five other siblings were deaf: one brother had a similar phenotype, three siblings also had goiters but normal thyroid function tests, and one brother had only a subtle thyroid enlargement. Other 4 siblings had no thyroid or hearing disorder. Parents were first degree cousins and had normal hearing. The mother was healthy, except for subclinical hypothyroidism; the father was deceased. A perchlorate test in the proband showed a discharge of 21% of the incorporated iodide 2h after the administration of 1g of KClO4. Audiological examinations showed profound hearing loss in all deaf subjects; CT and MRI of the temporal bones showed EVA in all of them. Genomic DNA was isolated from whole blood, from the 6 affected and 4 unaffected siblings, the mother and control. The coding region of the PDS gene (exons 2-21), including exon/intron boundaries, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. A single base-pair (T) deletion at position 1197 of exon 10 was detected in homozygous state in the 6 deaf siblings. The mother and 2 unaffected siblings were heterozygous for this mutation, which has been described by Everett et al. The 1197delT mutation is predicted to result in a frameshift and a truncated protein. The existence of PS phenocopies and intrafamilial phenotypic variability are well documented. The definite

  4. Predictors of healthy behaviours in Swedish school children.

    PubMed

    Villard, Li C; Rydén, Lars; Ståhle, Agneta

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of predictors of adopting a healthy lifestyle in Swedish schoolchildren. A sample of 1409 Swedish schoolchildren (mean age 12.5 years) representative of different socio-economic and geographical living areas participated in a questionnaire-based survey on healthy habits and knowledge of healthy behaviour. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify intrapersonal, social and environmental predictors of healthy habits. A normal body mass index (intrapersonal determinant) was connected to refraining from tobacco (P<0.05). For children to perceive family (P<0.001), themselves (P<0.001), or someone else (P<0.01) as a source of inspiration (social determinant) to be physically active was related to a high physical activity level. Paternal (P=0.01) and maternal (P<0.001) attention to the use of tobacco (social determinant) was of importance for children to refrain from such habits. To live in a socio-economically wealthy area (environmental determinant) was of importance for healthy food choices (P<0.01) and physical activity (P<0.05). Children from rural (P<0.01) areas (environmental determinant) were more physically active than children from urban areas. Social aspects such as parental support for physical activity and refraining from tobacco were found to be important for healthy behaviours. Moreover, environmental factors such as socio-economic and geographical living area favourably influenced food choices and physical activity. Parental attitudes and economy are therefore important for physical activity, healthy food choices and refraining from tobacco in children. Consequently, future interventions need to address the psychological and environmental influences of the home environment through the active involvement of parents, even in school-based interventions.

  5. A novel RUNX2 missense mutation predicted to disrupt DNA binding causes cleidocranial dysplasia in a large Chinese family with hyperplastic nails

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaohua; Xu, Qiyu; Xu, Xueqin; Du, Jicheng; Yang, Xuemei; Jiang, Yusheng; Wang, Xiaoqin; Speck, Nancy; Huang, Taosheng

    2007-01-01

    Background Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by hypoplastic or absent clavicles, large fontanels, dental dysplasia, and delayed skeletal development. The purpose of this study is to investigate the genetic basis of Chinese family with CCD. Methods Here, a large Chinese family with CCD and hyperplastic nails was recruited. The clinical features displayed a significant intrafamilial variation. We sequenced the coding region of the RUNX2 gene for the mutation and phenotype analysis. Results The family carries a c.T407C (p.L136P) mutation in the DNA- and CBFβ-binding Runt domain of RUNX2. Based on the crystal structure, we predict this novel missense mutation is likely to disrupt DNA binding by RUNX2, and at least locally affect the Runt domain structure. Conclusion A novel missense mutation was identified in a large Chinese family with CCD with hyperplastic nails. This report further extends the mutation spectrum and clinical features of CCD. The identification of this mutation will facilitate prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. PMID:18166138

  6. Concussion among Swedish elite ice hockey players.

    PubMed Central

    Tegner, Y; Lorentzon, R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of concussion in Swedish ice hockey and to establish a uniform grading and treatment model for concussions of different severity. METHODS: Frequency of concussion was investigated in two studies, one retrospective and one prospective. In the retrospective study, all Swedish elite ice hockey players (n = 265) were asked to answer a questionnaire on the number and treatment of previous concussions. Only concussions diagnosed by a doctor were recorded. The questionnaire was completed by 227 players (86%). In the prospective study, all injuries including concussions occurring during game and practice in the Swedish Elite League (n = 12 teams) were recorded during four years. The causes of injury, referees judgements, diagnosis, treatment, and time absent from ice hockey were registered on special cards. RESULTS: In the retrospective study, 51 out of 227 players (22%) in the Swedish Elite League reported at least one concussion. In the prospective study, 52 concussions were reported. The incidence of a concussion is at least one concussion every year/team or a yearly risk of about 5% for a player to sustain a concussion. Most concussions occurred during league play (81%). Body contact (checking or boarding) was the most common cause of concussions. The players were absent from full training and play on a mean of 6 d. CONCLUSIONS: As this injury is potentially dangerous it must be treated seriously according to a simple treatment model presented. In cases of repeated concussions during the same season, a longer period of time away from play is suggested. In players who have sustained several concussions over the years a thorough medical examination including EEG, CT/MRI, and neuropsychological tests should be performed. If any of these is pathological the player should be advised to give up ice hockey. PMID:8889123

  7. Swedish perspective. [Bulk power transactions and pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, S.

    1994-12-01

    In line with the worldwide trend in many developed countries, the power industry in Sweden is subject to a reformation in the direction of deregulation and increased competition. In late May 1994, the Swedish Parliament passed the new Electricity Act, which is to be instrumental from Jan. 1995. This paper discusses the new legislation, general tariff structures, national grid tariff structure, operational implications, and harmonizing rules.

  8. Four themes in recent Swedish bioethics debates.

    PubMed

    Helgesson, Gert; Eriksson, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    A wide variety of bioethical themes have recently been debated and researched in Sweden, including genetic screening, HPV vaccination strategies, end-of-life care, injustices and priority setting in healthcare, dual-use research, and the never-ending story of scientific fraud. Also, there are some new events related to Swedish biobanking that might be of general interest. Here we will concentrate on four themes: end-of-life care, dual-use research, scientific fraud, and biobanking.

  9. Global health education in Swedish medical schools.

    PubMed

    Ehn, S; Agardh, A; Holmer, H; Krantz, G; Hagander, L

    2015-11-01

    Global health education is increasingly acknowledged as an opportunity for medical schools to prepare future practitioners for the broad health challenges of our time. The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of global health education in Swedish medical schools and to assess students' perceived needs for such education. Data on global health education were collected from all medical faculties in Sweden for the years 2000-2013. In addition, 76% (439/577) of all Swedish medical students in their final semester answered a structured questionnaire. Global health education is offered at four of Sweden's seven medical schools, and most medical students have had no global health education. Medical students in their final semester consider themselves to lack knowledge and skills in areas such as the global burden of disease (51%), social determinants of health (52%), culture and health (60%), climate and health (62%), health promotion and disease prevention (66%), strategies for equal access to health care (69%) and global health care systems (72%). A significant association was found between self-assessed competence and the amount of global health education received (p<0.001). A majority of Swedish medical students (83%) wished to have more global health education added to the curriculum. Most Swedish medical students have had no global health education as part of their medical school curriculum. Expanded education in global health is sought after by medical students and could strengthen the professional development of future medical doctors in a wide range of topics important for practitioners in the global world of the twenty-first century. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  10. Swedish anthropometrics for product and workplace design.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Lars; Sperling, Lena; Gard, Gunvor; Ipsen, Staffan; Olivares Vergara, Cindy

    2009-07-01

    The present study describes the anthropometrics of the Swedish workforce, aged 18-65, and compares the measurements with data collected four decades earlier. This anthropometric information is based on measurements of a total of 367 subjects, 105 males and 262 females. Of the 367 subjects, 268 responded to advertisements (Study A) and 99 were randomly selected from a community register (Study B). Subjects were scanned in four positions. Manual measuring equipment was used for hands, feet, head and stature. As differences between significant measurements in Studies A and B were negligible, the data were merged. Anthropometric descriptive statistics of women and men are presented for 43 body dimensions. Participants represent the Swedish population fairly well when compared with national statistics of stature and weight. Comparing new anthropometric data with old shows that the breadth, depth, height, and length measurements of Swedes as well as weight have increased and that Swedish anthropometric homogeneity has decreased. The results indicate that there is a need to update ergonomic recommendations and adjust products and workplaces to the new information.

  11. Large genomic rearrangements in the familial breast and ovarian cancer gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased frequency of high risk features.

    PubMed

    James, Paul A; Sawyer, Sarah; Boyle, Samantha; Young, Mary-Anne; Kovalenko, Serguei; Doherty, Rebecca; McKinley, Joanne; Alsop, Kathryn; Beshay, Victoria; Harris, Marion; Fox, Stephen; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Mitchell, Gillian

    2015-06-01

    Large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) account for at least 10% of the mutations in BRCA1 and 5% of BRCA2 mutations in outbred hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) families. Data from some series suggest LGRs represent particularly penetrant mutations. 1,034 index cases from HBOC families underwent comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing, including screening for LGRs. The personal and family history of 254 identified mutation carriers were compared based on mutation type. Thirty-six LGRs were detected; 32/122 (26%) BRCA1 and 4/132 (3%) BRCA2 mutations. High risk features (bilateral breast cancer, diagnosis <40 years, ovarian cancer, male breast cancer) were more commonly associated with an LGR than a non-LGR mutation (p = 0.008), In families with a BRCA1 LGR the mean age of breast cancer diagnosis was younger than in families with a non-LGR BRCA1 mutation (42.5 vs. 46.1 years, p = 0.007). Across the entire group of mutation positive families the number of relatives affected by breast or ovarian cancer was increased [LGR 3.7 vs. non- LGR 2.8 per family, p value (adjusted for genotype) = 0.047]. Excluding index cases, the odds ratio for breast cancer in BRCA1 families with an LGR was 1.42 (95% CI 1.24-1.63) and for ovarian cancer 1.66 (95% CI 1.10-2.49). The increased cancer risk was reflected in significantly higher risk assessments by mutation prediction tools. LGRs are associated with higher cancer risks. If validated, LGRs could be included in cancer risk prediction tools to improve personalised cancer risk prediction estimates and may guide cost-minimising mutation screening strategies in some healthcare settings.

  12. Swedish scientists take acid-rain research to developing nations

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, T.

    1995-12-01

    In the realm of acid-rain research, Sweden looms large on the world stage. It is the country where scientists first proved more than 30 years ago that airborne chemicals could and did cross international boundaries to acidify lakes and forests far from where the pollution was generated. Now, Swedish scientists are leading an international effort to map acid-rain patterns in the developing countries of Asia, where new industrial activity seems to be recreating problems that European and North American policy makers have already taken steps to solve. Topics covered in this article include acid rain on the rise in Asia; visualizing and validating the data; funding as the key to steady research.

  13. Silencing of voices in a Swedish science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos de Robles, S. Lizette

    2016-09-01

    From a sociocultural perspective, I discuss data from a Swedish science classroom presented in María Gómez's article "Student Explanations of their Science Teachers' Assessments, Grading Practices, and How they learn Science". In this discussion, I focus on the need to change existing conceptions of assessment in the teaching and learning of science. Next, I talk about the importance of taking into consideration the dialectic between agency and passivity as filters in order to understand what student silence may signify in science classes as well as in relation to their perceptions of assessment. I conclude with the importance of the teacher's role in developing formative assessment, along with the challenges in developing assessments which transform science education into a relevant field of knowledge for both students and society at large.

  14. Providing maternal and child health-family planning services to a large rural population: results of the Bohol Project, Philippines.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, N E; Parado, J P; Maturan, E G

    1983-01-01

    The Bohol Project (1975-1979) sought to improve maternal and child health and to increase the use of family planning among a rural Philippine population of 400,000. Research indicated that maternal and child health (MCH) services did become more available during the Project period and coverage of the priority populations improved. Family planning (FP) use, particularly of less effective methods, increased and fertility declined although some change could have been expected even without the Project. Deaths due to neonatal tetanus were almost eliminated by mortality rates did not decline for a number of reasons, including the fact that services were probably not tailored closely enough to local health problems, especially respiratory diseases. The Project showed that it was possible to increase health and family planning services by using low-cost strategies (such as setting up community drug stores) and by employing paramedical workers, in this case, midwives. Preventive MCH-FP services were not overwhelmed by curative services as had been feared. Perhaps the most significant contributions of the Project were the lessons learned about delivering health and family planning services and conducting evaluation research. In general, if developing countries could maintain well-evaluated field laboratories for working out health and family planning delivery approaches before going nationwide, it is likely that time and money would be saved in the long run. PMID:6848001

  15. Analysis of BRCA1and BRCA2 large genomic rearrangements in Sri Lankan familial breast cancer patients and at risk individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Majority of mutations found to date in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in breast and/or ovarian cancer families are point mutations or small insertions and deletions scattered over the coding sequence and splice junctions. Such mutations and sequence variants of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were previously identified in a group of Sri Lankan breast cancer patients. Large genomic rearrangements have been characterized in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in several populations but these have not been characterized in Sri Lankan breast cancer patients. Findings A cohort of familial breast cancer patients (N = 57), at risk individuals (N = 25) and healthy controls (N = 23) were analyzed using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification method to detect BRCA1 and BRCA2 large genomic rearrangements. One familial breast cancer patient showed an ambiguous deletion in exon 6 of BRCA1 gene. Full sequencing of the ambiguous region was used to confirm MLPA results. Ambiguous deletion detected by MLPA was found to be a false positive result confirming that BRCA1 large genomic rearrangements were absent in the subjects studied. No BRCA2 rearrangement was also identified in the cohort. Conclusion Thus this study demonstrates that BRCA1 and BRCA2 large genomic rearrangements are unlikely to make a significant contribution to aetiology of breast cancer in Sri Lanka. PMID:24906410

  16. Parental Participation and Retention in an Alcohol Preventive Family-Focused Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarstrand, Eva; Branstrom, Richard; Sundell, Knut; Kallmen, Hakan; Andreassen, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine factors predicting parental participation and retention in a Swedish version of the Strengthening Families Programme (SFP). Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on data from a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effects of the Swedish version of the SFP. The sample involves 441…

  17. X-linked nonspecific mental retardation (MRX16) mapping to distal Xq28: linkage study and neuropsychological data in a large family.

    PubMed

    Gendrot, C; Ronce, N; Raynaud, M; Ayrault, A D; Dourlens, J; Castelnau, P; Muh, J P; Chelly, J; Moraine, C

    1999-04-23

    A genetic linkage study was performed on a large four-generation family with variable nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (MRX16), speech abnormalities, and retardation of all milestones. Significant linkage was found in the Xq28 region with loci DXS52, DXS15, BGN, and DXS1108 with maximum LOD scores of 4.86, 4.01, 4.83, and 5.43, respectively, at theta = 0.00. Recombination was observed at the locus DXS1113, thus mapping the gene in an 8-Mb interval between this marker and the Xq telomere. Linkage intervals of three other MRX families overlap with this interval in Xq28 where the RABGDIA gene, mutated in the MRX41 and MRX48 families, is also located. In MRX3, MRX28, but also in MRX16, no alteration of RABGDIA has been found, thus suggesting the existence of at least two MRX genes in distal Xq28.

  18. Cervical screening participation and risk among Swedish-born and immigrant women in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Azerkan, Fatima; Sparén, Pär; Sandin, Sven; Tillgren, Per; Faxelid, Elisabeth; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2012-02-15

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide, although cervical screening has reduced the incidence in many high-income countries. Low screening uptake among immigrant women may reflect differences in risk of cervical cancer. We investigated the degree of participation in cervical screening among immigrant and Swedish-born women and their concurrent risk of cervical cancer based on individual information on Pap smears taken both from organized and opportunistic screening. Mean degree of participation in cervical screening was estimated for women between 23 and 60 years from 1993 to 2005, stratified by birth region and age at migration. In Poisson regression models, we estimated relative risks (RRs), incidence rates and incidence rate ratios of cervical cancer for women adhering or not to the cervical screening program. We also assessed effect of adherence to screening on the risk of cervical cancer among immigrant groups compared to Swedish-born women. The degree of participation was 62% and 49% among Swedish-born and immigrant women, respectively, with large variations between immigrant groups. Participation was lowest among those immigrating at older ages. Swedish-born and immigrant women who where nonadherent to the cervical screening program had a fivefold excess risk of cervical cancer compared to adherent women. After adjustment for screening adherence, excess RRs of cervical cancer were statistically significant only for women from Norway and the Baltic States. Participation to screening is lower among immigrant than Swedish-born women, and adherence to the recommended screening intervals strongly prevents cervical cancer.

  19. Swedish medical students' expectations of their future life

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jenny; Johansson, Eva E.; Verdonk, Petra; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine; Hamberg, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate future life expectations among male and female medical students in their first and final year. Methods The study was cross-sectional and conducted at a Swedish medical school. Out of 600 invited students, 507 (85%) answered an open-ended question about their future life, 298 (59%) first-year students and 209 (41%) last-year students. Women constituted 60% of the respondents. A mixed model design was applied; qualitative content analysis was utilized to create statistically comparable themes and categories. Results Students’ written answers were coded, categorized and clustered into four themes: “Work”, “Family”, “Leisure” and “Quality of personal life”. Almost all students included aspects of work in their answers. Female students were more detailed than male ones in their family concerns. Almost a third of all students reflected on a future work-life balance, but considerations regarding quality of personal life and leisure were more common among last-year students. Conclusions Today’s medical students expect more of life than work, especially those standing on the doorstep of working life. They intend to balance work not only with a family but also with leisure activities. Our results reflect work attitudes that challenge the health care system for more adaptive working conditions. We suggest that discussions about work-life balance should be included in medical curricula.

  20. Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency: heterogeneity of mutations and phenotypic variability in a large number of families.

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier, L; Ouahchi, K; Kayden, H J; Di Donato, S; Reutenauer, L; Mandel, J L; Koenig, M

    1998-01-01

    Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), or familial isolated vitamin E deficiency, is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by symptoms with often striking resemblance to those of Friedreich ataxia. We recently have demonstrated that AVED is caused by mutations in the gene for alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (alpha-TTP). We now have identified a total of 13 mutations in 27 families. Four mutations were found in >=2 independent families: 744delA, which is the major mutation in North Africa, and 513insTT, 486delT, and R134X, in families of European origin. Compilation of the clinical records of 43 patients with documented mutation in the alpha-TTP gene revealed differences from Friedreich ataxia: cardiomyopathy was found in only 19% of cases, whereas head titubation was found in 28% of cases and dystonia in an additional 13%. This study represents the largest group of patients and mutations reported for this often misdiagnosed disease and points to the need for an early differential diagnosis with Friedreich ataxia, in order to initiate therapeutic and prophylactic vitamin E supplementation before irreversible damage develops. PMID:9463307

  1. Novel 6-bp deletion in MEF2A linked to premature coronary artery disease in a large Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    XU, DONG-LING; TIAN, HONG-LIANG; CAI, WEI-LI; ZHENG, JIE; GAO, MIN; ZHANG, MING-XIANG; ZHENG, ZHAO-TONG; LU, QING-HUA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the genetic defect responsible for familial coronary artery disease/myocardial infarction (CAD/MI), which exhibited an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, in an extended Chinese Han pedigree containing 34 members. Using exome and Sanger sequencing, a novel 6-base pair (bp) 'CAGCCG' deletion in exon 11 of the myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) gene was identified, which cosegregated with CAD/MI cases in this family. This 6-bp deletion was not detected in 311 sporadic cases of premature CAD/MI or in 323 unrelated healthy controls. Determination of a genetic risk profile has a key role in understanding the pathogenesis of CAD and MI. Among the reported risk conferring genes and their variants, mutations in MEF2A have been reported to segregate with CAD/MI in Caucasian families. Causative missense mutations have also been detected in sporadic CAD/MI cases. However, this suggested genetic linkage is controversial, since it could not be confirmed by ensuing studies. The discovery of a novel MEF2A mutation in a Chinese family with premature CAD/MI suggests that MEF2A may have a significant role in the pathogenesis of premature CAD/MI. To better understand this association, further in vitro and in vivo studies are required. PMID:27221044

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Training and Development and Work-Family Education Systems in a Large Corporate Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the findings of a comparative analysis of two education systems in one corporate organization: training and development and work-family. Key learning features across these systems were analyzed to determine similarities and differences and to identify common concerns. The findings indicated that, although this organization…

  3. Novel homozygous large deletion including the 5′ part of the SPATA7 gene in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Anja-Kathrin; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Zobor, Ditta; Bonin, Michael; Sharkia, Rajech

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defect in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family with juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods DNA samples were collected from the index patient, her parents, her affected sister, and two non-affected siblings. Genome-wide linkage analysis with 250 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays was performed using DNA from the two affected patients. Owing to consanguinity in the family, we applied homozygosity mapping to identify the disease-causing gene. The candidate gene SPATA7 was screened for mutations with PCR amplifications and direct Sanger sequencing. Results Following high-density SNP arrays, we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the SPATA7 gene. Several mutations in SPATA7 have been reported for various forms of retinal dystrophy, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and juvenile RP. PCR-based sequence content mapping, long-distance PCR amplifications, and subsequent sequencing analysis revealed a homozygous 63.4 kb large deletion that encompasses the 5′ part of the SPATA7 gene including exons 1–5. The mutation showed concordant segregation with the phenotype in the family as expected for autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and is consistent with a diagnosis of juvenile RP. Conclusions We report a novel homozygous large deletion in SPATA7 associated with juvenile RP in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family. This is the first larger deletion mutation reported for SPATA7. PMID:25814828

  4. Clinical and genetic investigation of a large Tunisian family with complete achromatopsia: identification of a new nonsense mutation in GNAT2 gene.

    PubMed

    Ouechtati, Farah; Merdassi, Ahlem; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Largueche, Leila; Derouiche, Kaouther; Ouragini, Houyem; Nouira, Sonia; Tiab, Leila; Baklouti, Karim; Rebai, Ahmed; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis L; Zografos, Leonidas; Abdelhak, Sonia; El Matri, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Complete achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2 and PDE6C mutations. This retinal disorder is characterized by complete loss of color discrimination due to the absence or alteration of the cones function. The purpose of the present study was the clinical and the genetic characterization of achromatopsia in a large consanguineous Tunisian family. Ophthalmic evaluation included a full clinical examination, color vision testing and electroretinography. Linkage analysis using microsatellite markers flanking CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2 and PDE6C genes was performed. Mutations were screened by direct sequencing. A total of 12 individuals were diagnosed with congenital complete achromatopsia. They are members of six nuclear consanguineous families belonging to the same large consanguineous family. Linkage analysis revealed linkage to GNAT2. Mutational screening of GNAT2 revealed three intronic variations c.119-69G>C, c.161+66A>T and c.875-31G>C that co-segregated with a novel mutation p.R313X. An identical GNAT2 haplotype segregating with this mutation was identified, indicating a founder mutation. All patients were homozygous for the p.R313X mutation. This is the first report of the clinical and genetic investigation of complete achromatopsia in North Africa and the largest family with recessive achromatopsia involving GNAT2; thus, providing a unique opportunity for genotype-phenotype correlation for this extremely rare condition.

  5. The large soybean (Glycine max) WRKY TF family expanded by segmental duplication events and subsequent divergent selection among subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background WRKY genes encode one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors in higher plants, and its members regulate important biological process such as growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although the soybean genome sequence has been published, functional studies on soybean genes still lag behind those of other species. Results We identified a total of 133 WRKY members in the soybean genome. According to structural features of their encoded proteins and to the phylogenetic tree, the soybean WRKY family could be classified into three groups (groups I, II, and III). A majority of WRKY genes (76.7%; 102 of 133) were segmentally duplicated and 13.5% (18 of 133) of the genes were tandemly duplicated. This pattern was not apparent in Arabidopsis or rice. The transcriptome atlas revealed notable differential expression in either transcript abundance or in expression patterns under normal growth conditions, which indicated wide functional divergence in this family. Furthermore, some critical amino acids were detected using DIVERGE v2.0 in specific comparisons, suggesting that these sites have contributed to functional divergence among groups or subgroups. In addition, site model and branch-site model analyses of positive Darwinian selection (PDS) showed that different selection regimes could have affected the evolution of these groups. Sites with high probabilities of having been under PDS were found in groups I, II c, II e, and III. Together, these results contribute to a detailed understanding of the molecular evolution of the WRKY gene family in soybean. Conclusions In this work, all the WRKY genes, which were generated mainly through segmental duplication, were identified in the soybean genome. Moreover, differential expression and functional divergence of the duplicated WRKY genes were two major features of this family throughout their evolutionary history. Positive selection analysis revealed that the different groups have

  6. Function search in a large transcription factor gene family in Arabidopsis: assessing the potential of reverse genetics to identify insertional mutations in R2R3 MYB genes.

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, R C; Jin, H; Cominelli, E; Denekamp, M; Fuertes, A; Greco, R; Kranz, H D; Penfield, S; Petroni, K; Urzainqui, A; Martin, C; Paz-Ares, J; Smeekens, S; Tonelli, C; Weisshaar, B; Baumann, E; Klimyuk, V; Marillonnet, S; Patel, K; Speulman, E; Tissier, A F; Bouchez, D; Jones, J J; Pereira, A; Wisman, E

    1999-01-01

    More than 92 genes encoding MYB transcription factors of the R2R3 class have been described in Arabidopsis. The functions of a few members of this large gene family have been described, indicating important roles for R2R3 MYB transcription factors in the regulation of secondary metabolism, cell shape, and disease resistance, and in responses to growth regulators and stresses. For the majority of the genes in this family, however, little functional information is available. As the first step to characterizing these genes functionally, the sequences of >90 family members, and the map positions and expression profiles of >60 members, have been determined previously. An important second step in the functional analysis of the MYB family, through a process of reverse genetics that entails the isolation of insertion mutants, is described here. For this purpose, a variety of gene disruption resources has been used, including T-DNA-insertion populations and three distinct populations that harbor transposon insertions. We report the isolation of 47 insertions into 36 distinct MYB genes by screening a total of 73 genes. These defined insertion lines will provide the foundation for subsequent detailed functional analyses for the assignment of specific functions to individual members of the R2R3 MYB gene family. PMID:10521515

  7. Clinical variability of the cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy phenotype in two siblings of a large family showing the same mutation

    PubMed Central

    Vyshka, Gentian; Kruja, Jera

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old Albanian male was consulted and diagnosed with dementia. His magnetic resonance imaging suggested diffuse white matter changes. The suspicion of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) was raised, and a genetic analysis confirmed such a suspicion through uncovering a pathogenic mutation at the level of exon 4 (c.475C>T) of chromosome 19. The patient came from a large family of 13 children, all of whom underwent clinical, genetic, and imaging examination. The pathogenic mutation was found present only in his eldest sister (50 years old), and she presented also very suggestive signs of CADASIL in her respective imaging study, but without any clinically significant counterpart. All other siblings were free from clinical and radiological signs of the disorder. Our opinion was that we were dealing with a mutation showing a very low level of penetrance, with only two siblings affected in a large Albanian family with 13 children. PMID:24124395

  8. A novel large deletion in the RYR1 gene in a Belgian family with late-onset and recessive core myopathy.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Kadhim, Hazim; Abramowicz, Marc; Mavroudakis, Nicolas; Monnier, Nicole; Lunardi, Joël

    2015-05-01

    We report a novel and particularly unusual type of mutation, namely, large deletion in the RYR1 gene, in a Belgian family with myopathy: Patients were found to be compound heterozygous and presented a clinico-pathological phenotype characterized by late-onset and recessive myopathy with cores. We depict the clinical, electrophysiological, pathological and molecular genetic characteristics of family members. To date, large deletions in the RYR1 gene have been reported in only two cases. Both involved different mutations and, in sharp contrast to our cases, presented with a very early-onset, neonatal, and a very severe or lethal phenotype. Overview of reported clinico-pathologic phenotypes, also highlights the rarity of combined late-onset/recessive co-occurrence in this group of myopathies with cores. Finally, this report underlines the broadening spectrum in this group of myopathologic disorders and highlights the concept of 'RYR1-associated/related core myopathies'.

  9. Confirmation of X-linked inheritance and provisional mapping of the keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans gene on Xp in a large Dutch family.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, J C; Nelen, M; Van Zandvoort, P M; Van Osch, L D; Oranje, A P; Wittebol-Post, D; Van Oost, B A

    1992-03-01

    In a large Dutch family with keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD, MIM 308800), DNA linkage analysis was performed in order to locate the gene. Pedigree analysis and lod score calculation confirmed X-linked inheritance and revealed significant linkage to DNA markers on Xp. A maximum lod score of 5.70 at theta = 0.0 was obtained with DXS41 (p99.6). The KFSD gene is tentatively located on Xp21.2-p22.2.

  10. The experience and responses of Swedish health professionals to patients requesting virginity restoration (hymen repair).

    PubMed

    Essén, Birgitta; Blomkvist, Anna; Helström, Lotti; Johnsdotter, Sara

    2010-05-01

    An important determinant of family honour in many cultures is the chastity of women, with much importance attributed to virginity until marriage. The traditional proof of virginity is bleeding from the ruptured hymen, which has led some women to request genital surgery to "restore" virginity, or hymen repair. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Swedish health care providers have had experience of patients requesting this surgery. Questionnaires were sent to 1,086 gynaecologists, midwives, youth welfare and social officers, and school nurses and doctors in four Swedish cities. Of the 507 who returned the questionnaire, 271 had seen patients seeking virginity-related care. Of these, 14 had turned the patients away; 221 had made 429 referrals, mostly to a welfare officer or a gynaecologist; and 26 had referred patients to a plastic surgeon. Nine gynaecologists had carried out such surgery themselves. Swedish authorities have to date focused on this issue primarily from a social and legal perspective. No guidelines exist on how health professionals should deal with requests for surgery to restore virginity. Further research is needed on how best to meet the needs of this group of patients in a multi-ethnic society and how to address requests for hymen repair. Without this, medical practitioners and counsellors will remain uncertain and ambivalent, and a variety of approaches will persist. Copyright 2010 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Is congenital malformation a risk factor for caries development in Swedish adolescents?

    PubMed

    Julihn, Annika; Jansson, Pelle; Regnstrand, Tobias; Modéer, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether various forms of congenital malformations are risk factors for approximal caries development in Swedish adolescents. This longitudinal register-based cohort study included all adolescents (n = 18 142) of 13 years of age who resided in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, in 2000. The cohort was followed until individuals were 19 years of age. Dental caries (decayed, missing and filled teeth/surfaces (DMFT/S)) were collected from the Public Health Care Administration in Stockholm. Data concerning pre- and perinatal factors and parental socio-demographic determinants were collected from Swedish National Registers. In a logistic regression analysis, neither congenital malformation nor any sub-group of congenital malformation registered at birth were significantly associated with an enhanced risk of approximal caries increment in adolescents between 13-19 years of age. The final multivariate logistic regression model, adjusted for possible maternal and family socio-demographic confounders, showed that congenital malformation of the 'circulatory system' was significantly associated with a decreased risk of approximal caries increment, between 13-19 years of age (OR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.12-0.88). Congenital malformation should not be considered as a risk factor for approximal caries development in Swedish adolescents today. Noticeably, adolescents with congenital heart diseases exhibited less risk of developing approximal caries, which was probably related to prevention programs allocated to these children in Sweden.

  12. ICT Use among 13-Year-Old Swedish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsson, Ulli

    2010-01-01

    Swedish children have grown up in a digital culture, but have internalized information and communication technology (ICT) in different ways and gained most of their knowledge by peer-based learning. The aim of this study is to give an empirical understanding of patterns of ICT use among Swedish children. The data are collected through a survey…

  13. ICT Use among 13-Year-Old Swedish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsson, Ulli

    2010-01-01

    Swedish children have grown up in a digital culture, but have internalized information and communication technology (ICT) in different ways and gained most of their knowledge by peer-based learning. The aim of this study is to give an empirical understanding of patterns of ICT use among Swedish children. The data are collected through a survey…

  14. Picking up the Threads. Languaging in a Swedish Mainstream Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puskás, Tünde

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the strategies monolingual teachers use to scaffold meaning and encourage and enhance verbal communication with emergent bilingual children in a Swedish mainstream preschool. The study is based on ethnographic fieldwork in a preschool group in which seven of twelve children spoke Swedish as their second, additional language.…

  15. Problem Solving in Swedish Mathematics Textbooks for Upper Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehmer, Daniel; Ryve, Andreas; Van Steenbrugge, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse how mathematical problem solving is represented in mathematical textbooks for Swedish upper secondary school. The analysis comprises dominating Swedish textbook series, and relates to uncovering (a) the quantity of tasks that are actually mathematical problems, (b) their location in the chapter, (c) their…

  16. Parental Expectations of the Swedish Municipal School of Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilliedahl, Jonathan; Georgii-Hemming, Eva

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on a study designed to analyse parental expectations of the Swedish municipal school of arts (hereafter MSA) (in Swedish: kommunal musik- och kulturskola). The study is based on in-depth interviews conducted and informed by grounded theory. Although parental expectations are scarcely uniform, the study reveals a hope that the…

  17. Lingual Electromyography Related to Tongue Movements in Swedish Vowel Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Hajime; And Others

    1979-01-01

    In order to investigate the articulatory dynamics of the tongue in the production of Swedish vowels, electromyographic (EMG) and X-ray microbeam studies were performed on a native Swedish subject. The EMG signals were used to obtain average indication of the muscle activity of the tongue as a function of time. (NCR)

  18. Mathematical Reasoning Requirements in Swedish Upper Secondary Level Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm, Torulf; Boesen, Jesper; Lithner, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the mathematical reasoning required to solve the tasks in the Swedish national tests and a random selection of Swedish teacher-made tests. The results show that only a small proportion of the tasks in the teacher-made tests require the students to produce new reasoning and to consider the intrinsic mathematical properties involved…

  19. Lingual Electromyography Related to Tongue Movements in Swedish Vowel Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Hajime; And Others

    1979-01-01

    In order to investigate the articulatory dynamics of the tongue in the production of Swedish vowels, electromyographic (EMG) and X-ray microbeam studies were performed on a native Swedish subject. The EMG signals were used to obtain average indication of the muscle activity of the tongue as a function of time. (NCR)

  20. National Curriculum Assessment in England--A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikstrom, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary, the author discusses some of the issues she finds interesting from a Swedish perspective, and also makes some comparisons between the systems. The English and Swedish education and assessment systems have some fundamental differences, but also similarities. Some are becoming even more evident after learning about the…

  1. Imperatives for "Right" Educational Choices in Swedish Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puaca, Goran

    2014-01-01

    The present article is based on a critical semiotic investigation of the Swedish Long-Term Survey on economic development. It aims to examine how recent Swedish policy trends bring specific economic, political and social processes together to form a system of meaning for both motivation and regulation over individuals' educational choices. What is…

  2. Teachers' Pedagogical Mathematical Awareness in Swedish Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Björklund, Camilla; Barendregt, Wolmet

    2016-01-01

    Revised guidelines for Swedish early childhood education that emphasize mathematics content and competencies in more detail than before raise the question of the status of pedagogical mathematical awareness among Swedish early childhood teachers. The purpose of this study is to give an overview of teachers' current pedagogical mathematical…

  3. National Curriculum Assessment in England--A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikstrom, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary, the author discusses some of the issues she finds interesting from a Swedish perspective, and also makes some comparisons between the systems. The English and Swedish education and assessment systems have some fundamental differences, but also similarities. Some are becoming even more evident after learning about the…

  4. Preschool Education and Day Care for Swedish Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jeanne

    A comprehensive study of the types of care provided for Swedish children is presented. The point is made that the three major frameworks which support the Swedish philosophy of early childhood education are those of Arnold Gesell, Jean Piaget, and Erik H. Erikson. From all three sources, preschool teachers learn the concept of epigenesis, the…

  5. Preschool Education and Day Care for Swedish Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jeanne

    A comprehensive study of the types of care provided for Swedish children is presented. The point is made that the three major frameworks which support the Swedish philosophy of early childhood education are those of Arnold Gesell, Jean Piaget, and Erik H. Erikson. From all three sources, preschool teachers learn the concept of epigenesis, the…

  6. Parental Expectations of the Swedish Municipal School of Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilliedahl, Jonathan; Georgii-Hemming, Eva

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on a study designed to analyse parental expectations of the Swedish municipal school of arts (hereafter MSA) (in Swedish: kommunal musik- och kulturskola). The study is based on in-depth interviews conducted and informed by grounded theory. Although parental expectations are scarcely uniform, the study reveals a hope that the…

  7. The Boston Naming Test in Swedish: Normative Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallberg, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to introduce a Swedish version of the Boston Naming Test and to offer normative data based on a sample of native Swedish-speaking healthy adults stratified concerning age, gender, and length of education. The subjects were assessed with other lexical tests and half of the group also performed tests of global…

  8. Swedish Immersion in the Early Years in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Björklund, Siv; Mård-Miettinen, Karita; Savijärvi, Marjo

    2014-01-01

    Immersion education in Finland is a one-way (monolingual) early total Swedish programme for Finnish-speaking students. This immersion provision is offered at kindergarten level (ages 3-5), at preschool (age 6) and at primary levels (grades 1-9). Here, a brief synthesis of Finnish research studies on the early years in Swedish immersion is first…

  9. Swedish Support to Non-Formal Adult Education Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA).

    This document presents an overview of support for economic development provided by the Swedish government to a variety of nonformal adult education programs in developing nations (mostly in Africa). The four sections of the report provide details of the following: (1) scope, objectives, and methods of Swedish development cooperation; (2) the…

  10. Problem Solving in Swedish Mathematics Textbooks for Upper Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehmer, Daniel; Ryve, Andreas; Van Steenbrugge, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse how mathematical problem solving is represented in mathematical textbooks for Swedish upper secondary school. The analysis comprises dominating Swedish textbook series, and relates to uncovering (a) the quantity of tasks that are actually mathematical problems, (b) their location in the chapter, (c) their…

  11. Teachers' Pedagogical Mathematical Awareness in Swedish Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Björklund, Camilla; Barendregt, Wolmet

    2016-01-01

    Revised guidelines for Swedish early childhood education that emphasize mathematics content and competencies in more detail than before raise the question of the status of pedagogical mathematical awareness among Swedish early childhood teachers. The purpose of this study is to give an overview of teachers' current pedagogical mathematical…

  12. Deletion of exons 1-3 of the MEN1 gene in a large Italian family causes the loss of menin expression.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Tagliati, Federico; Di Ruvo, Mauro; Castermans, Emilie; Cavazzini, Luigi; Daly, Adrian F; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Beckers, Albert; degli Uberti, Ettore

    2014-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease, characterized by parathyroid adenomas, endocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors and pituitary adenomas, due to inactivating mutations of the MEN1 gene (chromosome 11q13). MEN1 mutations are mainly represented by nonsense, deletions/insertions, splice site or missense mutations that can be detected by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. However, MEN1 patients with large heterozygous deletions may escape classical genetic screening and may be misidentified as phenocopies, thereby hindering proper clinical surveillance. We employed a real-time polymerase chain reaction application, the TaqMan copy number variation assay, to evaluate a family in which we failed to identify an MEN1 mutation by direct sequencing, despite a clear clinical diagnosis of MEN1 syndrome. Using the TaqMan copy number variation assay we identified a large deletion of the MEN1 gene involving exons 1 and 2, in three affected family members, but not in the other nine family members that were to date clinically unaffected. The same genetic alteration was not found in a group of ten unaffected subjects, without family history of endocrine tumors. The MEN1 deletion was further confirmed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, which showed the deletion extended from exon 1 to exon 3. This new approach allowed us to correctly genetically diagnose three clinical MEN1 patients that were previously considered as MEN1 phenocopies. More importantly, we excluded the presence of genetic alterations in the unaffected family members. These results underline the importance of using a variety of available biotechnology approaches when pursuing a genetic diagnosis in a clinically suggestive setting of inherited endocrine cancer.

  13. Swedish Chemists and Discovery of the Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Volker

    1996-10-01

    All of the elements not already known from antiquity were discovered in Europe and North America. So which country ranks number one on the discovery list? The question occurred to me while leafing through reference 1 in search of thermodynamic data on silicon. Never having seen such a tabulation, I wondered if it might prove useful in teaching. The question has a sports-related flavor that will appeal to many students. Personally, I picked England or Germany for #1. The actual result is surprising. The ranking considering only up to atomic number 103 is as follows: Note: Where two or more independent discoveries have been made, each country is credited. In the "others" category Austria and Denmark each has two discoveries. The remaining countries, with one each, are Finland, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Romania, Russia, and Spain. The high place for the USA is primarily due to the work done at Berkeley and Los Alamos on the transuranics. Without these discoveries, the US would have tied with Switzerland at three elements. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this tabulation is that Swedish chemists have discovered the most elements. Four chemists alone account for twelve of the 20 discoveries: Baron Jöns Jakob Berzelius (1779-1848) is credited with four elements. His pupil, friend, and assistant, Carl Gustav Mosander (1797-1858) discovered three. P. T. Cleve also found three elements and Karl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786) discovered two. Biographical research on the Swedish chemists is a suitable assignment at the introductory level. Reasons for the predominance of Swedish chemists presents a challenging student research topic in the history of chemistry. Another interesting question at the introductory level is, transuranics aside, who discovered the most elements? At the more advanced level the question becomes, why? Literature Cited: 1. Emsley, J. The Elements; Clarendon: Oxford, 1989.

  14. Helicobacter pylori eradication in the Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Doorakkers, Eva; Lagergren, Jesper; Gajulapuri, Vijaya Krishna; Callens, Steven; Engstrand, Lars; Brusselaers, Nele

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with peptic ulcers and gastric cancer and its eradication aims to prevent these conditions. The recommended eradication regimen is triple therapy, consisting of a proton-pump inhibitor in combination with clarithromycin and amoxicillin or metronidazole for 7 days. Yet, other antibiotic regimens are sometimes prescribed. We aimed to assess the use of eradication therapy for H. pylori in the Swedish population during the last decade. This population-based study used data from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. From July 2005 until December 2014, all regimens that can eradicate H. pylori were identified and evaluated according to patients' age and sex and calendar year of eradication. We identified 157,915 eradication episodes in 140,391 individuals (53.8% women, 42.6% older than 60 years), who correspond to 1.5% of the Swedish population. The absolute number and incidence of eradications decreased over the study period. Overall, 91.0% had one eradication and 0.1% had more than three. Of all eradications, 95.4% followed the recommended regimen, while 4.7% did not. The latter group was overrepresented among individuals aged ≥80 years (7.8%). Amoxicillin and clarithromycin were most frequently prescribed, while metronidazole was rarely used (0.01%). Other prescribed antibiotics were ciprofloxacin (2.4%), doxycycline (1.4%), nitrofurantoin (0.7%), norfloxacin (0.5%) and erythromycin (0.3%). During the last decade in Sweden H. pylori eradication has been frequently prescribed, but the incidence of eradication has slowly declined. Most eradications followed the recommended regimen, including those occurring after a previous eradication.

  15. Work-family conflict, emotional exhaustion and performance-based self-esteem: reciprocal relationships.

    PubMed

    Richter, Anne; Schraml, Karin; Leineweber, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    The three constructs of work-family conflict, emotional exhaustion and performance-based self-esteem are all related to tremendous negative consequences for the individual, the organization as well as for society. Even though there are studies that connect two of those constructs, the prospective relations between all three of them have not been studied yet. We explored the prospective relations between the three constructs in a large Swedish data set representative of the Swedish workforce. Gender differences in the relations were investigated. Longitudinal data with a 2-year time lag were gathered from 3,387 working men and women who responded to the 2006 and 2008 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Four different cross-lagged models were analysed. In the best fitting model, higher levels of work-family conflict at time 1 were associated with an increased level of performance-based self-esteem at time 2, but not with emotional exhaustion, after controlling for having children, gender, education and age. Also, relationships between emotional exhaustion at time 1 and work-family conflict and performance-based self-esteem at time 2 could be established. Furthermore, relationships between performance-based self-esteem time 1 and work-family conflict and emotional exhaustion time 2 were found. Multiple-group analysis did not show any differences in the relations of the tested constructs over time for either men or women. We conclude that the three constructs are interrelated and best understood through a reciprocal model. No differences were found between men and women.

  16. Swedish prosody. Summary of a project.

    PubMed

    Gårding, E

    1982-01-01

    The paper summarizes project work on Swedish accents and intonation. One major goal was the development of a generative model for intonation. The input of the model is a text with markings for word and sentence prosody and dialect. The output is a realistic intonation contour. The model was first set up for statement intonation in isolated sentences from five prototype dialects. It was later applied to interrogative intonation, to transitional forms between the prototype dialects, to Greek and French intonation and to prosodic transfer in a foreign accent.

  17. Swedish chemical regulation: an overview and analysis.

    PubMed

    Löfstedt, Ragnar E

    2003-04-01

    This article begins with a review of the regulation of chemicals in Sweden over the past 30 years, focusing particularly on the 1997 Government Environmental Quality Bill, which called for a toxic-free society by the year 2020. The second part of the article analyzes why Sweden has taken this route. The third and final section discusses Sweden's present role in formulating present EU chemical regulation, such as the recent EU Chemical White Paper, and hypothesizes future impacts of Swedish chemical regulations on the EU itself.

  18. Swedish Small Satellites Investigate the Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, Göran; André, Mats; Lundin, Rickard

    2004-04-01

    The Swedish small satellite program-which began in the mid-1980s-has been recognized internationally as cost-efficient and scientifically successful, and the results have contributed significantly to the progress in auroral research. The program comprises six research satellites to date, five of which were auroral or space plasma missions. Viking and Freja made substantial and sometimes pioneering contributions to the understanding of the aurora. The smaller satellites Astrid, Astrid-2, and Munin proved powerful both for testing new space technologies and instruments and for providing high-quality scientific data.

  19. A Family-Wide RT-PCR Assay for Detection of Paramyxoviruses and Application to a Large-Scale Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    van Boheemen, Sander; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Verhagen, Josanne H.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Pas, Suzan D.; Herfst, Sander; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Family-wide molecular diagnostic assays are valuable tools for initial identification of viruses during outbreaks and to limit costs of surveillance studies. Recent discoveries of paramyxoviruses have called for such assay that is able to detect all known and unknown paramyxoviruses in one round of PCR amplification. We have developed a RT-PCR assay consisting of a single degenerate primer set, able to detect all members of the Paramyxoviridae family including all virus genera within the subfamilies Paramyxovirinae and Pneumovirinae. Primers anneal to domain III of the polymerase gene, with the 3′ end of the reverse primer annealing to the conserved motif GDNQ, which is proposed to be the active site for nucleotide polymerization. The assay was fully optimized and was shown to indeed detect all available paramyxoviruses tested. Clinical specimens from hospitalized patients that tested positive for known paramyxoviruses in conventional assays were also detected with the novel family-wide test. A high-throughput fluorescence-based RT-PCR version of the assay was developed for screening large numbers of specimens. A large number of samples collected from wild birds was tested, resulting in the detection of avian paramyxoviruses type 1 in both barnacle and white-fronted geese, and type 8 in barnacle geese. Avian metapneumovirus type C was found for the first time in Europe in mallards, greylag geese and common gulls. The single round family-wide RT-PCR assay described here is a useful tool for the detection of known and unknown paramyxoviruses, and screening of large sample collections from humans and animals. PMID:22496880

  20. A family-wide RT-PCR assay for detection of paramyxoviruses and application to a large-scale surveillance study.

    PubMed

    van Boheemen, Sander; Bestebroer, Theo M; Verhagen, Josanne H; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Pas, Suzan D; Herfst, Sander; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2012-01-01

    Family-wide molecular diagnostic assays are valuable tools for initial identification of viruses during outbreaks and to limit costs of surveillance studies. Recent discoveries of paramyxoviruses have called for such assay that is able to detect all known and unknown paramyxoviruses in one round of PCR amplification. We have developed a RT-PCR assay consisting of a single degenerate primer set, able to detect all members of the Paramyxoviridae family including all virus genera within the subfamilies Paramyxovirinae and Pneumovirinae. Primers anneal to domain III of the polymerase gene, with the 3' end of the reverse primer annealing to the conserved motif GDNQ, which is proposed to be the active site for nucleotide polymerization. The assay was fully optimized and was shown to indeed detect all available paramyxoviruses tested. Clinical specimens from hospitalized patients that tested positive for known paramyxoviruses in conventional assays were also detected with the novel family-wide test. A high-throughput fluorescence-based RT-PCR version of the assay was developed for screening large numbers of specimens. A large number of samples collected from wild birds was tested, resulting in the detection of avian paramyxoviruses type 1 in both barnacle and white-fronted geese, and type 8 in barnacle geese. Avian metapneumovirus type C was found for the first time in Europe in mallards, greylag geese and common gulls. The single round family-wide RT-PCR assay described here is a useful tool for the detection of known and unknown paramyxoviruses, and screening of large sample collections from humans and animals.

  1. Use of functional foods among Swedish consumers is related to health-consciousness and perceived effect.

    PubMed

    Landström, Eva; Hursti, Ulla-Kaisa Koivisto; Becker, Wulf; Magnusson, Maria

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to survey attitudes to and use of functional foods and to investigate which demographic variables and attitudes to diet and health predict consumption of functional foods among Swedish consumers. A questionnaire was developed and sent to 2000 randomly selected Swedish citizens aged between 17 and 75 years. A total of 972 (48%) responded, 53% were female and 44% male. Mean age was 45 years. The results revealed that 84% of respondents were familiar with the concept of functional foods; 83% had consumed/purchased at least one of the seven functional food products presented in the questionnaire. Of those who had consumed a functional food, 25% had perceived effect of it. Positive correlations were seen between consumers perceiving a personal reward from eating functional foods, having an interest in natural products and an interest in general health. Consumption/purchase of functional foods was related to beliefs in the effects of the products, having consumed nutraceuticals or dietary supplements, having a diet-related problem personally or in the family, and a high level of education. The characteristic Swedish functional food consumer has a high level of education, is health-conscious and interested in healthy foods and believes in the health effect of functional foods. Thus, factors other than demographics better explain consumption of FF. However, the study population may represent a more health-conscious segment of the Swedish population in general. Additional studies are therefore required to elucidate the attitudes and use of FF in different consumer groups.

  2. Identification of rare DNA sequence variants in high-risk autism families and their prevalence in a large case/control population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetics clearly plays a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but studies to date are only beginning to characterize the causal genetic variants responsible. Until recently, studies using multiple extended multi-generation families to identify ASD risk genes had not been undertaken. Methods We identified haplotypes shared among individuals with ASDs in large multiplex families, followed by targeted DNA capture and sequencing to identify potential causal variants. We also assayed the prevalence of the identified variants in a large ASD case/control population. Results We identified 584 non-conservative missense, nonsense, frameshift and splice site variants that might predispose to autism in our high-risk families. Eleven of these variants were observed to have odds ratios greater than 1.5 in a set of 1,541 unrelated children with autism and 5,785 controls. Three variants, in the RAB11FIP5, ABP1, and JMJD7-PLA2G4B genes, each were observed in a single case and not in any controls. These variants also were not seen in public sequence databases, suggesting that they may be rare causal ASD variants. Twenty-eight additional rare variants were observed only in high-risk ASD families. Collectively, these 39 variants identify 36 genes as ASD risk genes. Segregation of sequence variants and of copy number variants previously detected in these families reveals a complex pattern, with only a RAB11FIP5 variant segregating to all affected individuals in one two-generation pedigree. Some affected individuals were found to have multiple potential risk alleles, including sequence variants and copy number variants (CNVs), suggesting that the high incidence of autism in these families could be best explained by variants at multiple loci. Conclusions Our study is the first to use haplotype sharing to identify familial ASD risk loci. In total, we identified 39 variants in 36 genes that may confer a genetic risk of developing autism. The

  3. Comparative Genomics of Chrysochromulina Ericina Virus and Other Microalga-Infecting Large DNA Viruses Highlights Their Intricate Evolutionary Relationship with the Established Mimiviridae Family.

    PubMed

    Gallot-Lavallée, Lucie; Blanc, Guillaume; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2017-07-15

    Chrysochromulina ericina virus CeV-01B (CeV) was isolated from Norwegian coastal waters in 1998. Its icosahedral particle is 160 nm in diameter and encloses a 474-kb double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome. This virus, although infecting a microalga (the haptophyceae Haptolina ericina, formerly Chrysochromulina ericina), is phylogenetically related to members of the Mimiviridae family, initially established with the acanthamoeba-infecting mimivirus and megavirus as prototypes. This family was later split into two genera (Mimivirus and Cafeteriavirus) following the characterization of a virus infecting the heterotrophic stramenopile Cafeteria roenbergensis (CroV). CeV, as well as two of its close relatives, which infect the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes Phaeocystis globosa (Phaeocystis globosa virus [PgV]) and Aureococcus anophagefferens (Aureococcus anophagefferens virus [AaV]), are currently unclassified by the International Committee on Viral Taxonomy (ICTV). The detailed comparative analysis of the CeV genome presented here confirms the phylogenetic affinity of this emerging group of microalga-infecting viruses with the Mimiviridae but argues in favor of their classification inside a distinct clade within the family. Although CeV, PgV, and AaV share more common features among them than with the larger Mimiviridae, they also exhibit a large complement of unique genes, attesting to their complex evolutionary history. We identified several gene fusion events and cases of convergent evolution involving independent lateral gene acquisitions. Finally, CeV possesses an unusual number of inteins, some of which are closely related despite being inserted in nonhomologous genes. This appears to contradict the paradigm of allele-specific inteins and suggests that the Mimiviridae are especially efficient in spreading inteins while enlarging their repertoire of homing genes.IMPORTANCE Although it infects the microalga Chrysochromulina ericina, CeV is more closely related

  4. Rare genetic variants with large effect on triglycerides in subjects with a clinical diagnosis of familial vs nonfamilial hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    De Castro-Orós, Isabel; Civeira, Fernando; Pueyo, María Jesús; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Bolado-Carrancio, Alfonso; Lamíquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Álvarez-Sala, Luis; Fabiani, Fernando; Cofán, Montserrat; Cenarro, Ana; Rodríguez-Rey, José Carlos; Ros, Emilio; Pocoví, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Most primary severe hypertriglyceridemias (HTGs) are diagnosed in adults, but their molecular foundations have not been completely elucidated. We aimed to identify rare dysfunctional mutations in genes encoding regulators of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) function in patients with familial and non-familial primary HTG. We sequenced promoters, exons, and exon-intron boundaries of LPL, APOA5, LMF1, and GPIHBP1 in 118 patients with severe primary HTG (triglycerides >500 mg/dL) and 53 normolipidemic controls. Variant functionality was analyzed using predictive software and functional assays for mutations in regulatory regions. We identified 29 rare variants, 10 of which had not been previously described: c.(-16A>G), c.(1018+2G>A), and p.(His80Arg) in LPL; p.(Arg143Alafs*57) in APOA5; p.(Val140Ile), p.(Leu235Ile), p.(Lys520*), and p.(Leu552Arg) in LMF1; and c.(-83G>A) and c.(-192A>G) in GPIHBP1. The c.(1018+2G>A) variant led to deletion of exon 6 in LPL cDNA, whereas the c.(-16A>G) analysis showed differences in the affinity for nuclear proteins. Overall, 20 (17.0%) of the patients carried at least one allele with a rare pathogenic variant in LPL, APOA5, LMF1, or GPIHBP1. The presence of a rare pathogenic variant was not associated with lipid values, family history of HTG, clinical diagnosis, or previous pancreatitis. Less than one in five subjects with triglycerides >500 mg/dL and no major secondary cause for HTG may carry a rare pathogenic mutation in LPL, APOA5, LMF1, or GPIHBP1. The presence of a rare pathogenic variant is not associated with a differential phenotype. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel variation in the AVP gene resulting in familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in a large Italian kindred.

    PubMed

    Birkegaard, Camilla; Christensen, Jane H; Falorni, Alberto; Marzotti, Stefania; Minarelli, Viviana; Gregersen, Niels; Rittig, Søren

    2013-06-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is mostly an autosomal dominant inherited disorder presenting with severe polydipsia and polyuria typically in early childhood. To date, 69 different variations in the AVP gene encoding the AVP prohormone have been identified in autosomal dominant FNDI (adFNDI). In this study we present a family of seven generations, in which a novel variation in the AVP gene seems to cause adFNDI. Clinical assessment by 24 h urine collection, water deprivation test, desmopressin (dDAVP) challenge, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the posterior pituitary are presented. The diagnosis of adFNDI was confirmed by direct DNA sequence analysis of the AVP gene. Inheritance pattern and clinical history clearly pointed towards adFNDI. Inability of concentrating urine upon dehydration was demonstrated by a water deprivation test, and neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus was strongly suspected after dDAVP administration, during which renal concentration ability quadrupled. MRI revealed a very weak pituitary "bright spot" in each of six subjects and a further reduction in the size of the neurohypophysis in a 7-year follow-up MRI scan in one subject. DNA sequence analysis revealed heterozygousity for a novel g.1785T > C gene variation predicting a p.Leu63Pro substitution in four affected subjects. Genetic testing in the diagnostic evaluation of families in which diabetes insipidus segregates is highly recommended in that interpretation of clinical assessments can be difficult. Furthermore, presymptomatic diagnosis can ease the parental concern of the carrier status of their offspring, and also avoid unnecessary surveillance of those being unaffected.

  6. Chlamydophila pneumoniae HflX belongs to an uncharacterized family of conserved GTPases and associates with the Escherichia coli 50S large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Ziegler, Urs; González-Hernández, Yanela; Pospischil, Andreas; Timms, Peter; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2008-11-01

    Predicted members of the HflX subfamily of phosphate-binding-loop guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are widely distributed in the bacterial kingdom but remain virtually uncharacterized. In an attempt to understand mechanisms used for regulation of growth and development in the chlamydiae, obligate intracellular and developmentally complex bacteria, we have begun investigations into chlamydial GTPases; we report here what appears to be the first analysis of a HflX family GTPase using a predicted homologue from Chlamydophila pneumoniae. In agreement with phylogenetic predictions for members of this GTPase family, purified recombinant Cp. pneumoniae HflX was specific for guanine nucleotides and exhibited a slow intrinsic GTPase activity when incubated with [gamma-(32)P]GTP. Using HflX-specific monoclonal antibodies, HflX could be detected by Western blotting and high-resolution confocal microscopy throughout the vegetative growth cycle of Cp. pneumoniae and, at early time points, appeared to partly localize to the membrane. Ectopic expression of Cp. pneumoniae HflX in Escherichia coli revealed co-sedimentation of HflX with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. The results of this work open up some intriguing possibilities for the role of GTPases belonging to this previously uncharacterized family of bacterial GTPases. Ribosome association is a feature shared by other important conserved GTPase families and more detailed investigations will be required to delineate the role of HflX in bacterial ribosome function.

  7. Whole exome sequencing reveals a C-terminal germline variant in CEBPA-associated acute myeloid leukemia: 45-year follow up of a large family

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anand; Seipel, Katja; Pemov, Alexander; Dewan, Ramita; Brown, Christina; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T.; Malasky, Michael; Suman, Shalabh; Yeager, Meredith; Gatti, Richard A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Mulvihill, John J.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Pabst, Thomas; McMaster, Mary L.; Stewart, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Familial acute myeloid leukemia is rare and linked to germline mutations in RUNX1, GATA2 or CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (CEBPA). We re-evaluated a large family with acute myeloid leukemia originally seen at NIH in 1969. We used whole exome sequencing to study this family, and conducted in silico bioinformatics analysis, protein structural modeling and laboratory experiments to assess the impact of the identified CEBPA Q311P mutation. Unlike most previously identified germline mutations in CEBPA, which were N-terminal frameshift mutations, we identified a novel Q311P variant that was located in the C-terminal bZip domain of C/EBPα. Protein structural modeling suggested that the Q311P mutation alters the ability of the CEBPA dimer to bind DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the Q311P mu-tant had attenuated binding to DNA, as predicted by the protein modeling. Consistent with these findings, we found that the Q311P mutation has reduced transactivation, consistent with a loss-of-function mutation. From 45 years of follow up, we observed incomplete penetrance (46%) of CEBPA Q311P. This study of a large multi-generational pedigree reveals that a germline mutation in the C-terminal bZip domain can alter the ability of C/EBP-α to bind DNA and reduces transactivation, leading to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:26721895

  8. Caries, Periodontal Disease, Supernumerary Teeth and Other Dental Disorders in Swedish Wild Boar (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Malmsten, A; Dalin, A-M; Pettersson, A

    2015-07-01

    Between January and December 2013, the dental and periodontal health of 99 Swedish wild boars (Sus scrofa) was investigated. Sampling occurred in conjunction with routine hunting at six large estates in the southern and middle parts of Sweden. All six of the estates use supplemental feeding. The weight of the animals, their sex and their dates of death were noted. Age was estimated using tooth eruption and tooth replacement patterns. The oral cavity was inspected and abnormalities were recorded on a dental chart modified for wild boars. The findings included supernumerary teeth, absence of teeth, mild class II malocclusion, severe tooth wear, periodontitis, calculus, caries, tooth fractures and the presence of enamel defects. Swedish wild boars suffer from different dental lesions and the impact of supplemental feeding on dental and periodontal health is still to be investigated.

  9. Benefits negotiation: three Swedish hospitals pursuit of potential electronic health record benefits.

    PubMed

    Jeansson, John S

    2013-01-01

    At the very heart of Swedish healthcare digitalisation are large investments in electronic health records (EHRs). These integrated information systems (ISs) carry promises of great benefits and value for organisations. However, realising IS benefits and value has, in general, proven to be a challenging task, and as organisations strive to formalise their realisation efforts a misconception of rationality threatens to emerge. This misconception manifests itself when the formality of analysis threatens to underrate the impact of social processes in deciding which potential benefits to pursue. This paper suggests that these decisions are the result of a social process of negotiation. The purpose of this paper is to observe three benefits analysis projects of three Swedish hospitals to better understand the character and management of proposed benefits negotiations. Findings depict several different categories of benefits negotiations, as well as key factors to consider during the benefits negotiation process.

  10. The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design.

    PubMed

    Bergström, G; Berglund, G; Blomberg, A; Brandberg, J; Engström, G; Engvall, J; Eriksson, M; de Faire, U; Flinck, A; Hansson, M G; Hedblad, B; Hjelmgren, O; Janson, C; Jernberg, T; Johnsson, Å; Johansson, L; Lind, L; Löfdahl, C-G; Melander, O; Östgren, C J; Persson, A; Persson, M; Sandström, A; Schmidt, C; Söderberg, S; Sundström, J; Toren, K; Waldenström, A; Wedel, H; Vikgren, J; Fagerberg, B; Rosengren, A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

  11. Isolation of a gene (DLG3) encoding a second member of the discs-large family on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A.; Holik, P.; Stevens, J.

    1996-01-15

    The discs-large family is a collection of proteins that have a common structural organization and are thought to be involved in signal transduction and mediating protein-protein interactions at the cytoplasmic surface of the cell membrane. The defining member of this group of proteins is the gene product of the Drosophila lethal (1) discs large (dlg) 1 locus, which was originally identified by the analysis of recessive lethal mutants. Germline mutations in dlg result in loss of apical-basolateral polarity, disruption of normal cell-cell adhesion, and neoplastic overgrowth of the imaginal disc epithelium. We have isolated and characterized a novel human gene, DLG3, that encodes a new member of the discs-large family of proteins. The putative DLG3 gene product has a molecular weight of 66 kDa and contains a discs-large homologous region, an src oncogene homology motif 3, and a domain with homology to guanylate kinase. The DLG3 gene is located on chromosome 17, in the same segment, 17q12-q21, as the related gene, DLG2. The products of the DLG2 and DLG3 genes show 36% identity and 58% similarity to each other, and both show nearly 60% sequence similarity to p55, an erythroid phosphoprotein that is a component of the red cell membrane. We suggest that p55, DLG2, and DLG3 are closely related members of a gene family, whose protein products have a common structural organization and probably a similar function. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  12. First evidence of a large CHEK2 duplication involved in cancer predisposition in an Italian family with hereditary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background CHEK2 is a multi-cancer susceptibility gene whose common germline mutations are known to contribute to the risk of developing breast and prostate cancer. Case presentation Here, we describe an Italian family with a high number of cases of breast cancer and other types of tumour subjected to the MLPA test to verify the presence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2 deletions and duplications. We identified a new 23-kb duplication in the CHEK2 gene extending from intron 5 to 13 that was associated with breast cancer in the family. The presence and localisation of the alteration was confirmed by a second analysis by Next-Generation Sequencing. Conclusions This finding suggests that CHEK2 mutations are heterogeneous and that techniques other than sequencing, such as MLPA, are needed to identify CHEK2 mutations. It also indicates that CHEK2 rare variants, such as duplications, can confer a high susceptibility to cancer development and should thus be studied in depth as most of our knowledge of CHEK2 concerns common mutations. PMID:24986639

  13. Topological properties of large-scale structural brain networks in children with familial risk for reading difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, S.M. Hadi; Black, Jessica M.; Soriano, Teresa; Bugescu, Nicolle; Martinez, Rociel; Raman, Mira M.; Kesler, Shelli R.; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a neurobiological deficit characterized by persistent difficulty in learning to read in children and adults who otherwise possess normal intelligence. Functional and structural connectivity data suggest that developmental dyslexia could be a disconnection syndrome. However, whether abnormalities in connectivity exist in beginning readers at-risk for reading difficulties is unknown. Using graphtheoretical analysis, we investigated differences in global and regional topological properties of structural brain networks in 42 beginning readers with (FH+) and without (FH−) familial risk for reading difficulties. We constructed separate structural correlation networks based on measures of surface area and cortical thickness. Results revealed changes in topological properties in brain regions known to be abnormal in dyslexia (left supramarginal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus) in the FH+ group mainly in the network constructed from measures of cortical surface area. We also found alterations in topological properties in regions that are not often advertised as dyslexia but nonetheless play important role in reading (left posterior cingulate, hippocampus, and left precentral gyrus). To our knowledge, this is the first report of altered topological properties of structural correlation networks in children at risk for reading difficulty, and motivates future studies that examine the mechanisms underlying how these brain networks may mediate the influences of family history on reading outcome. PMID:23333415

  14. An increased duplication of ZRS region that caused more than one supernumerary digits preaxial polydactyly in a large Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Diao, Yutao; Liu, Qiji; An, Hongqiang; Ma, Ruiping; Jiang, Guosheng; Lai, Nannan; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Zhao, Lin; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Rong; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Preaxial polydactyly (PPD) is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the presence of one or more supernumerary digits on the thumb side. It had been identified that point mutation or genomic duplications of the long-range limb-specific cis-regulator - zone of polarizing activity regulatory sequence (ZRS) cause PPD or other limb deformities such as syndactyly type IV (SD4) and Triphalangeal thumb-polysyndactyly syndrome (TPTPS). Most previously reported cases involved with no more than one extra finger; however, the role of the point mutation or genomic duplications of ZRS in the case of more than one redundant finger polydactyly remains unclear. In this article, we reported a family case of more than one redundant finger polydactyly on the thumb side for bilateral hands with a pedigree chart of the family. Results of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and sequence analysis suggested that the relative copy number (RCN) of ZRS but not point mutation (including insertion and deletion) was involved in all affected individuals. PMID:27922091

  15. Part-time work or social benefits as predictors for disability pension: a prospective study of Swedish twins.

    PubMed

    Ropponen, Annina; Alexanderson, Kristina; Svedberg, Pia

    2014-04-01

    To a large extent, it is unknown whether work absences other than sickness absence (SA) covered by social benefits such as parental leave, rehabilitation, or unemployment would predict disability pension (DP). We investigated whether part-time work or having received social benefits for sick leave, rehabilitation, or parental leave would be predictors for DP taking into account familial confounding (genetics and shared environment, e.g., social background) in these associations. A sample of 17,640 same-sex Swedish twin ndividuals [corrected] was followed from 2000 to 2008 via national registries for their receipt of social benefits and DP including additional baseline questionnaire data. Cox proportional hazard ratios were estimated. Full-time work was less common (47 %) among those being granted DP during the follow-up compared to those without DP (69 %). Self-reported full-time work, part-time work (≥50 %), and self-employment and registry data of caring for a child were the direct protective factors, whereas self-reported part-time work (<50 %) and long-term SA and registry data on SA, compensation for rehabilitation, and benefits during return to work were the direct risk factors for DP, i.e., independent of familial confounding. Part-time work and social benefits play different roles in predicting DP. Thus, full-time work, part-time work (≥50 %), self-employment, and benefits for parental leave seem to protect from DP. In contrast, SA and part-time work (<50 %) carry a highly increased risk for DP. Although these associations were mainly independent from several mediating factors, some of the associations seem to be influenced by family situation, social benefits, or severity of diseases.

  16. Conscientious refusal in healthcare: the Swedish solution.

    PubMed

    Munthe, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The Swedish solution to the legal handling of professional conscientious refusal in healthcare is described. No legal right to conscientious refusal for any profession or class of professional tasks exists in Sweden, regardless of the religious or moral background of the objection. The background of this can be found in strong convictions about the importance of public service provision and related civic duties, and ideals about rule of law, equality and non-discrimination. Employee's requests to change work tasks are handled on a case-by-case basis within the frames of labour law, ensuring full voluntariness, and also employer's privilege regarding the organisation and direction of work, and duties of public institutions to provide services. Two complicating aspects of this solution related to the inclusion of 'alternative medical' service providers in a national health service, and professional insistence on conscientious refusal rights to accept legalised assisted dying are discussed. The latter is found to undermine the pragmatic reasons behind recent attempts by prolife groups to challenge the Swedish solution related to legal abortion in courts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Making Early Modern Medicine: Reproducing Swedish Bitters.

    PubMed

    Ahnfelt, Nils-Otto; Fors, Hjalmar

    2016-05-01

    Historians of science and medicine have rarely applied themselves to reproducing the experiments and practices of medicine and pharmacy. This paper delineates our efforts to reproduce "Swedish Bitters," an early modern composite medicine in wide European use from the 1730s to the present. In its original formulation, it was made from seven medicinal simples: aloe, rhubarb, saffron, myrrh, gentian, zedoary and agarikon. These were mixed in alcohol together with some theriac, a composite medicine of classical origin. The paper delineates the compositional history of Swedish Bitters and the medical rationale underlying its composition. It also describes how we go about to reproduce the medicine in a laboratory using early modern pharmaceutical methods, and analyse it using contemporary methods of pharmaceutical chemistry. Our aim is twofold: first, to show how reproducing medicines may provide a path towards a deeper understanding of the role of sensual and practical knowledge in the wider context of early modern medical culture; and second, how it may yield interesting results from the point of view of contemporary pharmaceutical science.

  18. Empathizing, systemizing and finger length ratio in a Swedish sample.

    PubMed

    Von Horn, Agneta; Bäckman, Lisa; Davidsson, Thomas; Hansen, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The Empathy- and Systemizing Quotients (EQ and SQ, respectively; Baron-Cohen, 2003) were determined in a Swedish sample consisting mainly of university undergraduates. Females had significantly higher EQ than males, who in turn scored higher on the SQ inventory. Gender explained 12-14% of the variation. Males were strikingly overrepresented in the group defined by a high SQ/low EQ profile or by a large SQ - EQ difference; females dominated among people with a low SQ/high EQ profile or by a large EQ - SQ difference. Students majoring in the natural sciences had higher SQs than psychology majors, but in both groups the gender difference in SQ and EQ was strong. For each participant a weighted composite score was generated by multivariate processing of the EQ and SQ data (Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis). These scores were associated in a sex-linked fashion to a biometric measure reflecting prenatal testosterone exposure, i.e. the ratio between index (2D)- and ring (4D) finger lengths. In males a high (female-typical) 2D:4D ratio predicted an enhanced tendency to empathize and a reduced tendency to systemize; in women, by contrast, the 2D:4D ratio was unrelated to these traits. The present research confirms earlier work of a gender difference in EQ and SQ. The difference appears robust as it appears as large in Sweden (a country with high cultural gender-equality) as in countries with considerably lower gender-equality.

  19. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) relationships: a large family with eight clusters common to human, animal, and plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Kallberg, Yvonne; Oppermann, Udo; Jörnvall, Hans; Persson, Bengt

    2002-03-01

    The progress in genome characterizations has opened new routes for studying enzyme families. The availability of the human genome enabled us to delineate the large family of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) members. Although the human genome releases are not yet final, we have already found 63 members. We have also compared these SDR forms with those of three model organisms: Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Arabidopsis thaliana. We detect eight SDR ortholog clusters in a cross-genome comparison. Four of these clusters represent extended SDR forms, a subgroup found in all life forms. The other four are classical SDRs with activities involved in cellular differentiation and signalling. We also find 18 SDR genes that are present only in the human genome of the four genomes studied, reflecting enzyme forms specific to mammals. Close to half of these gene products represent steroid dehydrogenases, emphasizing the regulatory importance of these enzymes.

  20. Hunting effects on favourable conservation status of highly inbred Swedish wolves.

    PubMed

    Laikre, Linda; Jansson, Mija; Allendorf, Fred W; Jakobsson, Sven; Ryman, Nils

    2013-04-01

    The wolf (Canis lupus) is classified as endangered in Sweden by the Swedish Species Information Centre, which is the official authority for threat classification. The present population, which was founded in the early 1980s, descends from 5 individuals. It is isolated and highly inbred, and on average individuals are more related than siblings. Hunts have been used by Swedish authorities during 2010 and 2011 to reduce the population size to its upper tolerable level of 210 wolves. European Union (EU) biodiversity legislation requires all member states to promote a concept called "favourable conservation status" (FCS) for a series of species including the wolf. Swedish national policy stipulates maintenance of viable populations with sufficient levels of genetic variation of all naturally occurring species. Hunting to reduce wolf numbers in Sweden is currently not in line with national and EU policy agreements and will make genetically based FCS criteria less achievable for this species. We suggest that to reach FCS for the wolf in Sweden the following criteria need to be met: (1) a well-connected, large, subdivided wolf population over Scandinavia, Finland, and the Russian Karelia-Kola region should be reestablished, (2) genetically effective size (Ne ) of this population is in the minimum range of Ne = 500-1000, (3) Sweden harbors a part of this total population that substantially contributes to the total Ne and that is large enough to not be classified as threatened genetically or according to IUCN criteria, and (4) average inbreeding levels in the Swedish population are <0.1. © 2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. VSGdb: a database for trypanosome variant surface glycoproteins, a large and diverse family of coiled coil proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Lucio; Menon, Suraj; Ward, Pauline; Wilkes, Jonathan M; Jones, Nicola G; Carrington, Mark; Barry, J David

    2007-01-01

    Background Trypanosomes are coated with a variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that is so densely packed that it physically protects underlying proteins from effectors of the host immune system. Periodically cells expressing a distinct VSG arise in a population and thereby evade immunity. The main structural feature of VSGs are two long α-helices that form a coiled coil, and sets of relatively unstructured loops that are distal to the plasma membrane and contain most or all of the protective epitopes. The primary structure of different VSGs is highly variable, typically displaying only ~20% identity with each other. The genome has nearly 2000 VSG genes, which are located in subtelomeres. Only one VSG gene is expressed at a time, and switching between VSGs primarily involves gene conversion events. The archive of silent VSGs undergoes diversifying evolution rapidly, also involving gene conversion. The VSG family is a paradigm for α helical coiled coil structures, epitope variation and GPI-anchor signals. At the DNA level, the genes are a paradigm for diversifying evolutionary processes and for the role of subtelomeres and recombination mechanisms in generation of diversity in multigene families. To enable ready availability of VSG sequences for addressing these general questions, and trypanosome-specific questions, we have created VSGdb, a database of all known sequences. Description VSGdb contains fully annotated VSG sequences from the genome sequencing project, with which it shares all identifiers and annotation, and other available sequences. The database can be queried in various ways. Sequence retrieval, in FASTA format, can deliver protein or nucleotide sequence filtered by chromosomes or contigs, gene type (functional, pseudogene, etc.), domain and domain sequence family. Retrieved sequences can be stored as a temporary database for BLAST querying, reports from which include hyperlinks to the genome project database (GeneDB) CDS Info and to individual VSGdb

  2. The crystal structure of M. leprae ML2640c defines a large family of putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Graña, Martin; Haouz, Ahmed; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Miras, Isabelle; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Bondet, Vincent; Shepard, William; Schaeffer, Francis; Cole, Stewart T.; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae protein ML2640c belongs to a large family of conserved hypothetical proteins predominantly found in mycobacteria, some of them predicted as putative S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases (MTase). As part of a Structural Genomics initiative on conserved hypothetical proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria, we have determined the structure of ML2640c in two distinct crystal forms. As expected, ML2640c has a typical MTase core domain and binds the methyl donor substrate AdoMet in a manner consistent with other known members of this structural family. The putative acceptor substrate-binding site of ML2640c is a large internal cavity, mostly lined by aromatic and aliphatic side-chain residues, suggesting that a lipid-like molecule might be targeted for catalysis. A flap segment (residues 222–256), which isolates the binding site from the bulk solvent and is highly mobile in the crystal structures, could serve as a gateway to allow substrate entry and product release. The multiple sequence alignment of ML2640c-like proteins revealed that the central α/β core and the AdoMet-binding site are very well conserved within the family. However, the amino acid positions defining the binding site for the acceptor substrate display a higher variability, suggestive of distinct acceptor substrate specificities. The ML2640c crystal structures offer the first structural glimpses at this important family of mycobacterial proteins and lend strong support to their functional assignment as AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases. PMID:17660248

  3. The occurrence of earlier changes in family dynamics and friendship conflict predicting adolescent functional somatic symptoms: A large-scale prospective study.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Emma M; van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Stigall, Logan A

    2017-10-01

    To better understand the role earlier stressful environments have in predicting functional somatic symptoms (FSS) in late adolescence, this study explores the effect the occurrence of earlier changes in family dynamics and friendship conflict have on FSS. We used data from the Consortium for Longitudinal Studies on Child Abuse and Neglect (N = 1,314), a large, prospective study of children at risk for maltreatment and their parent/caregiver from approximately 4 to 18 years of age. We found a significant, small (Effect Size = .10), positive association between the frequency of family dynamic change during middle childhood (ages 6-12 years) and FSS at age 18 but not during middle adolescence (ages 14 and 16). Conflict with a same-sex best friend at age 16 moderated the association between the frequency of change and FSS. The frequency of family dynamic change in middle childhood and middle adolescence was associated with greater FSS among those who reported greater conflict but not for those who reported experiencing lower conflict. Overall, these effects were specific to friendship conflict and remained when other friendship processes (intimacy and companionship) were included, did not generalize to anxiety/depressive symptoms, and predicted FSS without comorbid anxiety/depressive symptoms. No gender differences were found. The change-conflict interaction differed according to type of family dynamic change (parental vs. residential). Findings emphasize how earlier exposure to frequent changes in family dynamics in middle childhood is particularly associated with late-adolescent health, especially in the context of greater friendship conflict. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Prevalence of familial hypercholesterolemia: a meta-analysis of six large, observational, population-based studies in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Szafraniec, Krystyna; Polak, Maciej; Drygas, Wojciech; Piotrowski, Walerian; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Jankowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a severely underdiagnosed and undertreated genetic disorder. Little is known about regional variation in the prevalence of FH, and information for Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) is scarce. This paper assesses the prevalence of FH and related cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Poland. Material and methods We performed a meta-analysis of six population-based studies in Poland. The FH was assessed using the Dutch Lipids Clinics Network (DLCN) criteria. The categories “definite” (> 8 points) and “probable” (6–8 points) were combined into “potential FH”. Combined estimates of proportions across studies were pooled by meta-analysis with a random effects model. Results A total of 37,889 persons aged 20–79 years were included in the analysis. The distribution of DLCN scores was skewed, and there were only 7 cases of definite FH. Prevalence of potential FH was 404/100,000 people (95% CI = 277–531/100,000). Familial hypercholesterolemia was more prevalent in women than in men, and the prevalence was the highest in the age group 45–54 years in men and 55–64 years in women. After adjustment for age and sex, compared to participants with normal cholesterol, persons with potential FH had twice the prevalence of hypertension (p < 0.01); smoking was more prevalent by about 80% (p < 0.01) and hypertriglyceridemia was nine times more frequent (p < 0.001). There was no difference in the prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol or diabetes. Conclusions We believe that our study might facilitate the planning of a strategy to manage the disease at a population level, i.e. to develop a national strategy for the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of FH. PMID:27478447

  5. IQ and Schizophrenia in a Swedish National Sample: Their Causal Relationship and the Interaction of IQ with Genetic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, Kenneth S.; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To clarify the relationship between IQ and subsequent risk for schizophrenia. Method IQ was assessed at ages 18-20 in 1,204,983 Swedish males born 1951-1975. Schizophrenia was assessed by hospital diagnosis through 2010. Results IQ had a monotonic relationship with schizophrenia risk across the IQ range with a mean change of 3.8% in risk per IQ point. This association, stronger in the lower versus higher IQ range, was similar if onsets within five years of testing were censored. No increased risk for schizophrenia was seen in those with highest intelligence. Co-relative control analyses showed a similar IQ-schizophrenia association in the general population and in cousin, half-sibling and full-sibling pairs. A robust interaction was seen between genetic liability to schizophrenia and IQ in predicting schizophrenia risk. Genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia had a much stronger impact on risk of illness for those with low versus high intelligence. The IQ-genetic liability interaction arose largely from IQ differences between close relatives. Conclusions IQ assessed in late adolescence is a robust risk factor for subsequent onset of schizophrenia. This association is not the result of a declining IQ associated with insidious onset. In this large, representative sample, we found no evidence for a link between genius and schizophrenia. Co-relative control analyses show that the association between lower IQ and schizophrenia is not the result of shared familial risk factors and may be causal. The strongest effect was seen with IQ differences within families. High intelligence substantially attenuates the impact of genetic liability on the risk for schizophrenia. PMID:25727538

  6. Social aetiology of violent deaths in Swedish children and youth

    PubMed Central

    Hjern, A; Bremberg, S

    2002-01-01

    Study objective: To describe the contribution of social conditions for the main causes of injury deaths in Swedish children and youth aged 5–25 years. Design: Cohort study. All children below 15 years of age that resided in Sweden 1985 were followed up during 1991–1995. Injury deaths were recorded from The National Cause of Death Register. Information on parental social determinants were collected from various national registers. Connections between the social determinants and an injury death outcome were analysed in multivariate Cox regression models. Main results: In total 1474 injury deaths were recorded during approximately 8 million person years. In a regression model, with control for sex, year of birth, and residency (urban/rural), the aetiological fraction for parental SES, maternal country of birth, family situation, parental risk factors, and all these factors combined were 13%, 6%, 1.4%, 1.3%, and 19%, respectively. Similar regression models were studied separately for each of the main causes of injury death. The parental social determinants explained 58% of all homicides, 47% of all motor traffic injuries, and 30% of all other traffic injuries while the suicide rate was not affected by these determinants. Parental socioeconomic status was the single most important parental determinant for all major causes of injury. Conclusions: There was a wide variation of the aetiological fractions of parental social determinants for different causes of injury death. This variation might be used to further investigate the social aetiology of injuries. PMID:12177086

  7. Frequency of hypersensitive-like reaction and stem infections in a large full-sib family of Pinus monticola

    Treesearch

    Robert S. Danchok; R.A. Sniezko; S. Long; A. Kegley; D. Savin; J.B. Mayo; J.J. Liu; J. Hill

    2012-01-01

    Western white pine (WWP) (Pinus monticola Douglas ex D. Don) is a long-lived forest tree species with a large native range in western North America. The tree species is highly susceptible to the non-native fungal pathogen, Cronartium ribicola, the causative agent of white pine blister rust (WPBR)....

  8. Swedish child health care in a changing society.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Ann-Christine; Lindbladh, Eva; Petersson, Kerstin; Råstam, Lennart; Håkansson, Anders

    2005-09-01

    Staff in Swedish child health care today feel a gap between policy and practice. By revealing the main lines in the development of child health care, we hoped to achieve a better understanding of the current trends and problems in today's Swedish child health care. A selection of official documents about the development of child health care during the period 1930-2000 was studied with the aid of discourse analysis. Four discourses were identified, which serve as a foundation for a periodization of the development of child health care. In the first period the main task of child health care, alongside checking on the development of the child, was to inform and educate the mothers. During the second period health supervision became the crucial task, to identify risks and discover abnormalities and disabilities. The third period focused on the discussion concerning the identification of health-related and social 'risk groups', and the work of child health care was increasingly geared to supervision of the parents' care of their children. Parents were to be given support so that they could cope with their difficulties by themselves. During the current period child health care is increasingly expected to direct its work towards the child's surroundings and the family as a whole and is now explicitly defined as an institution that should strengthen parents' self-esteem and competence. The level of responsibility for the child's health changed gradually during the different periods, from public responsibility to parental responsibility. The focus of efforts in child health care was changed from being general in the first and second periods to general and selective in period three, and then gradually becoming selective again in period four. While control of the child's physical health was central during the first two periods, psychosocial health came into focus in the last two, along with the importance of supporting the parents to enable them to handle their difficulties

  9. A large family with hereditary spastic paraparesis due to a frame shift mutation of the spastin (SPG4) gene: association with multiple sclerosis in two affected siblings and epilepsy in other affected family members.

    PubMed

    Mead, S H; Proukakis, C; Wood, N; Crosby, A H; Plant, G T; Warner, T T

    2001-12-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. Some forms have been associated with white matter lesions and complex phenotypes. This study was prompted by the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in two sisters from a large pedigree with hereditary spastic paraparesis. Twelve affected members of the extended family were examined (MRI and EEG were carried out and evoked potentials measured in five), and historical information was obtained from six affected deceased persons. The inherited disease phenotype was confirmed as autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraparesis associated with epilepsy in four affected persons. None of the extended family had evidence of MS. Genetic analysis of the family has shown linkage to chromosome 2p and sequencing of the spastin gene has identified a 1406delT frameshift mutation in exon 10. This kindred demonstrates the clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations. The possible relevance of the concurrence of HSP and MS in the sib pair is discussed.

  10. Insulin-resistance and metabolic syndrome are related to executive function in women in a large family-based study

    PubMed Central

    Schuur, M.; Henneman, P.; van Swieten, J. C.; Zillikens, M. C.; de Koning, I.; Janssens, A. C. J. W.; Witteman, J. C. M.; Aulchenko, Y. S.; Frants, R. R.; Oostra, B. A.; van Dijk, K. Willems

    2010-01-01

    While type 2 diabetes is well-known to be associated with poorer cognitive performance, few studies have reported on the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and contributing factors, such as insulin-resistance (HOMA-IR), low adiponectin-, and high C-reactive protein (CRP)- levels. We studied whether these factors are related to cognitive function and which of the MetS components are independently associated. The study was embedded in an ongoing family-based cohort study in a Dutch population. All participants underwent physical examinations, biomedical measurements, and neuropsychological testing. Linear regression models were used to determine the association between MetS, HOMA-IR, adiponectin levels, CRP, and cognitive test scores. Cross-sectional analyses were performed in 1,898 subjects (mean age 48 years, 43% men). People with MetS had significantly higher HOMA-IR scores, lower adiponectin levels, and higher CRP levels. MetS and high HOMA-IR were associated with poorer executive function in women (P = 0.03 and P = 0.009). MetS and HOMA-IR are associated with poorer executive function in women. PMID:20585974

  11. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene.

    PubMed

    Ulucan, Hakan; Gül, Davut; Sapp, Julie C; Cockerham, John; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2008-10-23

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome.

  12. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene

    PubMed Central

    Ulucan, Hakan; Gül, Davut; Sapp, Julie C; Cockerham, John; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2008-01-01

    Background Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Methods Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. Results We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. Conclusion We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome. PMID:18947413

  13. Inheritance of skewed X chromosome inactivation in a large family with an X-linked recessive deafness syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Orstavik, K.H.; Orstavik, R.E.; Eiklid, K.; Tranebjaerg, L.

    1996-07-12

    A new X-linked recessive deafness syndrome was recently reported and mapped to Xq22 (Mohr-Tranebjaeerg syndrome). In addition to deafness, the patients had visual impairment, dystonia, fractures, and mental deterioration. The female carriers did not have any significant manifestations of the syndrome. We examined X chromosome inactivation in 8 obligate and 12 possible carriers by using a polymerase chain reaction analysis of the methylation-dependent amplification of the polymorphic triplet repeat at the androgen receptor locus. Seven of 8 obligate carriers and 1 of 5 carriers by linkage analysis had an extremely skewed pattern in blood DNA not found in 30 normal females. The X inactivation pattern in fibroblast DNA from 2 of the carriers with the extremely skewed pattern was also skewed but to a lesser degree than in blood DNA. One obligate carrier had a random X inactivation pattern in both blood and fibroblast DNA. A selection mechanism for the skewed pattern is therefore not likely. The extremely skewed X inactivation in 8 females of 3 generations in this family may be caused by a single gene that influences skewing of X chromosome inactivation. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Blood lipid response to 20 weeks of supervised exercise in a large biracial population: the HERITAGE Family Study.

    PubMed

    Leon, A S; Rice, T; Mandel, S; Després, J P; Bergeron, J; Gagnon, J; Rao, D C; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Bouchard, C

    2000-04-01

    We studied the effects of 20 weeks of supervised cycle-ergometer exercise on plasma lipids in 675 healthy, sedentary, normolipidemic white and black men and women aged 17 to 65 years, participating in the HERITAGE Family Study. Fasting plasma lipids were assessed twice at baseline and 24 and 72 hours after the last exercise session and adjusted for plasma volume changes. No significant differences from the mean baseline levels were observed for total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (Apo B). A significant reduction (P < .01) from baseline levels in plasma total and VLDL triglycerides was observed only in the 24-hour posttraining specimens, reflecting a response to the last bout of exercise. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol increased 3.6% for the combined group, primarily due to an increase in HDL2, with an associated increase in Apo A-1 (P < .001). No significant differences were noted in the HDL response by sex, race, or age. An inverse correlation (r = -.241) was observed between the increase in HDL cholesterol and change in body fat only in men, and the increase in HDL cholesterol was unrelated to the change in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max).

  15. Correlated Si isotope anomalies and large C-13 enrichments in a family of exotic SiC grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Epstein, S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    A hypothesis is presented to the effect that the distinctive morphological characteristics and comparatively simple Si isotope systematics identify the platy SiC crystals as a genetically related family, formed around a single isotopically heterogeneous presolar star on an association of related stars. The enrichments in C-13 and the Si isotope systematics of the platy SiC are broadly consistent with theoretical models of nucleosynthesis in low-mass, carbon stars on the ASG. The Si isotope array most plausibly reflects mixing between (Si-28)-rich material, inherited from a previous generation of stars, and material enriched in Si-29 and Si-30, produced in intershell regions by neutron capture during He-burning. The absence of a correlation between the Si and C isotopic compositions of the SiC suggests either episodic condensation of SiC, extending over several thermal pulses, in the atmosphere of a single star, or the derivation of the SiC from several stars characterized by different rates of C-13 production.

  16. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care

    PubMed Central

    Olof Hedman, Nils; Johansson, Roine; Rosenqvist, Urban

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Method Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289). Results Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The models represented different degrees of integration of home care, i.e. health and social aspects of home care were to varying degrees integrated in the same organization. The county councils (i.e. large sub-national political-administrative units) tended to contain clusters of municipalities (smaller sub-national units) with the same organizational characteristics. Thus, municipalities' home care organization followed a county council pattern. In spite of a general tendency for Swedish municipalities to reorganize their activities, only 1% of them had changed their home care services organization in relation to the county council since the reform. Conclusion The decentralist intention of the reform—to give actors at the sub-national levels freedom to integrate home care according to varying local circumstances—has resulted in a sub-national inter-organizational network structure at the county council, rather than municipal, level, which is highly inert and difficult to change. PMID:17925837

  17. Survey of tuberculin testing in Swedish zoos.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Susanna; Bernodt, Karin; Holmström, Andrea; Röken, Bengt

    2002-12-01

    Tuberculin test results from 214 animals in three Swedish zoos, tested between the years 1993 and 2000, were compiled from a questionnaire sent out to zoo veterinarians. Comparative testing with bovine and avian tuberculin was used on various sites of injection. A total of five skin test reactors were found: three cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) in one zoo and two tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) in another zoo. Postmortem culture from one of the tapirs revealed growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and a stamping out policy was adopted in the herd. Tuberculosis in the primates was ruled out by further investigations. Zoo veterinarians should try to adopt a common scheme for the regular testing of zoo animals to improve the diagnostic ability and comparison of results between institutions.

  18. Gendered portraits of depression in Swedish newspapers.

    PubMed

    Bengs, Carita; Johansson, Eva; Danielsson, Ulla; Lehti, Arja; Hammarström, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Mass media are influential mediators of information, knowledge, and narratives of health and illness. In this article, we report on an examination of personal accounts of illness as presented in three Swedish newspapers, focusing on the gendered representation of laypersons' experiences of depression. A database search identified all articles mentioning depression during the year 2002. Twenty six articles focusing on personal experiences of depression were then subjected to a qualitative content analysis. We identified four themes: displaying a successful facade, experiencing a cracking facade, losing and regaining control, and explaining the illness. We found both similarities and differences with regard to gendered experiences. The mediated accounts of depression both upheld and challenged traditional gender stereotypes. The women's stories were more detailed, relational, emotionally oriented, and embodied. The portrayal of men was less emotional and expressive, and described a more dramatic onset of depression, reflecting hegemonic patterns of masculinity.

  19. Perceived employability trajectories: A Swedish cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Törnroos (née Kirves), Kaisa; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia; Leineweber, Constanze

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study identified perceived employability trajectories and their associations with sleeping difficulties and depressive symptoms over time. Methods: The sample was part of the Swedish Longitudinal Survey on Health from 2008 to 2014 (n=4,583). Results: Two stable trajectories (high and low perceived employability over time) and three trajectories with changes (increasing, decreasing, and V-shaped perceived employability over time) were identified. Workers with stable low perceived employability reported more sleeping difficulties and depressive symptoms than those who perceived high or increasing employability. Conclusion: Perceived employability is a rather stable personal resource, which is associated with well-being over time. However, changes in perceived employability do not seem to be echoed in well-being, at least not as immediately as theoretically expected. PMID:28539535

  20. Haplotype Analysis of Norwegian and Swedish Patients with Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP): Extreme Haplotype Heterogeneity for the Mutation R116W

    PubMed Central

    Tjensvoll, Kjersti; Bruland, Ove; Floderus, Ylva; Skadberg, Øyvind; Sandberg, Sverre; Apold, Jaran

    2003-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common of the acute porphyrias, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) also called porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). The mutation spectrum in the HMBS gene is characterized by a majority of family specific mutations. Among the exceptions are R116W and W198X, with high prevalence in both the Dutch and Swedish populations. These two mutations were also detected in unrelated Norwegian patients. Thus, Norwegian and Swedish patients were haplotyped using closely linked flanking microsatellites and intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to see if the high frequency of these two mutations is due to a founder effect. Twelve intragenic SNPs were determined by a method based on fluorescent restriction enzyme fingerprinting single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-REF-SSCP). W198X occurred exclusively on one haplotype in both Norwegian and Swedish patients, showing that it has originated from a common gene source. In contrast, R116W was found on three different haplotypes in three Norwegian families, and in five Swedish families on four or five haplotypes. This extreme haplotype heterogeneity indicates that R116W is a recurrent mutation, maybe explained by the high mutability of CpG dinucleotides. This can also explain why it is the only AIP mutation reported to occur in seven different populations (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Netherlands, France, Spain and South Africa). PMID:14757946

  1. A Swedish national adoption study of criminality

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, K. S.; Lönn, S. Larsson; Morris, N. A.; Sundquist, J.; Långström, N.; Sundquist, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background To clarify the role of genetic and environmental factors in criminal behavior (CB), we examined all CB and violent and non-violent subtypes (VCB and NVCB, respectively) in a Swedish national sample of adoptees and their relatives. Method CB was defined by a conviction in the Swedish Crime Register with standard definitions for VCB and NVCB subtypes. We examined adoptees born 1950–1991 (n=18070) and their biological (n=79206) and adoptive (n=47311) relatives. Results The risk for all CB was significantly elevated in the adopted-away offspring of biological parents of which at least one had CB [odds ratio (OR) 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–1.6] and in the biological full and half-siblings of CB adoptees (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2–1.6 and OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.3, respectively). A genetic risk index (including biological parental/sibling history of CB and alcohol abuse) and an environmental risk index (including adoptive parental and sibling CB and a history of adoptive parental divorce, death, and medical illness) both strongly predicted probability of CB. These genetic and environmental risk indices acted additively on adoptee risk for CB. Moderate specificity was seen in the transmission of genetic risk for VCB and NVCB between biological parents and siblings and adoptees. Conclusions CB is etiologically complex and influenced by a range of genetic risk factors including a specific liability to CB and a vulnerability to broader externalizing behaviors, and by features of the adoptive environment including parental CB, divorce and death. Genetic risk factors for VCB and NVCB may be at least partially distinct. PMID:24180693

  2. Inherited mutations in 17 breast cancer susceptibility genes among a large triple-negative breast cancer cohort unselected for family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Hart, Steven N; Sharma, Priyanka; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Wang, Xianshu; Miron, Penelope; Olson, Janet E; Godwin, Andrew K; Pankratz, V Shane; Olswold, Curtis; Slettedahl, Seth; Hallberg, Emily; Guidugli, Lucia; Davila, Jaime I; Beckmann, Matthias W; Janni, Wolfgang; Rack, Brigitte; Ekici, Arif B; Slamon, Dennis J; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fountzilas, George; Pelttari, Liisa M; Tapper, William J; Durcan, Lorraine; Cross, Simon S; Pilarski, Robert; Shapiro, Charles L; Klemp, Jennifer; Yao, Song; Garber, Judy; Cox, Angela; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ambrosone, Christine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Slager, Susan L; Vachon, Celine M; Eccles, Diana M; Fasching, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing have led to the development of breast cancer susceptibility gene panels for germline genetic testing of patients. We assessed the frequency of mutations in 17 predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, in a large cohort of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer to determine the utility of germline genetic testing for those with TNBC. Patients with TNBC (N = 1,824) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through 12 studies, and germline DNA was sequenced to identify mutations. Deleterious mutations were identified in 14.6%