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Sample records for large telescope adaptive

  1. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  2. Adaptive optics operations at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Taylor, Gregory; Christou, Julian C.; Zhang, Xianyu; Brusa Zappellini, Guido; Rahmer, Gustavo; Lefebvre, Michael; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Esposito, Simone

    2016-07-01

    The goal for the adaptive optics systems at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO) is for them to operate fully automatically, without the need for an AO Scientist, and to be run by the observers and/or the telescope operator. This has been built into their design. Initially, the AO systems would close the loop using optimal parameters based on the observing conditions and guide star brightness, without adapting to changing conditions. We present the current status of AO operations as well as recent updates that improve the operational efficiency and minimize downtime. Onsky efficiency and performance will also be presented, along with calibrations required for AO closed loop operation.

  3. Adaptive Optics Control Strategies for Extremely Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T

    2001-07-26

    Adaptive optics for the 30-100 meter class telescopes now being considered will require an extension in almost every area of AO system component technology. In this paper, we present scaling laws and strawman error budgets for AO systems on extremely large telescopes (ELTs) and discuss the implications for component technology and computational architecture. In the component technology area, we discuss the advanced efforts being pursued at the NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) in the development of large number of degrees of freedom deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, and guidestar lasers. It is important to note that the scaling of present wavefront reconstructor algorithms will become computationally intractable for ELTs and will require the development of new algorithms and advanced numerical mathematics techniques. We present the computational issues and discuss the characteristics of new algorithmic approaches that show promise in scaling to ELT AO systems.

  4. Scaling multiconjugate adaptive optics performance estimates to extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbroek, Brent L.; Rigaut, Francois J.

    2000-07-01

    Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) is a key technology for extremely large, ground-based telescopes (ELT's) because it enables near-uniform atmospheric turbulence compensation over fields-of-view considerably larger than can be corrected with more conventional AO systems. Quantitative performance evaluation using detailed analytical or simulation models is difficult, however, due to the very large number of deformable mirror (DM) actuators, wave front sensors (WFS) subapertures, and guide stars which might comprise an MCAO system for an ELT. This paper employs more restricted minimal variance estimation methods to evaluate the fundamental performance limits imposed by anisoplanatism alone upon MCAO performance for a range of sample cases. Each case is defined by a atmospheric turbulence profile, telescope aperture diameter, field-of-view, guide star constellation, and set of DM conjugate ranges. For a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum with an infinite outer scale, MCAO performance for a whole range of aperture diameters and proportional fields-of-view can be computed at once using a scaling law analogous to the (D/dO)5/3 formula for the cone effect. For 30 meter telescopes, useful levels of performance are possible across a 1.0 - 2.0 arc minute square field-of-view using 5 laser guide stars (LGS's) and 3 DM's, and somewhat larger fields can be corrected using 9 guide stars and 4 mirrors. 3 or more tip/tilt natural guide stars (NGS's) are necessary to detect modes of tilt anisoplanatism which cannot be detected using LGS's, however. LGS MCAO performance is a quite weak function of aperture diameter for a fixed field-of-view, and it is tempting to scale these results to larger apertures. NGS MCAO performance is moderately superior to LGS MCAO if the NGS constellation is within the compensated field-of-view, but degrades rapidly as the guide stars move away from the field. The penalty relaxes slowly with increasing aperture diameter, but how to extrapolate this trend

  5. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, Brian J.

    2003-01-01

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) to track the LGS light subaperture by

  6. Atmospheric dispersion in very large telescopes with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynne, Charles G.

    1997-02-01

    Current work on correcting the effects of atmospheric turbulence on telescope imagery, so as to approach the diffraction limit, requires attention to related effects to exploit it fully. In particular adaptive optics, which acts by means of a flexible mirror, is therefore colour-blind, and requires a hitherto unknown level of correction of atmospheric dispersion if it is to be used more than a few degrees from zenith. Adaptive optics can only operate over a very limited field angle and wavelength range. Fine fast auto-guiding can give substantially improved imagery, over wider field angles and wavelength range, requiring higher performance dispersion correctors than heretofore. This note describes a dispersion corrector to meet both these needs.

  7. Large field-of-view configurations for large-telescope adaptive optics systems: advantages and tradeoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianyu; Herbst, Thomas M.; Rao, Changhui; Bizenberger, Peter; Conrad, Albert R.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Bertram, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    In order to achieve high sky coverage with natural guide star adaptive optics systems, the reference stars need to be chosen over a large field of view. But the size of the optical beam can become unmanageably large in current and planned future giant telescopes. This can render the optics unaffordable. To solve this issue, we have adopted two approaches - multiple fields of view and star-enlargers - for the LINC-NIRVANA layer-oriented, multiple-conjugated adaptive optics system. In this paper, we compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of various optical configurations for wide-field, natural guide star acquisition on current 8-meter and future 25-40 meter extremely large telescopes.

  8. Development of laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.M.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.; Morris, J.R.; Olivier, S.S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, J.T.; Waltjen, K.

    1992-06-29

    We describe a feasibility experiment to demonstrate high-order adaptive optics using a sodium-layer laser guide star. We use the copper-vapor-pumped dye lasers developed for LLNL`s atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program to create the laser guide star. Closed-loop adaptive corrections will be accomplished using a 69-subaperture adaptive optics system on a one-meter telescope at LLNL. The laser bream is projected upwards from a beam director approximately 5 meters away from the main telescope, and is expected to form a spot 1-2 meters in diameter at the atmospheric sodium layer (95 km altitude). We describe the overall system architecture and adaptive optics components, and analyze the expected performance. Our long-term goal is to develop sodium-layer laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes. We discuss preliminary design trade-offs for the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea.

  9. Development of laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.M.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.; Morris, J.R.; Olivier, S.S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, J.T.; Waltjen, K.

    1992-06-29

    We describe a feasibility experiment to demonstrate high-order adaptive optics using a sodium-layer laser guide star. We use the copper-vapor-pumped dye lasers developed for LLNL's atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program to create the laser guide star. Closed-loop adaptive corrections will be accomplished using a 69-subaperture adaptive optics system on a one-meter telescope at LLNL. The laser bream is projected upwards from a beam director approximately 5 meters away from the main telescope, and is expected to form a spot 1-2 meters in diameter at the atmospheric sodium layer (95 km altitude). We describe the overall system architecture and adaptive optics components, and analyze the expected performance. Our long-term goal is to develop sodium-layer laser guide stars and adaptive optics for large astronomical telescopes. We discuss preliminary design trade-offs for the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea.

  10. GSMT Education: Teaching about Adaptive Optics and Site Selection Using Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    Giant Segmented Mirror Telescopes (GSMT) represents the next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELT). Currently there are three active ELT projects, all established as international partnerships to build telescopes of greater than 20 meters aperture. Two of these have major participation by U.S. institutions: the Giant Magellan Telescope and the Thirty Meter Telescope. The ESO-ELT is under development by the European Southern Observatory and other European institutions. We have developed educational activities to accompany the design phase of these projects. The current activities focus on challenges faced in the design and site selection of a large telescope. The first module is on site selection. This online module is based on the successful Astronomy Village program model. Students evaluate several potential sites to decide where to build the GSMT. They must consider factors such as weather, light pollution, seeing, logistics, and geography. The second project has developed adaptive optics teaching units suitable for high school.

  11. Adaptive optics capabilities at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, J. C.; Brusa, G.; Conrad, A.; Esposito, S.; Herbst, T.; Hinz, P.; Hill, J. M.; Miller, D. L.; Rabien, S.; Rahmer, G.; Taylor, G. E.; Veillet, C.; Zhang, X.

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the current and future adaptive optics systems at the LBTO along with the current and planned science instruments they feed. All the AO systems make use of the two 672 actuator adaptive secondary mirrors. They are (1) FLAO (NGS/SCAO) feeding the LUCI NIR imagers/spectrographs; (2) LBTI/AO (NGS/SCAO) feeding the NIR/MIR imagers and LBTI beam combiner; (3) the ARGOS LGS GLAO system feeding LUCIs; and (4) LINC-NIRVANA - an NGS/MCAO imager and interferometer system. AO performance of the current systems is presented along with proposed performances for the newer systems taking into account the future instrumentation.

  12. The large binocular telescope.

    PubMed

    Hill, John M

    2010-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Observatory is a collaboration among institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, and Virginia. The telescope on Mount Graham in Southeastern Arizona uses two 8.4 m diameter primary mirrors mounted side by side. A unique feature of the LBT is that the light from the two Gregorian telescope sides can be combined to produce phased-array imaging of an extended field. This cophased imaging along with adaptive optics gives the telescope the diffraction-limited resolution of a 22.65 m aperture and a collecting area equivalent to an 11.8 m circular aperture. This paper describes the design, construction, and commissioning of this unique telescope. We report some sample astronomical results with the prime focus cameras. We comment on some of the technical challenges and solutions. The telescope uses two F/15 adaptive secondaries to correct atmospheric turbulence. The first of these adaptive mirrors has completed final system testing in Firenze, Italy, and is planned to be at the telescope by Spring 2010.

  13. Monte Carlo modelling of multiconjugate adaptive optics performance on the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of a wide-field adaptive optics system depends on input design parameters. Here we investigate the performance of a multiconjugate adaptive optics system design for the European Extremely Large Telescope, using an end-to-end Monte Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool, DASP (Durham adaptive optics simulation platform). We consider parameters such as the number of laser guide stars, sodium layer depth, wavefront sensor pixel scale, number of deformable mirrors (DMs), mirror conjugation and actuator pitch. We provide potential areas where costs savings can be made, and investigate trade-offs between performance and cost. We conclude that a six-laser guide star system using three DMs seems to be a sweet spot for performance and cost compromise.

  14. A FOSSIL BULGE GLOBULAR CLUSTER REVEALED BY VERY LARGE TELESCOPE MULTI-CONJUGATE ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Ortolani, Sergio; Barbuy, Beatriz; Momany, Yazan; Saviane, Ivo; Jilkova, Lucie; Bica, Eduardo; Salerno, Gustavo M.; Jungwiert, Bruno E-mail: barbuy@astro.iag.usp.br E-mail: isaviane@eso.org E-mail: bica@if.ufrgs.br

    2011-08-10

    The globular cluster HP 1 is projected on the bulge, very close to the Galactic center. The Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator on the Very Large Telescope allowed us to acquire high-resolution deep images that, combined with first epoch New Technology Telescope data, enabled us to derive accurate proper motions. The cluster and bulge fields' stellar contents were disentangled through this process and produced an unprecedented definition in color-magnitude diagrams of this cluster. The metallicity of [Fe/H] {approx} -1.0 from previous spectroscopic analysis is confirmed, which together with an extended blue horizontal branch imply an age older than the halo average. Orbit reconstruction results suggest that HP 1 is spatially confined within the bulge.

  15. Sensitivity to differential piston and to adaptive optics errors with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Hill, John; Hinz, Philip

    2016-08-01

    On-sky adaptive optics wavefront screens have been used and random optical path fluctuations - differential pistons - have been included in numerical simulations for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer. We characterize the Point Spread Function (PSF) and the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) by computing respectively the interferometric Strehl and the visibility criteria. We study the contribution of the wavefront disturbance induced by each adaptive optics system and by the optical path difference between the arms of the LBTI. To provide an image of quality (Strehl above 70%) suitable with standard science cases , the requirements for a LBTI mode in the visible wavelengths (750nm) must be at least an adaptive optics wavefront RMS fluctuations below λ/18≍40nm (Strehl above 90%) provided by each adaptive optics system, and a differential piston RMS fluctuations below λ/8≍100nm in the overall LBTI system. The adaptive optics wavefront errors - mainly the differential tip-tilt - appear to be more critical than the differential piston.

  16. The large adaptive reflector: a 200-m diameter wideband centimeter- to meter-wave radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Brent; Bauwens, Luc; Belostotski, Leonid; Cannon, Elizabeth; Chang, Ya-Ying; Deng, Xiaohui; Dewdney, Peter E.; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff T.; Halliday, David; Kuerschner, Kai; Lachapelle, Gerard; Lo, David; Mousavi, Pedram; Nahon, Meyer; Shafai, Lot; Stiemer, Sigfried F.; Taylor, Russell; Veidt, Bruce

    2000-07-01

    The Large Adaptive Reflector (LAR) is a concept for a low- cost, large aperture, wideband, radio telescope, designed to operate over the wavelength range from 2 m to 1.4 cm. It consists of a 200-m diameter actuated-surface parabolic reflector with a focal length of 500 m, mounted flat on the ground. The feed is held in place by a tension-structure, consisting of three or more tethers tensioned by the lift of a large, helium-filled aerostat -- a stiff structure that effectively resists wind forces. The telescope is steered by simultaneously changing the lengths of the tethers with winches (thus the position of the feed) and by modifying the shape of the reflector. At all times the reflector configuration is that of an offset parabolic antenna, with the capability to point anywhere in the sky above approximately 15 degree Elevation Angle. At mid-range wavelengths, the feed is a multi-beam prime-focus phased array, about 5 m diameter; at meter wavelengths, it is a single-beam phased array of up to 10 m diameter. Simulations have shown that in operating wind conditions (10 m/s average speed with 2.5 m/s gusts), the position of the feed platform can be stabilized to within a few cm over time scales of approximately 20 s. Research indicates that the telescope concept is feasible and that an order of magnitude improvement in cost per m2 of collecting area over traditional designs of large parabolic antennas can be achieved.

  17. Large Binocular Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.

    1997-03-01

    The large binocular telescope (LBT) project have evolved from concepts first proposed in 1985. The present partners involved in the design and construction of this 2 by 8.4 meter binocular telescope are the University of Arizona, Italy represented by the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and the Research Corporation based in Tucson, Arizona. These three partners have committed sufficient funds to build the enclosure and the telescope populated with a single 8.4 meter optical train -- approximately 40 million dollars (1989). Based on this commitment, design and construction activities are now moving forward. Additional partners are being sought. The next mirror to be cast at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab in the fall of 1996 will be the first borosilicate honeycomb primary for LBT. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes wide field Cassegrain secondaries with optical foci above the primaries to provide a corrected one degree field at F/4. The infrared F/15 secondaries are a Gregorian design to allow maximum flexibility for adaptive optics. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane which is unvignetted over a 4 arcminute diameter field-of-view. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4 meter primaries will reimage two folded Gregorian focal planes to a central location. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arms which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors. Maximum stiffness and minimal thermal disturbance continue to be important drivers for the detailed design of the telescope. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The detailed design of the telescope structure will be completed in 1996 by ADS Italia (Lecco) and European Industrial Engineering (Mestre). The final enclosure design is now in progress at M3 Engineering (Tucson), EIE and ADS Italia

  18. Multi-laser-guided adaptive optics for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; Angel, R.; Green, R.; Stalcup, T.; Milton, N. M.; Powell, K.

    2007-09-01

    We describe the conceptual design of an advanced laser guide star facility (LGSF) for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), to be built in collaboration with the LBT's international partners. The highest priority goal for the facility is the correction of ground-layer turbulence, providing partial seeing compensation in the near IR bands over a 4' field. In the H band, GLAO is projected to improve the median seeing from 0.55" to 0.2". The new facility will build on the LBT's natural guide star AO system, integrated into the telescope with correction by adaptive secondary mirrors, and will draw on Arizona's experience in the construction of the first multi-laser adaptive optics (AO) system at the 6.5 m MMT. The LGSF will use four Rayleigh beacons at 532 nm, projected to an altitude of 25 km, on each of the two 8.4 m component telescopes. Initial use of the system for ground layer correction will deliver image quality well matched to the LBT's two LUCIFER near IR instruments. They will be used for direct imaging over a 4'×4' field and will offer a unique capability in high resolution multi-object spectroscopy. The LGSF is designed to include long-term upgrade paths. Coherent imaging at the combined focus of the two apertures will be exploited by the LBT Interferometer in the thermal IR. Using the same launch optics, an axial sodium or Rayleigh beacon can be added to each constellation, for tomographic wavefront reconstruction and diffraction limited imaging over the usual isoplanatic patch. In the longer term, a second DM conjugated to high altitude is foreseen for the LBT's LINC-NIRVANA instrument, which would extend the coherent diffraction-limited field to an arcminute in diameter with multi-conjugate AO.

  19. Laser guide star wavefront sensing for ground-layer adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Clare, Richard M; Le Louarn, Miska; Béchet, Clementine

    2011-02-01

    We propose ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) to improve the seeing on the 42 m European Extremely Large Telescope. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFSs) with laser guide stars (LGSs) will experience significant spot elongation due to off-axis observation. This spot elongation influences the design of the laser launch location, laser power, WFS detector, and centroiding algorithm for LGS GLAO on an extremely large telescope. We show, using end-to-end numerical simulations, that with a noise-weighted matrix-vector-multiply reconstructor, the performance in terms of 50% ensquared energy (EE) of the side and central launch of the lasers is equivalent, the matched filter and weighted center of gravity centroiding algorithms are the most promising, and approximately 10×10 undersampled pixels are optimal. Significant improvement in the 50% EE can be observed with a few tens of photons/subaperture/frame, and no significant gain is seen by adding more than 200 photons/subaperture/frame. The LGS GLAO is not particularly sensitive to the sodium profile present in the mesosphere nor to a short-timescale (less than 100 s) evolution of the sodium profile. The performance of LGS GLAO is, however, sensitive to the atmospheric turbulence profile.

  20. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  1. Telescope performance at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Rothberg, Barry; Christou, Julian C.; Summers, Kellee R.; Summers, Douglas M.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Observatory is a collaboration between institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio and Virginia. The telescope uses two 8.4-m diameter primary mirrors mounted sideby- side on the same AZ-EL mount to produce a collecting area equivalent to an 11.8-meter aperture. Adaptive optics loops are routinely closed with natural stars on both sides for sided and combined beam observations. Rayleigh laser guide stars provide GLAO seeing improvement. With the telescope now in operation for 10 years, we report on various statistics of telescope performance and seeing-limited image quality. Statistics of telescope performance are reported in the areas of off-axis guiding, open-loop mount tracking, active optics and vibration. Delivered image quality is reported as measured by the DIMM and several guide cameras as a function of other parameters such as temperature and wind velocity. Projects to improve image quality and dome seeing are underway.

  2. Engineering aspects of the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, Guido; Ashby, Dave; Christou, Julian C.; Kern, Jonathan; Lefebvre, Michael; McMahon, Tom J.; Miller, Douglas; Rahmer, Gustavo; Sosa, Richard; Taylor, Gregory; Vogel, Conrad; Zhang, Xianyu

    2016-07-01

    Vertical profiles of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and velocity is of critical importance for simulating, designing, and operating the next generation of instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Many of these instruments are already well into the design phase meaning these profies are required immediately to ensure they are optimised for the unique conditions likely to be observed. Stereo-SCIDAR is a generalised SCIDAR instrument which is used to characterise the profile of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and wind velocity using triangulation between two optical binary stars. Stereo-SCIDAR has demonstrated the capability to resolve turbulent layers with the required vertical resolution to support wide-field ELT instrument designs. These high resolution atmospheric parameters are critical for design studies and statistical evaluation of on-sky performance under real conditions. Here we report on the new Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed on one of the Auxillary Telescope ports of the Very Large Telescope array at Cerro Paranal. Paranal is located approximately 20 km from Cerro Armazones, the site of the E-ELT. Although the surface layer of the turbulence will be different for the two sites due to local geography, the high-altitude resolution profiles of the free atmosphere from this instrument will be the most accurate available for the E-ELT site. In addition, these unbiased and independent profiles are also used to further characterise the site of the VLT. This enables instrument performance calibration, optimisation and data analysis of, for example, the ESO Adaptive Optics facility and the Next Generation Transit Survey. It will also be used to validate atmospheric models for turbulence forecasting. We show early results from the commissioning and address future implications of the results.

  3. Active Control of Adaptive Optics System in a Large Segmented Mirror Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    expensive. Hubble Space Telescope has a primary mirror of 2.4 m diameter, but it is difficult to further extend the size of the mirror because no launch...Method I INTRODUCTION In optical systems used for imagery, such as telescopes for astronomy or surveillance of the earth surface from the space , the...possible resolution of the image. For telescopes in the space , on the other hand, launching a large solid optical mirror is very challenging and also

  4. Adaptive optics simulations for imaging with the Large Binocular Telescope interferometer: a first application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; Correia, Serge; Femenia, Bruno; Riccardi, Armando

    2000-07-01

    In this contribution we present a first application of the ongoing numerical simulations that are carried out in order to study the adaptive optics (AO) correction and the subsequent imaging post-processing when observing with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) interferometer. The simulation tool used as a starting point for this study is the software package CAOS 2.0 (Code for Adaptive Optics Systems, version 2.0), for its AO-simulation capabilities and its modular structure. It is used here in order to generate the turbulence-corrupted and subsequently adaptive-optics- corrected interferometric point-spread functions corresponding to the simultaneous observation of both a scientific object and a reference star, for three parallactic angles corresponding to three observation runs during the night. The obtained data are therefore used as the inputs of a multiple deconvolution method planned for imaging with the LBT interferometer. As an example, we have simulated the observation, in the R-band, of a Betelgeuse-like stellar object of 15th magnitude, 30 mas diameter, and with a 3 mas bright spot, under two different conditions of turbulence and AO-correction (leading to Strehl ratios of approximately 0.15 and approximately 0.45, respectively). Final results are found to be very encouraging.

  5. Adaptive optics with four laser guide stars: correction of the cone effect in large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Viard, Elise; Le, Louarn Miska; Hubin, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    We study the performance of an adaptive optics (AO) system with four laser guide stars (LGSs) and a natural guide star (NGS). The residual cone effect with four LGSs is obtained by a numerical simulation. This method allows the adaptive optics system to be extended toward the visible part of the spectrum without tomographic reconstruction of three-dimensional atmospheric perturbations, resolving the cone effect in the visible. Diffraction-limited images are obtained with 17-arc ms precision in median atmospheric conditions at wavelengths longer than 600 nm. The gain achievable with such a system operated on an existing AO system is studied. For comparison, performance in terms of achievable Strehl ratio is also computed for a reasonable system composed of a 40 x 40 Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor optimized for the I band. Typical errors of a NGS wave front are computed by use of analytical formulas. With the NGS errors and the cone effect, the Strehl ratio can reach 0.45 at 1.25 microm under good-seeing conditions with the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS; a 14 x 14 subpupil wave-front sensor) at the Very Large Telescope and 0.8 with a 40 x 40 Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor.

  6. Numerical simulation studies for the first-light adaptive optics system of the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone

    2004-10-01

    We present our latest results concerning the simulation studies performed for the first-light adaptive optics (AO) system of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), namely WLBT. After a brief description of the "raw" performance evaluation results, in terms of Strehl ratios attained in the various considered bands (from V to K), we focus on the "scientific" performance that will be obtained when considering the subsequent instrumentation that will benefit from the correction given by the AO system WLBT and the adaptive secondary mirrors LBT 672. In particular, we discuss the performance of the coupling with the instrument LUCIFER, working at near-infrared bands, in terms of signal-to-noise values and limiting magnitudes, and in both the cases of spectroscopy and photometric detection. We also give the encircled energies that are expected in the visible bands, result relevant in one hand for the instrument PEPSI, and in other hand for the "technical viewer" that will be on board the WLBT system itself.

  7. Monte Carlo modelling of multi-object adaptive optics performance on the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Morris, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The performance of a wide-field adaptive optics (AO) system depends on input design parameters. Here we investigate the performance of a multi-object AO system design for the European Extremely Large Telescope, using an end-to-end Monte Carlo AO simulation tool, Durham adaptive optics simulation platform, with relevance for proposed instruments such as MOSAIC. We consider parameters such as the number of laser guide stars, sodium layer depth, wavefront sensor pixel scale, actuator pitch and natural guide star availability. We provide potential areas where costs savings can be made, and investigate trade-offs between performance and cost, and provide solutions that would enable such an instrument to be built with currently available technology. Our key recommendations include a trade-off for laser guide star wavefront sensor pixel scale of about 0.7 arcsec per pixel, and a field of view of at least 7 arcsec, that electron multiplying CCD technology should be used for natural guide star wavefront sensors even if reduced frame rate is necessary, and that sky coverage can be improved by a slight reduction in natural guide star sub-aperture count without significantly affecting tomographic performance. We find that AO correction can be maintained across a wide field of view, up to 7 arcmin in diameter. We also recommend the use of at least four laser guide stars, and include ground-layer and multi-object AO performance estimates.

  8. Active control of adaptive optics system in a large segmented mirror telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, M.; Agrawal, B. N.

    2014-02-01

    For a large adaptive optics system such as a large segmented mirror telescope (SMT), it is often difficult, although not impossible, to directly apply common multi-input multi-output (MIMO) controller design methods due to the computational burden imposed by the large dimension of the system model. In this article, a practical controller design method is proposed which significantly reduces the system dimension for a system where the dimension required to represent the dynamics of the plant is much smaller than the dimension of the full plant model. The proposed method decouples the dynamic and static parts of the plant model by a modal decomposition technique to separately design a controller for each part. Two controllers are then combined using the so-called sensitivity decoupling method so that the resulting feedback loop becomes the superposition of the two individual feedback loops of the dynamic and static parts. A MIMO controller was designed by the proposed method using the H ∞ loop-shaping technique for an SMT model to be compared with other controllers proposed in the literature. Frequency-domain analysis and time-domain simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed controller.

  9. The field stabilization and adaptive optics mirrors for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernet, Elise; Jochum, Lieselotte; La Penna, Paolo; Hubin, Norbert; Muradore, Riccardo; Casalta, Joan Manel; Kjelberg, Ivar; Sinquin, Jean-Christophe; Locre, Frédéric; Morin, Pierre; Cousty, Raphaël; Lurçon, Jean-Marie; Roland, Jean-Jacques; Crepy, Bruno; Gabriel, Eric; Biasi, Roberto; Andrighettoni, Mario; Angerer, Gerald; Gallieni, Daniele; Mantegazza, Marco; Tintori, Matteo; Molinari, Emilio; Tresoldi, Daniela; Toso, Giorgio; Spanó, Paolo; Riva, Marco; Crimi, Giuseppe; Riccardi, Armando; Marque, Gilles; Carel, Jean-Louis; Ruch, Eric

    2008-07-01

    A 42 meters telescope does require adaptive optics to provide few milli arcseconds resolution images. In the current design of the E-ELT, M4 provides adaptive correction while M5 is the field stabilization mirror. Both mirrors have an essential role in the E-ELT telescope strategy since they do not only correct for atmospheric turbulence but have also to cancel part of telescope wind shaking and static aberrations. Both mirrors specifications have been defined to avoid requesting over constrained requirements in term of stroke, speed and guide stars magnitude. Technical specifications and technological issues are discussed in this article. Critical aspects and roadmap to assess the feasibility of such mirrors are outlined.

  10. Prospects for MOEMS-based adaptive optical systems on extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Dohlen, Kjetil

    Different research groups around the world are currently involved in the design of extremely large optical telescopes, ranging from 40 to 100m. These telescopes will rely on the availability of highly performing adaptive optical systems with of the order of 100 000 actuators. This number of actuators is prohibitive for conventional technology (stacked piezoelectric actuators, bimorph mirrors), but can be achieved by the development of new technologies based on micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS). MOEMS devices are realized by the mature microelectronics process and they show great potential to reach the specifications required by AO in astronomy. Within the AO-ELT RTN, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille is designing and developing new MDM in collaboration with the LAAS, a leading French micro-opto-electronics research laboratory. After realization of prototypes, tests will be performed on specific characterization bench set-ups in our laboratory. We review the three main kinds of micro-deformable mirrors (MDM) which are under study and illustrate their great potential. Driven by electrostatic fields, the concepts differ in terms of surface quality, size of the device, number of actuators, inter-actuator coupling effects, deformation motion (maximal deflection) and driving voltage. A major advantage of the MOEMS technology is the possibility to build complete addressing and driving electronics into the device. However, MOEMS present some technological limitations regarding actuators stroke (< 10 μ m) and overall size (size of the wafer). These limitations stress some parameters of the AO system optical design, such as the possibility to correct low order perturbations, the axial separation between the deformable mirrors (DM), and the size of the internal pupil. To counter the limited stroke problem, we propose a multistage AO concept. Tip-tilt and low-order corrections can be achieved with conventional technology, leaving only high order

  11. DM/LCWFC based adaptive optics system for large aperture telescopes imaging from visible to infrared waveband.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Cao, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yukun; Zhang, Caihua; Zhang, Xingyun; Liu, Yong; Mu, Quanquan; Xuan, Li

    2016-11-28

    Almost all the deformable mirror (DM) based adaptive optics systems (AOSs) used on large aperture telescopes work at the infrared waveband due to the limitation of the number of actuators. To extend the imaging waveband to the visible, we propose a DM and Liquid crystal wavefront corrector (DM/LCWFC) combination AOS. The LCWFC is used to correct the high frequency aberration corresponding to the visible waveband and the aberrations of the infrared are corrected by the DM. The calculated results show that, to a 10 m telescope, DM/LCWFC AOS which contains a 1538 actuators DM and a 404 × 404 pixels LCWFC is equivalent to a DM based AOS with 4057 actuators. It indicates that the DM/LCWFC AOS is possible to work from visible to infrared for larger aperture telescopes. The simulations and laboratory experiment are performed for a 2 m telescope. The experimental results show that, after correction, near diffraction limited resolution USAF target images are obtained at the wavebands of 0.7-0.9 μm, 0.9-1.5 μm and 1.5-1.7 μm respectively. Therefore, the DM/LCWFC AOS may be used to extend imaging waveband of larger aperture telescope to the visible. It is very appropriate for the observation of spatial objects and the scientific research in astronomy.

  12. Investigations of an Accelerometer-based Disturbance Feedforward Control for Vibration Suppression in Adaptive Optics of Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glück, Martin; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Sawodny, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) systems in large telescopes do not only correct atmospheric phase disturbances, but they also telescope structure vibrations induced by wind or telescope motions. Often the additional wavefront error due to mirror vibrations can dominate the disturbance power and contribute significantly to the total tip-tilt Zernike mode error budget. Presently, these vibrations are compensated for by common feedback control laws. However, when observing faint natural guide stars (NGS) at reduced control bandwidth, high-frequency vibrations (>5 Hz) cannot be fully compensated for by feedback control. In this paper, we present an additional accelerometer-based disturbance feedforward control (DFF), which is independent of the NGS wavefront sensor exposure time to enlarge the “effective servo bandwidth”. The DFF is studied in a realistic AO end-to-end simulation and compared with commonly used suppression concepts. For the observation in the faint (>13 mag) NGS regime, we obtain a Strehl ratio by a factor of two to four larger in comparison with a classical feedback control. The simulation realism is verified with real measurement data from the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT); the application for on-sky testing at the LBT and an implementation at the E-ELT in the MICADO instrument is discussed.

  13. Visible light high-resolution imaging system for large aperture telescope by liquid crystal adaptive optics with phase diversity technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zihao; Yang, Chengliang; Zhang, Peiguang; Zhang, Xingyun; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Sun, Qiang; Xuan, Li

    2017-08-30

    There are more than eight large aperture telescopes (larger than eight meters) equipped with adaptive optics system in the world until now. Due to the limitations such as the difficulties of increasing actuator number of deformable mirror, most of them work in the infrared waveband. A novel two-step high-resolution optical imaging approach is proposed by applying phase diversity (PD) technique to the open-loop liquid crystal adaptive optics system (LC AOS) for visible light high-resolution adaptive imaging. Considering the traditional PD is not suitable for LC AOS, the novel PD strategy is proposed which can reduce the wavefront estimating error caused by non-modulated light generated by liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC SLM) and make the residual distortions after open-loop correction to be smaller. Moreover, the LC SLM can introduce any aberration which realizes the free selection of phase diversity. The estimating errors are greatly reduced in both simulations and experiments. The resolution of the reconstructed image is greatly improved on both subjective visual effect and the highest discernible space resolution. Such technique can be widely used in large aperture telescopes for astronomical observations such as terrestrial planets, quasars and also can be used in other applications related to wavefront correction.

  14. Novel Adaptive Optics concepts : wavefront sensing with sodium laser guide stars at Extemely Large Telescopes and simultaneous differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, Stephan Albert

    2005-12-01

    Since more than 15 years, Adaptive Optics (AO) is a proven concept to reach diffraction limited imaging at modern astronomical telescopes. In the case of next generation telescopes (Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs)) with aperture diameters of up to 100m, sodium laser guide star based multi-conjugated-AO systems will be a basic requirement to exploit their full capability in terms of resolution and light concentration. A drawback of such an approach emerges in the finite distance and vertical extent of the sodium beacon in the mesosphere with respect to the telescope. This induces effects such as perspective elongation, where conventional wavefront sensing mechanisms will fail. Although several engineering concepts are under development to counteract these constraints at the cost of overall light efficiency and increased system complexity, this thesis proposes a novel kind of wavefront sensing technique to overcome the imposed limitations in a more natural way. The sensing technique is composed of two independently working sensors, a reflective rod and a mask with circular slits, each a representative of a novel wavefront sensor class, the so called z-invariant and Inverse Bessel Beam technique. Both are discussed in this thesis with a focus on the Inverse Bessel Beam technique. The latter is compared to alternative concepts such as temporal gating, with respect to the photon efficiency. Furthermore, the reflective rod was tested for its feasibility in laboratory conditions and in a more realistic environment at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at La Palma. With this test run its sensing principle has been verified. A novel technique already intensively used at 8m class telescopes is Simultaneous Differential Imaging. The direct detection of giant extra-solar planets is and will be a major science driver for galactic astronomy in the coming years. Modern telescope facilities such as the VLT reach, by means of adaptive optics, potentially the capability in terms

  15. The Large Binocular Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.

    1994-12-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Project has evolved from concepts first proposed in 1985. The present partners involved in the design and construction of this 2 x 8.4 meter binocular telescope are the University of Arizona, Italy represented by the Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri and the Research Corporation based in Tucson. These three partners have committed sufficient funds to build the enclosure and the telescope populated with a single 8.4 meter optical train --- approximately 40 million dollars (1989). Based on this commitment, design and construction activities are now moving forward. Additional partners are being sought. The next mirror to be cast at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab in late fall 1995 will be the first borosilicate honeycomb primary for LBT. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes wide field Cassegrain secondaries with optical foci above the primaries to provide a corrected one degree field at F/4. The infrared F/15 secondaries are a Gregorian design to allow maximum flexibility for adaptive optics. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane which is unvignetted over a 4 arcminute diameter field-of-view. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4 meter primaries will reimage two folded Gregorian focal planes to a central location. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arms which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors. Maximum stiffness and minimal thermal disturbance continue to be important drivers for the detailed design of the telescope. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The detailed design of the telescope structure will be completed in 1995 by ADS Italia (Lecco) and European Industrial Engineering (Mestre). The final enclosure design is now in progress at M3 Engineering (Tucson) and ADS Italia. Construction

  16. The Large Binocular Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Project has evolved from concepts first proposed in 1985. The present partners involved in the design and construction of this 2 x 8.4 meter binocular telescope are the University of Arizona, Italy represented by the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and the Research Corporation based in Tucson. These three partners have committed sufficient funds to build the enclosure and the telescope populated with a single 8.4 meter optical train --- approximately 40 million dollars (1989). Based on this commitment, design and construction activities are now moving forward. Additional partners are being sought. The next mirror to be cast at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab in spring of 1996 will be the first borosilicate honeycomb primary for LBT. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes wide field Cassegrain secondaries with optical foci above the primaries to provide a corrected one degree field at F/4. The infrared F/15 secondaries are a Gregorian design to allow maximicrons flexibility for adaptive optics. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane which is unvignetted over a 4 arcminute diameter field-of-view. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4 meter primaries will reimage two folded Gregorian focal planes to a central location. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arms which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors. Maximicrons stiffness and minimal thermal disturbance continue to be important drivers for the detailed design of the telescope. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The detailed design of the telescope structure will be completed in 1995 by ADS Italia (Lecco) and European Industrial Engineering (Mestre). The final enclosure design is now in progress at M3 Engineering (Tucson) and ADS Italia

  17. The Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Michelson, Peter F.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL

    2007-11-13

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy pair-conversion telescope, covering the energy range from {approx}20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT is being built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. The scientific objectives the LAT will address include resolving the high-energy gamma-ray sky and determining the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources and the origin of the apparently isotropic diffuse emission observed by EGRET; understanding the mechanisms of particle acceleration in celestial sources, including active galactic nuclei, pulsars, and supernovae remnants; studying the high-energy behavior of gamma-ray bursts and transients; using high-energy gamma-rays to probe the early universe to z {ge} 6; and probing the nature of dark matter. The components of the LAT include a precision silicon-strip detector tracker and a CsI(Tl) calorimeter, a segmented anticoincidence shield that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large field-of-view and ensuring that nearly all pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. This paper includes a description of each of these LAT subsystems as well as a summary of the overall performance of the telescope.

  18. Wavefront Analysis of Adaptive Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Hillman, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work came from a NASA Headquarters interest in investigating design concepts for a large space telescope employing active optics technology. The development of telescope optical requirements and potential optical design configurations is reported.

  19. Stress polishing of thin shells for adaptive secondary mirrors. Application to the Very Large Telescope deformable secondary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, E.; Ferrari, M.; Riccardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Lemaître, G. R.; Arsenault, R.; Hubin, N.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Adaptive secondary mirrors (ASM) are, or will be, key components on all modern telescopes, providing improved seeing conditions or diffraction limited images, thanks to the high-order atmospheric turbulence correction obtained by controlling the shape of a thin mirror. Their development is a key milestone towards future extremely large telescopes (ELT) where this technology is mandatory for successful observations. Aims: The key point of actual adaptive secondaries technology is the thin glass mirror that acts as a deformable membrane, often aspheric. On 6 m - 8 m class telescopes, these are typically 1 m-class with a 2 mm thickness. The optical quality of this shell must be sufficiently good not to degrade the correction, meaning that high spatial frequency errors must be avoided. The innovative method presented here aims at generating aspherical shapes by elastic bending to reach high optical qualities. Methods: This method is called stress polishing and allows generating aspherical optics of a large amplitude with a simple spherical polishing with a full sized lap applied on a warped blank. The main advantage of this technique is the smooth optical quality obtained, free of high spatial frequency ripples as they are classically caused by subaperture toolmarks. After describing the manufacturing process we developed, our analytical calculations lead to a preliminary definition of the geometry of the blank, which allows a precise bending of the substrate. The finite element analysis (FEA) can be performed to refine this geometry by using an iterative method with a criterion based on the power spectral density of the displacement map of the optical surface. Results: Considering the specific case of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) deformable secondary mirror (DSM), extensive FEA were performed for the optimisation of the geometry. Results are showing that the warping will not introduce surface errors higher than 0.3 nm rms on the minimal spatial scale

  20. Very Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Community Days Report on the ESO Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibundgut, B.; Kasper, M.; Kuntschner, H.

    2016-12-01

    The future of adaptive optics (AO) instruments at the VLT was discussed during a two-day workshop. Three major directions emerged from these discussions: adaptive optics in the optical; multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO); and extreme adaptive optics (XAO). The science cases for these three options were presented and the discussions are summarised. ESO is now planning to provide detailed science cases for an optical AO system and to prepare upgrade plans for XAO and MOAO.

  1. Adaptive-optics performance of Antarctic telescopes.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Jon S

    2004-02-20

    The performance of natural guide star adaptive-optics systems for telescopes located on the Antarctic plateau is evaluated and compared with adaptive-optics systems operated with the characteristic mid-latitude atmosphere found at Mauna Kea. A 2-m telescope with tip-tilt correction and an 8-m telescope equipped with a high-order adaptive-optics system are considered. Because of the large isoplanatic angle of the South Pole atmosphere, the anisoplanatic error associated with an adaptive-optics correction is negligible, and the achievable resolution is determined only by the fitting error associated with the number of corrected wave-front modes, which depends on the number of actuators on the deformable mirror. The usable field of view of an adaptive-optics equipped Antarctic telescope is thus orders of magnitude larger than for a similar telescope located at a mid-latitude site; this large field of view obviates the necessity for multiconjugate adaptive-optics systems that use multiple laser guide stars. These results, combined with the low infrared sky backgrounds, indicate that the Antarctic plateau is the best site on Earth at which to perform high-resolution imaging with large telescopes, either over large fields of view or with appreciable sky coverage. Preliminary site-testing results obtained recently from the Dome Concordia station indicate that this site is far superior to even the South Pole.

  2. Large size telescope report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, D.; Cortina, J.; Teshima, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be deployed over two sites in the two hemispheres. Both sites will be equipped with four Large Size Telescopes (LSTs), which are crucial to achieve the science goals of CTA in the 20-200 GeV energy range. Each LST is equipped with a primary tessellated mirror dish of 23 m diameter, supported by a structure made mainly of carbon fibre reinforced plastic tubes and aluminum joints. This solution guarantees light weight (around 100 tons), essential for fast repositioning to any position in the sky in <20 seconds. The camera is composed of 1855 photomultiplier tubes and embeds the control, readout and trigger electronics. The detailed design is now complete and production of the first LST, which will serve as a prototype for the remaining seven, is ongoing. The installation of the first LST at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the Canary island of La Palma (Spain) started in July 2016. In this paper we will outline the technical solutions adopted to fulfill the design requirements, present results of element prototyping and describe the installation and operation plans.

  3. Steady-state analysis of the multi-tethered aerostat platform for the Large Adaptive Reflector telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Joeleff T.; Veidt, Bruce; Dewdney, Peter E.

    2000-07-01

    The Large Adaptive Reflector (LAR), currently being developed at the National Research Council Canada, is a low-cost, large- aperture, wide-band, cm-wave radio telescope designed for implementation in the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). The LAR consists of a 200 m diameter, actuated-surface, parabolic reflector with a feed located at a 500 m focal length. Since the feed must be positioned on a 500 m hemisphere centered about the reflector and between a zenith angle of 0 degree(s) to 60 degree(s), an innovative method for feed positioning is required. This feed positioning will be achieved using a high- tension structure consisting of a 4100 m3 helium aerostat supporting an array of tethers. The length of each tether can be controlled through the use of winches, resulting in accurate control of the feed position. The feasibility of the tethered aerostat feed-positioning system is of critical importance to the success of the LAR. Extensive steady-state analyses of the multi-tethered aerostat have been completed and provide strong evidence that this feed-positioning system will operate reliably in moderate weather conditions (10 m/s constant wind velocity with 2.5 m/s wind gusts). The framework of these analyses and the corresponding results will be presented.

  4. Extra large telescope actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben; Hatheway, Alson E.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of the Extra Large Telescope Actuator (ELTA) development project was to demonstrate operation of a relatively high stiffness, single stage optical positioning actuator capable of achieving diffraction-limited performance (<10 nm) in the visible optical band for weeks at a time while consuming no electrical power and dissipating no heat. The design challenge was to develop a linear positioning mechanism exhibiting high stiffness, low power, zero backlash, and thermal stability over extended time periods. The key to achieving high resolution, and stability with low power is to eliminate the closed-loop control system that is normally employed to overcome the nonlinearities and hysteresis inherent in some technologies, such as piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers. This was accomplished by using the patented elastic transducer developed by Alson E. Hatheway (AEH Inc.) This device consists of two elastic elements; a soft spring and a stiff flexural member. Deflection of the soft spring applies a force input to the stiff flexure, which responds with a proportionally reduced output deflection. To maintain linearity, the displacements, and hence the stresses, developed in both elastic members are kept below the micro-yield strength of the material. The AEH transducer is inherently linear and hysteresis free. The unique design features of this actuator which contribute to its extremely precise motion capability include an electric motor driving a leadscrew through a zero backlash harmonic drive gear reduction. The already fine incremental motion of the leadscrew nut is further attenuated by the elastic action of the AEH transducer, to provide output motion with resolution <10 nm.

  5. Large aperture Fresnel telescopes/011

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A., LLNL

    1998-07-16

    At Livermore we`ve spent the last two years examining an alternative approach towards very large aperture (VLA) telescopes, one based upon transmissive Fresnel lenses rather than on mirrors. Fresnel lenses are attractive for VLA telescopes because they are launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) and because they virtually eliminate the traditional, very tight, surface shape requirements faced by reflecting telescopes. Their (potentially severe) optical drawback, a very narrow spectral bandwidth, can be eliminated by use of a second (much smaller) chromatically-correcting Fresnel element. This enables Fresnel VLA telescopes to provide either single band ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 0.1), multiple band, or continuous spectral coverage. Building and fielding such large Fresnel lenses will present a significant challenge, but one which appears, with effort, to be solvable.

  6. Infrastructure for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEwen, Howard A.; Lillie, Charles F.

    2016-10-01

    It is generally recognized (e.g., in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration response to recent congressional appropriations) that future space observatories must be serviceable, even if they are orbiting in deep space (e.g., around the Sun-Earth libration point, SEL2). On the basis of this legislation, we believe that budgetary considerations throughout the foreseeable future will require that large, long-lived astrophysics missions must be designed as evolvable semipermanent observatories that will be serviced using an operational, in-space infrastructure. We believe that the development of this infrastructure will include the design and development of a small to mid-sized servicing vehicle (MiniServ) as a key element of an affordable infrastructure for in-space assembly and servicing of future space vehicles. This can be accomplished by the adaptation of technology developed over the past half-century into a vehicle approximately the size of the ascent stage of the Apollo Lunar Module to provide some of the servicing capabilities that will be needed by very large telescopes located in deep space in the near future (2020s and 2030s). We specifically address the need for a detailed study of these servicing requirements and the current proposals for using presently available technologies to provide the appropriate infrastructure.

  7. Science with Large Solar Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, G.; Tritschler, A.; Deng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    With several large aperture optical/IR telescopes coming on-line, and scheduled for the near future, solar physics is on the verge of a quantum leap in observational capabilities. An efficient use of such facilities will require new and innovative approaches to both observatory operations and data handling. This two-days long Special Session will discuss the science expected with large solar telescopes, and start addressing the strategies necessary to optimize their scientific return. Cutting edge solar science as derived from state of the art observations and numerical simulations will be presented, and discussions will be held on the role of large facilities in satisfying the demanding requirements of spatial and temporal resolution, stray-light, and spectro-polarimetric accuracy. Building on the experience of recently commissioned telescopes, we will then discuss critical issues for the development of future facilities including operational issues peculiar to large telecopes, and strategies for their best use.

  8. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  9. Wavefront Analysis of Adaptive Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Hillman, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work came from a NASA Headquarters interest in investigating design concepts for a large space telescope employing active optics technology. Current and foreseeable launch vehicles will be limited to carrying around 4-5 meter diameter objects. Thus, if a large, filled-aperture telescope (6-20 meters in diameter) is to be placed in space, it will be required to have a deployable primary mirror. Such a mirror may be an inflatable membrane or a segmented mirror consisting of many smaller pieces. In any case, it is expected that the deployed primary will not be of sufficient quality to achieve diffraction-limited performance for its aperture size. Thus, an active optics system will be needed to correct for initial as well as environmentally-produced primary figure errors. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed considerable expertise in the area of active optics with the PAMELA test-bed. The combination of this experience along with the Marshall optical shop's work in mirror fabrication made MSFC the logical choice to lead NASA's effort to develop active optics technology for large, space-based, astronomical telescopes. Furthermore, UAH's support of MSFC in the areas of optical design, fabrication, and testing of space-based optical systems placed us in a key position to play a major role in the development of this future-generation telescope. A careful study of the active optics components had to be carried out in order to determine control segment size, segment quality, and segment controllability required to achieve diffraction-limited resolution with a given primary mirror. With this in mind, UAH undertook the following effort to provide NASA/MSFC with optical design and analysis support for the large telescope study. All of the work performed under this contract has already been reported, as a team member with MSFC, to NASA Headquarters in a series of presentations given between May and December of 1995. As specified on the delivery

  10. Toward Adaptive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Tim W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peer; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (less than 1 inch) optics with very-large-aperture (greater than 25 square meter) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the surface areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kilogram per square meter or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve adaptive (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, adaptive optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States, and the Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom. This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward adaptive x-ray telescopes.

  11. Real-time turbulence profiling with a pair of laser guide star Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for wide-field adaptive optics systems on large to extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gilles, L; Ellerbroek, B L

    2010-11-01

    Real-time turbulence profiling is necessary to tune tomographic wavefront reconstruction algorithms for wide-field adaptive optics (AO) systems on large to extremely large telescopes, and to perform a variety of image post-processing tasks involving point-spread function reconstruction. This paper describes a computationally efficient and accurate numerical technique inspired by the slope detection and ranging (SLODAR) method to perform this task in real time from properly selected Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements accumulated over a few hundred frames from a pair of laser guide stars, thus eliminating the need for an additional instrument. The algorithm is introduced, followed by a theoretical influence function analysis illustrating its impulse response to high-resolution turbulence profiles. Finally, its performance is assessed in the context of the Thirty Meter Telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics system via end-to-end wave optics Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  13. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. Anthony

    2002-12-01

    A large wide-field telescope and camera with optical throughput over 200 m2 deg2 -- a factor of 50 beyond what we currently have -- would enable the detection of faint moving or bursting optical objects: from Earth threatening asteroids to energetic events at the edge of the optical universe. An optimized design for LSST is a 8.4 m telescope with a 3 degree field of view and an optical throughput of 260 m2 deg2. With its large throughput and dedicated all-sky monitoring mode, the LSST will reach 24th magnitude in a single 10 second exposure, opening unexplored regions of astronomical parameter space. The heart of the 2.3 Gpixel camera will be an array of imager modules with 10 μm pixels. Once each month LSST will survey up to 14,000 deg2 of the sky with many ~10 second exposures. Over time LSST will survey 30,000 deg2 deeply in multiple bandpasses, enabling innovative investigations ranging from galactic structure to cosmology. This is a shift in paradigm for optical astronomy: from "survey follow-up" to "survey direct science." The resulting real-time data products and fifteen petabyte time-tagged imaging database and photometric catalog will provide a unique resource. A collaboration of ~80 engineers and scientists are gearing up to confront this exciting challenge.

  14. World atlas of large optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    By 1980 there will be approximately 100 large optical telescopes in the world with mirror or lens diameters of one meter (39 inches) and larger. This atlas gives information on these telescopes and shows their locations on continent-sized maps. Observatory locations considered suitable for the construction of future large telescopes are also shown.

  15. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  16. Cumulative Reconstructor: fast wavefront reconstruction algorithm for Extremely Large Telescopes.

    PubMed

    Rosensteiner, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    The Cumulative Reconstructor (CuRe) is a new direct reconstructor for an optical wavefront from Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements. In this paper, the algorithm is adapted to realistic telescope geometries and the transition from modified Hudgin to Fried geometry is discussed. After a discussion of the noise propagation, we analyze the complexity of the algorithm. Our numerical tests confirm that the algorithm is very fast and accurate and can therefore be used for adaptive optics systems of Extremely Large Telescopes.

  17. Wind buffeting of large telescopes.

    PubMed

    MacMynowski, Douglas G; Andersen, Torben

    2010-02-01

    Unsteady wind loads due to turbulence within the telescope enclosure are one of the largest dynamic disturbances for ground-based optical telescopes. The desire to minimize the response to the wind influences the design of the telescope enclosure, structure, and control systems. There is now significant experience in detailed integrated modeling to predict image jitter due to wind. Based on this experience, a relatively simple model is proposed that is verified (from a more detailed model) to capture the relevant physics. In addition to illustrating the important elements of the telescope design that influence wind response, this model is used to understand the sensitivity of telescope image jitter to a wide range of design parameters.

  18. The large size telescope of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, G.; Awane, Y.; Baba, H.; Bamba, A.; Barceló, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Boix, J.; Brunetti, L.; Carmona, E.; Chabanne, E.; Chikawa, M.; Colin, R.; Cortina, J.; Contreras, J. L.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; Deleglise, G.; Delgado, C.; Díaz, C.; Fiasson, A.; Fink, D.; Fouque, N.; Freixas, L.; Fruck, C.; Gadola, A.; García, R.; Gascon, D.; Geffroy, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Grañena, F.; Gunji, S.; Hagiwara, R.; Hamer, N.; Hanabata, Y.; Hassan, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirotani, K.; Inoue, S.; Inoue, Y.; Ioka, K.; Jablonski, C.; Kagaya, M.; Katagiri, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kodani, K.; Kohri, K.; Konno, Y.; Koyama, S.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Lamanna, G.; Le Flour, T.; Lorenz, E.; López, R.; López-Moya, M.; Majumdar, P.; Manalaysay, A.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, G.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Monteiro, I.; Moralejo, A.; Murase, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakajima, D.; Nakamori, T.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nozato, A.; Ohira, Y.; Ohishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Okumura, A.; Orito, R.; Panazol, J. L.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pauletta, G.; Podkladkin, S.; Prast, J.; Rando, R.; Reimann, O.; Ribó, M.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Saito, K.; Saito, T.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sakonaka, R.; Sanuy, A.; Sasaki, H.; Sawada, M.; Scalzotto, V.; Schultz, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shibata, T.; Shu, S.; Sieiro, J.; Stamatescu, V.; Steiner, S.; Straumann, U.; Sugawara, R.; Tajima, H.; Takami, H.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, M.; Tejedor, L. A.; Terada, Y.; Teshima, M.; Totani, T.; Ueno, H.; Umehara, K.; Vollhardt, A.; Wagner, R.; Wetteskind, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshikoshi, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project aims to implement the world's largest next generation of Very High Energy gamma-ray Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes devoted to the observation from a few tens of GeV to more than 100 TeV. To view the whole sky, two CTA sites are foreseen, one for each hemisphere. The sensitivity at the lowest energy range will be dominated by four Large Size Telescopes, LSTs, located at the center of each array and designed to achieve observations of high red-shift objects with the threshold energy of 20 GeV. The LST is optimized also for transient low energy sources, such as Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB), which require fast repositioning of the telescope. The overall design and the development status of the first LST telescope will be discussed.

  19. European Extremely Large Telescope: progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, R.; Spyromilio, J.

    2014-07-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope is a project of the European Southern Observatory to build and operate a 40-m class optical near-infrared telescope. The telescope design effort is largely concluded and construction contracts are being placed with industry and academic/research institutes for the various components. The siting of the telescope in Northern Chile close to the Paranal site allows for an integrated operation of the facility providing significant economies. The progress of the project in various areas is presented in this paper and references to other papers at this SPIE meeting are made.

  20. Performance of the restoration of interferometric images from the Large Binocular Telescope: the effects of angular coverage and partial adaptive optics correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; Correia, Serge; Boccacci, Patrizia; Bertero, Mario

    2003-02-01

    This presentation reports the status of our study concerning the imaging properties of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) interferometer, and namely the effect of limited angular coverage and partial adaptive optics (AO) correction. The limitation in angular coverage, together with the correlated problem of angular smearing due to time-averaging of the interferometric images, is investigated for relevant cases depending on the declination of the observed object. Results are encouraging even in case of incomplete coverage. Partial AO-correction can result in a wide range of image quality, but can also create significant differences within a same field-of-view, especially between a suitable reference star to be used for post-observation multiple deconvolution and the observed object. Our study deals with both the problem of space-variance of the AO-corrected point-spread function, and that of global quality of the AO-correction. Uniformity, rather than global quality, is found to be the key-problem. After considering the single-conjugate AO case, we reach to some conclusions for the more interesting, and actually wide-field, case implying multi-conjugate AO. The whole study is performed on different types of object, from binary stars to diffuse objects, and a combined one with a high-dynamic range.

  1. The Large Binocular Telescope as an early ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John; Hinz, Philip; Ashby, David

    2013-12-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has two 8.4-m primary mirrors on a common AZ-EL mounting. The dual Gregorian optical configuration for LBT includes a pair of adaptive secondaries. The adaptive secondaries are working reliably for science observations as well as for the commissioning of new instruments. Many aspects of the LBT telescope design have been optimized for the combination of the two optical trains. The telescope structure is relatively compact and stiff with a lowest eigenfrequency near 8 Hz. A vibration measurement system of accelerometers (OVMS) has been installed to characterize the vibrations of the telescope. A first-generation of the binocular telescope control system has been deployed on-sky. Two instruments, LBTI and LINC-NIRVANA, have been built to take advantage of the 22.65-m diffraction baseline when the telescope is phased. This diffraction-limited imaging capability (beyond 20-m baseline) positions LBT as a forerunner of the new generation of extremely large telescopes (ELT). We discuss here some of the experiences ofphasing the two sides of the telescope starting in 2010. We also report some lessons learned during on-sky commissioning of the LBTI instrument.

  2. Large aperture millimeter/submillimeter telescope: which is more cost-effective, aperture synthesis telescope versus large single dish telescope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Satoru; Saito, Masao

    2016-07-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) consists of 66 antennas with the aperture equivalent to a 91-m diameter antenna. The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is the world's largest, 100-m diameter telescope in the wavelength range of 3 mm to 30 cm. The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) will be the world's largest, 50-m diameter, steerable millimeter-wavelength telescope. The Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope (CCAT) will be the world's largest, 25-m diameter, submillimeter-wavelength telescope. We will investigate advantages and disadvantages of both the aperture synthesis telescope and the large single-dish telescope taking the cost effectiveness into consideration, and will propose the design of antenna structure for a future telescope project at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  3. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R A

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band (Deltalambda/lambda approximately 0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage.

  4. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25{endash}100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope{close_quote}s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope{close_quote}s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda}{approximately}0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  5. STATUS OF THE GLAST LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R

    2003-12-05

    The GLAST Large Area telescope is a modular 4 x 4 tower pair conversion telescope with field of view greater than 2 steradians and energy coverage from 20 MeV to 300 GeV. The observatory is scheduled for launch in September 2006. A status of the instrument construction is presented here.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope: large deployable cryogenic telescope in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.; Atkinson, Charles; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an infrared space telescope designed to explore four major science themes: first light and reionization, the assembly of galaxies, the birth of stars and protoplanetary systems, and planetary systems and origins of life. JWST is a segmented architecture telescope with an aperture of 6.6 m. It will operate at cryogenic temperature (40 K), achieved via passive cooling, in an orbit about the Earth-Sun second Lagrange point (L2). Passive cooling is facilitated by means of a large sunshield that provides thermal isolation and protection from direct illumination from the Sun. The large size of the telescope and spacecraft systems require that they are stowed for launch in a configuration that fits the Ariane 5 fairing, and then deployed after launch. Routine wavefront sensing and control measurements are used to achieve phasing of the segmented primary mirror and initial alignment of the telescope. A suite of instruments will provide the capability to observe over a spectral range from 0.6- to 27-μm wavelengths with imaging and spectroscopic configurations. An overview is presented of the architecture and selected optical design features of JWST are described.

  7. Zone generator for Large Space Telescope technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    A concept is presented for monitoring the optical adjustment and performance of a Large Space Telescope which consists of a 1.2m diameter turntable with a laser stylus to operate at speeds up to 30 rpm. The focus of the laser stylus is under closed loop control. A technique for scribing zones of suitable depth, width, and uniformity applicable to large telescope mirrors is also reported.

  8. Adaptive Optics at the World’s Biggest Optical Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    bottom up. The reflective, and deformable, component of each of the LBT’s mirrors is a concave Zerodur shell, 1.6 mm in average thickness and 911 mm in...Physik, 85748 Garching, Germany ABSTRACT The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, comprises two 8.4 m primary mirrors on a...adaptive optics (AO) was incorporated into the design through two adaptive secondary mirrors (ASM), each 91 cm in diameter with 672 actuators, which feed

  9. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, P. A.

    2004-12-01

    The LSST is an 8.4 meter telescope with a ten square degree field and three gigapixel detector, backed up by a powerful data processing and archiving facility. Operating as a fully-automated survey, it will image the entire sky repeatedly and at a rapid pace, opening the time domain to astronomy by producing more than 20 terabytes of high-quality images per night. Rarely observed events will become commonplace, new and unanticipated events will be discovered, and the combination of LSST with contemporary space-based missions will provide powerful synergies. Adding the data accumulated over years of operation will provide multicolor maps of the entire sky to unprecedented depth, with every pixel tied to its own time history in the database. An "open data" project, it will have no proprietary scientific information or areas of study. The LSST will simultaneously address many of astronomy's fundamental problems, from planetary science to cosmology, and will open a window to new discoveries yet unknown. I will give an overview of the LSST project, the data to be obtained, and some of its principal science drivers and key science deliverables.

  10. Solar Rejection Filter for Large Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James

    2009-01-01

    To reject solar radiation photons at the front aperture for large telescopes, a mosaic of large transmission mode filters is placed in front of the telescope or at the aperture of the dome. Filtering options for effective rejection of sunlight include a smaller filter down-path near the focus of the telescope, and a large-diameter filter located in the front of the main aperture. Two types of large filters are viable: reflectance mode and transmittance mode. In the case of reflectance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (e.g. a low-thermal-expansion glass) is arranged to reflect only a single, narrow wavelength and to efficiently transmit all other wavelengths. These coatings are commonly referred to as notch filter. In this case, the large mirror located in front of the telescope aperture reflects the received (signal and background) light into the telescope. In the case of transmittance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (glass, sapphire, clear plastic, membrane, and the like) is arranged to transmit only a single wavelength and to reject all other wavelengths (visible and near IR) of light. The substrate of the large filter will determine its mass. At first glance, a large optical filter with a diameter of up to 10 m, located in front of the main aperture, would require a significant thickness to avoid sagging. However, a segmented filter supported by a structurally rugged grid can support smaller filters. The obscuration introduced by the grid is minimal because the total area can be made insignificant. This configuration can be detrimental to a diffraction- limited telescope due to diffraction effects at the edges of each sub-panel. However, no discernable degradation would result for a 20 diffraction-limit telescope (a photon bucket). Even the small amount of sagging in each subpanel should have minimal effect in the performance of a non-diffraction limited telescope because the part has no appreciable optical power. If the

  11. New technology for large optical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, M. J.

    1983-05-01

    A recurrent topic arising in the discussions about new generation large optical telescopes is related to the economic advantages of lightweight reflector surfaces. A description is given of new technologies which might be suited for the construction of lightweight telescopes of low cost. One technology involves the use of sandwich structures, which include aluminum layers, separated by aluminum honeycomb layers. The availability of these structures, which have been developed for aircraft manufacture, has led various groups to study the feasibility of a use of sandwich materials for the manufacture of highly accurate reflecting surfaces, as required for millimeter and submillimeter wave telescopes. The results of these studies are discussed.

  12. Large Binocular Telescope M3 units design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallieni, Daniele; Hill, John M.; Salinari, Piero; Davison, Warren B.; Anaclerio, E.; Lazzarini, P. G.

    2000-08-01

    We report on the design of the two tertiary mirrors of the Large Binocular Telescope. The tertiary mirrors are flat octagonal shaped 540 X 640 mm Hextex honeycombs made of Schott borosilicate. Each mirror cell is mounted on three linear actuators for the active control of the mirror pointing and for the adjustment of the telescope optical path length. Each tertiary mirror unit embeds a rotator stage to point at four different instrument stations on the telescope. Particular effort is developed to the optimization of the honeycomb mirror support system to minimize the optical surface RMS deformation at the different mirror attitudes.

  13. The Large Binocular Telescope: binocular all the time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.; Ashby, D. S.; Brynnel, J. G.; Christou, J. C.; Little, John K.; Summers, D. M.; Veillet, C.; Wagner, R. M.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Observatory is a collaboration between institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio and Virginia. The telescope uses two 8.4-m diameter primary mirrors mounted sideby- side on the same AZ-EL mount to produce a collecting area equivalent to an 11.8-meter aperture. Many science observations collect the light from the two sides separately. With the arrival of the second copy of the near-infrared spectrometer and the second copy of the optical spectrometer, the telescope is observing with both apertures a significant fraction of the time. The light from the two primary mirrors can be combined to produce phased-array imaging of an extended field. This coherent imaging along with adaptive optics gives the telescope the diffraction-limited resolution of a 22.65-meter telescope. Adaptive optics loops are routinely closed with natural stars on both sides of the telescope for combined beam observations. Twin laser guide star constellations have recently been installed for ground layer adaptive optics observations. Commissioning of new instruments and focal stations for high resolution spectroscopy and near-infrared phased-array imaging is underway.

  14. NLST: the Indian National Large Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Soltau, D.; Kärcher, H.; Süss, M.; Berkefeld, T.

    2010-07-01

    India is planning a new solar telescope with an aperture of 2-m for carrying out high resolution studies of the Sun. Site characterization is underway at high altitude locations in the Himalayan mountains. A detailed concept design for NLST (National Large Solar Telescope) has been completed. The optical design of the telescope is optimized for high optical throughput and uses a minimum number of optical elements. A high order AO system is integrated part of the design that works with a modest Fried's parameter of 7-cm to give diffraction limited performance. The telescope will be equipped with a suite of post-focus instruments including a high resolution spectrograph and a polarimeter. NLST will also be used for carrying out stellar observations during the night. The mechanical design of the telescope, building, and the innovative dome is optimized to take advantage of the natural air flush which will help to keep the open telescope in temperature equilibrium. After its completion (planned for 2014), NLST will fill a gap in longitude between the major solar facilities in USA and Europe, and it will be for years the largest solar telescope in the world

  15. Very large Arecibo-type telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Frank D.

    1988-01-01

    The Arecibo-type radio telescope, based on a fixed spherical reflector, is a very effective design for a large radio telescope on the Moon. In such telescopes, major structural members are provided by the ground on which they are built, and thus are provided at no cost in materials or transportation. The strong compression members, the tall towers which support the suspended platform, are an expensive part of the Arecibo telescope. The need for such towers can be eliminated if a suitable valley or crater can be found wherein the rim of the depression can be used as the support point for the cables which support the suspended platform. With an Arecibo-type radio telescope on the Moon, there are no changing gravity loads because of the design and no changing wind loads because of the location; therefore, the only source of time variation in the telescope geometry is thermal changes. Calculations show that with conventional materials, such as steel, it should be possible to construct an Arecibo-type telescope with a reflector diameter of some 30 km on the Moon, and with a reflector diameter of some 60 to 90 km if materials of high specific strength are used.

  16. Adaptive Optics at the World's Biggest Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, M.; Esposito, S.; Rabien, S.

    2010-09-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, comprises two 8.4 m primary mirrors on a common mount. The two apertures will be co-phased to create a single telescope with 110 m2 of collecting area and 22.7 m baseline. From the outset, adaptive optics (AO) was incorporated into the design through two adaptive secondary mirrors (ASM), each 91 cm in diameter with 672 actuators, which feed all of the instruments mounted at the telescope's four pairs of Gregorian foci. The first ASM has now seen first light on sky with natural guide stars. Strehl ratios at 1.6 μm under average seeing are estimated to be ~80%, and diffraction-limited performance is maintained for stars down to magnitude 15. At the same time, pioneering work at the 6.5 m MMT telescope has for the first time shown the compelling benefits of ground-layer AO compensation. This technique relies on the signals from multiple laser beacons to sense and correct aberration arising close to the telescope with the result that near IR seeing is reduced by a factor of 2-3 over a field of many arc minutes. Building on these efforts at both telescopes, a project is underway to enhance the LBT's AO capability by the addition of wavefront sensing with multiple laser guide stars. The Advanced Rayleigh Ground-layer adaptive Optics System (ARGOS) is now in the construction phase. We provide an overview of ARGOS and how it foreshadows AO systems destined for the 30 m class telescopes of tomorrow.

  17. Enclosure of the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinari, Piero; Hill, John M.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the enclosure of the Large Binocular Telescope, now in a detailed design phase. The enclosure is co-rotating with the telescope, includes a service floor carrying all telescope utilities, and is characterized by two large portal shutters, which open laterally leaving the air flow at the front and at the back of the telescope essentially unobstructed. Large louvers on the side walls and wind shields with variable permeability at the front and back openings are used to control the air flow in different wind conditions. The inner and outer surfaces of the enclosure are designed to obtain short thermal time constant and close equilibrium with ambient air. Forced air circulation in the outer skin of the enclosure is used for better heat exchange and, with electrical heaters, for melting snow. The interaction of the whole building with the natural air flow in conditions representative of those encountered at the specific site on Mt. Graham was the subject of extensive water channel measurements on a model of the building and of the surrounding environment. The flow patterns obtained in the simulations show no mixing of lower air layers with those at the level of the primary mirrors or above. The handling scheme for large equipment, including the primary mirror cells and the bell-jar for aluminizing of the mirrors on board the telescope, is based on a large bridge crane that can transfer instruments and maintenance equipment to the telescope and to the service floor from the storage and maintenance area at ground level.

  18. Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, Michael; Cleveland, Paul; Durand, Dale; Klavins, Andy; Muheim, Daniella; Paine, Christopher; Petach, Mike; Tenerelli, Domenick; Tolomeo, Jason; Walyus, Keith

    2007-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program funded an effort to develop a system cooling technology, which is applicable to all future infrared, sub-millimeter and millimeter cryogenic space telescopes. In particular, this technology is necessary for the proposed large space telescope Single Aperture Far-Infrared Telescope (SAFIR) mission. This technology will also enhance the performance and lower the risk and cost for other cryogenic missions. The new paradigm for cooling to low temperatures will involve passive cooling using lightweight deployable membranes that serve both as sunshields and V-groove radiators, in combination with active cooling using mechanical coolers operating down to 4 K. The Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes (LST) mission planned to develop and demonstrate a multi-layered sunshield, which is actively cooled by a multi-stage mechanical cryocooler, and further the models and analyses critical to scaling to future missions. The outer four layers of the sunshield cool passively by radiation, while the innermost layer is actively cooled to enable the sunshield to decrease the incident solar irradiance by a factor of more than one million. The cryocooler cools the inner layer of the sunshield to 20 K, and provides cooling to 6 K at a telescope mounting plate. The technology readiness level (TRL) of 7 will be achieved by the active cooling technology following the technology validation flight in Low Earth Orbit. In accordance with the New Millennium charter, tests and modeling are tightly integrated to advance the technology and the flight design for "ST-class" missions. Commercial off-the-shelf engineering analysis products are used to develop validated modeling capabilities to allow the techniques and results from LST to apply to a wide variety of future missions. The LST mission plans to "rewrite the book" on cryo-thermal testing and modeling techniques, and validate modeling techniques to scale to future space telescopes such as SAFIR.

  19. Large telescopes and the art of bridge building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, H. J.

    2008-07-01

    In the last decade the evolution of large or extreme large earthbound optical telescopes speeded up in an unforeseen manner. The technological development is driven by the issues of the complex and challenging active and adaptive optics. But the design of the telescope structure and mechanics - as the backbone of the optics - is also increasing in the importance for costs and later performance. Structural mechanics is an old art, starting a long time ago with building bridges and gothic cathedrals etc. Essence of this art is the understanding of forces, load paths, weight and balance, strength and related deformations. The paper develops a perception of the structural subsystems of telescopes ("tube structure", "alidade") from the viewpoint of structural mechanics as learned from the "bridge builders". Actual example is a proposal for the design of ESO's 42m E-ELT.

  20. Towards a European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, is taking an important step towards the realisation of a new, giant telescope for Europe's astronomers, by creating the ESO Extremely Large Telescope Project Office. It will be headed by Jason Spyromilio, formerly La Silla Paranal Observatory Director. "We believe that the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) is essential if we are to ensure the continued competitiveness of the astronomical community in ESO's member-states. This goal can be achieved in a timely manner through ESO and the community working closely together, and the establishment of the ELT project office is a significant step in this direction", says Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. "In its December 2004 Resolution, ESO's Council requested ESO to launch the construction of an ELT on a competitive timescale", says Jason Spyromilio. "The creation of the ELT Project Office is thus the logical step, following on the large amount of preparatory work on ELTs carried out in Europe, for instance in the framework of the OWL Conceptual Study [1], the EU co-funded ELT Design Study project [2] and more recently by the five ELT thematic working groups established by the Director General." The ESO ELT Project Office, which is part of the ESO Telescope Systems Division (TSD), will work closely together with experts, from both ESO and the European scientific community, represented in the ELT Science and Engineering Working Group and in a Standing Review Committee established by the ESO Council. "ESO aims to put the European Extremely Large Telescope on a 'fast-track', within a wide collaboration with its community and with the direct involvement of industry", says Roberto Gilmozzi, head of the ESO TSD and E-ELT Principal Investigator. A baseline design is to be presented to the ESO Council at the end of 2006. The plan is a telescope with a primary mirror between 30 and 60 metres in diameter and a financial envelope

  1. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope mount final design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Shawn; Gressler, William; Thomas, Sandrine J.; Gessner, Chuck; Warner, Mike; Barr, Jeff; Lotz, Paul J.; Schumacher, German; Wiecha, Oliver; Angeli, George; Andrew, John; Claver, Chuck; Schoening, Bill; Sebag, Jacques; Krabbendam, Victor; Neill, Doug; Hileman, Ed; Muller, Gary; Araujo, Constanza; Orden Martinez, Alfredo; Perezagua Aguado, Manuel; García-Marchena, Luis; Ruiz de Argandoña, Ismael; Romero, Francisco M.; Rodríguez, Ricardo; Carlos González, José; Venturini, Marco

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the status and details of the large synoptic survey telescope1,2,3 mount assembly (TMA). On June 9th, 2014 the contract for the design and build of the large synoptic survey telescope mount assembly (TMA) was awarded to GHESA Ingeniería y Tecnología, S.A. and Asturfeito, S.A. The design successfully passed the preliminary design review on October 2, 2015 and the final design review January 29, 2016. This paper describes the detailed design by subsystem, analytical model results, preparations being taken to complete the fabrication, and the transportation and installation plans to install the mount on Cerro Pachón in Chile. This large project is the culmination of work by many people and the authors would like to thank everyone that has contributed to the success of this project.

  2. Chinese large solar telescopes site survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2017-04-01

    In order to observe the solar surface with unprecedentedly higher resolution, Chinse solar physics society decided to launch their solar site survey project in 2010 as the first step to look for the best candidate sites for the Chinese next-generation large-aperture solar telescopes, i.e., the 5-8 meter Chinese Giant Solar Telescope, and the 1 meter level coronagraph. We have built two long-term monitoring sites in Daocheng, with altitudes of around 4800 meters above the sea level located in the large Shangri-La mountain area, and we have collected systematic site data since 2014. Clear evidence, including the key parameters of seeing factor, sky brightness and water vapor content, has indicated that the large Shangri-La area owns the potential conditions of excellent seeing level and sufficient amount of clear-sky hours suitable for developing large solar telescopes. We will review the site survey progress and present the preliminary statistical results in this talk.

  3. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P. F.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  4. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P.F.; Cameron, R.A.; Digel, S.W.; Thompson, D.J.; Wood, K.S.

    2007-01-03

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  5. Operations analysis for a large lunar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thyen, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a study of the operations and assembly of a 16-m large lunar telescope (LLT), which deals with the operations and assembly of the telescope from LEO to the lunar surface for assembly. The study of LLT operations and assembly is broken down into three divisions to allow easier operations analysis: earth to orbit operations, LEO operations (transfer to lunar surface operations), and lunar surface operations. The following guidelines were set down to ensure a reasonable starting point for a large, lunar, untended installation: the existence of a lunar base, a space transportation system from LEO to the lunar surface, continuous manning of the lunar base during the assembly period, and availability/capability to perform lunar assembly with the lunar base crew. The launch/vehicle packaging options, lunar site selection and assembly options, and assembly crew assumptions are discussed.

  6. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  7. Completion of the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Charles, P. A.; O'Donoghue, D.; Nordsieck, K. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) is a low cost (19.7M), innovative, 10-m class optical telescope, which was inaugurated on 10 November 2005, just 5 years after ground-breaking. SALT and its first-light instruments are currently being commissioned, and full science operations are expected to begin later this year. This paper describes the design and construction of SALT, including the first-light instruments, SALTICAM and the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS). A rigorous Systems Engineering approach was adopted to ensure that SALT was built to specification, on budget, close to the original schedule and using a relatively small project team. The design trade-offs, which include an active spherical primary mirror array in a fixed altitude telescope with a prime focus tracker, although restrictive in comparison to conventional telescopes, have resulted in an affordable and capable 10-m class telescope for South Africa and its ten partners. Coupled with an initial set of two seeing-limited instruments that concentrate on the UV-visible region (320 - 900nm) and featuring some unique observational capabilities, SALT will have an ability to conduct a wide range of science programs. These will include high time resolution studies, for which some initial results have already been obtained and are presented here. Many of the versatile modes available with the RSS will provide unparalleled opportunities for imaging polarimetry and spectropolarimetry. Likewise, Multi-Object Spectroscopy (using laser cut graphite slit masks) and imaging spectroscopy with the RSS, the latter using Fabry-Perot etalons and interference filters, will extend the multiplex advantage over resolutions from R = 300 to 9000 over fields of view of 2 to 8 arcminutes. Future instrumentation plans include an extremely stable, fibre-fed, high resolution échelle spectrograph and a near-IR (possibly to 1.7 μm) extension to the RSS. Future development possibilities include phasing the primary mirror

  8. Moving toward queue operations at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Michelle L.; Summers, Doug; Astier, Joseph; Suarez Sola, Igor; Veillet, Christian; Power, Jennifer; Cardwell, Andrew; Walsh, Shane

    2016-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO), a joint scientific venture between the Instituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF), LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft (LBTB), University of Arizona, Ohio State University (OSU), and the Research Corporation, is one of the newest additions to the world's collection of large optical/infrared ground-based telescopes. With its unique, twin 8.4m mirror design providing a 22.8 meter interferometric baseline and the collecting area of an 11.8m telescope, LBT has a window of opportunity to exploit its singular status as the "first" of the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). Prompted by urgency to maximize scientific output during this favorable interval, LBTO recently re-evaluated its operations model and developed a new strategy that augments classical observing with queue. Aided by trained observatory staff, queue mode will allow for flexible, multi-instrument observing responsive to site conditions. Our plan is to implement a staged rollout that will provide many of the benefits of queue observing sooner rather than later - with more bells and whistles coming in future stages. In this paper, we outline LBTO's new scientific model, focusing specifically on our "lean" resourcing and development, reuse and adaptation of existing software, challenges presented from our one-of-a-kind binocular operations, and lessons learned. We also outline further stages of development and our ultimate goals for queue.

  9. Current Status of the Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, M.; LMT Team

    2014-03-01

    I will briefly describe the current status of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT), the near-term plans for the telescope and the initial suite of instrumentation. I will also summarize some of the results of the Early Science Phase that took place in the summer of 2013. The LMT is a bi-national collaboration between Mexico and the USA, led by the Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE) and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, to construct, commission and operate a 50m-diameter millimeter-wave radio telescope. Construction activities are complete at the 4600m LMT site on the summit of Volcan Sierra Negra, an extinct volcano in the Mexican state of Puebla. First light with the LMT (inner 32mdiameter) was successfully conducted in June and July of 2011, as well as the Early Science Phase in May-July 2013 with observations at both the 3 and 1.1mm wave-bands. The LMT antenna, outfitted with its initial complement of scientific instruments, will be a world-leading scientific research facility for millimeter-wave astronomy.

  10. Large Binocular Telescope pre-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglietta, Luciano; Anaclerio, E.; Castelli, G.; Gallieni, Daniele; Marchiori, Gianpietro; Rossettini, P.; Tassan Din, P.; Tomelleri, R.; Villa, G.; Zanon, Alberto

    2000-08-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope is currently in the pre- assembly phase at the Ansaldo Energia workshop in Milan. Since late 1998 the manufacturing of the Azimuth and Elevation structures has been taken place in North Italy along with the main auxiliary equipments, and since September 1999, the Azimuth Ring have been assembled and aligned on the new concrete foundation poured months before in the same area. The pre-assembly activity in Italy will take some months more from now as the final acceptance tests are scheduled now for December 2000; then the whole telescope steel structure will be disassembled and shipped to Mt. Graham where the final assembling phase will start in spring 2001. In this paper, the authors, part of some industrial companies and public institutes main character in this scientific and technical challenges, briefly describe the manufacturing and the machining processes of the main telescope components, the reached results and the procedures adopted during the pre-assembling as overall test bench for the final erection in Arizona.

  11. Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope- GLAST Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), and the instrumentation that will be on the spacecraft: Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The presentation revierws in detail the LAT instrument.

  12. Status and Plans for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. F.

    2006-08-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is in commissioning, with the initiation of science operations planned for 2007. The telescope contains two 8.4-m diameter borosilicate honeycomb primary mirrors, supported actively to control bending modes. The secondary mirrors will provide adaptive optics correction through rapid modulation of the surface of a Zerodur face sheet 91 cm in diameter and 1.5 mm thick. The initial complement of facility instruments comprises capabilities used in pairs on common fields of view. The Large Binocular Cameras are wide-field 36 Mpix mosaics at prime focus optimized for blue and for red performance. The Multi-Object Double Spectrographs will be fed at straight-through Gregorian foci through custom cut focal plane masks. The ambitious LUCIFER near-IR spectrographs at bent Gregorian will have exchangeable cold focal plan masks. Ultimately, two instruments will combine the two beams through Fizeau interferometry. One, LBTI, is optimized for mid-IR, and will have a nulling capability for coronagraphic work. The other, LINC-NIRVANA, will employ three levels of adaptive correction to achieve interferometric resolution down to 1 micron. The 23-m tip-to-tip dimension affords resolution as good as 10 mas. LBTO is supported by a consortium of institutions from Arizona, Italy, Germany, and the U.S. It is truly an international project and the first of the next generation of large ground-based telescopes.

  13. Supernova Remnants with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caragiulo, M.; Di Venere, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on-board the Fermi satellite, proved to be, after 8 years of data taking, an excellent instrument to detect and observe Supernova Remnants (SNRs) in a range of energies running from few hundred MeV up to few hundred GeV. It provides essential information on physical processes that occur at the source, involving both accelerated leptons and hadrons, in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for the primary Cosmic Ray (CR) acceleration. We show the latest results in the observation of Galactic SNRs by Fermi-LAT.

  14. Multiconjugate adaptive optics at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkefeld, Thomas; Soltau, Dirk; von der Luehe, Oskar

    2002-02-01

    We present the optical setup and wavefront reconstruction algorithms for the multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system at the 70 cm German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife. The system is designed to increase the corrected field of view (FOV) from about 10 arcseconds to 30 arcseconds in the visible. It will consist of two Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and two deformable mirrors (DMs). Both wavefront sensors will be situated in the pupil plane of the telescope. One determines the high order wavefront aberrations for the center of the FOV, the other measures only low order wavefront aberrations, but covers a large FOV in each subaperture. A 35 actuator bimorph mirror and a micro mirror will correct the ground layer and the tropopause, respectively. The system will have first light in early 2002. Scientific operation is expected to start in the second half of 2002.

  15. A pyramid sensor based AO system for Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Pinna, E.; Esposito, S.; Riccardi, A.; Rabien, S.

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of the pyramid wavefront sensor in the mid 90s, various authors have shown both theoretically and with the aid of simulations that pyramid sensors can achieve a better performance than traditional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Recently the First-Light AO system (FLAO) at the Large Binocular Telescope has demonstrated excellent on sky performance achieved with a pyramid based system. Motivated by these results, we will present in this paper a first heuristic analysis scaling up the FLAO performance to the case of an Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). We support our arguments with preliminary numerical simulations for the case of the European ELT using the M4 adaptive corrector and a properly matched pyramid sensor. Such a system could be used as a first-light natural guide-star AO system for the European ELT offering the advantages of a demonstrated AO system with practically off-the-shelf technology.

  16. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Patrick Nolan, who died on 2011 November 6. His career spanned much of the history of high-energy astronomy from space and his work on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) began nearly 20 years ago when it was just a concept. Pat was a central member in the operation of the LAT collaboration and he is greatly missed.

  17. Bimorph mirrors for adaptive optics in space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaluf, D.; Bastaits, R.; Wang, K.; Horodinca, M.; Burda, I.; Martic, G.; Preumont, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses a concept of bimorph deformable mirror used in adaptive optics to compensate for manufacturing errors, gravity release and thermal distortion affecting large lightweight mirrors in space telescopes. The mirror consists of a single-crystal Silicon wafer (D=75 mm t=500μm) covered with an optical coating on the front side and an array of 25 independent PZT actuators acting in d31 mode on the back side. The mirror is mounted on an isostatic support with three linear PZT actuators controlling the rigid-body motion. The paper presents the experimental results obtained with this design and a new, more compact alternative.

  18. The LATT way towards large active primaries for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, Runa; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Biasi, Roberto; Patauner, Christian; Gallieni, Daniele; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; d'Amato, Francesco; Pucci, Mauro; Duò, Fabrizio; Vettore, Christian; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    The Large Aperture Telescope Technology (LATT) goes beyond the current paradigm of future space telescopes, based on a deformable mirror in the pupil relay. Through the LATT project we demonstrated the concept of a low-weight active primary mirror, whose working principle and control strategy benefit from two decades of advances in adaptive optics for ground-based telescopes. We developed a forty centimeter spherical mirror prototype, with an areal density lower than 17 kg/m2, controlled through contactless voice coil actuators with co-located capacitive position sensors. The prototype was subjected to thermo-vacuum, vibration and optical tests, to push its technical readiness toward level 5. In this paper we present the background and the outcomes of the LATT activities under ESA contract (TRP programme), exploring the concept of a lightweight active primary mirror for space telescopes. Active primaries will open the way to very large segmented apertures, actively shaped, which can be lightweight, deployable and accurately phased once in flight.

  19. Metrication study for large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creswick, F. A.; Weller, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    Various approaches which could be taken in developing a metric-system design for the Large Space Telescope, considering potential penalties on development cost and time, commonality with other satellite programs, and contribution to national goals for conversion to the metric system of units were investigated. Information on the problems, potential approaches, and impacts of metrication was collected from published reports on previous aerospace-industry metrication-impact studies and through numerous telephone interviews. The recommended approach to LST metrication formulated in this study cells for new components and subsystems to be designed in metric-module dimensions, but U.S. customary practice is allowed where U.S. metric standards and metric components are not available or would be unsuitable. Electrical/electronic-system design, which is presently largely metric, is considered exempt from futher metrication. An important guideline is that metric design and fabrication should in no way compromise the effectiveness of the LST equipment.

  20. The Large Binocular Telescope's ARGOS ground-layer AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, M.; Rabien, S.; Busoni, L.; Barl, L.; Bechmann, U.; Bonaglia, M.; Boose, Y.; Borelli, J.; Bluemchen, T.; Carbonaro, L.; Connot, C.; Deysenroth, M.; Davies, R.; Durney, O.; Elberich, M.; Ertl, T.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Gasho, V.; Gemperlein, H.; Hubbard, P.; Kanneganti, S.; Kulas, M.; Newman, K.; Noenickx, J.; de Xivry, G.; Qirrenback, A.; Rademacher, M.; Schwab, C.; Storm, J.; Vaitheeswaran, V.; Weigelt, G.; Ziegleder, J.

    2011-09-01

    ARGOS, the laser-guided adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), is now under construction at the telescope. By correcting atmospheric turbulence close to the telescope, the system is designed to deliver high resolution near infrared images over a field of 4 arc minute diameter. ARGOS is motivated by a successful prototype multi-laser guide star system on the 6.5 m MMT telescope, results from which are presented in this paper. At the LBT, each side of the twin 8.4 m aperture is being equipped with three Rayleigh laser guide stars derived from six 18 W pulsed green lasers and projected into two triangular constellations matching the size of the corrected field. The returning light is to be detected by wavefront sensors that are range gated within the seeinglimited depth of focus of the telescope. Wavefront correction will be introduced by the telescope’s deformable secondary mirrors driven on the basis of the average wavefront errors computed from the respective guide star constellation. Measured atmospheric turbulence profiles from the site lead us to expect that by compensating the ground-layer turbulence, ARGOS will deliver median image quality of about 0.2 arc sec in the near infrared bands. This will be exploited by a pair of multi-object near-IR spectrographs, LUCI1 and LUCI2, each with 4 arc minute field already operating on the telescope. In future, ARGOS will also feed two interferometric imaging instruments, the LBT Interferometer operating in the thermal infrared, and LINC-NIRVANA, operating at visible and near infrared wavelengths. Together, these instruments will offer very broad spectral coverage at the diffraction limit of the LBT’s combined aperture, 23 m in size.

  1. Fermi large area telescope second source catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-03-28

    Here, we present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. Furthermore, we provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. Finally, the 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes.

  2. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  3. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  4. Real-time vibration compensation for large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, M.; Pott, J.-U.; Sawodny, O.; Herbst, T.; Kürster, M.

    2014-08-01

    We compare different strategies for minimizing the effects of telescope vibrations to the differential piston (optical pathway difference) for the Near-InfraRed/Visible Adaptive Camera and INterferometer for Astronomy (LINC-NIRVANA) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) using an accelerometer feedforward compensation approach. We summarize, why this technology is important for LINC-NIRVANA, and also for future telescopes and already existing instruments. The main objective is outlining a solution for the estimation problem in general and its specifics at the LBT. Emphasis is put on realistic evaluation of the used algorithms in the laboratory, such that predictions for the expected performance at the LBT can be made. Model-based estimation and broad-band filtering techniques can be used to solve the estimation task, and the differences are discussed. Simulation results and measurements are shown to motivate our choice of the estimation algorithm for LINC-NIRVANA. The laboratory setup is aimed at imitating the vibration behaviour at the LBT in general, and the M2 as main contributor in particular. For our measurements, we introduce a disturbance time series which has a frequency spectrum comparable to what can be measured at the LBT on a typical night. The controllers' ability to suppress vibrations in the critical frequency range of 8-60 Hz is demonstrated. The experimental results are promising, indicating the ability to suppress differential piston induced by telescope vibrations by a factor of about 5 (rms), which is significantly better than any currently commissioned system.

  5. Study on the detecting ability of the adaptive astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BiTao, Tan; Myers, R. M.; HongBin, Chen

    2015-04-01

    Adaptive imaging systems have been developed to compensate for distortion introduced by atmospheric turbulence. The performance of its imaging quality can be evaluated by the Strehl ratio, but this does not directly quantify the detecting ability of an adaptively correcting telescope. Combining the normally detecting SNR and the telescope Strehl ratio, a new method evaluating the detecting ability of an adaptive astronomical telescope is put forward, which can give a quantified value. The new method is simulated on a computer, the simulation results indicated that the detecting ability of an adaptively correcting a 2-m telescopes improves 2 visual magnitudes. The effects of different atmospheric coherence length on detecting ability also can be quantitatively studied through the new method, which can give a scientific basis for the optimization of the design of the system and the development of implementations.

  6. The National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Indian National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) will be a state-of-the-art 2-m class telescope for carrying out high-resolution studies in the solar atmosphere. Recent numerical simulations suggest that crucial physical processes like vortex flow, dissipation of magnetic fields and the generation of MHD waves can occur efficiently over length scales of tens of kilometers. Current telescopes are unable to resolve solar feature to this level at visible wavelengths. NLST will not only achieve good spatial resolution, but will also have a high photon throughput in order to carry out spectropolarimetric observations to accurately measure vector magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere with a good signal to noise ratio. The main science goals of NLST include: a) Magnetic field generation and the solar cycle; b) Dynamics of magnetized regions; c) Helioseismology; d) Long term variability; e) Energetic phenomena and Activity; and f) Night time astronomy. The optical design of the telescope is optimized for high optical throughput and uses a minimum number of optical elements. A high order adaptive optics system is integrated as part of the design that works with a modest Fried's parameter of 7-cm to give diffraction limited performance. The telescope will be equipped with a suite of post-focus instruments including a high resolution spectrograph and a polarimeter. NLST will also be used for carrying out stellar observations during the night. The mechanical design of the telescope, building, and the innovative dome takes advantage of the natural air flush which will help to keep the open telescope in temperature equilibrium. Critical to the successful implementation of NLST is the selection of a site with optimum atmospheric properties, such as the number of sunshine hours and good "seeing" over long periods. A site characterization programme carried over several years has established the existence of suitable sites in the Ladakh region. After its completion, currently

  7. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-05-25

    Here, we present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions,more » defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. In conclusion, care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.« less

  8. Fermi large area telescope second source catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; ...

    2012-03-28

    Here, we present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are fluxmore » measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. Furthermore, we provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. Finally, the 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes.« less

  9. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Berenji, B.; Bisello, D.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Canadas, B.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeKlotz, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S. -H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Scolieri, G.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J. -L.; Stephens, T. E.; Striani, E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-05-25

    Here, we present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. In conclusion, care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  10. Primary mirror assemblies for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    In this report are considered the basic problems which relate to developemnt, manufacture, experimental trying out, and usage of primary mirrors (PM) of the large space telescopes intended to perform distant sounding of the Earth. Attention is concentrated on development of weight-reduced passive mirrors which ensure more reliable operation of the telescope as a whole. In the report we expressed the opinion that it is quite possible to manufacture a passive weight-reduced PM if its diameter is equal approximately to 3 m. Materials which may be used for the manufacturing of PM are beryllium and silicon carbide, physical and mechanical parameters of which are the most preferable ones. But it should be taken into consideration that this is the glass ceramic of CO115M brand which has been mastered by the industry of Russia in the greatest extent. It was confirmed that parameters of this material remain unchanged during a long period of time. Constructions of the PM, made of glass ceramic, as well as constructions of holders intended to fix the mirror, are presented in this report. A holder is used first of all to prevent lowering of a PM surface quality after a mirror has been removed from a machine and fixed in a primary mirror assembly (PMA). At present two-layer construction of a PM is preferable. This construction consists of thick base including weight reduction structure, which is in a radius which is optimum from the standpoint of deformation of a mirror operating surface. In the process of manufacture a mirror is deprived of its weight with the use of special pneumatic off-loading elements. PMA is erected in vertical plane by means of using an interferometric inspection system. In the end of this report we expressed the views on an approach to engineering of a PM by taking into account potentialities both of space ships and of carrier rockets.

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope third source catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2015-06-12

    Here, we present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV–300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second Fermi LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources abovemore » $$4\\sigma $$ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. As a result, from source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ~3% at 1 GeV.« less

  12. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Berenji, B.; Bisello, D.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Canadas, B.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeKlotz, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Scolieri, G.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Striani, E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. Care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  13. Active optics in Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ming; Krabbendam, Victor; Claver, Charles F.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Xin, Bo

    2012-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) has a 3.5º field of view and F/1.2 focus that makes the performance quite sensitive to the perturbations of misalignments and mirror surface deformations. In order to maintain the image quality, LSST has an active optics system (AOS) to measure and correct those perturbations in a closed loop. The perturbed wavefront errors are measured by the wavefront sensors (WFS) located at the four corners of the focal plane. The perturbations are solved by the non-linear least square algorithm by minimizing the rms variation of the measured and baseline designed wavefront errors. Then the correction is realized by applying the inverse of the perturbations to the optical system. In this paper, we will describe the correction processing in the LSST AOS. We also will discuss the application of the algorithm, the properties of the sensitivity matrix and the stabilities of the correction. A simulation model, using ZEMAX as a ray tracing engine and MATLAB as an analysis platform, is set up to simulate the testing and correction loop of the LSST AOS. Several simulation examples and results are presented.

  14. Curvature wavefront sensing for the large synoptic survey telescope.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bo; Claver, Chuck; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-10-20

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from four curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1 mm on either side of focus. In this paper, we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intrafocal and extrafocal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LSST optical system. The algorithm extensions reported here are generic and can easily be adapted to other wide-field optical systems including similar telescopes with large central obscuration and off-axis curvature sensing.

  15. The Large Binocular Telescope azimuth and elevation encoder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; Sargent, Tom; Cox, Dan; Rosato, Jerry; Brynnel, Joar G.

    2008-08-01

    A typical high-resolution encoder interpolator relies on careful mechanical alignment of the encoder read-heads and tight electrical tolerances of the signal processing electronics to ensure linearity. As the interpolation factor increases, maintaining these tight mechanical and electrical tolerances becomes impractical. The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is designed to utilize strip-type encoders on the main axes. Because of the very large scale of the telescope, the accumulative length of the azimuth and elevation encoder strips exceeds 80 meters, making optical tape prohibitively expensive. Consequently, the designers of the LBT incorporated the far less expensive Farrand Controls Inductosyn® linear strip encoder to encode the positions of the main axes and the instrument rotators. Since the cycle pitch of these encoders is very large compared to that of optical strip encoders, the interpolation factor must also be large in order to achieve the 0.005 arcsecond encoder resolution as specified. The authors present a description of the innovative DSP-based hardware / software solution that adaptively characterizes and removes common systematic cycle-to-cycle encoder interpolation errors. These errors can be caused by mechanical misalignment, encoder manufacturing flaws, variations in electrical gain, signal offset or cross-coupling of the encoder signals. Simulation data are presented to illustrate the performance of the interpolation algorithm, and telemetry data are presented to demonstrate the actual performance of the LBT main-axis encoder system.

  16. Support structures for large infrared telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    An infrared telescope requires an accuracy of its reflecting surfaces of less than a micrometer. Future missions may require such accuracy from telescopes that are 20 meters or larger in diameter. The structure for supporting such a telescope will most probably take the form of a deep truss. Various approaches for constructing the primary mirror in space are illustrated. One that employs automated deployment of interconnected reflector-structure modules was described in detail. Estimates were made of the precision obtainable with properly configured truss structures and the required ability of active control systems for achieving the desired accuracy.

  17. Adaptive Optics Educational Outreach and the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.

    2008-06-01

    One of the limiting factors in telescope performance is atmospheric seeing. Atmospheric seeing limits the resolution of ground based optical telescopes. Even telescopes in good locations on top of mountains cannot achieve diffraction-limited resolution. Until recently, the only way to overcome this limitation was to use space-based telescopes. Adaptive Optics (AO) is a collection of technologies that measure the turbulence of Earth's atmosphere and compensate for the turbulence, resulting in high-resolution images without the expense and complexity of space based telescopes. Our Hands-On Optics program has developed activities that teach students how telescopes form images and make observations about the resolution of a telescope. We are developing materials for high school students to use in the study of adaptive optics. These activities include various ways to illustrate atmospheric distortion by using everyday materials such as bubble wrap and mineral oil. We will also illustrate how to demonstrate the workings of a Shack-Hartman sensor to measure atmospheric distortion through the use of a unique model. We will also show activities illustrating two techniques astronomers use to improve the image: tip-tilt mirrors and deformable mirrors. We are developing an activity where students learn how to use a tip-tilt mirror to keep an image focused at one point on a screen. The culminating activity has students learn to use a deformable mirror to correct a distorted wavefront. These activities are being developed in conjunction with the Education program for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT).

  18. Large open telescope: size-upscaling from DOT to LOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Jaegers, Aswin P. L.; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.

    2003-02-01

    The design characteristics of a large open telescope (LOT) are: (i) an open tower with only pure translations of the platform under wind load; (ii) an open telescope construction with extremely stiff geometry and drives; (iii) simple optics with easy aligning and testing, but nevertheless suitable for large auxiliary equipment like spectrographs.

  19. The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Jacob W.

    1998-07-01

    The LMT is a 50 m diameter telescope for operation to a wavelength of 1 mm from a high mountain site in central Mexico at a latitude of 19 degrees. The telescope is designed to address fundamental questions about the origin and formation of galaxies, clusters of galaxies as well as stars and planets. It is a joint project of the Mexican Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE) in Tonantzintla, Puebla and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. The telescope is in the Critical Design phase and completion of the basic assembly at the site is scheduled for the end of 2000. We describe historical and organizational aspects of the Project and present the major technical specifications and plans for realization.

  20. Compliant Baffle for Large Telescope Daylight Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    3.6 m telescope shown in Fig. 1 was constructed. It includes the structural components and mechanisms of the azimuth and elevation axis as well as a...model of the fabric baffle. The baffle derives its stiffness from the preload exerted by the ratcheted straps that attach the baffle. In order to

  1. Estimating the cost of extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Larry M.; Daggert, Larry G.; Gillett, Paul E.

    2003-01-01

    For future giant telescopes, control of construction and operation costs will be the key factor in their success. The best way to accomplish this cost control, while maximizing the performance of the telescope, will be through design-to-cost methods that use value engineering techniques to develop the most cost-effective design in terms of performance per dollar. This will require quantifiable measures of performance and cost, including: (1) a way of quantifying science value with scientific merit functions; (2) a way of predicting telescope performance in the presence of real-world disturbances by means of integrated modeling; and (3) a way of predicting the cost of multiple design configurations. Design-to-cost methods should be applied as early as possible in the project, since the majority of the life-cycle costs for the observatory will be locked in by choices made during the conceptual design phase. However, there is a dilemma: how can costs be accurately estimated for systems that have not yet been designed? This paper discusses cost estimating methods and describes their application to estimating the cost of ELTs, showing that the best method to use during the conceptual design phase is parametric cost estimating. Examples of parametric estimating techniques are described, based on experience gained from instrument development programs at NOAO. We then describe efforts underway to collect historical cost information and develop cost estimating relationships in preparation for the conceptual design phase of the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope.

  2. Comparison of large aperture telescopes with parabolic and spherical primaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1986-01-01

    Quasi-Cassegrain-type four-mirror telescopes are compared to conventional two-mirror Cassegrain telescopes for use as high performance, very large aperture space telescopes. Spherical and parabolic primaries with continuous as well as segmented surfaces are considered. Imaging characteristics and misalignment sensitivities serve as the principal criteria of comparison. The evaluation shows that parabolic primaries yield superior wide-field performance, whereas spherical primaries hold distinct advantages regarding manufacturability and regarding certain alignment aspects in the case of segmentation.

  3. European Extremely Large Telescope Site Characterization I: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernin, Jean; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Sarazin, Marc; Vazquez Ramió, Héctor; Varela, Antonia M.; Trinquet, Hervé; Delgado, José Miguel; Jiménez Fuensalida, Jesús; Reyes, Marcos; Benhida, Abdelmajid; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair; García Lambas, Diego; Hach, Youssef; Lazrek, M.; Lombardi, Gianluca; Navarrete, Julio; Recabarren, Pablo; Renzi, Victor; Sabil, Mohammed; Vrech, Rubén

    2011-11-01

    The site for the future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) is already known to be Armazones, near Paranal (Chile). The selection was based on a variety of considerations, with an important one being the quality of the atmosphere for the astronomy planned for the ELT. We present an overview of the characterization of the atmospheric parameters of candidate sites, making use of standard procedures and instruments as carried out within the Framework Programme VI (FP6) of the European Union. We have achieved full characterization of the selected sites for the parameters considered. Further details on adaptive optics results and climatology will be the subject of two forthcoming articles. A summary of the results of the FP6 site-testing campaigns at the different sites is provided.

  4. A 16-m Telescope for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Telescope (ATLAST) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, Charles F.; Dailey, D. R.; Polidan, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Future space observatories will require increasingly large telescopes to study the earliest stars and galaxies, as well as faint nearby objects. Technologies now under development will enable telescopes much larger than the 6.5-meter diameter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to be developed at comparable costs. Current segmented mirror and deployable optics technology enables the 6.5 meter JWST telescope to be folded for launch in the 5-meter diameter Ariane 5 payload fairing, and deployed autonomously after reaching orbit. Late in the next decade, when the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle payload fairing becomes operational, even larger telescope can be placed in orbit. In this paper we present our concept for a 16-meter JWST derivative, chord-fold telescope which could be stowed in the 10-m diameter Ares V fairing, plus a description of the new technologies that enable ATLAST to be developed at an affordable price.

  5. Compliant Baffle for Large Telescope Daylight Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, S.; Whiting, A.; Haar, S.

    2014-09-01

    With the recent interest in daylight imaging, a baffle was needed to reduce background light during the day but not impact wind loading induced jitter on the 3.6 m telescope. Analysis was performed to design a compliant baffle out of a synthetic fabric that satisfied these requirements. Initial testing showed that static loading increased as predicted by classical wind drag analysis techniques, and wind induced jitter remained the same or decreased slightly. This paper will present further testing to quantify this effect and offer a physical explanation based on the design analysis models and wind pressure data collected with and without the baffle installed. The metric used to quantify jitter will be a comparison of angular rate sensors and accelerometers mounted on the telescope and track data from stars.

  6. On the adaptive control of a phased array telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, M.; Meinhardt, J. A.; Carreras, R. A.; Baciak, M. G.

    1989-09-01

    An adaptive control philosophy known as model-reference adaptive control based on an 'ideal' behavior of the system called 'reference' system is considered. Software and hardware implementation of a model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) for a phased array telescope is discussed. The overall system configuration is presented and a model description of the system from both mathematical formulations and the MATRIXx SYSTEM-BUILD points of view is analyzed. A unified approach to to adaptive control design algorithm using MATRIXx is introduced. It is noted that a digital position monitor plays a focal point in the hardware realization of the MRAC algorithm.

  7. Large Telescope Segmented Primary Mirror Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rud, Mayer

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a broadband (white light) point source, located at the telescope Cassegrain focus, which generates a cone of light limited by the hole in the secondary mirror (SM). It propagates to the aspheric null-mirror, which is optimized to make all the reflected rays to be normal to the primary mirror (PM) upon reflection. PM retro-reflects the rays back through the system for wavefront analysis. The point source and the wavefront analysis subsystems are all located behind the PM. The PM phasing is absolute (white light) and does not involve the SM. A relatively small, aspheric null-mirror located near the PM center of curvature has been designed to deliver the high level of optical wavefront correction. The phasing of the segments is absolute due to the use of a broadband source. The segmented PM is optically aligned independently and separately from the SM alignment. The separation of the PM segments alignment from the PM to the SM, and other telescope optics alignments, may be a significant advantage, eliminating the errors coupling. The point source of this concept is fully cooperative, unlike a star or laser-generated guide-star, providing the necessary brightness for the optimal S/N ratio, the spectral content, and the stable on-axis position. This concept can be implemented in the lab for the PM initial alignment, or made to be a permanent feature of the space-based or groundbased telescope.

  8. Spacecraft momentum management procedures. [large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. C.; Davenport, P. B.; Sturch, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques appropriate for implementation onboard the space telescope and other spacecraft to manage the accumulation of momentum in reaction wheel control systems using magnetic torquing coils are described. Generalized analytical equations are derived for momentum control laws that command the magnetic torquers. These control laws naturally fall into two main categories according to the methods used for updating the magnetic dipole command: closed loop, in which the update is based on current measurements to achieve a desired torque instantaneously, and open-loop, in which the update is based on predicted information to achieve a desired momentum at the end of a period of time. Physical interpretations of control laws in general and of the Space Telescope cross product and minimum energy control laws in particular are presented, and their merits and drawbacks are discussed. A technique for retaining the advantages of both the open-loop and the closed-loop control laws is introduced. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of these control laws in the Space Telescope environment.

  9. Simulating observations with HARMONI: the integral field spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Thatte, Niranjan; Kendrew, Sarah; Houghton, Ryan; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; Fusco, Thierry; Swinbank, Mark

    2014-07-01

    With the next generation of extremely large telescopes commencing construction, there is an urgent need for detailed quantitative predictions of the scientific observations that these new telescopes will enable. Most of these new telescopes will have adaptive optics fully integrated with the telescope itself, allowing unprecedented spatial resolution combined with enormous sensitivity. However, the adaptive optics point spread function will be strongly wavelength dependent, requiring detailed simulations that accurately model these variations. We have developed a simulation pipeline for the HARMONI integral field spectrograph, a first light instrument for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The simulator takes high-resolution input data-cubes of astrophysical objects and processes them with accurate atmospheric, telescope and instrumental effects, to produce mock observed cubes for chosen observing parameters. The output cubes represent the result of a perfect data reduc- tion process, enabling a detailed analysis and comparison between input and output, showcasing HARMONI's capabilities. The simulations utilise a detailed knowledge of the telescope's wavelength dependent adaptive op- tics point spread function. We discuss the simulation pipeline and present an early example of the pipeline functionality for simulating observations of high redshift galaxies.

  10. Optical configurations for very large telescopes - The TEMOS concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, Andre; Lemaitre, Gerard

    1987-07-01

    An optical design concept for very large telescopes, TEMOS, is proposed which takes advantage of a newly discovered optomechanical property of distortion. This property makes possible an increase in the collecting area of a previously described telescope with a 'vase-bottom' secondary (Baranne and Lemaitre, 1980) to a size corresponding to a classical telescope of more than 8 m diameter without optical modifications. With the TEMOS concept, the usual parasitic light is avoided by using a tubular baffle in the telescope to completely isolate the rays. Furthermore, noise due to distortion by the optical surfaces is minimized, and the noise due to diffracted light is eliminated.

  11. Monitoring the performance of the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettlage, Christian; Coetzee, Chris; Väisänen, Petri; Romero Colmenero, Encarni; Crawford, Steven M.; Kotze, Paul; Rabe, Paul; Hulme, Stephen; Brink, Janus; Maartens, Deneys; Browne, Keith; Strydom, Ockert; De Bruyn, David

    2016-07-01

    The efficient operation of a telescope requires awareness of its performance on a daily and long-term basis. This paper outlines the Fault Tracker, WebSAMMI and the Dashboard used by the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) to achieve this aim. Faults are mostly logged automatically, but the Fault Tracker allows users to add and edit faults. The SALT Astronomer and SALT Operator record weather conditions and telescope usage with WebSAMMI. Various efficiency metrics are shown for different time periods on the Dashboard. A kiosk mode for displaying on a public screen is included. Possible applications for other telescopes are discussed.

  12. Open Principle for Large High-Resolution Solar Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sliepen, Guus

    2009-04-01

    Vacuum solar telescopes solve the problem of image deterioration inside the telescope due to refractive index fluctuations of the air heated by the solar light. However, such telescopes have a practical diameter limit somewhat over 1 m. The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) was the pioneering demonstrator of the open-telescope technology without need of vacuum, now pursued in the German GREGOR. Important ingredients for this technology are primary beam completely open to natural wind flow, stiff but still open design by principal stiff overall geometries in combination with carefully designed joints and completely open-foldable dome constructions based on tensioned strong cloth. Further developments to large sizes are made within the framework of the design study for a European Solar Telescope (EST).

  13. A large-area gamma-ray imaging telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The concept definition of using the External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle as the basis for constructing a large area gamma ray imaging telescope in space is detailed. The telescope will be used to locate and study cosmic sources of gamma rays of energy greater than 100 MeV. Both the telescope properties and the means whereby an ET is used for this purpose are described. A parallel is drawn between those systems that would be common to both a Space Station and this ET application. In addition, those systems necessary for support of the telescope can form the basis for using the ET as part of the Space Station. The major conclusions of this concept definition are that the ET is ideal for making into a gamma ray telescope, and that this telescope will provide a substantial increase in collecting area.

  14. Wavefront Control for Space Telescope Applications Using Adaptive Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    SPACE TELESCOPE APPLICATIONS USING ADAPTIVE OPTICS by Matthew R. Allen December 2007 Thesis Advisor: Brij Agrawal Second Reader...ASTRONAUTICAL ENGINEERING from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December 2007 Author: Matthew R. Allen Approved by: Dr, Brij Agrawal...34 3. Direct Iterative Zonal Feedback Control ........................................ 35 4. Direct Iterative

  15. Expanding the mission plan for large scale telescope systems via skew path optical conditioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savastinuk, John; Palmer, Troy A.; Alexay, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    We describe a case study in which a telescope system, originally designed for a large format, visible camera, needed MWIR imaging capabilities while maintaining its original setup. The dedicated telescope system was adapted to share its existing optics with a new imaging module via a skew path concept. The challenges of non-rotationally symmetric design are explored along with an explanation of the methodology used to analyze and address the unique configuration.

  16. Large fully retractable telescope enclosures still closable in strong wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sliepen, Guus

    2008-07-01

    Two prototypes of fully retractable enclosures with diameters of 7 and 9 m have been built for the high-resolution solar telescopes DOT (Dutch Open Telescope) and GREGOR, both located at the Canary Islands. These enclosures protect the instruments for bad weather and are fully open when the telescopes are in operation. The telescopes and enclosures also operate in hard wind. The prototypes are based on tensioned membrane between movable but stiff bows, which fold together to a ring when opened. The height of the ring is small. The prototypes already survived several storms, with often snow and ice, without any damage, including hurricane Delta with wind speeds up to 68 m/s. The enclosures can still be closed and opened with wind speeds of 20 m/s without any problems or restrictions. The DOT successfully demonstrated the open, wind-flushing concept for astronomical telescopes. It is now widely recognized that also large future telescopes benefit from wind-flushing and retractable enclosures. These telescopes require enclosures with diameters of 30 m until roughly 100 m, the largest sizes for the ELTs (Extreme Large Telescopes), which will be built in the near future. We discuss developments and required technology for the realization of these large sizes.

  17. World Atlas of large optical telescopes (second edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    By early 1986 there will be over 120 large optical telescopes in the world engaged in astronomical research with mirror or lens diameters of one meter (39-inches) and larger. This atlas gives information on these telescopes and shows their observatory sites on continent sized maps. Also shown are observatory locations considered suitable for the construction of future large telescopes. Of the 126 major telescopes listed in this atlas, 101 are situated in the Northern Hemisphere and 25 are located in the Southern Hemisphere. The totals by regions are as follows: Europe (excluding the USSR), 30; Soviet Union, 9; Asia (excluding the USSR), 5; Africa, 9; Australia, 6; The Pacific, 4 (all on Hawaii); South America, 17; North America, 46 (the continental US has 38 of these). In all, the United States has 42 of the world's major telescopes on its territory (continental US plus Hawaii) making it by far the leading nation in astronomical instrumentation.

  18. Astronomers, Congress, and the Large Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanle, P. A.

    1985-04-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project was initiated near the end of the Apollo program and immediately encountered fiscal contraints. Planned as a long-term facility, the HST had to be continually justified to the public, astronomers and Congress from 1973 onward. Budgetary restraints caused design reductions which for a while threatened the practicality of the HST and changed it from a pressurized, manned unit to an automatic mode, teleoperated, intermittently visited spacecraft. It is noted that numerous exaggerations were made of both the power of the HST for scientific research and the total support of the astronomical community during promotion of the HST program, although the HST is the most powerful visual wavelength telescope ever to be built due to its unique operating environment. NASA's consistent and steadily more detailed definitions of the design features and missions of the HST proved to be a decisive factor in repeated requests for information by funding committees who were deliberating in the presence of severe fiscal difficulties.

  19. Tip tilt corection for astronomical telescopes using adaptive control

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.

    1997-04-17

    The greatest hindrance to modern astronomy is the effect of the Earth`s atmosphere on incoming light. The fundamental, or lowest mode of disturbance is tip and tilt.. This mode causes the focused image of a distant point source to move about in a plane (X-Y motion) as viewed form a telescope objective. Tip-tilt correction systems can be used to correct for these disturbances in real time. We propose a novel application of adaptive control to address some unique problems inherent with tip-tilt correction systems for astronomical telescopes.

  20. Innovative telescope architectures for future large space observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidan, Ronald S.; Breckinridge, James B.; Lillie, Charles F.; MacEwen, Howard A.; Flannery, Martin R.; Dailey, Dean R.

    2016-10-01

    Over the past few years, we have developed a concept for an evolvable space telescope (EST) that is assembled on orbit in three stages, growing from a 4×12-m telescope in Stage 1, to a 12-m filled aperture in Stage 2, and then to a 20-m filled aperture in Stage 3. Stage 1 is launched as a fully functional telescope and begins gathering science data immediately after checkout on orbit. This observatory is then periodically augmented in space with additional mirror segments, structures, and newer instruments to evolve the telescope over the years to a 20-m space telescope. We discuss the EST architecture, the motivation for this approach, and the benefits it provides over current approaches to building and maintaining large space observatories.

  1. Design of optical systems for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    On the basis of long-term experience of LOMO PLC in creating large optical systems for ground and space telescopes, with diameter of primary mirror from 1 to 6 meters, the following issues should be considered: principles of constructing optical systems for space telescopes and selecting their optimum design in respect of dimensions/mass and performance criteria; ensuring the fulfillment of image quality requirements in the process of manufacturing optical systems for controlling ground telescope elements in operating conditions; providing automatic adjustment of telescope secondary mirror, automatic focusing, interferometric control of image quality by means of stellar interferometer with radial shift and internal control with Gartman's test. Description of space telescope equipped with primary mirror of diameter 1.5 m, manufactured in LOMO PLC, is given.

  2. Limits on Lyot coronagraphy with AEOS adaptive optics telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Makidon, R. B.; Lloyd, J. P.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Graham, J. R.; Kalas, P. G.; Macintosh, B. A.; Max, C. E.; Baudoz, P.; Kuhn, J.; Potter, D.

    2001-05-01

    The 3.6m Air Force Electo-Optical System telescope is the most advanced adaptive optics (AO) system available to the astronomical community. Its 941-channel AO system feeds several stable instrument platforms at a very slow Cassegrain focus. Its small secondary obscuration makes it ideal for AO coronagraphy. We present estimates of current and theoretical limits on dynamic range using a diffraction-limited Lyot coronagraph optimized for the 3.6m AEOS telescope. We incorporate both the effects of imperfect AO correction of the wavefront and telescope guiding errors in our simulations. We calculate limits on faint companion detection (in the H-band) for this system at separations between 0.36 and 1.3 arcseconds.

  3. Gamma Large Area Silicon Telescope (GLAST)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by EGRET have prompted an investigation into modern technologies ultimately leading to the next generation space-based gamma ray telescope. The goal is to design a detector that will increase the data acquisition rate by almost two orders of magnitude beyond EGRET, while at the same time improving on the angular resolution, the energy measurement of reconstructed gamma rays, and the triggering capability of the instrument. The GLAST proposal is based on the assertion that silicon particle detectors are the technology of choice for space application: no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggering. The GLAST detector is roughly modeled after EGRET in that a tracking module precedes a calorimeter. The GLAST Tracker has planes of thin radiatior interspersed with planes of crossed-strip (x,y) 300-{mu}m-pitch silicon detectors to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. The gap between the layers ({approximately}5 cm) provides a lever arm in track fitting resulting in an angular resolution of 0.1{degree} at high energy (the low energy angular resolution at 100 MeV would be about 2{degree}, limited by multiple scattering). A possible GLAST calorimeter is made of a mosaic of Csl crystals of order 10 r.l. in depth, with silicon photodiodes readout. The increased depth of the GLAST calorimeter over EGRET`s extends the energy range to about 300 GeV.

  4. Pyramid Wavefront Sensor at the William Herschel Telescope: Towards Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Tozzi, A.; Puglisi, A.; Stefanini, P.

    2005-12-01

    The Arcetri adaptive optics group showed in 2001, using numerical simulation, that the pyramid WFS is able to do phasing and alignment of the mirror segments at the same time. In the period 2000-2004 the adaptive optics group developed this concept, and have built a lab prototype of the pyramid co-phasing sensor. A unique opportunity to calibrate and test our prototype in the lab and on the sky has been provided by the William Herschel Telescope and its adaptive optics system NAOMI.

  5. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  6. Lessons for new large telescopes from the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, P. R.

    1989-10-01

    When it began operating in 1975, the Anglo-Australian Telescope set new standards for pointing, tracking, and efficient observing. Since then, several large telescopes with more advanced control systems and on better sites have come into competition but the AAT retains the reputation of having the best overall observing efficiency. A number of organizational factors in the design and construction phase and in the Anglo-Australian Observatory's operational years have contributed to the AAT's success. Careful consideration of these factors should help groups planning the construction and operation of new telescopes.

  7. Lightweight optical barrel assembly structures for large deployable space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Peter A.; Silver, Mark J.; Dobson, Benjamin J.

    2009-08-01

    Future space based telescopes will need apertures and focal lengths that exceed the dimensions of the launch vehicle shroud. In addition to deploying the primary mirror and secondary mirror support structure, these large telescopes must also deploy the stray light and thermal barriers needed to ensure proper telescope performance. The authors present a deployable light and thermal optical barrel assembly approach for a very large telescope with a variable sun angle and fast slew rate. The Strain Energy Deployable Optical Barrel Assembly (SEDOBA) uses elastic composite hinges to power the deployment of a hierarchical truss structure that supports the thermal and stray light shroud material that form the overall system. The paper describes the overall design approach, the key component technologies, and the design and preliminary testing of a self deploying scale model prototype.

  8. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  9. Adaptive optics at the Subaru telescope: current capabilities and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Oya, Shin; Minowa, Yosuke; Lai, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Kasdin, Jeremy; Groff, Tyler; Hayashi, Masahiko; Arimoto, Nobuo; Takami, Hideki; Bradley, Colin; Sugai, Hajime; Perrin, Guy; Tuthill, Peter; Mazin, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Current AO observations rely heavily on the AO188 instrument, a 188-elements system that can operate in natural or laser guide star (LGS) mode, and delivers diffraction-limited images in near-IR. In its LGS mode, laser light is transported from the solid state laser to the launch telescope by a single mode fiber. AO188 can feed several instruments: the infrared camera and spectrograph (IRCS), a high contrast imaging instrument (HiCIAO) or an optical integral field spectrograph (Kyoto-3DII). Adaptive optics development in support of exoplanet observations has been and continues to be very active. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme-AO (SCExAO) system, which combines extreme-AO correction with advanced coronagraphy, is in the commissioning phase, and will greatly increase Subaru Telescope's ability to image and study exoplanets. SCExAO currently feeds light to HiCIAO, and will soon be combined with the CHARIS integral field spectrograph and the fast frame MKIDs exoplanet camera, which have both been specifically designed for high contrast imaging. SCExAO also feeds two visible-light single pupil interferometers: VAMPIRES and FIRST. In parallel to these direct imaging activities, a near-IR high precision spectrograph (IRD) is under development for observing exoplanets with the radial velocity technique. Wide-field adaptive optics techniques are also being pursued. The RAVEN multi-object adaptive optics instrument was installed on Subaru telescope in early 2014. Subaru Telescope is also planning wide field imaging with ground-layer AO with the ULTIMATE-Subaru project.

  10. Inexpensive mount for a large millimeter-wavelength telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-07-10

    A telescope mount with a single-point force support at the center of gravity of the primary mirror is proposed in order to eliminate much of the structure and cost of a large, millimeter-wavelength telescope. The single-point support gives repeatable thermal and gravitational deformation, so the surface of the primary can be controlled based on lookup tables for elevation and temperature. The new design is most appropriate for a survey telescope because locating the support above the vertex of the primary limits the range of motion of the mount to about 1 rad. A 30 m diameter, λ=850  μm telescope with the proposed mount is a factor of 4 lighter than a design with a conventional elevation-over-azimuth mount, and roughly half the cost.

  11. Image Reconstruction Using Large Optical Telescopes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-15

    imaged the Pluto/Charon system, resolved a multiple QSO (quasar) and we have mapped and imaged asymmetries in the envelope around the supergiant star ...fringes for point source. 38 11.7. Interference fringes for binary star . 40 1I.8. Power spectrum of C Tau. 42 III.1. PG 1115+080. 50 111.2. Tracking...Dawe’s limit given above. An example of short exposure star photos, at very large image scale, is given in Figure 1.1. The overall size of these

  12. Resolved Stellar Populations with MAD: Preparing for the Era of Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Diolaiti, E.; Valenti, E.; Cignoni, M.; Mackey, A. D.

    2012-03-01

    Deep images in J, H and Ks filters using the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) on the VLT have been made of a region of the Large Magellanic Cloud near the globular cluster NGC 1928. Our aim was to assess if accurate photometry could be carried out down to faint limits over the whole MAD field of view. In addition we tested how accurate a basic analysis of the properties of the stellar population could be made using the near-infrared MAD photometry, compared to the Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry. This study has implications for understanding the issues involved in Extremely Large Telescope imaging of resolved stellar populations.

  13. Disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi-rui; Fan, Bin; Zhang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The success of the large telescope is largely linked to the excellent performance and reliability of the primary mirror. In order to maintain the quality of its reflective surface at the high expectations of astronomers, the primary mirror after almost two or three years of astronomical observations, needs to be removed and reinstalled for its cleaning and re-coating operation. There are a series of procedures such as the primary mirror cell dissembling from telescope, mirror handling, transportation, reintegration, alignment and so on. This paper will describe the experiences of disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror, taking a two meter grade primary mirror for example. As with all advanced and complex opto-mechanical systems, there has been the usual problems and trouble shooting.

  14. Early laser operations at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmer, Gustavo; Lefebvre, Michael; Christou, Julian; Raab, Walfried; Rabien, Sebastian; Ziegleder, Julian; Borelli, José L.; Gässler, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    ARGOS is the GLAO (Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics) Rayleigh-based LGS (Laser Guide Star) facility for the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO). It is dedicated for observations with LUCI1 and LUCI2, LBTO's pair of NIR imagers and multi-object spectrographs. The system projects three laser beams from the back of each of the two secondary mirror units, which create two constellations circumscribed on circles of 2 arcmin radius with 120 degree spacing. Each of the six Nd:YAG lasers provides a beam of green (532nm) pulses at a rate of 10kHz with a power of 14W to 18W. We achieved first on-sky propagation on the night of November 5, 2013, and commissioning of the full system will take place during 2014. We present the initial results of laser operations at the observatory, including safety procedures and the required coordination with external agencies (FAA, Space Command, and Military Airspace Manager). We also describe our operational procedures and report on our experiences with aircraft spotters. Future plans for safer and more efficient aircraft monitoring and detection are discussed.

  15. Fast minimum variance wavefront reconstruction for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Thiébaut, Eric; Tallon, Michel

    2010-05-01

    We present what we believe to be a new algorithm, FRactal Iterative Method (FRiM), aiming at the reconstruction of the optical wavefront from measurements provided by a wavefront sensor. As our application is adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes, our algorithm was designed with speed and best quality in mind. The latter is achieved thanks to a regularization that enforces prior statistics. To solve the regularized problem, we use the conjugate gradient method, which takes advantage of the sparsity of the wavefront sensor model matrix and avoids the storage and inversion of a huge matrix. The prior covariance matrix is, however, non-sparse, and we derive a fractal approximation to the Karhunen-Loève basis thanks to which the regularization by Kolmogorov statistics can be computed in O(N) operations, with N being the number of phase samples to estimate. Finally, we propose an effective preconditioning that also scales as O(N) and yields the solution in five to ten conjugate gradient iterations for any N. The resulting algorithm is therefore O(N). As an example, for a 128 x 128 Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, the FRiM appears to be more than 100 times faster than the classical vector-matrix multiplication method.

  16. An approach to fabrication of large adaptive optics mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Eric; Rey, Justin; Blaszak, David; Cavaco, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    For more than two decades, Northrop Grumman Xinetics has been the principal supplier of small deformable mirrors that enable adaptive optical (AO) systems for the ground-based astronomical telescope community. With today's drive toward extremely large aperture systems, and the desire of telescope designers to include adaptive optics in the main optical path of the telescope, Xinetics has recognized the need for large active mirrors with the requisite bandwidth and actuator stoke. Presented in this paper is the proposed use of Northrop Grumman Xinetics' large, ultra-lightweight Silicon Carbide substrates with surface parallel actuation of sufficient spatial density and bandwidth to meet the requirements of tomorrow's AO systems, while reducing complexity and cost.

  17. Large field-of-view telescope for deep surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbe, Jacques P.; Cerutti-Maori, Guy; Rozelot, Jean-Pierre

    1997-03-01

    Conventional astronomical telescope makes use of a Ritchey- Chretien 2-mirror telescope, with a limited FOV except in the case of use of complex field corrector inducing spectral range limitations. For the future, large imaging telescope could offer main scientific advantages, like: (1) obtain a 3D description of the content of a large volume of the universe; (2) galaxy content and morphology; (3) galaxy red shift; (4) dark matter distribution; (5) absolute length scale. The present paper proposes for this large imaging telescope mission, the use of a Korsh, 3-mirror telescope thats characteristics are: (1) size approximately equals 2.5 meter; (2) field is greater than or equal to 1.5 degrees (but with no light on the optical axis); (3) image quality is less than or equal to 0.3 feet; (4) multispectral capabilities: from 0.35 micrometer up to 2.5 micrometer and more if needed; (5) real exit pupil with flat mirror; (6) good focal plane accessibility allowing multiple instrumentations: turret rotation of the previous flat mirror can be used, with several fixed instruments.

  18. Sun avoidance strategies at the Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souccar, Kamal; Smith, David R.; Schloerb, F. Peter; Wallace, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The Large Millimeter Telescope observatory is extending its night time operation to the day time. A sun avoidance strategy was therefore implemented in the control system in real-time to avoid excessive heating and damage to the secondary mirror and the prime focus. The LMT uses an "on-the-fly" trajectory generator that receives as input the target location of the telescope and in turn outputs a commanded position to the servo system. The sun avoidance strategy is also implemented "on-the-fly" where it intercepts the input to the trajectory generator and alters that input to avoid the sun. Two sun avoidance strategies were explored. The first strategy uses a potential field approach where the sun is represented as a high-potential obstacle in the telescope's workspace and the target location is represented as a low-potential goal. The potential field is repeatedly calculated as the sun and the telescope move and the telescope follows the induced force by this field. The second strategy is based on path planning using visibility graphs where the sun is represented as a polygonal obstacle and the telescope follows the shortest path from its actual position to the target location via the vertices of the sun's polygon. The visibility graph approach was chosen as the favorable strategy due to the efficiency of its algorithm and the simplicity of its computation.

  19. Very Large Optical Telescope (VLOT) integrated model enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jennifer; Roberts, Scott C.; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff; Pazder, John; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Herriot, Glen; Smith, Malcolm J.

    2004-09-01

    The integrated modeling tools for Canada's 20-meter telescope model, VLOT, have advanced significantly in the last year. Specifically, the flexibility of the tool and the pre-processing and post-processing functions have been enhanced. Also, closed loop control of the primary mirror and feeding the optical displacements through an adaptive optics tool, have been developed. This paper details the enhancements made to the tool and discusses the future challenges of the integrated modeling team.

  20. The Large Millimeter Telescope in the GLAST era

    SciTech Connect

    Carraminana, Alberto

    2007-07-12

    The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) was inaugurated on November 22, 2006. LMT will soon start commissioning and is expected to enter full science operations by 2008. With a 50m aperture, LMT will be the largest millimeter telescope and can become a powerful multiwavelength partner for GLAST. LMT will probe star formation at very high redshifts and can be used jointly with GLAST to uncover relativistic jet engines of flaring AGNs and GRBs. It will map with high resolution the distribution of molecular gas in nearby galaxies and in extended molecular clouds, providing an important input for gamma-ray emission models. These possibilities are a sample of how the Large Millimeter Telescope, working in a coordinated manner with GLAST, can become a powerful tool for high energy astrophysics.

  1. Development of the camera for the large size telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inome, Y.; Ambrosi, G.; Awane, Y.; Baba, H.; Bamba, A.; Barceló, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Boix, J.; Brunetti, L.; Carmona, E.; Chabanne, E.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, N.; Colin, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Dazzi, F.; Deangelis, A.; Deleglise, G.; Delgado, C.; Díaz, C.; Dubois, F.; Fiasson, A.; Fink, D.; Fouque, N.; Freixas, L.; Fruck, C.; Gadola, A.; García, R.; Gascón, D.; Geffroy, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Grañena, F.; Gunji, S.; Hagiwara, R.; Hamer, N.; Hanabata, Y.; Hassan, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Haubold, T.; Hayashida, M.; Hermel, R.; Herranz, D.; Hirotani, K.; Hose, J.; Hugh, D.; Inoue, S.; Inoue, Y.; Ioka, K.; Jablonski, C.; Kagaya, M.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kellermann, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Knoetig, M.; Kodani, K.; Kohri, K.; Kojima, T.; Konno, Y.; Koyama, S.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Lamanna, G.; Le Flour, T.; López-Moya, M.; López, R.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Manalaysay, A.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, G.; Martinez, M.; Masuda, S.; Matsuoka, S.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Monteiro, I.; Moralejo, A.; Murase, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nagayoshi, T.; Nakajima, D.; Nakamori, T.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nozato, A.; Ogino, M.; Ohira, Y.; Ohishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Okumura, A.; Ono, S.; Orito, R.; Panazol, J. L.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pauletta, G.; Podkladkin, S.; Prast, J.; Rando, R.; Reimann, O.; Ribó, M.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Saito, K.; Saito, T.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sakonaka, R.; Sanuy, A.; Sawada, M.; Scalzotto, V.; Schultz, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shibata, T.; Shu, S.; Sieiro, J.; Stamatescu, V.; Steiner, S.; Straumann, U.; Sugawara, R.; Tajima, H.; Takami, H.; Takahashi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, M.; Tejedor, L. A.; Terada, Y.; Teshima, M.; Tomono, Y.; Totani, T.; Toyama, T.; Tsubone, Y.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Tsujimoto, S.; Ueno, H.; Umehara, K.; Umetsu, Y.; Vollhardt, A.; Wagner, R.; Wetteskind, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshikoshi, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Size Telescopes, LSTs, located at the center of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA, will be sensitive for low energy gamma-rays. The camera on the LST focal plane is optimized to detect low energy events based on a high photon detection efficiency and high speed electronics. Also the trigger system is designed to detect low energy showers as much as possible. In addition, the camera is required to work stably without maintenance in a few tens of years. In this contribution we present the design of the camera for the first LST and the status of its development and production.

  2. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2006-06-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27' × 27') mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6' field and spectral resolutions of up to 8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4' × 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0'.5 × 0'.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near-infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits unique science, flexible scheduling, and improved operational support.

  3. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2008-07-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27' × 27') mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6 field and spectral resolutions of up to 8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4' × 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0.5' × 0.5') imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near-infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits unique science, flexible scheduling, and improved operational support.

  4. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2010-07-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27 × 27) mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6 field and spectral resolutions of up to 8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4 × 4) imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0.5 × 0.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near-infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits unique science, flexible scheduling, and improved operational support. Over the past two years the LBC and the first LUCIFER instrument have been brought into routine scientific operation and MODS1 commissioning is set to begin in the fall of 2010.

  5. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2004-09-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27'x 27') UB/VRI optimized mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6\\arcmin\\ field and spectral resolutions of up to 8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4'x 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0'.5 x 0'.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench beam combiner with visible and near-infrared imagers utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC/NIRVANA). In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits unique science, flexible scheduling, and improved operational support.

  6. Self-Referencing Hartmann Test for Large-Aperture Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korechoff, Robert P.; Oseas, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for end-to-end, full aperture testing of large-aperture telescopes using an innovative variation of a Hartmann mask. This technique is practical for telescopes with primary mirrors tens of meters in diameter and of any design. Furthermore, it is applicable to the entire optical band (near IR, visible, ultraviolet), relatively insensitive to environmental perturbations, and is suitable for ambient laboratory as well as thermal-vacuum environments. The only restriction is that the telescope optical axis must be parallel to the local gravity vector during testing. The standard Hartmann test utilizes an array of pencil beams that are cut out of a well-corrected wavefront using a mask. The pencil beam array is expanded to fill the full aperture of the telescope. The detector plane of the telescope is translated back and forth along the optical axis in the vicinity of the nominal focal plane, and the centroid of each pencil beam image is recorded. Standard analytical techniques are then used to reconstruct the telescope wavefront from the centroid data. The expansion of the array of pencil beams is usually accomplished by double passing the beams through the telescope under test. However, this requires a well-corrected, autocollimation flat, the diameter or which is approximately equal to that of the telescope aperture. Thus, the standard Hartmann method does not scale well because of the difficulty and expense of building and mounting a well-corrected, large aperture flat. The innovation in the testing method proposed here is to replace the large aperture, well-corrected, monolithic autocollimation flat with an array of small-aperture mirrors. In addition to eliminating the need for a large optic, the surface figure requirement for the small mirrors is relaxed compared to that required of the large autocollimation flat. The key point that allows this method to work is that the small mirrors need to operate as a monolithic flat only with regard to

  7. Performance predictions for the Keck telescope adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1995-08-07

    The second Keck ten meter telescope (Keck-11) is slated to have an infrared-optimized adaptive optics system in the 1997--1998 time frame. This system will provide diffraction-limited images in the 1--3 micron region and the ability to use a diffraction-limited spectroscopy slit. The AO system is currently in the preliminary design phase and considerable analysis has been performed in order to predict its performance under various seeing conditions. In particular we have investigated the point-spread function, energy through a spectroscopy slit, crowded field contrast, object limiting magnitude, field of view, and sky coverage with natural and laser guide stars.

  8. ARTIST: Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimeter Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Jes; Brinch, Christian; Girart, Josep Miquel; Padovani, Marco; Frau, Pau; Schaaf, Reinhold; Kuiper, Rolf; Bertoldi, Frank; Hogerheijde, Michiel; Juhasz, Attila; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2014-02-01

    ARTIST is a suite of tools for comprehensive multi-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of dust and line emission, as well as their polarization, to help interpret observations from submillimeter telescopes. The ARTIST package consists of LIME, a radiative transfer code that uses adaptive gridding allowing simulations of sources with arbitrary multi-dimensional (1D, 2D, 3D) and time-dependent structures, thus ensuring rapid convergence; the DustPol and LinePol tools for modeling the polarization of the line and dust emission; and an interface run from Python scripts that manages the interaction between a general model library and LIME, and a graphical interface to simulate images.

  9. The scaling relationship between telescope cost and aperture size for very large telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Belle, Gerard T.; Meinel, Aden Baker; Meinel, Marjorie Pettit

    2004-01-01

    Cost data for ground-based telescopes of the last century are analyzed for trends in the relationship between aperture size and cost. We find that for apertures built prior to 1980, costs scaled as aperture size to the 2.8 power, which is consistent with the precious finding of Meinel (1978). After 1980, 'traditional' monolithic mirror telescope costs have scaled as aperture to the 2.5 power. The large multiple mirror telescopes built or in construction during this time period (Keck, LBT, GTC) appear to deviate from this relationship with significant cost savings as a result, although it is unclear what power law such structures follow. We discuss the implications of the current cost-aperture size data on the proposed large telescope projects of the next ten to twenty years. Structures that naturally tend towards the 2.0 power in the cost-aperture relationship will be the favorable choice for future extremely large apertures; out expectation is that space-based structures will ultimately gain economic advantage over ground-based ones.

  10. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 5: Support systems module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the support systems module for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The following systems and described: (1) thermal control, (2) electrical, (3) communication and data landing, (4) attitude control system, and (5) structural features. Analyses of maintainability and reliability considerations are included.

  11. Scientific Instrument Package for the large space telescope (SIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a scientific instrument package (SIP) that will satisfy the requirements of the large space telescope was established. A reference configuration serving as a study model and data which will aid in the trade-off studies leading to the final design configuration are reported.

  12. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 4: Scientific instrument package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and characteristics of the scientific instrument package for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The subjects include: (1) general scientific objectives, (2) package system analysis, (3) scientific instrumentation, (4) imaging photoelectric sensors, (5) environmental considerations, and (6) reliability and maintainability.

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  14. Aplanatic corrector designs for the extremely large telescope.

    PubMed

    Moretto, G; Sebring, T A; Ray, F B; Ramsey, L W

    2000-06-01

    The next century is knocking on our door, bringing with it the possibility of telescopes even bigger than the 8-10-m-class instruments that have proliferated over the past decade. The fixed spherical reflector is the most economical and pragmatic way to construct an extremely large primary mirror (30-50 m in diameter). Although spherical mirrors have virtues such as manufacturability and identically figured segments, they also create great amounts of spherical aberration and coma. Here we show that there are several catoptric (all-reflecting) corrector designs that enable a fast telescope based on a spherical primary mirror.

  15. NST: Thermal Modeling for a Large Aperture Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, Roy

    2011-05-01

    Late in the 1990s the Dutch Open Telescope demonstrated that internal seeing in open, large aperture solar telescopes can be controlled by flushing air across the primary mirror and other telescope structures exposed to sunlight. In that system natural wind provides a uniform air temperature throughout the imaging volume, while efficiently sweeping heated air away from the optics and mechanical structure. Big Bear Solar Observatory's New Solar Telescope (NST) was designed to realize that same performance in an enclosed system by using both natural wind through the dome and forced air circulation around the primary mirror to provide the uniform air temperatures required within the telescope volume. The NST is housed in a conventional, ventilated dome with a circular opening, in place of the standard dome slit, that allows sunlight to fall only on an aperture stop and the primary mirror. The primary mirror is housed deep inside a cylindrical cell with only minimal openings in the side at the level of the mirror. To date, the forced air and cooling systems designed for the NST primary mirror have not been implemented, yet the telescope regularly produces solar images indicative of the absence of mirror seeing. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of the NST primary mirror system along with measurements of air flows within the dome, around the telescope structure, and internal to the mirror cell are used to explain the origin of this seemingly incongruent result. The CFD analysis is also extended to hypothetical systems of various scales. We will discuss the results of these investigations.

  16. An Improved Wavefront Control Algorithm for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Wavefront sensing and control is required throughout the mission lifecycle of large space telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When an optic of such a telescope is controlled with both surface-deforming and rigid-body actuators, the sensitivity-matrix obtained from the exit pupil wavefront vector divided by the corresponding actuator command value can sometimes become singular due to difference in actuator types and in actuator command values. In this paper, we propose a simple approach for preventing a sensitivity-matrix from singularity. We also introduce a new "minimum-wavefront and optimal control compensator". It uses an optimal control gain matrix obtained by feeding back the actuator commands along with the measured or estimated wavefront phase information to the estimator, thus eliminating the actuator modes that are not observable in the wavefront sensing process.

  17. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2012-09-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27' x 27') mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the left and right direct F/15 Gregorian foci incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6' field and spectral resolutions of up to 2000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCI), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at the left and right front bent F/15 Gregorian foci and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4' × 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multiobject spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0'.5 × 0'.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development that can utilize the full 23-m baseline of the LBT include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near-infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). LBTI is currently undergoing commissioning on the LBT and utilizing the installed adaptive secondary mirrors in both single- sided and two-sided beam combination modes. In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. Over the past four years the LBC pair, LUCI1, and MODS1 have been commissioned and are now scheduled for routine partner science observations. The delivery of both LUCI2 and MODS2 is anticipated before the end of 2012. The

  18. Neptune and Titan Observed with Keck Telescope Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Macintosh, B.A.; Gibbard, S.; Gavel, D.T.; Roe, H.; De Pater, I.; Ghez, A.M.; Acton, S.; Wizinowich, P.L.; Lai, O.

    2000-05-05

    The authors report on observations taken during engineering science validation time using the new adaptive optics system at the 10-m Keck II Telescope. They observe Neptune and Titan at near-infrared wavelengths. These objects are ideal for adaptive optics imaging because they are bright and small, yet have many diffraction-limited resolution elements across their disks. In addition Neptune and Titan have prominent physical features, some of which change markedly with time. They have observed infrared-bright storms on Neptune, and very low-albedo surface regions on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, Spatial resolution on Neptune and Titan was 0.05-0.06 and 0.04-0.05 arc sec, respectively.

  19. Neptune and Titan observed with Keck Telescope adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Claire E.; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Gibbard, Seran; Gavel, Donald T.; Roe, Henry; de Pater, Imke; Ghez, Andrea M.; Acton, Scott; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Lai, Olivier

    2000-07-01

    We report on observations taken during engineering science validation time using the new adaptive optics system at the 10-m Keck II Telescope. We observed Neptune and Titan at near- infrared wavelengths. These objects are ideal for adaptive optics imaging because they are bright and small, yet have many diffraction-limited resolution elements across their disks. In addition Neptune and Titan have prominent physical features, some of which change markedly with time. We have observed infrared-bright 'storms' on Neptune, and very low- albedo surface regions on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Spatial resolution on Neptune and Titan was 0.05 - 0.06 and 0.04 - 0.05 arc sec, respectively.

  20. Scatter and reflectivity measurements on large telescope mirror coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, James W.; Killpatrick, Don H.

    1998-08-01

    The reflectivity and scatter of several large telescope mirrors have been measured immediately after coating and after various use times. Mirrors evaluated inside those of the AEOS 3.67-m Telescope and the SOR 3.5-m Telescope. Reflectivity and scatter measurements were made on the actual mirrors and witness samples using a (mu) Scan(superscript TM) reflectometer/scatterometer, a Minolta 2002 hand-held spectro-reflectometer, and laboratory spectro-photometers and scatterometers. The reflectivity measurements made on coating witness samples were compared to measurements in round-robin tests by nationally recognized optical measurement laboratories. From the results of the round- robin measurements, correction factors were determined for the hand-held instruments and used to establish actual reflectivities of the large mirrors as a function of location on the mirror and time after coating deposition. Measurements of the reflectivity and scatter of the SOR 3.5- m primary mirror taken immediately after coating, nine months after coating, and 39 months after coating, and measurements of the reflectivity and scatter of the AEOS 3.67-m telescope primary mirror immediately after coating are presented and discussed. Correlations with coating data taken on other large mirrors are also presented. Depending on coating selection, initial coating quality, operational conditions, and cleaning procedures, coating lifetimes may vary from less than one to more than five years.

  1. Ideas for future large single dish radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, Hans J.; Baars, Jacob W. M.

    2014-07-01

    The existing large single dish radio telescopes of the 100m class (Effelsberg, Green Bank) were built in the 1970s and 1990s. With some active optics they work now down to 3 millimeter wavelength where the atmospheric quality of the site is also a limiting factor. Other smaller single dish telescopes (50m LMT Mexico, 30m IRAM Spain) are located higher and reach sub-millimeter quality, and the much smaller 12m antennas of the ALMA array reach at a very high site the Terahertz region. They use advanced technologies as carbon fiber structures and flexible body control. We review natural limits to telescope design and use the examples of a number of telescopes for an overview of the available state-of-the-art in design, engineering and technologies. Without considering the scientific justification we then offer suggestions to realize ultimate performance of huge single dish telescopes (up to 160m). We provide an outlook on design options, technological frontiers and cost estimates.

  2. Wavelength dependence of star images formed by large ground-based telescopes including ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. Stewart

    2016-08-01

    Star image appearance in large ground-based telescopes is determined by the properties of the Optical Path Difference (OPD) fluctuation associated with the image-forming wave potions collected by the telescope aperture. The principal properties are the root mean square (rms) OPD fluctuation and the autocorrelation function of the OPD fluctuation. The OPD properties ultimately depend on the combined effects of turbulence in the atmospheric path, the fixed aberrations of the telescope and, if appropriate, the corrective effects of Adaptive Optics (AO). The equations given in this paper relating star image properties to the OPD properties (and also the inverse relations) apply to all large ground-based reflector telescopes, including ELTs. They apply equally to telescopes with and without AO. The OPD properties can be obtained directly from an image of an unresolved star. This image represents the intensity Point Spread Function (PSF) corresponding to the entire end-to-end imaging path. To obtain the full OPD information compliment, however, the image must be formed at a wavelength that delivers the most general type of star image: a core and halo image. Once the OPD properties have been obtained from such an image, the intensity PSF for the telescope/atmosphere/AO combination can immediately be calculated for any other wavelengths of interest in the extended optical wavelength range, 0.3 μm - 1000 μm. There are numerous applications for the mathematical relationships set out in this paper, including characterization of atmospheric paths, assessment of telescope/AO imaging performance, establishing wave front tolerances for ELTs and other large ground-based telescopes, and the rapid identification of sweetspot wavelength regions where highest resolution is achieved and star images attain maximum central intensity.

  3. MAD about the Large Magellanic Cloud. Preparing for the era of Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Diolaiti, E.; Valenti, E.; Cignoni, M.; Mackey, A. D.

    2011-11-01

    We present J,H,Ks photometry from the the Multi conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD), a visitor instrument at the VLT, of a resolved stellar population in a small crowded field in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud near the globular cluster NGC 1928. In a total exposure time of 6, 36 and 20 min, magnitude limits were achieved of J ~ 20.5 mag, H ~ 21 mag, and Ks ~ 20.5 mag respectively, with S/N > 10. This does not reach the level of the oldest Main Sequence Turnoffs, however the resulting Colour-Magnitude Diagrams are the deepest and most accurate obtained so far in the infrared for the LMC bar. We combined our photometry with deep optical photometry from the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys, which is a good match in spatial resolution. The comparison between synthetic and observed CMDs shows that the stellar population of the field we observed is consistent with the star formation history expected for the LMC bar, and that all combinations of IJHKs filters can, with some care, produce the same results. We used the red clump magnitude in Ks to confirm the LMC distance modulus as, μ0 = 18.50 ± 0.06r ± 0.09s mag. We also addressed a number of technical aspects related to performing accurate photometry with adaptive optics images in crowded stellar fields, which has implications for how we should design and use the Extremely Large Telescopes of the future for studies of this kind. Based on observations obtained with the MCAO Demonstrator (MAD) al the VLT Melipal Nasmyth focus (ESO public data release).

  4. Design of smart composite platforms for adaptive trust vector control and adaptive laser telescope for satellite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents design of smart composite platforms for adaptive trust vector control (TVC) and adaptive laser telescope for satellite applications. To eliminate disturbances, the proposed adaptive TVC and telescope systems will be mounted on two analogous smart composite platform with simultaneous precision positioning (pointing) and vibration suppression (stabilizing), SPPVS, with micro-radian pointing resolution, and then mounted on a satellite in two different locations. The adaptive TVC system provides SPPVS with large tip-tilt to potentially eliminate the gimbals systems. The smart composite telescope will be mounted on a smart composite platform with SPPVS and then mounted on a satellite. The laser communication is intended for the Geosynchronous orbit. The high degree of directionality increases the security of the laser communication signal (as opposed to a diffused RF signal), but also requires sophisticated subsystems for transmission and acquisition. The shorter wavelength of the optical spectrum increases the data transmission rates, but laser systems require large amounts of power, which increases the mass and complexity of the supporting systems. In addition, the laser communication on the Geosynchronous orbit requires an accurate platform with SPPVS capabilities. Therefore, this work also addresses the design of an active composite platform to be used to simultaneously point and stabilize an intersatellite laser communication telescope with micro-radian pointing resolution. The telescope is a Cassegrain receiver that employs two mirrors, one convex (primary) and the other concave (secondary). The distance, as well as the horizontal and axial alignment of the mirrors, must be precisely maintained or else the optical properties of the system will be severely degraded. The alignment will also have to be maintained during thruster firings, which will require vibration suppression capabilities of the system as well. The innovative platform has been

  5. Resolving the Southern African Large Telescope's image quality problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh E.; Crause, Lisa A.; O'Connor, James; Strümpfer, Francois; Strydom, Ockert J.; Sass, Craig; Brink, Janus D.; Plessis, Charl du; Wiid, Eben; Love, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Images obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) during its commissioning phase in 2006 showed degradation due to a large focus gradient, astigmatism, and higher order optical aberrations. An extensive forensic investigation exonerated the primary mirror and the science instruments before pointing to the mechanical interface between the telescope and the spherical aberration corrector, the complex optical subassembly which corrects the spherical aberration introduced by the 11-m primary mirror. Having diagnosed the problem, a detailed repair plan was formulated and implemented when the corrector was removed from the telescope in April 2009. The problematic interface was replaced, and the four aspheric mirrors were optically tested and re-aligned. Individual mirror surface figures were confirmed to meet specification, and a full system test after the re-alignment yielded a root mean square wavefront error of 0.15 waves. The corrector was reinstalled in August 2010 and aligned with respect to the payload and primary mirror. Subsequent on-sky tests revealed spurious signals being sent to the tracker by the auto-collimator, the instrument that maintains the alignment of the corrector with respect to the primary mirror. After rectifying this minor issue, the telescope yielded uniform 1.1 arcsec star images over the full 10-arcmin field of view.

  6. First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vieyra, Armando; Dubra, Alfredo; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel; Williams, David R

    2009-10-12

    Expressions for minimal astigmatism in image and pupil planes in off-axis afocal reflective telescopes formed by pairs of spherical mirrors are presented. These formulae which are derived from the marginal ray fan equation can be used for designing laser cavities, spectrographs and adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The use, range and validity of these formulae are limited by spherical aberration and coma for small and large angles respectively. This is discussed using examples from adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The performance of the resulting optical designs are evaluated and compared against the configurations with minimal wavefront RMS, using the defocus-corrected wavefront RMS as a metric.

  7. Status report on the Large Binocular Telescope's ARGOS ground-layer AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, M.; Rabien, S.; Busoni, L.; Barl, L.; Beckmann, U.; Bonaglia, M.; Boose, Y.; Borelli, J. L.; Bluemchen, T.; Carbonaro, L.; Connot, C.; Deysenroth, M.; Davies, R.; Durney, O.; Elberich, M.; Ertl, T.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Gasho, V.; Gemperlein, H.; Hubbard, P.; Kanneganti, S.; Kulas, M.; Newman, K.; Noenickx, J.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Peter, D.; Quirrenbach, A.; Rademacher, M.; Schwab, C.; Storm, J.; Vaitheeswaran, V.; Weigelt, G.; Ziegleder, J.

    2011-10-01

    ARGOS, the laser-guided adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), is now under construction at the telescope. By correcting atmospheric turbulence close to the telescope, the system is designed to deliver high resolution near infrared images over a field of 4 arc minute diameter. Each side of the LBT is being equipped with three Rayleigh laser guide stars derived from six 18 W pulsed green lasers and projected into two triangular constellations matching the size of the corrected field. The returning light is to be detected by wavefront sensors that are range gated within the seeing-limited depth of focus of the telescope. Wavefront correction will be introduced by the telescope's deformable secondary mirrors driven on the basis of the average wavefront errors computed from the respective guide star constellation. Measured atmospheric turbulence profiles from the site lead us to expect that by compensating the ground-layer turbulence, ARGOS will deliver median image quality of about 0.2 arc sec across the JHK bands. This will be exploited by a pair of multi-object near-IR spectrographs, LUCIFER1 and LUCIFER2, with 4 arc minute field already operating on the telescope. In future, ARGOS will also feed two interferometric imaging instruments, the LBT Interferometer operating in the thermal infrared, and LINC-NIRVANA, operating at visible and near infrared wavelengths. Together, these instruments will offer very broad spectral coverage at the diffraction limit of the LBT's combined aperture, 23 m in size.

  8. Results from the adaptive optics coronagraph at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. J.; Doel, A. P.; Bingham, R. G.; Charalambous, A.; Myers, R. M.; Bissonauth, N.; Clark, P.; Talbot, G.

    2005-12-01

    Described here is the design and commissioning of a coronagraph facility for the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and its Nasmyth Adaptive Optics for Multi-purpose Instrumentation (NAOMI). The use of the NAOMI system gives an improved image resolution of ~0.15 arcsec at a wavelength of 2.2μm. This enables the Optimised Stellar Coronagraph for Adaptive optics (OSCA) to suppress stellar light using smaller occulting masks and thus allows regions closer to bright astronomical objects to be imaged. OSCA provides a selection of 10 different occulting masks with sizes of 0.25-2.0arcsec in diameter, including two with full grey-scale Gaussian profiles. There is also a choice of different sized and shaped Lyot stops (pupil plane masks). Computer simulations of the different coronagraphic options with the NAOMI segmented mirror have relevance for the next generation of highly segmented extremely large telescopes.

  9. A large fiber sensor network for an acoustic neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buis, Ernst-Jan; Doppenberg, Ed; Lahmann, Robert; Toet, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The scientific prospects of detecting neutrinos with an energy close or even higher than the GKZ cut-off energy has been discussed extensively in literature. It is clear that due to their expected low flux, the detection of these ultra-high energy neutrinos (Ev > 1018 eV) requires a telescope larger than 100 km3. Acoustic detection may provide a way to observe these ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos, as sound that they induce in the deep sea when neutrinos lose their energy travels undisturbed for many kilometers. To realize a large scale acoustic neutrino telescope, dedicated technology must be developed that allows for a deep sea sensor network. Fiber optic hydrophone technology provides a promising means to establish a large scale sensor network [1] with the proper sensitivity to detect the small signals from the neutrino interactions.

  10. Data Management at the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Steve

    2015-12-01

    PySALT is the python/PyRAF-based data reduction and analysis pipeline for the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), a modern 10m class telescope with a large user community consisting of 13 partner institutions. The suite of tools developed as part of PySALT include: (1) science quality reductions for the major operational modes of SALT include high-time resolution and spectroscopic reductions, (2) quick-look capabilities for the observers and real-time data delivery for the investigators, and (3) management of the data archive and regularly processing of SALT observations. In addition to presenting the overall framework, we also highlight some of the lessons learned since the start of SALT scientific observations in 2011.

  11. Extreme Adaptive Optics for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; al., e

    2006-05-02

    Direct detection of extrasolar Jovian planets is a major scientific motivation for the construction of future extremely large telescopes such as the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Such detection will require dedicated high-contrast AO systems. Since the properties of Jovian planets and their parent stars vary enormously between different populations, the instrument must be designed to meet specific scientific needs rather than a simple metric such as maximum Strehl ratio. We present a design for such an instrument, the Planet Formation Imager (PFI) for TMT. It has four key science missions. The first is the study of newly-formed planets on 5-10 AU scales in regions such as Taurus and Ophiucus--this requires very small inner working distances that are only possible with a 30m or larger telescope. The second is a robust census of extrasolar giant planets orbiting mature nearby stars. The third is detailed spectral characterization of the brightest extrasolar planets. The final targets are circumstellar dust disks, including Zodiacal light analogs in the inner parts of other solar systems. To achieve these, PFI combines advanced wavefront sensors, high-order MEMS deformable mirrors, a coronagraph optimized for a finely-segmented primary mirror, and an integral field spectrograph.

  12. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    and vanished giant planets is preserved in the orbital elements and size distributions of those objects. In the main asteroid belt between Mars and...REPORT DATE MAR 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From...have provided the detailed information needed to construct physical models of planets , stars, galaxies, quasars, and larger structures. Until

  13. Study of composites as substrate materials in large space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    Nonmetallic composites such as the graphite/epoxy system were investigated as possible substrates for the primary mirror of the large space telescope. The possible use of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites was reviewed in the literature. Problems arising out of the use of composites as substrate materials such as grinding, polishing, adherence of reflective coatings, rigidity of substrate, hygrospcopici tendency of the composites, thermal and temporal stability and other related problems were examined.

  14. High Energy Astrophysics with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Observatory. It includes information about the LAT, and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), detection of the quiet sun and the moon in gamma rays, Pulsars observed by the observatory, Globular Star Clusters, Active Galactic Nucleus, and Gamma-Ray Bursts, with specific information about GRB 080916C.

  15. Extremely Large Telescope Project Selected in ESFRI Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    In its first Roadmap, the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) choose the European Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), for which ESO is presently developing a Reference Design, as one of the large scale projects to be conducted in astronomy, and the only one in optical astronomy. The aim of the ELT project is to build before the end of the next decade an optical/near-infrared telescope with a diameter in the 30-60m range. ESO PR Photo 40/06 The ESFRI Roadmap states: "Extremely Large Telescopes are seen world-wide as one of the highest priorities in ground-based astronomy. They will vastly advance astrophysical knowledge allowing detailed studies of inter alia planets around other stars, the first objects in the Universe, super-massive Black Holes, and the nature and distribution of the Dark Matter and Dark Energy which dominate the Universe. The European Extremely Large Telescope project will maintain and reinforce Europe's position at the forefront of astrophysical research." Said Catherine Cesarsky, Director General of ESO: "In 2004, the ESO Council mandated ESO to play a leading role in the development of an ELT for Europe's astronomers. To that end, ESO has undertaken conceptual studies for ELTs and is currently also leading a consortium of European institutes engaged in studying enabling technologies for such a telescope. The inclusion of the ELT in the ESFRI roadmap, together with the comprehensive preparatory work already done, paves the way for the next phase of this exciting project, the design phase." ESO is currently working, in close collaboration with the European astronomical community and the industry, on a baseline design for an Extremely Large Telescope. The plan is a telescope with a primary mirror between 30 and 60 metres in diameter and a financial envelope of about 750 m Euros. It aims at more than a factor ten improvement in overall performance compared to the current leader in ground based astronomy: the ESO Very Large

  16. The Large Binocular Telescope mount control system architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; McKenna, Dan; Brynnel, Joar G.; Sargent, Tom; Cox, Dan; Little, John; Powell, Keith; Holmberg, Gene

    2006-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) features dual 8.4 m diameter mirrors in a common elevation-over-azimuth mount. The LBT moves in elevation on two large crescent-shaped C-rings that are supported by radial hydrostatic bearing pads located near the four corners of the rectangular azimuth frame. The azimuth frame, in turn, is supported by four hydrostatic bearing pads and uses hydrodynamic roller bearings for centering. Each axis is gear driven by four large electric motors. In addition to precision optical motor encoders, each axis is equipped with Farrand Inductosyn strip encoders which yield 0.005 arcsecond resolution. The telescope weighs 580 metric tons and is designed to track with 0.03 arcsecond or better servo precision under wind speeds as high as 24 km/hr. Though the telescope is still under construction, the Mount Control System (MCS) has been routinely exercised to achieve First Light. The authors present a description of the unique, DSP-based synchronous architecture of the MCS and its capabilities.

  17. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Neptune with the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.; Max, C. E.; Roe, H.; Gibbard, S.; Gavel, D.; Acton, S.; Lai, O.; Wizinowich, P.; de Pater, I.; Ghez, A.; Baines, K.

    1999-09-01

    We present near-IR images of Neptune with a resolution of 0.05 arcseconds obtained with the new adaptive optics (AO) system at the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope. The resolution and contrast of these images allows us to fit radiative transfer models to Neptune's clear atmosphere, completely uncontaminated by scattered light from bright storms or bands. We can measure for the first time the precise infrared spatial extent of storm features and calculate their reflectance in broad-band and methane-absorption near-IR bandpasses. The images show many bands and cloud features, and detect a bright southern-hemisphere complex that may be associated with a large dark spot similar to that seen by Voyager. These observations demonstrate that AO on an 8-10 meter telescope is a powerful new tool for studying objects in the outer solar system, surpassing the resolution of the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope by a factor of 2-4. This research was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-ENG-48. It was supported in part by NASA grant NRA-97-OSS-04-98-053(R3281). The adaptive optics system on the Keck II telescope was funded by the W.M. Keck foundation under a grant to the California Association for Research in Astronomy, and by NASA.

  18. Study Towards Human Aided Construction of Large Lunar Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vanSusante, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    than 0,03 mm during operation. It would be possible for astronauts to maintain, repair and upgrade the telescope much in the same way that the Hubble Space Telescope has been maintained. When the telescope is built, an infrastructure will also have been created for energy supply and communications that can be used in subsequent missions. The total mission can be achieved by launching 3 Ariane 5 rockets in the year 2006 configuration that can launch 20,000 kg into GTO. New studies of the construction of even larger telescopes have also been undertaken.. One additional aspect that will be very important is the synergy between humans and robots and their role in transport, construction, operation, maintenance, etc. is addressed in these new studies. Also an attempt will be made to make a parametric cost model for different scenario's as well as the technology readiness levels for the techniques necessary to build a telescope with the capacity of the 'planet finder', equivalent up to 1000 sq m of photon collecting surface. Part of the scenario definition and conceptual design of a large lunar telescope has also been done in the lunar base design workshop, held from 10-21 of June at ESTEC, NL. After the conceptual phase there will be a more engineering oriented workshop, which will be held in the concurrent design facility at ESTEC. This paper includes discussion of recent progress on these studies.

  19. Study towards construction and operations of large lunar telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Susante, P.

    than 0,03 mm during operation. It would be possible for astronauts to maintain, repair and upgrade the telescope much in the same way that the Hubble Space Telescope has been maintained. When the telescope is built, an infrastructure will also have been created for energy supply and communications that can be used in subsequent missions. The total mission can be achieved by launching 3 Ariane 5 rockets in the year 2006 configuration that can launch 20,000 kg into GTO. New studies of the construction of even larger telescopes have also been undertaken.. One additional aspect that will be very important is the synergy between humans and robots and their role in transport, construction, operation, maintenance, etc. is addressed in these new studies Also an attempt will be made to make a parametric cost model for different scenario's as well as the technology readiness levels for the techniques necessary to build a telescope with the capacity of the "planet finder,"equivalent to 1000 m2 of photon collecting surface. Part of the scenario definition and conceptual design of a large lunar telescope has also been done in the lunar base design workshop, held from 10-21 of June at ESTEC, NL. After the conceptual phase there will be a more engineering oriented workshop, which will be held in the concurrent design facility at ESTEC. This paper includes discussion of recent progress on these studies

  20. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TcV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a Galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  1. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TeV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  2. New 50-m-class single-dish telescope: Large Submillimeter Telescope (LST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Takekoshi, Tatsuya; Oshima, Tai; Ishii, Shun

    2016-08-01

    We report on a plan to construct a 50-m-class single-dish telescope, the Large Submillimeter Telescope (LST). The conceptual design and key science behind the LST are presented, together with its tentative specifications. This telescope is optimized for wide-area imaging and spectroscopic surveys in the 70-420 GHz frequency range, which spans the main atmospheric windows at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths for good observation sites such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) site in Chile. We also target observations at higher frequencies of up to 1 THz, using an inner high-precision surface. Active surface control is required in order to correct gravitational and thermal deformations of the surface, and will be useful for correction of the wind-load deformation. The LST will facilitate new discovery spaces such as wide-field imaging with both continuum and spectral lines, along with new developments for time-domain science. Through exploitation of its synergy with ALMA and other telescopes, the LST will contribute to research on a wide range of topics in the fields of astronomy and astrophysics, e.g., astrochemistry, star formation in our Galaxy and galaxies, the evolution of galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, the search for transients such as γ-ray burst reverse shocks produced during the epoch of re-ionization, electromagnetic follow up of detected gravitational wave sources, and examination of general relativity in the vicinity of super massive black holes via submillimeter very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI).

  3. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. Gordon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably faster than for most spectrograph collimators, while maintaining diffraction-limited imaging quality. It is possible to obtain excellent performance despite these challenges. We also briefly consider the number of such spectrographs required, which can be reduced by full or partial adaptive optics correction, and/or moving towards longer wavelengths.

  4. Spectrographs and Large Telescopes: A Study of Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fica, Haley Diane; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Uomoto, Alan K.; Hare, Tyson

    2017-01-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a telescope in possession of a large aperture, must be in want of a high resolution spectrograph. Subsystems of these instruments require testing and upgrading to ensure that they can continue to be scientifically productive and usher in a new era of astronomical research. The Planet Finder Spectrograph (PFS) and Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE), both on the Magellan II Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) are examples of such instruments. Bluer flat field lamps were designed for PFS and MIKE to replace lamps no longer available in order to ensure continued, efficient functionality. These newly designed lamps will result in better flat fielding and calibration of data, and thus result in increased reduction of instrument noise. When it is built and installed in 2022, G-CLEF will be be fed by a tertiary mirror on the GMT. Stepper motors attached to the back of this mirror will be used to correct misalignments in the optical relay system. These motors were characterized to ensure that they function as expected to an accuracy of a few microns. These projects incorporate several key aspects of astronomical instrumentation: designing, building, and testing.

  5. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A. W.; Charles, E.

    2007-07-12

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration and Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  6. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A.W.; Charles, E.; /SLAC

    2007-10-16

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  7. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgland, A. W.; Charles, E.

    2007-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  8. The Large Millimeter Telescope -- Gran Telescopio Milimetrico (LMT/GTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. I.; Schloerb, F. P.; Strom, S.; Carrasco, L.; Cardona, O.; Serrano, A.

    1996-05-01

    The University of Massachusetts at Amherst and the Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electonica (INAOE) of Puebla, Mexico, are involved in a joint project for the design and construction of the Large Millimeter Telescope, or Gran Telescopio Milimetrico. The LMT/GTM is a 50-meter diameter radio telescope with active control systems to maintain high aperture efficiency and pointing accuracy. The observatory will be located at a high altitude site in Mexico with excellent atmospheric transparency at wavelengths near 1mm. By virtue of its nearly 2000 square meter collecting area, the LMT/GTM will be a powerful instrument for many types of observations. Continuum observations from very distant astronomical objects and wide field spectral line mapping from 1 to 3 mm are among the prime scientific goals. LMT/GTM will be capable of operation either as a sensitive receive-only radio astronomical instrument or, when properly equipped, as an interplanetary radar capable of transmitting high power levels at short millimeter wavelengths. Observational scheduling will include a strong commitment of large ``key'' projects, and a substantial fraction of observing time will be open to the U.S. and international communities. The telescope is currently in its major design phase, with construction scheduled to begin in approximately two years and first light in the year 2000.

  9. Thermal imaging of the Large Millimeter Telescope structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David R.

    2010-07-01

    A dominant problem for large, high precision telescopes is the deformation due to temperature changes in the structure. Even for active surface designs such as the Large Millimeter Telescope/Gran Telescopio Milimetrico (LMT), accurate knowledge of the temperature distribution in the structure is necessary in order to adjust the primary reflector panels and make pointing corrections. The design of thermal management system of the LMT consists of a fully-cladded structure, a forced ventilation system, and a collection of temperature sensors distributed throughout the telescope. During the design, both steady-state and dynamic thermal models were developed to predict the thermal behavior. Additionally, some thermal measurements were taken during construction, before the cladding was installed. Since the structure is now completely enclosed with insulating cladding, it is an excellent candidate for thermal imaging at this stage of the commissioning. Thermal images of the structure are presented, showing the actual temperature distribution of the LMT alidade structure and reflector. The images are taken from a consistent set of positions to show the how the structural temperature distribution evolves over day and night conditions.

  10. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Phase A study of the Large Space Telescope (LST) is reported. The study defines an LST concept based on the broad mission guidelines provided by the Office of Space Science (OSS), the scientific requirements developed by OSS with the scientific community, and an understanding of long range NASA planning current at the time the study was performed. The LST is an unmanned astronomical observatory facility, consisting of an optical telescope assembly (OTA), scientific instrument package (SIP), and a support systems module (SSM). The report consists of five volumes. The report describes the constraints and trade off analyses that were performed to arrive at a reference design for each system and for the overall LST configuration. A low cost design approach was followed in the Phase A study. This resulted in the use of standard spacecraft hardware, the provision for maintenance at the black box level, growth potential in systems designs, and the sharing of shuttle maintenance flights with other payloads.

  11. Development of television tubes for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrance, J. L.; Zucchino, P.

    1971-01-01

    Princeton Observatory has been working for several years under NASA sponsorship to develop television type sensors to use in place of photographic film for space astronomy. The performance of an SEC-vidicon with a 25 mm x 25 mm active area, MgF2 window, and bi-alkali photocathode is discussed. Results from ground based use on the Coude spectrograph of the 200-inch Hale telescope are included. The intended use of this tube in an echelle spectrograph sounding rocket payload and on Stratoscope 2 for direct high resolution imagery is also discussed. The paper also discusses the large space telescope image sensor requirements and the development of a larger television tube for this mission.

  12. Development of television tubes for the large space telescope.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrance, J. L.; Zucchino, P.

    1971-01-01

    Princeton Observatory has been working for several years under NASA sponsorship to develop television type sensors to use in place of photographic film for space astronomy. This paper discusses the performance of an SEC-vidicon with a 25 mm x 25 mm active area, MgF2 window, and bi-alkali photocathode. Results from ground based use on the Coude spectrograph of the 200-inch Hale telescope are included. The intended use of this tube in an echelle spectrograph sounding rocket payload and on Stratoscope II for direct high resolution imagery is also discussed. The paper also discusses the Large Space Telescope image sensor requirements and the development of a larger television tube for this mission.

  13. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope OCS and TCS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, German; Delgado, Francisco

    2010-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a project envisioned as a system of systems with demanding science, technical, and operational requirements, that must perform as a fully integrated unit. The design and implementation of such a system poses big engineering challenges when performing requirements analysis, detailed interface definitions, operational modes and control strategy studies. The OMG System Modeling Language (SysML) has been selected as the framework for the systems engineering analysis and documentation for the LSST. Models for the overall system architecture and different observatory subsystems have been built describing requirements, structure, interfaces and behavior. In this paper we show the models for the Observatory Control System (OCS) and the Telescope Control System (TCS), and how this methodology has helped in the clarification of the design and requirements. In one common language, the relationships of the OCS, TCS, Camera and Data management subsystems are captured with models of the structure, behavior, requirements and the traceability between them.

  14. Location of the elevation axis in a large optical telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, Stephen

    2004-02-10

    Proposed designs for the next generation of large optical telescopes favor a tripod or quadrupod secondary support, and a primary supported from the back, but it is not yet clear whether the elevation axis should be in front of the primary or behind it. A study is described of the effect of elevation-axis location on key performance parameters (fundamental frequency, blockage, and wind-induced secondary decenter) for a 30-m Cassegrain telescope with amount configuration that is typical of the new designs. For a fast (e.g., f/1) primary, the best location for the elevation axis is behind the primary. The penalty for moving the elevation axis in front of the primary is roughly a 40% decrease in fundamental frequency and a corresponding reduction in the control bandwidth for pointing and optical alignment.

  15. Layer-oriented adaptive optics for solar telescopes.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé

    2012-08-10

    First multiconjugate adaptive-optical (MCAO) systems are currently being installed on solar telescopes. The aim of these systems is to increase the corrected field of view with respect to conventional adaptive optics. However, this first generation is based on a star-oriented approach, and it is then difficult to increase the size of the field of view beyond 60-80 arc sec in diameter. We propose to implement the layer-oriented approach in solar MCAO systems by use of wide-field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors conjugated to the strongest turbulent layers. The wavefront distortions are averaged over a wide field: the signal from distant turbulence is attenuated and the tomographic reconstruction is thus done optically. The system consists of independent correction loops, which only need to account for local turbulence: the subapertures can be enlarged and the correction frequency reduced. Most importantly, a star-oriented MCAO system becomes more complex with increasing field size, while the layer-oriented approach benefits from larger fields and will therefore be an attractive solution for the future generation of solar MCAO systems.

  16. Cloud Structures on Neptune Observed with Keck Telescope Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, C. E.; Macintosh, B. A.; Gibbard, S. G.; Gavel, D. T.; Roe, H. G.; de Pater, I.; Ghez, A. M.; Acton, D. S.; Lai, O.; Stomski, P.; Wizinowich, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    We report on observations obtained with the adaptive optics system at the 10 m Keck II Telescope during engineering validation and early science observing time for the adaptive optics system. We observed Neptune at near-infrared wavelengths. Angular resolution was 0.05"-0.06", corresponding to a spatial scale of approximately 1000 km at Neptune. We discuss the latitudinal structure of circumferential cloud bands and of compact infrared-bright features seen in the southern hemisphere, as well as their variation with wavelength. We determine the values of I/F (proportional to the ratio of reflected intensity to incident solar flux) in the J and H infrared-wavelength bands, including narrowband filters where there is strong methane absorption. We use the I/F values inside and outside of methane bands to estimate the altitude of clouds responsible for the brightest compact features in the infrared. Our data show that, on two of our four observing dates, the brightest region on Neptune contained highly reflective haze layers located below the tropopause but not deeper than a few bars.

  17. Large thin adaptive x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doel, Peter; Atkins, Carolyn; Thompson, Samantha; Brooks, David; Yao, Jun; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the progress made in a proof of concept study and recent results of a research program into large active x-ray mirrors that is part of the UK Smart X-ray Optics project. The ultimate aim is to apply the techniques of active/adaptive optics to the next generation of nested shell astronomical X-ray space telescopes. A variety of deformable mirror technologies are currently available, the most promising of which for active X-ray mirrors are probably unimorph and bimorph piezoelectric mirrors. In this type of mirror one or more sheets of piezoelectric material are bonded to or coated with a passive reflective layer. On the back or between the piezoceramic layer/layers are series of electrodes. Application of an electric field causes the piezoelectric material to undergo local deformation thus changing the mirror shape. Starting in 2005 a proof of concept active mirror research program has been undertaken. This work included modelling and development of actively controlled thin shell mirrors. Finite element models of piezo-electric actuated mirrors have been developed and verified against experimental test systems. This has included the modelling and test of piezo-electric hexagonal unimorph segments. Various actuator types and low shrinkage conductive bonding methods have been investigated and laboratory tests of the use of piezo-electric actuators to adjust the form of an XMM-Newton space telescope engineering model mirror shell have been conducted and show that movement of the optics at the required level is achievable. Promising technological approaches have been identified including moulded piezo-ceramics and piezo-electrics fibre bundles.

  18. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  19. BLAST: The Balloon-Borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devlin, Mark; Ade, Peter; Bock, Jamie; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matt; Gunderson, Josh; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    BLAST is the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope. It will fly from a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform from Antarctica. The telescope design incorporates a 2 m primary mirror with large-format bolometer arrays operating at 250, 350 and 500 microns. By providing the first sensitive large-area (10 sq. deg.) sub-mm surveys at these wavelengths, BLAST will address some of the most important galactic and cosmological questions regarding the formation and evolution of stars, galaxies and clusters. Galactic and extragalactic BLAST surveys will: (1) identify large numbers of high-redshift galaxies; (2) measure photometric redshifts, rest-frame FIR luminosities and star formation rates thereby constraining the evolutionary history of the galaxies that produce the FIR and sub-mm background; (3) measure cold pre-stellar sources associated with the earliest stages of star and planet formation; (4) make high-resolution maps of diffuse galactic emission over a wide range of galactic latitudes. In addition to achieving the above scientific goals, the exciting legacy of the BLAST LDB experiment will be a catalogue of 3000-5000 extragalactic sub-mm sources and a 100 sq. deg. sub-mm galactic plane survey. Multi-frequency follow-up observations from SIRTF, ASTRO-F, and Herschel, together with spectroscopic observations and sub-arcsecond imaging from ALMA are essential to understand the physical nature of the BLAST sources.

  20. The feasibility of large refracting telescopes for solar coronal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Elmore, David F.; Kolinski, Donald J.

    2008-07-01

    Measuring magnetic fields in the solar corona requires a large aperture telescope with exceptionally low levels of scattered light. For internally-occulted coronagraphs the main source is scattering from dust or microroughness on the primary lens or mirror. We show refracting primaries offer significantly lower levels for both sources. To observe magnetic fields in the solar corona with scientifically interesting spatial and temporal resolutions, a 1 meter aperture or larger is required. For a long time such large-scale refractors have been deemed impractical or impossible to construct due to gravitational deformation of the lens. We present the results of finite-element and optical analyses of the gravitational deformation, stress-induced birefringence, and absorptive heating of a (see manuscript)1.5 meter f/5 fused silica lens. These studies demonstrate the traditional objections to large refractors are unfounded and large refracting primaries have unique capabilities.

  1. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope concept design overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, Victor L.

    2008-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Project is a public-private partnership that has successfully completed the Concept Design of its wide-field ground based survey system and started several long-lead construction activities using private funding. The telescope has a 3-mirror wide field optical system with an 8.4 meter primary, 3.4 meter secondary, and 5 meter tertiary mirror. The reflective optics feed three refractive elements and a 64 cm 3.2 gigapixel camera. The telescope will be located on the summit of Cerro Pachón in Chile. The LSST data management system will reduce, transport, alert, archive the roughly 15 terabytes of data produced nightly, and will serve the raw and catalog data accumulating at an average of 7 petabytes per year to the community without any proprietary period. This survey will yield contiguous overlapping imaging of 20,000 square degrees of sky in 6 optical filter bands covering wavelengths from 320 to 1080nm. The project continues to attract institutional partners and has acquired non-federal funding sufficient to construct the primary mirror, already in progress at the University of Arizona, and fund detector prototype efforts, two of the longest lead items in the LSST. The project has submitted a proposal for construction to the National Science Foundation Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC) program and is preparing for a 2011 funding authorization.

  2. Use of an Extremely Large Telescope for HTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Oliver; Redfern, Mike

    Investigative studies have designed concept instruments for a proposed 42 m European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) facility suite. An ELT will aid, at its most basic level, detection of the faintest stellar sources and instrinsic features, and detailed quantitative analysis of relatively bright sources. The development of such a telescope thus plays to the strengths of high time resolution (HTR) detectors which provide single photon detection capabilities and/or extremely high refresh rates—they can maximize detection of faint sources through photon counting and they can cope with the high photon flux from relatively bright objects building up extremely high S/N. Specific considerations and fast detectors then need to be adopted into the ELT design to accommodate high time resolution astrophysics (HTRA) efficiently. No one instrument or detector can cover all HTRA timescales (nanoseconds to seconds and `slower'), and a dedicated facility HTRA instrument on the ELT is unlikely as yet, but chosen facility instruments can include HTRA options in their packages. Currently there are numerous HTRA options in existing telescope facilities around the world as well as many visiting HTRA instruments. This demonstrates an active HTRA community with worldwide support and interest in HTRA observation capabilities, which underscores the need for HTR capabilities to be designed into the ELT.

  3. Contemporaneous VLBA 5 GHz Observations of Large Area Telescope Detected Blazars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-10

    blazars detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma - ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long...galaxies: jets – galaxies: nuclei – gamma rays : galaxies – radio continuum: galaxies 1. INTRODUCTION The Large Area Telescope (LAT; Atwood et al. 2009...on board the Fermi Gamma - ray Space Telescope is a wide-field telescope covering the energy range from about 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. It has been

  4. Lessons learned with the Active Phasing Experiment: comparison of four optical phasing sensors on a segmented Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Surdej, I.

    The adaptive optics capabilities are strongly limited by the quality of the phasing of the primary mirror of the extremely large telescope. Up to date, the Keck telescopes are the only segmented telescope phased with a quality enabling the application of adaptive optics. The Active Phasing Experiment has been installed at the Namyth focus of the Very Large Telescope Melipal during the last 6 months. Its purpose is to understand and compare different technological concepts for an optical phasing sensor dedicated to the European Extremely Large Telescope. The pupil of the telescope is segmented in 61 hexagonal segments by projecting it on an Active Segmented Mirror. The ASM is controlled by a dual wavenlength interferometer made by Fogale Nanotech with a nanometric precision. The segmented pupil is distributed in parallel to four optical phasing sensors. They are a pyramid sensor, a curvature sensor, a phase filtering sensor and a ShackHartmann sensor. They have been developed respectively by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Florenze, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias in Tenerife, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. The global behaviour of the optical phasing sensors will be described and preliminary results of the Active Phasing Experiments obtained on sky will be explained. The extrapolation of the results to the EELT and the potential consequences for the adaptive optics will be given. The Active Phasing Experiment has been financed by the European Union and the European Southern Observatory via the Sixth European Union Framework Program for Research and Technological Development under the contract number 011863.

  5. Scheduling Algorithm for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichharam, Jaimal; Stubbs, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a wide-field telescope currently under construction and scheduled to be deployed in Chile by 2022 and operate for a ten-year survey. As a ground-based telescope with the largest etendue ever constructed, and the ability to take images approximately once every eighteen seconds, the LSST will be able to capture the entirety of the observable sky every few nights in six different band passes. With these remarkable features, LSST is primed to provide the scientific community with invaluable data in numerous areas of astronomy, including the observation of near-Earth asteroids, the detection of transient optical events such as supernovae, and the study of dark matter and energy through weak gravitational lensing.In order to maximize the utility that LSST will provide toward achieving these scientific objectives, it proves necessary to develop a flexible scheduling algorithm for the telescope which both optimizes its observational efficiency and allows for adjustment based on the evolving needs of the astronomical community.This work defines a merit function that incorporates the urgency of observing a particular field in the sky as a function of time elapsed since last observed, dynamic viewing conditions (in particular transparency and sky brightness), and a measure of scientific interest in the field. The problem of maximizing this merit function, summed across the entire observable sky, is then reduced to a classic variant of the dynamic traveling salesman problem. We introduce a new approximation technique that appears particularly well suited for this situation. We analyze its effectiveness in resolving this problem, obtaining some promising initial results.

  6. The Large Millimeter Telescope and Solar Like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, M.; Hughes, D.; LMT Project Team

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the current status of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT), the near-term plans for the telescope and the initial suite of instrumentation. It also briefly describes two astronomical branches in which the LMT will certainly have a major impact: the study of thermal emission of circumstellar material around main sequence stars and the analysis of the molecular contents of this material in relatively young stars. The LMT is a bi-national collaboration between Mexico and the USA, led by the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Optica y Electrónica (INAOE) and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, to construct, commission and operate a 50m-diameter millimeter-wave radio telescope. Construction of the telescope structure is complete at the 4600 m LMT site on the summit of Volcán Sierra Negra, an extinct volcano in the Mexican state of Puebla. First-light with the LMT was successfully conducted in June and July 2011 with observations at both 3 and 1.1 mm. The commissioning and future scientific operation of the LMT is divided into two major phases. As part of phase I, following the improvement in the alignment of the surface segments within the inner 32 meter diameter of the antenna, the project will begin the first shared risk scientific observations in the spring of 2013. In phase II, we will continue the installation and alignment of the remainder of the reflector surface, after which the final commissioning of the full 50m LMT will take place. The LMT antenna, outfitted with its initial complement of scientific instruments, will be a world-leading scientific research facility for millimeter-wave astronomy.

  7. Australia to Build Fibre Positioner for the Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    The Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO) at Epping (New South Wales, Australia) has been awarded the contract to build a fibre positioner for the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT). This new, large astronomical facility is located at the Paranal Observatory in Chile and will feature four Unit Telescopes, each with a main mirror of 8.2-m diameter. This positioner, (affectionately) known as the OzPoz , will form part of the FLAMES facility (the F ibre L arge A rea M ulti- E lement S pectrograph), to be mounted on the second Unit Telescope (UT2) of the VLT in 2001. The construction of this facility includes other institutes in Europe, e.g. Observatoire de Genève (Switzerland) and Observatoire de Meudon (France). The ESO Instrument Division will coordinate the entire project that will result in an observational capability that is unique in the world. Optical fibres at astronomical telescopes Optical fibres have come to play an increasingly important role as transmitters of information, for instance in telephone and computer networks. It may be less known that they can be used in a similar way to transmit visible and infrared light in astronomical telescopes. Over the past decade, the AAO has been refining its skills in building optical-fibre instruments for its own telescopes, the 3.9-metre Anglo-Australian Telescope and the 1.2-m UK Schmidt Telescope (a telescope dedicated to wide-field surveys). These instruments enable astronomers to study many celestial objects simultaneously, increasing the effectiveness and productivity by enormous factors. The OzPoz positioner sets up to 560 optical fibres (developed in collaboration with the Observatoire de Meudon in France) very precisely by a robotic arm to match the positions of galaxies and quasars in the telescope's focal plane. The positional accuracy is about 50 µm (0.05 mm), or 0.08 arcsec on the sky. The fibres siphon the light from these very faint and distant astronomical objects and guide it

  8. Recent developments for the Large Binocular Telescope Guiding Control Subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golota, T.; De La Peña, M. D.; Biddick, C.; Lesser, M.; Leibold, T.; Miller, D.; Meeks, R.; Hahn, T.; Storm, J.; Sargent, T.; Summers, D.; Hill, J.; Kraus, J.; Hooper, S.; Fisher, D.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has eight Acquisition, Guiding, and wavefront Sensing Units (AGw units). They provide guiding and wavefront sensing capability at eight different locations at both direct and bent Gregorian focal stations. Recent additions of focal stations for PEPSI and MODS instruments doubled the number of focal stations in use including respective motion, camera controller server computers, and software infrastructure communicating with Guiding Control Subsystem (GCS). This paper describes the improvements made to the LBT GCS and explains how these changes have led to better maintainability and contributed to increased reliability. This paper also discusses the current GCS status and reviews potential upgrades to further improve its performance.

  9. Dark Matter Searches with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Meurer, Christine

    2008-12-24

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, successfully launched on June 11th, 2008, is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The main instrument, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), with a wide field of view (>2 sr), a large effective area (>8000 cm{sup 2} at 1 GeV), sub-arcminute source localization, a large energy range (20 MeV-300 GeV) and a good energy resolution (close to 8% at 1 GeV), has excellent potential to either discover or to constrain a Dark Matter signal. The Fermi LAT team pursues complementary searches for signatures of particle Dark Matter in different search regions such as the galactic center, galactic satellites and subhalos, the milky way halo, extragalactic regions as well as the search for spectral lines. In these proceedings we examine the potential of the LAT to detect gamma-rays coming from Weakly Interacting Massive Particle annihilations in these regions with special focus on the galactic center region.

  10. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this work is to define and initiate a long-term program to mature six inter-linked critical technologies for future UVOIR space telescope mirrors to TRL6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors: 4 to 8 m monolithic & 8 to 16 m segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, stiffer substrates. (2) Support System:Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error:A very smooth mirror is critical for producing a high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high-contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges:Edges impact PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects the total collecting aperture. (5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing:Segment phasing is critical for producing a high-quality temporally stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation:On-orbit performance is determined by mechanical and thermal stability. Future systems require validated performance models. We are pursuing multiple design paths give the science community the option to enable either a future monolithic or segmented space telescope.

  11. Lyot coronagraph design study for large, segmented space telescope apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Neil T.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; St. Laurent, Kathryn E.; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Stark, Christopher C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Perrin, Marshall; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Kasdin, N. J.; Shaklan, Stuart; Carlotti, Alexis

    2016-07-01

    Recent efforts combining the optimization techniques of apodized pupil Lyot coronagraphs (APLC) and shaped pupils have demonstrated the viability of a binary-transmission mask architecture for extremely high contrast (10-10) exoplanet imaging. We are now building on those innovations to carry out a survey of Lyot coronagraph performance for large, segmented telescope apertures. These apertures are of the same kind under considera- tion for NASA's Large UV/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) observatory concept. To map the multi-dimensional design parameter space, we have developed a software toolkit to manage large sets of mask optimization programs and execute them on a computing cluster. Here we summarize a preliminary survey of 500 APLC solutions for 4 reference hexagonal telescope apertures. Several promising designs produce annular, 10-10 contrast dark zones down to inner working angle 4λ0=D over a 15% bandpass, while delivering a half-max PSF core throughput of 18%. We also report our progress on devising solutions to the challenges of Lyot stop alignment/fabrication tolerance that arise in this contrast regime.

  12. A European vision for a ``Polar Large Telescope'' project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Lyu; Epchtein, Nicolas; Ansorge, Wolfgang; Argentini, Stefania; Bryson, Ian; Carbillet, Marcel; Dalton, Gavin; David, Christine; Esau, Igor; Genthon, Christophe; Langlois, Maud; Le Bertre, Thibault; Lemrani, Rachid; Le Roux, Brice; Marchiori, Gianpietro; Mékarnia, Djamel; Montnacher, Joachim; Moretto, Gil; Prugniel, Philippe; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Ruch, Eric; Tao, Charling; Tilquin, André; Vauglin, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    The Polar Large Telescope (PLT) project is primarily aimed at undertaking large, wide band synoptic astronomical surveys in the infrared in order to provide critical data to the forthcoming generation of observational facilities such as ALMA, JWST, LSST and the E-ELT, and to complement the observations obtained with them. Sensitive thermal IR surveys beyond 2.3 μm cannot be carried out from any existing ground based observatory and the Antarctic Plateau is the only place on the ground where it can be envisaged, thanks to its unique atmospheric and environmental properties, such as the turbulence profile (image quality), the low opacity and the reduced thermal background emission of the sky. These unique conditions enable high angular resolution wide field surveys in the near thermal infrared (2.3-5 μm). This spectral range is particularly well suited to tackling key astrophysical questions such as: i) investigating the nature of the distant universe, the first generation of stars and the latest stages of stellar evolution, ii) understanding transient phenomena such as gamma ray-bursts and Type Ia supernovae, iii) increasing our knowledge of extra-solar planets. Further instruments may broaden the expected science outcomes of such a 2-4 m class telescope especially for the characterization of galaxies at very large distance to provide new clues in the mysteries of dark matter and energy. Efforts will be made to merge this project with other comparable projects within an international consortium.

  13. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, W. B.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Althouse, W.; Anderson, B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bartelt, J.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bédérède, D.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Bisello, D.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, P.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Condamoor, S.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Corucci, L.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Decotigny, D.; DeKlotz, M.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Edmonds, Y.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Flath, D. L.; Fleury, P.; Focke, W. B.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gentit, F.-X.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Haller, G.; Harding, A. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Hirayama, M.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Horn, R.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johansson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kavelaars, A.; Kawai, N.; Kelly, H.; Kerr, M.; Klamra, W.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Komin, N.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lee, B.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Massai, M. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Menon, N.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mirizzi, N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nishino, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paccagnella, A.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pearce, M.; Pepe, M.; Perazzo, A.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Picozza, P.; Pieri, L.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rapposelli, E.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Russell, J. J.; Ryde, F.; Sabatini, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Scolieri, G.; Sgrò, C.; Share, G. H.; Shaw, M.; Shimokawabe, T.; Shrader, C.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tenze, A.; Tether, S.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Turri, M.; Usher, T. L.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view (FoV), high-energy γ-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT was built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. This paper describes the LAT, its preflight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 (x, y) tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an eight-layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths, giving both longitudinal and transverse information about the energy deposition pattern. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large FoV (2.4 sr) and ensuring that most pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (1) permit rapid notification of high-energy γ-ray bursts and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (2) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (3) measure spectra

  14. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.; Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Anderson, B. Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bartelt, J.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bederede, D.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bisello, D.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R.D.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view (FoV), high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT was built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. This paper describes the LAT, its preflight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4 x 4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 (x, y) tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an eight-layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths, giving both longitudinal and transverse information about the energy deposition pattern. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large FoV (2.4 sr) and ensuring that most pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (1) permit rapid notification of high-energy {gamma}-ray bursts and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (2) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (3) measure

  15. Metrology System for a Large, Somewhat Flexible Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl Christian; Bartman, Randall; Cook, Walter; Craig, William

    2009-01-01

    A proposed metrology system would be incorporated into a proposed telescope that would include focusing optics on a rigid bench connected via a deployable mast to another rigid bench holding a focal-plane array of photon counting photodetectors. Deformations of the deployable mast would give rise to optical misalignments that would alter the directions (and, hence, locations) of incidence of photons on the focal plane. The metrology system would measure the relative displacement of the focusing- optics bench and the focal-plane array bench. The measurement data would be used in post-processing of the digitized photodetector outputs to compensate for the mast-deformation-induced changes in the locations of incidence of photons on the focal plane, thereby making it possible to determine the original directions of incidence of photons with greater accuracy. The proposed metrology system is designed specifically for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) a proposed spaceborne x-ray telescope. The basic principles of design and operation are also applicable to other large, somewhat flexible telescopes, both terrestrial and spaceborne. In the NuSTAR, the structural member connecting the optical bench and the photodetector array would be a 10-m-long deployable mast, and there is a requirement to keep errors in measured directions of incidence of photons below 10 arc seconds (3 sigma). The proposed system would include three diode lasers that would be mounted on the focusing-optics bench. For clarity, only one laser is shown in the figure, which is a greatly simplified schematic diagram of the system. Each laser would be aimed at a position-sensitive photodiode that would be mounted on the detector bench alongside the aforementioned telescope photodetector array. The diode lasers would operate at a wavelength of 830 nm, each at a power of 200 mW. Each laser beam would be focused to a spot of .1-mm diameter on the corresponding position-sensitive photodiode. To

  16. Observing Planetary Nebulae with JWST and Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    2015-01-01

    Most stars in the Universe that leave the main sequence in a Hubble time will end their lives evolving through the Planetary Nebula (PN) evolutionary phase. The heavy mass loss which occurs during the preceding AGB phase is important across astrophysics, dramatically changing the course of stellar evolution, dominantly contributing to the dust content of the interstellar medium, and influencing its chemical composition. The evolution from the AGB phase to the PN phases remains poorly understood, especially the dramatic transformation that occurs in the morphology of the mass-ejecta as AGB stars and their round circumstellar envelopes evolve into mostly PNe, the majority of which deviate strongly from spherical symmetry. In addition, although the PN [OIII] luminosity function (PNLF) has been used as a standard candle (on par with distance indicators such as Cepheids), we do not understand why it works. It has been argued that the resolution of these issues may be linked to binarity and associated processes such as mass transfer and common envelope evolution.Thus, understanding the formation and evolution of PNe is of wide astrophysical importance. PNe have long been known to emit across a very large span of wavelengths, from the radio to X-rays. Extensive use of space-based observatories at X-ray (Chandra/ XMM-Newton), optical (HST) and far-infrared (Spitzer, Herschel) wavelengths in recent years has produced significant new advances in our knowledge of these objects. Given the expected advent of the James Webb Space Telescope in the near future, and ground-based Extremely Large Telescope(s) somewhat later, this talk will focus on future high-angular-resolution, high-sensitivity observations at near and mid-IR wavelengths with these facilities that can help in addressing the major unsolved problems in the study of PNe.

  17. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class; pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  18. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  19. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered p ulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsar s will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar s, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for e lucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric partic le acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theo retical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all un identified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geming a-like pulsars.

  20. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: Opening New Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. A.; LSST Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    A large wide-field telescope and camera with optical throughput over 200 sq.m sq.deg -- a factor of 50 beyond what we currently have -- would enable the detection of faint moving or bursting optical objects: from Earth threatening asteroids to energetic events at the edge of the optical universe. An optimized design for LSST is a 8.4 m telescope with a 3 degree field of view and an optical throughput of 260 sq.m sq.deg. With its large throughput and dedicated all-sky monitoring mode, the LSST will reach 24th magnitude in a single 10 second exposure, opening unexplored regions of astronomical parameter space. The heart of the 2.3 Gpixel camera will be an array of imager modules with 10 micron pixels. Once each month LSST will survey up to 14,000 sq.deg of the sky with many 10 second exposures. Over time LSST will survey 30,000 sq.deg deeply in multiple bandpasses, enabling innovative investigations ranging from galactic structure to cosmology. This is a shift in paradigm for optical astronomy: from "survey follow-up" to "survey direct science." The resulting real-time data products and fifteen petabyte time-tagged imaging database and photometric catalog will provide a unique resource. A collaboration of 80 engineers and scientists is gearing up to confront this exciting challenge.

  1. Analytical study of diffraction effects in extremely large segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Yaitskova, Natalia; Dohlen, Kjetil; Dierickx, Philippe

    2003-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffraction effects from a segmented aperture with a very large number of segments-prototype of the next generation of extremely large telescopes. This analysis is based on the point-spread-function analytical calculation for Keck-type hexagonal segmentation geometry. We concentrate on the effects that lead to the appearance of speckles and/or a regular pattern of diffraction peaks. These effects are related to random piston and tip-tilt errors on each segment, gaps between segments, and segment edge distortion. We deliver formulas and the typical numerical values for the Strehl ratio, the relative intensity of higher-order diffraction peaks, and the averaged intensity of speckles associated with each particular case of segmentation error.

  2. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  3. A fine pointing system for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiehlen, W. O.

    1973-01-01

    The large space telescope (LST) developed by NASA requires ultrahigh pointing stability within 0.0005 arc sec rms. A fine guidance system is proposed to body-point the entire spacecraft within this limit. The spacecraft is modeled as a rigid body having reaction wheel actuators and subject to gravitational and magnetic disturbance torques. The fine guidance sensor is cluttered with electronic noise. The disturbance accommodation standard deviation optimal controller (DASOC) is designed to be optimal with respect to the transient and the steady state response to noise, whereas the steady state response to deterministic external torques is exactly zero. Compared with conventional controllers, the fine guidance system with the DASOC offers as much as a factor of 30 improvement in pointing stability, resulting in an optimal performance of nearly 0.0001 arc sec rms. Thus, the required pointing stability can easily be obtained, and a large margin remains for the compensation of possibile deteriorations.

  4. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truch, Matthew D. P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chung, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; MacTavish, C. J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Martin, T. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Olmi, L.; Pascale, E.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a suborbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between three arrays, observes simultaneously in broadband (30%) spectral windows at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The optical design is based on a 2 m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 microns. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of 30"; postflight pointing reconstruction to <5" rms is achieved. The onboard telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a preselected set of maps, with the option of manual override. On this poster, we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100 hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in 2005 June; and a 250 hour, circumpolar flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2006 December. The BLAST collaboration acknowledges the support of NASA through grants NAG5-12785, NAG5-13301, and NNGO-6GI11G, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Canada's Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Ontario Innovation Trust, the Puerto Rico Space Grant Consortium, the Fondo Institucional para la Investigacion of the University of Puerto Rico, and the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs.

  5. An optical technology study on large aperture telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1985-01-01

    The difficult and crucial problem of selecting a suitable telescope concept for an advanced space observatory was examined. To this end two and four mirror telescopes were analyzed and compared. Both configurations are very practical and structurally similar. Parabolic primary and spherical primary four mirror telescope were compared with respect to their performance and the alignment sensitivities of the three correction mirrors. A 1 meter class afocal telescope system with lag angle compensation, to be used in a LIDAR experiment, was examined.

  6. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  7. Pupil Alignment Considerations for Large, Deployable Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent J.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Kubalak, Daivd A.

    2011-01-01

    For many optical systems the properties and alignment of the internal apertures and pupils are not critical or controlled with high precision during optical system design, fabrication or assembly. In wide angle imaging systems, for instance, the entrance pupil position and orientation is typically unconstrained and varies over the system s field of view in order to optimize image quality. Aperture tolerances usually do not receive the same amount of scrutiny as optical surface aberrations or throughput characteristics because performance degradation is typically graceful with misalignment, generally only causing a slight reduction in system sensitivity due to vignetting. But for a large deployable space-based observatory like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we have found that pupil alignment is a key parameter. For in addition to vignetting, JWST pupil errors cause uncertainty in the wavefront sensing process that is used to construct the observatory on-orbit. Furthermore they also open stray light paths that degrade the science return from some of the telescope s instrument channels. In response to these consequences, we have developed several pupil measurement techniques for the cryogenic vacuum test where JWST science instrument pupil alignment is verified. These approaches use pupil alignment references within the JWST science instruments; pupil imaging lenses in three science instrument channels; and unique pupil characterization features in the optical test equipment. This will allow us to verify and crosscheck the lateral pupil alignment of the JWST science instruments to approximately 1-2% of their pupil diameters.

  8. Reports on the Conference "Towards the European Extremely Large Telescope"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnet, G.; Hook, I.; Cuby, J.-G.

    2007-03-01

    As a prelude to the decision by the ESO Council to approve the detailed studies (Phase B) for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) project, a meet-ing was held in Marseille to comprehensively present and discuss the extensive planning for this exciting project. The conference was attended by 250 astron-omers and engineers (see the confer-ence photograph in Figure 1). The strong support, together with detailed considerations and feedback from the community provided by this meeting were instru-mental in the ESO Council decision a few days later. They will be further harnessed in the years to come. There were three sessions, devoted to science (1.5 days), the telescope design (1.5 days) and in-strumentation (1 day). In the following arti-cles, a summary of each session and the list of speakers and posters is presented, by the chairs of the three sessions: Isobel Hook, Guy Monnet and Jean-Gabriel Cuby.

  9. BLAST: A balloon-borne, large-aperture, submillimetre telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Donald Victor

    BLAST is a balloon-borne large-aperture, submillimetre telescope, which makes large area (1--200 square degree) surveys of Galactic and extragalactic targets. Since BLAST observes in the stratosphere, it is able to make broad-band observations between 200 mum and 550 mum which are difficult or impossible to perform from the ground. BLAST has been designed to probe star formation both in the local Galaxy and in the high redshift (z = 1--4) universe. Because BLAST is flown on an unmanned stratospheric balloon platform, it has been designed to be able to operate autonomously, without needing operator intervention to perform its scientific goals. This thesis includes an overview of the design of the BLAST platform, with emphasis on the command and control systems used to operate the telescope. BLAST has been flown on two long-duration balloon flights. The first of these, from Esrange, Sweden in June of 2005, acquired ˜70 hours of primarily Galactic data. During the second flight, from Willy Field, Antarctica in December of 2006, BLAST acquired ˜225 hours of both Galactic and extragalactic data. Operational performance of the platform during these two flights is reviewed, with the goal of providing insight on how future flights can be improved. Reduction of the data acquired by these large-format bolometer arrays is a challenging procedure, and techniques developed for BLAST data reduction are reviewed. The ultimate goal of this reduction is the generation of high quality astronomical maps which can be used for subsequent portions of data analysis. This thesis treats, in detail, the iterative, maximum likelihood map maker developed for BLAST. Results of simulations performed on the map maker to characterise its ability to reconstruct astronomical signals are presented. Finally, astronomical maps produced by this map maker using real data acquired by BLAST are presented, with a discussion on non-physical map pathologies resulting from the data reduction pipeline and

  10. Experimental study of an optimised Pyramid wave-front sensor for Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Charlotte Z.; El Hadi, Kacem; Sauvage, Jean-François; Correia, Carlos; Fauvarque, Olivier; Rabaud, Didier; Lamb, Masen; Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Over the last few years the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM) has been heavily involved in R&D for adaptive optics systems dedicated to future large telescopes, particularly in preparation for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Within this framework an investigation into a Pyramid wave-front sensor is underway. The Pyramid sensor is at the cutting edge of high order, high precision wave-front sensing for ground based telescopes. Investigations have demonstrated the ability to achieve a greater sensitivity than the standard Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor whilst the implementation of a Pyramid sensor on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has provided compelling operational results.1, 2 The Pyramid now forms part of the baseline for several next generation Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). As such its behaviour under realistic operating conditions must be further understood in order to optimise performance. At LAM a detailed investigation into the performance of the Pyramid aims to fully characterise the behaviour of this wave-front sensor in terms of linearity, sensitivity and operation. We have implemented a Pyramid sensor using a high speed OCAM2 camera (with close to 0 readout noise and a frame rate of 1.5kHz) in order to study the performance of the Pyramid within a full closed loop adaptive optics system. This investigation involves tests on all fronts, from theoretical models and numerical simulations to experimental tests under controlled laboratory conditions, with an aim to fully understand the Pyramid sensor in both modulated and non-modulated configurations. We include results demonstrating the linearity of the Pyramid signals, compare measured interaction matrices with those derived in simulation and evaluate the performance in closed loop operation. The final goal is to provide an on sky comparison between the Pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor, at Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (ONERA-ODISSEE bench). Here we

  11. Satellite Imaging with Adaptive Optics on a 1 M Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, F.; Price, I.; Rigaut, F.; Copeland, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Canberra, Australia, have been developing adaptive optic (AO) systems for space situational awareness applications. We report on the development and demonstration of an AO system for satellite imaging using a 1 m telescope. The system uses the orbiting object as a natural guide star to measure atmospheric turbulence, and a deformable mirror to provide an optical correction. The AO system utilised modern, high speed and low noise EMCCD technology on both the wavefront sensor and imaging camera to achieve high performance, achieving a Strehl ratio in excess of 30% at 870 nm. Images are post processed with lucky imaging algorithms to further improve the final image quality. We demonstrate the AO system on stellar targets and Iridium satellites, achieving a near diffraction limited full width at half maximum. A specialised realtime controller allows our system to achieve a bandwidth above 100 Hz, with the wavefront sensor and control loop running at 2 kHz. The AO systems we are developing show how ground-based optical sensors can be used to manage the space environment. AO imaging systems can be used for satellite surveillance, while laser ranging can be used to determine precise orbital data used in the critical conjunction analysis required to maintain a safe space environment. We have focused on making this system compact, expandable, and versatile. We are continuing to develop this platform for other space situational awareness applications such as geosynchronous satellite astrometry, space debris characterisation, satellite imaging, and ground-to-space laser communication.

  12. Preparation research on novel dampers used in large optical telescope's noise and vibrations attenuating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiu-ping; Yang, Jian-chun; Zhang, Li

    2010-10-01

    General rubber damping materials used in noise and vibrations attenuating system can not adapt large optical telescope's working temperatures and environments. While Metal Rubber material which has loose, reticulate structures can endure high or low temperatures, rigorous space environments, erosions, aging, volatilization and radiations due to its metallic properties because it is made of stainless steel wires of φ 0.1~0.3 mm. When the MR damping component is uploaded with vibrating force, the displacement will cause intense frictions between wires' surfaces which will dissipate abundant energy and thus it can serve as dampers like natural rubbers. Since Metal Rubber components are prepared by compression moulding, various complex shapes of dampers can be produced conveniently to fulfill large optical telescope's noise and vibrations attenuating tasks. Based on the Metal Rubber component's four preparation approaches, helix-making, planar roughcast-weaving, planar roughcast-rolling and 3D roughcast punching, a ring-shaped 3D parametrical numerical model is founded by CAD technology. Definitely, this modeling research work may support the optimization of the current trial and try preparation of MR component and it will provide necessary foundations for its further application in noise and vibrations attenuating system in large optical telescopes.

  13. Telemetry correlation and visualization at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Kellee R.; Summers, Douglas M.; Biddick, Christopher; Hooper, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    To achieve highly efficient observatory operations requires continuous evaluation and improvement of facility and instrumentation metrics. High quality metrics requires a foundation of robust and complete observatory telemetry. At the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO), a variety of telemetry-capturing mechanisms exist, but few tools have thus far been created to facilitate studies of the data. In an effort to make all observatory telemetry data easy to use and broadly available, we have developed a suite of tools using in-house development and open source applications. This paper will explore our strategies for consolidating, parameterizing, and correlating any LBTO telemetry data to achieve easily available, web-based two- and three-dimensional time series data visualization.

  14. Camera memory study for large space telescope. [charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. P.; Brewer, J. E.; Brager, E. A.; Farnsworth, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Specifications were developed for a memory system to be used as the storage media for camera detectors on the large space telescope (LST) satellite. Detectors with limited internal storage time such as intensities charge coupled devices and silicon intensified targets are implied. The general characteristics are reported of different approaches to the memory system with comparisons made within the guidelines set forth for the LST application. Priority ordering of comparisons is on the basis of cost, reliability, power, and physical characteristics. Specific rationales are provided for the rejection of unsuitable memory technologies. A recommended technology was selected and used to establish specifications for a breadboard memory. Procurement scheduling is provided for delivery of system breadboards in 1976, prototypes in 1978, and space qualified units in 1980.

  15. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. With its upcoming launch in 2008, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the collaboration between particle physicists and astrophysicists, the opportunities for guest observers, and the mission status.

  16. Prospects for GRB science with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Band, D. L.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; ...

    2009-08-04

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi mission will reveal the rich spectral and temporal gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena in the >100 MeV band. The synergy with Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detectors will link these observations to those in the well explored 10-1000 keV range; the addition of the >100 MeV band observations will resolve theoretical uncertainties about burst emission in both the prompt and afterglow phases. Trigger algorithms will be applied to the LAT data both onboard the spacecraft and on the ground. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these triggers will differ because of the available computing resourcesmore » onboard and on the ground. Here we present the LAT's burst detection methodologies and the instrument's GRB capabilities.« less

  17. Searches for Axionlike Particles with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Andrea; Meyer, Manuel; Sanchez-Conde, Miguel; Wood, Matthew; LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Axionlike particles (ALPs) are dark-matter candidates that occur in a variety of extensions of the Standard Model. These particles could leave signatures in gamma rays, due to the coupling of ALPs to photons in external electromagnetic fields. To date, observations with Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) provide the strongest constraints on the photon-ALP coupling for ALP masses between 0.5 and 20 neV. Here, we summarize these constraints and present the sensitivity to detect an ALP induced gamma-ray burst from a Galactic core-collapse supernova. ALPs would be produced in the stellar medium via the Primakoff effect and convert into gamma rays in the Galactic magnetic field. Fermi LAT observations would be able to probe couplings where ALPs could constitute the entirety of dark matter. Below 1 neV, the Fermi-LAT sensitivity would surpass that of future laboratory experiments by one order of magnitude.

  18. The Second Fermi Large Area Telescope GRB Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Daniel; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is a formidable probe of extreme physics, requiring rapid variability from highly relativistic sources. Despite the advancements in our understanding of GRBs through observations by NASA's Swift and Fermi spacecraft, many fundemental questions regarding the particle acceleration and radiative processes associated with these events remain unanswered. Here we present the most extensive search for emission from GRBs above 40 MeV performed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The resulting catalog includes more than 130 detections and represents an improvement in the detection efficency of GRBs at high-energies of over 50% compared to the first LAT GRB catalog. We utilize this improved sensativity to characterize the high-energy emission from GRBs and review how these observations further our understanding of the nature of these events.

  19. News Note: South African Large Telescope (SALT) reveals too large a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), has been used to discover a supermassive black hole in the centre of a modest galaxy, SAGE0536AGN. All but the smallest galaxies are thought to harbour black holes, but in this case the black hole was found to be thirty times more massive than what one would have expected for this size galaxy.

  20. Advanced Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology project to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. The developed mirror technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Just as JWST’s architecture was driven by launch vehicle, a future UVOIR mission’s architectures (monolithic, segmented or interferometric) will depend on capacities of future launch vehicles (and budget). Since we cannot predict the future, we must prepare for all potential futures. Therefore, to provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We derived engineering specifications for potential future monolithic or segmented space telescopes based on science needs and implement constraints. And we are maturing six inter-linked critical technologies to enable potential future large aperture UVOIR space telescope: 1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors, 2) Support Systems, 3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error, 4) Segment Edges, 5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing, and 6) Integrated Model Validation Science Advisory Team and a Systems Engineering Team. We are maturing all six technologies simultaneously because all are required to make a primary mirror assembly (PMA); and, it is the PMA’s on-orbit performance which determines science return. PMA stiffness depends on substrate and support stiffness. Ability to cost-effectively eliminate mid/high spatial figure errors and polishing edges depends on substrate stiffness. On-orbit thermal and mechanical performance depends on substrate stiffness, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and thermal mass. And, segment-to-segment phasing depends on substrate & structure stiffness

  1. Effect of the Keck telescope`s segmented primary on the performance on the Keck adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.

    1997-06-01

    The 349 degree of freedom Keck adaptive optics system will be mapped on to the 36 segment Keck primary mirror. Each telescope segment is independently controlled in piston and tilt by an active control system and each segment also has its own set of aberrations. This presents a unique set of problems for the Keck adaptive optics system, not encountered with continuous primaries. To a certain extent the low order segment aberrations, beginning with focus, can be corrected statically by the adaptive optic system. However, the discontinuous surface at the segment edges present special problems in sensing and correcting wavefront with laser guide stars or natural guide stars.

  2. The study on servo-control system in the large aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei; Zhenchao, Zhang; Daxing, Wang

    2008-08-01

    Large astronomical telescope or extremely enormous astronomical telescope servo tracking technique will be one of crucial technology that must be solved in researching and manufacturing. To control technique feature of large astronomical telescope or extremely enormous astronomical telescope, this paper design a sort of large astronomical telescope servo tracking control system. This system composes a principal and subordinate distributed control system, host computer sends steering instruction and receive slave computer functional mode, slave computer accomplish control algorithm and execute real-time control. Large astronomical telescope servo control use direct drive machine, and adopt DSP technology to complete direct torque control algorithm, Such design can not only increase control system performance, but also greatly reduced volume and costs of control system, which has a significant occurrence. The system design scheme can be proved reasonably by calculating and simulating. This system can be applied to large astronomical telescope.

  3. A Digital Motion Control System for Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Wilson, R. W.; Kimberk, R.; Leiker, P. S.

    2001-05-01

    We have designed and programmed a digital motion control system for large telescopes, in particular, the 6-meter antennas of the Submillimeter Array on Mauna Kea. The system consists of a single robust, high-reliability microcontroller board which implements a two-axis velocity servo while monitoring and responding to critical safety parameters. Excellent tracking performance has been achieved with this system (0.3 arcsecond RMS at sidereal rate). The 24x24 centimeter four-layer printed circuit board contains a multitude of hardware devices: 40 digital inputs (for limit switches and fault indicators), 32 digital outputs (to enable/disable motor amplifiers and brakes), a quad 22-bit ADC (to read the motor tachometers), four 16-bit DACs (that provide torque signals to the motor amplifiers), a 32-LED status panel, a serial port to the LynxOS PowerPC antenna computer (RS422/460kbps), a serial port to the Palm Vx handpaddle (RS232/115kbps), and serial links to the low-resolution absolute encoders on the azimuth and elevation axes. Each section of the board employs independent ground planes and power supplies, with optical isolation on all I/O channels. The processor is an Intel 80C196KC 16-bit microcontroller running at 20MHz on an 8-bit bus. This processor executes an interrupt-driven, scheduler-based software system written in C and assembled into an EPROM with user-accessible variables stored in NVSRAM. Under normal operation, velocity update requests arrive at 100Hz from the position-loop servo process running independently on the antenna computer. A variety of telescope safety checks are performed at 279Hz including routine servicing of a 6 millisecond watchdog timer. Additional ADCs onboard the microcontroller monitor the winding temperature and current in the brushless three-phase drive motors. The PID servo gains can be dynamically changed in software. Calibration factors and software filters can be applied to the tachometer readings prior to the application of

  4. Fermi Large Area Telescope third source catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Tanugi, J. Cohen-; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; Angelis, A. de; DeKlotz, M.; Palma, F. de; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Venere, L. Di; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; Mura, G. La; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Goumard, M. Lemoine-; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Rollins, M. Pesce-; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Conde, M. Sánchez-; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Klaveren, B. Van; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2015-06-12

    Here, we present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV–300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second Fermi LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above $4\\sigma $ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. As a result, from source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ~3% at 1 GeV.

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations Of Misaligned Active Galactic Nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-08-13

    Analysis is presented for 15 months of data taken with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope for 11 non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including seven FRI radio galaxies and four FRII radio sources consisting of two FRII radio galaxies and two steep spectrum radio quasars. The broad line FRI radio galaxy 3C 120 is reported here as a γ-ray source for the first time. The analysis is based on directional associations of LAT sources with radio sources in the 3CR, 3CRR, and MS4 (collectively referred to as 3C-MS) catalogs. Seven of the eleven LAT sourcesmore » associated with 3C-MS radio sources have spectral indices larger than 2.3 and, except for the FRI radio galaxy NGC 1275 that shows possible spectral curvature, are well described by a power law. No evidence for time variability is found for any sources other than NGC 1275. The γ-ray luminosities of FRI radio galaxies are significantly smaller than those of the BL Lac objects detected by the LAT, whereas the γ-ray luminosities of the FRII sources are quite similar to those of FSRQs, which could reflect different beaming factors for the γ-ray emission. A core dominance (CD) study of the 3CRR sample indicates that sources closer to the jet axis are preferentially detected with the Fermi LAT, insofar as the γ-ray-detected misaligned AGNs have larger CD at a given average radio flux. The results are discussed in view of the AGN unification scenario.« less

  6. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope preliminary design overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, V. L.; Sweeney, D.

    2010-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Project is a public-private partnership that is well into the design and development of the complete observatory system to conduct a wide fast deep survey and to process and serve the data. The telescope has a 3-mirror wide field optical system with an 8.4 meter primary, 3.4 meter secondary, and 5 meter tertiary mirror. The reflective optics feed three refractive elements and a 64 cm 3.2 gigapixel camera. The LSST data management system will reduce, transport, alert and archive the roughly 15 terabytes of data produced nightly, and will serve the raw and catalog data accumulating at an average of 7 petabytes per year to the community without any proprietary period. The project has completed several data challenges designed to prototype and test the data management system to significant pre-construction levels. The project continues to attract institutional partners and has acquired non-federal funding sufficient to construct the primary mirror, already in progress at the University of Arizona, build the secondary mirror substrate, completed by Corning, and fund detector prototype efforts, several that have been tested on the sky. A focus of the project is systems engineering, risk reduction through prototyping and major efforts in image simulation and operation simulations. The project has submitted a proposal for construction to the National Science Foundation Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC) program and has prepared project advocacy papers for the National Research Council's Astronomy 2010 Decadal Survey. The project is preparing for a 2012 construction funding authorization.

  7. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  8. On-sky single-mode fiber coupling measurements at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechter, Andrew; Crass, Jonathan; Ketterer, Ryan; Crepp, Justin R.; Reynolds, Robert O.; Bechter, Eric; Hinz, Philip; Pedichini, Fernando; Foley, Michael; Runburg, Elliott; Onuma, Eleanya E.; Gaudi, Scott; Micela, Giuseppina; Pagano, Isabella; Woodward, Charles E.

    2016-07-01

    The demonstration of efficient single-mode fiber (SMF) coupling is a key requirement for the development of a compact, ultra-precise radial velocity (RV) spectrograph. iLocater is a next generation instrument for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) that uses adaptive optics (AO) to inject starlight into a SMF. In preparation for commissioning iLocater, a prototype SMF injection system was installed and tested at the LBT in the Y-band (0.970-1.065 μm). This system was designed to verify the capability of the LBT AO system as well as characterize on-sky SMF coupling efficiencies. SMF coupling was measured on stars with variable airmasses, apparent magnitudes, and seeing conditions for six half-nights using the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer. We present the overall optical and mechanical performance of the SMF injection system, including details of the installation and alignment procedure. A particular emphasis is placed on analyzing the instrument's performance as a function of telescope elevation to inform the final design of the fiber injection system for iLocater.

  9. European Extremely Large Telescope: some history, and the scientific community's preferences for wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Gerard

    2008-04-01

    Extremely expensive new telescopes involve a compromise between the extreme ambitions of the scientific community, whose support justifies the financial costs, and the need to have a telescope design which can actually be built today at appropriate cost. In this article I provide a brief history of the process which built community support in Europe for what has become the European Extremely Large Telescope project (E-ELT). I then review remaining tensions between the community science case and day-one technical performance. While the range of very strong scientific cases which support the E-ELT project will largely be delivered, and lead to a quite outstanding scientific return, there are - as always! - demands for even more impressive performance. In addition to what the E-ELT will deliver, much of the community wants high spatial resolution at wavelengths shorter than one micron. Affordable adaptive optics systems will work best, initially at somewhat longer wavelengths. Planned performance enhancement during its operational life is very desirable in the E-ELT.

  10. Recent Enhancements of the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) Telescope Testbed at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Montgomery, Edward E.; Lindner, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Recent incremental upgrades to the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope testbed have enabled the demonstration of phasing (with a monochromatic source) of clusters of primary mirror segments down to the diffraction limit. PAMELA upgrades include an improved Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, passive viscoelastic damping treatments for the voice-coil actuators, mechanical improvement of mirror surface figures, and optical bench baffling. This report summarizes the recent PAMELA upgrades, discusses the lessons learned, and presents a status of this unique testbed for wavefront sensing and control. The Marshall Space Flight Center acquired the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope in 1993 after Kaman Aerospace was unable to complete integration and testing under the limited SDIO and DARPA funding. The PAMELA is a 36-segment, half-meter aperture, adaptive telescope which utilizes a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, inductive coil edge sensors, voice coil actuators, imaging CCD cameras and interferometry for figure alignment, wavefront sensing and control. MSFC originally obtained the PAMELA to supplement its research in the interactions of control systems with flexible structures. In August 1994, complete tip, tilt and piston control was successfully demonstrated using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the inductive edge sensors.

  11. Recent Enhancements of the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) Telescope Testbed at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent incremental upgrades to the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope testbed have enabled the demonstration of phasing (with a monochromatic source) of clusters of primary mirror segments down to the diffraction limit. PAMELA upgrades include in improved Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, passive viscoelastic damping treatments for the voice-coil actuators, mechanical improvement of mirror surface figures, and optical bench baffling. This report summarizes the recent PAMELA upgrades, discusses the lessons learned, and presents a status of this unique testbed for wavefront sensing and control. The Marshall Space Flight Center acquired the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope in 1993 after Kaman Aerospace was unable to complete integration and testing under the limited SDIO and DARPA funding. The PAMELA is a 36-segment, half-meter aperture, adaptive telescope which utilizes a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, inductive coil edge sensors, voice coil actuators, imaging CCD cameras and interferometry for figure alignment, wavefront sensing and control. MSFC originally obtained the PAMELA to supplement its research in the interactions of control systems with flexible structures. In August 1994, complete tip, tilt and piston control was successfully demonstrated using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the inductive edge sensors.

  12. Development of PIAA Complex Mask Coronagraphs for large aperture ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin; Sirbu, Dan; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) is an architecture for directly observing extra-solar planets, and can achieve performance near the theoretical limits for any direct-detection instrument. The PIAACMC architecture includes aspheric PIAA optics, and a complex phase-shifting focal plane mask that provides a pi phase shift to a portion of the on-axis starlight. The phase-shifted starlight is forced to interfere destructively with the un-shifted starlight, causing the starlight to be eliminated, and allowing a region for high-contrast imaging near the star. The PIAACMC architecture can be designed for segmented and obscured apertures, so it is particularly well suited for ground-based observing with the next generation of large telescopes. There will be unique scientific opportunities for directly observing Earth-like planets around nearby low-mass stars. We will discuss design strategies for adapting PIAACMC for the next generation of large ground-based telescopes, and present progress on the development of the focal plane mask technology. We also present simulations of wave-front control with PIAACMC, and suggest directions to apply the coronagraph architecture to future telescopes.

  13. VERY LARGE TELESCOPE SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; De Breuck, C.

    2011-03-15

    We present spectropolarimetry of 19 confirmed and four possible bright, southern broad absorption line (BAL) quasars from the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. A wide range of redshifts is covered in the sample (from 0.9 to 3.4), and both low- and high-ionization quasars are represented, as well as radio-loud and radio-quiet BALQSOs. We continue to confirm previously established spectropolarimetric properties of BALQSOs, including the generally rising continuum polarization with shorter wavelengths and comparatively large fraction with high broadband polarization (6 of 19 with polarizations >2%). Emission lines are polarized less than or similar to the continuum, except in a few unusual cases, and absorption troughs tend to have higher polarizations. A search for correlations between polarization properties has been done, identifying two significant or marginally significant correlations. These are an increase in continuum polarization with decreasing optical luminosity (increasing absolute B magnitude) and decreasing C IV emission-line polarization with increased continuum polarization.

  14. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project management control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, Jeffrey P.

    2012-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) program is jointly funded by the NSF, the DOE, and private institutions and donors. From an NSF funding standpoint, the LSST is a Major Research Equipment and Facilities (MREFC) project. The NSF funding process requires proposals and D&D reviews to include activity-based budgets and schedules; documented basis of estimates; risk-based contingency analysis; cost escalation and categorization. "Out-of-the box," the commercial tool Primavera P6 contains approximately 90% of the planning and estimating capability needed to satisfy R&D phase requirements, and it is customizable/configurable for remainder with relatively little effort. We describe the customization/configuration and use of Primavera for the LSST Project Management Control System (PMCS), assess our experience to date, and describe future directions. Examples in this paper are drawn from the LSST Data Management System (DMS), which is one of three main subsystems of the LSST and is funded by the NSF. By astronomy standards the LSST DMS is a large data management project, processing and archiving over 70 petabyes of image data, producing over 20 petabytes of catalogs annually, and generating 2 million transient alerts per night. Over the 6-year construction and commissioning phase, the DM project is estimated to require 600,000 hours of engineering effort. In total, the DMS cost is approximately 60% hardware/system software and 40% labor.

  15. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  16. Fermi Large Area Telescope as a Galactic Supernovae Axionscope

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, M.; Giannotti, M.; Mirizzi, A.; ...

    2017-01-06

    In a Galactic core-collapse supernova (SN), axionlike particles (ALPs) could be emitted via the Primakoff process and eventually convert into γ rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. From a data-driven sensitivity estimate, we find that, for a SN exploding in our Galaxy, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) would be able to explore the photon-ALP coupling down to gaγ ≃ 2 × 10-13 GeV-1 for an ALP mass ma ≲ 10-9 eV. Also, these values are out of reach of next generation laboratory experiments. In this event, the Fermi LAT would probe large regions of the ALPmore » parameter space invoked to explain the anomalous transparency of the Universe to γ rays, stellar cooling anomalies, and cold dark matter. Lastly, if no γ-ray emission were to be detected, Fermi-LAT observations would improve current bounds derived from SN 1987A by more than 1 order of magnitude.« less

  17. The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for signals of hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a brief description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  18. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope as a Galactic Supernovae Axionscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M.; Giannotti, M.; Mirizzi, A.; Conrad, J.; Sánchez-Conde, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a Galactic core-collapse supernova (SN), axionlike particles (ALPs) could be emitted via the Primakoff process and eventually convert into γ rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. From a data-driven sensitivity estimate, we find that, for a SN exploding in our Galaxy, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) would be able to explore the photon-ALP coupling down to ga γ≃2 ×10-13 GeV-1 for an ALP mass ma≲10-9 eV . These values are out of reach of next generation laboratory experiments. In this event, the Fermi LAT would probe large regions of the ALP parameter space invoked to explain the anomalous transparency of the Universe to γ rays, stellar cooling anomalies, and cold dark matter. If no γ -ray emission were to be detected, Fermi-LAT observations would improve current bounds derived from SN 1987A by more than 1 order of magnitude.

  20. Fermi Large Area Telescope as a Galactic Supernovae Axionscope.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Giannotti, M; Mirizzi, A; Conrad, J; Sánchez-Conde, M A

    2017-01-06

    In a Galactic core-collapse supernova (SN), axionlike particles (ALPs) could be emitted via the Primakoff process and eventually convert into γ rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. From a data-driven sensitivity estimate, we find that, for a SN exploding in our Galaxy, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) would be able to explore the photon-ALP coupling down to g_{aγ}≃2×10^{-13}  GeV^{-1} for an ALP mass m_{a}≲10^{-9}  eV. These values are out of reach of next generation laboratory experiments. In this event, the Fermi LAT would probe large regions of the ALP parameter space invoked to explain the anomalous transparency of the Universe to γ rays, stellar cooling anomalies, and cold dark matter. If no γ-ray emission were to be detected, Fermi-LAT observations would improve current bounds derived from SN 1987A by more than 1 order of magnitude.

  1. A comparison between using incoherent or coherent sources to align and test an adaptive optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The concept in the initial alignment of the segmented mirror adaptive optics telescope called the phased array mirror extendable large aperture telescope (Pamela) is to produce an optical transfer function (OTF) which closely approximates the diffraction limited value which would correspond to a system pupil function that is unity over the aperture and zero outside. There are differences in the theory of intensity measurements between coherent and incoherent radiation. As a result, some of the classical quantities which describe the performance of an optical system for incoherent radiation can not be defined for a coherent field. The most important quantity describing the quality of an optical system is the OTF and for a coherent source the OTF is not defined. Instead a coherent transfer function (CTF) is defined. The main conclusion of the paper is that an incoherent collimated source and not a collimated laser source is preferred to calibrate the Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS) of an aligned adaptive optical system. A distant laser source can be used with minimum problems to correct the system for atmospheric turbulence. The collimation of the HeNe laser alignment source can be improved by using a very small pin hole in the spatial filter so only the central portion of the beam is transmitted and the beam from the filter is nearly constant in amplitude. The size of this pin hole will be limited by the sensitivity of the lateral effect diode (LEDD) elements.

  2. Solar System science with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lynne; Brown, Mike; Ivezić, Zeljko; Jurić, Mario; Malhotra, Renu; Trilling, David

    2015-11-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST; http://lsst.org) will be a large-aperture, wide-field, ground-based telescope that will survey half the sky every few nights in six optical bands from 320 to 1050 nm. It will explore a wide range of astrophysical questions, ranging from performing a census of the Solar System, to examining the nature of dark energy. It is currently in construction, slated for first light in 2019 and full operations by 2022.The LSST will survey over 20,000 square degrees with a rapid observational cadence, to typical limiting magnitudes of r~24.5 in each visit (9.6 square degree field of view). Automated software will link the individual detections into orbits; these orbits, as well as precisely calibrated astrometry (~50mas) and photometry (~0.01-0.02 mag) in multiple bandpasses will be available as LSST data products. The resulting data set will have tremendous potential for planetary astronomy; multi-color catalogs of hundreds of thousands of NEOs and Jupiter Trojans, millions of asteroids, tens of thousands of TNOs, as well as thousands of other objects such as comets and irregular satellites of the major planets.LSST catalogs will increase the sample size of objects with well-known orbits 10-100 times for small body populations throughout the Solar System, enabling a major increase in the completeness level of the inventory of most dynamical classes of small bodies and generating new insights into planetary formation and evolution. Precision multi-color photometry will allow determination of lightcurves and colors, as well as spin state and shape modeling through sparse lightcurve inversion. LSST is currently investigating survey strategies to optimize science return across a broad range of goals. To aid in this investigation, we are making a series of realistic simulated survey pointing histories available together with a Python software package to model and evaluate survey detections for a user-defined input population. Preliminary

  3. The Dobsonian telescope. A practical manual for building large aperture telescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriege, D.; Berry, R.

    This book tells how you can build a state-of-the-art Dobsonian telescope using readily available materials and supplies. Every step of construction is detailed in photographs and diagrams, and the underlying ideas are carefully explained. As a result of a three-year collaboration between the authors, experienced and well-known telescope makers, one now has the opportunity to build a high-performance telescope with a 14-inch to 40-inch aperture based on the thoroughly tested designs described in this book.

  4. Simulation and analysis of laser guide star adaptive optics systems for the eight to ten meter class telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the design and analysis of laser-guided adaptive optic systems for the large, 8--10 meter class telescopes. We describe a technique for calculating the expected modulation transfer function and the point spread function for a closed loop adaptive optics system, parameterized by the degree of correction and the seeing conditions. The results agree closely with simulations and experimental data, and validate well known scaling law models even at low order correction. Scaling law.model analysis of a proposed adaptive optics system at the Keck telescope leads to the conclusion that a single laser guide star beacon will be adequate for diffraction limited imaging at wavelengths between 1 and 3 am with reasonable coverage of the sky. Cone anisoplanatism will dominate wavefront correction error at the visible wavelengths unless multiple laser guide stars are used.

  5. EXO-ZODI MODELING FOR THE LARGE BINOCULAR TELESCOPE INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C.; Panić, Olja; Shannon, Andrew; Bailey, Vanessa; Defrère, Denis; Hinz, Philip M.; Rieke, George H.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Su, Katherine Y. L.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Mennesson, Bertrand; Morales, Farisa; Serabyn, Eugene; Danchi, William C.; Roberge, Aki; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Haniff, Chris; Lebreton, Jérémy; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; and others

    2015-02-01

    Habitable zone dust levels are a key unknown that must be understood to ensure the success of future space missions to image Earth analogs around nearby stars. Current detection limits are several orders of magnitude above the level of the solar system's zodiacal cloud, so characterization of the brightness distribution of exo-zodi down to much fainter levels is needed. To this end, the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) will detect thermal emission from habitable zone exo-zodi a few times brighter than solar system levels. Here we present a modeling framework for interpreting LBTI observations, which yields dust levels from detections and upper limits that are then converted into predictions and upper limits for the scattered light surface brightness. We apply this model to the HOSTS survey sample of nearby stars; assuming a null depth uncertainty of 10{sup –4} the LBTI will be sensitive to dust a few times above the solar system level around Sun-like stars, and to even lower dust levels for more massive stars.

  6. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-04-20

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ∼5.1σ. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, Γ ∼ 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy γ-rays. The very hard GeV γ-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the γ-rays. The γ-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347.

  7. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bartelt, J.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Atwood, W. B.; Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bisello, D.; Baughman, B. M. E-mail: massimiliano.razzano@pi.infn.it

    2009-05-10

    The Vela pulsar is the brightest persistent source in the GeV sky and thus is the traditional first target for new {gamma}-ray observatories. We report here on initial Fermi Large Area Telescope observations during verification phase pointed exposure and early sky survey scanning. We have used the Vela signal to verify Fermi timing and angular resolution. The high-quality pulse profile, with some 32,400 pulsed photons at E {>=} 0.03 GeV, shows new features, including pulse structure as fine as 0.3 ms and a distinct third peak, which shifts in phase with energy. We examine the high-energy behavior of the pulsed emission; initial spectra suggest a phase-averaged power-law index of {gamma} = 1.51{sup +0.05} {sub -0.04} with an exponential cutoff at E{sub c} = 2.9 {+-} 0.1 GeV. Spectral fits with generalized cutoffs of the form e{sup -(E/E{sub c}){sup b}} require b {<=} 1, which is inconsistent with magnetic pair attenuation, and thus favor outer-magnetosphere emission models. Finally, we report on upper limits to any unpulsed component, as might be associated with a surrounding pulsar wind nebula.

  8. Replacing a technology - The Large Space Telescope and CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. W.; Tatarewicz, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The technological improvements, design choices and mission goals which led to the inclusion of CCD detectors in the wide field camera of the Large Space Telescope (LST) to be launched by the STS are recounted. Consideration of CCD detectors began before CCDs had seen wide astronomical applications. During planning for the ST, in the 1960s, photographic methods and a vidicon were considered, and seemed feasible provided that periodic manual maintenance could be performed. The invention of CCDs was first reported in 1970 and by 1973 the CCDs were receiving significant attention as potential detectors instead of a vidicon, which retained its own technological challenges. The CCD format gained new emphasis when success was achieved in developments for planetary-imaging spacecraft. The rapidity of progress in CCD capabilities, coupled with the continued shortcomings of the vidicon, resulted in a finalized choice for a CCD device by 1977. The decision was also prompted by continuing commercial and military interest in CCDs, which was spurring the development of the technology and improving the sensitivities and reliability while lowering the costs.

  9. Pulsar simulations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Razzano, M.; Harding, Alice K.; Baldini, L.; ...

    2009-05-21

    Pulsars are among the prime targets for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the recently launched Fermi observatory. The LAT will study the gamma-ray Universe between 20 MeV and 300 GeV with unprecedented detail. Increasing numbers of gamma-ray pulsars are being firmly identified, yet their emission mechanisms are far from being understood. To better investigate and exploit the LAT capabilities for pulsar science, a set of new detailed pulsar simulation tools have been developed within the LAT collaboration. The structure of the pulsar simulator package (PulsarSpectrum) is presented here. Starting from photon distributions in energy and phase obtained from theoreticalmore » calculations or phenomenological considerations, gamma-rays are generated and their arrival times at the spacecraft are determined by taking into account effects such as barycentric effects and timing noise. Pulsars in binary systems also can be simulated given orbital parameters. As a result, we present how simulations can be used for generating a realistic set of gamma-rays as observed by the LAT, focusing on some case studies that show the performance of the LAT for pulsar observations.« less

  10. Pulsar Simulations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzano, M.; Harding, A. K.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Burnett, T.; Chiang, J.; Digel, S. W.; Dubois, R.; Kuss, M. W.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Pulsars are among the prime targets for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the recently launched Fermi observatory. The LAT will study the gamma-ray Universe between 20 MeV and 300 GeV with unprecedented detail. Increasing numbers of gamma-ray pulsars are being firmly identified, yet their emission mechanisms are far from being understood. To better investigate and exploit the tAT capabilities for pulsar science. a set of new detailed pulsar simulation tools have been developed within the LAT collaboration. The structure of the pulsar simulator package (PulsarSpeccrum) is presented here. Starting from photon distributions in energy and phase obtained from theoretical calculations or phenomenological considerations, gamma-rays are generated and their arrival times at the spacecraft are determined by taking Into account effects such as barycentric effects and timing noise. Pulsars in binary systems also can be simulated given orbital parameters. We present how simulations can be used for generating a realistic set of gamma rays as observed by the LAT, focusing on some case studies that show the performance of the LAT for pulsar observations.

  11. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (e.g., Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate its feasibility.

  12. Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT): An Architecture Demonstration for Cost-effective Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Budinoff, Jason; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate a new type of space telescope architecture that builds on the rigid, segmented telescope heritage of the James Webb Space Telescope but that solves several key challenges for future space telescopes. The architecture is based on a cost-effective segmented spherical primary mirror combined with a unique wavefront sensing and control system that allows for continuous phasing of the primary mirror. The segmented spherical primary allows for cost-effective 3-meter class (eg, Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enables 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable amount of money. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions in low-earth-orbit and missions that do not require expensive stable structures and thermal control systems. For the 30-meter class applications, the paper discusses considerations for assembling and testing the telescopes in space. The paper also summarizes the scientific and technological roadmap for the architecture and also gives an overview of technology development, design studies, and testbed activities underway to demonstrate it s feasibility.

  13. Asteroid Detection with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lynne

    2015-08-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a ground-based, optical, all-sky, rapid cadence survey project with tremendous potential for discovering and characterizing asteroids. With LSST's large 6.5m diameter, wide 9.6 square degree field of view, and rapid observational cadence, LSST will discover more than 5 million asteroids over its ten year survey lifetime. Building on the results of existing surveys such as NEO-WISE, SDSS and PanSTARRS, this will provide a wealth of information about the dynamical structure and physical properties of the main asteroid belt.With a single visit limiting magnitude of 24.5 in r band, LSST will detect asteroids in the main belt down to sub-kilometer sizes. This results in a substantial overlap between the detected main belt asteroids and known NEO population, providing better understanding of the source population for NEOs. The current strawman for the LSST observational cadence is two visits (each visit is a pair of back-to-back 15 second exposures) per field separated by about 30 minutes, covering the entire visible sky every 3-4 days throughout the observing season. Most main belt asteroids will receive on the order of 200-300 observations, with visits spread between six broadband filters, ugrizy. When coupled with LSST's precise photometric and astrometric calibration, a significant fraction of the asteroid sample will obtain colors accurate to about 0.02-0.05 magnitudes and with sufficient number of observations to perform sparse lightcurve inversion. This dataset will increase the number of asteroids with photometric colors, and the number of objects with rotation period and shape information, by more than an order of magnitude, and provide unprecedented measurements of Yarkovsky effects and YORP evolution. Color information combined with proper orbital elements will enable identification of asteroid families down to much smaller sizes, permitting size distribution measurements and providing constraints on the

  14. Asteroid Discovery and Characterization with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Lynne; Jurić, Mario; Ivezić, Željko

    2016-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a ground-based, optical, all-sky, rapid cadence survey project with tremendous potential for discovering and characterizing asteroids. With LSST's large 6.5m diameter primary mirror, a wide 9.6 square degree field of view 3.2 Gigapixel camera, and rapid observational cadence, LSST will discover more than 5 million asteroids over its ten year survey lifetime. With a single visit limiting magnitude of 24.5 in r band, LSST will be able to detect asteroids in the Main Belt down to sub-kilometer sizes. The current strawman for the LSST survey strategy is to obtain two visits (each `visit' being a pair of back-to-back 15s exposures) per field, separated by about 30 minutes, covering the entire visible sky every 3-4 days throughout the observing season, for ten years. The catalogs generated by LSST will increase the known number of small bodies in the Solar System by a factor of 10-100 times, among all populations. The median number of observations for Main Belt asteroids will be on the order of 200-300, with Near Earth Objects receiving a median of 90 observations. These observations will be spread among ugrizy bandpasses, providing photometric colors and allow sparse lightcurve inversion to determine rotation periods, spin axes, and shape information. These catalogs will be created using automated detection software, the LSST Moving Object Processing System (MOPS), that will take advantage of the carefully characterized LSST optical system, cosmetically clean camera, and recent improvements in difference imaging. Tests with the prototype MOPS software indicate that linking detections (and thus `discovery') will be possible at LSST depths with our working model for the survey strategy, but evaluation of MOPS and improvements in the survey strategy will continue. All data products and software created by LSST will be publicly available.

  15. CAMERA: a compact, automated, laser adaptive optics system for small aperture telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Matthew; Velur, Viswa; Law, Nick; Choi, Philip; Penprase, Bryan E.

    2008-07-01

    CAMERA is an autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics system designed for small aperture telescopes. This system is intended to be mounted permanently on such a telescope to provide large amounts of flexibly scheduled observing time, delivering high angular resolution imagery in the visible and near infrared. The design employs a Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor, a 12x12 actuator MEMS device for high order wavefront compensation, and a solid state 355nm ND:YAG laser to generate a guide star. Commercial CCD and InGaAs detectors provide coverage in the visible and near infrared. CAMERA operates by selecting targets from a queue populated by users and executing these observations autonomously. This robotic system is targeted towards applications that are diffcult to address using classical observing strategies: surveys of very large target lists, recurrently scheduled observations, and rapid response followup of transient objects. This system has been designed and costed, and a lab testbed has been developed to evaluate key components and validate autonomous operations.

  16. Interferometric beam combination for a large number of telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, P.; Malbet, F.; Le Coarer, E.

    2014-04-01

    We revisit here the system design for the beam combinations of ground based interferometers in the single mode case. We propose an upstream beam distribution using splitting of individual telescope pupils. This solution aims at reducing the constrains of the turbulence, thanks to larger equivalent D/r_o values when injecting in single mode waveguides, and also to increase the field of view imposed by the optical étendue in single mode conditions. A set of elementary beam combiner devices operated in closure phase mode collects the beams delivered by the telescope sub-apertures. The concept brings along also additional interesting features like an easier distribution of the light in parallel instrument or a better use of telescopes of different diameters. Several practical implementations are presented to illustrate the potential of the concept in the case of the combination of 4 or 6 telescopes of the VLTI/ESO in Paranal or CHARA on Mt Wilson.

  17. Paper Productivity of Ground-based Large Optical Telescopes from 2000 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Chul

    2011-08-01

    We present an analysis of the scientific (refereed) paper productivity of the current largest (diameter>8m) ground-based optical (and infrared) telescopes during the ten-year period from 2000 to 2009. The telescopes for which we have gathered and analysed the scientific publication data are the two 10-m Keck telescopes, the four 8.2-m Very Large Telescopes (VLT), the two 8.1-m Gemini telescopes, the 8.2-m Subaru telescope, and the 9.2-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). We have analysed the numbers of papers published in various astronomical journals produced by using these telescopes. While the total numbers of papers from these observatories are largest for the VLT, followed by Keck, Gemini, Subaru, and HET, the number of papers produced by each component of the telescopes is largest for Keck, followed by VLT, Subaru, Gemini, and HET. In 2009, each telescope of the Keck, VLT, Gemini, Subaru, and HET observatories produced 135, 109, 93, 107, and 5 refereed papers, respectively. We have shown that each telescope of the Keck, VLT, Gemini, and Subaru observatories is producing 2.1+/-0.9 Nature and Science papers annually and these papers make up 1.7+/-0.8% of all refereed papers produced by using each of those telescopes. Extending this relation, we propose that this ratio of the number of Nature and Science papers to the total number of refereed papers that will be produced by future extremely large telescopes (ELTs) will remain similar. From a comparison of the publication trends of the above telescopes, we suggest that (i) having more than one telescope of the same kind at the same location and (ii) increasing the number of instruments available at the telescope are good ways to maximize the paper productivity.

  18. Fundamental gain in high-contrast imaging with the large binocular telescope interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Hill, John; Hinz, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Numerical simulations for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer have shown a fundamental gain in contrast when using two 8m adaptive optics telescopes instead of one, assuming a high Strehl and a cophasing mode. The global gain is improved by a factor 2 in contrast by using the long exposures and by a factor of 10 in contrast by using the short exposures. Indeed, fringes are still present in the short exposure, contrary to the long exposure where the fringes are blurred. Thus, there is some gain in grouping some short exposures with high gain G. This makes the LBTI well suitable for the Angular Differential Imaging technique. A planet will be alternatively located in the dark fringes (G ≈ 10 to 100) and/or in the dark rings (G ≈ 4 to 20). A rotation of 15° is sufficient to pass through at least one gain zone. The LBTI can provide in the visible wavelengths not only high angular resolution (≈ 6:5mas at 750nm) and high sensitivity (by a factor 4), but also a gain in contrast (by a factor 10 to 100) compared to the stand-alone adaptive optics used on each LBT aperture.

  19. A flat array large telescope concept for use on the moon, earth, and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.

    1991-01-01

    An astronomical optical telescope concept is described which can provide very large collecting areas, of order 1000 sq m. This is an order of magnitude larger than the new generation of telescopes now being designed and built. Multiple gimballed flat mirrors direct the beams from a celestial source into a single telescope of the same aperture as each flat mirror. Multiple images of the same source are formed at the telescope focal plane. A beam combiner collects these images and superimposes them into a single image, onto a detector or spectrograph aperture. This telescope could be used on the earth, the moon, or in space.

  20. GLAST large area telescope - daily survey of high energy sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi

    2003-07-01

    GLAST Large Area Telescope was proposed to NASA in 1999 as a follow-up of EGRET on-board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory by an international collaboration. The proposal has been approved as a part of the GLAST observatory mission in its capability to explore a wide range of astrophysics with 5-40 times higher sensitivity and extended energy coverage (20MeV to 300GeV) than EGRET. The instrument consists of 16 towers of e+e- pair tracker, 16 blocks of segmented electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles covering the tracker towers. It will have 5-10 times larger on-axis effective area, 6 times wider field-of-view (FOV), and up to 5 times better angular resolution when compared with EGRET. The Large Area Telescope will cover about 40% of the sky above the Earth's horizon in its FOV at any given time and will scan nearly the entire Universe every orbit (~ 90min): about 20% of Gamma-Ray Bursts will be observed from the onset of the bursts to the initial after-glow phase; all longer-lasting transients and variabilities will be detected daily at the improved sensitivity. The instrument has been prototyped twice between 1995 and 2001, designed almost to the Flight Model by the international collaboration of the US (NASA and DoE), France, Italy, Japan, and Sweden. The first prototype consisted of one tower of e+e- pair trackers, one block of segmented calorimeters and a smaller set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles (Beam Test Engineering Model, BTEM), which was put into e+, p, and γ beams at SLAC in the winter of 1999-2000. It was subsequently modified for a balloon experiment (Balloon Flight Engineering Model, BFEM) and flown at Palestine, Texas in August 2001. Data collected in the test experiments have been analyzed and compared with predictions of computer simulation codes such as Geant4. These studies have confirmed validity of the basic design, brought up a few issues for further improvement, and gathered data on

  1. Automated Science Processing for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, James

    2012-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi γ-ray Space Telescope provides high sensitivity to emission from astronomical sources over a broad energy range (20MeV to >300 GeV) and has substantially improved spatial, energy, and timing resolution compared with previous observatories at these energies [4]. One of the LAT's most innovative features is that it performs continuous monitoring of the gamma-ray sky with all-sky coverage every 3 h. This survey strategy greatly enables the search for transient behavior from both previously known and unknown sources. In addition, the constant accumulation of data allows for increasingly improved measurements of persistent sources. These include the Milky Way Galaxy itself, which produces gamma-ray emission as a result from interactions of cosmic rays with gas in the Galaxy, and potential signals from candidate dark matter particles in the Milky Way and its neighboring galaxies. The automated science processing (ASP) functionality of the Fermi Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) is a part of the automated data pipeline that processes the raw data arriving from the spacecraft and puts it into a form amenable to scientific analysis. ASP operates at the end of the pipeline on the processed data and is intended to detect and characterize transient behavior (e.g., short time scale increases or “flares” in the gamma-ray flux) from astronomical sources. On detection of a flaring event, ASP will alert other observatories on a timely basis so that they may train their telescopes on the flaring source in order to detect possible correlated activity in other wavelength bands. Since the data from the LAT is archived and publicly available as soon as it is processed, ASP serves mainly to provide triggers for those follow-up observations; its estimates of the properties of the flaring sources (flux, spectral index, location) need not be the best possible, as subsequent off-line analysis can provide more refined

  2. A Wire Grid Paraboloid for Large Low Frequency Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Tom

    2017-05-01

    Planetary magnetic fields are usually studied remotely through their electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission from electrons trapped in their magnetic fields. Jupiter has been well studied since the 1960's because its strong magnetic field allows emissions up to about 40 MHz to be observed. The emission from Earth and other outer planets is mostly below 1 MHz and can only be observed from space. It is reasonable to assume that most exoplanets with ECM must be observed at low frequencies from space. Even optimistic assumptions about the strength of such emission leads one to conclude that very large filled aperture telescopes, with a diameters of a kilometer or more, will be needed.This paper reports on a study of a copper wire reflector with a diameter of 1 km operating between 100 kHz and 3.75 MHz. It would require 200 kg of 0.5 mm diameter copper wire (AWG 24)) to be lifted to and deployed in space. For aluminum, the mass would be about 100 kg. By optimizing the wire spacing the mass can be reduced to 80% of a simple radial-azimuthal arrangement. A relatively flat reflector (0.6 ≤ f/D ≤ 1.0) needs to be anchored at about 5 points from center to ring along 24 radii. Station-keeping CubeSats could serve as anchors. A total of about 100-120 anchors would be needed for an f/D = 1 reflector, adding 200-300 kg. to the mass of the reflector. It would be possible to carry several such reflectors into space in a single payload.The Deep Space Network is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Large-Aperture, Three Mirror Telescopes for Near-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J.

    In this era when Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is a national priority and optical-infrared telescopic sensor development is underway, cost-benefit analyses of competing approaches are necessary and appropriate. The DOD is presently investing in a new three-mirror telescope for SSA. At the same time, the Air Force, various universities and private research organizations are either studying or building wide-field telescopes with similar capabilities, but in most cases, at a significantly lower cost. Much of the expense for the DOD system appears driven by certain design choices which were advertised as necessary to fulfill the mission. Design details which would allow an independent analysis have not been published and no public comparison with other approaches is known to exist. Most telescope designs however, can be closely approximated from their optical configuration and imaging performance specifications. An optical designer will tell you that field curvature is one of the five monochromatic aberrations which they try to eliminate. The fact that one DOD development effort considers field curvature a design feature immediately draws attention to the project. This coupled with the paucity of published information and the very high development cost makes this program irresistible for comparison with competing approaches. This paper examines the likely design and performance of a proxy telescope intended to find NEOs, compares and contrasts that telescope with similar, but lower cost on-going projects, and examines the predictable impacts of reproducing such a telescope and placing multiple copies around the globe. The study primarily concentrates on performance measured in terms of search rate in square degrees per hour vs. object visual magnitude. Other considerations such as cost, transportability, availability of replacement components and ease of installation are also considered.

  4. Adaptive Control Of Large Vibrating, Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1991-01-01

    Globally convergent theoretical method provides for adaptive set-point control of orientation of, along with suppression of the vibrations of, large structure. Method utilizes inherent passivity properties of structure to attain mathematical condition essential to adaptive convergence on commanded set point. Maintains stability and convergence in presence of errors in mathematical model of dynamics of structure and actuators. Developed for controlling attitudes of large, somewhat flexible spacecraft, also useful in such terrestrial applications as controlling movable bridges or suppressing earthquake vibrations in bridges, buildings, and other large structures.

  5. Diffraction-limited 8- to 20-m telescope with an active and adaptive tertiary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    1998-08-01

    Active Optics Methods are extremely performing to obtain highly aspherical mirrors. The development of these methods is underlined with the presently proposed 4 to 5 mirror large telescope in the 8 - 20 m class. In this design, a particular emphasis has been placed to achieve the following main features: diffraction limited images over a restricted 1 or 2 arcmin field of view at f/30 for separate use with 16 Mpx detectors, diffraction limited images over a 2 to 5 arcsec field of view at the interferometric Mersenne focus, fast primary mirror of spherical shape, next mirrors the smallest as possible, low asphericity secondary and a tertiary spherically polished. It was found from optimization process with, for instance a 8 m primary at f/1.75, that, of the four mirrors required to achieve a diffraction limited afocal beam to a Mersenne focus, the spherical tertiary is the only mirror to be actively aspherized. Thus, due to a small aperture of this mirror (0.7 m), the vase form already developed from elasticity analysis would allow accurate aspherization by active optics. Similarly to our previous proposal TEMOS, the tertiary figure at f/6 can be achieved in situ, from a spherical polishing, by air depressure inside the mirror. The Sphe3 deformation sag of this mirror is quite large since is congruent to 1.3 mm ptv. Further, slight variations of the loading intensity allow a full optimization of the system as a function of the selected spectral range. The telescope design includes a pupil transfer on the tertiary realized by a doublet-lens. Thus, an adaptive optics system can be co- added to the same mirror. Finally, a concept for an active- adaptive tertiary is proposed.

  6. Adaptive optics for array telescopes using piston-and-tilt wave-front sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wizinowich, P.; Mcleod, B.; Lloyd-Yhart, M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Colucci, D.; Dekany, R.; Mccarthy, D.; Wittman, D.; Scott-Fleming, I.

    1992-01-01

    A near-infrared adaptive optics system operating at about 50 Hz has been used to control phase errors adaptively between two mirrors of the Multiple Mirror Telescope by stabilizing the position of the interference fringe in the combined unresolved far-field image. The resultant integrated images have angular resolutions of better than 0.1 arcsec and fringe contrasts of more than 0.6. Measurements of wave-front tilt have confirmed the wavelength independence of image motion. These results show that interferometric sensing of phase errors, when combined with a system for sensing the wave-front tilt of the individual telescopes, will provide a means of achieving a stable diffraction-limited focus with segmented telescopes or arrays of telescopes.

  7. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2011-10-14

    In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the

  8. Performance of the Fourier transform reconstructor for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, I.; Reyes, M.; Le Louarn, M.; Marichal-Hernández, J. G.; Rodríguez-Ramos, J. M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.

    2008-07-01

    The forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes, and the new generation of Extreme Adaptive Optics systems, carry on a boost in the number of actuators that makes the real-time correction of the atmospheric aberration computationally challenging. It is necessary to study new algorithms for performing Adaptive Optics at the required speed. Among the last generation algorithms that are being studied, the Fourier Transform Reconstructor (FTR) appears as a promising candidate. Its feasibility to be used for Single-Conjugate Adaptive Optics has been extensively proved by Poyneer et al.[1] As part of the activities supported by the ELT Design Study (European Community's Framework Programme 6) we have studied the performance of this algorithm applied to the case of the European ELT, in two different cases: single-conjugate and ground-layer adaptive optics and we are studying different approaches to apply it to the more complex multi-conjugate case. The algorithm has been tested on ESO's OCTOPUS software, which simulates the atmosphere, the deformable mirror, the sensor and the closed-loop control. The performance has been compared with other algorithms as well as their response in the presence of noise and with various atmospheric conditions. The good results on performance and robustness, and the possibility of parallelizing the algorithm (shown by Rodríguez-Ramos and Marichal-Hernández) make it an excellent alternative to the typically used Matrix-Vector Multiply algorithm.

  9. Optical performance analysis and optimization of large telescope structural designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Scott; Sun, Simon; Kerley, Dan

    2005-09-01

    We describe a tool to analyze the effects of gravity induced deflections on a telescope structure with segmented primary mirror optics. An objective of the telescope structural design process is to minimize image quality degradation due to uncorrectable static deflections of the optics under gravity, while ensuring that the overall system meets several requirements including limits of maximum primary mirror actuator stroke, segment rotation and decenter, and secondary mirror actuation. These design and performance criteria are not readily calculated within a finite element program. Our Merit Function routine, implemented in MATLAB and called by ANSYS, calculates these parameters and makes them available within ANSYS for evaluation and design optimization. In this analysis, ANSYS outputs key structural-model nodal displacements to a file, which are used to determine the 6 degree of freedom motion of the telescope's optical surfaces. MATLAB then utilizes these displacements, along with a database containing coordinate system transforms and a linear optics model derived from ZEMAX, to calculate various performance criteria. The values returned to ANSYS can be used to iteratively optimize performance over a set of structural design parameters. Optical parameters calculated by this routine include the optical path difference at the pupil, RMS wavefront, encircled energy and low order Zernike terms resulting from primary mirror segment rotation and decenter. Also reported are the maximum actuator strokes required to restore tip-tilt and piston of the primary mirror segments, and the deflection of the secondary mirror under gravitational load. The merit function routine is being used by the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project to optimize and assess the performance of various telescope structural designs. This paper describes the mathematical basis of the calculations, their implementation and gives preliminary results of the TMT Telescope Structure Reference Design.

  10. Holographic correction and phasing of large sparse-array telescopes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Geoff

    2005-03-10

    I have constructed a 1-m-diameter telescope using separate, low-quality spherical primary mirror segments. A single hologram of the mirrors is used to correct the random surface distortions as well as spherical aberration, while simultaneously phasing the individual apertures together. I present experimental results of the removal of an error of thousands of waves to produce a diffraction-limited instrument operating over a narrow bandwidth. This technique promises to have many benefits in future space-based telescopes for imaging, lidar, and optical communications.

  11. Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkefeld, Thomas; Soltau, Dirk; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2003-02-01

    We present an overview of the optical setup and control algorithms for the multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system of the 70cm German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife. The system is designed to remove the strong differential tip/tilt of the present AO system across a field of 30 arcseconds at visible wavelengths. It will consist of two Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and two deformable mirrors (DM) plus a separate Tip/Tilt mirror. Both wavefront sensors will be situated in the pupil plane of the telescope. One determines the high order wavefront aberrations for the center of the field of view (FOV), the other measures only low order wavefront aberrations, but covers a large FOV in each subaperture. A 35 actuator bimorph mirror and a 37 actuator membrane mirror will correct the ground layer and the tropopause, respectively. For wavefront reconstruction, the mirror eigenmodes will be used. The system will have first light in the first quarter of 2003. Scientific operation is expected to start in April 2003 or July 2003.

  12. Adaptable radiative transfer innovations for submillimetre telescopes (ARTIST). Dust polarisation module (DustPol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Brinch, C.; Girart, J. M.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Frau, P.; Hennebelle, P.; Kuiper, R.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Bertoldi, F.; Hogerheijde, M.; Juhasz, A.; Schaaf, R.

    2012-07-01

    We present a new publicly available tool (DustPol) aimed to model the polarised thermal dust emission. The module DustPol, which is publicly available, is part of the ARTIST (Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimetre Telescopes) package, which also offers tools for modelling the polarisation of line emission together with a model library and a Python-based user interface. DustPol can easily manage analytical as well as pre-gridded models to generate synthetic maps of the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters. These maps are stored in FITS format which is straightforwardly read by the data reduction software used, e.g., by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). This turns DustPol into a powerful engine for the prediction of the expected polarisation features of a source observed with ALMA or the Planck satellite as well as for the interpretation of existing submillimetre observations obtained with other telescopes. DustPol allows the parameterisation of the maximum degree of polarisation and we find that, in a prestellar core, if there is depolarisation, this effect should happen at densities of 106 cm-3 or larger. We compare a model generated by DustPol with the observational polarisation data of the low-mass Class 0 object NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, finding that the total and the polarised emission are consistent.

  13. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Neptune and Titan with the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, C.; Macintosh, B.; Gibbard, S.; Roe, H.; de Pater, I.; Ghez, A.; Acton, S.; Wizinowich, P.; Lai, O.

    1999-12-01

    We present near-IR images of Neptune and Titan with a resolution of 0.05 and 0.04 arc seconds respectively, obtained with the new adaptive optics (AO) system at the 10-m Keck II telescope. The resolution and contrast of these images allows us to fit radiative transfer atmospheric models including latitudinal and longitudinal variations. In the case of Neptune the images show both circumferential bands and bright cloud or storm features. We first model Neptune's clear atmosphere, un- contaminated by scattered light from the bright storms and bands. We can measure for the first time the precise infrared spatial extent of storm features and calculate their reflectance in broad-band and methane-absorption near-IR band-passes. These data allow us to model the changed haze distribution within the storm, relative to the clear atmosphere. In the case of Titan we use a radiative transfer model incorporating fractal haze properties, and are able to separate the contributions of Titan's atmosphere and surface to determine the optical depth of Titan's haze layer and to construct surface albedo maps. We find that Titan's trailing hemisphere is overall very dark, with a surface reflectance <0.05 consistent with the presence of solid or liquid hydrocarbons or perhaps very large-grained ice. The leading hemisphere is brighter, but with dark patches of very low albedo similar to the trailing hemisphere. These observations demonstrate that AO on an 8-10 meter telescope is a powerful new tool for the quantitative study of objects in the outer solar system, surpassing the resolution of the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope by a factor of 2-4. This research was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  14. Implementing focal-plane phase masks optimized for real telescope apertures with SLM-based digital adaptive coronagraphy.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Jonas; Patapis, Polychronis; Ruane, Garreth; Lu, Xin

    2017-07-10

    Direct imaging of exoplanets or circumstellar disk material requires extreme contrast at the 10(-6) to 10(-12) levels at < 100 mas angular separation from the star. Focal-plane mask (FPM) coronagraphic imaging has played a key role in this field, taking advantage of progress in Adaptive Optics on ground-based 8 + m class telescopes. However, large telescope entrance pupils usually consist of complex, sometimes segmented, non-ideal apertures, which include a central obstruction for the secondary mirror and its support structure. In practice, this negatively impacts wavefront quality and coronagraphic performance, in terms of achievable contrast and inner working angle. Recent theoretical works on structured darkness have shown that solutions for FPM phase profiles, optimized for non-ideal apertures, can be numerically derived. Here we present and discuss a first experimental validation of this concept, using reflective liquid crystal spatial light modulators as adaptive FPM coronagraphs.

  15. The European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmozzi, R.; Spyromilio, J.

    2007-03-01

    The ESO Council has authorised the E-ELT project to move to Phase B and approved the budget for the further design of the telescope and its instrumentation. In this article we present the activities and design concepts considered in the past year leading up to the decision of Council.

  16. Novel In-Space Manufacturing Concepts for the Development of Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, James T.; Reardon, Patrick; Gregory Don; Manning, Andrew; Blackmon, Jim; Howsman, Tom; Williams, Philip; Brantley, Whitt; Rakoczy, John; Herren, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    There is a continuous demand for larger, lighter, and higher quality telescopes. Over the past several decades, we have seen the evolution from launchable 2 meter-class telescopes (such as Hubble), to today s demand for deployable 6 meter-class telescopes (such as JWST), to tomorrow s need for up to 150 meter-class telescopes. As the apertures continue to grow, it will become much more difficult and expensive to launch assembled telescope structures. To address this issue, we are seeing the emergence of new novel structural concepts, such as inflatable structures and membrane optics. While these structural concepts do show promise, it is very difficult to achieve and maintain high surface figure quality. Another potential solution to develop large space telescopes is to move the fabrication facility into space and launch the raw materials. In this paper we present initial in-space manufacturing concepts to enable the development of large telescopes. This includes novel approaches for the fabrication of both the optical elements and the telescope support structure. We will also discuss potential optical designs for large space telescopes and describe their relation to the fabrication methods. These concepts are being developed to meet the demanding requirements of DARPA s LASSO (Large Aperture Space Surveillance Optic) program which currently requires a 150 meter optical aperture with a 17 degree field of view.

  17. Innovative research in the design and operation of large telescopes for space: Aspects of giant telescopes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The capability and understanding of how to finish the reflector surfaces needed for large space telescopes is discussed. The technology for making very light glass substrates for mirrors is described. Other areas of development are in wide field imaging design for very fast primaries, in data analysis and retrieval methods for astronomical images, and in methods for making large area closely packed mosaics of solid state array detectors.

  18. Design of Large Lightweight Space Telescope Optical Systems for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Dave; Craig, Larry; Schunk, Greg; Shapiro, Alan; Cloyd, Dick; Ricks, Ed; Vacarro, Mark; Redding, Dave; Hadaway, James; Bely, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) is currently in a Pre Phase A study effort to prove feasibility of design and to show that the design can be implemented within cost constraint guidelines and meet the requirements of the science community. In an effort to achieve the science communities goals as outlined in "HST and Beyond" the NGST team has developed a government "yardstick" design of an eight meter diameter segmented telescope which would be launched in an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle to a L2 (Lagrange Point) orbit. This paper will discuss the design of the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) and the various issues and complications of designing lightweight optics to be placed in the environment that the NGST will encounter both during launch and during its operational mission at L2. The OTA must be lightweight but structurally must withstand the launch environment and transfer to its final L2 orbit. The OTA must be stable at L2 to provide high quality science at the cryogenic temperatures it will experience. The OTA segmented petal concept is to develop lightweight optics which can either be manipulated to achieve and maintain a desired figure or be rigid enough so that change in shape is only necessary for phasing and alignment. The secondary mirror structural mast must also be rigid with frequency responses which are not coupled to spacecraft modes in order to maintain and decenter and despace requirements.

  19. Recent performance of the normal incident x-ray telescope with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamoto, S.; Ishii, R.; Nukamori, S.; Imai, K.; Mochida, A.; Sato, S.; Ohgi, Y.; Yoshida, Y.; Hoshino, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report recent results of the performance measurement of our X-ray telescope with adaptive optics. The telescope is designed to use the 13.5nm EUV with the Mo/Si multilayers, making a normal incident optics. The primary mirror is 80mm in its diameter and the focal length of 2m. The deformable mirror is controlled by measuring a wave-front of an optical laser. Effects of a difference between the light paths from the reference and from an object are examined. The angular resolution is measured with optical light and we confirm almost diffraction limited resolution as well as its appropriate function as adaptive optics.

  20. First Light Adaptive Optics Images from the Keck II Telescope: A New Era of High Angular Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizinowich, P.; Acton, D. S.; Shelton, C.; Stomski, P.; Gathright, J.; Ho, K.; Lupton, W.; Tsubota, K.; Lai, O.; Max, C.; Brase, J.; An, J.; Avicola, K.; Olivier, S.; Gavel, D.; Macintosh, B.; Ghez, A.; Larkin, J.

    2000-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology that corrects in real time for the blurring effects of atmospheric turbulence, in principle allowing Earth-bound telescopes to achieve their diffraction limit and to ``see'' as clearly as if they were in space. The power of AO using natural guide stars has been amply demonstrated in recent years on telescopes up to 3-4 m in diameter. The next breakthrough in astronomical resolution was expected to occur with the implementation of AO on the new generation of large, 8-10 m diameter telescopes. In this paper we report the initial results from the first of these AO systems, now coming on line on the 10 m diameter Keck II Telescope. The results include the highest angular resolution images ever obtained from a single telescope (0.022" and 0.040" at 0.85 and 1.65 μm wavelengths, respectively), as well as tests of system performance on three astronomical targets.

  1. Primary mirror control for large segmented telescopes: combining high performance with robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witvoet, Gert; Doelman, Niek; den Breeje, Remco

    2016-08-01

    Future large telescopes, such as E-ELT and TMT, will need feedback control of the thousands of actuators underneath their segmented primary mirrors (M1). Differences in actuator dynamics and spatially and temporally changing disturbances make it extremely difficult to formulate classical controllers which are both sufficiently robust and highly performing. Therefore, TNO has developed and tested a control approach, in which the actual system response is quickly measured, disturbances are continuously estimated and the controller is adapted in real-time. The algorithm is tested on an actual M1-relevant setup, in which it converges to a sub-nm optimum within a few minutes, keeps track of changing disturbances and shows its reliability over multiple days.

  2. Construction of the 16 meter Large Lunar Telescope (LLT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Husam Anwar

    1990-01-01

    The different materials that could be used to design the pedestal for a Moon based 16 meter telescope are discussed. The material that should be used has a low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus of elasticity, and high compressive and tensile strengths. For the model developed in this study, an aluminum-manganese alloy was used because of its low coefficient of thermal expansion. Due to variations in lunar soil conditions, both vertically and horizontally, three foundation systems are presented. The spudcan footing can be used in the case where dense soil is more than three meters. The spread footing is recommended where the dense soil is between one and three meters. Finally, in the third system, the Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) is used as a base support for the telescope's pedestal. The LEV support requires a prepared site. The soil should be compacted and stabilized, if necessary, to reduce settlement.

  3. Construction of the 16 meter Large Lunar Telescope (LLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Husam Anwar

    1990-10-01

    The different materials that could be used to design the pedestal for a Moon based 16 meter telescope are discussed. The material that should be used has a low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus of elasticity, and high compressive and tensile strengths. For the model developed in this study, an aluminum-manganese alloy was used because of its low coefficient of thermal expansion. Due to variations in lunar soil conditions, both vertically and horizontally, three foundation systems are presented. The spudcan footing can be used in the case where dense soil is more than three meters. The spread footing is recommended where the dense soil is between one and three meters. Finally, in the third system, the Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) is used as a base support for the telescope's pedestal. The LEV support requires a prepared site. The soil should be compacted and stabilized, if necessary, to reduce settlement.

  4. Improved Optical Design for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, L

    2002-09-24

    This paper presents an improved optical design for the LSST, an fll.25 three-mirror telescope covering 3.0 degrees full field angle, with 6.9 m effective aperture diameter. The telescope operates at five wavelength bands spanning 386.5 nm to 1040 nm (B, V, R, I and Z). For all bands, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy is collected within 0.20 arc-seconds diameter. The reflective telescope uses an 8.4 m f/1.06 concave primary, a 3.4 m convex secondary and a 5.2 m concave tertiary in a Paul geometry. The system length is 9.2 m. A refractive corrector near the detector uses three fused silica lenses, rather than the two lenses of previous designs. Earlier designs required that one element be a vacuum barrier, but now the detector sits in an inert gas at ambient pressure. The last lens is the gas barrier. Small adjustments lead to optimal correction at each band. The filters have different axial thicknesses. The primary and tertiary mirrors are repositioned for each wavelength band. The new optical design incorporates features to simplify manufacturing. They include a flat detector, a far less aspheric convex secondary (10 {micro}m from best fit sphere) and reduced aspheric departures on the lenses and tertiary mirror. Five aspheric surfaces, on all three mirrors and on two lenses, are used. The primary is nearly parabolic. The telescope is fully baffled so that no specularly reflected light from any field angle, inside or outside of the full field angle of 3.0 degrees, can reach the detector.

  5. Improved optical design for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Lynn G.

    2002-12-01

    This paper presents an improved optical design for the LSST, an f/1.25 three-mirror telescope covering 3.0 degrees full field angle, with 6.9 m effective aperture diameter. The telescope operates at five wavelength bands spanning 386.5 nm to 1040 nm (B, V, R, I and Z). For all bands, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy is collected within 0.20 arc-seconds diameter. The reflective telescope uses an 8.4 m f/1.06 concave primary, a 3.4 m convex secondary and a 5.2 m concave tertiary in a Paul geometry. The system length is 9.2 m. A refractive corrector near the detector uses three fused silica lenses, rather than the two lenses of previous designs. Earlier designs required that one element be a vacuum barrier, but now the detector sits in an inert gas at ambient pressure, with the last lens serving as the gas barrier. Small adjustments lead to optimal correction at each band. Each filter has a different axial thickness, and the primary and tertiary mirrors are repositioned for each wavelength band. Features that simplify manufacturing include a flat detector, a far less aspheric convex secondary (10 μm from best fit sphere) and reduced aspheric departures on the lenses and tertiary mirror. Five aspheric surfaces, on all three mirrors and on two lenses, are used. The primary is nearly parabolic. The telescope is fully baffled so that no specularly reflected light from any field angle, inside or outside of the full field angle of 3.0 degrees, can reach the detector.

  6. Adaptive Machining Of Large, Somewhat Flexible Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutow, David; Wagner, Garrett; Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Deily, David

    1996-01-01

    Adaptive machining is method of machining large, somewhat flexible workpieces to close tolerances. Devised for machining precise weld lands on aft skirts of rocket nozzles, but underlying concept generally applicable to precise machining of any of large variety of workpieces deformed by thermal, gravitational, and/or machining forces. For example, in principle, method used to bore precise hole on unanchored end of long cantilever beam.

  7. Tomographic control for wide field AO systems on extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Conan, J.-M.; Fusco, T.; Neichel, B.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate in this article tomographic control using both Laser and Natural Guide Stars (LGS and NGS) in the particular framework of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) Wide Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) modules design. A similar global control strategy has been indeed derived for both the Laser Tomographic Adaptive Optics (LTAO) and Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) modules of the E-ELT, due to similar constraints. This control strategy leads in both cases to a split control of low order modes measured thanks to NGS and high order modes measured thanks to LGS. We investigate here this split tomographic control, compared to an optimal coupled solution. To support our analysis, a dedicated simulation code has been developed. Indeed, due to the huge complexity of the EELT, fast simulation tools must be considered to explore quickly the tomographic issues. We describe our control strategy which has lead to considering split tomographic control. First results on Tomography for E-ELT WFAO systems are then presented and discussed.

  8. Laboratory demonstration of a primary active mirror for space with the LATT: large aperture telescope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Vettore, Christian; d'Amato, Francesco; Xompero, Marco; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Patauner, Christian; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; Duò, Fabrizio; Pucci, Mauro; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Maresi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The LATT project is an ESA contract under TRP programme to demonstrate the scalability of the technology from ground-based adaptive mirrors to space active primary mirrors. A prototype spherical mirror based on a 40 cm diameter 1 mm thin glass shell with 19 contactless, voice-coil actuators and co-located position sensors have been manufactured and integrated into a final unit with an areal density lower than 20 kg/m2. Laboratory tests demonstrated the controllability with very low power budget and the survival of the fragile glass shell exposed to launch accelerations, thanks to an electrostatic locking mechanism; such achievements pushes the technology readiness level toward 5. With this prototype, the LATT project explored the feasibility of using an active and lightweight primary for space telescopes. The concept is attractive for large segmented telescopes, with surface active control to shape and co-phase them once in flight. In this paper we will describe the findings of the technological advances and the results of the environmental and optical tests.

  9. Resolving Io's Volcanoes from a Mutual Event Observation at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, K.; Skrutskie, M.; Leisenring, J.; Davies, A. G.; Resnick, A.; Conrad, A.; De Pater, I.; Hinz, P.; Defrere, D.; Veillet, C.

    2016-12-01

    Near-infrared observations of Io during occultation by Jupiter and the other Galilean satellites have been central to ground-based studies of Io's volcanism for decades. When such observations are made using adaptive optics on 8-10m telescopes, the infrared emission from individual features can be resolved at a resolution approaching a few km on Io's surface. On March 8, 2015, the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) observed Io during a Europa mutual occultation event. Images were obtained at a wavelength of 4.8 microns every 123 milliseconds, corresponding to 2 km on Io's surface. The thermal emission from four hot spots including Loki Patera, Pillan Patera, and Kurdalagon Patera is clearly resolved. The latter two hot spots hosted bright eruptions in early 2015; the thermal emission from these sites likely represents the aftermath of those eruptions. The occultation light curves are used to construct a brightness temperature map for each of the four hot spots, from which the lava age is estimated using a model for cooling basaltic lavas. The thermal mapping of Loki Patera has produced the first-ever temperature map of the entire patera floor at high (10 km) spatial resolution, and the corresponding age distribution yields the resurfacing rate. For each hot spot, the age and spatial extent of the lava is interpreted in the context of its activity during the surrounding months.

  10. iLocater: a diffraction-limited Doppler spectrometer for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin R.; Crass, Jonathan; King, David; Bechter, Andrew; Bechter, Eric; Ketterer, Ryan; Reynolds, Robert; Hinz, Philip; Kopon, Derek; Cavalieri, David; Fantano, Louis; Koca, Corina; Onuma, Eleanya; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Thomes, Joseph; Wall, Sheila; Macenka, Steven; McGuire, James; Korniski, Ronald; Zugby, Leonard; Eisner, Joshua; Gaudi, B. S.; Hearty, Fred; Kratter, Kaitlin; Kuchner, Marc; Micela, Giusi; Nelson, Matthew; Pagano, Isabella; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Schwab, Christian; Skrutskie, Michael; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Woodward, Charles; Zhao, Bo

    2016-08-01

    We are developing a stable and precise spectrograph for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) named "iLocater." The instrument comprises three principal components: a cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph that operates in the YJ-bands (0.97-1.30 μm), a fiber-injection acquisition camera system, and a wavelength calibration unit. iLocater will deliver high spectral resolution (R 150,000-240,000) measurements that permit novel studies of stellar and substellar objects in the solar neighborhood including extrasolar planets. Unlike previous planet-finding instruments, which are seeing-limited, iLocater operates at the diffraction limit and uses single mode fibers to eliminate the effects of modal noise entirely. By receiving starlight from two 8.4m diameter telescopes that each use "extreme" adaptive optics (AO), iLocater shows promise to overcome the limitations that prevent existing instruments from generating sub-meter-per-second radial velocity (RV) precision. Although optimized for the characterization of low-mass planets using the Doppler technique, iLocater will also advance areas of research that involve crowded fields, line-blanketing, and weak absorption lines.

  11. Use of the moon and the large space telescope as an extrasolar planet detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matloff, G. L.; Fennelly, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Roman (1959), Spitzer (1962), and Huang (1973) have discussed photometric detection of extrasolar planets using a 3-m space telescope such as the Large Space Telescope (LST). A space telescope could be an extrasolar planet detection system if used in conjunction with an occulter placed 10,000 km in front of the telescope. The occulter would reduce the amount of light received from the star under observation. For a semi-infinite plane occulter 10,000 km in front of the telescope, Spitzer and Huang's results indicate that a Jupiter-like planet would be observed with a signal/noise of 1.00, for observations at 0.4 micron using a 3-m telescope like the LST.

  12. Use of the moon and the large space telescope as an extrasolar planet detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matloff, G. L.; Fennelly, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Roman (1959), Spitzer (1962), and Huang (1973) have discussed photometric detection of extrasolar planets using a 3-m space telescope such as the Large Space Telescope (LST). A space telescope could be an extrasolar planet detection system if used in conjunction with an occulter placed 10,000 km in front of the telescope. The occulter would reduce the amount of light received from the star under observation. For a semi-infinite plane occulter 10,000 km in front of the telescope, Spitzer and Huang's results indicate that a Jupiter-like planet would be observed with a signal/noise of 1.00, for observations at 0.4 micron using a 3-m telescope like the LST.

  13. Robust control of the Multiple Mirror Telescope adaptive secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.; Grocott, Simon C.

    1999-08-01

    For force-actuated, thin facesheet mirrors, structural flexibility within the control bandwidth calls for a new approach to adaptive optics. Dynamic influence functions are used to characterize the influence of each actuator on the entire surface of a deformable mirror. A linearized model of atmospheric distortion is combined with these dynamic influence functions to produce a dynamic reconstructor for providing actuator inputs in response to wavefront sensor measurements. This dynamic reconstructor is recognized as an optimal-control problem. A hierarchic control scheme that seeks to emulate the quasistatic control approach that is generally used in adaptive optics is compared with the dynamic reconstruction technique. Although dynamic reconstruction requires somewhat more computational power to implement, it achieves better performance with less power usage, and is less sensitive to errors than the hierarchic technique because it incorporates a dynamic model of the deformable mirror.

  14. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetik, Viliam; Vitovec, Bohumil; Jiran, Lukas; Nemcova, Sarka; Zicha, Josef; Inneman, Adolf; Mikulickova, Lenka; Pavlica, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Large aperture composite adaptive optics for laser applications is investigated in cooperation of Institute of Plasma Physic, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering FME CTU and 5M Ltd. We are exploring opportunity of a large-size high-power-laser deformable-mirror production using a lightweight bimorph actuated structure with a composite core. In order to produce a sufficiently large operational free aperture we are developing new technologies for production of flexible core, bimorph actuator and deformable mirror reflector. Full simulation of a deformable-mirrors structure was prepared and validated by complex testing. A deformable mirror actuation and a response of a complicated structure are investigated for an accurate control of the adaptive optics. An original adaptive optics control system and a bimorph deformable mirror driver were developed. Tests of material samples, components and sub-assemblies were completed. A subscale 120 mm bimorph deformable mirror prototype was designed, fabricated and thoroughly tested. A large-size 300 mm composite-core bimorph deformable mirror was simulated and optimized, fabrication of a prototype is carried on. A measurement and testing facility is modified to accommodate large sizes optics.

  15. Micro-motion actuators for adaptive telescope: magnetostrictor of piezoelectric?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovskij, L. V.; Borzyak, P. I.; Dolgushin, A. I.; Elizarov, A. I.; Sirant, V. S.; Steshenko, N. V.; Sychev, V. V.

    Some results from comparative tests of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive actuators with values of amplitude in a range not exceeding 6 microns are given. Stepped input impacts on frequencies 4 - 12 Hz have been measured by a specially designed non-contactable sensor of micro shift (with precision of 5 nm in a range of ±0.5 mm; frequency of measurements >50 Hz) on specially prepared experimental stand including the real segment (diameter = 40 cm) of the main segmented telescope mirror. Shifts in a range from 0 to 6 microns as functions of the input impact can be represented as parabolas (piezoactuator) or as third order curves (magnetostrictors) with error values ≅ ±0.02 microns. The results of long (about 14 days) and continuous action of a piezo-actuator on 10 Hz frequency (total 12×106 cycles) with the value of shift = 3.3 microns show slight reduction (about 4%) of the segment vibration amplitude and this probably connected with some changes in structure of ceramics.

  16. Performance comparison of wavefront reconstruction and control algorithms for Extremely Large Telescopes.

    PubMed

    Montilla, I; Béchet, C; Le Louarn, M; Reyes, M; Tallon, M

    2010-11-01

    Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) are very challenging with respect to their adaptive optics (AO) requirements. Their diameters and the specifications required by the astronomical science for which they are being designed imply a huge increment in the number of degrees of freedom in the deformable mirrors. Faster algorithms are needed to implement the real-time reconstruction and control in AO at the required speed. We present the results of a study of the AO correction performance of three different algorithms applied to the case of a 42-m ELT: one considered as a reference, the matrix-vector multiply (MVM) algorithm; and two considered fast, the fractal iterative method (FrIM) and the Fourier transform reconstructor (FTR). The MVM and the FrIM both provide a maximum a posteriori estimation, while the FTR provides a least-squares one. The algorithms are tested on the European Southern Observatory (ESO) end-to-end simulator, OCTOPUS. The performance is compared using a natural guide star single-conjugate adaptive optics configuration. The results demonstrate that the methods have similar performance in a large variety of simulated conditions. However, with respect to system misregistrations, the fast algorithms demonstrate an interesting robustness.

  17. Laboratory and telescope demonstration of the TP3-WFS for the adaptive optics segment of AOLI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colodro-Conde, C.; Velasco, S.; Fernández-Valdivia, J. J.; López, R.; Oscoz, A.; Rebolo, R.; Femenía, B.; King, D. L.; Labadie, L.; Mackay, C.; Muthusubramanian, B.; Pérez Garrido, A.; Puga, M.; Rodríguez-Coira, G.; Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Rodríguez-Ramos, J. M.; Toledo-Moreo, R.; Villó-Pérez, I.

    2017-05-01

    Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI) is a state-of-the-art instrument that combines adaptive optics (AO) and lucky imaging (LI) with the objective of obtaining diffraction-limited images in visible wavelength at mid- and big-size ground-based telescopes. The key innovation of AOLI is the development and use of the new Two Pupil Plane Positions Wavefront Sensor (TP3-WFS). The TP3-WFS, working in visible band, represents an advance over classical wavefront sensors such as the Shack-Hartmann WFS because it can theoretically use fainter natural reference stars, which would ultimately provide better sky coverages to AO instruments using this newer sensor. This paper describes the software, algorithms and procedures that enabled AOLI to become the first astronomical instrument performing real-time AO corrections in a telescope with this new type of WFS, including the first control-related results at the William Herschel Telescope.

  18. Nearby active galactic nuclei seen via adaptive optics at the Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Claire

    2004-02-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that mergers between galaxies play a critical role in galaxy evolution, in the formation of central black holes, and in the phenomena of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasar activity. The advent of adaptive optics on the new generation of 6-10 m telescopes is making it possible to study nearby AGNs and merging galaxies with spatial resolutions of10 - 100 pc. In this talk I will describe and discuss observations of NGC 6240 and Cygnus A, archetypes of merging disk galaxies and of powerful radiogalaxies respectively. I will make use of infrared observations using the adaptive optics system on the 10-m Keck Telescope, as well as visible-light observations from the Hubble Space Telescope.

  19. Life Cycle of a Large Telescope: the David Dunlap Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    When it went into operation in 1935, the 74-inch reflector at the David Dunlap Observatory was the world's second largest and most sophisticated telescope. Designed specifically for stellar spectroscopy, almost all work performed with it until the early 1950s was limited to that specialty. Most University of Toronto staff were expected to contribute to the observatory's programme. However, as the staff expanded and newer research specialties were introduced, the telescope had to be refitted with new auxiliary equipment, or not be used at all. By the late 1960s, the observatory's night sky began to deteriorate due to light pollution from uncontrolled urban growth. While limited work could be performed into the 1990s, the telescope was no longer considered "large” far more powerful, versatile instruments at much superior sites were by then available. That Toronto astronomers had moved on can be demonstrated from their publication records. The end came in 2008 when the University of Toronto decided that the land's value could be used to support astronomical research in a broader sense. In response, the community, which had ignored the observatory for most of its history, and a few dissident astronomers, strongly defended its survival on a number of grounds. The narrative suggests a number of life-cycle stages: 1) maximum use of the instrument due to superior environmental and technical conditions, plus staff homogeneity; 2) application of new technologies to extend the instrument's capability in the face of diversifying research interests and decaying environmental factors; 3) fading value due to obsolescence and poor environmental factors; 4) death or metamorphosis (such as becoming an educational or historical institution). It appears that these phases apply to a number of historical cases. It is not clear, for the Dunlap Observatory, how the fourth phase will play out.

  20. Technical description of the U.K. large telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Roger L.; Raybould, Keith

    1990-07-01

    The British astronomical community is currently engaged in the development of an 8-m aperture visible/IR telecope whose structure is based on the successful Herschel 4.2-m telescope. The primary mirror will be of meniscus type, with a 40:1 aspect ratio and active support; two secondaries will be used, of which the first (f/7) will furnish a corrected 40-arcmin field, while the second (f/35) can be chopped for use in the thermal IR. Enclosure design options under consideration encompass a carousel, a conventional hemispherical dome, and a lightweight octagonal enclosure.

  1. Gleam: the GLAST Large Area Telescope Simulation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, Richard

    2003-08-22

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented.

  2. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Mike; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY 2012. This effort is to mature, by at least a half Technology Readiness Level step, the critical technologies required to enable 4-meter or larger ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD continues to achieve all of its goals and has accomplished all of its milestones to date. This has been achieved by assembling an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes; by deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence mirror systems needed to make the required science measurements; and by defining and prioritizing the most important technical problems to be solved. Our results have been presented to the CoPAG and Mirror Tech Days 2013, and proceedings papers of the 2013 and 2014 SPIE Optics & Photonics Symposia have been published.

  3. The Very Large Telescope Interferometer - Challenges for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, P. J. V.; Glindemann, A.; Henning, Th.; Malbet, F.

    2003-11-01

    The last quarter of the 20th century witnessed the rebirth and maturing of optical interferometry and associated technologies. Major successes spanning from direct detection of stellar pulsations to imaging in the optical were achieved with test-bed systems, some of which have now evolved to facilities open to the astronomical community. The intense activity and rapid growth of this field are a clear sign that interferometry will be a major observational tool in this century both from ground and space. The VLTI is the largest ground-based interferometric facility combining four 8.2-m telescopes with up to eight 1.8-m telescopes. This facility is the first opened on a shared risk basis in 2002, a milestone for the astronomical community. The combination of enhanced sensitivity and common user support bring into grasp a vastly unexplored astrophysical territory. This book presents state of the art optical interferometry in astrophysics. We emphasise new VLTI users by including tutorials in optical interferometry theory and practice, and related instrumentation, as well as reviews in stellar formation and evolution, and extragalactic science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1518-6

  4. A purely reflective large wide-field telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebizh, V. Yu.

    2008-06-01

    Two versions of a fast, purely reflective Paul-Baker-type telescope are discussed, each with an 8.4-m aperture, 3° diameter flat field and f/1.25 focal ratio. The first version is based on a common, even asphere type of surface with zero conic constant. The primary and tertiary mirrors are 6th order aspheres, while the secondary mirror is an 8th order asphere (referred to here for brevity, as the 6/8/6 configuration). The D 80 diameter of a star image varies from 0″.18 on the optical axis up to 0″.27 at the edge of the field (9.3-13.5 μm). The second version of the telescope is based on a polysag surface type, which uses a polynomial expansion in the sag z, r^2 = 2R_0 z - left( {1 + b} right)z^2 + a_3 z^3 + a_4 z^3 + a_4 z^4 + ldots + a_N z^N instead of the common form of aspheric surface. This approach results in somewhat better images, with D 80 ranging from 0″.16 to 0″.23, using a lower-order 3/4/3 combination of powers for the mirror surfaces. An additional example with 3.5-m aperture, 3°.5 diameter flat field, and f/1.25 focal ratio featuring near-diffraction-limited image quality is also presented.

  5. Projected Near-Earth Object Discovery Performance of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesley, Steven R.; Veres, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of an assessment study of the performance of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) in its planned efforts to detect and catalog near-Earth objects (NEOs).

  6. Development of precision structure of a large-size space radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astavin, A. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Komaev, R. V.; Moisheev, A. A.; Tsvelev, V. M.; Serebrennikov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents methods for the design and engineering concepts, which made it possible to develop and manufacture the space radio telescope with a large size and high accuracy of the effective reflector area and focal assembly position.

  7. The Laser Guide Star System for Adaptive Optics at Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Y.; Saito, Y.; Ito, M.; Saito, N.; Akagawa, K.; Takazawa, A.; Ito, M.; Wada, S.; Takami, H.; Iye, M.

    We report on the current status of developing the new laser guide star (LGS) system for the Subaru adaptive optics (AO) system. We have three major subsystems: the laser unit, the relay optical fiber and the laser launching telescope. A 4W-class all-solid-state 589nm laser has been developed as a light source for sodium laser guide star. We use two mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers operated at the wavelength of 1064nm and 1319nm to generate sum-frequency conversion into 589nm. The side-LD pumped configuration is used for the mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers. We have carefully considered the thermal lens effect in the cavity to achieve a high beam quality with TEM00; M2 = 1.06. The mode-locked frequency is selected at 143 MHz. We obtained the output powers of 16.5 W and 5.0 W at 1064nm and 1319 nm. Sum frequency generated by mixing two synchronized Nd:YAG mode-locked pulsed beams is precisely tuned to the sodium D2 line by thermal control of the etalon in the 1064nm Nd:YAG laser by observing the maximum fluorescence intensity of heated sodium vapor cell. The maximum output power at 589.159 nm reaches to 4.6 W using a PPMgOSLT crystal as a nonlinear optical crystal. And the output power can be maintained within a stability of +/- 1.2% for more than 3 days without optical damage. We developed a single-mode photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to relay the laser beam from laser clean room, in which the laser unit is located on the Nasmyth platform, to the laser launching telescope mounted behind the secondary mirror of Subaru Telescope. The photonic crystal fiber has solid pure silica core with the mode field diameter of 14 micron, which is relatively larger than that of the conventional step-index type single mode fiber. The length of the PCF is 35m and transmission loss due to the pure silica is 10dB/km at 589nm, which means PCF transmits 92% of the laser beam. We have preliminary achieved 75% throughput in total. Small mode-locked pulse width in time allows us to transmit the high

  8. Thirty Meter Telescope narrow-field infrared adaptive optics system real-time controller prototyping results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Malcolm; Kerley, Dan; Chapin, Edward L.; Dunn, Jennifer; Herriot, Glen; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Boyer, Corinne; Ellerbroek, Brent; Gilles, Luc; Wang, Lianqi

    2016-07-01

    Prototyping and benchmarking was performed for the Real-Time Controller (RTC) of the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS). To perform wavefront correction, NFIRAOS utilizes two deformable mirrors (DM) and one tip/tilt stage (TTS). The RTC receives wavefront information from six Laser Guide Star (LGS) Shack- Hartmann WaveFront Sensors (WFS), one high-order Natural Guide Star Pyramid WaveFront Sensor (PWFS) and multiple low-order instrument detectors. The RTC uses this information to determine the commands to send to the wavefront correctors. NFIRAOS is the first light AO system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The prototyping was performed using dual-socket high performance Linux servers with the real-time (PREEMPT_RT) patch and demonstrated the viability of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware approach to large scale AO reconstruction. In particular, a large custom matrix vector multiplication (MVM) was benchmarked which met the required latency requirements. In addition all major inter-machine communication was verified to be adequate using 10Gb and 40Gb Ethernet. The results of this prototyping has enabled a CPU-based NFIRAOS RTC design to proceed with confidence and that COTS hardware can be used to meet the demanding performance requirements.

  9. The tail wags the dog: managing large telescope construction projects with lagging requirements and creeping scope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In a perfect world, large telescopes would be developed and built in logical, sequential order. First, scientific requirements would be agreed upon, vetted, and fully developed. From these, instrument designers would define their own subsystem requirements and specifications, and then flesh out preliminary designs. This in turn would then allow optic designers to specify lens and mirror requirements, which would permit telescope mounts and drives to be designed. Finally, software and safety systems, enclosures and domes, buildings, foundations, and infrastructures would be specified and developed. Unfortunately, the order of most large telescope projects is the opposite of this sequence. We don't live in a perfect world. Scientists usually don't want to commit to operational requirements until late in the design process, instrument designers frequently change and update their designs due to improving filter and camera technologies, and mount and optics engineers seem to live by the words "more" and "better" throughout their own design processes. Amplifying this is the fact that site construction of buildings and domes are usually the earliest critical path items on the schedule, and are often subject to lengthy permitting and environmental processes. These facility and support items therefore must quickly get underway, often before operational requirements are fully considered. Mirrors and mounts also have very long lead times for fabrication, which in turn necessitates that they are specified and purchased early. All of these factors can result in expensive and time-consuming change orders when requirements are finalized and/or shift late in the process. This paper discusses some of these issues encountered on large, multi-year construction projects. It also presents some techniques and ideas to minimize these effects on schedule and cost. Included is a discussion on the role of Interface Control Documents (ICDs), the importance (and danger) of making big

  10. Optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) Petite on the Thirty Meter Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B; Gavel, D; Dekany, R; Ellerbroek, B

    2005-08-02

    We describe an exploratory optical design for the Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics (AO) System (NFIRAOS) Petite, a proposed adaptive optics system for the Thirty Meter Telescope Project. NFIRAOS will feed infrared spectrograph and wide-field imaging instruments with a diffraction limited beam. The adaptive optics system will require multi-guidestar tomographic wavefront sensing and multi-conjugate AO correction. The NFIRAOS Petite design specifications include two small 60 mm diameter deformable mirrors (DM's) used in a woofer/tweeter or multiconjugate arrangement. At least one DM would be a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) DM. The AO system would correct a 10 to 30 arcsec diameter science field as well as laser guide stars (LGS's) located within a 60 arcsec diameter field and low-order or tip/tilt natural guide stars (NGS's) within a 60 arcsec diameter field. The WFS's are located downstream of the DM's so that they can be operated in true closed-loop, which is not necessarily a given in extremely large telescope adaptive optics design. The WFS's include adjustable corrector elements which correct the static aberrations of the AO relay due to field position and LGS distance height.

  11. Forecasting surface-layer atmospheric parameters at the Large Binocular Telescope site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Alessio; Masciadri, Elena; Fini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we quantify the performance of an automated weather forecast system implemented on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) site at Mt Graham (Arizona) in forecasting the main atmospheric parameters close to the ground. The system employs a mesoscale non-hydrostatic numerical model (Meso-Nh). To validate the model, we compare the forecasts of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and relative humidity close to the ground with the respective values measured by instrumentation installed on the telescope dome. The study is performed over a large sample of nights uniformly distributed over 2 yr. The quantitative analysis is done using classical statistical operators [bias, root-mean-square error (RMSE) and σ] and contingency tables, which allows us to extract complementary key information, such as the percentage of correct detections (PC) and the probability of obtaining a correct detection within a defined interval of values (POD). The results of our study indicate that the model performance in forecasting the atmospheric parameters we have just cited are very good, in some cases excellent: RMSE for temperature is below 1°C, for relative humidity it is 14 per cent and for the wind speed it is around 2.5 m s-1. The relative error of the RMSE for wind direction varies from 9 to 17 per cent depending on the wind speed conditions. This work is performed in the context of the ALTA (Advanced LBT Turbulence and Atmosphere) Center project, whose final goal is to provide forecasts of all the atmospheric parameters and the optical turbulence to support LBT observations, adaptive optics facilities and interferometric facilities.

  12. Adaptive optics real time processing design for the advanced technology solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Kit

    2012-07-01

    The four meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) adaptive optics (AO) system will require at least twenty-four times the real time processing power as the Dunn Solar Telescope AO system. An FPGA solution for ATST AO real time processing is being pursued instead of the parallel DSP approach used for the Dunn AO76 system. An analysis shows FPGAs will have lower latency and lower hardware cost than an equivalent DSP solution. Interfacing to the proposed high speed camera and the deformable mirror will be simpler and have lower latency than with DSPs. This paper will discuss the current design and progress toward implementing the FPGA solution.

  13. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST): Instrument Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; GLAST Collaboration

    1999-04-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a satellite-based experiment under development to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV. The primary telescope for the mission is a pair-conversion telescope. The telescope design includes a precision tracker/converter section based on silicon-strip detectors, a CsI scintillating crystal calorimeter arranged in a hodoscopic configuration, an anticoincidence shield that is an array of plastic scintillator tiles read out with waveshifting optical fibers, and a powerful distributed data acquisition and triggering system. The design and expected performance of the telescope are presented along with results obtained from a high-energy beam test of a prototype.

  14. Formation Flying of Components of a Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Quadrelli, Marco; Breckenridge, William

    2009-01-01

    A conceptual space telescope having an aperture tens of meters wide and a focal length of hundreds of meters would be implemented as a group of six separate optical modules flying in formation: a primary-membrane-mirror module, a relay-mirror module, a focal-plane-assembly module containing a fast steering mirror and secondary and tertiary optics, a primary-mirror-figure-sensing module, a scanning-electron-beam module for controlling the shape of the primary mirror, and a sunshade module. Formation flying would make it unnecessary to maintain the required precise alignments among the modules by means of an impractically massive rigid structure. Instead, a control system operating in conjunction with a metrology system comprising optical and radio subsystems would control the firing of small thrusters on the separate modules to maintain the formation, thereby acting as a virtual rigid structure. The control system would utilize a combination of centralized- and decentralized-control methods according to a leader-follower approach. The feasibility of the concept was demonstrated in computational simulations that showed that relative positions could be maintained to within a fraction of a millimeter and orientations to within several microradians.

  15. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope Mission Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  16. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  17. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10 seconds of gigaelectronvolts from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as super-symmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  18. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  19. Large aperture freeform VIS telescope with smart alignment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Matthias; Fuhlrott, Wilko; Hartung, Johannes; Holota, Wolfgang; Gebhardt, Andreas; Risse, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The development of smart alignment and integration strategies for imaging mirror systems to be used within astronomical instrumentation are especially important with regard to the increasing impact of non-rotationally symmetric optics. In the present work, well-known assembly approaches preferentially applied in the course of infrared instrumentation are transferred to visible applications and are verified during the integration of an anamorphic imaging telescope breadboard. The four mirror imaging system is based on a modular concept using mechanically fixed arrangements of each two freeform surfaces, generated by servo assisted diamond machining and corrected using Magnetorheological Finishing as a figuring and smoothing step. Surface testing include optical CGH interferometry as well as tactile profilometry and is conducted with respect to diamond milled fiducials at the mirror bodies. A strict compliance of surface referencing during all significant fabrication steps allow for an easy integration and direct measurement of the system's wave aberration after initial assembly. The achievable imaging performance, as well as influences of the tight tolerance budget and mid-spatial frequency errors, are discussed and experimentally evaluated.

  20. Photorefractive processing for large adaptive phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weverka, Robert T.; Wagner, Kelvin; Sarto, Anthony

    1996-03-01

    An adaptive null-steering phased-array optical processor that utilizes a photorefractive crystal to time integrate the adaptive weights and null out correlated jammers is described. This is a beam-steering processor in which the temporal waveform of the desired signal is known but the look direction is not. The processor computes the angle(s) of arrival of the desired signal and steers the array to look in that direction while rotating the nulls of the antenna pattern toward any narrow-band jammers that may be present. We have experimentally demonstrated a simplified version of this adaptive phased-array-radar processor that nulls out the narrow-band jammers by using feedback-correlation detection. In this processor it is assumed that we know a priori only that the signal is broadband and the jammers are narrow band. These are examples of a class of optical processors that use the angular selectivity of volume holograms to form the nulls and look directions in an adaptive phased-array-radar pattern and thereby to harness the computational abilities of three-dimensional parallelism in the volume of photorefractive crystals. The development of this processing in volume holographic system has led to a new algorithm for phased-array-radar processing that uses fewer tapped-delay lines than does the classic time-domain beam former. The optical implementation of the new algorithm has the further advantage of utilization of a single photorefractive crystal to implement as many as a million adaptive weights, allowing the radar system to scale to large size with no increase in processing hardware.

  1. System concepts for a large UV/optical/IR telescope on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, Max E.; Davis, Billy

    1991-01-01

    To assess the systems and technological requirements for constructing lunar telescopes in conjunction with the buildup of a lunar base for scientific exploration and as a waypoint for travel to Mars, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted concept studies of a 16-m-aperture large lunar telescope (LLT) and a 4-m-aperture precursor telescope, both operating in the UV/visible/IR spectral region. The feasibility of constructing a large telescope on the lunar surface is assessed, and its systems and subsystems are analyzed. Telescope site selection, environmental effects, and launch and assembly scenarios are also evaluated. It is argued that key technical drivers for the LLT must be tested in situ by precursor telescopes to evaluate such areas as the operations and long-term reliability of active optics, radiation protection of instruments, lunar dust mitigation, and thermal shielding of the telescope systems. For a manned lunar outpost or an LLT to become a reality, a low-cost dependable transportation system must be developed.

  2. System concepts for a large UV/optical/IR telescope on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, Max E.; Davis, Billy

    1991-01-01

    To assess the systems and technological requirements for constructing lunar telescopes in conjunction with the buildup of a lunar base for scientific exploration and as a waypoint for travel to Mars, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted concept studies of a 16-m-aperture large lunar telescope (LLT) and a 4-m-aperture precursor telescope, both operating in the UV/visible/IR spectral region. The feasibility of constructing a large telescope on the lunar surface is assessed, and its systems and subsystems are analyzed. Telescope site selection, environmental effects, and launch and assembly scenarios are also evaluated. It is argued that key technical drivers for the LLT must be tested in situ by precursor telescopes to evaluate such areas as the operations and long-term reliability of active optics, radiation protection of instruments, lunar dust mitigation, and thermal shielding of the telescope systems. For a manned lunar outpost or an LLT to become a reality, a low-cost dependable transportation system must be developed.

  3. Large aperture adaptive optics for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, François; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed a range of large aperture electro-mechanical deformable mirrors (DM) suitable for ultra short pulsed intense lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations thanks to electromechanical actuators driven by stepper motors. DM design and assembly method have been adapted to large aperture beams and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm at 45° angle of incidence. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Simulations were correlated with measurements on optical bench and the design has been validated by calculation for very large aperture (up to Ø550mm). Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for actual MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The MD-AME mirrors can be adapted to circular, square or elliptical beams and they are compatible with all dielectric or metallic coatings.

  4. PALM-3000: EXOPLANET ADAPTIVE OPTICS FOR THE 5 m HALE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Dekany, Richard; Bouchez, Antonin; Baranec, Christoph; Hale, David; Zolkower, Jeffry; Henning, John; Croner, Ernest; McKenna, Dan; Hildebrandt, Sergi; Milburn, Jennifer; Roberts, Jennifer; Burruss, Rick; Truong, Tuan; Guiwits, Stephen; Angione, John; Trinh, Thang; Shelton, J. Christopher; Palmer, Dean; Troy, Mitchell; Tesch, Jonathan

    2013-10-20

    We describe and report first results from PALM-3000, the second-generation astronomical adaptive optics (AO) facility for the 5.1 m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. PALM-3000 has been engineered for high-contrast imaging and emission spectroscopy of brown dwarfs and large planetary mass bodies at near-infrared wavelengths around bright stars, but also supports general natural guide star use to V ≈ 17. Using its unique 66 × 66 actuator deformable mirror, PALM-3000 has thus far demonstrated residual wavefront errors of 141 nm rms under ∼1'' seeing conditions. PALM-3000 can provide phase conjugation correction over a 6.''4 × 6.''4 working region at λ = 2.2 μm, or full electric field (amplitude and phase) correction over approximately one-half of this field. With optimized back-end instrumentation, PALM-3000 is designed to enable 10{sup –7} contrast at 1'' angular separation, including post-observation speckle suppression processing. While continued optimization of the AO system is ongoing, we have already successfully commissioned five back-end instruments and begun a major exoplanet characterization survey, Project 1640.

  5. PALM-3000: Exoplanet Adaptive Optics for the 5 m Hale Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekany, Richard; Roberts, Jennifer; Burruss, Rick; Bouchez, Antonin; Truong, Tuan; Baranec, Christoph; Guiwits, Stephen; Hale, David; Angione, John; Trinh, Thang; Zolkower, Jeffry; Shelton, J. Christopher; Palmer, Dean; Henning, John; Croner, Ernest; Troy, Mitchell; McKenna, Dan; Tesch, Jonathan; Hildebrandt, Sergi; Milburn, Jennifer

    2013-10-01

    We describe and report first results from PALM-3000, the second-generation astronomical adaptive optics (AO) facility for the 5.1 m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. PALM-3000 has been engineered for high-contrast imaging and emission spectroscopy of brown dwarfs and large planetary mass bodies at near-infrared wavelengths around bright stars, but also supports general natural guide star use to V ≈ 17. Using its unique 66 × 66 actuator deformable mirror, PALM-3000 has thus far demonstrated residual wavefront errors of 141 nm rms under ~1'' seeing conditions. PALM-3000 can provide phase conjugation correction over a 6.''4 × 6.''4 working region at λ = 2.2 μm, or full electric field (amplitude and phase) correction over approximately one-half of this field. With optimized back-end instrumentation, PALM-3000 is designed to enable 10-7 contrast at 1'' angular separation, including post-observation speckle suppression processing. While continued optimization of the AO system is ongoing, we have already successfully commissioned five back-end instruments and begun a major exoplanet characterization survey, Project 1640.

  6. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  7. Requirements and concept design for large earth survey telescope for SEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mailhot, P.; Bisbee, J.

    1975-01-01

    The efforts of a one year program of Requirements Analysis and Conceptual Design for the Large Earth Survey Telescope for the Synchronous Earth Observatory Satellite is summarized. A 1.4 meter aperture Cassegrain telescope with 0.6 deg field of view is shown to do an excellent job in satisfying the observational requirements for a wide range of earth resources and meteorological applications. The telescope provides imagery or thermal mapping in ten spectral bands at one time in a field sharing grouping of linear detector arrays. Pushbroom scanning is accomplished by spacecraft slew.

  8. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Bolcar, Matt; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark,Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance.

  9. J.S. Plaskett and the Origins of the Modern Large Reflecting Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrell, R. A.

    1996-12-01

    The large (>60-inch) reflecting telescope, despite 19th-century antecedents, is the technological foundation of 20th-century astronomy. We might assume that Ritchey's 60- and 100-inch reflectors at Mt Wilson were the first examples of modern telescopes. I will argue that it was 72-inch Victoria telescope, built for J.S. Plaskett's needs, that became the model for a whole generation of large telescopes throughout the world. It was a state-of-the-art, composite instrument that owed its engineering and design features to several astronomers and engineers, including Ritchey, David Gill, Howard Grubb, the Warner and Swasey team and Plaskett himself. The overall conception of the final product, despite technological improvements over the next four decades, remained remarkably unchanged.

  10. Toward Large-Area Sub-Arcsecond X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Allured, Ryan; Atkins, Carolyn; Burrows, David N.; Cao, Jian; Chalifoux, Brandon D.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Elsner, Ronald F.; Graham, Michael E.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; McMuldroch, Stuart; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Riveros, Raul E.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Saha, Timo T.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Vaynman, Semyon; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Wang, Xiaoli; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The future of x-ray astronomy depends upon development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (>1 sq m) and finer angular resolution(<1).Combined with the special requirements of nested grazing incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of spaceborne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging. Achieving this goal will require precision fabrication, alignment, mounting, and assembly of large areas (>100 sq m) of lightweight (1 kg/sq m areal density) high quality mirrors-possibly entailing active (in-space adjustable) alignment and figure correction. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward large area sub-arcsecond x-ray telescopes. Key words: X-ray telescopes, x-ray optics, active optics, electroactive devices, silicon mirrors, differential deposition, ion implantation.

  11. Diversity and Adaptation in Large Population Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. Y. Michael; Lim, S. W.; Luo, Peixun

    We consider a version of large population games whose players compete for resources using strategies with adaptable preferences. The system efficiency is measured by the variance of the decisions. In the regime where the system can be plagued by the maladaptive behavior of the players, we find that diversity among the players improves the system efficiency, though it slows the convergence to the steady state. Diversity causes a mild spread of resources at the transient state, but reduces the uneven distribution of resources in the steady state.

  12. iLocater: A Diffraction-Limited Doppler Spectrometer for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin R.; Bechter, A.; Bechter, E.; Berg, M.; Carroll, J.; Collins, K.; Corpuz, T.; Ketterer, R.; Kielb, E.; Stoddard, R.; Eisner, J. A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hinz, P.; Kratter, K. M.; Macela, G.; Quirrenbach, A.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Sozzetti, A.; Woodward, C. E.; Zhao, B.

    2014-01-01

    We are building an ultra-precise Doppler spectrometer for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) that operates at near-infrared wavelengths. The instrument, named iLocater, holds significant advantages over current and forth-coming Doppler designs. An R=110,000 spectrograph that operates in the Y-band, iLocater will receive a well-corrected beam from the LBT “extreme” adaptive optics system and use single-mode optical fibers to stabilize the instrument line spread function. With an input image 30 times smaller than comparable seeing-limited instruments (i.e., all Doppler radial velocity predecessors), iLocater will simultaneously achieve high spectral resolution, high spatial resolution, high throughput, and a compact optical design for low cost (affordable gratings). By working at the diffraction-limit, it is possible to circumvent, or ameliorate, many of the sources of noise common to seeing-limited spectrometers, including background contamination, thermal drifts, binary star interlopers, and pressure-induced changes in refractive index. Further, starlight received simultaneously from the LBT’s two separate telescope dishes may be used to monitor and remove internal systematic RV errors. iLocater will: identify "Earth-like" planets orbiting in the habitable-zone around nearby M-dwarf stars; perform the first systematic study of planet occurrence around binary stars as a function of their orbital separation; obtain the first spin-orbit orientation measurements of transiting terrestrial planets; and acquire essential follow-up observations for NASA's planned Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission. In this poster, we present iLocater's design and science cases.

  13. The Starfire Optical Range 3.5-m Adaptive Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugate, Robert Q.

    2003-02-01

    The 3.5-m telescope at the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), operated by the Directed Energy Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM saw first light in February, 1994 and first operation of the adaptive optics in September, 1997. The primary mirror built by Steward Observatory Mirror Lab is spun cast borosilicate, actively supported and temperature conditioned. The telescope mount was designed to smoothly track low-earth-orbiting (LEO) satellites and therefore has different features than most telescopes designed for astronomy. The protective enclosure retracts vertically, leaving the telescope completely exposed, enabling access to rapidly moving targets. The telescope feeds a coude laboratory containing steering mirrors, deformable mirror, sensors for wave front control and target tracking, high resolution cameras, and lasers for beacons and energy projection experiments. This paper summarizes recent operating experiences and provides lessons learned in terms of thermal conditioning, mount control, mirror control, mirror cleaning, optical alignment, and satellite tracking. The operation and performance of the tracking and higher-order wave front compensation to LEO satellites will be presented. Plans for future upgrades will be described.

  14. Conceptual design of the scientific instrument arrangement for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurasky, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the scientific instrument arrangement for the large space telescope (LST) is given, with some of the rationale for selecting this concept. The first section of this report describes the basic configuration and was designed for an f/20 telescope focal plane. The subsequent LSTWG meeting held in November gave some redirection to the scientific requirements, and these changes are described in the section, Configuration Update.

  15. Low-cost Large Aperture Telescopes for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    Low-cost, large-aperture optical receivers are required to form an affordable optical ground receiver network for laser communications. Among the ground receiver station's multiple subsystems, here, we only discuss the ongoing research activities aimed at reducing the cost of the large-size optics on the receiver. Experimental results of two different approaches for fabricating low-cost mirrors of wavefront quality on the order of 100-200X the diffraction limit are described. Laboratory-level effort are underway to improve the surface figure to better than 20X the diffraction limit.

  16. Low-cost Large Aperture Telescopes for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    Low-cost, large-aperture optical receivers are required to form an affordable optical ground receiver network for laser communications. Among the ground receiver station's multiple subsystems, here, we only discuss the ongoing research activities aimed at reducing the cost of the large-size optics on the receiver. Experimental results of two different approaches for fabricating low-cost mirrors of wavefront quality on the order of 100-200X the diffraction limit are described. Laboratory-level effort are underway to improve the surface figure to better than 20X the diffraction limit.

  17. Increasing the Corrected Field of View of an Adaptive Optical Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Chester S. Gardner. "Experiments on laser guide stars at Mauna Kea Observatory for adaptive imaging in astronomy," Nature, 328:229-231 (1987). BIB-3 59...Roddier, F. and others. "Seeing at Mauna Kea : a joint UH-UN-NOAO-CFHT study." Ad- vanced Technology Optical Telescopes IV, Proc. SPIE1236, edited by...assumptions are made in this dissertation: 1) geometrical optics is adequate to describe propagation down through the atmosphere at a good observatory

  18. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2014-01-01

    We describe the instrument architecture of the Johns Hopkins University-led CLASS instrument, a groundbased cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter that will measure the large-scale polarization of the CMB in several frequency bands to search for evidence of inflation.

  19. Large filters for wide-field survey telescope LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Sassolas, Benoit; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Daniéle; Lagrange, Bernard; Michel, Christophe; Antilogus, Pierre

    2012-09-01

    The LSST design foresees the use of six wide-band large optical filters that can alternatively be moved in front of the CCD camera. Each of the six filters has a different band-pass covering all the wavelengths from 300 nm to 1200 nm. The way to achieve this is to coat an optimized optical thin films stack on a filter substrate. Each filter requires a specific design using specific appropriate materials. The main characteristics of these filters, that constitute a real technological challenge, are: their relatively large size - their radii of curvature (about 5.6 m) that represent a sagitta of 12,5 mm that increases the uniformity complexity, the large rejection band requirements with transmission lower than 0.01 % out of the band and a transmission of 95 % over the band-pass. This paper proposes to show the problematic and the results obtained at LMA (Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés-FRANCE) to the purpose of realizing these filters using the IBS (Ion Beam Sputtering) deposition technique. The results obtained with High-Pass/Low-Pass structures will be presented. Experimental results will be shown concerning the R-band filter (552-691 nm). An overview of the work to be done to realize transmittance map over large filters will be given.

  20. Science with Large Solar Telescopes: Overview of SpS 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, Gianna; Tritschler, Alexandra; Deng, Yuanyong

    2015-03-01

    With several large aperture optical and IR telescopes just coming on-line, or scheduled for the near future, solar physics is on the verge of a quantum leap in observational capabilities. An efficient use of such facilities will require new and innovative approaches to both observatory operations and data handling. This two-days long Special Session discussed the science expected with large solar telescopes, and started addressing the strategies necessary to optimize their scientific return. Cutting edge solar science as derived from state-of-the-art observations and numerical simulations and modeling was presented, and discussions were held on the role of large facilities in satisfying the demanding requirements of spatial and temporal resolution, stray-light correction, and spectro-polarimetric accuracy. Building on the experience of recently commissioned telescopes, critical issues for the development of future facilities were discussed. These included operational issues peculiar to large telecopes as well as strategies for their best use.

  1. Chinese Large Optic/IR Telescope (LOT): planning for the next decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiang-qun; Zhu, Yong-tian

    2016-08-01

    Chinese astronomical community has suggested to construct a high resolution precision and wide field survey of universal optical / infrared telescope, suitable for a wide range of cutting-edge scientific research subject. The telescope diameter is 12 meters, and it is composed of 84 pieces of hexagonal mirrors. After the completion, it could be a world's largest telescope. Its wide field survey function will be work together with the 30 meters telescope in the near future on the observation of complementary. The telescope optical system adopted innovative design ideas, its multiple focuses can achieve rapid switching; its atmospheric dispersion corrector lens-prism can correct aberration also, and with the advantage of simple structure; two layers of Nasmyth platform can be placed more scientific instruments. LAMOST, a Chinese large spectrum survey telescope has been built and put into operation many years, it has successfully developed the two segmented optical mirrors and one of them is with deformation of thin mirror active optical technology, as well as the batch grinding hexagonal off-axis mirror technology developed in recent years, for construction of the 12 meters telescope laid a good technical foundation.

  2. Extremely large telescope: a twenty-five meter aperture for the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Frank N.; Sebring, Thomas A.; Ray, Frank B.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    1997-03-01

    The 10-meter class Hobby-Eberly telescope (HET), now nearing completion, provides technology for optical Arecibo-type telescopes which can be extrapolated to even larger apertures. Utilizing a fixed elevation angle and a spherical segmented primary mirror provides cost effective and pragmatic solutions to mirror mounting and fabrication. Arecibo-type tracking implies a greatly reduced tracking mass and no change to the gravity vector for the primary mirror. Such a telescope can address 70 percent of the available sky and exhibit optical quality easily sufficient for effective spectroscopy and photometry. The extremely large telescope takes advantage of several key engineering approaches demonstrated by the HET project to achieve a cost comparable to similarly-sized radio rather than optical telescopes. These engineering approaches include: bolted pre-manufactured primary mirror truss, factory manufactured geodesic enclosure dome, air bearing rotation of primary mirror, tracker, and dome systems directly on concrete piers, and tracking via a hexapod system. Current estimates put the cost of the ELT at $200 million for a 25-meter aperture utilizing a 33-meter primary mirror array. Construction of the ELT would provide the astronomy community with an optical telescope nearly an order of magnitude larger than even the largest telescopes in operation or under construction today.

  3. Prime focus architectures for large space telescopes: reduce surfaces to save cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Lillie, C. F.

    2016-07-01

    Conceptual architectures are now being developed to identify future directions for post JWST large space telescope systems to operate in the UV Optical and near IR regions of the spectrum. Here we show that the cost of optical surfaces within large aperture telescope/instrument systems can exceed $100M/reflection when expressed in terms of the aperture increase needed to over come internal absorption loss. We recommend a program in innovative optical design to minimize the number of surfaces by considering multiple functions for mirrors. An example is given using the Rowland circle imaging spectrometer systems for UV space science. With few exceptions, current space telescope architectures are based on systems optimized for ground-based astronomy. Both HST and JWST are classical "Cassegrain" telescopes derived from the ground-based tradition to co-locate the massive primary mirror and the instruments at the same end of the metrology structure. This requirement derives from the dual need to minimize observatory dome size and cost in the presence of the Earth's 1-g gravitational field. Space telescopes, however function in the zero gravity of space and the 1- g constraint is relieved to the advantage of astronomers. Here we suggest that a prime focus large aperture telescope system in space may have potentially have higher transmittance, better pointing, improved thermal and structural control, less internal polarization and broader wavelength coverage than Cassegrain telescopes. An example is given showing how UV astronomy telescopes use single optical elements for multiple functions and therefore have a minimum number of reflections.

  4. Robo-AO: The First Autonomous Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System for Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, C.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N.; Tendulkar, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kasliwal, M.; Ofek, E.; Zolkower, J.

    2011-01-01

    Robo-AO will be the first fully autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics and science system. Specifically designed to take advantage of small (1 to 3 meter) telescopes, Robo-AO will deliver high angular resolution science in the visible and near infrared for up to hundreds of targets per night. This will enable the exploration of science programs not practical for larger aperture adaptive optics systems. This presentation discusses the current status of the Robo-AO project, including the laboratory testbed, laser guide star facility and plans for a demonstration of the fully autonomous system next year.

  5. PILOT—a Pathfinder for an International Large Optical Telescope in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, M. C. B.; Burton, M. G.; Lawrence, J. S.; Storey, J. W. V.

    2006-08-01

    PILOT is a proposed 2.4 metre optical/IR telescope, designed to take advantage of the extraordinarily good observing conditions on the high plateau of Antarctica. The superb seeing and low infrared backgrounds will allow PILOT to outperform telescopes of 2-3 times the diameter at a mid-latitude site. PILOT is large enough to undertake important science, while small enough to act as a low-cost low-risk technology demonstrator for the next generation of large optical/IR telescopes in Antarctica. Future facilities could include the proposed 8.4 metre off-axis LAPCAT telescope, that would be competitive with ELTs in its ability to directly image extra-solar planets. PILOT is envisaged as an international collaboration. It is hoped that Australia will fund the telescope, with instruments, logistics and other aspects of the project contributed by international partners. A detailed science case for PILOT has been published, and a number of design studies for the telescope have been completed or are under way.

  6. Development of Large-Aperture, Light-Weight Fresnel Lenses for Gossamer Space Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, D; Hyde, R; Weisberg, A; Early, J; Rushford, M; Britten, J

    2002-04-29

    In order to examine more distant astronomical objects, with higher resolution, future space telescopes require objectives with significantly larger aperture than presently available. NASA has identified a progression in size from the 2.4m aperture objective currently used in the HUBBLE space telescope[l,2], to 25m and greater in order to observe, e.g., extra-solar planets. Since weight is a crucial factor for any object sent into space, the relative weight of large optics over a given area must be reduced[3]. The areal mass density of the primary mirror for the Hubble space telescope is {approx}200 kg/m{sup 2}. This is expected to be reduced to around 15 kg/m{sup 2} for the successor to Hubble--the next generation space telescope (NGST)[4]. For future very large aperture telescopes needed for extra-solar planet detection, the areal mass density must be reduced even further. For example, the areal mass density goal for the Gossamer space telescopes is < 1 kg/m{sup 2}. The production of lightweight focusing optics at >10m size is also an enabling technology for many other applications such as Earth observation, power beaming, and optical communications.

  7. Isoplanatic patch considerations for solar telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Jacques M.

    2014-08-01

    I compare recent site surveys for the future large 4-meter solar and 30-meter nighttime telescopes at the nearby Haleakala and Mauna Kea sites respectively. They show that the outstanding early morning image quality at the solar site corresponds indeed to that observed at the late night one at the nighttime site. That confirms the notion that daytime solar site heating only shows itself later in the morning. The nighttime survey includes observations of the refractive index structure function Cn 2(h) to high altitudes from which the radius of the isoplanatic patch (Ɵ0) can be determined. At zenith (ζ = 00) it equals 2.5 arcsec at 500 nm wavelength. For the early morning (best) seeing at the solar site, which occurs at ζsun = 750 and the cos1.6(ζ) dependence of Θ0,that means an extremely small Ɵ0 (0.26 arcsec). Such small values compromise Adaptive Optics (AO) solar correlation wavefront sensing for which areas are needed equal to about 8"× 8" I suggest options for measuring Cn2(h), and therefore Ɵ0, during the day. These make use of the solar image as well as of daytime images of bright stars and planets. Some use the MASS technique on stars; some use the SHABAR technique using very large detector baselines on the Sun and shorter baselines on planets. It is suggested that these Cn2(h) measurements are made also during regular solar observations. In that way optimal solar observations can be planned using real-time Ɵ0 observations by image selection and optimization of the MCAO configuration.

  8. AOLI: near-diffraction limited imaging in the visible on large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Craig; Rebolo, Rafael; King, David L.; Labadie, Lucas; Puga, Marta; Pérez Garrido, Antonio; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Lopez, Roberto L.; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Oscoz, Alejandro; Rodríguez Ramos, J.; Rodrigo-Ramos, Luis F.; Fernandez-Valdivia, J. J.; Velasco, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    The combination of Lucky Imaging with a low order adaptive optics system was demonstrated very successfully on the Palomar 5m telescope nearly 10 years ago. It is still the only system to give such high-resolution images in the visible or near infrared on ground-based telescope of faint astronomical targets. The development of AOLI for deployment initially on the WHT 4.2 m telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, will be described in this paper. In particular, we will look at the design and status of our low order curvature wavefront sensor which has been somewhat simplified to make it more efficient, ensuring coverage over much of the sky with natural guide stars as reference object. AOLI uses optically butted electron multiplying CCDs to give an imaging array of 2000 x 2000 pixels.

  9. NPT: a large-aperture telescope for high dynamic range astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Robert D.; Kuhn, Jeff R.; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Coulter, Roy; Ftaclas, Christo; Graves, J. Elon; Hull, Charles L.; Jewitt, D.; Mickey, Donald L.; Moretto, Gilberto; Neill, Doug; Northcott, Malcolm J.; Roddier, Claude A.; Roddier, Francois J.; Siegmund, Walter A.; Owen, Tobias C.

    2000-06-01

    All existing night-time astronomical telescopes, regardless of aperture, are blind to an important part of the universe - the region around bright objects. Technology now exist to build an unobscured 6.5 m aperture telescope which will attain coronagraphic sensitivity heretofore unachieved. A working group hosted by the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy has developed plans for a New Planetary Telescope which will permit astronomical observations which have never before ben possible. In its narrow-field mode the off-axis optical design, combined with adaptive optics, provides superb coronagraphic capabilities, and a very low thermal IR background. These make it ideal for studies of extra-solar planets and circumstellar discs, as well as for general IR astronomy. In its wide-field mode the NPT provides a 2 degree diameter field for surveys of Kuiper Belt Objects and Near-Earth Objects, surveys central to current intellectual interests in solar system astronomy.

  10. Partially filled aperture interferometric telescopes: achieving large aperture and coronagraphic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Gil; Kuhn, Jeff R.; Berdyugina, Svetlana V.; Langlois, Maud; Tallon, Michel; Thiébaut, Eric; Halliday, David

    2016-08-01

    The exponential growth in exoplanet studies and science cases requiring high contrast observations is a powerful reason for developing very large optical systems optimized for narrow-field science. Concepts which cross the boundary between fixed aperture telescopes and interferometers, combined with technologies that decrease the system moving mass, can violate the cost and mass scaling laws that make conventional large-aperture telescopes relatively expensive. Here we describe concepts of large, filled-aperture (Colossus) and partially filled aperture (ParFAIT) interferometric optical/IR telescope systems which break this scaling relation. These systems are dedicated to high dynamic range science such as detecting life and even civilizations on Earth-like planets.

  11. An efficient pipeline wavefront phase recovery for the CAFADIS camera for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show a fast, specialized hardware implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera. The CAFADIS camera is a new plenoptic sensor patented by the Universidad de La Laguna (Canary Islands, Spain): international patent PCT/ES2007/000046 (WIPO publication number WO/2007/082975). It can simultaneously measure the wavefront phase and the distance to the light source in a real-time process. The pipeline algorithm is implemented using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). These devices present architecture capable of handling the sensor output stream using a massively parallel approach and they are efficient enough to resolve several Adaptive Optics (AO) problems in Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) in terms of processing time requirements. The FPGA implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera is based on the very fast computation of two dimensional fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs). Thus we have carried out a comparison between our very novel FPGA 2D-FFTa and other implementations.

  12. Fractal iterative method for fast atmospheric tomography on extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallon, Michel; Tallon-Bosc, Isabelle; Béchet, Clémentine; Momey, Fabien; Fradin, Marie; Thiébaut, Éric

    2010-07-01

    A challenge of adaptive optics (AO) on Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) is to overcome the difficulty of solving a huge number of equations in real time, especially when atmospheric tomography is involved. This is particularly the case for multi-conjugate or multi-objects AO systems. In addition, the quality of the wavefront estimation is crucial to optimize the performances of the future systems in a situation where measurements are missing and noises are correlated. The Fractal Iterative Method has been introduced as a fast iterative algorithm for minimum variance wavefront reconstruction and control on ELTs. This method has been successfully tested on Classical Single Conjugate AO systems on Octopus numerical simulator at ESO. But the minimum variance approach is expected to be mostly useful with atmospheric tomography. We present the first results obtained with FrIM in the context of atmospheric tomography. We recall the principle of the algorithm and we summarize the formalism used for modeling the measurements obtained from laser guide stars that entail spot elongation and tip/tilt indetermination, mixed with low order measurements from natural guide stars. We show the respective effects of tip/tilt indetermination, spot elongation, unseen modes on various configurations, as well as the usefulness of priors and correct noise models in the reconstruction. This analysis is essential for balancing the various errors that combine in a quite complex way and to optimize the configuration of the future AO systems for specific science cases and instrument requirements.

  13. An Efficient Pipeline Wavefront Phase Recovery for the CAFADIS Camera for Extremely Large Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show a fast, specialized hardware implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera. The CAFADIS camera is a new plenoptic sensor patented by the Universidad de La Laguna (Canary Islands, Spain): international patent PCT/ES2007/000046 (WIPO publication number WO/2007/082975). It can simultaneously measure the wavefront phase and the distance to the light source in a real-time process. The pipeline algorithm is implemented using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). These devices present architecture capable of handling the sensor output stream using a massively parallel approach and they are efficient enough to resolve several Adaptive Optics (AO) problems in Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) in terms of processing time requirements. The FPGA implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera is based on the very fast computation of two dimensional fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs). Thus we have carried out a comparison between our very novel FPGA 2D-FFTa and other implementations. PMID:22315523

  14. High Contrast Imaging in the Visible: First Experimental Results at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedichini, F.; Stangalini, M.; Ambrosino, F.; Puglisi, A.; Pinna, E.; Bailey, V.; Carbonaro, L.; Centrone, M.; Christou, J.; Esposito, S.; Farinato, J.; Fiore, F.; Giallongo, E.; Hill, J. M.; Hinz, P. M.; Sabatini, L.

    2017-08-01

    In 2014 February, the System for High contrast And coronography from R to K at VISual bands (SHARK-VIS) Forerunner, a high contrast experimental imager operating at visible wavelengths, was installed at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Here we report on the first results obtained by recent on-sky tests. These results show the extremely good performance of the LBT Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system at visible wavelengths, both in terms of spatial resolution and contrast achieved. Similarly to what was done by Amara & Quanz (2012), we used the SHARK-VIS Forerunner data to quantitatively assess the contrast enhancement. This is done by injecting several different synthetic faint objects in the acquired data and applying the angular differential imaging (ADI) technique. A contrast of the order of 5 × 10-5 is obtained at 630 nm for angular separations from the star larger than 100 mas. These results are discussed in light of the future development of SHARK-VIS and compared to those obtained by other high contrast imagers operating at similar wavelengths.

  15. Adaptive momentum management for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, E.

    1987-01-01

    Momentum management is discussed for a Large Space Structure (LSS) with the structure selected configuration being the Initial Orbital Configuration (IOC) of the dual keel space station. The external forces considered were gravity gradient and aerodynamic torques. The goal of the momentum management scheme developed is to remove the bias components of the external torques and center the cyclic components of the stored angular momentum. The scheme investigated is adaptive to uncertainties of the inertia tensor and requires only approximate knowledge of principle moments of inertia. Computational requirements are minimal and should present no implementation problem in a flight type computer and the method proposed is shown to be effective in the presence of attitude control bandwidths as low as .01 radian/sec.

  16. An Analysis Methodology for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2004-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has been designed to detect high-energy gamma rays and determine their direction of incidence and energy. We propose a reconstruction algorithm based on recent advances in statistical methodology. This method, alternative to the standard event analysis inherited from high energy collider physics experiments, incorporates more accurately the physical processes occurring in the detector, and makes full use of the statistical information available. It could thus provide a better estimate of the direction and energy of the primary photon.

  17. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William

    2014-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies. AMTD is deliberately pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with op-tions to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  18. Direct 75 milliarcsecond images from the Multiple Mirror Telescope with adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; Dekany, R.; Mcleod, B.; Wittman, D.; Colucci, D.; Mccarthy, D.; Angel, R.

    1993-01-01

    We report results from an adaptive optics system designed to provide imaging at the diffraction limit of resolution in the near-infrared at the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT). For the present experiment, the aperture consisted of five of the six primary mirrors of the MMT, operating as a coherently phased array. The largest components of the atmospherically induced wave-front aberration are the fluctuations in mean phase between the segments. These errors were derived in real time from the Fourier transform of short-exposure stellar images at 2.2 microns and corrected at an image of the telescope pupil with piston motion from a segmented adaptive mirror. At a correction rate of 43 Hz, this level of adaptive control resulted in an integrated image with a clear diffraction-limited component of 0.075 arcsec FWHM. This stabilized component is present directly in the light arriving at the detector and is not the result of postprocessing. We discuss future improvements to our adaptive wave-front control and its application to astronomical observations.

  19. Science data quality assessment for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Richard A.; Levine, Deborah; Axelrod, Timothy; Laher, Russ R.; Mannings, Vince G.

    2010-07-01

    LSST will have a Science Data Quality Assessment (SDQA) subsystem for the assessment of the data products that will be produced during the course of a 10 yr survey. The LSST will produce unprecedented volumes of astronomical data as it surveys the accessible sky every few nights. The SDQA subsystem will enable comparisons of the science data with expectations from prior experience and models, and with established requirements for the survey. While analogous systems have been built for previous large astronomical surveys, SDQA for LSST must meet a unique combination of challenges. Chief among them will be the extraordinary data rate and volume, which restricts the bulk of the quality computations to the automated processing stages, as revisiting the pixels for a post-facto evaluation is prohibitively expensive. The identification of appropriate scientific metrics is driven by the breadth of the expected science, the scope of the time-domain survey, the need to tap the widest possible pool of scientific expertise, and the historical tendency of new quality metrics to be crafted and refined as experience grows. Prior experience suggests that contemplative, off-line quality analyses are essential to distilling new automated quality metrics, so the SDQA architecture must support integrability with a variety of custom and community-based tools, and be flexible to embrace evolving QA demands. Finally, the time-domain nature of LSST means every exposure may be useful for some scientific purpose, so the model of quality thresholds must be sufficiently rich to reflect the quality demands of diverse science aims.

  20. GRACE: a controlled environment for adaptive optics at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Gordon; Abrams, Don C.; Benn, Chris R.; Chopping, Alan; Dee, Kevin; Els, Sebastian; Fisher, Martin; Goodsell, Stephen; Gray, Doug; Jolley, Paul D.

    2004-10-01

    The William Herschel Telescope (WHT) has an adaptive optics (AO) suite consisting of the AO system NAOMI, near IR imager INGRID, optical field spectrograph OASIS and coronagraph OSCA. GRACE (GRound based Adaptive optics Controlled Environment) is a dedicated structure at a Nasmyth focus designed to facilitate routine AO use by providing a controlled environment for the instrument system. However, GRACE is not just a building; it is all of the systems associated with providing the controlled environment, especially the control of air quality, temperature and flow. A key concern was that adding the GRACE building to the Nasmyth platform would not adversely change the telescope performance. This paper gives the background to GRACE, its specification and design, the building construction and installation, the environmental controls installed and their performance, the services provided, the effect of the new structure on telescope performance, the results of the project, including the effect having a controlled environment on AO performance and its planned use for a Rayleigh laser guide star system.

  1. An overview and the current status of instrumentation at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark; Edwards, Michelle L.; Kuhn, Olga; Thompson, David; Veillet, Christian

    2014-07-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (24' × 24') mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the left and right direct F/15 Gregorian foci incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6' field and spectral resolutions of up to 2000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectrometer (LUCI), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at the left and right front-bent F/15 Gregorian foci and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4' × 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0'.5 x 0'.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development that can utilize the full 23 m baseline of the LBT include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near- infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). LBTI is currently undergoing commissioning and performing science observations on the LBT utilizing the installed adaptive secondary mirrors in both single-sided and two-sided beam combination modes. In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. Installation and testing of the bench spectrograph will begin in July 2014. Over the past four years the LBC pair, LUCI1, and MODS1 have been commissioned and are now scheduled for routine partner science observations. Both LUCI2 and MODS2 passed their laboratory

  2. Co-Phasing the Large Binocular Telescope:. [Status and Performance of LBTI-PHASECam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrere, D.; Hinz, P.; Downey, E.; Ashby, D.; Bailey, V.; Brusa, G.; Christou, J.; Danchi, W. C.; Grenz, P.; Hill, J. M.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Leisenring, J.; Lozi, J.; McMahon, T.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Montoya, M.; Powell, K.; Skemer, A.; Vaitheeswaran, V.; Vaz, A.; Veillet, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer is a NASA-funded nulling and imaging instrument designed to coherently combine the two 8.4-m primary mirrors of the LBT for high-sensitivity, high-contrast, and high-resolution infrared imaging (1.5-13 micrometer). PHASECam is LBTI's near-infrared camera used to measure tip-tilt and phase variations between the two AO-corrected apertures and provide high-angular resolution observations. We report on the status of the system and describe its on-sky performance measured during the first semester of 2014. With a spatial resolution equivalent to that of a 22.8-meter telescope and the light-gathering power of single 11.8-meter mirror, the co-phased LBT can be considered to be a forerunner of the next-generation extremely large telescopes (ELT).

  3. Integration and mechanical interfacing of very large instruments at UKIRT and JCMT telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chylek, Tomas; Shutt, Dean J.

    2003-02-01

    The progress in development of advanced instrumentation for IR and submillimeter telescopes during the past decades is bringing new structural and logistics challenges to engineers at both the UKIRT and JCMT telescopes. These facilities were designed for instruments much smaller, lighter, and less complex than those currently under construction. This paper describes the ongoing structural changes to the design of both telescopes and innovative approaches to the mechanical interfacing of extremely large and heavy instruments. The design changes and handling schemes these large and unwieldy instruments require would be unthinkable without utilization of advanced 3-D computer modeling and finite element analysis. Examples will be given of particular challenges associated with the handling and interfacing of existing instruments at both facilities as well as the difficulties presented by new generation instrumentation currently under development. The importance of involving facility engineers as early as the conceptual stages of new instrument design and development will be demonstrated.

  4. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Phillip; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsecond angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST); ultraviolet/optical space telescopes; astrophysics; astrobiology; technology development.

  5. Adaptive Control Techniques for Large Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-23

    mission objectives. In particular, uncertainties in both system dynamics and disturbance spectra characterizations (both time varying and stochastic... uncertainty ) significantly limit the performance attainable with fixed gain, fixed architecture controls. Therefore, the use of an adaptive system , where...Theoretical Development: The initial emphasis has been on slow adaptation, since this covers may LSS situations. Later on we will examine fast adaptation. The

  6. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  7. Designs for a large-aperture telescope to map the CMB 10× faster.

    PubMed

    Niemack, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Current large-aperture cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescopes have nearly maximized the number of detectors that can be illuminated while maintaining diffraction-limited image quality. The polarization-sensitive detector arrays being deployed in these telescopes in the next few years will have roughly 10⁴ detectors. Increasing the mapping speed of future instruments by at least an order of magnitude is important to enable precise probes of the inflationary paradigm in the first fraction of a second after the big bang and provide strong constraints on cosmological parameters. The CMB community has begun planning a next generation "Stage IV" CMB project that will be comprised of multiple telescopes with between 10⁵-10⁶ detectors to pursue these goals. This paper introduces the new crossed Dragone telescope and receiver optics designs that increase the usable diffraction-limited field-of-view, and therefore the mapping speed, by an order of magnitude compared to the upcoming generation of large-aperture instruments. Polarization systematics and engineering considerations are presented, including a preliminary receiver model to demonstrate that these designs will enable high efficiency illumination of >10⁵ detectors in a next generation CMB telescope.

  8. Preliminary use of nematic liquid crystal adaptive optics with a 2.16-meter reflecting telescope.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Hu, Lifa; Li, Dayu; Peng, Zenghui; Liu, Yonggang; Xuan, Li

    2009-02-16

    A nematic liquid crystal adaptive optics system (NLC AOS) was assembled for a 2.16-m telescope to correct for atmospheric turbulence. LC AOS was designed and optimized with Zemax optical software. Second, an adaptive correction experiment was performed in the laboratory to test the performance of the NLC AOS. After the correction, the peak to valley (PV) and root mean square (RMS) of the wavefront were down to 0.2 lambda (lambda=633 nm) and 0.05 lambda, respectively. Finally, the star of Pollux (beta Gem) was tracked using the 2.16-m Reflecting Telescope, and real time correction of the atmospheric turbulence was performed with the NLC AOS. After the adaptive correction, the average PV and RMS of the wavefront were reduced from 11 lambda and 2.5 lambda to 2.3 lambda and 0.6 lambda, respectively. Although the intensity distribution of the beta Gem was converged and its peak was sharp, a halo still existed around the peak. These results indicated that the NLC AOS only partially corrected the vertical atmospheric turbulence. The limitations of our NLC AOS are discussed and some proposals are made.

  9. Modelling, simulation and testing of an optomechatronics design of a large radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, B. Y.; Qiu, Y. Y.; Su, Y. X.; Wang, W. L.; Nan, R. D.; Peng, B.

    An innovative design for a feed support structure for the next generation large radio telescope, based on the idea of integrating mechanical, electronic and optical technologies (OPTOMECHATRONICS), is considered. Theoretical analyses and simulations are carried out. A 5 m experimental model is built to demonstrate the idea.

  10. Research on the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingxu

    2007-12-01

    Large-aperture telescope can be used in surveying battlefield, researching landform, searching object, real-time monitoring, imaging, detecting and identifying spatial targets and so on. A large-aperture telescope for achieving high resolution power is designed to monitor spatial target and image in real time. Real-time monitoring plays an important role in military conflicts. The orbit parameter of object, quantity, geometrical shape parameter and so on can be obtained by detect spatial target. With the development of optical technology, people require larger aperture in optics-electronic (O-E) system. By increasing optical aperture, the ability of collecting light and resolution power in the system can be enhanced. But the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope will be a very difficult problem. With the increase of primary mirror aperture, the weight of the primary mirror will become larger than before. The root mean square (rms) of the primary mirror is affected by many factors, such as deadweight, deformation of heat, environment and so on. Due to the primary mirror of telescope is an important component of telescope system. By reducing the weight of primary mirror, precision of the system is ensured. During the designing phase, one can consider the supporting project of the primary mirror synthetically and analyze it roundly according to technical requirement of optical system and the effect factors. The final structural design can be reasonable. In an astronomical telescope, the surface of reflector is an important part for collecting dark radiation of celestial bodies. Its surface shape will have an effect on collecting efficiency of telescope radiant energy directly. So the rms must be very high. Optical system of large aperture, small wavelength and small focus can receive maximal light intensity. For ground-based optical astronomical telescope, the design proposed in the paper can satisfy the requirement of the possible

  11. A STUDY OF CEPHEIDS IN M81 WITH THE LARGE BINOCULAR TELESCOPE (EFFICIENTLY CALIBRATED WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, J. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Prieto, J. L.; Macri, L. M.

    2011-12-20

    We identify and phase a sample of 107 Cepheids with 10 days < P < 100 days in M81 using the Large Binocular Telescope and calibrate their B, V, and I mean magnitudes with archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. The use of a ground-based telescope to identify and phase the Cepheids and HST only for the final calibration reduces the demand on this highly oversubscribed spacecraft by nearly an order of magnitude and yields period-luminosity (PL) relations with dispersions comparable to the best LMC samples. We fit the sample using the OGLE-II LMC PL relations and are unable to find a self-consistent distance for different band combinations or radial locations within M81. We can do so after adding a radial dependence to the PL zero point that corresponds to a luminosity dependence on metallicity of {gamma}{sub {mu}} = -0.56 {+-} 0.36 mag dex{sup -1}. We find marginal evidence for a shift in color as a function of metallicity, distinguishable from the effects of extinction, of {gamma}{sub 2} = +0.07 {+-} 0.03 mag dex{sup -1}. We find a distance modulus for M81, relative to the LMC, of {mu}{sub M81} - {mu}{sub LMC} = 9.39 {+-} 0.14 mag, including uncertainties due to the metallicity corrections. This corresponds to a distance to M81 of 3.6 {+-} 0.2 Mpc, assuming an LMC distance modulus of 18.41 mag. We carry out a joint analysis of M81 and NGC 4258 Cepheids and simultaneously solve for the distance of M81 relative to NGC 4258 and the metallicity corrections. Given the current data, the uncertainties of such joint fits are dominated by the relative metallicities and the abundance gradients rather than by measurement errors of the Cepheid magnitudes or colors. We find {mu}{sub M81} - {mu}{sub LMC} = 9.40{sup +0.15}{sub -0.11} mag, {mu}{sub N4258} - {mu}{sub LMC} = 11.08{sup +0.21}{sub -0.17} mag, and {mu}{sub N4258} - {mu}{sub M81} = 1.68 {+-} 0.08 mag and metallicity effects on luminosity and color of {gamma}{sub {mu}} = -0.62{sup +0.31}{sub -0.35} mag dex{sup -1} and

  12. PEPSI: The high-resolution échelle spectrograph and polarimeter for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Ilyin, I.; Järvinen, A.; Weber, M.; Woche, M.; Barnes, S. I.; Bauer, S.-M.; Beckert, E.; Bittner, W.; Bredthauer, R.; Carroll, T. A.; Denker, C.; Dionies, F.; DiVarano, I.; Döscher, D.; Fechner, T.; Feuerstein, D.; Granzer, T.; Hahn, T.; Harnisch, G.; Hofmann, A.; Lesser, M.; Paschke, J.; Pankratow, S.; Plank, V.; Plüschke, D.; Popow, E.; Sablowski, D.

    2015-05-01

    PEPSI is the bench-mounted, two-arm, fibre-fed and stabilized Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument for the 2×8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Three spectral resolutions of either 43 000, 120 000 or 270 000 can cover the entire optical/red wavelength range from 383 to 907 nm in three exposures. Two 10.3k×10.3k CCDs with 9-μm pixels and peak quantum efficiencies of 94-96 % record a total of 92 échelle orders. We introduce a new variant of a wave-guide image slicer with 3, 5, and 7 slices and peak efficiencies between 92-96 %. A total of six cross dispersers cover the six wavelength settings of the spectrograph, two of them always simultaneously. These are made of a VPH-grating sandwiched by two prisms. The peak efficiency of the system, including the telescope, is 15 % at 650 nm, and still 11 % and 10 % at 390 nm and 900 nm, respectively. In combination with the 110 m2 light-collecting capability of the LBT, we expect a limiting magnitude of ≈ 20th mag in V in the low-resolution mode. The R = 120 000 mode can also be used with two, dual-beam Stokes IQUV polarimeters. The 270 000-mode is made possible with the 7-slice image slicer and a 100-μm fibre through a projected sky aperture of 0.74 arcsec, comparable to the median seeing of the LBT site. The 43 000-mode with 12-pixel sampling per resolution element is our bad seeing or faint-object mode. Any of the three resolution modes can either be used with sky fibers for simultaneous sky exposures or with light from a stabilized Fabry-Pérot étalon for ultra-precise radial velocities. CCD-image processing is performed with the dedicated data-reduction and analysis package PEPSI-S4S. Its full error propagation through all image-processing steps allows an adaptive selection of parameters by using statistical inferences and robust estimators. A solar feed makes use of PEPSI during day time and a 500-m feed from the 1.8 m VATT can be used when the LBT is busy otherwise. In this paper, we

  13. Engineering Specification for Large-aperture UVO Space Telescopes Derived from Science Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Arnold, William; Bevan, Ryan M.; Smith, W. Scott.; Kirk, Charles S.; Postman, Mark

    2013-01-01

    An advanced large aperture UV/optical UVO space telescope is required for the next generation of astrophysics and exoplanet science. The science requirements of proposed exoplanet and astrophysics missions were used to determine the encircled energy, point spread function stability and thermal environment requirements. These requirements then determine the optical wavefront specification for potential telescope assemblies which can fit inside current and planned launch vehicles. The optical wavefront specification becomes the top level of the error budget that is split into various sources that control the structural, thermal and optical design.

  14. Efficient Method for the Reduction of Large Piston Errors in Segmented-Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanan, Gary; Pintó, Agustí

    2004-06-01

    Phase discontinuity sensing (PDS) is one of two successful approaches to segment phasing that are currently in use at the Keck telescopes, but it has only a limited capture range. We describe and present numerical simulations of a broadband version of the current (narrowband) PDS algorithm that can extend the capture range from 0.4 to 40 µm. Like the original algorithm, the new broadband PDS algorithm requires no special-purpose hardware but only a high-resolution area detector operating in the 2-3-µm range. The potential application of this algorithm to extremely large telescopes is also discussed.

  15. Efficient method for the reduction of large piston errors in segmented-mirror telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanan, Gary A.; Pinto, Agusti

    2004-07-01

    Phase Discontinuity Sensing (PDS) is one of two successful approaches to segment phasing currently in use at the Keck telescopes, but it has only very limited capture range. In this work, we describe and present numerical simulations of a broadband version of the current (narrowband) PDS algorithm which can extend the capture range from 0.4 μm to 40 μm. Like the original algorithm, the new broadband PDS algorithm (BPDS) does not require any special-purpose hardware, only a high-resolution area detector operating in the 2 - 3 μm range. The potential application of this algorithm to Extremely Large Telescopes is also discussed.

  16. Status of GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large-area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rochester, L.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    GLAST is a satellite-based observatory consisting of the Large-Area Telescope (LAT), a modular 4 x 4-tower pair-conversion telescope with a field-of-view greater than 2 steradians, capable of measuring gamma-ray energies in the range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), a set of NaI and BGO detectors covering 8 steradians and sensitive to photons with energies between 10 keV and 25 MeV, allowing for correlative observations of transient events. The observatory is currently being constructed and is scheduled to be launched in August 2007.

  17. A Long Expected Party — The First Stone Ceremony for the Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Comerón, F.; Tamai, R.

    2017-06-01

    The ceremony to seal the time capsule, signalling the beginning of construction of the dome and main telescope structure for the Extremely Large Telescope, took place at the Paranal Observatory on 26 May 2017, in the presence of the President of Chile, Michelle Bachelet and many international guests. Owing to high winds, the ceremony could not take place as planned on the levelled site on Cerro Armazones, but instead was held at the Paranal Residencia. A brief report of the event and its organisation is presented, and the welcome speech by the ESO Director General is included.

  18. Fermi/Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-Ray Source List

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Komin, N.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marelli, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi/LAT Collaboration

    2009-07-01

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the γ-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than ~10σ) γ-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) γ-ray sources in the early mission data.

  19. FERMI/LARGE AREA TELESCOPE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY SOURCE LIST

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Battelino, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bignami, G. F.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: jean.ballet@cea.fr E-mail: David.J.Thompson@nasa.gov

    2009-07-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  20. Efficient method for the reduction of large piston errors in segmented-mirror telescopes.

    PubMed

    Chanan, Gary; Pintó, Agustí

    2004-06-01

    Phase discontinuity sensing (PDS) is one of two successful approaches to segment phasing that are currently in use at the Keck telescopes, but it has only a limited capture range. We describe and present numerical simulations of a broadband version of the current (narrowband) PDS algorithm that can extend the capture range from 0.4 to 40 microns. Like the original algorithm, the new broadband PDS algorithm requires no special-purpose hardware but only a high-resolution area detector operating in the 2-3-microns range. The potential application of this algorithm to extremely large telescopes is also discussed.

  1. Object-oriented software design for the Mt. Wilson 100-inch Hooker telescope adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas G.

    2000-06-01

    The object oriented software design paradigm has been instrumented in the development of the Adoptics software used in the Hooker telescope's ADOPT adaptive optics system. The software runs on a Pentium-class PC host and eight DSP processors connected to the host's motherboard bus. C++ classes were created to implement most of the host software's functionality, with the object oriented features of inheritance, encapsulation and abstraction being the most useful. Careful class design at the inception of the project allowed for the rapid addition of features without comprising the integrity of the software. Base class implementations include the DSP system, real-time graphical displays and opto-mechanical actuator control.

  2. Real-time distributed processing in the Mt. Wilson 100-inch Hooker telescope adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas G.; Shelton, J. Christopher

    2000-06-01

    The Adoptics software used with the Hooker telescope's ADOPT adaptive optics system implements real-time control on a network of eight Texas Instruments C40 40Mhz DSP processors. System inputs and outputs consist of a 32 port 4 fiber wavefront sensor CCD with 32 X 32 pixels, a tilt mirror and a deformable mirror of which 241 elements are actively controlled. The network os eight DSP processors is configured as two cross-connected rings of four processors each. Four input sites perform intensity and gradient calculations immediately on incoming pixels as well as passing pixels on to adjacent sites for parallel calculations.

  3. Results of the JOSE site evaluation project for adaptive optics at the William Herschel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R.

    1998-11-01

    Results are presented from a long-term study of the seeing properties at the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. The measurements have been made over a two-year period using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with high frame-rate CCD camera. The aim of the campaign is to characterize those aspects of the seeing relevant to the design and performance of astronomical adaptive optical systems for the WHT. Statistical results are presented for the value of Fried's parameter, power spectra of Zernike mode coefficients, isoplanatism and the outer scale of turbulence.

  4. Adaptive Optics Observations of Arcturus using the Mount Wilson 100 Inch Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Nils H.; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Mason, Brian D.

    1999-05-01

    Upon inspection of the multiple-star results in the Hipparcos catalog, the flag for entry number 69673 particularly stands out; it is Arcturus, for which no companion has been reported previously. The Hipparcos companion is reported to be at a separation of 0.255"+/-0.039" with a magnitude difference in a broadband filter (peaked near 460 nm) of 3.33+/-0.31. We present recent results using the natural guide star adaptive optics system on the Mount Wilson 100 inch telescope showing Arcturus to be a single star.

  5. Correlation of Fermi Large Area Telescope sources with the 20-GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array radio survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Foschini, L.

    2010-09-01

    We cross-correlate the Fermi 11-month survey (1FGL) catalogue with the 20-GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array (AT20G) radio survey catalogue composed of 5890 sources at declination < 0°. Among the 738 Fermi sources distributed in the southern sky, we find 230 highly probable candidate counterparts in the AT20G survey. Of these, 222 are already classified in the Fermi one-year Large Area Telescope (LAT) active galactic nucleus (AGN) catalogue (1LAC) as blazars [either flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) or BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs)], AGNs or sources of unknown class but with an associated counterpart, while eight are new associations. By studying the γ-ray and radio properties of these associations, we find a correlation between the γ-ray flux (above 100 MeV) and the 20-GHz flux density. This correlation is more than 3σ statistically significant, both for the population of BL Lacs and for FSRQs considered separately. We also find that the radio counterparts associated with the Fermi sources have, on average, flat radio spectra between 5 and 20 GHz and that Fermi γ-ray sources are not preferentially associated with `ultra-inverted spectrum' radio sources. For two of the eight new associations, we build the broad-band spectral energy distribution combining Fermi, Swift and radio observations. One of these two sources is identified with the high-redshift FSRQ Swift J1656.3-3302 (z = 2.4) and we classify the other source as a candidate new FSRQ. We also study the brightest radio source of the 46 associations without an optical classification and classify it as a new BL Lac candidate `twin' of the prototypical BL Lac OJ 287 if its redshift is larger, z ~ 0.4.

  6. An ultrahigh-accuracy body pointing system for the Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.; Mayo, R. A.; Lieberman, S. I.; Hartter, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Large Space Telescope (LST) program is aimed at placing a three-meter diffraction-limited telescope in a 270-nm orbit to perform astronomical observations that are not possible with earth-based telescopes. A complex simulation model is described which was developed to determine whether the stringent pointing stability requirements could be met. The model (programmed on a hybrid computer) included detailed dynamic representation of control moment gyros (CMGs) and reaction wheels (RWs), including their noise characteristics; dynamic sensor representation (including noise); shockmounts for the CMG actuators; detailed representation of an image motion compensation system; and a detailed flexible body vehicle model. Stability and performance studies based on the simulation model showed that the body pointing system will meet LST requirements in the presence of CMG vibrational disturbances and sensor noise. The recommended system consists of three orthogonally mounted RWs for primary short-term control, and a cluster of CMG actuators for continuous RW desaturation and vehicle maneuvering.

  7. Neutron Star Astronomy in the era of the European Extremely Large Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Mignani, Roberto P.

    2011-09-21

    About 25 isolated neutron stars (INSs) are now detected in the optical domain, mainly thanks to the HST and to VLT-class telescopes. The European Extremely Large Telescope(E-ELT) will yield {approx}100 new identifications, many of which from the follow-up of SKA, IXO, and Fermi observations. Moreover, the E-ELT will allow to carry out, on a much larger sample, INS observations which still challenge VLT-class telescopes, enabling studies on the structure and composition of the NS interior, of its atmosphere and magnetosphere, as well as to search for debris discs. In this contribution, I outline future perspectives for NS optical astronomy with the E-ELT.

  8. A secure and reliable monitor and control system for remote observing with the Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Gary; Souccar, Kamal; Malin, Daniella

    2004-09-01

    Remote access to telescope monitor and control capabilities necessitates strict security mechanisms to protect the telescope and instruments from malicious or unauthorized use, and to prevent data from being stolen, altered, or corrupted. The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) monitor and control system (LMTMC) utilizes the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) middleware technology to connect remote software components. The LMTMC provides reliable and secure remote observing by automatically generating SSLIOP enabled CORBA objects. TAO, the ACE open source Object Request Broker (ORB), now supports secure communications by implementing the Secure Socket Layer Inter-ORB Protocol (SSLIOP) as a pluggable protocol. This capability supplies the LMTMC with client and server authentication, data integrity, and encryption. Our system takes advantage of the hooks provided by TAO SSLIOP to implement X.509 certificate based authorization. This access control scheme includes multiple authorization levels to enable granular access control.

  9. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Rioux, Norman; Bolcar, Matthew; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Oliver; Stark, Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10^-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance. These efforts are combined through integrated modeling, coronagraph evaluations, and Exo-Earth yield calculations to assess the potential performance of the selected architecture. In addition, we discusses the scalability of this architecture to larger apertures and the technological tall poles to enabling it.

  10. The achromatic design of an atmospheric dispersion corrector for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2011-08-29

    For off-zenith observations with ground-based astronomical telescopes, the effect of atmospheric dispersion relative to diffraction on image size increases with telescope diameter. Correction of atmospheric dispersion in extremely large telescopes (ELTs) might become critical. A common solution for ELTs is to use linear atmospheric dispersion correctors (ADCs). In spite of their simplicity, the intrinsic chromatic aberrations of linear ADCs could render diffraction-limited imaging impossible when used in a fast focus. The chromatic problems of the linear ADC in ELTs can be resolved by replacing the linear ADC by the achromatic ADC designs presented here, which provide diffraction-limited image quality and offer several opto-mechanical advantages over linear ADCs.

  11. Imaging Extra-Solar Planets with an Ultra-Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Charles R.

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Origins Program is directed toward two main goals: Imaging of galactic evolution in the early universe, and searching for planets orbiting nearby stars. The Next-Generation Space Telescope (NGST), operating at low temperature with an 8-m aperture, is well designed to meet the first goal. The goal of imaging planets orbiting nearby stars is more problematic. One line of investigation has been the ULTIMA concept (Ultra-Large Telescope, Integrated Missions in Astronomy). In this report, I will lay out the resolution requirements for telescopes to achieve the imaging of extrasolar planets, and describe a modeling tool created to investigate the requirements for imaging a planet when it is very near a much brighter star.

  12. End-to-end assessment of a large aperture segmented ultraviolet optical infrared (UVOIR) telescope architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Rioux, Norman; Bolcar, Matthew; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark, Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10^-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield exo-earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an exo-earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance. These efforts are combined through integrated modeling, coronagraph evaluations, and exo-earth yield calculations to assess the potential performance of the selected architecture. In addition, we discusses the scalability of this architecture to larger apertures and the technological tall poles to enabling these missions.

  13. Serviceable Large Low Cost/Mass Infrared 4 Kelvin Telescope Passively Cooled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerelli, Domenick; Tolomeo, J.; Klavins, A.; Putnam, D.

    2012-05-01

    An innovative space telescope concept was studied for the New Millenium program for ST6. The telescope called a Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) features two single curvature monolith parabolic surfaces. The telescope system personifies simplicity which extrapolates to low cost and mass. We at Lockheed Martin have implemented this design in two large prototypes that demonstrate imaging in the IR without the use of corrective optics as well as demonstrate the mass scaling advantageous of this architecture. A serviceable deployment concept is described which will enable apertures greater than 10m with areal density less than 10 kg/m2 to be realized for space applications. Because of the overall simplicity of the architecture the instrument section is easily replaceable when new detector technology is developed. In addition the simplicity of the overall architecture allows the system to assembled on the International Space Station (ISS). Anti sun pointing, low conductance support structure and deployable sun shade made of multiple deployable shields in an open groove configuration maintains telescope temperatures near 4K with minimal gradients

  14. Testbed for an adaptive secondary mirror of 1.8m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xinlong; Guan, Chunlin; Rao, Changhui

    2010-11-01

    Testbed for an adaptive secondary mirror of 1.8m telescope is a system, which originates from Simpson-Oland-Meckel method. The testbed is composed of Hartmann-Shack (H-S) wavefront sensor, Hindle element and analysis element. Light from H-S wavefront sensor passes through the Hindle element and reflects off of the adaptive secondary mirror. It then is reflected by the concave surface of the Hindle element. After reflecting off of the adaptive secondary mirror again, it passes through the Hindle element and return to the H-S wavefront sensor. A beam splitter is placed between H-S wavefront sensor and Hindle element to reflect part of the output light to analysis element. The testbed is a low cost simple system that allows testing the convex hyperboloid adaptive secondary mirror. It also could be used to calibrate the adaptive secondary mirror as well as investigating higher performance control loops. Optical setup design, tolerance of fabrication, alignment and material asymmetry are presented in this paper.

  15. Control designs for the Canadian Large Adaptive Radiotelescope concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Alexandre

    This thesis is a product of our collaboration with the National Research Council of Canada's astronomy laboratory (Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory) to study the control of a new radio-telescope design: the Canadian Large Adaptive Reflector. The first part consists in an identification of a parabolic reflector's direct and inverse kinematics. This reflector is made of multiple triangular sections, each of them supported by hydraulic actuators from the ground. Kinematics resulted in the creation of a trajectory generator to issue commands to the actuators. Second part consists in direct modeling and model identification of a tethered aerostat system, in order to identify the bandwidth of this system. The cable system's purpose is to hold the receiver to the parabolic reflector's focal point. Once the model is validated, robust and LPV (linear parameter-varying) controllers are designed. As the tethered system consists in many cables, the winches reeling cables on the ground affect the whole system dynamics. The model contains parameters varying with the cable lengths. Variations in tether lengths lead to some difficulties in the design of linear robust controllers.

  16. NAOMI adaptive optics system for the 4.2m William Herschel telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Richard M.; Longmore, Andrew J.; Benn, Chris R.; Buscher, David F.; Clark, Paul; Dipper, Nigel A.; Doble, Nathan; Doel, Andrew P.; Dunlop, Colin N.; Gao, Xiaofeng; Gregory, Thomas; Humphreys, Ronald A.; Ives, Derek J.; Øestensen, Roy; Peacocke, P. T.; Rutten, René G.; Tierney, Chris J.; Vick, Andrew J. A.; Wells, Martyn R.; Wilson, Richard W.; Worswick, Susan P.; Zadrozny, Andrew

    2003-02-01

    NAOMI (Nasmyth Adaptive Optics for Multi-purpose Instrumentation) is a recently completed and commissioned astronomical facility on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. The system is designed to work initially with Natural Guide Stars and also to be upgradeable for use with a single laser guide star. It has been designed to work with both near infrared and optical instrumentation (both imagers and spectrographs). The system uses a linearised segmented adaptive mirror and dual-CCD Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor together with a multiple-DSP real-time processing system. Control system parameters can be updated on-the-fly by monitoring processes and the system can self-optimize its base optical figure to compensate for the optical characteristics of attached scientific instrumentation. The scientific motivation, consequent specification and implementation of NAOMI are described, together with example performance data and information on future upgrades and instrumentation.

  17. LINC-NIRVANA for the large binocular telescope: setting up the world's largest near infrared binoculars for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofferbert, Ralph; Baumeister, Harald; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Bizenberger, Peter; Böhm, Armin; Böhm, Michael; Borelli, José Luis; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Conrad, Albert; De Bonis, Fulvio; Follert, Roman; Herbst, Tom; Huber, Armin; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Laun, Werner; Mall, Ulrich; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Naranjo, Vianak; Pavlov, Aleksei; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Schinnerer, Eva; Storz, Clemens; Trowitzsch, Jan; Yan, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xianyu; Eckart, Andreas; Horrobin, Matthew; Rost, Steffen; Straubmeier, Christian; Wank, Imke; Zuther, Jens; Beckmann, Udo; Connot, Claus; Heininger, Matthias; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kröner, Tim; Nussbaum, Eddy; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Bergomi, Maria; Brunelli, Alessandro; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Magrin, Demetrio; Marafatto, Luca; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cosentino, Guiseppe; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Foppiani, Italo; Lombini, Matteo; Schreiber, Laura; D'Alessio, Francesco; Li Causi, Gianluca; Lorenzetti, Dario; Vitali, Fabrizio; Bertero, Mario; Boccacci, Patrizia; La Camera, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    LINC-NIRVANA (LN) is the near-infrared, Fizeau-type imaging interferometer for the large binocular telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona (elevation of 3267 m). The instrument is currently being built by a consortium of German and Italian institutes under the leadership of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. It will combine the radiation from both 8.4 m primary mirrors of LBT in such a way that the sensitivity of a 11.9 m telescope and the spatial resolution of a 22.8 m telescope will be obtained within a 10.5×10.5 arcsec scientific field of view. Interferometric fringes of the combined beams are tracked in an oval field with diameters of 1 and 1.5 arcmin. In addition, both incoming beams are individually corrected by LN's multiconjugate adaptive optics system to reduce atmospheric image distortion over a circular field of up to 6 arcmin in diameter. A comprehensive technical overview of the instrument is presented, comprising the detailed design of LN's four major systems for interferometric imaging and fringe tracking, both in the near infrared range of 1 to 2.4 μm, as well as atmospheric turbulence correction at two altitudes, both in the visible range of 0.6 to 0.9 μm. The resulting performance capabilities and a short outlook of some of the major science goals will be presented. In addition, the roadmap for the related assembly, integration, and verification process are discussed. To avoid late interface-related risks, strategies for early hardware as well as software interactions with the telescope have been elaborated. The goal is to ship LN to the LBT in 2014.

  18. A large adaptive deformable membrane mirror with highactuator density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Kappelhof, Pieter; Snijders, Bart; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2004-10-01

    With the future growing size of telescopes, new, high-resolution, affordable wavefront corrector technology with low power dissipation is needed. A new adaptive deformable mirror concept is presented, to meet such requirements. The adaptive mirror consists of a thin (30-50 μm), highly reflective, deformable membrane. An actuator grid with thousands of actuators is designed which push and pull at the membrane"s surface, free from pinning and piston effects. The membrane and the actuator grid are supported by an optimized light and stiff honeycomb sandwich structure. This mechanically stable and thermally insensitive support structure provides a stiff reference plane for the actuators. The design is extendable up to several hundreds of mm's. Low-voltage electro-magnetic actuators have been designed. These highly linear actuators can provide a stroke of 15 micrometers. The design allows for a stroke difference between adjacent actuators larger than 1 micron. The actuator grid has a layer-based design; these layers extend over a large numbers of actuators. The current actuator design allows for actuator pitches of 3 mm or more. Actuation is free from play, friction and mechanical hysteresis and therefore has a high positioning resolution and is highly repeatable. The lowest mechanical resonance frequency is in the range of kHz so a high control bandwidth can be achieved. The power dissipation in the actuator grid is in the order of milliwatts per actuator. Because of this low power dissipation active cooling is not required. A first prototype is currently being developed. Prototypes will be developed with increasing number of actuators.

  19. Wheel drives for large telescopes: save the cost and keep the performance over hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Marvin F.

    2014-07-01

    The use of steel wheels on steel tracks has been around since steel was invented, and before that it was iron wheels on iron tracks. Not to be made obsolete by the passage of time, this approach for moving large objects is still valid, even optimal, but the detailed techniques for achieving high performance and long life have been much improved. The use of wheel-and-track designs has been very popular in radio astronomy for the largest of the large radio telescopes (RT), including such notables as the 305m Arecibo RT, the 100m telescopes at Effelsberg, Germany (at 3600 tonnes) and the Robert C. Byrd, Greenbank Telescope (GBT, 7600 tonnes) at Greenbank, West Virginia. Of course, the 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank is the grandfather of all large aperture radio telescopes that use wheel drives. Smaller sizes include NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescopes at 25m and others. Wheel drives have also been used on large radars of significance such as the 410 tonne Ground Based Radar-Prototype (GBR-P) and the 150 foot (45.7m) Altair Radar, and the 2130 tonne Sea Based X-Band Radar (SBX). There are also many examples of wheel driven communications antennas of 18 meters and larger. All of these instruments have one thing in common: they all use steel wheels that run in a circle on one or more flat, level, steel tracks. This paper covers issues related to designing for wheel driven systems. The intent is for managing motion to sub arc-second levels, and for this purpose it is primary for the designer to manage measurement and alignment errors, and to establish repeatability through dimensional control, structural and drive stiffness management, adjustability and error management. In a practical sense, there are very few, if any, fabricators that can machine structural and drive components to sufficiently small decimal places to matter. In fact, coming within 2-3 orders of magnitude of the precision needed is about the best that can be expected. Further, it is

  20. Technology gap assessment for a future large-aperture ultraviolet-optical-infrared space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl M.; Thronson, Harley

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team identified five key technology areas to enable candidate architectures for a future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions." The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technology areas are internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescope systems, detectors, and mirror coatings. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current technology readiness level (TRL), thus identifying the current technology gap. We also report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  1. Adaptive Control Techniques for Large Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-06

    Point Analy- sis", submitted, IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems; Special Issue on Adaptive Systems, Sept. 1987. I.M.Y. Mareels, R.R. Bitmead, M. Gevers...adaptive system with unmodelled dynamics," Proc. IFAC Workshop on Adaptive Systems, San Francisco, CA. C.A. Desoer , R.W. Liu, J. Murray and R. Sacks...June 1980. C.A. Desoer and M. Vidyasagar, Feedback Systems: Input-Output Properties, Academic Press, * 1975. J.C. Doyle and G. Stein (1981

  2. Current status of the laser guide star adaptive optics system for Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Yutaka; Takami, Hideki; Guyon, Olivier; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Watanabe, Makoto; Murakami, Naoshi; Minowa, Yosuke; Ito, Meguru; Colley, Stephen; Eldred, Michael; Golota, Taras; Dinkins, Matthew; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori

    2008-07-01

    The current status and recent results, since last SPIE conference at Orlando in 2006, for the laser guide star adaptive optics system for Subaru Telescope is presented. We had a first light using natural guide star and succeed to launch the sodium laser beam in October 2006. The achieved Strehl ratio on the 10th magnitude star was around 0.5 at K band. We confirmed that the full-width-half-maximum of the stellar point spread function is smaller than 0.1 arcsec even at the 0.9 micrometer wavelehgth. The size of the artificial guide star by the laser beam tuned at the wavelength of 589 nm was estimated to be 10 arcsec. The obtained blurred artificial guide star is caused by the wavefront error on the laser launching telescope. After the first light and first launch, we found that we need to modify and to fix the components, which are temporarily finished. Also components, which were postponed to fabricate after the first light, are required to build newly. All components used by the natural guide star adaptive optics system are finalized recently and we are ready to go on the sky. Next engineering observation is scheduled in August, 2008.

  3. Anomalous refraction measurements at FCRAO and tip-tilt compensation on the Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, L.

    Radio seeing shows up on filled-aperture telescopes as an anomalous refraction (AR), i.e. an apparent displacement of a radio source from its true position. The magnitude of this effect, as a fraction of the beam width, is bigger on larger telescopes, and thus its impact on the opinting is likely to become critically important in the next generation of electrically large filled-aperture radio telescopes (D/lambda > 10000) and in particular on the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). AR effects are expected to reduce the total effective observing time at the highest frequencies and will affect on-the-fly mapping. Here we present partial results of systematic AR measurements carried out at FCRAO. Using a model study of AR effects, by producing simulations of two-dimensional phase screens, we then discuss the basic technical problems of a tip-tilt compensation device at millimeter wavelengths for the LMT that would use a scanning 183 GHz radiometer. Finally, we discuss th! e desing of a "hybrid" seeing monitor to be installed on the LMT site.

  4. Large Space Telescopes Using Fresnel Lens for Power Beaming, Astronomy and Sail Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J T

    2002-10-15

    The concept of using Fresnel optics as part of power beaming, astronomy or sail systems has been suggested by several authors. The primary issues for large Fresnel optics are the difficulties in fabricating these structures and deploying them in space and for astronomy missions the extremely narrow frequency range of these optics. In proposals where the telescope is used to transmit narrow frequency laser power, the narrow bandwidth has not been an issue. In applications where the optic is to be used as part of a telescope, only around 10{sup -5} to limited frequency response of a Fresnel optic is addressed by the use of a corrective optic that will broaden the frequency response of the telescope by three or four orders of magnitude. This broadening will dramatically increase the optical power capabilities of the system and will allow some spectroscopy studies over a limited range. Both the fabrication of Fresnel optics as large as five meters and the use of corrector optics for telescopes have been demonstrated at LLNL. For solar and laser sail missions the use of Fresnel amplitude zone plates made of very thin sail material is also discussed.

  5. Ten years maintaining MACAO-VLTI units in operation in the Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, F.; Hudepohl, G.

    2016-07-01

    More than 10 years have already passed since the first Multiple Application Curvature Adaptive Optics (MACAO) facilities got the first light in UT2 the 18th of April, 2003, in the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal Observatory. The achievable image sharpness of a ground-based telescope is normally limited by the effect of atmospheric turbulence. However, with Adaptive Optics (AO) techniques, this major drawback can be overcome so that the telescope produces images that are as sharp as theoretically possible, i.e., as if they were taken from space. [1] The intention of this document is summarize in few pages some highlights related with the activities needed to keep MACAO units in operation. Some statistics of problems based in Action Remedy tool is included, showing how through these years the number of problems has been reduced, even when there are still some unsolved ones. Some lessons have been learned and there are others one to learn. Corrective and predictive maintenance performed are shown too like the current measurements, transfer functions measurements, thermography pictures, health checks measuring interaction matrix and flat vectors to detect dead APDs or short circuits in the DM, etc. Some forced interventions are included as well like the removal of the cabinets from Coude rooms to avoid that acoustic noise and vibrations perturb the operations, the deformable mirrors reached by cooling leaks and a mirror that got rusty are shown too. Well knowledge of the system, good interaction between different disciplines groups to perform corrective and preventive maintenance seems to be key aspects of keeping it under control and operative during all these years leading to this good result.

  6. GLAST: Exploring Nature's Highest Energy Processes with the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, Seth; Myers, J. D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multi-agency space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV. Several successful exploratory missions in gamma-ray astronomy led to the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). Launched in 1991, EGRET made the first complete survey of the sky in the 30 MeV-10 GeV range. EGRET showed the high-energy gamma-ray sky to be surprisingly dynamic and diverse, with sources ranging from the sun and moon to massive black holes at large redshifts. Most of the gamma-ray sources detected by EGRET remain unidentified. In light of the discoveries with EGRET, the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope vastly more capable than instruments flown previously, as well as a secondary instrument to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. The main instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will have superior area, angular resolution, field of view, and deadtime that together will provide a factor of 30 or more advance in sensitivity, as well as provide capability for study of transient phenomena. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will have a field of view several times larger than the LAT and will provide spectral coverage of gamma-ray bursts that extends from the lower limit of the LAT down to 10 keV. The basic parameters of the GBM are compared to those of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on CGRO in Table 1-2. With the LAT and GBM, GLAST will be a flexible observatory for investigating the great range of astrophysical phenomena best studied in high-energy gamma rays. NASA plans to launch GLAST in late 2005.

  7. Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) project: progress and status after 2 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiring, Jacobus G.; Buckley, David A. H.; Lomberg, Michael C.; Stobie, Robert S.

    2003-02-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) is a 10-m class optical/IR segmented mirror telescope based on the groundbreaking, low cost, Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) design. Approval to construct and operate SALT, which will be the largest single optical telescope in the Southern Hemisphere, was given by the South African Government in November 1999, after sufficient guarantees of matching funding from international partners were secured. Facility construction started in January 2001, and SALT is due to start operations by December 2004. SALT will enable a quantum leap in astronomical research capability in Southern Africa, and indeed the continent, where currently the largest telescope is a modest 1.9-m, dating to the 1940s. A substantial amount of design work for SALT has been completed, sourced from multiple suppliers, with ~60% South African content. South African industry is well equipped to handle the construction of most of the telescope, the exceptions being the glass ceramic mirror blanks (from LZOS in Russia), the polishing and ion figuring of these (Eastman Kodak in the USA), and fabrication of the four-element spherical aberration corrector (SAGEM in France). This paper will present (1) the scientific requirements, (2) the specified performance of SALT, (3) the basic design, with emphasis on the innovative modifications to the HET design that enable significantly improved performance, (4) the progress and status of the project, currently in its construction phase, (5) the first generation instrument suite, (6) the management and organisation of the project and (7) the international partnership in SALT.

  8. High-fidelity cryothermal test of a subscale large space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Ollendorf, S.; Mattern, A.; Leisawitz, D.; Jackson, M.; Francis, J.; Hait, T.; Cleveland, P.; Muheim, D.; Mastropietro, A. J.

    2007-09-01

    To take advantage of the unique environment of space and optimize infrared observations for faint sources, space telescopes must be cooled to low temperatures. The new paradigm in cooling large space telescopes is to use a combination of passive radiative cooling and mechanical cryocoolers. The passive system must shield the telescope from the Sun, Earth, and the warm spacecraft components while providing radiative cooling to deep space. This shield system is larger than the telescope itself, and must attenuate the incoming energy by over one million to limit heat input to the telescope. Testing of such a system on the ground is a daunting task due to the size of the thermal/vacuum chamber required and the degree of thermal isolation necessary between the room temperature and cryogenic parts of the shield. These problems have been attacked in two ways: by designing a subscale version of a larger sunshield and by carefully closing out radiation sneak paths. The 18% scale (the largest diameter shield was 1.5 m) version of the SPIRIT Origins Probe telescope shield was tested in a low cost helium shroud within a 3.1 m diameter x 4.6 m long LN II shrouded vacuum chamber. Thermal straps connected from three shield stages to the liquid helium cooled shroud were instrumented with heaters and thermometers to simulate mechanical cryocooler stages at 6 K, 18-20 K, and 45-51 K. Performance data showed that less than 10 microwatts of radiative heat leaked from the warm to cold sides of the shields during the test. The excellent agreement between the data and the thermal models is discussed along with shroud construction techniques.

  9. The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and the potential for galactic dynamical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David A. H.

    1999-12-01

    Over the next 5 years or so, an international consortium lead by South Africa plans to build an 8-10 m class telescope - the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) - modelled closely on the novel design of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) in west Texas. These telescopes represent new paradigms in design, at ~ 20% of the cost of conventional telescopes. SALT will be operated as a queue-scheduled telescope and is primarily designed for spectroscopic observations. I review the characteristics of SALT and discuss the major science drivers, which will decide the probable choice of a first-light instrument package, yet to be defined. This will likely include multi-object spectroscopic capability over a wavelength range of at least 400 nm to 1700 nm and with resolving powers of at least R ~ 300-20000, using both fibre-fed and imaging spectrographs. The former will include provision for long-slit and integral field unit fibre arrangements. A Fabry-Perot etalon may also be employed to enable 2-D imaging spectroscopy of particular spectral lines. It is possible that the instrument suite eventually chosen for SALT may have extended capabilities, both in wavelength (perhaps 350 nm <~ λ <~ 2500 nm) and resolution limit (R up to ~ 100 000). I review some of the possible science applications of SALT. Studies in the area of galactic dynamics could include dark matter in elliptical galaxies, galaxy formation and evolution, galaxy rotation curves and applications to general surveys (e.g. the HST Medium Deep Survey; XMM).

  10. Full Speed Ahead for Eso's Very Large Telescope First Enclosure on its way to PARANAL!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    During the past months, vast progress has been made in the construction of ESO's 16-metre equivalent Very Large Telescope (VLT). This major scientific and technological project aims at installing the world's largest optical telescope in the form of four interconnected telescopes with 8.2-metre mirrors on the Paranal mountain in the Chilean Atacama desert. It continues to be on schedule as it heads towards its completion, just after the year 2000. An important milestone will be reached in early October 1994 when the first large shipment containing heavy steel parts of the enclosure for VLT Unit Telescope no. 1 leaves the Italian port of Genova [1]. Meanwhile the construction work on the Paranal site is also progressing very well. It is now expected that, as planned, the first enclosure will be ready in May 1995 to receive the first 8.2-metre telescope. This Press Release is accompanied by four colour pictures that illustrate some of the most recent developments. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS IN EUROPE Considerable progress has been made by ESO's industrial partners in Europe, and the VLT Project has now entered into a new and dynamic phase of construction. The first 8.2-metre mirror is currently in the middle of a two-year polishing process at the REOSC company near Paris, and the first interferometric tests have shown that this very delicate operation is progressing well. The enormous mirror surface, with a total area of more than 50 m^2, is slowly but steadily approaching the desired shape which must be achieved within a few hundred-thousandths of one millimetre over the entire surface. Mirror blank no. 2 is now ready at the Schott factory in Mainz (Germany) and will be delivered by barge transport to REOSC in October 1994. Blank no. 3 has successfully completed the critical ceramization phase and blank no. 4 will soon receive the same treatment. The circular steel track, 18 metres in diameter, that will support Telescope no. 1 has now been successfully machined at the

  11. MegaMIR: The Megapixel Mid-Infrared Instrument for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mainzer, Amanda K.; Young, Erick; Hong, John; Werner, Mike; Hinz, Phil; Gorjan, Varoujan; Ressler, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    The Megapixel Mid-infrared Instrument (MegaMIR) is a proposed Fizeau-mode camera for the Large Binocular Telescope operating at wavelengths between 5 and 28 micrometers. The camera will be used in conjunction with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI), a cryogenic optical system that combines the beams from twin 8.4-m telescopes in a phase coherent manner. Unlike other interferometric systems, the co-mounted telescopes on the LBT satisfy the sine condition, providing diffraction-limited resolution over the 40" field of view of the camera. With a 22.8-m baseline, MegaMIR will yield 0.1" angular resolution, making it the highest resolution wide field imager in the thermal infrared for at least the next decade. MegaMIR will utilize a newly developed 1024 x 1024 pixel Si:As detector array that has been optimized for use at high backgrounds. This new detector is a derivative of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) low-background detector. The combination of high angular resolution and wide field imaging will be a unique scientific capability for astronomy. Key benefits will be realized in planetary science, galactic, and extra-galactic astronomy. High angular resolution is essential to disentangle highly complex sources, particularly in star formation regions and external galaxies, and MegaMIR provides this performance over a full field of view. Because of the great impact being made by space observatories like the Spitzer Space Telescope, the number of available targets for study has greatly increased in recent years, and MegaMIR will allow efficient follow up science.

  12. MegaMIR: The Megapixel Mid-Infrared Instrument for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mainzer, Amanda K.; Young, Erick; Hong, John; Werner, Mike; Hinz, Phil; Gorjan, Varoujan; Ressler, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    The Megapixel Mid-infrared Instrument (MegaMIR) is a proposed Fizeau-mode camera for the Large Binocular Telescope operating at wavelengths between 5 and 28 micrometers. The camera will be used in conjunction with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI), a cryogenic optical system that combines the beams from twin 8.4-m telescopes in a phase coherent manner. Unlike other interferometric systems, the co-mounted telescopes on the LBT satisfy the sine condition, providing diffraction-limited resolution over the 40" field of view of the camera. With a 22.8-m baseline, MegaMIR will yield 0.1" angular resolution, making it the highest resolution wide field imager in the thermal infrared for at least the next decade. MegaMIR will utilize a newly developed 1024 x 1024 pixel Si:As detector array that has been optimized for use at high backgrounds. This new detector is a derivative of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) low-background detector. The combination of high angular resolution and wide field imaging will be a unique scientific capability for astronomy. Key benefits will be realized in planetary science, galactic, and extra-galactic astronomy. High angular resolution is essential to disentangle highly complex sources, particularly in star formation regions and external galaxies, and MegaMIR provides this performance over a full field of view. Because of the great impact being made by space observatories like the Spitzer Space Telescope, the number of available targets for study has greatly increased in recent years, and MegaMIR will allow efficient follow up science.

  13. A project for an infrared synoptic survey from Antarctica with the Polar Large Telescope (PLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epchtein, N.; Abe, L.; Ansorge, W.; Langlois, M.; Vauglin, I.; Argentini, S.; Esau, I.; David, C.; Bryson, I.; Dalton, G.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Lawrence, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Polar Large Telescope (PLT) aims at performing a new generation of astronomical Infrared Synoptic Survey from Antarctica (ISSA). It would carry out for the first time large scale periodic imaging surveys at ˜ 0.3 arcsec angular resolution in the short thermal infrared (2-5 micron) range benefiting from the extremely dry, cold, and stable polar atmosphere. The PLT consists of a 2.5 m class telescope equipped with a 250-Mpixel infrared camera. The survey would produce diffraction limited images at 2 micron covering a total of ˜ 5000 square degrees, explore the time domain from seconds to years down to mab =25.5 in Kd, generate alerts of transients and react quickly to alerts from other ground based or space borne facilities.

  14. The anti-coincidence detector for the GLAST large area telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Ormes, J. F.; Thompson, D. J.; Amato, M. J.; Johnson, T. E.; Segal, K. N.; Sheppard, D. A.

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LATs first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3 5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and four sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of ˜8.3 m2. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  15. Large Binocular Telescope Observations of Europa Occulting Io's Volcanoes at 4.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrutskie, Michael F.; Conrad, Albert; Resnick, Aaron; Leisenring, Jarron; Hinz, Phil; de Pater, Imke; de Kleer, Katherine; Spencer, John; Skemer, Andrew; Woodward, Charles E.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Defrére, Denis

    2015-11-01

    On 8 March 2015 Europa passed nearly centrally in front of Io. The Large Binocular Telescope observed this event in dual-aperture AO-corrected Fizeau interferometric imaging mode using the mid-infrared imager LMIRcam operating behind the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) at a broadband wavelength of 4.8 μm (M-band). Occultation light curves generated from frames recorded every 123 milliseconds show that both Loki and Pele/Pillan were well resolved. Europa's center shifted by 2 kilometers relative to Io from frame-to-frame. The derived light curve for Loki is consistent with the double-lobed structure reported by Conrad et al. (2015) using direct interferometric imaging with LBTI.

  16. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  17. Performance of the Anti-Coincidence Detector on the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; Charles, E.; Hartman, R.C.; Moiseev, A.A.; Ormes, J.F.; /NASA, Goddard /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), the outermost detector layer in the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT), is designed to detect and veto incident cosmic ray charged particles, which outnumber cosmic gamma rays by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The challenge in ACD design is that it must have high (0.9997) detection efficiency for singly-charged relativistic particles, but must also have a low probability for self-veto of high-energy gammas by backsplash radiation from interactions in the LAT calorimeter. Simulations and tests demonstrate that the ACD meets its design requirements. The performance of the ACD has remained stable through stand-alone environmental testing, shipment across the U.S., installation onto the LAT, shipment back across the U.S., LAT environmental testing, and shipment to Arizona. As part of the fully-assembled GLAST observatory, the ACD is being readied for final testing before launch.

  18. Towards a Network of Small Aperture Telescopes with Adaptive Optics Correction Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegarra Polo, M.; Lambert, A.

    2016-09-01

    A low cost and compact Adaptive Optics (AO) system for a small aperture telescope (Meade LX200ACF 16") has been developed at UNSW Canberra, where its performance is currently being evaluated. It is based on COTS components, with the exception of a real time control loop implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), populated in a small form factor board which also includes the wavefront image sensor. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) running in an external computer connected to the FPGA imaging board provides the operator with control of different parameters of the AO system; results registration; and log of gradients, Zernike coefficients and deformable mirror voltages for later troubleshooting. The U.S. Air Force Academy Falcon Telescope Network (USAFA FTN) is an international network of moderate aperture telescopes (20 inches) that provides raw imagery to FTN partners [1]. The FTN supports general purpose use, including astronomy, satellite imaging and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) support. Currently 5 nodes are in operation, operated on-site or remotely, and more are to be commissioned over the next few years. One of the network nodes is located at UNSW Canberra (Australia), where the ground-based space surveillance team is currently using it for research in different areas of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). Some current and future SSA goals include geostationary satellite characterization through imaging modalities like polarimetry and real time image processing of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) objects. The fact that all FTN nodes have the same configuration facilitates the collaborative work between international teams of different nodes, so improvements and lessons learned at one site can be extended to the rest of nodes. With respect to this, preliminary studies of the imagery improvement that would be achieved with the AO system developed at UNSW, installed on a second 16 inch Meade LX200ACF telescope and compared to the

  19. Managment and construction of the Large Binocular Telescope enclosure: Meeting unusual challenges with a competitive discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagle, James H.; Hill, John M.; Davison, Warren B.; Hart, Wood; Teran, Jose U.

    1998-08-01

    Planning, estimating, and building a telescope and its enclosure within a budget is a challenge to any project staff. The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) project office goal has been to break every phase of the project into small packages and competitively bid the packages. In this way the project office can minimize costs and keep the project budget from escalating out of control. This paper will discuss both the unique and common problems associated with the building of telescopes into the next millennium. The discussion is centered on the planning and execution phases of construction for the LBT, located on Mt. Graham in Arizona. The paper will discuss the effects of delays on the actual start of the telescope due to environmental issues and the impact the delays had on design and budget. The paper will provide the solutions that have been incorporated by the LBT project office to maximize the quality of construction while holding costs to a minimum. The use of a team approach by the contractors, engineers, and the project office has been successful in maintaining quality construction at a reasonable cost.

  20. Operational metrics for the ESO Very Large Telescope: lessons learned and future steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, F.; Marteau, S.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Mainieri, V.; Mysore, S.; Rejkuba, M.; Hilker, M.; Patat, F.; Sterzik, M.; Kaufer, A.; Mieske, S.

    2016-07-01

    When ESO's Very Large Telescope opened its first dome in April 1999 it was the first ground-based facility to offer to the scientific community access to an 8-10m class telescope with both classical and queue observing. The latter was considered to be the most promising way to ensure the observing flexibility necessary to execute the most demanding scientific programmes under the required, usually very well defined, conditions. Since then new instruments have become operational and 1st generation ones replaced, filling the 12 VLT foci and feeding the VLT Interferometer and its four Auxiliary Telescopes. Operating efficiently such a broad range of instruments installed and available every night of the year on four 8-metre telescopes offers many challenges. Although it may appear that little has changed since 1999, the underlying VLT operational model has evolved in order to accommodate different requirements from the user community and features of new instruments. Did it fulfil its original goal and, if so, how well? How did it evolve? What are the lessons learned after more than 15 years of operations? A careful analysis and monitoring of statistics and trends in Phase 1 and Phase 2 has been deployed under the DOME (Dashboard for Operational Metrics at ESO) project. The main goal of DOME is to provide robust metrics that can be followed with time in a user-friendly manner. Here, we summarize the main findings on the handling of service mode observations and present the most recent developments.

  1. Double stage Lyot coronagraph with the apodized reticulated stop for the Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaitskova, Natalia

    2005-08-01

    One of the science drivers for the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) is imaging and spectroscopy of exo-solar planets located as close as 20mas to their parent star [1]. The application requires a well thought-out design of the high contrast imaging instrumentation. Several working coronagraphic concepts have already been developed for the monolithic telescope with the diameter up to 8 meter. Nevertheless the conclusions made about the performance of these systems cannot be applied directly to the telescope of the diameter 30-100m. The existing schemes are needed to be reconsidered taking into account the specific characteristics of a segmented surface. We start this work with the classical system - Lyot coronagraph. We show that while the increase in telescope diameter is an advantage for the high contrast range science, the segmentation sets a limit on the performance of the coronagraph. Diffraction from intersegment gaps sets a floor to the achievable extinction of the starlight. Masking out the bright segment gaps in the Lyot plane although helps increasing the contrast, does not solve completely the problem: the high spatial frequency component of the diffractive light remains. We suggest using the Lyot stop which acts on the light within gaps in order to produce the uniform illumination in the Lyot plane. We show that for the diffraction limit regime and a perfect phasing this type of coronagraph achieves a sufficient star light extinction.

  2. Foundation, excavation and radiation shielding concepts for a 16-m large lunar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Koon M.; Johnson, Stewart W.

    1991-09-01

    NASA is considering a 16-m diameter optical telescope on the moon as a part of the Space Exploration Initiative. Fundamental concepts of engineering activities on the moon and how they can be applied to the establishment of a 16-m large lunar telescope (LLT) are discussed. These fundamental concepts include the engineering response of lunar soils and how they affect construction activities, namely, drilling, blasting, ripping, digging and compaction. A mirror support structure and foundation design concept is proposed. The foundation considered is a multiple contact points spud-can type footing. It does not appear that a deep foundation or the presence of bedrock is required to achieve the telescope foundation stiffness. The LLT system will include a regolith covered housing, the size of a small room, which will contain sensitive electronic equipment including charge coupled devices which need protection from cosmic radiation effects. A brief discussion is made on radiation, radiation transport and radiation effects on electronics and on humans. Radiation protection techniques and the different emplacement schemes for the LLT instrument housing for radiation protection are suggested. A structural concept of an early lunar based telescope is also presented.

  3. Foundation, excavation and radiation shielding concepts for a 16-m large lunar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, Koon M.; Johnson, Stewart W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is considering a 16-m diameter optical telescope on the moon as a part of the Space Exploration Initiative. Fundamental concepts of engineering activities on the moon and how they can be applied to the establishment of a 16-m large lunar telescope (LLT) are discussed. These fundamental concepts include the engineering response of lunar soils and how they affect construction activities, namely, drilling, blasting, ripping, digging and compaction. A mirror support structure and foundation design concept is proposed. The foundation considered is a multiple contact points spud-can type footing. It does not appear that a deep foundation or the presence of bedrock is required to achieve the telescope foundation stiffness. The LLT system will include a regolith covered housing, the size of a small room, which will contain sensitive electronic equipment including charge coupled devices which need protection from cosmic radiation effects. A brief discussion is made on radiation, radiation transport and radiation effects on electronics and on humans. Radiation protection techniques and the different emplacement schemes for the LLT instrument housing for radiation protection are suggested. A structural concept of an early lunar based telescope is also presented.

  4. Phase A reaction control system design for the Large Space Telescope (LST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The design of a reaction control system (RCS) for the Large Space Telescope is discussed. The primary requirement for the RCS is to serve as an emergency backup control system to the primary attitude control system. A regulated gaseous nitrogen RCS was selected. The operation of the system and its individual components is described. The principal design goals of the RCS were to minimize contamination effects, make use of existing components, and modularize the system to provide ease in manned orbital maintenance.

  5. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiang-Qun; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Chu, Yao-Quan; Li, Guo-Ping; Li, Qi; Zhang, Li-Ping; Su, Hong-Jun; Yao, Zheng-Qiu; Wang, Ya-Nan; Xing, Xiao-Zheng; Li, Xin-Nan; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Wang, Gang; Gu, Bo-Zhong; Luo, A.-Li; Xu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Zhen-Chao; Liu, Gen-Rong; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Yang, De-Hua; Cao, Shu-Yun; Chen, Hai-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Kun-Xin; Chen, Ying; Chu, Jia-Ru; Feng, Lei; Gong, Xue-Fei; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Hong-Zhuan; Hu, Ning-Sheng; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jia, Lei; Jiang, Fang-Hua; Jiang, Xiang; Jiang, Zi-Bo; Jin, Ge; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Yan; Li, Ye-Ping; Liu, Guan-Qun; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Wen-Zhi; Mao, Yin-Dun; Men, Li; Qi, Yong-Jun; Qi, Zhao-Xiang; Shi, Huo-Ming; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Tao, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Da-Qi; Wang, Dan; Wang, Guo-Min; Wang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian-Ling; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shu-Qing; Wang, You; Wang, Yue-Fei; Xu, Ling-Zhe; Xu, Yan; Yang, Shi-Hai; Yu, Yong; Yuan, Hui; Yuan, Xiang-Yan; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Jie; Zou, Si-Cheng

    2012-09-01

    The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called the Guo Shou Jing Telescope) is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST's special design allows both a large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 m-4.9 m) and a wide field of view (FOV) (5°). It has an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration which continuously changes the mirror's surface that adjusts during the observation process and combines thin deformable mirror active optics with segmented active optics. Its primary mirror (6.67 m × 6.05 m) and active Schmidt mirror (5.74m × 4.40m) are both segmented, and composed of 37 and 24 hexagonal sub-mirrors respectively. By using a parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 m in diameter can accommodate 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST will be the telescope with the highest rate of spectral acquisition. As a national large scientific project, the LAMOST project was formally proposed in 1996, and approved by the Chinese government in 1997. The construction started in 2001, was completed in 2008 and passed the official acceptance in June 2009. The LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and the spectroscopic survey will launch in September 2012. Up to now, LAMOST has released more than 480000 spectra of objects. LAMOST will make an important contribution to the study of the large-scale structure of the Universe, structure and evolution of the Galaxy, and cross-identification of multi-waveband properties in celestial objects.

  6. The Fermi Large Area Telescope on Orbit: Event Classification, Instrument Response Functions, and Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON ORBIT: EVENT CLASSIFICATION, INSTRUMENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS, AND CALIBRATION...dimensional ( 3D ) imaging calorimeter. This is achieved by arranging the CsI crystals in each tower module in 8 layers, each with 12 crystal logs (with...Thus, the CAL provides a 3D image of the energy deposition for each event. Since the CAL is only 8.6 radiation lengths thick at normal incidence

  7. Computational performance comparison of wavefront reconstruction algorithms for the European Extremely Large Telescope on multi-CPU architecture.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lu; Fedrigo, Enrico; Béchet, Clémentine; Brunner, Elisabeth; Pirani, Werther

    2012-06-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is studying the next generation giant telescope, called the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). With a 42 m diameter primary mirror, it is a significant step from currently existing telescopes. Therefore, the E-ELT with its instruments poses new challenges in terms of cost and computational complexity for the control system, including its adaptive optics (AO). Since the conventional matrix-vector multiplication (MVM) method successfully used so far for AO wavefront reconstruction cannot be efficiently scaled to the size of the AO systems on the E-ELT, faster algorithms are needed. Among those recently developed wavefront reconstruction algorithms, three are studied in this paper from the point of view of design, implementation, and absolute speed on three multicore multi-CPU platforms. We focus on a single-conjugate AO system for the E-ELT. The algorithms are the MVM, the Fourier transform reconstructor (FTR), and the fractal iterative method (FRiM). This study enhances the scaling of these algorithms with an increasing number of CPUs involved in the computation. We discuss implementation strategies, depending on various CPU architecture constraints, and we present the first quantitative execution times so far at the E-ELT scale. MVM suffers from a large computational burden, making the current computing platform undersized to reach timings short enough for AO wavefront reconstruction. In our study, the FTR provides currently the fastest reconstruction. FRiM is a recently developed algorithm, and several strategies are investigated and presented here in order to implement it for real-time AO wavefront reconstruction, and to optimize its execution time. The difficulty to parallelize the algorithm in such architecture is enhanced. We also show that FRiM can provide interesting scalability using a sparse matrix approach.

  8. First light for the sodium laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Lijiang 1.8m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Min; Chen, Shan-Qiu; Bo, Yong; Chen, Feng; Zuo, Jun-Wei; Bian, Qi; Yao, Ji; Zhou, Lu-Chun; Wei, Lin; Chen, Dong-Hong; Gao, Yang; Jin, Kai; Dai, Xiao-Lin; Fu, Han-Chu; Xu, Chang; Wang, Zhi-Chao; Xue, Xiang-Hui; Chen, Xue-Wu; Qian, Xian-Mei; Zhou, Yu; Xian, Hao; Peng, Qin-Jun; Rao, Chang-Hui; Xu, Zu-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Dong

    2016-12-01

    A first generation sodium Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System (LGS-AOS) was developed and integrated into the Lijiang 1.8m telescope in 2013. The LGS-AOS has three sub-systems: (1) a 20 W long pulsed sodium laser, (2) a 300-millimeter-diameter laser launch telescope, and (3) a 37-element compact adaptive optics system. On 2014 January 25, we obtained high resolution images of an mV 8.18 star, HIP 43963, during the first light of the LGS-AOS. In this paper, the sodium laser, the laser launch telescope, the compact adaptive optics system and the first light results will be presented.

  9. Mechanical analysis and measurement of wheel-rail contact system in large aperture radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. P.; Kong, D. Q.; Li, C. G.; Zhu, N. J.; Shi, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    The azimuth rotation part of a large aperture radio telescope usually takes one wheel-rail system; therefore, wheel-rail pointing errors and wheel-rail wear are very important to antenna point accuracy. First, this paper discusses the wheelrail contact theory and some specific characteristics of wheel-rail system in large aperture radio telescope. Second, one 3D model of wheel-rail contact system is built according to the parameters of 50m antenna in China, and the model is analyzed by one whole body in MSC.Patran/Nastran. Third, we use the multi-body dynamic method to build the model of wheel-rail and simulate it in RecurDyn software. Comparing the simulation results, we find that the coupling of rigidbody and soft-body is much more precise than one whole body in describing the contact deformation. And the results also explain the crevice's influence on the mechanical properties of wheel-rail contact system. Finally, some experiments and measurements of 50m antenna are made, by which we get some useful tips for large aperture radio telescope. The test results show that the multi-body dynamic method is much more suitable to the mechanical analysis in wheel-rail contact system.

  10. Propellantless precision formation flying with photonic laser thrusters for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young K.

    2009-08-01

    One economically and technologically feasible bedrock structure for constructing large (diameter > 10 m) space telescopes is a segmented or sparse aperture system with subcomponents in precision formation flight. For UV/Visible/IR systems, initial targeting and targeting new objects to establish initial fringes requires the positioning precision to nm - μm accuracy, thus the control system should be capable of the required precision positioning and attitude controls without producing contaminations from thruster exhaust plumes. A nanometer accuracy contaminationfree formation architecture, Photon Tether Formation Flight (PTFF), based on Photonic Laser Thrusters (PLTs) and tethers has been proposed to exploit a force equilibrium formed by PLT thrust and tether tension for forming precision persistent 3-D formation structures ideal for the large UV/Visible/IR space telescopes. The range of the PLT force can theoretically extend over several kms. Under previous NASA sponsorship, we have successfully demonstrated a proofof- concept PLT. In addition, the demonstrations of required laser components, optics and tracking technologies developed under military laser applications now support that implementation of PLTs for large space telescopes is one step closer to reality.

  11. A Research on the Primary Mirror Manipulator of Large Segmented-mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, H.

    2012-09-01

    Since Galileo firstly used the telescope to observe the sky 400 years ago, the aperture of the telescope has become larger and larger to observe the deeper universe, and the segmented-mirror telescope is becoming more and more popular with increasing aperture. In the early 21st century, a series of segmented-mirror telescopes have been constructed including the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) of China. LAMOST is a meridian reflecting Schmidt telescope, and the dimension of the primary mirror is about 6.7 m× 6 m, which is composed of 37 hexagonal sub-mirrors. However, a problem about the mirror installation appears with the increasing aperture. If there are hundreds of sub-mirrors in the telescope, it is a challenging job to mount and dismount them to the truss. This problem is discussed in this paper and a manipulator for the primary mirror of LAMOST is designed to perform the mount and dismount work. In chapter 1, all the segmented-mirror telescopes in the world are introduced and how the sub-mirrors of these telescopes are installed has been investigated. After comparing with the serial and the parallel robot, a serial robot manipulator proposal, which has several redundant degrees of freedom (DOFs), has been chosen from a series of design proposals. In chapter 2, the theoretical analysis has been carried out on the basis of the design proposal, which includes the forward kinematics and the inverse kinematics. Firstly the D-H coordinate is built according to the structure of the manipulator, so it is possible to obtain the end-effector position and orientation from the individual joint motion thanks to the forward kinematics. Because of the redundant DOFs of the manipulator, the inverse kinematics solution can be a very trick task, and the result may not be only, therefore a kind of simulation is carried out to get the numerical solution using ADAMS (Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical System). In the dynamics analysis the

  12. ATLAST-9.2: A Deployable Large Aperture UVOIR Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Feinberg, L.; Purves, L.; Hyde, T.; Thronson, H.; Townsend, J.; Postman, M.; Bolcar, M.; Budinoff, J.; Dean, B.; Clampin, N.; Ebbets, D.; Gong, Q.; Gull, T.; Howard, J.; Jones, A.; Lyon, R.; Pasquale, B.; Perrygo, C.; Smith, S.; Thompson, P.; Woodgate, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a study of a deployable version of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) that could be launched on an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). ATLAST is a concept for a next-generation UVOIR observatory to follow HST and JWST. The observatory retains significant heritage from JWST, thereby taking advantage of technologies and engineering already developed for that mission. At the same time, we have identified several design changes to the JWST architecture, some of which are required due to the demanding wavefront error requirements at visible wavelengths. The optical telescope assembly has a segmented 9.2-meter aperture and consists of 36 hexagonal glass mirrors, each of which is I.3l5m in size (flat-to-flat). The telescope can be folded to fit in the 6.5m fairing on the planned upgrade to the Delta-IV heavy launch vehicle. Near-real time wavefront sensing and control is performed on-board the telescope using stars in the field of view to deliver diffraction limited imaging performance at 500nm wavelength. The optical design of the telescope provides an 8x20 arcmin FOV in which 4-5 instruments can be accommodated, plus fine guidance and wavefront sensors. Unlike JWST, the OTA sits at the end of a multi-gimbaled arm, allowing pitch and roll motion, and is isolated from the sunshield and spacecraft bus by an active isolation system. Our design permits servicing in order to extend the life of the observatory.

  13. ATLAST-9.2: A Deployable Large Aperture UVOIR Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Feinberg, L.; Purves, L.; Hyde, T.; Thronson, H.; Townsend, J.; Postman, M.; Bolcar, M.; Budinoff, J.; Dean, B.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a study of a deployable version of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) that could be launched on an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). ATLAST is a concept for a next-generation UVOIR observatory to follow HST and JWST. The observatory retains significant heritage from JWST, thereby taking advantage of technologies and engineering already developed for that mission. At the same time, we have identified several design changes to the JWST architecture, some of which are required due to the demanding wavefront error requirements at visible wavelengths. The optical telescope assembly has a segmented 9.2-meter aperture and consists of 36 hexagonal glass mirrors, each of which is I.3l5m in size (flat-to-flat). The telescope can be folded to fit in the 6.5m fairing on the planned upgrade to the Delta-IV heavy launch vehicle. Near-real time wavefront sensing and control is performed on-board the telescope using stars in the field of view to deliver diffraction limited imaging performance at 500nm wavelength. The optical design of the telescope provides an 8x20 arcmin FOV in which 4-5 instruments can be accommodated, plus fine guidance and wavefront sensors. Unlike JWST, the OTA sits at the end of a multi-gimbaled arm, allowing pitch and roll motion, and is isolated from the sunshield and spacecraft bus by an active isolation system. Our design permits servicing in order to extend the life of the observatory.

  14. Prospects for Measuring Supermassive Black Hole Masses with Future Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan; Wright, S. A.; Barton, E. J.; Barth, A. J.; Simard, L.; Larkin, J. E.; Moore, A.

    2013-01-01

    The next generation of giant-segmented mirror telescopes (> 20 m) will enable us to observe galactic nuclei at much higher angular resolution and sensitivity than ever before. These capabilities will introduce a revolutionary shift in our understanding of the origin and evolution of supermassive black holes by enabling more precise black hole mass measurements in a mass range that is unreachable today. We present simulations and predictions of the observations of nuclei that will be made with the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and the adaptive optics assisted integral-field spectrograph IRIS. These simulations, for the first time, use realistic values for the sky, telescope, adaptive optics system, and instrument, to determine the expected signal-to-noise of a range of possible targets spanning intermediate mass black holes of ~10^4 M⊙ to the most massive black holes known today of >10^10 M⊙. We find that future integral-field spectrographs will be able to observe Milky Way-mass black holes out the distance of the Virgo cluster, and will allow us to observe many more brightest-cluster galaxies where the most massive black holes are thought to reside. We also evaluate how well the kinematic moments of the velocity distributions can be constrained at different spectral resolutions and plate scales. We find that a spectral resolution of ~8000 will be necessary to measure the masses of IMBHs. We find by using the SDSS DR7 catalog of galaxies that over 4000 massive black holes will be observable at distances between 0.005 < z < 0.3 with the estimated sensitivity and angular resolution of TMT. These observations will provide the most accurate dynamical mass measurements of black holes to enable the study of their demography, address the origin of the M_bh-σ and M_bh - L relationships, and the origins and evolution of black holes through cosmic time.

  15. 2-micron Adaptive Optics Images of Titan from the W.M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, S. G.; Macintosh, B. A.; Max, C. E.; de Pater, I.; Roe, H. G.; Marchis, F.

    2001-12-01

    Saturn's largest moon Titan is the only satellite in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere, which consists mainly of nitrogen and a few percent methane. Photolysis of methane creates a hydrocarbon haze in Titan's atmosphere that is opaque to visible light. However, in the infrared there are `windows' between methane absorption bands in which the surface of Titan can be imaged. We have observed Titan over the period of 1999-2001 using the adaptive optics system on the 10-meter W.M. Keck Telescope. Using adaptive optics allows us to observe Titan with a resolution of 0.04 arcseconds, or approximately 20 resolution elements across the satellite's disk. We will report on adaptive optics images of Titan taken in 1999-2001 at K band (1.95-2.29 microns). The images are enhanced by application of the MISTRAL iterative image deconvolution routine. Using this data combined with atmospheric modeling, we are able to determine Titan's surface albedo at this wavelength and properties of its hydrocarbon haze layer. This research was supported in part by the STC Program of the National Science Foundation under Agreement No. AST-9876783, and in part under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of Calif. under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  16. Subaru Telescope adaptive optics observations of gravitationally lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Oguri, Masamune; Minowa, Yosuke; Iye, Masanori; Inada, Naohisa; Oya, Shin; Kayo, Issha; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Terada, Hiroshi; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of an imaging observation campaign conducted with the Subaru Telescope adaptive optics system (IRCS+AO188) on 28 gravitationally lensed quasars and candidates (23 doubles, 1 quad, 1 possible triple, and 3 candidates) from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search. We develop a novel modelling technique that fits analytical and hybrid point spread functions (PSFs), while simultaneously measuring the relative astrometry, photometry, as well as the lens galaxy morphology. We account for systematics by simulating the observed systems using separately observed PSF stars. The measured relative astrometry is comparable with that typically achieved with the Hubble Space Telescope, even after marginalizing over the PSF uncertainty. We model for the first time the quasar host galaxies in five systems, without a priori knowledge of the PSF, and show that their luminosities follow the known correlation with the mass of the supermassive black hole. For each system, we obtain mass models far more accurate than those previously published from low-resolution data, and we show that in our sample of lensing galaxies the observed light profile is more elliptical than the mass, for ellipticity ≳0.25. We also identify eight doubles for which the sources of external and internal shear are more reliably separated, and should therefore be prioritized in monitoring campaigns aimed at measuring time delays in order to infer the Hubble constant.

  17. Laboratory demonstrations of multi-object adaptive optics in the visible on a 10 meter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. M.; Johnson, Luke; Laag, Edward A.; Kupke, Renate; Gavel, Donald T.

    2008-07-01

    We have demonstrated MOAO-type atmospheric compensation on a 10 meter telescope at visible wavelengths with the UCO/Lick MCAO/MOAO testbed in the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at UCSC. We report Strehls of ~20% in R band (658 nm) on-axis and Strehls of ~15% off-axis 25" for a 3D Mauna Kea-type atmosphere with r0 = 15 cm and Τ0 = 3.5". We show that a tomographic MOAO approach with 5 LGS's in a 50" constellation is sufficient to realize good correction in the visible. Two major improvements to the testbed realized this gain: (1) An upgrade to 64x64 subapertures across a 10 meter pupil (2) and a predictor-corrector wind model. We discuss limitations to wide-field visible light AO on 8-10 meter class telescopes and stress that the tomographic error due to blind modes is frequently the largest field-dependent error. We use a predictor-corrector wind model (Wiberg et al. 2006) to take advantage of windlayer shearing in the atmosphere to reduce the tomographic error over a 50" diameter field. Depending on the validity of the Taylor frozen flow model for individual layers in the real atmosphere, this approach could be more effective than increasing the number of LGS's.

  18. Development of an ultra high-precision x-ray telescope with an adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamoto, Shunji; Takano, Haruko; Saitoh, Harue; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Suga, Kazuharu; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2003-06-01

    We are developing an ultra high precision Soft X-ray telescope. The design of the telescope is a normal incident one for 13.5 nm band using Mo/Si multilayers. Two ideas are introduced. One is the optical measurement system in order to monitor the prevision of the optics system. The other is the adaptive optics system with a deformable mirror. Using an x-ray optical separation filter, we can always monitor the deformation of the optics by optical light. With this information, we can control the deformable mirror to compensate the system deformation as a closed loop system. We confirmed that the absolute precision of the wave front sensor was less than 3 nm rms. The preicison of the deformable mirror was roughly 5 nm rms. The shape of the primary mirror was an off-axis paraboloide with an effective diameter of 80mm. This primary mirror was coated by Mo/Si multilayers. The reflectivity of the primary mirror at 13.5 nm was rnaging from 30 to 50%. The x-ray optical separation filter was made from Zr with a thicknness of ~170nm. The transmission of the filter for low energy x-ray was measured and was roughly 50% at 13.5nm.

  19. Adaptive system for solar telescopes operating in the strongly turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoshkin, L. V.; Botugina, N. N.; Bolbasova, L. A.; Demidov, M. L.; Grigoriev, V. M.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.; Kopylov, E. A.; Kovadlo, P. G.; Kudryashov, A. V.; Lavrinov, V. V.; Lavrinova, L. N.; Lukin, V. P.; Shikhovtcev, A. Yu.; Trifonov, V. D.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we describe the development of the newest adaptive optics system for the Big Solar Vacuum Telescope of the Baikal Astrophysical Observatory. This system is a result of collaboration between VE Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Tomsk, and Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics SB RAS, Irkutsk. The system includes two active mirrors for the correction: domestic tip-tilt and bimorph deformable (Active Optics NightN Ltd.), and separate wavefront sensors (WFS). A correlation S-H wave-front sensor is based on a Allies Prosilica GX-1050 GigE camera with speed of 309 Hz and frame size of 1248x1248 pixels. A personal computer is used for bimorph deformable mirror image processing. The mirror was successfully used during the 2010-2014 observing seasons. The system developed is capable of correcting up to 35 modes, thus providing diffraction limited images at visible wavelengths.

  20. Lick Observatory's Shane telescope adaptive optics system (ShaneAO): research directions and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald T.; Kupke, Renate; Rudy, Alexander R.; Srinath, Srikar; Dillon, Daren; Poyneer, Lisa A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a review of the ongoing research activity surrounding the adaptive optics system at the Shane telescope (ShaneAO) particularly the R&D efforts on the technology and algorithms for that will advance AO into wider application for astronomy. We are pursuing the AO challenges for whole sky coverage diffraction-limited correction down to visible science wavelengths. This demands high-order wavefront correction and bright artificial laser beacons. We present recent advancements in the development of MEMS based AO correction, woofer-tweeter architecture, wind-predictive wavefront control algorithms, atmospheric characterization, and a pulsed fiber amplifier guide star laser tuned for optical pumping of the sodium layer. We present the latest on-sky results from the new AO system and present status and experimental plans for the optical pumping guide star laser.

  1. Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Flight Engineering Model: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Godfrey, G.; Williams, S. M.; Grove, J. E.; Mizuno, T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Kamae, T.; Ampe, J.; Briber, Stuart; Dann, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-production high-energy (greater than 20 MeV) gamma-ray telescope being built by an international partnership of astrophysicists and particle physicists for a satellite launch in 2006, designed to study a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. As part of the development effort, the collaboration has built a Balloon Flight Engineering Model (BFEM) for flight on a high-altitude scientific balloon. The BFEM is approximately the size of one of the 16 GLAST-LAT towers and contains all the components of the full instrument: plastic scintillator anticoincidence system (ACD), high-Z foil/Si strip pair-conversion tracker (TKR), CsI hodoscopic calorimeter (CAL), triggering and data acquisition electronics (DAQ), commanding system, power distribution, telemetry, real-time data display, and ground data processing system. The principal goal of the balloon flight was to demonstrate the performance of this instrument configuration under conditions similar to those expected in orbit. Results from a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, on August 4, 2001, show that the BFEM successfully obtained gamma-ray data in this high-background environment.

  2. Toward Large-Area Sub-Arcsecond X-Ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Allured, Ryan; Ames, Andrew O.; Biskach, Michael P.; Broadway David M.; Bruni, Ricardo J.; Burrows, David; Cao, Jian; Chalifoux, Brandon D.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Chung, Yip-Wah; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Hertz, Edward; Jackson, Thomas N.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Riveros, Raul E.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Romaine, Suzanne E.; Saha, Timo T.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Eric D.; Solly, Peter M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Mellville P.; Vikhlilin, Alexey; Wallace, Margeaux L.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    In order to advance significantly scientific objectives, future x-ray astronomy missions will likely call for x-ray telescopes with large aperture areas (approx. = 3 sq m) and fine angular resolution (approx. = 1"). Achieving such performance is programmatically and technologically challenging due to the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes and to the need for densely nested grazing-incidence optics. Such an x-ray telescope will require precision fabrication, alignment, mounting, and assembly of large areas (approx. = 600 sq m) of lightweight (approx. = 2 kg/sq m areal density) high-quality mirrors, at an acceptable cost (approx. = 1 M$/sq m of mirror surface area). This paper reviews relevant programmatic and technological issues, as well as possible approaches for addressing these issues-including direct fabrication of monocrystalline silicon mirrors, active (in-space adjustable) figure correction of replicated mirrors, static post-fabrication correction using ion implantation, differential erosion or deposition, and coating-stress manipulation of thin substrates.

  3. Toward large-area sub-arcsecond x-ray telescopes II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Allured, Ryan; Ames, Andrew O.; Biskach, Michael P.; Broadway, David M.; Bruni, Ricardo J.; Burrows, David N.; Cao, Jian; Chalifoux, Brandon D.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Chung, Yip-Wah; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Hertz, Edward; Jackson, Thomas N.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Riveros, Raul E.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Romaine, Suzanne E.; Saha, Timo T.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Eric D.; Solly, Peter M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ulmer, Melville P.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Wallace, Margeaux L.; Wang, Xiaoli; Windt, David L.; Yao, Youwei; Ye, Shi; Zhang, William W.; Zuo, Heng

    2016-09-01

    In order to advance significantly scientific objectives, future x-ray astronomy missions will likely call for x-ray telescopes with large aperture areas (≍ 3 m2) and fine angular resolution (≍ 12). Achieving such performance is programmatically and technologically challenging due to the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes and to the need for densely nested grazing-incidence optics. Such an x-ray telescope will require precision fabrication, alignment, mounting, and assembly of large areas (≍ 600 m2) of lightweight (≍ 2 kg/m2 areal density) high-quality mirrors, at an acceptable cost (≍ 1 M$/m2 of mirror surface area). This paper reviews relevant programmatic and technological issues, as well as possible approaches for addressing these issues-including direct fabrication of monocrystalline silicon mirrors, active (in-space adjustable) figure correction of replicated mirrors, static post-fabrication correction using ion implantation, differential erosion or deposition, and coating-stress manipulation of thin substrates.

  4. Solar Sail - Fresnel Zone Plate Lens for a Large Space Based Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J T

    2002-02-13

    A Fresnel zone plate lens made with solar sail material could be used as the primary optic for a very large aperture telescope on deep space probes propelled by solar sails. The large aperture telescope capability could enable significant science on fly-by missions to the asteroids, Pluto, Kuiper belt or the tort cloud and could also enable meaningful interstellar fly-by missions for laser propelled sails. This type of lens may also have some potential for laser communications and as a solar concentrator. The techniques for fabrication of meter size and larger Fresnel phase plate optics are under development at LLNL, and we are extending this technology to amplitude zone plates made from sail materials. Corrector optics to greatly extend the bandwidth of these Fresnel optics will be demonstrated in the future. This novel telescope concept will require new understanding of the fabrication, deployment and control of gossamer space structures. It will also require new materials technology for fabricating these optics and understanding their long term stability in a space environment.

  5. Large-format electrographic and array detectors for a space Schmidt imaging telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Fischer, Jacqueline; Wray, James D.; Lowrance, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Possible optical designs of imaging detectors for the spaceborne Schmidt telescope proposed by Carruthers et al. (1990) are discussed, surveying the currently or potentially available technology. Consideration is given to FUV electrographic detectors of large format (e.g., 120 mm with 10-micron resolution) using CsI photocathodes, the possible extension of the same technology to the mid-UV using Cs2Te instead of CsI, large CCD arrays for the visible and NIR, electron-bombarded CCDs for the FUV and mid-UV, and the data handling and processing requirements of these detectors.

  6. Fabrication of large-aperture, high efficiency, Fresnel diffractive membrane optic for space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Mengjuan; Yin, Ganghua; Jiao, Jianchao; Liu, Zhengkun; Xu, Xiangdong; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive optical system can be a favorable choice for large-aperture space telescope to reduce the mass and size of image system. To meet the demand of large-aperture, high efficiency, lightweight diffractive optic for high resolution remote sensing, a 200 mm diameter, 20 μmthick, 4-level diffractive membrane fabricated is shown to have over 62% diffraction efficiency into the +1 order, with 0.051 efficiency RMS. Over 66% diffraction efficiency is achieved for a 100 mm aperture membrane, with 0.023 efficiency RMS. The membrane thickness uniformity control is discussed and 8 nm wave front error RMS is achieved in 100 mm diameter.

  7. Maintaining a suite of binocular facility instruments at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Robert O.; Morris, John; Power, Jennifer; Howard, James; Riedl, James; Solheid, Elliott; Wagner, R. M.; Veillet, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Facility Instruments at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) include the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field imagers at the prime focus, the LUCIFER (or LUCI) near-infrared imager and spectrograph pair, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of long-slit spectrographs. The disciplines involved in instrument support are reviewed, as well as scheduling of support personnel. A computerized system for instrument maintenance scheduling and spare parts inventory is described. Instrument problems are tracked via an online reporting system, and statistics on types of instrument problems are discussed, as well as applicability of the system to troubleshooting.

  8. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: A summary update on the scientific potential for pulsating star research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Melissa L.

    2017-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will provide hundreds of deep images of the southern sky over its 10 year duration, enabling variability studies for an unprecedentedly large and unbiased population of objects. In this proceeding paper I will cover the aspects of the LSST's survey and data products that are most relevant to the study of stellar pulsations (Sect. 1), and provide a directory of pertinent materials for further information. I will also summarize the anticipated variable star sample sizes from the LSST, and highlight recent research from several members of the scientific community which evaluates the scientific potential of the LSST's data products with respect to pulsating stars (Sect. 2).

  9. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Dark Accelerator HESS J1745-303

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Reviewing the two MeV-GeV investigations in the field of the HESS J1745-303 performed using Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we confirmed that the emission peak comfortably coincides with ‘Region A’ in the TeV regime, which is the brightest part of this feature. The MeV–TeV spectrum can be precisely described by a single power-law. Also, recent investigation has shown that the MeV-GeV feature is elongated from ‘Region A’ toward the north-west, which is similar to the case of large- scale atomic/molecular gas distribution.

  10. ATLAST-9.2m: a Large-Aperture Deployable Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oergerle, William; Feinberg, Lee D.; Purves, Lloyd R.; Hyde, T. Tupper; Thronson, Harley A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Postman, Marc; Bolear, Matthew R.; Budinoff, Jason G.; Dean, Bruce H.; Clampin, Mark C.; Ebbets, Dennis C.; Gong, Qian; Gull, Theodore R.; Howard, Joseph M.; Jones, Andrew L.; Lyon, Richard G.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Perrygo, Charles; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Thompson, Patrick L.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results of a study of a deployable version of the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), designed to operate in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit. The primary mirror of the segmented 9.2-meter aperture has 36 hexagonal 1.315 m (flat to flat) glass mirrors. The architecture and folding of the telescope is similar to JWST, allowing it to fit into the 6.5 m fairing of a modest upgrade to the Delta-IV Heavy version of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). We discuss the overall observatory design, optical design, instruments, stray light, wavefront sensing and control, pointing and thermal control, and in-space servicing options.

  11. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, on Behalf of the Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays can be produced by processes that also produce neutrinos, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi (Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of potential targets for neutrino observations. Gamma-ray bursts. Active Galactic Nuclei, and supernova remnants are all sites where hadronic, neutrino-producing interactions are plausible. Pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and binary sources are all phenomena that reveal leptonic particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. While important to gamma-ray astrophysics, such sources are of less interest to neutrino studies. This talk will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT)on the Fermi spacecraft.

  12. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimetre Telescope (BLAST) and BLASTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, Enzo; Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Balloon observations from Antarctica have proven an effective and efficient way to address open Cosmological questions as well as problems in Galactic astronomy. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimetre Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital mapping experiment which uses 270 bolometric detectors to image the sky in three wavebands centred at 250, 350 and 500 μm with a 1.8 m telescope. In the years before Herschel launched, BLAST provided data of unprecedented angular and spectral coverage in frequency bands close to the peak of dust emission in star forming regions in our Galaxy, and in galaxies at cosmological distances. More recently, BLASTPol was obtained by reconfiguring the BLAST focal plane as a submillimetric polarimeter to study the role that Galactic magnetic fields have in regulating the processes of star-formation. The first and successful BLASTPol flight from Antarctica in 2010 is followed by a second flight, currently scheduled for the end of 2012.

  13. The On-Orbit Calibrations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Ampe, J.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bartelt, J.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bederede, D.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Berenji, B.; Bisello, D.; /more authors..

    2011-11-17

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope began its on-orbit operations on June 23, 2008. Calibrations, defined in a generic sense, correspond to synchronization of trigger signals, optimization of delays for latching data, determination of detector thresholds, gains and responses, evaluation of the perimeter of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), measurements of live time, of absolute time, and internal and spacecraft boresight alignments. Here we describe on-orbit calibration results obtained using known astrophysical sources, galactic cosmic rays, and charge injection into the front-end electronics of each detector. Instrument response functions will be described in a separate publication. This paper demonstrates the stability of calibrations and describes minor changes observed since launch. These results have been used to calibrate the LAT datasets to be publicly released in August 2009.

  14. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Repo