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Sample records for large-area silicon sheet

  1. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalejs, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Work carried out on the JPL Flat Plate Solar Array Project, for the purpose of developing a method for silicon ribbon production by Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EEG) for use as low-cost substrate material in terrestrial solar cell manufacture, is described. A multiple ribbon furnace unit that is designed to operate on a continuous basis for periods of at least one week, with melt replenishment and automatic ribbon width control, and to produce silicon sheet at a rate of one square meter per hour, was constructed. Program milestones set for single ribbon furnace operation to demonstrate basic EEG system capabilities with respect to growth speed, thickness and cell performance were achieved for 10 cm wide ribbon: steady-state growth at 4 cm/min and 200 micron thickness over periods of an hour and longer was made routine, and a small area cell efficiency of 13+% demonstrated. Large area cells of average efficiency of 10 to 11%, with peak values of 11 to 12% were also achieved. The integration of these individual performance levels into multiple ribbon furnace operation was not accomplished.

  2. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Recent advances toward silicon growth stations and improved electronic quality of multiplesilicon are discussed. These advances were made in large measure by studies in which the composition of the gas environment around the meniscus area was varied. By introducing gases such as CO2, CO, and CH4 into this region, reproducible increases in diffusion length and cell performance were realized, with the best large area (5 cm x 10 cm) cells exceeding 11% efficiency.

  3. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.; Ravi, K. V.; Rao, C. V. H.; Surek, T.; Bliss, D. F.; Garone, L. C.; Hogencamp, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Progress in a program to produce high speed, thin, wide silicon sheets for fabricating 10% efficient solar cells is reported. An EFG ribbon growth system was used to perform growth rate and ribbon thickness experiments. A new, wide ribbon growth system was developed. A theoretical study of stresses in ribbons was also conducted. The EFG ribbons were observed to exhibit a characteristic defect structure which is orientation dependent in the early stages of growth.

  4. Large-area silicon sheet task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A set of computer models was used to define a growth system configuration that was then built and used to grow web with lower thermally generated stress. Aspects of research in the edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) method of making Si ribbon are reported. A technique was developed to determine base resistivity and carrier lifetime in semicrystalline wafers. Automated growth of 150 kg of 15 cm-dia ingot material per crucible is reviewed. Scanning transmisson electron microscopy (STEM) and microprobe investigations of processed EFG ribbon are reported. The chemical composition of the large precipitates was studied. The structural arrangement and the electrical activity of distentions or close to the central twin plane in processed material were studied. The electrical and structural properties of grain boundaries in silicon are discussed. Temperature-dependence measurements of zero-bias conductance, a photoconductivity technique, and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) were developed. A grooving and staining technique, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and EBIC measurements in scanning electron microscopy were used to study enhanced diffusion of phosphorus at grain boundaries in polycrystaline silicon. The fundamental mechanisms of abrasion and wear and the deformation of Si by a diamond in various fluid environments are described. The efficiency of solar cells made from EFG ribbon and Semix Inc. material is reported.

  5. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Progress was made in improving ribbon flatness and reducing stress, and in raising cell performance for 10 cm wide ribbon grown in single cartridge EFG furnaces. Optimization of growth conditions resulted in improved ribbon thickness uniformity at a thickness of 200 micron, grown at 4 cm/minute, and growth at this target speed is routinely achieved over periods of the order of one hour or more. With the improved ribbon flatness, fabrication of large area (50 cm2) cells is now possible, and 10 to 11% efficiencies were demonstrated on ribbon grown at 3.5 to 4 cm/minute. Factors limiting performance of the existing multiple ribbon furnace were identified, and growth system improvements implemented to help raise throughput rates and the time percentage of simultaneous three-ribbon growth. However, it is evident that major redesign of this furnace would be needed to overcome shortfalls in its ability to achieve the Technical Features Demonstration goals of 1980. It was decided to start construction of a new multiple ribbon furnace and to incorporate the desired improvements into its design. The construction of this furnace is completed.

  6. LSA Large Area Silicon Sheet Task Continuous Czochralski Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A commercial Czochralski crystal growing furnace was converted to a continuous growth facility by installation of a small, in-situ premelter with attendant silicon storage and transport mechanisms. Using a vertical, cylindrical graphite heater containing a small fused quartz test tube linear from which the molten silicon flowed out the bottom, approximately 83 cm of nominal 5 cm diamter crystal was grown with continuous melt addition furnished by the test tube premelter. High perfection crystal was not obtained, however, due primarily to particulate contamination of the melt. A major contributor to the particulate problem was severe silicon oxide buildup on the premelter which would ultimately drop into the primary melt. Elimination of this oxide buildup will require extensive study and experimentation and the ultimate success of continuous Czochralski depends on a successful solution to this problem. Economically, the continuous Czochralski meets near-term cost goals for silicon sheet material.

  7. LSSA large area silicon sheet task continuous Czochralski process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.

    1978-01-01

    A Czochralski crystal growing furnace was converted to a continuous growth facility by installation of a premelter to provide molten silicon flow into the primary crucible. The basic furnace is operational and several trial crystals were grown in the batch mode. Numerous premelter configurations were tested both in laboratory-scale equipment as well as in the actual furnace. The best arrangement tested to date is a vertical, cylindrical graphite heater containing small fused silicon test tube liner in which the incoming silicon is melted and flows into the primary crucible. Economic modeling of the continuous Czochralski process indicates that for 10 cm diameter crystal, 100 kg furnace runs of four or five crystals each are near-optimal. Costs tend to asymptote at the 100 kg level so little additional cost improvement occurs at larger runs. For these conditions, crystal cost in equivalent wafer area of around $20/sq m exclusive of polysilicon and slicing was obtained.

  8. Large area silicon sheet by EFG. [furnace growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a technique for the production of silicon ribbon is discussed. Extensive characterization of the multiple ribbon Furnace 3A main zone temperature profile was performed and the information used to improve uniformity of heating. Irregularities in the main zone heater were associated with growth difficulties at specific cartridge locations, and growth conditions subsequently improved by profiling the main zone heater. Good growth conditions were established in all three cartridge positions. These improvements allowed multiple growth of three 10 cm wide ribbons to be demonstrated for periods of an hour on several occasions. A gas distribution system for the 10 cm cartridge was introduced and demonstrated to lead to improved ambient control during growth. Growth without and with CO2 showed that quality improvement in 10 cm ribbon grown with cold shoes results from ambient manipulation.

  9. Low Angle Silicon Sheet Growth. Large Area Silicon Sheet Task Low Cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The results of a program to demonstrate the feasibility of a low angle silicon ribbon growth process are described. Twenty-six experimental runs were performed. Ribbons were grown at pull rates from 5 to 68 cm/min. Ribbon lengths up to 74 cm were grown while widths varied from 5 to 25 mm. Thicknesses varied from 0.6 to 2.5 mm, with typical values of about 1 mm.

  10. Low cost silicon solar array project large area silicon sheet task: Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Blais, P. D.; Davis, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Growth configurations were developed which produced crystals having low residual stress levels. The properties of a 106 mm diameter round crucible were evaluated and it was found that this design had greatly enhanced temperature fluctuations arising from convection in the melt. Thermal modeling efforts were directed to developing finite element models of the 106 mm round crucible and an elongated susceptor/crucible configuration. Also, the thermal model for the heat loss modes from the dendritic web was examined for guidance in reducing the thermal stress in the web. An economic analysis was prepared to evaluate the silicon web process in relation to price goals.

  11. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Koepke, B. G.; Butter, C. D.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon was investigated. The sheets were made by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress was made in all areas of the program.

  12. Silicon-on ceramic process: Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grung, B. L.; Heaps, J. D.; Schmit, F. M.; Schuldt, S. B.; Zook, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The technical feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) 1986 overall price goal of $0.70/watt was investigated. With the silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) approach, a low-cost ceramic substrate is coated with large-grain polycrystalline silicon by unidirectional solidification of molten silicon. This effort was divided into several areas of investigation in order to most efficiently meet the goals of the program. These areas include: (1) dip-coating; (2) continuous coating designated SCIM-coating, and acronym for Silicon Coating by an Inverted Meniscus (SCIM); (3) material characterization; (4) cell fabrication and evaluation; and (5) theoretical analysis. Both coating approaches were successful in producing thin layers of large grain, solar-cell-quality silicon. The dip-coating approach was initially investigated and considerable effort was given to this technique. The SCIM technique was adopted because of its scale-up potential and its capability to produce more conventiently large areas of SOC.

  13. Floating substrate process: Large-area silicon sheet task low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, M.; Hall, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    Supercooling of silicon-tin alloy melts was studied. Values as high as 78 C at 1100 C and 39 C at 1200 C were observed, corresponding to supersaturation parameter values 0.025 and 0.053 at 1050 C and 1150 C, respectively. The interaction of tin with silane gas streams was investigated over the temperature range 1000 to 1200 C. Single-pass conversion efficiencies exceeding 30% were obtained. The growth habit of spontaneously-nucleated surface growth was determined to be consistent with dendritic and web growth from singly-twinned triangular nucleii. Surface growth of interlocking silicon crystals, thin enough to follow the surface of the liquid and with growth velocity as high as 5 mm/min, was obtained. Large area single-crystal growth along the melt surface was not achieved. Small single-crystal surface growth was obtained which did not propagate beyond a few millimeters.

  14. Large area Czochralski silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Gleim, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall cost effectiveness of the Czochralski process for producing large-area silicon was determined. The feasibility of growing several 12 cm diameter crystals sequentially at 12 cm/h during a furnace run and the subsequent slicing of the ingot using a multiblade slurry saw were investigated. The goal of the wafering process was a slice thickness of 0.25 mm with minimal kerf. A slice + kerf of 0.56 mm was achieved on 12 cm crystal using both 400 grit B4C and SiC abrasive slurries. Crystal growth experiments were performed at 12 cm diameter in a commercially available puller with both 10 and 12 kg melts. Several modifications to the puller hoz zone were required to achieve stable crystal growth over the entire crystal length and to prevent crystallinity loss a few centimeters down the crystal. The maximum practical growth rate for 12 cm crystal in this puller design was 10 cm/h, with 12 to 14 cm/h being the absolute maximum range at which melt freeze occurred.

  15. Silicon-on-ceramic process: Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. B.; Zook, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Heaps, J. D.; Schmit, F.; Schuldt, S. B.; Chapman, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The technical feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon to meet the DOE 1986 cost goal of 70 cents/watt was investigated. The silicon on ceramic approach is to coat a low cost ceramic substrate with large grain polycrystalline silicon by unidirectional solidification of molten silicon. Results and accomplishments are summarized.

  16. Slicing of silicon into sheet material. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, S. C.; Fleming, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fabrication of a prototype large capacity multiple blade slurry saw is considered. Design of the bladehead which will tension up to 1000 blades, and cut a 45 cm long silicon ingot as large as 12 cm in diameter is given. The large blade tensioning force of 270,000 kg is applied through two bolts acting on a pair of scissor toggles, significantly reducing operator set-up time. Tests with an upside-down cutting technique resulted in 100% wafering yields and the highest wafer accuracy yet experienced with MS slicing. Variations in oil and abrasives resulted only in degraded slicing results. A technique of continuous abrasive slurry separation to remove silicon debris is described.

  17. Slicing of Silicon into Sheet Material: Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Testing of low cost low suspension power slurry vehicles is presented. Cutting oils are unlikely to work, but a mineral oil with additives should be workable. Two different abrasives were tested. A cheaper silicon carbide from Norton gave excellent results except for excessive kerf loss: the particles were too big. An abrasive treated for lubricity showed no lubricity improvement in mineral oil vehicle. The bounce fixture was tested for the first time under constant cut rate conditions (rather than constant force). Although the cut was not completed before the blades broke, the blade lifetime of thin (100 micrometer) blades was 120 times the lifetime without the fixture. The large prototype saw completed a successful run, producing 90% cutting yield (849 wafers) at 20 wafers/cm. Although inexperience with large numbers of wafers caused cleaning breakage to reduce this yield to 74%, the yield was high enough that the concept of the large saw is proven workable.

  18. Hot forming of silicon sheet, silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.; Kulkarni, S.; Wolf, M.

    1978-01-01

    The hot workability of polycrystalline silicon was studied. Uniaxail stress-strain curves are given for strain rates in the range of .0001 to .1/sec and temperatures from 1100 to 1380 C. At the highest strain rates at 1380 C axial strains in excess of 20% were easily obtainable without cracking. After deformations of 36%, recrystallization was completed within 0.1 hr at 1380 C. When the recrystallization was complete, there was still a small volume fraction of unrecyrstallized material which appeared very stable and may degrade the electronic properties of the bulk materials. Texture measurements showed that the as-produced vapor deposited polycrystalline rods have a 110 fiber texture with the 110 direction parallel to the growth direction and no preferred orientation about this axis. Upon axial compression perpendicular to the growth direction, the former 110 fiber axis changed to 111 and the compression axis became 110 . Recrystallization changed the texture to 110 along the former fiber axis and to 100 along the compression axis.

  19. LSA Large Area Silicon Sheet Task. Continuous Liquid Feed Czochralski Growth. [for solar cell fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiegl, G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of equipment and processes to demonstrate continuous growth of crystals by the Czochralski method suitable for producing single silicon crystals for use in solar cells is presented. The growth of at least 150 kg of mono silicon crystal, 150 mm in diameter is continuous from one growth container. A furnace with continuous liquid replenishment of the growth crucible, accomplished by a meltdown system with a continuous solid silicon feed mechanism and a liquid transfer system, with associated automatic feedback controls is discussed. Due to the silicon monoxide build up in the furnace and its retarding effect on crystal growth the furnace conversion for operation in the low pressure range is described. Development of systems for continuous solid recharging of the meltdown chamber for various forms of poly silicon is described.

  20. Large area sheet task. Advanced dendritic web growth development. [silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Frantti, E.; Schruben, J.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a silicon dendritic web growth machine is discussed. Several refinements to the sensing and control equipment for melt replenishment during web growth are described and several areas for cost reduction in the components of the prototype automated web growth furnace are identified. A circuit designed to eliminate the sensitivity of the detector signal to the intensity of the reflected laser beam used to measure melt level is also described. A variable speed motor for the silicon feeder is discussed which allows pellet feeding to be accomplished at a rate programmed to match exactly the silicon removed by web growth.

  1. Large area silicon sheet by EFG. [Edge-defined Film-fed Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, C. V. H.; Surek, T.; Mackintosh, B.; Ravi, K. V.; Wald, F. V.

    1978-01-01

    The edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) technique has been employed to grow silicon ribbons for photovoltaic applications. Considerable progress has been made in recent years in developing the technique to the point that long lengths of silicon ribbon can be routinely grown. In order to attain the full low-cost potential of the EFG technique, several further developments such as the growth of thinner and wider ribbons, increase in ribbon growth rate, and improvements in material quality are needed. The technological problems to be solved and the approaches employed to achieve these goals are discussed.

  2. LSA Large Area Silicon Sheet Task Continuous Liquid Feed Czochralski Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiegl, G.

    1979-01-01

    A process for the continuous growth of crystals by the Czochralski method, suitable for producing single silicon crystals for use in solar cells was studied. Continuous growth is the growth of 100 Kg of single silicon crystals, 10 cm in diameter, from one container. A furnace with continuous liquid replenishment of the growth crucible, accomplished by a melt-down system and a liquid transfer mechanism, with associated automatic feedback controls was developed. Elements of the transfer system were further developed and tested during actual transfer runs. Considerable simplification of the heating element of the transfer tube was achieved. Accuracy and reliability of the temperature sensor, which is part of the power input control system for the transfer tube, was improved. Electrical and thermal effectiveness were increased while assembly of the transfer tube system was further simplified.

  3. Dip-coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Koepke, B. G.; Gutter, C. D.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. The past quarter demonstrated significant progress in several areas. Seeded growth of silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) with an EFG ribbon seed was demonstrated. Different types of mullite were successfully coated with silicon. A new method of deriving minority carrier diffusion length, L sub n from spectral response measurements was evaluated. ECOMOD cost projections were found to be in good agreement with the interim SAMIS method proposed by JPL. On the less positive side, there was a decrease in cell performance which we believe to be due to an unidentified source of impurities.

  4. Large area silicon sheet by EFG. Annual progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, F.V.

    1981-02-02

    Progress in the development of a cartridge system for growth of 10 cm wide ribbon is described. Growth speed capability, automated growth, ribbon quality and solar cell performance are areas in which significant progress is reported. Routine growth of 10 cm wide ribbon at speeds in the range from 3.5 to 4.0 cm/minute has been demonstrated both in single cartridge and multiple ribbon furnaces. Simultaneous growth of three 10 cm wide ribbons over a period of several hours has also been accomplished. A system for automated control of ribbon width has been developed and successfully implemented in the multiple ribbon growth system. As-grown ribbon quality and solar cell performance has continued to improve for the 10 cm wide ribbon grown in high-speed systems. Cell efficiencies of greater than 10% have been demonstrated on large areas (approx. 50 cm/sup 2/) of this ribbon. Better optimized growth conditions and cell processing have now been combined to produce greater than 13% (AMl) small area (approx. 6 cm/sup 2/) cells on ribbon grown at 2 cm/minute. Optimization work for 10 cm wide ribbon is continuing aimed at understanding the factors which affect quality in these systems. Utilization of computer modeling to study interface shapes and mass transport phenomena in the meniscus are described.

  5. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Harrison, W. B.; Wolner, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    The research program to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by dip-coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon is reported. The initial effort concentrated on the design and construction of the experimental dip-coating facility. The design was completed and its experimental features are discussed. Current status of the program is reported, including progress toward solar cell junction diffusion and miscellaneous ceramic substrate procurement.

  6. Slicing of Silicon into Sheet Material. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. R.; Holden, S. C.; Wolfson, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    The use of multiblade slurry sawing to produce silicon wafers from ingots was investigated. The commercially available state of the art process was improved by 20% in terms of area of silicon wafers produced from an ingot. The process was improved 34% on an experimental basis. Economic analyses presented show that further improvements are necessary to approach the desired wafer costs, mostly reduction in expendable materials costs. Tests which indicate that such reduction is possible are included, although demonstration of such reduction was not completed. A new, large capacity saw was designed and tested. Performance comparable with current equipment (in terms of number of wafers/cm) was demonstrated.

  7. Development of Methods of Producing Large Areas of Silicon Sheet by the Slicing of Silicon Ingots Using Inside Diameter (I.D.) Saws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonyan, P.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of producing large areas of silicon sheets were developed by using inside diameter (I.D.) saws to slice silicon ingots. A 16 inch automated I.D. slicing machine was modified to accept programmable electric feed system, a crystal rotating system and a dyna-track blade monitoring and control system. The saw and accessories were used to slice 75 mm diameter single crystal silicon ingots while rotating them. The automated saw automatically recovered the wafers and loaded them into a cassette. The amount of material lost during slicing was reduced by using smaller blades than ones normally used to slice the wafers. Slicing runs on 100 mm diameter silicon is the next goal.

  8. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Zook, J. D.; Harrison, W. B.; Scott, M. W.; Hendrickson, G.; Wolner, H. A.; Nelson, L. D.; Schuller, T. L.; Peterson, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon by dip-coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large grain polycrystalline silicon was investigated. The dip-coating methods studied were directed toward a minimum cost process with the ultimate objective of producing solar cells with a conversion efficiency of 10% or greater. The technique shows excellent promise for low cost, labor-saving, scale-up potentialities and would provide an end product of sheet silicon with a rigid and strong supportive backing. An experimental dip-coating facility was designed and constructed, several substrates were successfully dip-coated with areas as large as 25 sq cm and thicknesses of 12 micron to 250 micron. There appears to be no serious limitation on the area of a substrate that could be coated. Of the various substrate materials dip-coated, mullite appears to best satisfy the requirement of the program. An inexpensive process was developed for producing mullite in the desired geometry.

  9. Analysis of defect structure in silicon. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the Low-Cost Solar array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Mena, M.; Plichta, M.; Smith, J. M.; Sellani, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred ninety-three silicon sheet samples, approximately 880 square centimeters, were analyzed for twin boundary density, dislocation pit density, and grain boundary length. One hundred fifteen of these samples were manufactured by a heat exchanger method, thirty-eight by edge defined film fed growth, twenty-three by the silicon on ceramics process, and ten by the dendritic web process. Seven solar cells were also step-etched to determine the internal defect distribution on these samples. Procedures were developed or the quantitative characterization of structural defects such as dislocation pits, precipitates, twin & grain boundaries using a QTM 720 quantitative image analyzing system interfaced with a PDP 11/03 mini computer. Characterization of the grain boundary length per unit area for polycrystalline samples was done by using the intercept method on an Olympus HBM Microscope.

  10. Delayed fracture of silicon: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T. J.; Knapp, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Bar specimens were cut from ingots of single crystal silicon, and acid etched prior to testing. Artificial surface flaws were introduced in specimens by indentation with a Knoop hardness tester. The specimens were loaded in four-point bending to 95 percent of the nominal fracture stress, while keeping the surface area, containing the flaw, wet with test liquids. No evidence of delayed fracture, and, therefore stress corrosion, of single crystal silicon was observed for liquid environments including water, acetone, and aqueous solutions of NaCl, NH4OH, and HNO3, when tested with a flaw parallel to a (110) surface. The fracture toughness was calculated.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Defects in Silicon. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Smith, J. M.; Qidwai, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The various steps involved in the chemical polishing and etching of silicon samples are described. Data on twins, dislocation pits, and grain boundaries from thirty-one (31) silicon sample are also discussed. A brief review of the changes made to upgrade the image analysis system is included.

  12. Development of methods of producing large areas of silicon sheet by the slicing of silicon ingots using Inside-Diameter (I.D.) saws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonyan, P.

    1980-01-01

    Inside diametar wafering equipment, blades and processes were used to develop methods to produce large areas of silicon sheet. Modifications to a 16 inch STC automated saw included: programmable feed system, crystal rotating system, and STC dynatrack blade monitoring and control system. By controlling the plating operation and by grinding of the cutting edge, 16 inch ID blades with a cutting edge thickness of .22 mm can be produced. Crystal rotation mechanism was used to slice 100 mm diameter crystals with a 16 inch blade down to a thickness of .20 mm. Cutting rates with crystal rotation were generally slower than with standard plunge ID slicing techniques. Using programmed feeds and programmed rotation, maximum cutting rates were from 0.3 to 1.0 inches per minute.

  13. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost solar array project. Quantitative analysis of defects in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.

    1978-01-01

    The various steps involved in obtaining quantitative information of structural defects in crystalline silicon samples are described. Procedures discussed include: (1) chemical polishing; (2) chemical etching; and (3) automated image analysis of samples on the QTM 720 System.

  14. Quantitative analysis of defects in silicon: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Smith, J. M.; Qidwai, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    The various steps involved in the chemical polishing and etching of silicon samples are described and the data on twins, grain boundaries and dislocation pits from fifty-three (53) samples are discussed.

  15. Quantitative analysis of defects in silicon. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Natesh, R.; Smith, J.M.; Bruce, T.; Qidwai, H.A.

    1980-04-01

    The complete procedures for the defect analysis of silicon samples using a QTM-720 Image Analyzing System are described, chemical polishing, etching, and QTM operation are discussed. The data from one hundred and seventy four (174) samples, and a discussion of the data are included. The data include twin boundary density, dislocation pit density, and grain boundary length. (WHK)

  16. Development of advanced methods for continuous Czochralski growth. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, R. G.; Sibley, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    The three components required to modify the furnace for batch and continuous recharging with granular silicon were designed. The feasibility of extended growth cycles up to 40 hours long was demonstrated by a recharge simulation experiment; a 6 inch diameter crystal was pulled from a 20 kg charge, remelted, and pulled again for a total of four growth cycles, 59-1/8 inch of body length, and approximately 65 kg of calculated mass.

  17. Continuous Czochralski Growth. Silicon Sheet Growth Development of the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merz, F.

    1978-01-01

    The JPL Continuous Czochralski Growth Facility is now essentially complete and is functional. In this reporting period, a silicon lump recharging device was designed, and a prototype was built which performed well in simulated recharge tests. The large chamber (designed to accommodate a 14-inch hot zone) was put into operation initially with the standard hot zone in order to compare performance with previous experience. Some modifications were made to the hot zones in the larger chamber due to considerably larger radiative heat losses. Several short (one-ingot) runs were performed and four continuous runs were attempted. The largest continuous run lasted 64 hours and produced 57 kilograms of ingot.

  18. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Harrison, W. B.; Wolner, H. A.; Hendrickson, G.; Nelson, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    To date, an experimental dip-coating facility was constructed. Using this facility, relatively thin (1 mm) mullite and alumina substrates were successfully dip-coated with 2.5 - 3.0 ohm-cm, p-type silicon with areas of approximately 20 sq cm. The thickness and grain size of these coatings are influenced by the temperature of the melt and the rate at which the substrate is pulled from the melt. One mullite substrate had dendrite-like crystallites of the order of 1 mm wide and 1 to 2 cm long. Their axes were aligned along the direction of pulling. A large variety of substrate materials were purchased or developed enabling the program to commence a substrate definition evaluation. Due to the insulating nature of the substrate, the bottom layer of the p-n junction may have to be made via the top surface. The feasibility of accomplishing this was demonstrated using single crystal wafers.

  19. Continuous Czochralski growth: Silicon sheet growth development of the large area sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The growth of 100 kg of silicon single crystal material, ten cm in diameter or greater, and 150 kg of silicon single crystal material 15 cm or greater utilizing one common silicon container material (one crucible) is investigated. A crystal grower that is recharged with a new supply of polysilicon material while still under vacuum and at temperatures above the melting point of silicon is developed. It accepts large polysilicon charges up to 30 kg, grows large crystal ingots (to 15 cm diameter and 25 kg in weight), and holds polysilicon material for recharging (rod or lump) while, at the same time, growing crystal ingots. Special equipment is designed to recharge polysilicon rods, recharge polysilicon lumps, and handle and store large, hot silicon crystal ingots. Many continuous crystal growth runs were performed lasting as long as 109 hours and producing as many as ten crystal ingots, 15 cm with weights progressing to 27 kg.

  20. Silicon-on Ceramic Process: Silicon Sheet Growth and Device Development for the Large-area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. W.; Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell-quality silicon was investigated. This was done by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress in the following areas was demonstrated: (1) fabricating a 10 sq cm cell having 9.9 percent conversion efficiency; (2) producing a 225 sq cm layer of sheet silicon; and (3) obtaining 100 microns thick coatings at pull speed of 0.15 cm/sec, although approximately 50 percent of the layer exhibited dendritic growth.

  1. Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device developmentt for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B

    1980-02-15

    Research on the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon is reported. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 11 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A variety of ceramic materials have been dip coated with silicon. The investigation has shown that mullite substrates containing an excess of SiO/sub 2/ best match the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon and hence produce the best SOC layers. With such substrates, smooth and uniform silicon layers 25 cm/sup 2/ in area have been achieved with single-crystal grains as large as 4 mm in width and several cm in length. Crystal length is limited by the length of the substrate. The thickness of the coating and the size of the crystalline grains are controlled by the temperature of the melt and the rate at which the substrate is withdrawn from the melt. The solar-cell potential of this SOC sheet silicon is promising. To date, solar cells with areas from 1 to 10 cm/sup 2/ have been fabricated from material with an as-grown surface. Conversion efficiencies of about 10 percent with antireflection (AR) coating have been achieved. Such cells typically have open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current densities of 0.55V and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively.

  2. Silicon on Ceramic Process: Silicon Sheet Growth and Device Development for the Large-area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. W.; Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Pickering, C.; Grung, B. L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon was investigated. It was hoped this could be done by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Work was directed towards the solution of unique cell processing/design problems encountered with the silicon-ceramic (SOC) material due to its intimate contact with the ceramic substrate. Significant progress was demonstrated in the following areas; (1) the continuous coater succeeded in producing small-area coatings exhibiting unidirectional solidification and substatial grain size; (2) dip coater succeeded in producing thick (more than 500 micron) dendritic layers at coating speeds of 0.2-0.3 cm/sec; and (3) a standard for producing total area SOC solar cells using slotted ceramic substrates was developed.

  3. Silicon-on ceramic process: silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report NO. 15, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, A B; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B; Chapman, P W

    1980-07-31

    The objective of this research is to investigate the technical feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon which could meet the DOE cost goals. The Honeywell approach is to coat one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Results and accomplishments which occurred during the quarter can be summarized as follows: (1) two major problems associated with SCIM-coating wide (10-cm) substrates were identified and solved; (2) the longitudinal temperature profile in SCIM-II has been improved to prevent substrate warping, buckling, and cracking; (3) the transverse temperature profile in SCIM II has been improved to produce more uniform coatings; (4) a strategy to eliminate effects of thermal stress has been developed; (5) the best SOC cell has a total-area conversion efficiency of 10.5% (AM1, AR), for a cell area of 5 cm/sup 2/; (6) a number of experiments are being investigated for improving cell efficiency; (7) for the slow-cooldown experiment, the average efficiency of 29 AR-coated cells was 9.9%, with a standard deviation of 0.3%; (8) encouraging results were obtained on SOC material that had been treated in a hydrogen plasma at Sandia; and (9) thermal modeling has proven to be beneficial in designing modifications of SCIM II.

  4. Development of methods of producing large areas of silicon sheet by the slicing of silicon ingots using inside-diameter (I. D. ) saws. Final report, May 1979-April 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Aharonyan, P.

    1980-01-01

    I.D. wafering equipment, blades and processes were used to develop methods for producing large areas of silicon sheet. Modifications to a 16 inch STC automated saw included programmable feed system; crystal rotating system; and STC dyna-track blade monitoring and control system. By controlling the plating operation and by grinding of the cutting edge, we were able to produce 16 inch I.D. blades with a cutting edge thickness of .22 mm. Crystal rotation mechanism was used to slice 100 mm diameter crystals with a 16 inch blade down to a thickness of .20 mm. Cutting rates with crystal rotation were generally slower than with standard plunge I.D. slicing techniques. Using programmed feeds and programmed rotation, maximum cutting rates were from 0.3 to 1.0 inches per minute.

  5. Heat exchanger-ingot casting/slicing process, phase 1: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1977-01-01

    A controlled growth, heat-flow and cool-down process is described that yielded silicon with a high degree of single crystallinity. Even when the seed melted out, very large grains formed. Solar cell samples made from cast material yielded conversion efficiency of over 9%. Representative characterizations of grown silicon demonstrated a dislocation density of less than 100/sq cm and a minority carrier diffusion length of 31 micron. The source of silicon carbide in silicon ingots was identified to be from graphite retainers in contact with silica crucibles. Higher growth rates were achieved with the use of a graphite plug at the bottom of the silica crucible.

  6. Laser-zone growth in a Ribbon-To-Ribbon, RTR, process silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurtler, R. W.; Baghdadi, A.

    1977-01-01

    A ribbon-to-ribbon process was used for routine growth of samples for analysis and fabrication into solar cells. One lot of solar cells was completely evaluated: ribbon solar cell efficiencies averaged 9.23% with a highest efficiency of 11.7%. Spherical reflectors have demonstrated significant improvements in laser silicon coupling efficiencies. Material analyses were performed including silicon photovoltage and open circuit photovoltage diffusion length measurements, crystal morphology studies, modulus of rupture measurements, and annealing/gettering studies. An initial economic analysis was performed indicating that ribbon-to-ribbon add-on costs of $.10/watt might be expected in the early 1980's.

  7. Large area Czochralski silicon for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed model of a typical Czochralski silicon crystal puller is utilized to predict maximum crystal growth rate as a function of various furnace parameters. Results of this analysis, when combined with multiblade slurry sawing, indicate that the Czochralski process is highly attractive for achieving near-term cost reduction of solar cell silicon.

  8. Large area Czochralski silicon for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed model of a typical Czochralski silicon crystal puller is utilized to predict maximum crystal growth rate as a function of various furnace parameters. Results of this analysis, when combined with multiblade slurry sawing, indicate that the Czochralski process is highly attractive for achieving near-term cost reduction of solar cell silicon.

  9. Laser-zone growth in a Ribbon-To-Ribbon (RTR) process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurtler, R. W.; Baghdadi, A.; Legge, R.; Sopori, B.; Ellis, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Ribbon-to-Ribbon (RTR) approach to silicon ribbon growth is investigated. An existing RTR apparatus is to be upgraded to its full capabilities and operated routinely to investigate and optimize the effects of various growth parameters on growth results. A new RTR apparatus was constructed to incorporate increased capabilities and improvements over the first apparatus and to be capable of continuous growth. New high power lasers were implemented and this led to major improvements in growth velocity -- 4 inch/min. growth has been demonstrated. A major step in demonstration of the full feasibility of the RTR process is reported in the demonstration of RTR growth from CVD polyribbon rather than sliced polyribbon ingots. Average solar cell efficiencies of greater than 9% and a best cell efficiency of 11.7% are reported. Processing was shown to provide a substantial improvement in material minority carrier diffusion length. An economic analysis is reported which treats both the polyribbon fabrication and RTR processes.

  10. Laser-zone growth in a Ribbon-To-Ribbon (RTR) process silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurtler, R. W.; Baghdadi, A.; Wise, J.; Ellis, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Ribbon-to-Ribbon (RTR) approach to silicon ribbon growth was investigated. An existing RTR apparatus, RTR#1, was upgraded to allow for 5 cm wide ribbon growth with a finite stroke length of at least 15 cm. A second RTR apparatus, RTR#2, was designed, built, and operated which utilizes continuous feed mechanisms and allows continuous growth of 7.5 cm wide ribbons. RTR#2 includes development and utilization of advanced beam scanning (or shaping), high power lasers, and thermal profile modification elements to attain maximum growth velocities (with a design goal of 18 cm/min). Materials studies, process development, and thermal analyses are also described. Residual stresses and dislocation densities were minimized through theoretical and experimental efforts towards optimization of thermal profiles. Growth runs were performed on RTR#2 and solar cells were fabricated which demonstrated efficiencies greater than 10%.

  11. Gamma Large Area Silicon Telescope (GLAST)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by EGRET have prompted an investigation into modern technologies ultimately leading to the next generation space-based gamma ray telescope. The goal is to design a detector that will increase the data acquisition rate by almost two orders of magnitude beyond EGRET, while at the same time improving on the angular resolution, the energy measurement of reconstructed gamma rays, and the triggering capability of the instrument. The GLAST proposal is based on the assertion that silicon particle detectors are the technology of choice for space application: no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggering. The GLAST detector is roughly modeled after EGRET in that a tracking module precedes a calorimeter. The GLAST Tracker has planes of thin radiatior interspersed with planes of crossed-strip (x,y) 300-{mu}m-pitch silicon detectors to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. The gap between the layers ({approximately}5 cm) provides a lever arm in track fitting resulting in an angular resolution of 0.1{degree} at high energy (the low energy angular resolution at 100 MeV would be about 2{degree}, limited by multiple scattering). A possible GLAST calorimeter is made of a mosaic of Csl crystals of order 10 r.l. in depth, with silicon photodiodes readout. The increased depth of the GLAST calorimeter over EGRET`s extends the energy range to about 300 GeV.

  12. Silicon Ingot Casting - Heat Exchanger Method (HEM). Multi-Wire Slicing - Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (Fast). Phase 4 Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.

    1981-01-01

    The crystallinity of large HEM silicon ingots as a function of heat flow conditions is investigated. A balanced heat flow at the bottom of the ingot restricts spurious nucleation to the edge of the melted-back seed in contact with the crucible. Homogeneous resistivity distribution over all the ingot has been achieved. The positioning of diamonds electroplated on wirepacks used to slice silicon crystals is considered. The electroplating of diamonds on only the cutting edge is described and the improved slicing performance of these wires evaluated. An economic analysis of value added costs of HEM ingot casting and band saw sectioning indicates the projected add on cost of HEM is well below the 1986 allocation.

  13. Laser-zone Growth in a Ribbon-to-ribbon (RTR) Process Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baghdadi, A.; Gurtler, R. W.; Legge, R.; Sopori, B.; Rice, M. J.; Ellis, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for growing limited-length ribbons continually was demonstrated. This Rigid Edge technique can be used to recrystallize about 95% of the polyribbon feedstock. A major advantage of this method is that only a single, constant length silicon ribbon is handled throughout the entire process sequence; this may be accomplished using cassettes similar to those presently in use for processing Czochralski waters. Thus a transition from Cz to ribbon technology can be smoothly affected. The maximum size being considered, 3 inches x 24 inches, is half a square foot, and will generate 6 watts for 12% efficiency at 1 sun. Silicon dioxide has been demonstrated as an effective, practical diffusion barrier for use during the polyribbon formation.

  14. Silicon Ingot Casting - Heat Exchanger Method Multi-wire Slicing - Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique. Phase 3 Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    Several 20 cm diameter silicon ingots, up to 6.3 kg. were cast with good crystallinity. The graphite heat zone can be purified by heating it to high temperatures in vacuum. This is important in reducing costs and purification of large parts. Electroplated wires with 45 um synthetic diamonds and 30 um natural diamonds showed good cutting efficiency and lifetime. During slicing of a 10 cm x 10 cm workpiece, jerky motion occurred in the feed and rocking mechanisms. This problem is corrected and modifications were made to reduce the weight of the bladeheat by 50%.

  15. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A multiple growth run with three 10 cm cartridges was carried out with the best throughput rates and time percentage of simultaneous three ribbon growth achieved to date in this system. Growth speeds were between 3.2 and 3.6 cm/minute on all three cartridges and simultaneous full width growth of three ribbons was achieved 47 percent of the time over the eight hour duration of the experiment. Improvements in instrumentation and in the main zone temperature uniformity were two factors that have led to more reproducible growth conditions in the multiple ribbon furnace.

  16. Large Area Silicon Sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Progress made in the development of EFG ribbon growth is discussed. Specific areas covered include: (1) demonstration of multiple growth for ribbons 5 cm wide in runs of 12 and 20 hours duration; (2) a single cartridge crystal growth station was built expanding observational capacity by virtue of an anamorphic optical-video system which allows close observation of the meniscus over 7.5 cm wide, as well as video taping of the ribbon growth process; (3) growth station no.1 achieved reproducible and reliable growth of 7.5 cm wide ribbon at speeds up to 4 cm/min; (4) introduction of the 'mini cold shoe'; (5) increases in cell efficiency due to interface shaping using the 'displaced die' concept; and (6) clarification of the role of gaseous impurities in cartridge furnaces and stabilization of their destabilizing influence on growth.

  17. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The influence of parameters such as CO2 concentration, gas flow patterns, quartz in the bulk melt, melt doping level and growth speed on ribbon properties was examined for 10 cm wide ribbon. Ribbon quality is optimized for ambient CO2 in argon concentrations in the range from 1000 to 5000 ppm. Cell performance degrades at CO2 concentrations above 5000 ppm and IR interstitial oxygen levels decrease. These experiments were done primarily at a growth speed of 3.5 cm/minute. Cartridge parameters influencing the ribbon thickness were studied and thickness uniformity at 200 micrometers (8 mils) has been improved. Growth stability at the target speed of 4.0 cm/minute was improved significantly.

  18. Large area silicon sheet by EFG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Some hypotheses to explain both of these features are advanced and the possible implications for solar cell performance are touched upon. The multiple ribbon growth system has shown a number of flaws with respect to the reliability of the basic furnace design. These definitely need to be rectified before any significant demonstration of multiple ribbon growth can proceed. The cartridges, however, have performed quite well. The work on 3" cartridge design and automatic controls has proceeded nearly on schedule and the report contains a detailed description of the approach and the equipment to be used for automatic control of ribbon growth.

  19. Large area, dense silicon nanowire array chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Talin, A. Alec; Hunter, Luke L.; Leonard, Francois; Rokad, Bhavin

    2006-10-09

    The authors present a simple top-down approach based on nanoimprint lithography to create dense arrays of silicon nanowires over large areas. Metallic contacts to the nanowires and a bottom gate allow the operation of the array as a field-effect transistor with very large on/off ratios. When exposed to ammonia gas or cyclohexane solutions containing nitrobenzene or phenol, the threshold voltage of the field-effect transistor is shifted, a signature of charge transfer between the analytes and the nanowires. The threshold voltage shift is proportional to the Hammett parameter and the concentration of the nitrobenzene and phenol analytes.

  20. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project. Heat Exchanger Method - Ingot Casting Fixed Abrasive Method - Multi-Wire Slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    Solar cells fabricated from HEM cast silicon yielded up to 15% conversion efficiencies. This was achieved in spite of using unpurified graphite parts in the HEM furnace and without optimization of material or cell processing parameters. Molybdenum retainers prevented SiC formation and reduced carbon content by 50%. The oxygen content of vacuum cast HEM silicon is lower than typical Czochralski grown silicon. Impregnation of 45 micrometers diamonds into 7.5 micrometers copper sheath showed distortion of the copper layer. However, 12.5 micrometers and 15 micrometers copper sheath can be impregnated with 45 micrometers diamonds to a high concentration. Electroless nickel plating of wires impregnated only in the cutting edge showed nickel concentration around the diamonds. This has the possibility of reducing kerf. The high speed slicer fabricated can achieve higher speed and longer stroke with vibration isolation.

  1. Laser-zone growth in a Ribbon-To-Ribbon (RTR) process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baghdadi, A.; Gurtler, R. W.; Legge, R.; Sopori, B.; Ellis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A new calculation of the effects of thermal stresses during growth on silicon ribbon quality is reported. Thermal stress distributions are computed for ribbon growth under a variety of temperature profiles. A growth rate of 55 cu cm/min with a single ribbon was achieved. The growth of RTR ribbon with a fairly uniform parallel dendritic structure was demonstrated. Results with two approaches were obtained for reducing the Mo impurity level in polycrystalline feedstock. Coating the Mo substrate with Si3N4 does not effect thermal shear separation of the polyribbon; this process shows promise of improving cell efficiency and also increasing the useful life of the molybdenum substrate. A number of solar cells were fabricated on RTR silicon grown from CVD feedstock.

  2. Large area sheet task: Advanced Dendritic Web Growth Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Schruben, J.

    1981-01-01

    A melt level control system was implemented to provide stepless silicon feed rates from zero to rates exactly matching the silicon consumed during web growth. Bench tests of the unit were successfully completed and the system mounted in a web furnace for operational verification. Tests of long term temperature drift correction techniques were made; web width monitoring seems most appropriate for feedback purposes. A system to program the initiation of the web growth cycle was successfully tested. A low cost temperature controller was tested which functions as well as units four times as expensive.

  3. Anti-reflection coatings on large area glass sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastirik, E.

    1980-01-01

    Antireflective coatings which may be suitable for use on the covers of photovoltaic solar modules can be easily produced by a dipping process. The coatings are applied to glass by drawing sheets of glass vertically out of dilute aqueous sodium silicate solutions at a constant speed, allowing the adherent liquid film to dry, then exposing the dried film to concentrated sulfuric acid, followed by a water rinse and dry. The process produces coatings of good optical performance (96.7 percent peak transmission at 0.540 mu M wavelength) combined with excellent stain and soil resistance, and good resistance to abrasion. The process is reproduceable and easily controlled.

  4. Large area sheet task: Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Schruben, J.

    1981-01-01

    The growth of silicon dendritic web for photovoltaic applications was investigated. The application of a thermal model for calculating buckling stresses as a function of temperature profile in the web is discussed. Lid and shield concepts were evaluated to provide the data base for enhancing growth velocity. An experimental web growth machine which embodies in one unit the mechanical and electronic features developed in previous work was developed. In addition, evaluation of a melt level control system was begun, along with preliminary tests of an elongated crucible design. The economic analysis was also updated to incorporate some minor cost changes. The initial applications of the thermal model to a specific configuration gave results consistent with experimental observation in terms of the initiation of buckling vs. width for a given crystal thickness.

  5. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  6. Silicon sheet technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1982-09-01

    A classification of silicon sheet growth methods by meniscus geometry permits them to be discussed in three groups: short meniscus techniques, high meniscus techniques, and extended meniscus or large solid/liquid interface area techniques. A second parameter, meniscus shaper interaction with the liquid silicon, is also instrumental in determining the characteristics of the various sheet processes. The current status of each process is discussed in the context of meniscus geometry and shaper/melt interaction. One aspect of sheet growth, surface area generation rate, is quantitatively compared with combined ingot growth and wafering surface area generation rates.

  7. Embedded graphene for large-area silicon-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluba, M. A.; Amkreutz, D.; Troppenz, G. V.; Rappich, J.; Nickel, N. H.

    2013-08-01

    Macroscopic graphene films buried below amorphous and crystalline silicon capping layers are studied by Raman backscattering spectroscopy and Hall-effect measurements. The graphene films are grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil and transferred to glass substrates. Uncapped films possess charge-carrier mobilities of 2030 cm2/Vs at hole concentrations of 3.6 × 1012 cm-2. Graphene withstands the deposition and subsequent crystallization of silicon capping layers. However, the crystallinity of the silicon cap has large influence on the field-induced doping of graphene. Temperature dependent Hall-effect measurements reveal that the mobility of embedded graphene is limited by charged-impurity and phonon-assisted scattering.

  8. Paper-like electronic displays: Large-area rubber-stamped plastic sheets of electronics and microencapsulated electrophoretic inks

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, John A.; Bao, Zhenan; Baldwin, Kirk; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Crone, Brian; Raju, V. R.; Kuck, Valerie; Katz, Howard; Amundson, Karl; Ewing, Jay; Drzaic, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Electronic systems that use rugged lightweight plastics potentially offer attractive characteristics (low-cost processing, mechanical flexibility, large area coverage, etc.) that are not easily achieved with established silicon technologies. This paper summarizes work that demonstrates many of these characteristics in a realistic system: organic active matrix backplane circuits (256 transistors) for large (≈5 × 5-inch) mechanically flexible sheets of electronic paper, an emerging type of display. The success of this effort relies on new or improved processing techniques and materials for plastic electronics, including methods for (i) rubber stamping (microcontact printing) high-resolution (≈1 μm) circuits with low levels of defects and good registration over large areas, (ii) achieving low leakage with thin dielectrics deposited onto surfaces with relief, (iii) constructing high-performance organic transistors with bottom contact geometries, (iv) encapsulating these transistors, (v) depositing, in a repeatable way, organic semiconductors with uniform electrical characteristics over large areas, and (vi) low-temperature (≈100°C) annealing to increase the on/off ratios of the transistors and to improve the uniformity of their characteristics. The sophistication and flexibility of the patterning procedures, high level of integration on plastic substrates, large area coverage, and good performance of the transistors are all important features of this work. We successfully integrate these circuits with microencapsulated electrophoretic “inks” to form sheets of electronic paper. PMID:11320233

  9. Detection of Steel Fatigue Cracks with Strain Sensing Sheets Based on Large Area Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-01-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous monitoring over large areas of structure, and with sensors of high spatial resolution. Technologies based on Large Area Electronics (LAE) can enable direct sensing and can be scaled to the level required for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil structures and infrastructure. Sensing sheets based on LAE contain dense arrangements of thin-film strain sensors, associated electronics and various control circuits deposited and integrated on a flexible polyimide substrate that can cover large areas of structures. This paper presents the development stage of a prototype strain sensing sheet based on LAE for crack detection and localization. Two types of sensing-sheet arrangements with size 6 × 6 inch (152 × 152 mm) were designed and manufactured, one with a very dense arrangement of sensors and the other with a less dense arrangement of sensors. The sensing sheets were bonded to steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary, so the fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The sensors within the sensing sheet that were close to the notch tip successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The sensors that were away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue cracks based on the time history of the measured strain. The results of the tests have validated the general principles of the proposed sensing sheets for crack detection and identified advantages and challenges of the two tested designs. PMID:25853407

  10. Large-area silicon nanowires from silicon monoxide for solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Liang; Mahmood, Iram; Fan, Xia; Xu, Gang; Wong, Ning-Bew

    2010-12-01

    Large-area upstanding silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) using silicon monoxide (SiO) powder as Si source under high vacuum (1.2 x 10(-5) Torr). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were employed as catalyst, which were formed on Si substrate by in-situ reduction of gold chloride (AuCl3). The size and distribution of the Au nanoparticles can be easily controlled through chemical reaction conditions. Consequently, the diameter, length and density of SiNWs could be varied in certain range. The SiNWs obtained are single crystalline with growth directions predominantly along [01-1]. Silicon nanowires in large-scale and diameter less than 10 nm can be grown on different Si substrates with this method. Organic inorganic hybrid solar cells based on SiNWs arrays have been demonstrated.

  11. Sensing sheets based on large area electronics for fatigue crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-03-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous structural health monitoring (SHM) over large areas of structure, and with high spatial resolution of sensors. This paper presents the development stage of prototype strain sensing sheets based on Large Area Electronics (LAE), in which thin-film strain gauges and control circuits are integrated on the flexible electronics and deposited on a polyimide sheet that can cover large areas. These sensing sheets were applied for fatigue crack detection on small-scale steel plates. Two types of sensing-sheet interconnects were designed and manufactured, and dense arrays of strain gauge sensors were assembled onto the interconnects. In total, four (two for each design type) strain sensing sheets were created and tested, which were sensitive to strain at virtually every point over the whole sensing sheet area. The sensing sheets were bonded to small-scale steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary so that fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The fatigue tests were carried out at the Carleton Laboratory of Columbia University, and the steel plates were attached through a fixture to the loading machine that applied cyclic fatigue load. Fatigue cracks then occurred and propagated across the steel plates, leading to the failure of these test samples. The strain sensor that was close to the notch successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The strain sensor that was away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue crack based on the time history of measured strain. Overall, the results of the fatigue tests validated general principles of the strain sensing sheets for crack detection.

  12. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module

    PubMed Central

    Raylman, RR; Stolin, A; Majewski, S; Proffitt, J

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26 × 58 array of 1.5 × 1.5mm2 LYSO elements (spanning 41 × 91mm2) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ∼45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (∼2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner. PMID:24319305

  13. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module.

    PubMed

    Raylman, Rr; Stolin, A; Majewski, S; Proffitt, J

    2014-01-21

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26 × 58 array of 1.5 × 1.5mm(2) LYSO elements (spanning 41 × 91mm(2)) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ∼45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (∼2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  14. Multi-layered fabrication of large area PDMS flexible optical light guide sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Robert; Knopf, George K.; Bordatchev, Evgueni V.

    2017-02-01

    Large area polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flexible optical light guide sheets can be used to create a variety of passive light harvesting and illumination systems for wearable technology, advanced indoor lighting, non-planar solar light collectors, customized signature lighting, and enhanced safety illumination for motorized vehicles. These thin optically transparent micro-patterned polymer sheets can be draped over a flat or arbitrarily curved surface. The light guiding behavior of the optical light guides depends on the geometry and spatial distribution of micro-optical structures, thickness and shape of the flexible sheet, refractive indices of the constituent layers, and the wavelength of the incident light. A scalable fabrication method that combines soft-lithography, closed thin cavity molding, partial curing, and centrifugal casting is described in this paper for building thin large area multi-layered PDMS optical light guide sheets. The proposed fabrication methodology enables the of internal micro-optical structures (MOSs) in the monolithic PDMS light guide by building the optical system layer-by-layer. Each PDMS layer in the optical light guide can have the similar, or a slightly different, indices of refraction that permit total internal reflection within the optical sheet. The individual molded layers may also be defect free or micro-patterned with microlens or reflecting micro-features. In addition, the bond between adjacent layers is ensured because each layer is only partially cured before the next functional layer is added. To illustrate the scalable build-by-layers fabrication method a three-layer mechanically flexible illuminator with an embedded LED strip is constructed and demonstrated.

  15. Silicone Coating on Polyimide Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Silicone coatings applied to polyimide sheeting for variety of space-related applications. Coatings intended to protect flexible substrates of solar-cell blankets from degradation by oxygen atoms, electrons, plasmas, and ultraviolet light in low Earth orbit and outer space. Since coatings are flexible, generally useful in forming flexible laminates or protective layers on polyimide-sheet products.

  16. Interference lithographically defined and catalytically etched, large-area silicon nanocones from nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dawood, M K; Liew, T H; Lianto, P; Hong, M H; Tripathy, S; Thong, J T L; Choi, W K

    2010-05-21

    We report a simple and cost effective method for the synthesis of large-area, precisely located silicon nanocones from nanowires. The nanowires were obtained from our interference lithography and catalytic etching (IL-CE) method. We found that porous silicon was formed near the Au catalyst during the fabrication of the nanowires. The porous silicon exhibited enhanced oxidation ability when exposed to atmospheric conditions or in wet oxidation ambient. Very well located nanocones with uniform sharpness resulted when these oxidized nanowires were etched in 10% HF. Nanocones of different heights were obtained by varying the doping concentration of the silicon wafers. We believe this is a novel method of producing large-area, low cost, well defined nanocones from nanowires both in terms of the control of location and shape of the nanocones. A wide range of potential applications of the nanocone array can be found as a master copy for nanoimprinted polymer substrates for possible biomedical research; as a candidate for making sharp probes for scanning probe nanolithography; or as a building block for field emitting tips or photodetectors in electronic/optoelectronic applications.

  17. The Silicon Tracker of the Beam Test Engineering Model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    do Couto e Silva, Eduardo

    2000-06-01

    The silicon tracker for the engineering model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope(LAT) has at least two unique features: it employs self triggering readout electronics, dissipating less than 200 mu-W per channel and to date represents the largest surface of silicon microstrip detectors assembled in a tracker (2.7 m{sup 2}). It demonstrates the feasibility of employing this technology for satellite based experiments, in which low power consumption, large effective areas and high reliability are required. This note describes the construction of this silicon tracker, which was installed in a beam test of positrons, hadrons and tagged photons at SLAC in December of 1999 and January of 2000.

  18. Novel low cost chemical texturing for very large area industrial multi-crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, U.; Dhungel, S. K.; Kim, K.; Manna, U.; Basu, P. K.; Kim, H. J.; Karunagaran, B.; Lee, K. S.; Yoo, J. S.; Yi, J.

    2005-09-01

    Multi-crystalline silicon surface etching without grain-boundary delineation is a challenging task for the fabrication of high efficiency solar cells. The use of sodium hydroxide-sodium hypochlorite (NaOH-NaOCl) solution for texturing a multi-crystalline silicon wafer surface in a solar cell fabrication line is reported in this paper. The optimized etching solution of NaOH-NaOCl does not have any effect on multi-crystalline silicon grain boundaries and it also has excellent isotropic etch characteristics, which ultimately helps to achieve higher values of performance parameters, especially the open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF), than those in the case of conventional silicon texturing. Easy control over the reaction of the NaOH-NaOCl solution is also one of the major advantages due to which sophistication in controlling the temperature of the etching bath is not required for the industrial batch process. The FTIR analysis of the silicon surface after etching with the current approach shows the formation of Si-Cl bonds, which improves the quality of the diffused junction due to chlorine gettering during diffusion. We are the first to report 14-14.5% efficiency of very large area (150 mm × 150 mm) multi-crystalline silicon solar cells using a NaOH-NaOCl texturing approach in an industrial production line with a yield greater than 95%.

  19. Contact-free sheet resistance determination of large area graphene layers by an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaforost, O.; Wang, K.; Goniszewski, S.; Adabi, M.; Guo, Z.; Hanham, S.; Gallop, J.; Hao, L.; Klein, N.

    2015-01-01

    A method for contact-free determination of the sheet resistance of large-area and arbitrary shaped wafers or sheets coated with graphene and other (semi) conducting ultrathin layers is described, which is based on an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity. The sample under test is exposed to the evanescent resonant field outside the cavity. A comparison with a closed cavity configuration revealed that radiation losses have no significant influence of the experimental results. Moreover, the microwave sheet resistance results show good agreement with the dc conductivity determined by four-probe van der Pauw measurements on a set of CVD samples transferred on quartz. As an example of a practical application, correlations between the sheet resistance and deposition conditions for CVD graphene transferred on quartz wafers are described. Our method has a high potential as measurement standard for contact-free sheet resistance measurement and mapping of large area graphene samples.

  20. Contact-free sheet resistance determination of large area graphene layers by an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shaforost, O.; Wang, K.; Adabi, M.; Guo, Z.; Hanham, S.; Klein, N.; Goniszewski, S.; Gallop, J.; Hao, L.

    2015-01-14

    A method for contact-free determination of the sheet resistance of large-area and arbitrary shaped wafers or sheets coated with graphene and other (semi) conducting ultrathin layers is described, which is based on an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity. The sample under test is exposed to the evanescent resonant field outside the cavity. A comparison with a closed cavity configuration revealed that radiation losses have no significant influence of the experimental results. Moreover, the microwave sheet resistance results show good agreement with the dc conductivity determined by four-probe van der Pauw measurements on a set of CVD samples transferred on quartz. As an example of a practical application, correlations between the sheet resistance and deposition conditions for CVD graphene transferred on quartz wafers are described. Our method has a high potential as measurement standard for contact-free sheet resistance measurement and mapping of large area graphene samples.

  1. The effect of gettering on areal inhomogeneities in large-area multicrystalline-silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.; Sopori, B.L.

    1997-10-01

    Multicrystalline-silicon (mc-Si) materials and cells feature large areal variations in material and junction quality. The regions with poor device quality have been predicted to have more recombination current at forward bias than a simple area-weighted average due to the parallel interconnection of the good and bad regions by the front junction. The authors have examined the effect of gettering on areal inhomogeneities in large-area mc-Si cells. Cells with large areal inhomogeneities were found to have increased non-ideal recombination current, which is in line with theoretical predictions. Phosphorus-diffusion and aluminum-alloy gettering of mc-Si was found to reduce the areal inhomogeneities and improve large-area mc-Si device performance.

  2. Development of large-area monolithically integrated silicon-film photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Bacon, C.; Cotter, J.E.; Lampros, T.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Ruffins, T.R.; Hall, R.B.; Barnett, A.M. )

    1992-07-01

    This report describes work to develop Silicon-Film Product III into a low-cost, stable device for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product III structure is a thin (< 100 {mu}m) polycrystalline silicon layer on a non-conductive supporting ceramic substrate. The presence of the substrate allows cells to be isolated and in interconnected monolithically in various series/parallel configurations. The long-term goal for the product is efficiencies over 18% on areas greater than 1200 cm{sup 2}. The high efficiency is made possible through the benefits of using polycrystalline thin silicon incorporated into a light-trapping structure with a passivated back surface. Short-term goals focused on the development of large-area ceramics, a monolithic interconnection process, and 100 cm{sup 2} solar cells. Critical elements of the monolithically integrated device were developed, and an insulating ceramic substrate was developed and tested. A monolithic interconnection process was developed that will isolate and interconnect individual cells on the ceramic surface. Production-based, low-cost process steps were used, and the process was verified using free-standing silicon wafers to achieve an open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 8.25 V over a 17-element string. The overall efficiency of the silicon-film materials was limited to 6% by impurities. Improved processing and feedstock materials are under investigation.

  3. Large-area linear Silicon Drift Detector design for X-ray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachevski, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Campana, R.; Evangelista, Y.; Giacomini, G.; Picciotto, A.; Bellutti, P.; Feroci, M.; Labanti, C.; Piemonte, C.; Vacchi, A.

    2014-07-01

    A large area, 120 × 72 mm2, linear Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) has been developed for X-ray spectroscopy in the 2-50 keV energy range. Elaborated via a number of prototypes, the final detector design, REDSOX1, features elements to meet the requirements of a modern space-borne X-ray detector with a power consumption per sensitive area below 0.5 mW/cm2, offering the possibility to perform timing and spectroscopy X-ray observations on a ten microseconds scale.

  4. The Silicon Tracker Readout Electronics of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Luca; Brez, Alessandro; Himel, Thomas; Hirayama, Masaharu; Johnson, R.P.; Kroeger, Wilko; Latronico, Luca; Minuti, Massimo; Nelson, David; Rando, Riccardo; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Sgro, Carmelo; Spandre, Gloria; Spencer, E.N.; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Tajima, Hiro; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ziegler, Marcus; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /Maryland U. /UC, Santa Cruz /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2006-02-27

    A unique electronics system has been built and tested for reading signals from the silicon-strip detectors of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. The system amplifies and processes signals from 884,736 36-cm strips using only 160 W of power, and it achieves close to 100% detection efficiency with noise occupancy sufficiently low to allow it to self trigger. The design of the readout system is described, and results are presented from ground-based testing of the completed detector system.

  5. Large area and broadband ultra-black absorber using microstructured aluminum doped silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyi; Yang, Haigui; Gao, Jinsong

    2017-02-01

    A large area and broadband ultra-black absorber based on microstructured aluminum (Al) doped silicon (Si) films prepared by a low-cost but very effective approach is presented. The average absorption of the absorber is greater than 99% within the wide range from 350 nm to 2000 nm, and its size reaches to 6 inches. We investigate the fabrication mechanism of the absorber and find that the Al atom doped in silicon improves the formation of the nanocone-like microstructures on the film surface, resulting in a significant decrease in the reflection of incident light. The absorption mechanism is further discussed by experiments and simulated calculations in detail. The results show that the doped Al atoms and Mie resonance formed in the microstructures contribute the broadband super-high absorption.

  6. Large area silicon drift detectors for x-rays -- New results

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Patt, B.E.; Tull, C.R.; Segal, J.D.; Kenney, C.J.; Bradley, J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.

    1998-12-31

    Large area silicon drift detectors, consisting of 8 mm and 12 mm diameter hexagons, were fabricated on 0.35 mm thick high resistivity n-type silicon. An external FET and a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier were used for testing the prototype detectors. The detector performance was measured in the range 75 to 25 C using Peltier cooling, and from 0.125 to 6 {micro}s amplifier shaping time. Measured energy resolutions were 159 eV FWHM and 263 eV FWHM for the 0.5 cm{sup 2} and 1 cm{sup 2} detectors, respectively (at 5.9 keV, {minus}75 C, 6 {micro}s shaping time). The uniformity of the detector response over the entire active area (measured using 560 nm light) was < 0.5%.

  7. Large area and broadband ultra-black absorber using microstructured aluminum doped silicon films

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyi; Yang, Haigui; Gao, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    A large area and broadband ultra-black absorber based on microstructured aluminum (Al) doped silicon (Si) films prepared by a low-cost but very effective approach is presented. The average absorption of the absorber is greater than 99% within the wide range from 350 nm to 2000 nm, and its size reaches to 6 inches. We investigate the fabrication mechanism of the absorber and find that the Al atom doped in silicon improves the formation of the nanocone-like microstructures on the film surface, resulting in a significant decrease in the reflection of incident light. The absorption mechanism is further discussed by experiments and simulated calculations in detail. The results show that the doped Al atoms and Mie resonance formed in the microstructures contribute the broadband super-high absorption. PMID:28202899

  8. Conformable large-area position-sensitive photodetectors based on luminescence-collecting silicone waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartu, Petr; Koeppe, Robert; Arnold, Nikita; Neulinger, Anton; Fallon, Lisa; Bauer, Siegfried

    2010-06-01

    Position sensitive detection schemes based on the lateral photoeffect rely on inorganic semiconductors. Such position sensitive devices (PSDs) are reliable and robust, but preparation with large active areas is expensive and use on curved substrates is impossible. Here we present a novel route for the fabrication of conformable PSDs which allows easy preparation on large areas, and use on curved surfaces. Our device is based on stretchable silicone waveguides with embedded fluorescent dyes, used in conjunction with small silicon photodiodes. Impinging laser light (e.g., from a laser pointer) is absorbed by the dye in the PSD and re-emitted as fluorescence light at a larger wavelength. Due to the isotropic emission from the fluorescent dye molecules, most of the re-emitted light is coupled into the planar silicone waveguide and directed to the edges of the device. Here the light signals are detected via embedded small silicon photodiodes arranged in a regular pattern. Using a mathematical algorithm derived by extensive using of models from global positioning system (GPS) systems and human activity monitoring, the position of light spots is easily calculated. Additionally, the device shows high durability against mechanical stress, when clamped in an uniaxial stretcher and mechanically loaded up to 15% strain. The ease of fabrication, conformability, and durability of the device suggests its use as interface devices and as sensor skin for future robots.

  9. Recent advances with mercuric iodide x-ray detectors and large-area silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Andrzej J.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Madden, Michael C.; Szawlowski, Marek

    1993-10-01

    The paper presents advances in two sensor technologies: (1) Mercuric Iodide (HgI2) X-ray Detector Technology and, (2) Large Area Silicon Avalanche Photodiode (APD) Technology, which after years of development have recently produced commercially viable devices. Large Area Silicon Avalanche Photodiodes, which are solid-state light sensitive devices with internal amplification, combine the convenience, ruggedness and low power consumption of traditional semiconductor p-n and p-i-n photodiodes with the high light sensitivity and large photosensitive area approaching the active areas of traditional vacuum photomultiplier tubes. Device approaching 1-inch diameter with internal gain of up to 1000, have been developed by utilizing a beveled edge structure. By combining APD's with scintillation crystals, resolution of 6% (FWHM) was obtained for 662 keV energy line of 137Cs using a CsI(Tl) scintillator, and 7% (FWHM) was obtained using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. Resolution of 14% (FWHM) at room temperature and 11% (FWHM) at 0 degree(s)C have been obtained for APD's coupled to BGO scintillators. Rise times of 3 ns were measured by applying an impulse signal input, to a 200 mm2 device.

  10. Fabricating Large-Area Sheets of Single-Layer Graphene by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    This innovation consists of a set of methodologies for preparing large area (greater than 1 cm(exp 2)) domains of single-atomic-layer graphite, also called graphene, in single (two-dimensional) crystal form. To fabricate a single graphene layer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the process begins with an atomically flat surface of an appropriate substrate and an appropriate precursor molecule containing carbon atoms attached to substituent atoms or groups. These molecules will be brought into contact with the substrate surface by being flowed over, or sprayed onto, the substrate, under CVD conditions of low pressure and elevated temperature. Upon contact with the surface, the precursor molecules will decompose. The substituent groups detach from the carbon atoms and form gas-phase species, leaving the unfunctionalized carbon atoms attached to the substrate surface. These carbon atoms will diffuse upon this surface and encounter and bond to other carbon atoms. If conditions are chosen carefully, the surface carbon atoms will arrange to form the lowest energy single-layer structure available, which is the graphene lattice that is sought. Another method for creating the graphene lattice includes metal-catalyzed CVD, in which the decomposition of the precursor molecules is initiated by the catalytic action of a catalytic metal upon the substrate surface. Another type of metal-catalyzed CVD has the entire substrate composed of catalytic metal, or other material, either as a bulk crystal or as a think layer of catalyst deposited upon another surface. In this case, the precursor molecules decompose directly upon contact with the substrate, releasing their atoms and forming the graphene sheet. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can also be used. In this method, a substrate surface at low temperature is covered with exactly one monolayer of precursor molecules (which may be of more than one type). This is heated up so that the precursor molecules decompose and form one

  11. Argon Dilution as an Alternative to Hydrogen Dilution for the Preparation of Large Area Device Quality Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layek, Animesh; Middya, Somnath; Ray, Partha Pratim

    2011-07-01

    In stead of using silane-hydrogen mixture we have used silane-argon mixture to develop device quality amorphous silicon on large area for solar cell application. Although silane-hydrogen mixture gives very good material, it increases the risk of fire hazard. On the other hand argon-silane mixture promotes a much safer process. In this work large area (20×20 cm2) device quality amorphous silicon have been developed by argon dilution method for industrial use.

  12. Large-area Silicon-Film{trademark} panels and solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Barnett, A.M.; Checchi, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes AstroPower`s success in improving its material and processing capabilities during the first phase of this 3-year contract through the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) program. Key results include the demonstration of a 14.6%-efficient Silicon-Film{trademark} solar cell. This laboratory result (1.0 cm{sup 2}) provides the direction needed to develop and optimize continuous, in-line production processes. The continuous nature of the Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet fabrication process is being extended into the solar-cell processing sequence. Plans are in place to make the wafer cleaning, gettering, and diffusion steps all continuous during the scope of this program.

  13. Investigation of welded interconnection of large area wraparound contacted silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lott, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the welding and temperature cycle testing of large area 5.9 x 5.9 wraparound silicon solar cells utilizing printed circuit substrates with SSC-155 interconnect copper metals and the LMSC Infrared Controlled weld station. An initial group of 5 welded modules containing Phase 2 developmental 5.9 x 5.9 cm cells were subjected to cyclical temperatures of + or 80 C at a rate of 120 cycles per day. Anomalies were noted in the adhesion of the cell contact metallization; therefore, 5 additional modules were fabricated and tested using available Phase I cells with demonstrated contact integrity. Cycling of the later module type through 12,000 cycles indicated the viability of this type of lightweight flexible array concept. This project demonstrated acceptable use of an alternate interconnect copper in combination with large area wraparound cells and emphasized the necessity to implement weld pull as opposed to solder pull procedures at the cell vendors for cells that will be interconnected by welding.

  14. On the potential and limits of large area seeding for photovoltaic silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Nathan; Gründig-Wendrock, Bianca; Krause, Andreas; Oriwol, Daniel; Bertoni, Mariana; Naerland, Tine Uberg; Witting, Ian; Sylla, Lamine

    2016-10-01

    Single crystal production of silicon for solar cell substrates has relied on the Dash neck technique developed more than 50 years ago. The technique is simple and repeatable and enables truly dislocation free crystal growth. It does have drawbacks, however, including limits on throughput and some structural difficulties. It has long been assumed that dislocation-free growth is not possible by any other method. In the 'quasi-mono' crystal growth technique, one of the key elements is the use of large area single crystal seeds. By melting the seeds at near-equilibrium conditions, it is feasible to avoid the production of dislocations during melting. We will review the dislocation relevant details of the large area seeding process and present best case results for dislocation density, including measured minority carrier lifetimes in excess of 1 ms on p-type material. We will focus on dislocation density exclusive of seed boundaries, but we will also present a potential best-case limit for the technique.

  15. Large-area free-standing ultrathin single-crystal silicon as processable materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Weil, Benjamin D; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Ken Xingze; Garnett, Erik; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2013-09-11

    Silicon has been driving the great success of semiconductor industry, and emerging forms of silicon have generated new opportunities in electronics, biotechnology, and energy applications. Here we demonstrate large-area free-standing ultrathin single-crystalline Si at the wafer scale as new Si materials with processability. We fabricated them by KOH etching of the Si wafer and show their uniform thickness from 10 to sub-2 μm. These ultrathin Si exhibits excellent mechanical flexibility and bendability more than those with 20-30 μm thickness in previous study. Unexpectedly, these ultrathin Si materials can be cut with scissors like a piece of paper, and they are robust during various regular fabrication processings including tweezer handling, spin coating, patterning, doping, wet and dry etching, annealing, and metal deposition. We demonstrate the fabrication of planar and double-sided nanocone solar cells and highlight that the processability on both sides of surface together with the interesting property of these free-standing ultrathin Si materials opens up exciting opportunities to generate novel functional devices different from the existing approaches.

  16. Inexpensive silicon sheets for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.; Schwuttke, G. H.

    1977-01-01

    Technique of producing silicon sheets by drawing gridlike or porous graphite gauze through silicon melt is readily adaptable to mass production, making process applicable to inexpensive manufacture of solar cell arrays.

  17. Clean graphene interfaces by selective dry transfer for large area silicon integration.

    PubMed

    Na, S R; Rahimi, S; Tao, L; Chou, H; Ameri, S K; Akinwande, D; Liechti, K M

    2016-04-14

    Here we present a very fast, selective mechanical approach for transferring graphene with low levels of copper contamination from seed wafers on which it was grown to target wafers for very large scale integration (VLSI) electronics. We found that graphene/copper or copper/silicon oxide delamination paths could be selected by slow and faster separation rates, respectively. Thus graphene can be transferred to a target wafer, either exposed or protected by the seed copper layer, which can later be removed by etching. Delamination paths were identified by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by the two approaches was slightly higher than graphene transferred by a PMMA wet-transfer process, indicating reduced impurity doping, and the variation in the sheet resistance values was much lower. Copper contamination levels, quantitatively established by TOF-SIMS, were several orders of magnitude lower than the values for PMMA assisted transfer. In addition, we demonstrated that top-gated transistor devices from our mechanical, delamination transferred graphene exhibited superior transistor behavior to PMMA-assisted wet transfer graphene. The adhesion energy, strength and range of the interactions were quantitatively determined by nonlinear fracture analyses, and suggest that the roughness of the interface between graphene and copper plays an important role with implications for improvements in manufacturing processes.

  18. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting....

  19. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting....

  20. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting....

  1. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting....

  2. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting....

  3. Large-area monocrystalline silicon thin films by annealing of macroporous arrays: Understanding and tackling defects in the material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depauw, Valérie; Gordon, Ivan; Beaucarne, Guy; Poortmans, Jef; Mertens, Robert; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2009-08-01

    A concept that could provide a thin monocrystalline-silicon absorber layer without resorting to the expensive step of epitaxy would be very appealing for reducing the cost of solar cells. The empty-space-in-silicon technique by which thin films of silicon can be formed by reorganization of regular arrays of cylindrical voids at high temperature may be such a concept if the high quality of the thin film could be ensured on centimeter-large areas. While previous works mainly investigated the influence of the porous array on the final structure, this work focuses on the practical aspects of the high-temperature step and its application to large areas. An insight into the defects that may form is given and the origin of these defects is discussed, providing recommendations on how to avoid them. Surface roughening, pitting, formation of holes, and silicon pillars could be attributed to the nonuniform reactions between Si, SiO2, and SiO. Hydrogen atmospheres are therefore preferred for reorganization of macroporous arrays. Argon atmospheres, however, may provide high-quality silicon thin films as well, possibly even more easily transferable, as long as annealing is performed in controlled, clean, and oxygen-free conditions. Our experiments on large areas also highlight the importance of kinetics, which had not been considered up to now and which will require further understanding to ensure a complete reorganization over any wafer area.

  4. Sheet silicon cell/module technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    The cost involved in the performance of the standard operations for the manufacture of silicon wafers is insignificant in the case of space photovoltaics applications. It is, however, a decisive factor with respect to terrestrial applications of silicon photovoltaic devices. In 1975, a program was, therefore, begun to develop low cost silicon solar arrays for terrestrial applications. The goal was silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) modules ready for installation at a selling price of $0.50/watt (1975 dollars). Sheet and ribbon silicon growth held out the promise of reduced cost through continuous operation, high material throughput, high material utilization efficiency, and a product whose shape lent itself to the assembly of high packing density modules. Attention is given to ribbon growth technologies, sheet technology generic problems, and ribbon cell and module technology status. It is concluded that the potential for crystalline ribbon silicon appears to be better today than ever before.

  5. Sheet silicon cell/module technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    The cost involved in the performance of the standard operations for the manufacture of silicon wafers is insignificant in the case of space photovoltaics applications. It is, however, a decisive factor with respect to terrestrial applications of silicon photovoltaic devices. In 1975, a program was, therefore, begun to develop low cost silicon solar arrays for terrestrial applications. The goal was silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) modules ready for installation at a selling price of $0.50/watt (1975 dollars). Sheet and ribbon silicon growth held out the promise of reduced cost through continuous operation, high material throughput, high material utilization efficiency, and a product whose shape lent itself to the assembly of high packing density modules. Attention is given to ribbon growth technologies, sheet technology generic problems, and ribbon cell and module technology status. It is concluded that the potential for crystalline ribbon silicon appears to be better today than ever before.

  6. Cell technology: Advanced silicon sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D.

    1986-01-01

    The Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA)-sponsored Fourth Silicon Stress/Strain Workshop reviewed, coordinated, and assessed the progress in understanding and controlling stress and strain during the crystal growth of silicon ribbons. dislocation electrical activity and limits on solar cell efficiency, and on studying the effects of dopants on EFG characteristics. Work on silicon for high-efficiency solar cells, stress-strain relationships in silicon ribbon, and high temperature deformation of dendritic web ribbon was also discussed.

  7. Printable nanostructured silicon solar cells for high-performance, large-area flexible photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Biswas, Roshni; Li, Weigu; Kang, Dongseok; Chan, Lesley; Yoon, Jongseung

    2014-10-28

    Nanostructured forms of crystalline silicon represent an attractive materials building block for photovoltaics due to their potential benefits to significantly reduce the consumption of active materials, relax the requirement of materials purity for high performance, and hence achieve greatly improved levelized cost of energy. Despite successful demonstrations for their concepts over the past decade, however, the practical application of nanostructured silicon solar cells for large-scale implementation has been hampered by many existing challenges associated with the consumption of the entire wafer or expensive source materials, difficulties to precisely control materials properties and doping characteristics, or restrictions on substrate materials and scalability. Here we present a highly integrable materials platform of nanostructured silicon solar cells that can overcome these limitations. Ultrathin silicon solar microcells integrated with engineered photonic nanostructures are fabricated directly from wafer-based source materials in configurations that can lower the materials cost and can be compatible with deterministic assembly procedures to allow programmable, large-scale distribution, unlimited choices of module substrates, as well as lightweight, mechanically compliant constructions. Systematic studies on optical and electrical properties, photovoltaic performance in experiments, as well as numerical modeling elucidate important design rules for nanoscale photon management with ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells and their interconnected, mechanically flexible modules, where we demonstrate 12.4% solar-to-electric energy conversion efficiency for printed ultrathin (∼ 8 μm) nanostructured silicon solar cells when configured with near-optimal designs of rear-surface nanoposts, antireflection coating, and back-surface reflector.

  8. Microfabrication of large-area circular high-stress silicon nitride membranes for optomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, E.; Bawaj, M.; Borrielli, A.; Di Giuseppe, G.; Forte, S.; Kralj, N.; Malossi, N.; Marconi, L.; Marin, F.; Marino, F.; Morana, B.; Natali, R.; Pandraud, G.; Pontin, A.; Prodi, G. A.; Rossi, M.; Sarro, P. M.; Vitali, D.; Bonaldi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In view of the integration of membrane resonators with more complex MEMS structures, we developed a general fabrication procedure for circular shape SiNx membranes using Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Large area and high-stress SiNx membranes were fabricated and used as optomechanical resonators in a Michelson interferometer, where Q values up to 1.3 × 106 were measured at cryogenic temperatures, and in a Fabry-Pérot cavity, where an optical finesse up to 50000 has been observed.

  9. Large-area silicon nanowire Schottky junction photodetector with tunable absorption and low junction capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, L. P.; Seyedi, M. A.; Fiorentino, M.; Beausoleil, R. G.

    2017-06-01

    Silicon photodetectors for operation in the near-infrared with a sufficient responsivity and high-speed operation are currently needed as scalable, CMOS compatible components for photonic and communication applications. Photodetectors based on semiconductor nanowire structures with dielectric planarization enable larger active optical areas and higher operating speeds than planar devices due to reduced junction capacitance and enhanced absorption. Here, we report on the fabrication and characterization of a silicon nanowire photodetector with dielectric infilling and a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) Schottky contact. Optical simulations show that the absorbed power can be confined at the top of the nanowire array, enabling efficient operation in the near-infrared. This is despite the relatively low absorption coefficient for silicon in this wavelength range in addition to the design of the nanowire array to have a low fill factor compared to the bulk material in order to minimize the junction capacitance. The responsivity of this device is  >0.3 A W-1 at a reverse bias of 2 V and the junction capacitance is 8  ±  2 nF cm-2, which are respectively comparable and lower than the values expected for a planar silicon Schottky junction photodetector with a similar active area.

  10. Progress toward goals in silicon sheet development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koliwad, K. M.; Leipold, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    One of the goals of the national photovoltaic program in the U.S. is the establishment of an industry producing photovoltaic material which can be sold at a price not exceeding $0.70/W by 1986. A key element concerning the achievement of this goal is the development and utilization of improved methods for producing silicon sheet. Specific technologies being investigated in this connection can be divided into two categories. Methods of one category are based on a utilization of sheet growth techniques including film-fed growth, dendritic web, and silicon-on-ceramic processes. The approaches used by methods of the second category involve ingot and wafering processes, including Czochralski growth, the heat exchanger method, multiblade procedures, and the use of a fixed abrasive multiwire. It is found that using $84/kg silicon, most sheet technologies would yield module prices in the $2.00/Wp to $3.00/Wp range.

  11. Development of a Thick-film Silicon Ribbon Growth Technique for Application to Large-area Solar Cells and Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new technique is described for growth of large-area silicon ribbons. This technique is an edge-defined, film-fed growth process by which single crystals can be grown having a shape controlled by the outside dimensions of a shaping die, growth taking place from an extremely thin film of liquid fed by capillary action from a crucible below. The material from which the die is fabricated is very critical to the process. The die must be wet by the silicon, but adverse impurities must not be introduced into the silicon, and the die must not become degraded by the molten silicon. A breakthrough in die fabrication that has allowed the growth of silicon ribbons having dimensions of 1 cm by 30 cm with a thickness of 0.7 mm is described. The implications of this significant advancement with respect to development of photovoltaic solar arrays for wide-scale terrestrial solar-to-electric energy conversion systems are discussed.

  12. Improvements in data analysis obtained by large-area silicon ΔE - E detector telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uroić, M.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Martel, I.; Miljanić, Đ.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Prepolec, L.; Sánchez Benítez, A. M.; Scuderi, V.; Soić, N.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.

    2015-08-01

    The paper describes a few practical methods for the analysis of data obtained by standard thin-thick silicon detector telescopes used in nuclear reaction measurements. The addressed issues are: 1) improvement in double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSSD) calibration based on the fact that each event is registered twice, both in horizontal and vertical strips, 2) improvements in particle identification and 3) simplified mapping of the non-uniformity of the thin detector, without a dedicated measurement of the thickness. The proposed procedures are applied on experimental data obtained for 30MeV 7Li beam induced reactions on LiF and C targets, studied with a detection setup consisting of four telescopes placed at different angles and distances. The proposed methods aim at quicker and more reliable calibration and particle identification.

  13. Large area and structured epitaxial graphene produced by confinement controlled sublimation of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    de Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Ruan, Ming; Sprinkle, Mike; Li, Xuebin; Hu, Yike; Zhang, Baiqian; Hankinson, John; Conrad, Edward

    2011-10-11

    After the pioneering investigations into graphene-based electronics at Georgia Tech, great strides have been made developing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide (EG) as a new electronic material. EG has not only demonstrated its potential for large scale applications, it also has become an important material for fundamental two-dimensional electron gas physics. It was long known that graphene mono and multilayers grow on SiC crystals at high temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum. At these temperatures, silicon sublimes from the surface and the carbon rich surface layer transforms to graphene. However the quality of the graphene produced in ultrahigh vacuum is poor due to the high sublimation rates at relatively low temperatures. The Georgia Tech team developed growth methods involving encapsulating the SiC crystals in graphite enclosures, thereby sequestering the evaporated silicon and bringing growth process closer to equilibrium. In this confinement controlled sublimation (CCS) process, very high-quality graphene is grown on both polar faces of the SiC crystals. Since 2003, over 50 publications used CCS grown graphene, where it is known as the "furnace grown" graphene. Graphene multilayers grown on the carbon-terminated face of SiC, using the CCS method, were shown to consist of decoupled high mobility graphene layers. The CCS method is now applied on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce high mobility nano-patterned graphene structures thereby demonstrating that EG is a viable contender for next-generation electronics. Here we present for the first time the CCS method that outperforms other epitaxial graphene production methods.

  14. Large area and structured epitaxial graphene produced by confinement controlled sublimation of silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Ruan, Ming; Sprinkle, Mike; Li, Xuebin; Hu, Yike; Zhang, Baiqian; Hankinson, John; Conrad, Edward

    2011-01-01

    After the pioneering investigations into graphene-based electronics at Georgia Tech, great strides have been made developing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide (EG) as a new electronic material. EG has not only demonstrated its potential for large scale applications, it also has become an important material for fundamental two-dimensional electron gas physics. It was long known that graphene mono and multilayers grow on SiC crystals at high temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum. At these temperatures, silicon sublimes from the surface and the carbon rich surface layer transforms to graphene. However the quality of the graphene produced in ultrahigh vacuum is poor due to the high sublimation rates at relatively low temperatures. The Georgia Tech team developed growth methods involving encapsulating the SiC crystals in graphite enclosures, thereby sequestering the evaporated silicon and bringing growth process closer to equilibrium. In this confinement controlled sublimation (CCS) process, very high-quality graphene is grown on both polar faces of the SiC crystals. Since 2003, over 50 publications used CCS grown graphene, where it is known as the “furnace grown” graphene. Graphene multilayers grown on the carbon-terminated face of SiC, using the CCS method, were shown to consist of decoupled high mobility graphene layers. The CCS method is now applied on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce high mobility nano-patterned graphene structures thereby demonstrating that EG is a viable contender for next-generation electronics. Here we present for the first time the CCS method that outperforms other epitaxial graphene production methods. PMID:21960446

  15. Large area Co nanoring arrays fabricated on silicon substrate by anodic aluminum oxide template-assisted electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. L.; Tang, S. L.; Xia, W. B.; Chen, L. Y.; Wang, Y.; Tang, T.; Du, Y. W.

    2012-04-01

    A simple approach based on anodic aluminum oxide template-assisted electrodeposition was developed to fabricate large-area Co nanoring arrays on silicon substrate. The ring outer diameter and interspace can be modulated by varying the anodization parameters. Magnetic measurements and micromagnetic simulation revealed that the onion to vortex (O-V) transition is strongly diameter dependent. With increasing the outer diameter from 100 nm to 300 nm, the O-V switching field gradually changes from positive value to negative value. This was also proved by in situ observation of the magnetic states of the rings under different external fields using magnetic force microscope.

  16. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc.

  17. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc. PMID:26727551

  18. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-04

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~ 200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc.

  19. Controlled synthesis and transfer of large-area WS2 sheets: from single layer to few layers.

    PubMed

    Elías, Ana Laura; Perea-López, Néstor; Castro-Beltrán, Andrés; Berkdemir, Ayse; Lv, Ruitao; Feng, Simin; Long, Aaron D; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Gutiérrez, Humberto R; Pradhan, Nihar R; Balicas, Luis; Mallouk, Thomas E; López-Urías, Florentino; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio

    2013-06-25

    The isolation of few-layered transition metal dichalcogenides has mainly been performed by mechanical and chemical exfoliation with very low yields. In this account, a controlled thermal reduction-sulfurization method is used to synthesize large-area (~1 cm(2)) WS2 sheets with thicknesses ranging from monolayers to a few layers. During synthesis, WOx thin films are first deposited on Si/SiO2 substrates, which are then sulfurized (under vacuum) at high temperatures (750-950 °C). An efficient route to transfer the synthesized WS2 films onto different substrates such as quartz and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids has been satisfactorily developed using concentrated HF. Samples with different thicknesses have been analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and TEM, and their photoluminescence properties have been evaluated. We demonstrated the presence of single-, bi-, and few-layered WS2 on as-grown samples. It is well known that the electronic structure of these materials is very sensitive to the number of layers, ranging from indirect band gap semiconductor in the bulk phase to direct band gap semiconductor in monolayers. This method has also proved successful in the synthesis of heterogeneous systems of MoS2 and WS2 layers, thus shedding light on the controlled production of heterolayered devices from transition metal chalcogenides.

  20. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaschel, Nils; Ariza, Dario; Díez, Sergio; Gerboles, Marta; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Quirion, David; Tackmann, Kerstin; Ullan, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. In this paper, we are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype optimized to achieve a homogeneous flow distribution. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  1. Fabrication of large-area ultra-thin single crystal silicon membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Z. Y.; Motapothula, M.; Ow, Y. S.; Venkatesan, T.; Breese, M. B. H.; Rana, M. A.; Osman, A.

    2011-11-28

    Perfectly, crystalline, 55 nm thick silicon membranes have been fabricated over several square millimeters and used to observe transmission ion channeling patterns showing the early evolution of the axially channeled beam angular distribution for small tilts away from the [011] axis. The reduced multiple scattering through such thin layers allows fine angular structure produced by the highly non-equilibrium transverse momentum distribution of the channeled beam during its initial propagation in the crystal to be resolved. The membrane crystallinity and flatness were measured by using proton channeling measurements and the surface roughness of 0.4 nm using atomic force microscopy.

  2. Development of a large-area silicon α-particle detector.

    PubMed

    Tran, Linh T; Prokopovich, Dale A; Lerch, Michael L F; Petasecca, Marco; Siegele, Rainer; Reinhard, Mark I; Perevertaylo, Vladimir; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2014-09-01

    Circular ion-implanted silicon detector of α-particles with a large, 5-cm(2), sensitive area has been developed. An advantage of the detector is that the detector surface is easily cleanable with chemicals. The hardened surface of the detector shows no signs of deterioration of the spectroscopic and electrical characteristics upon repeated cleaning. The energy resolution along the diameters of the detector was (1.0±0.1)% for the 5.486-MeV α-particles. Detailed tests of the charge collection efficiency and uniformity of the detector entrance window were also performed with a 5.5-MeV He(2+) microbeam.

  3. The structure of 110 tilt boundaries in large area solar silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ast, D. G.; Cunningham, B.; Vaudin, M.

    1982-01-01

    The models of Hornstra and their connection to the repeating group description of grain boundaries (7-10) are discussed. A model for the Sigma = 27 boundary containing a zig-zag arrangement of dislocations is constructed and it is shown that zig-zag models can account for the contrast features observed in high resolution transmission electron micrographs of second and third order twin boundaries in silicon. The boundaries discussed are symmetric with a 110 tilt axis and a (110) boundary plane in the median lattice (the median plane). The median lattice is identical in structure and halfway in orientation between the crystal lattices either side of the boundary.

  4. Fabrication of Large-Area Hierarchical Structure Array Using Siliconized-Silsesquioxane as a Nanoscale Etching Barrier.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bong Kuk; Baek, In-Bok; Kim, Yarkyeon; Jang, Won Ick; Yoon, Yong Sun; Yu, Han Young

    2015-06-24

    A material approach to fabricate a large-area hierarchical structure array is presented. The replica molding and oxygen (O2) plasma etching processes were combined to fabricate a large-area hierarchical structure array. Liquid blends consisting of siliconized silsesquioxane acrylate (Si-SSQA), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), and photoinitiator are developed as a roughness amplifying material during O2 plasma etching. Microstructures composed of the Si-SSQA/EGDMA mixtures are fabricated by replica molding. Nanoscale roughness on molded microstructures is realized by O2 etching. The nanoscale roughness on microstructures is efficiently controlled by varying the etching time and the weight ratio of Si-SSQA to EGDMA. The hierarchical structures fabricated by combining replica molding and O2 plasma etching showed superhydrophilicity with long-term stability, resulting in the formation of hydroxyl-terminated silicon oxide layer with the reorientation limit. On the other hand, the hierarchical structures modified with a perfluorinated monolayer showed superhydrophobicity. The increment of water contact angles is consistent with increment of the nano/microroughness of hierarchical structures and decrement of the top contact area of water/hierarchical structures.

  5. Large Area Deposition Of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon By CW CO2 Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenchi, R.; Musci, M.; Murri, R.

    1984-06-01

    In order to enhance the deposited area and to improve the uniformity of hydrogenated amor phous silicon (a-Si:H) films, obtained from photodissociation of silane molecules by CO2 laser radiation, two new different experimental approaches are investigated. One of these utilizes a high power (≍ 1 KW) CW CO2 laser with uniform intensity distribution in a rectangular beam cross section; the other consists in a continuous scanning, along a horizontal plane parallel to the substrate, of a low power (≍ 100 W) gaussian laser beam. Preliminary results about p and n doping of the photodeposited material by boron and pho-sphorous ion implantation proved its high doping efficiency and its structural similarity to the chemical vapor deposition produced material.

  6. Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules

    SciTech Connect

    Delahoy, A.E.; Tonon, T.; Macneil, J. )

    1991-06-01

    The primary objective of this subcontract is to develop the technology for same bandgap, amorphous silicon tandem junction photovoltaic modules having an area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} with the goal of achieving an aperture area efficiency of 9%. A further objective is to demonstrate modules that retain 95% of their under standard light soaking conditions. Our approach to the attainment of these objective is based on the following distinctive technologies: (a) in-house deposition of SiO{sub 2}/SnO{sub 2}:F onto soda lime glass by APCVD to provide a textured, transparent electrode, (b) single chamber r.f. flow discharge deposition of the a-Si:H layers onto vertical substrates contained with high package density in a box carrier'' to which the discharge is confined (c) sputter deposition of highly reflecting, ZnO-based back contacts, and (d) laser scribing of the a-Si:H and electrodes with real-time scribe tracking to minimize area loss. Continued development of single junction amorphous silicon was aggressively pursued as proving ground for various optical enhancement schemes, new p-layers, and i-layers quality. We have rigorously demonstrated that the introduction of a transitional i-layer does not impair stability and that the initial gain in performance is retained. We have demonstrated a small improvement in cell stability through a post-fabrication treatment consisting of multiple, intense light flashes followed by sufficient annealing. Finally, several experiments have indicated that long term stability can be improved by overcoating the SnO{sub 2} with ZnO. 25 refs., 17 figs.

  7. Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area amorphous silicon based modules -- Task B

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, K.W.; Willet, D.R. )

    1990-10-01

    This report documents progress in developing a stable, high- efficiency, four-terminal hybrid tandem module. The module consists of a semi-transparent, thin-film silicon:hydrogen alloy (TFS) top circuit and a copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) bottom circuit. Film deposition and patterning processes were successfully extended to 0.4-m{sup 2} substrates. A 33.2-W (8.4% efficient) module with a 3970-cm{sup 2} aperture area and a white back reflector was demonstrated; without the back reflector, the module produced 30.2 W (7.6% efficient). Placing a laminated, 31.6-W, 8.1%-efficient CuInSe{sub 2} module underneath this TFS module, with an air gap between the two, produces 11.2 W (2.9% efficient) over a 3883-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Therefore, the four-terminal tandem power output is 41.4 W, translating to a 10.5% aperture-area efficiency. Subsequently, a 37.8-W (9.7% aperture-area efficiency) CuInSe{sub 2} module was demonstrated with a 3905-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Future performances of single-junction and tandem modules of this size were modeled, and predicted power outputs exceed 50 W (13% efficient) for CuInSe{sub 2} and 65 W (17% efficient) for TFS/CuInSe{sub 2} tandem modules.

  8. Large-area fabrication of silicon nanostructures by templated nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdana, Gerry; Bertke, Maik; Südkamp, Tobias; Bracht, Hartmut; Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Peiner, Erwin

    2017-05-01

    An improved nanoscale processing technique by using polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles as a mask is successfully implemented to produce vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. Lithographic microstructures with different shapes and opening sizes were applied to determine the fabrication area followed by deposition of a PSS/PDDA/PSS layer. Therefore, most of the substrate areas were covered and a large-range order of PS nanoparticles can be acquired by detailed investigation of spin-coating parameters and surface properties. Afterwards, the particle size was modulated resulting in feature diameters ranging from 459 +/- 9 nm down to 248 +/- 11 nm. Using this as a mask for inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching, a feature-size variation of high-density SiNWs from 225 +/- 18 nm to 146 +/- 7 nm can be achieved. Finally, a method with simple patterning steps has been developed and tested on more than 100 samples emerging as an alternative method for reliable nanostructure realization.

  9. Initial steps toward the realization of large area arrays of single photon counting pixels based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2014-03-01

    The thin-film semiconductor processing methods that enabled creation of inexpensive liquid crystal displays based on amorphous silicon transistors for cell phones and televisions, as well as desktop, laptop and mobile computers, also facilitated the development of devices that have become ubiquitous in medical x-ray imaging environments. These devices, called active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), measure the integrated signal generated by incident X rays and offer detection areas as large as ~43×43 cm2. In recent years, there has been growing interest in medical x-ray imagers that record information from X ray photons on an individual basis. However, such photon counting devices have generally been based on crystalline silicon, a material not inherently suited to the cost-effective manufacture of monolithic devices of a size comparable to that of AMFPIs. Motivated by these considerations, we have developed an initial set of small area prototype arrays using thin-film processing methods and polycrystalline silicon transistors. These prototypes were developed in the spirit of exploring the possibility of creating large area arrays offering single photon counting capabilities and, to our knowledge, are the first photon counting arrays fabricated using thin film techniques. In this paper, the architecture of the prototype pixels is presented and considerations that influenced the design of the pixel circuits, including amplifier noise, TFT performance variations, and minimum feature size, are discussed.

  10. Production of ultra thin grain oriented silicon steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Ishiyama, K.; Arai, K.I.

    1995-11-01

    Grain texture and magnetic properties of ultra thin silicon steel sheets were investigated. The sheets were produced using two kinds of starting materials. One was conventional grain oriented silicon steel sheet and the other was hot rolled silicon steel. Ultra thin sheets were obtained by cold rolling with intermediate annealing. By annealing in a high vacuum a recrystallization using surface energy occurred and very sharp (110)[001] texture was obtained in sheets of 5--8 {micro}m thick. The B{sub 8} of the ultra thin silicon steel sheets obtained were over 1.95 T.

  11. Slicing of Silicon into Sheet Material. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Tests on mineral oil slurries show that the potential for workability and low cost is present. However, slurries tested to date which had sufficient lubricity exhibited wafer breakage problems near the end of the run for as-yet unknown reasons. The first test of the large prototype saw under cutting force control was largely successful in that the controller worked perfectly. Unfortunately a technique error (excessive stroke shortening) caused blade breakage and low yield. The latest run of the large saw pointed up the fact that an indication of end-of-stoke vertical motion, or bounce, is necessary. A circuit to provide such indication was fabricated and installed. Preliminary tests show it to be excessively noise sensitive; therefore, work on grounding and shielding to reduce this sensitivity is in progress.

  12. Slicing of silicon into sheet material: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The limits of blade tolerance were defined. The standard blades are T-2 thickness tolerance. Good results were obtained by using a slurry fluid consisting of mineral oil and a lubricity additive. Adjustments of the formulation and fine tuning of the cutting process with the new fluid are necessary. Test results and consultation indicate that the blade breakage encountered with water based slurries is unavoidable. Two full capacity (974 wafer) runs were made on the large prototype saw. Both runs resulted in extremely low yield. However, the reasons for the low yield were lack of proper technique rather than problems with machine function. The test on the effect of amount of material etched off of an as-sawn wafer on solar cell efficiency were completed. The results agree with previous work at JPL in that the minimum material removed per side that gives maximum efficiency is on the order of 10 microns.

  13. Silicon Sheet Quality is Improved By Meniscus Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, D. A.; Hatch, A. E.; Goldsmith, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Better quality silicon crystals for solar cells are possible with instrument that monitors position of meniscus as sheet of solid silicon is drawn from melt. Using information on meniscus height, instrument generates feedback signal to control melt temperature. Automatic control ensures more uniform silicon sheets.

  14. Large-area silicon sheet by EFG. First quarterly report, January 1, 1981-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-29

    A multiple growth run with three 10 cm cartridges was carried out with the best throughput rates and time percentage of simultaneous three-ribbon growth achieved to date in this system. Growth speeds were between 3.2 and 3.6 cm/minute on all three cartridges and simultaneous full-width growth of three ribbons was achieved 47% of the time over the eight-hour duration of the experiment. Improvements in instrumentation and in the main zone temperature uniformity have been two factors that have led to more reproducible growth conditions in the multiple ribbon furnace. Factors influencing ribbon quality are being investigated through the study of the effect of ambient gas species and concentrations on material properties. Growth of ribbon with the cold shoes characteristic of the high-speed systems has shown that the properties of this ribbon respond to ambient changes in much the same way as when no cold shoes are present. The best cell efficiencies attained for 10 cm wide ribbon grown with cold shoes are still below those obtained without cold shoes (10 to 11% versus 12 to 13%, respectively). It has also been shown in these experiments that meniscus CO/sub 2/ and quartz introduced in the melt (contained in graphite crucibles) are equivalent in improving the electronic quality of the ribbon in these systems. Development of a system to grow 10 cm wide ribbon in the speed range from 3 to 4 cm/minute without the use of the conventional cold shoes is underway. Work on building a new multiple furnace for growth of four 10 cm wide ribbons has been started.

  15. Vitre-graf Coating on Mullite. Low Cost Silicon Array Project: Large Area Sillicon Sheet Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The processing parameters of the Vitre-Graf coating for optimal performance and economy when applied to mullite and graphite as substrates were presented. A minor effort was also performed on slip-cast fused silica substractes.

  16. Large-area silicon sheet by EFG. Fourth quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-17

    Extensive characterization of the multiple ribbon Furnace 3A main zone temperature profile has been performed and the information used to improve uniformity of heating. Irregularities in the main zone heater have been associated with growth difficulties at specific cartridge locations, and growth conditions subsequently improved by profiling the main zone heater. This work has resulted in good growth conditions being established in all three cartridge positions. These improvements have allowed multiple growth of three 10 cm wide ribbons to be demonstrated for periods of an hour on several occasions. A full eight-hour technical features demonstration run has not been achieved due to malfunctions in auxiliary equipment. A new gas distribution system for the 10 cm cartridge has been introduced and demonstrated to lead to improved ambient control during growth. Growth without and with CO/sub 2/ has shown that quality improvement in 10 cm ribbon grown with cold shoes results from ambient manipulation. Optimization of this process is continuing with studies of different means by which to vary oxygen levels in the ribbon.

  17. Large-area high-throughput synthesis of monolayer graphene sheet by Hot Filament Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Hawaldar, Ranjit; Merino, P.; Correia, M. R.; Bdikin, Igor; Grácio, José; Méndez, J.; Martín-Gago, J. A.; Singh, Manoj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We report hot filament thermal CVD (HFTCVD) as a new hybrid of hot filament and thermal CVD and demonstrate its feasibility by producing high quality large area strictly monolayer graphene films on Cu substrates. Gradient in gas composition and flow rate that arises due to smart placement of the substrate inside the Ta filament wound alumina tube accompanied by radical formation on Ta due to precracking coupled with substrate mediated physicochemical processes like diffusion, polymerization etc., led to graphene growth. We further confirmed our mechanistic hypothesis by depositing graphene on Ni and SiO2/Si substrates. HFTCVD can be further extended to dope graphene with various heteroatoms (H, N, and B, etc.,), combine with functional materials (diamond, carbon nanotubes etc.,) and can be extended to all other materials (Si, SiO2, SiC etc.,) and processes (initiator polymerization, TFT processing) possible by HFCVD and thermal CVD. PMID:23002423

  18. Formation of silicon sheet on a rotating substrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewoo; Lee, Changbum; Kim, Joonsoo; Jang, Bo-Yun; Ahn, Youngsoo; Yoon, Wooyoung

    2012-04-01

    A spin casting process to fabricate polycrystalline silicon sheets for use as solar cell wafers is presented and the parameters that control the sheet thickness are investigated. The computational model for the spin casting is proposed in order to understand the melt flow and solidification behaviors in the mold. The effect of the rotating speed of the mold and substrate morphology on the silicon sheets is studied via computer simulations, and the simulation results are compared with the experimental results. The numerical study of the fluidity and solidification behavior of the silicon predicted that the formation of rectangular sheets via spin casting is feasible, and the subsequent experiment confirmed this prediction. Using a square mold, rectangular silicon sheets can be produced under appropriate experimental conditions. Microstructural analyses verified the presence of long columnar structures on the sheets.

  19. A large-area wireless power-transmission sheet using printed organic transistors and plastic MEMS switches.

    PubMed

    Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Takamiya, Makoto; Noguchi, Yoshiaki; Nakano, Shintaro; Kato, Yusaku; Sakurai, Takayasu; Someya, Takao

    2007-06-01

    The electronics fields face serious problems associated with electric power; these include the development of ecologically friendly power-generation systems and ultralow-power-consuming circuits. Moreover, there is a demand for developing new power-transmission methods in the imminent era of ambient electronics, in which a multitude of electronic devices such as sensor networks will be used in our daily life to enhance security, safety and convenience. We constructed a sheet-type wireless power-transmission system by using state-of-the-art printing technologies using advanced electronic functional inks. This became possible owing to recent progress in organic semiconductor technologies; the diversity of chemical syntheses and processes on organic materials has led to a new class of organic semiconductors, dielectric layers and metals with excellent electronic functionalities. The new system directly drives electronic devices by transmitting power of the order of tens of watts without connectors, thereby providing an easy-to-use and reliable power source. As all of the components are manufactured on plastic films, it is easy to place the wireless power-transmission sheet over desks, floors, walls and any other location imaginable.

  20. Simple fabrication of air-stable black phosphorus heterostructures with large-area hBN sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sapna; Takabayashi, Yuya; Shinohara, Hisanori; Kitaura, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a facile and general method to passivate thin black phosphorus (BP) flakes with large-area high-quality monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) sheets grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. In spite of the one-atom-thick structure, the high-quality CVD-grown monolayer hBN has proven to be useful to prevent the degradation of thin BP flakes exfoliated on substrates. Mechanically exfoliated BP flakes prepared on a Si substrate are covered by the monolayer hBN sheet to preserve (otherwise unstable) atomic layered BP flakes from degradation. The present technique can generally be applied to fabricating BP-based electronic devices with much easiness.

  1. Numerical simulation and fabrication of silicon sheet via spin casting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewoo; Kim, Hyunhui; Lee, Changbum; Kim, Joonsoo; Jang, Bo-Yun; Lee, Jinseok; Ahn, Youngsoo; Yoon, Wooyoung

    2013-05-01

    A spin-casting process for fabricating polycrystalline silicon sheets for use as solar cell wafers is proposed, and the parameters that control the sheet thickness are investigated. A numerical study of the fluidity of molten silicon indicates that the formation of thin silicon sheets without a mold and via spin casting is feasible. The faster the rotation speed of graphite mold, the thinner the thickness of sheet. After the spread of the molten silicon to cover the graphite mold with rotation speed of above 500 rpm, the solidification has to start. Silicon sheets can be produced by using the centrifugal force under appropriate experimental conditions. The spin-cast sheet had a vertical columnar microstructure due to the normal heat extraction to the substrate, and the sheet lifetime varied from 0.1 microS to 0.3 microS measured by using the microwave photoconductance decay (MW-PCD) to confirm that the spin-cast silicon sheet is applicable to photovoltaics.

  2. Electron channeling and EBIC studies of polycrystalline silicon sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y S; Matson, R J

    1984-05-01

    Electron channeling and EBIC studies have been performed on silicon sheets grown by the edge-supported pulling (ESP) and low-angle silicon sheet (LASS) processes. We have found that the dominant grain structure of the ESP sheets is long, narrow grains with surface normals oriented near (011); grains with this structure tend to have better electronic quality than random grains. We have also studied the twin-stabilized planar growth material of LASS sheets. This material, grown at 200 cm/sup 2//min, is essentially single-crystal.

  3. Critical technology limits to silicon material and sheet production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Earlier studies have indicated that expenditures related to the preparation of high-purity silicon and its conversion to silicon sheet represent from 40 to 52 percent of the cost of the entire panel. The present investigation is concerned with the elements which were selected for study in connection with the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project. The first of two technologies which are being developed within the FSA Project involves the conversion of metallurgical-grade silicon through a silane purification process to silicon particles. The second is concerned with the conversion of trichlorosilane to dichlorosilane, and the subsequent production of silicon using modified rod reactors of the Siemens type. With respect to silicon sheet preparation, efforts have been focused both on the preparation of ingots, followed by wafering, and the direct crystallization of molten silicon into a ribbon or film.

  4. Exploration of maximum count rate capabilities for large-area photon counting arrays based on polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2016-03-01

    Pixelated photon counting detectors with energy discrimination capabilities are of increasing clinical interest for x-ray imaging. Such detectors, presently in clinical use for mammography and under development for breast tomosynthesis and spectral CT, usually employ in-pixel circuits based on crystalline silicon - a semiconductor material that is generally not well-suited for economic manufacture of large-area devices. One interesting alternative semiconductor is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), a thin-film technology capable of creating very large-area, monolithic devices. Similar to crystalline silicon, poly-Si allows implementation of the type of fast, complex, in-pixel circuitry required for photon counting - operating at processing speeds that are not possible with amorphous silicon (the material currently used for large-area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers). The pixel circuits of two-dimensional photon counting arrays are generally comprised of four stages: amplifier, comparator, clock generator and counter. The analog front-end (in particular, the amplifier) strongly influences performance and is therefore of interest to study. In this paper, the relationship between incident and output count rate of the analog front-end is explored under diagnostic imaging conditions for a promising poly-Si based design. The input to the amplifier is modeled in the time domain assuming a realistic input x-ray spectrum. Simulations of circuits based on poly-Si thin-film transistors are used to determine the resulting output count rate as a function of input count rate, energy discrimination threshold and operating conditions.

  5. Current status of solar cell performance of unconventional silicon sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, H. I.; Liu, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that activities in recent years directed towards reduction in the cost of silicon solar cells for terrestrial photovoltaic applications have resulted in impressive advancements in the area of silicon sheet formation from melt. The techniques used in the process of sheet formation can be divided into two general categories. All approaches in one category require subsequent ingot wavering. The various procedures of the second category produce silicon in sheet form. The performance of baseline solar cells is discussed. The baseline process included identification marking, slicing to size, and surface treatment (etch-polishing) when needed. Attention is also given to the performance of cells with process variations, and the effects of sheet quality on performance and processing.

  6. Reducing the thermal stress in a heterogeneous material stack for large-area hybrid optical silicon-lithium niobate waveguide micro-chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, P. O.; Mookherjea, S.

    2017-04-01

    The bonding of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to lithium niobate-on-insulator (LNOI) is becoming important for a new category of linear and nonlinear micro-photonic optical devices. In studying the bonding of SOI to LNOI through benzocyclobutene (BCB), a popular interlayer bonding dielectric used in hybrid silicon photonic devices, we use thermal stress calculations to suggest that BCB thickness does not affect thermal stress in this type of structure, and instead, thermal stress can be mitigated satisfactorily by matching the handles of the SOI and LNOI. We bond LNOI with a silicon handle to a silicon chip, remove the handle on the LNOI side, and thermally cycle the bonded stack repeatedly from room temperature up to 300°C and back down without incurring thermal stress cracks, which do appear when using LNOI with a lithium niobate handle, regardless of the BCB thickness. We show that this process can be used to create many hybrid silicon-lithium niobate waveguiding structures on a single patterned SOI chip bonded to a large-area (16 mm × 4.2 mm) lithium niobate film.

  7. Development of large-area monolithically integrated silicon-film photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 1 May 1991--15 November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Bacon, C.; Cotter, J.E.; Lampros, T.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Ruffins, T.R.; Hall, R.B.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes work to develop Silicon-Film Product III into a low-cost, stable device for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product III structure is a thin (< 100 {mu}m) polycrystalline silicon layer on a non-conductive supporting ceramic substrate. The presence of the substrate allows cells to be isolated and in interconnected monolithically in various series/parallel configurations. The long-term goal for the product is efficiencies over 18% on areas greater than 1200 cm{sup 2}. The high efficiency is made possible through the benefits of using polycrystalline thin silicon incorporated into a light-trapping structure with a passivated back surface. Short-term goals focused on the development of large-area ceramics, a monolithic interconnection process, and 100 cm{sup 2} solar cells. Critical elements of the monolithically integrated device were developed, and an insulating ceramic substrate was developed and tested. A monolithic interconnection process was developed that will isolate and interconnect individual cells on the ceramic surface. Production-based, low-cost process steps were used, and the process was verified using free-standing silicon wafers to achieve an open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 8.25 V over a 17-element string. The overall efficiency of the silicon-film materials was limited to 6% by impurities. Improved processing and feedstock materials are under investigation.

  8. Micro-nano hybrid structures with manipulated wettability using a two-step silicon etching on a large area

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nanoscale surface manipulation technique to control the surface roughness and the wettability is a challenging field for performance enhancement in boiling heat transfer. In this study, micro-nano hybrid structures (MNHS) with hierarchical geometries that lead to maximizing of surface area, roughness, and wettability are developed for the boiling applications. MNHS structures consist of micropillars or microcavities along with nanowires having the length to diameter ratio of about 100:1. MNHS is fabricated by a two-step silicon etching process, which are dry etching for micropattern and electroless silicon wet etching for nanowire synthesis. The fabrication process is readily capable of producing MNHS covering a wafer-scale area. By controlling the removal of polymeric passivation layers deposited during silicon dry etching (Bosch process), we can control the geometries for the hierarchical structure with or without the thin hydrophobic barriers that affect surface wettability. MNHS without sidewalls exhibit superhydrophilic behavior with a contact angle under 10°, whereas those with sidewalls preserved by the passivation layer display more hydrophobic characteristics with a contact angle near 60°. PMID:21711859

  9. Continuous Czochralski growth: Silicon sheet growth development of the large area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The primary objective of this contract is to develop equipment and methods for the economic production of single crystal ingot material by the continuous Czochralski (CZ) process. Continuous CZ is defined for the purpose of this work as the growth of at least 100 kilograms of ingot from only one melt container. During the reporting period (October, 1977 - September, 1978), a modified grower was made fully functional and several recharge runs were performed. The largest run lasted 44 hours and over 42 kg of ingot was produced. Little, if any, degradation in efficiency was observed as a result of pulling multiple crystals from one crucible. Solar efficiencies observed were between 9.3 and 10.4% AMO (13.0 and 14.6% AMI) compared to 10.5% (14.7% AMI) for optimum CZ material control samples. Using the SAMICS/IPEG format, economic analysis of continuous CZ suggests that 1986 DoE cost goals can only be met by the growth of large diameter, large mass crystals.

  10. Continuous Czochralski Growth. Silicon Sheet Growth Development of the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merz, F.

    1979-01-01

    During the reporting period, a successful 100 kilogram run was performed. Six ingots of 13 cm diameter were grown, ranging in size from 15.5 kg to 17.7 kg. Melt replenishment methods included both poly rod and lump feed material. Samples from each ingot were prepared for solar cell fabrication and analyses, impurity analysis, and structural studies. The furnace was converted to the 14-inch hot zone and preliminary heat runs were performed. Two sucessful runs were demonstrated, by growing 25 kg ingots from 30 kg melts. Also, a 100 kg run was attempted, utilizing the 14 inch crucible hot zone, but was prematurely terminated due to excessive monoxide which accumulated on the viewports and a seed failure.

  11. 3D silicon sensors: Design, large area production and quality assurance for the ATLAS IBL pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Via, Cinzia; Boscardin, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Darbo, Giovanni; Fleta, Celeste; Gemme, Claudia; Grenier, Philippe; Grinstein, Sebastian; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Chris; Kok, Angela; Parker, Sherwood; Pellegrini, Giulio; Vianello, Elisa; Zorzi, Nicola

    2012-12-01

    3D silicon sensors, where electrodes penetrate the silicon substrate fully or partially, have successfully been fabricated in different processing facilities in Europe and USA. The key to 3D fabrication is the use of plasma micro-machining to etch narrow deep vertical openings allowing dopants to be diffused in and form electrodes of pin junctions. Similar openings can be used at the sensor's edge to reduce the perimeter's dead volume to as low as ˜4 μm. Since 2009 four industrial partners of the 3D ATLAS R&D Collaboration started a joint effort aimed at one common design and compatible processing strategy for the production of 3D sensors for the LHC Upgrade and in particular for the ATLAS pixel Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In this project, aimed for installation in 2013, a new layer will be inserted as close as 3.4 cm from the proton beams inside the existing pixel layers of the ATLAS experiment. The detector proximity to the interaction point will therefore require new radiation hard technologies for both sensors and front end electronics. The latter, called FE-I4, is processed at IBM and is the biggest front end of this kind ever designed with a surface of ˜4 cm2. The performance of 3D devices from several wafers was evaluated before and after bump-bonding. Key design aspects, device fabrication plans and quality assurance tests during the 3D sensors prototyping phase are discussed in this paper.

  12. Impact of carrier recombination on fill factor for large area heterojunction crystalline silicon solar cell with 25.1% efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Daisuke; Hernández, José Luis; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    We have achieved a certified 25.1% conversion efficiency in a large area (151.9 cm2) heterojunction (HJ) crystalline Si (c-Si) solar cell with amorphous Si (a-Si) passivation layer. This efficiency is a world record in a both-side-contacted c-Si solar cell. Our high efficiency HJ c-Si solar cells are investigated from the standpoint of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τe), and the impact of τe on fill factor (FF) is discussed. The τe measurements of our high efficiency HJ c-Si solar cells reveal that τe at an injection level corresponding to an operation point of maximum power is dominated by the carrier recombination at the a-Si/c-Si interface. By optimization of the process conditions, the carrier recombination at the a-Si/c-Si interface is reduced, which leads to an improvement of the FF by an absolute value of 2.7%, and a conversion efficiency of 25.1% has been achieved. These results indicate that the reduction of carrier recombination centers at the a-Si/c-Si interface should be one of the most crucial issues for further improvement of FF even in the HJ c-Si solar cells with efficiency over 25%.

  13. Review of Silicone Gel Sheeting and Silicone Gel for the Prevention of Hypertrophic Scars and Keloids.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuei-Chang; Luan, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Yi-Wen

    2017-05-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are fibroproliferative disorders of dermal tissue after skin injury. Many clinical control studies have reported evidence that silicone gel is effective in preventing and alleviating hypertrophic scarring. Whether silicone gel sheeting prevents hypertrophic scars or keloids requires clear evidence of its clinical effectiveness. This review investigated the effectiveness of silicone gel and silicone gel sheeting for the prevention of hypertrophic or keloid scarring in patients with newly healed wounds. The authors searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CENTRAL databases (January 1, 1990 to September 24, 2014) for any randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing silicone gel sheeting or silicone gel with a control group for prevention of hypertrophic scars or keloids. All collected trials were assessed for methodological quality, control group and treatment group, and number of participants developing hypertrophic scars and keloids. The authors calculated risk ratios (RR) from each trial for the development of abnormal scarring and combined these using random-effects model meta-analysis. Between-study heterogeneity was calculated by using the I2 statistic. Ten trials in 9 studies were pooled (random effect; I² = 88%). There was a significant difference between the silicone gel sheeting group and the placebo group (RR 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.99; P = .04) in preventing the risk of hypertrophic scars. There was statistical significance in the effectiveness of silicone gel and silicone gel sheeting on the prevention of keloids or hypertrophic scars, especially in skin lesion wounds. However, most of the trials evaluating silicone gel sheeting or silicone gel as a prevention of hypertrophic scars and keloids had poor quality with high or uncertain risk of biases either in study design or in conduct.

  14. EBIC Characterization and Hydrogen Passivation in Silicon Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanoka, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a general qualitative tool, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method can be very useful in imaging recombination in silicon sheet used for solar cells. Work using EBIC on EFG silicon ribbon is described. In particular, some efforts at making the technique more quantitative and hence more useful, some limitations of the method, and finally specific application to hydrogen passivation is treated. Some brief remarks are made regarding the technique itself.

  15. Development of the large-area silicon PIN diode with 2 millimeter-thick depletion layer for hard x-ray detector (HXD) on board ASTRO-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Kubo, S.; Murakami, Toshio; Ota, Naomi; Ozawa, Hideki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kubota, Aya; Makishima, Kazuo; Tamura, Takayuki; Tashiro, Makoto

    1997-07-01

    ASTRO-E is the next Japanese x-ray satellite to be launched in the year 2000. It carries three high-energy astrophysical experiments, including the hard x-ray detector (HXD) which is unique in covering the wide energy band from 10 keV to 700 keV with an extremely low background. The HXD is a compound-eye detector, employing 16 GSO/BGO well-type phoswich scintillation counters together with 64 silicon PIN detectors. The scintillation counters cover an energy range of 40 - 700 keV, while the PIN diodes fill the intermediate energy range from 10 keV to 70 keV with an energy resolution about 3 keV. In this paper, we report on the developments of the large area, thick silicon PIN diodes. In order to achieve a high quantum efficiency up to 70 keV with a high energy resolution, we utilize a double stack of silicon PIN diodes, each 20 by 20 mm(superscript 2) in size and 2 mm thick. Signals from the two diodes are summed into a single output. Four of these stacks (or eight diodes) are placed inside the deep BGO active-shield well of a phoswich counter, to achieve an extremely low background environment. Thus, the HXD utilizes 64 stacked silicon PIN detectors, achieving a total geometrical collecting area of 256 cm(superscript 2). We have developed the 2 mm thick silicon PIN diodes which have low leakage current, a low capacitance, and a high breakdown voltage to meet the requirements of our goal. Through various trials in fabricating PIN diodes with different structures, we have found optimal design parameters, such as mask design of the surface p(superscript +) layer and the implantation process.

  16. Large area LED package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goullon, L.; Jordan, R.; Braun, T.; Bauer, J.; Becker, F.; Hutter, M.; Schneider-Ramelow, M.; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    Solid state lighting using LED-dies is a rapidly growing market. LED-dies with the needed increasing luminous flux per chip area produce a lot of heat. Therefore an appropriate thermal management is required for general lighting with LEDdies. One way to avoid overheating and shorter lifetime is the use of many small LED-dies on a large area heat sink (down to 70 μm edge length), so that heat can spread into a large area while at the same time light also appears on a larger area. The handling with such small LED-dies is very difficult because they are too small to be picked with common equipment. Therefore a new concept called collective transfer bonding using a temporary carrier chip was developed. A further benefit of this new technology is the high precision assembly as well as the plane parallel assembly of the LED-dies which is necessary for wire bonding. It has been shown that hundred functional LED-dies were transferred and soldered at the same time. After the assembly a cost effective established PCB-technology was applied to produce a large-area light source consisting of many small LED-dies and electrically connected on a PCB-substrate. The top contacts of the LED-dies were realized by laminating an adhesive copper sheet followed by LDI structuring as known from PCB-via-technology. This assembly can be completed by adding converting and light forming optical elements. In summary two technologies based on standard SMD and PCB technology have been developed for panel level LED packaging up to 610x 457 mm2 area size.

  17. Large area fabrication of vertical silicon nanowire arrays by silver-assisted single-step chemical etching and their formation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sanjay K.; Kumar, Dinesh; Schmitt, S. W.; Sood, K. N.; Christiansen, S. H.; Singh, P. K.

    2014-05-01

    Vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays have been fabricated over a large area using a silver-assisted single-step electroless wet chemical etching (EWCE) method, which involves the etching of silicon wafers in aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF) and silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution. A comprehensive systematic investigation on the influence of different parameters, such as the etching time (up to 15 h), solution temperature (10-80 °C), AgNO3 (5-200 mM) and HF (2-22 M) concentrations, and properties of the multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, is presented to establish a relationship of these parameters with the SiNW morphology. A linear dependence of the NW length on the etch time is obtained even at higher temperature (10-50 °C). The activation energy for the formation of SiNWs on Si(100) has been found to be equal to ˜0.51 eV . It has been shown for the first time that the surface area of the Si wafer exposed to the etching solution is an important parameter in determining the etching kinetics in the single-step process. Our results establish that single-step EWCE offers a wide range of parameters by means of which high quality vertical SiNWs can be produced in a very simple and controlled manner. A mechanism for explaining the influence of various parameters on the evolution of the NW structure is discussed. Furthermore, the SiNW arrays have extremely low reflectance (as low as <3% for Si(100) NWs and <12% for mc-Si NWs) compared to ˜35% for the polished surface in the 350-1000 nm wavelength range. The remarkably low reflection surface of SiNW arrays has great potential for use as an effective light absorber material in novel photovoltaic architectures, and other optoelectronic and photonic devices.

  18. Reconstruction of conjunctival fornices using silicone rubber sheets.

    PubMed

    Ralph, R A

    1975-01-01

    A simple procedure is described for reconstructing conjunctival fornices obliterated by severe symblepharon and ankyloblepharon, re-establishing lid movement. After dividing attachments of the lids to the globe and to themselves, a thin sheet of silicone rubber is sutured into the fornices and over the lids. A soft contact lens or scleral shell is worn postoperatively. Epithelialization occurs over denuded surfaces of the reconstituted fornix. The sheets remain in place as long as they are tolerated. Regrowth of symblepharon may not be preventable by this method, but their reappearance can often be postponed for weeks or months.

  19. Clinical comparative study with a large-area amorphous silicon flat-panel detector: image quality and visibility of anatomic structures on chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Hallscheidt, Peter J; Noeldge, Gerd; Kampschulte, Annette; Radeleff, Boris; Hosch, Waldemar P; Kauffmann, Günter W; Hansmann, Jochen

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare clinical chest radiographs of a large-area, flat-panel digital radiography system and a conventional film-screen radiography system. The comparison was based on an observer preference study of image quality and visibility of anatomic structures. Routine follow-up chest radiographs were obtained from 100 consecutive oncology patients using a large-area, amorphous silicon flat-panel detector digital radiography system (dose equivalent to a 400-speed film system). Hard-copy images were compared with previous examinations of the same individuals taken on a conventional film-screen system (200-speed). Patients were excluded if changes in the chest anatomy were detected or if the time interval between the examinations exceeded 1 year. Observer preference was evaluated for the image quality and the visibility of 15 anatomic structures using a five-point scale. Dose measurements with a chest phantom showed a dose reduction of approximately 50% with the digital radiography system compared with the film-screen radiography system. The image quality and the visibility of all but one anatomic structure of the images obtained with the digital flat-panel detector system were rated significantly superior (p < or = 0.0003) to those obtained with the conventional film-screen radiography system. The image quality and visibility of anatomic structures on the images obtained by the flat-panel detector system were perceived as equal or superior to the images from conventional film-screen chest radiography. This was true even though the radiation dose was reduced approximately 50% with the digital flat-panel detector system.

  20. The Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Michelson, Peter F.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL

    2007-11-13

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy pair-conversion telescope, covering the energy range from {approx}20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT is being built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. The scientific objectives the LAT will address include resolving the high-energy gamma-ray sky and determining the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources and the origin of the apparently isotropic diffuse emission observed by EGRET; understanding the mechanisms of particle acceleration in celestial sources, including active galactic nuclei, pulsars, and supernovae remnants; studying the high-energy behavior of gamma-ray bursts and transients; using high-energy gamma-rays to probe the early universe to z {ge} 6; and probing the nature of dark matter. The components of the LAT include a precision silicon-strip detector tracker and a CsI(Tl) calorimeter, a segmented anticoincidence shield that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large field-of-view and ensuring that nearly all pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. This paper includes a description of each of these LAT subsystems as well as a summary of the overall performance of the telescope.

  1. Coherent Bremsstrahlung effect observed during STEM analysis of dopant distribution in silicon devices using large area silicon drift EDX detectors and high brightness electron source.

    PubMed

    Pantel, R

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, during dopant analysis of silicon devices, we have observed a phenomenon generally neglected in EDX analysis: the coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB). We discussed the reason why and came to the conclusion that the analytical TEM used for these experiments presents a configuration and performances, which makes this equipment very sensitive to the CB effect. This is due to large collection solid angle and high counting rate of the four silicon drift EDX detectors (SDD), a high brightness electron source providing large probe current and moreover a geometry favorable to on axis crystal observations. We analyzed silicon devices containing Si [110] and Si [100] crystal areas at different energies (80-120-200keV). We also observed relaxed SiGe (27 and 40at% of Ge). The CB effect, whose intensity is maximum near zone axis beam alignment, manifests as characteristic broad peaks present in the X-ray spectrum background. The peak energies are predicted by a simple formula deduced for the CB models found in the literature and that we present simply. We evaluate also the CB peak intensities and discuss the importance of this effect on the detection and quantification traces of impurities. The CB peaks also give information on the analyzed crystal structure (measurement of the periodicity along the zone axis) and allow, in every particular experiment or system, to determine the median take off angle of the EDX detectors.

  2. Method of casting silicon into thin sheets

    DOEpatents

    Sanjurjo, Angel; Rowcliffe, David J.; Bartlett, Robert W.

    1982-10-26

    Silicon (Si) is cast into thin shapes within a flat-bottomed graphite crucible by providing a melt of molten Si along with a relatively small amount of a molten salt, preferably NaF. The Si in the resulting melt forms a spherical pool which sinks into and is wetted by the molten salt. Under these conditions the Si will not react with any graphite to form SiC. The melt in the crucible is pressed to the desired thinness with a graphite tool at which point the tool is held until the mass in the crucible has been cooled to temperatures below the Si melting point, at which point the Si shape can be removed.

  3. Some characteristics of low-cost silicon sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koliwad, K. M.; Daud, T.; Liu, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses structural defects in low-cost silicon sheets and their effect on the electronic properties related to solar cell performance. Experimental data are presented on the influence of grain boundaries on minority carrier diffusion length, impurity defect interaction, and variable surface recombination velocity. An analytical model of the effect of grain boundaries on solar cell performance is constructed based on these results.

  4. Some characteristics of low-cost silicon sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koliwad, K. M.; Daud, T.; Liu, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses structural defects in low-cost silicon sheets and their effect on the electronic properties related to solar cell performance. Experimental data are presented on the influence of grain boundaries on minority carrier diffusion length, impurity defect interaction, and variable surface recombination velocity. An analytical model of the effect of grain boundaries on solar cell performance is constructed based on these results.

  5. Evaluation and optimization of silicon sheet solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, H.; Iles, P.; Tanner, D.; Pollock, G.; Uno, F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the results and procedures to evaluate and improve the efficiency of solar cells made from various unconventional silicon sheets. The performance parameters included photovoltaic characteristics, spectral response, dark I-V characteristics, and diffusion length. The evaluation techniques used provided accurate and reliable information on sheet performance, and self-consistent results were obtained from the various measurement techniques used. Minority carrier diffusion length (L) was shown to be the ultimate limiting factor for the sheet cell performance (efficiency) and other back-up measurements confirmed this L-dependence. Limited efforts were made to identify defects which influence cell performance, and to use some improved process methods to increase cell efficiency.

  6. Vacuum Die Casting of Silicon Sheet for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of a vacuum die-casting process for producing silicon sheet suitable for photovoltaic cells with a terrestrial efficiency greater than 12 percent and having the potential to be scaled for large quantity production is considered. The initial approach includes: (1) obtaining mechanical design parameters by using boron nitride, which has been shown to non-wetting to silicon; (2) optimizing silicon nitride material composition and coatings by sessile drop experiments; (3) testing effectiveness of fluoride salt interfacial media with a graphite mold; and (4) testing the effect of surface finish using both boron nitride and graphite. When the material and mechanical boundary conditions are established, a finalized version of the prototype assembly will be constructed and the casting variables determined.

  7. Large Area Silicon Sheet by EFG. [quality control and productivity of edge-defined film-fed growth of ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Influences on ribbon quality which might be caused by various materials of construction which are used in the growth furnace were assessed. At the present level of ribbon quality, which has produced 8.5% to 9.5% efficient solar cells, no particular influence of any furnace part was detected. The experiments led to the suspicion that the general environment and the somewhat unoptimized materials handling procedures might be responsible for the current variations in ribbon quality and that, therefore, continuous work with this furnace under rather more stringent environmental conditions and operating procedures could perhaps improve materials quality to some extent. The work on the multiple furnace was continued with two multiple growth runs being performed. In these runs, the melt replenishment system performed poorly and extensive modifications to it were designed to make reliable melt feeding for five ribbon growth possible. Additional characterization techniques for wide ribbons, stress measurements, and growth dynamics experiments are reported.

  8. Low-temperature silicon thin films for large-area electronics: Device fabrication using soft lithography and laser-crystallization by sequential lateral solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyun-Chul

    This work demonstrates possible routes for fabricating large-area electronic devices on glass or plastic substrates using low-temperature materials deposition and soft lithographic device patterning. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) have been extensively studied as the semiconducting material for flat panel displays and solar cells. On glass substrates, we have deposited a-Si:H films at a temperature lower than 125°C, and we have used pulsed excimer laser crystallization in the sequential lateral solidification (SLS) regime to fabricate poly-Si films. We use micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC), a form of soft lithography involving micrometer-scale polymer molding, as a means to fabricate amorphous silicon thin-film transistors (TFTs), and photoconductive sensor arrays on both planar and curved substrates. The use of non-planar substrates has captured considerable attention in the field because it would open up new applications and new designs. Field-effect transistors made by SLS poly-Si show excellent mobility and on/off current ratio; however, the microstructure of the material had never been well documented. We determined the microtexture using electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD): the first crystallites formed in the a-Si layer are random; along the direction of the solidification, a strong <100> in-plane orientation quickly develops due to competitive growth and occlusion. The misorientation angle between neighboring grains is also analyzed. A large fraction of the boundaries within the material are low-angle and coincidence site lattice (CSL) types. We discuss the implications of the findings on the defect generation mechanism and on the electrical properties of the films. We have analyzed the electrical properties of SLS poly-Si films on oxidized Si wafer using the pseudo-MOSFET geometry; the majority carrier mobility is extracted from the transconductance. However, the data are non-ideal due to large

  9. Area Reports. Advanced materials and devices research area. Silicon materials research task, and advanced silicon sheet task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Silicon Materials Task and the Advanced Silicon Sheet Task are to identify the critical technical barriers to low-cost silicon purification and sheet growth that must be overcome to produce a PV cell substrate material at a price consistent with Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project objectives and to overcome these barriers by performing and supporting appropriate R&D. Progress reports are given on silicon refinement using silane, a chemical vapor transport process for purifying metallurgical grade silicon, silicon particle growth research, and modeling of silane pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors.

  10. Mechanical properties of various two-dimensional silicon carbide sheets: An atomistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Danh-Truong; Le, Minh-Quy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate through molecular dynamics finite element method with Tersoff potential the mechanical properties of 13 SimCn sheets under uniaxial tension in the armchair and zigzag directions. It is found that the presence and dispersion of silicon atoms in SimCn sheets affect strongly the mechanical properties and the anisotropy of these sheets. The Young's modulus and fracture stress of the SimCn sheet decrease in general when the silicon concentration increases from 0 to 0.2. In contrast, the mechanical properties (Young's modulus, fracture stress, and fracture strain) increase slightly when the silicon concentration increases from 0.3 to 0.5 due to an increase of the degree of dispersion of silicon atoms in the SimCn sheet. The mechanical properties of the sheet are relatively high when the silicon concentration is low or silicon atoms are well dispersed.

  11. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 3: Silicon sheet: Wafers and ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briglio, A.; Dumas, K.; Leipold, M.; Morrison, A.

    1986-01-01

    The primary objective of the Silicon Sheet Task of the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project was the development of one or more low cost technologies for producing silicon sheet suitable for processing into cost-competitive solar cells. Silicon sheet refers to high purity crystalline silicon of size and thickness for fabrication into solar cells. Areas covered in the project were ingot growth and casting, wafering, ribbon growth, and other sheet technologies. The task made and fostered significant improvements in silicon sheet including processing of both ingot and ribbon technologies. An additional important outcome was the vastly improved understanding of the characteristics associated with high quality sheet, and the control of the parameters required for higher efficiency solar cells. Although significant sheet cost reductions were made, the technology advancements required to meet the task cost goals were not achieved.

  12. VEGA: A low-power front-end ASIC for large area multi-linear X-ray silicon drift detectors: Design and experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Macera, Daniele; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Malcovati, Piero; Grassi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and the first experimental characterization of VEGA, an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) designed to read out large area monolithic linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD's). VEGA consists of an analog and a digital/mixed-signal section to accomplish all the functionalities and specifications required for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy in the energy range between 500 eV and 50 keV. The analog section includes a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper with 3-bit digitally selectable shaping times from 1.6 μs to 6.6 μs and a peak stretcher/sample-and-hold stage. The digital/mixed-signal section includes an amplitude discriminator with coarse and fine threshold level setting, a peak discriminator and a logic circuit to fulfill pile-up rejection, signal sampling, trigger generation, channel reset and the preamplifier and discriminators disabling functionalities. A Serial Peripherical Interface (SPI) is integrated in VEGA for loading and storing all configuration parameters in an internal register within few microseconds. The VEGA ASIC has been designed and manufactured in 0.35 μm CMOS mixed-signal technology in single and 32 channel versions with dimensions of 200 μm×500 μm per channel. A minimum intrinsic Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) of 12 electrons r.m.s. at 3.6 μs peaking time and room temperature is measured and the linearity error is between -0.9% and +0.6% in the whole input energy range. The total power consumption is 481 μW and 420 μW per channel for the single and 32 channels version, respectively. A comparison with other ASICs for X-ray SDD's shows that VEGA has a suitable low noise and offers high functionality as ADC-ready signal processing but at a power consumption that is a factor of four lower than other similar existing ASICs.

  13. Apparatus and method for the horizontal, crucible-free growth of silicon sheet crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1987-03-17

    This patent describes an apparatus for crucible-free growth of a sheet crystal of silicon, the apparatus comprising; means for providing a substantially enclosed space having an inert atmosphere; heating means for sequentially forming molten silicon from a source of substantially pure silicon within the space; means for vertically feeding a silicon source toward the heating means to form a molten layer of silicon at a top of the source; means for drawing a continuous silicon sheet crystal from the molten silicon layer within the space; wherein a meniscus of molten silicon is created by the drawing means. The apparatus includes means to control the shape of the meniscus, and the controlling means includes a repulsive RF generator for repulsive support of the meniscus as a molten silicon sheet crystal is drawn from the molten silicon. A crucible-free, non-dendritic growth method is described for continuously forming a silicon crystal sheet from a rod of substantially pure silicon, the method comprising: employing an RF heating means having first and second portions to provide a molten layer at an end of the silicon rod in an inert atmosphere by actively heating a first region at the end of the silicon rod while preventing an active heating of a second region of the end of the silicon rod.

  14. Anti-reflection coatings on large area glass sheets. Final report, Motorola report No. 2366/4, DRD No. SE-5

    SciTech Connect

    Pastirik, E.

    1980-09-01

    Antireflective coatings which may be suitable for use on the covers of photovoltaic solar modules can be easily produced by a dipping process. The coatings are applied to glass by drawing sheets of glass vertically out of dilute aqueous sodium silicate solutions at a constant speed, allowing the adherent liquid film to dry, then exposing the dried film to concentrated sulfuric acid, followed by a water rinse and dry. The process produces coatings of good optical performance (96.7% peak transmission at 0.540 ..mu..M wavelength) combined with excellent stain and soil resistance, and good resistance to abrasion. The process is reproduceable and easily controlled.

  15. Polycrystalline Silicon Sheets for Solar Cells by the Improved Spinning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Hide, I.

    1984-01-01

    Cost reduction of silicon materials in the photovoltaic program of materials was examined. The current process of producing silicon sheets is based entirely on the conventional Czochralski ingot growth and wafering used in the semiconductor industry. The current technology cannot meet the cost reduction demands for producing low cost silicon sheets. Alternative sheet production processes such as unconventional crystallization are needed. The production of polycrystalline silicon sheets by unconventional ingot technology is the casting technique. Though large grain sheets were obtained by this technique, silicon ribbon growth overcomes deficiencies of the casting process by obtaining the sheet directly from the melt. The need to solve difficulties of growth stability and impurity effects are examined. The direct formation process of polycrystalline silicon sheets with large grain size, smooth surface, and sharp edges from the melt with a high growth rate which will yield low cost silicon sheets for solar cells and the photovoltaic characteristics associated with this type of sheet to include an EBIC study of the grain boundaries are described.

  16. Polycrystalline Silicon Sheets for Solar Cells by the Improved Spinning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Hide, I.

    1984-01-01

    Cost reduction of silicon materials in the photovoltaic program of materials was examined. The current process of producing silicon sheets is based entirely on the conventional Czochralski ingot growth and wafering used in the semiconductor industry. The current technology cannot meet the cost reduction demands for producing low cost silicon sheets. Alternative sheet production processes such as unconventional crystallization are needed. The production of polycrystalline silicon sheets by unconventional ingot technology is the casting technique. Though large grain sheets were obtained by this technique, silicon ribbon growth overcomes deficiencies of the casting process by obtaining the sheet directly from the melt. The need to solve difficulties of growth stability and impurity effects are examined. The direct formation process of polycrystalline silicon sheets with large grain size, smooth surface, and sharp edges from the melt with a high growth rate which will yield low cost silicon sheets for solar cells and the photovoltaic characteristics associated with this type of sheet to include an EBIC study of the grain boundaries are described.

  17. Antifibrotic effect of dexamethasone/alginate-coated silicone sheet in the abraded middle ear mucosa.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chul Ho; Ahn, Seung Hyun; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Silicone sheet is a material which is commonly used in middle ear surgery to prevent the formation of adhesions between the tympanic membrane and the medial bony wall of the middle ear cavity. However, silicone sheet can induce a tight and hard fibrous capsule in the region of the stapes, and this is particularly common in cases of eustachian tube dysfunction. As a result of the fibrous encapsulation around the silicone sheet, postoperative aeration of the stapes can be interrupted causing poor hearing gain. In this study, we performed an in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the antifibrotic effects of a dexamethasone and alginate (Dx/alginate) coating on silicone sheet. The Dx/alginate-coated silicone sheets were fabricated using a plasma-treatment and coating method. The Dx/alginate-coated silicone sheets effectively limited in vitro fibroblast attachment and proliferation due to the controlled release of Dx, which can be modified by manipulation of the alginate coating. For the in-vivo evaluation, guinea pigs (albino, male, weighing 250g) were divided into two groups, with the control group (n=5) implanted with silicone sheet and the test group (n=5) receiving Dx/alginate-coated silicone sheet. Animals were sacrificed 3 weeks after implantation, and histological analysis was performed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical staining techniques. Dx/alginate-coated silicone sheets showed marked inhibition of fibrosis in both the in vitro and in vivo studies. Silicone sheet that incorporates a Dx/alginate coating can release Dx and inhibit fibrosis in the middle ear. This material could be utilized in middle ear surgery as a means of preserving proper aeration and hearing gain following ossiculoplasty.

  18. Thin 3%(100) textured silicon steel sheet with low loss

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Masaki; Kadotani, Tomoharu; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi; Yamashiro, Yasumasa; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Arai, Ken Ichi

    1999-09-01

    Magnetic properties of thin 3%(100) textured silicon steel sheets with low loss were investigated. Annealing at 1200 C in sulfur atmosphere enabled the authors to obtain the thin sheets containing only (100) grains and consequently the coercive force reached 10 A/m. They further advanced the production method of thin (100) textured silicon sheets by using sulfur in solution instead of a sulfur atmosphere.

  19. Chest wall abscesses due to continuous application of silicone gel sheets for keloid management

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hon-Lok; Lau, Keith K; Sam, Ramin; Ing, Todd S

    2015-01-01

    A patient with three episodes of chest wall abscesses as a result of 6 years of round-the-clock, uninterrupted (except during bathing) application of silicone gel sheets to a chest wall keloid is described. Two of the episodes occurred during hot weather. It is suggested that, in the space beneath the silicone sheet, the higher humidity and temperature, both generated as a result of prolonged sheeting, especially during hot weather, might have caused the keloid and its neighbouring skin to become soggy. This sogginess might have facilitated bacterial invasion. It is suggested that some sheeting-free time during a 24 h period might be indicated so that a keloid and its adjacent skin have the time to recover from their sheeting-induced sogginess. A sheeting-free period might especially be needed in the face of sweat accumulation beneath the silicone sheet. PMID:25920733

  20. Effects of transverse temperature field nonuniformity on stress in silicon sheet growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mataga, P. A.; Hutchinson, J. W.; Chalmers, B.; Bell, R. O.; Kalejs, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    Stress and strain rate distributions are calculated using finite element analysis for steady-state growth of thin silicon sheet temperature nonuniformities imposed in the transverse (sheet width) dimension. Significant reductions in residual stress are predicted to occur for the case where the sheet edge is cooled relative to its center provided plastic deformation with high creep rates is present.

  1. Effects of transverse temperature field nonuniformity on stress in silicon sheet growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mataga, P. A.; Hutchinson, J. W.; Chalmers, B.; Bell, R. O.; Kalejs, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    Stress and strain rate distributions are calculated using finite element analysis for steady-state growth of thin silicon sheet temperature nonuniformities imposed in the transverse (sheet width) dimension. Significant reductions in residual stress are predicted to occur for the case where the sheet edge is cooled relative to its center provided plastic deformation with high creep rates is present.

  2. Aligned carbon nanotube-silicon sheets: a novel nano-architecture for flexible lithium ion battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Yildiz, Ozkan; Bhanushali, Hardik; Wang, Yongxin; Stano, Kelly; Xue, Leigang; Zhang, Xiangwu; Bradford, Philip D

    2013-09-25

    Aligned carbon nanotube sheets provide an engineered scaffold for the deposition of a silicon active material for lithium ion battery anodes. The sheets are low-density, allowing uniform deposition of silicon thin films while the alignment allows unconstrained volumetric expansion of the silicon, facilitating stable cycling performance. The flat sheet morphology is desirable for battery construction.

  3. Magnetic properties of 6.5% silicon steel sheets under PWM voltage excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Namikawa, M.; Ninomiya, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Takada, Y.

    1998-07-01

    Power losses of 6.5% silicon steel sheets under PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) voltage excitation were examined. The PWM wave was composed of a 50Hz fundamental wave, a 16kHz carrier frequency wave and some other higher harmonics. It was found that the power losses of the inductor cores were much larger than those of the transformer cores when the cores were driven by a PWM inverter, although such a great difference was not observed under sinusoidal voltage excitation. Power losses of the inductor made of 6.5% silicon steel sheets and conventional grain oriented 3% silicon steel sheets under PWM voltage excitation were also investigated. It was found that the power losses of the inductor made of 6.5% silicon steel sheets were reduced by more than 30% compared to those of the inductor made of grain oriented 3% silicon steel sheets. This was because the grain oriented 3% silicon steel sheets had higher losses at higher harmonics found in the PWM excitation. Therefore, it was clearly shown that 6.5% silicon steel sheet was a suitable material for the inductor under PWM voltage excitation.

  4. Development of large-area monolithically integrated Silicon-Film photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 November 1991--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.; Ingram, A.E.; Ruffins, T.R.; Shreve, K.P.; Hall, R.B.; Barnett, A.M.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes work to develop Silicon-Film{trademark} Product III into a low-cost, stable solar cell for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product III structure is a thin (< 100-{mu}m) polycrystalline layer of silicon on a durable, insulating, ceramic substrate. The insulating substrate allows the silicon layer to be isolated and metallized to form a monolithically interconnected array of solar cells. High efficiency is achievable with the use of light trapping and a passivated back surface. The long-term goal for the product is a 1200-cm{sup 2}, 18%-efficient, monolithic array. The short-term objectives are to improve material quality and to fabricate 100 cm{sup 2} monolithically interconnected solar cell arrays. Low minority-carrier diffusion length in the silicon film and series resistance in the interconnected device structure are presently limiting device performance. Material quality is continually improving through reduced impurity contamination. Metallization schemes, such as a solder-dipped interconnection process, have been developed that will allow low-cost production processing and minimize R{sub s} effects. Test data for a nine-cell device (16 cm{sup 2}) indicated a V{sub oc} of 3.72 V. These first-reported monolithically interconnected multicrystalline silicon-on-ceramic devices show low shunt conductance (< 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}) due to limited conduction through the ceramic and no process-related metallization shunts.

  5. Topical Silicone Sheet Application in the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars and Keloids.

    PubMed

    Westra, Iris; Pham, Hth; Niessen, Frank B

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Since the early 1980s, topical silicone sheets have been used in the treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids.This study aimed to determine the optimal duration and application of these sheets. Design: multi-centered therapeutic study. Setting and participants: A total of 224 patients were included in this study; 205 patients with hypertrophic scars and 19 patients with keloids. Patients received treatment with a topical silicone sheet. Treated scars varied in age, ranging from two weeks to 62 years and treatment time ranged from one month to 16 months. Assessment of the scars was performed by the use of standardized study forms and digital photography. Measurements: Skin therapists objectively assessed the scars on its color, thickness, and elasticity. Patients themselves subjectively assessed their perception of their scar and their experience with the usage of the topical silicone sheet. Results: After applying the topical silicone sheet, all scars, regardless of type of scar and maturity, improved significantly in color, thickness, and elasticity. Conclusion: In this study, treatment with the topical silicone sheet showed significant improvement on both hypertrophic scars and keloids. Best results were reached when the silicone sheet was applied at least four hours per day.

  6. Development of large-area monolithically integrated Silicon-Film{trademark} photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 1 January 1993--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.; Ingram, A.E.; Ruffins, T.R.; Thomas, C.J.; Hall, R.B.; Barnett, A.M.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work performed under a program to develop Silicon-Film{trademark} Product III into a low-cost, stable solar cell for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product III structure is a thin polycrystalline layer of silicon on a durable, insulating, ceramic) substrate. The insulating substrate allows the silicon layer to be isolated and metallized to form a monolithically interconnected array of solar cells. High efficiency is achievable with the use of light trapping and a passivated back surface. The long-term goal for the product is a 1200-cm{sup {minus}2}, 18%-efficient solar module. This report discusses material quality improvements due to the use of new metallurgical barrier technologies. The barrier is essential in preventing impurity interaction between the silicon film and the low-cost substate. Also, a new filament-based fabric substate material was investigated. Efficiencies greater than 10% were achieved on 1.0-cm{sup 2} devices made on these substrates. We also demonstrated the monolithic fabrication sequence by the fabrication of a prototype array using the device processing sequences developed during Phase 11 of this program.

  7. Quantitative analysis of defects in silicon. Silicon sheet growth development for the large are silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Smith, J. M.; Bruce, T.; Oidwai, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and seventy four silicon sheet samples were analyzed for twin boundary density, dislocation pit density, and grain boundary length. Procedures were developed for the quantitative analysis of the twin boundary and dislocation pit densities using a QTM-720 Quantitative Image Analyzing system. The QTM-720 system was upgraded with the addition of a PDP 11/03 mini-computer with dual floppy disc drive, a digital equipment writer high speed printer, and a field-image feature interface module. Three versions of a computer program that controls the data acquisition and analysis on the QTM-720 were written. Procedures for the chemical polishing and etching were also developed.

  8. Development of methods of producing large areas of silicon sheet by the slicing of silicon ingots using Inside Diameter (I.D.) saws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonyan, P.

    1980-01-01

    Modifications to a 16 inch STC automated saw included: a programmable feed system; a crystal rotating system; and a STC dynatrack blade boring and control system. By controlling the plating operation and by grinding the cutting edge, 16 inch I.D. blades were produced with a cutting edge thickness of .22 mm. Crystal rotation mechanism was used to slice 100 mm diameter crystals with a 16 inch blade down to a thickness of .20 mm. Cutting rates with crystal rotation were generally slower than with standard plunge I.D. slicing techniques. Using programmed feeds and programmed rotation, maximum cutting rates were from 0.3 to 1.0 inches per minute.

  9. (110) grain growth and magnetic properties of thin grain-oriented 3% silicon steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Masaki; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Arai, Ken Ichi

    1999-09-01

    (110) grain growth and magnetic properties in thin grain-oriented silicon sheets with ultimately low loss were investigated. A final-annealing at 1150 C for 20 min enables us to obtain the thin sheets covered with only (110) grains and consequently the magnetic induction at 800 A/m, B{sub 8} reached 1.9 T.

  10. Large area mass analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachev, Mikhail; Srama, Ralf; Srowig, Andre; Grün, Eberhard

    2004-12-01

    A new time-of-flight spectrometer for the chemical analysis of cosmic dust particles in space has been simulated by Simion 7.0. The instrument is based upon impact ionization. This method is a reliable method for in situ dust detection and is well established. Instruments using the impact ionization flew on board of Helios and Galileo and are still in operation on board of the Ulysses and Cassini-Huygens missions. The new instrument has a large sensitive area of 0.1 m2 in order to achieve a significant number of measurements. The mass resolution M/ΔM>100 and the mass range covers the most relevant elements expected in cosmic dust. The instrument has a reflectron configuration which increases the mass resolution. Most of the ions released during the impact are focused to the detector. The ion detector consists of a large area ion-to-electron converter, an electron reflectron and a microchannel plate detector.

  11. Development of large-area monolithically integrated silicon-film{trademark} photovoltaic modules. Final subcontract report, May 1, 1991--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this program is to develop Silicon Film{trademark} Product III into a low-cost, stable solar cell for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product III structure is a thin (<100 {mu}m) polycrystalline layer of silicon on a durable, insulating, ceramic substrate. The insulating substrate allows the silicon layer to be isolated and metallized to form a monolithically interconnected array of solar cells. High efficiency is achieved by the use of light trapping and passivated surfaces. This project focused on the development of five key technologies associated with the monolithic sub-module device structure: (1) development of the film deposition and growth processes; (2) development of the low-cost ceramic substrate; (3) development of a metallurgical barrier technology; (4) development of sub-element solar cell processing techniques; and (5) development of sub-module (isolation and interconnection) processes. This report covers the development approaches and results relating to these technologies. Significant progress has been made in the development of all of the related technologies. This is evidenced by the fabrication of a working 12.0 cm{sup 2} prototype sub-module consisting of 7 elements and testing with an open circuit voltage of 3.9 volts, a short circuit current of 35.2 mA and a fill factor of 63% and an overall efficiency of 7.3%. Another significant result achieved is a 13.4% (NREL verified), 1.0 cm{sup 2} solar cell fabricated from material deposited and grown on a graphite cloth substrate. The significant technological hurdle of the program was and remains the low quality of the photovoltaic layer which is caused by contamination of the photovoltaic layer from the low-cost ceramic substrate by trace impurities found in the substrate precursor materials. The ceramic substrate and metallurgical barrier are being developed specifically to solve this problem.

  12. Large area space solar cell assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Nowlan, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a large area space solar cell assembly is presented. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are (1) use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and (2) integration of coverglass application and call fabrication.

  13. Harmful Shunting Mechanisms Found in Silicon Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    Scientists developed near-field optical microscopy for imaging electrical breakdown in solar cells and identified critical electrical breakdown mechanisms operating in industrial silicon and epitaxial silicon solar cells.

  14. Apparatus and method for the horizontal, crucible-free growth of silicon sheet crystals

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for continuously forming a silicon crystal sheet from a silicon rod in a noncrucible environment. The rod is rotated and fed toward an RF coil in an inert atmosphere so that the upper end of the rod becomes molten and the silicon sheet crystal is pulled therefrom substantially horizontally in a continuous strip. A shorting ring may be provided around the rod to limit the heating to the upper end only. Argon gas can be used to create the inert atmosphere within a suitable closed chamber. By use of this apparatus and method, a substantially defect-free silicon crystal sheet is formed that can be used for microcircuitry chips or solar cells.

  15. Apparatus and method for the horizontal, crucible-free growth of silicon sheet crystals

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1984-09-12

    Apparatus is provided for continuously forming a silicon crystal sheet from a silicon rod in a non-crucible environment. The rod is rotated and fed toward an RF coil in an inert atmosphere so that the upper end of the rod becomes molten and the silicon sheet crystal is pulled therefrom substantially horizontally in a continuous strip. A shorting ring may be provided around the rod to limit the heating to the upper end only. Argon gas can be used to create the inert atmosphere within a suitable closed chamber. By use of this apparatus and method, a substantially defect-free silicon crystal sheet is formed which can be used for micro-circuitry chips or solar cells.

  16. Solid/melt interface studies of high-speed silicon sheet growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.

    1984-01-01

    Radial growth-rate anisotropies and limiting growth forms of point nucleated, dislocation-free silicon sheets spreading horizontally on the free surface of a silicon melt have been measured for (100), (110), (111), and (112) sheet planes. Sixteen-millimeter movie photography was used to record the growth process. Analysis of the sheet edges has lead to predicted geometries for the tip shape of unidirectional, dislocation-free, horizontally growing sheets propagating in various directions within the above-mentioned planes. Similar techniques were used to study polycrystalline sheets and dendrite propagation. For dendrites, growth rates on the order of 2.5 m/min and growth rate anisotropies on the order of 25 were measured.

  17. a Full Constitutive Relation of Silicon-Steel Sheet with Anisotropy Considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byon, S. M.; Yoo, U. K.; Lee, Y.

    We present a full constitutive relation of silicon steel which can describe the anisotropy effect as well. Using a pilot rolling machine, initial silicon strip with thickness of 2.5mm is rolled into sheet with several thicknesses as reduction ratio increases from 10% to 90%. To examine the effect of anisotropy on the stress-strain behavior, the specimen was cut out from the sheet so that the direction of specimen and sheet is 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90°, respectively. A series of tensile test are then performed with the specimens. The stress-strain curves computed from the proposed constitutive relation are compared with the experimental data. Results show that the predicted curves are in overall in a good agreement with measured ones. The work hardening and unstable softening behaviors of silicon steel during rolling are predicted by the proposed full constitutive relation.

  18. Dose reduction in skeletal and chest radiography using a large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide: technical background, basic image quality parameters, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Völk, Markus; Hamer, Okka W; Feuerbach, Stefan; Strotzer, Michael

    2004-05-01

    The two most frequently performed diagnostic X-ray examinations are those of the extremities and of the chest. Thus, dose reduction in the field of conventional skeletal and chest radiography is an important issue and there is a need to reduce man-made ionizing radiation. The large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide provides a significant reduction of radiation dose in skeletal and chest radiography compared with traditional imaging systems. This article describes the technical background and basic image quality parameters of this 43 x 43-cm digital system, and summarizes the available literature (years 2000-2003) concerning dose reduction in experimental and clinical studies. Due to its high detective quantum efficiency and dynamic range compared with traditional screen-film systems, a dose reduction of up to 50% is possible without loss of image quality.

  19. Analysis of defect structure in silicon. Characterization of SEMIX material. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Stringfellow, G. B.; Virkar, A. V.; Dunn, J.; Guyer, T.

    1983-01-01

    Statistically significant quantitative structural imperfection measurements were made on samples from ubiquitous crystalline process (UCP) Ingot 5848 - 13C. Important correlation was obtained between defect densities, cell efficiency, and diffusion length. Grain boundary substructure displayed a strong influence on the conversion efficiency of solar cells from Semix material. Quantitative microscopy measurements gave statistically significant information compared to other microanalytical techniques. A surface preparation technique to obtain proper contrast of structural defects suitable for quantimet quantitative image analyzer (QTM) analysis was perfected and is used routinely. The relationships between hole mobility and grain boundary density was determined. Mobility was measured using the van der Pauw technique, and grain boundary density was measured using quantitative microscopy technique. Mobility was found to decrease with increasing grain boundary density.

  20. Silicon-on-ceramic Process: Silicon Sheet Growth and Device Development for the Large-area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. W.; Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Significant progress is reported in fabricating a 4 sq cm cell having a 10.1 percent conversion efficiency and a 10 sq cm cell having a 9.2 percent conversion efficiency. The continuous (SCIM) coater succeeded in producing a 16 sq cm coating exhibiting unidirectional solidification and large grain size. A layer was grown at 0.2 cm/sec in the experimental coater which was partially dendritic but also contained a large smooth area approximately 100 micron m thick. The dark characteristic measurements of a typical SCC solar cell yield shunt resistance values of 10K ohms and series resistance values and 0.4 ohm. The production dip-coater is operating at over 50 percent yield in terms of good cell quality material. The most recent run yielded 13 good substrates out of 15.

  1. Large area CNT-Si heterojunction for photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramo, C.; Ambrosio, M.; Bonavolontà, C.; Boscardin, M.; Crivellari, M.; de Lisio, C.; Grossi, V.; Maddalena, P.; Passacantando, M.; Valentino, M.

    2017-02-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) consist of multiple layers of graphite sheets arranged in concentric cylinders, from two to many tens. These systems are closely related to graphite layers but in some features, MWCNTs behave quite differently from graphite. In particular, their ability to generate a photocurrent in a wide wavelength range has been demonstrated either without or with the application of a draining voltage. In addition, the photocurrent signal has been found to reproduce the optical absorbance of MWCNTs, showing a maximum in the near UV region. In this paper main characteristics of a novel large area photodetector featuring low noise, high linearity and efficiency are reported. This detector has been obtained by coupling the optoelectronic characteristics of MWCNTs with the well-known properties of silicon. MWCNTs are growth on n-doped silicon layer by chemical vapour deposition creating a p-n heterojunction with high sensitivity to the radiation from UV to IR. An additional MIS junction is obtained with a metallic conductive layer deposited on the back of silicon substrate. Moreover, first results on the signals generated by pulsed laser are also reported.

  2. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  3. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  4. High sheet resistance, arsenic implanted polycrystalline silicon for integrated circuit resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, W. K.

    1984-11-01

    The electrical properties of high sheet resistance polycrystalline silicon were investigated to facilitate its use in fabricating integrated circuit resistors. The effects of ion implantation dose, energy and annealing procedures were studied. Sheet resistances ranging from 10(2) to 10(9) omega/square were produced. A double depletion layer, thermionic emission model for electrical transport across grain boundaries accounts for many of the electrical properties, including the correlation of high activation energies with high sheet resistances. A reverse annealing peak in the sheet resistance is found for annealing temperatures between 800 and 1100 C. This irreversible effect is stronger in more lightly doped samples. The final sheet resistance value is primarily determined by the implantation dose and the highest processing temperature used.

  5. Analysis of high-speed growth of silicon sheet in inclined-meniscus configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Brown, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The study of high speed growth of silicon sheet in inclined-meniscus configurations is discussed. It was concluded that the maximum growth rates in vertical and inclined growth are set by thermal-capillary limits. Also, the melt/crystal interface was determined to be flat. And, vertical growth is qualitatively modelled by one dimensional heat transfer.

  6. Processing experiments on non-Czochralski silicon sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, R. A.; Grenon, L. A.; Sakiotis, N. G.; Pastirik, E. M.; Sparks, T. O.; Legge, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    A program is described which supports and promotes the development of processing techniques which may be successfully and cost-effectively applied to low-cost sheets for solar cell fabrication. Results are reported in the areas of process technology, cell design, cell metallization, and production cost simulation.

  7. A new process to develop (100) texture in silicon steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, T.

    1996-06-01

    A process for developing (100) texture in silicon steel sheets by manganese removal and decarburization is described. The process consists of annealing in vacuum and subsequent decarburization of conventionally hot- and cold-rolled steel sheets that contain silicon, manganese, and carbon. During the vacuum annealing at {alpha}/{gamma} duplex or {gamma}-phase temperatures around 1,000 C, manganese removal occurs and a thin layer near the sheet surface transforms to {alpha}. The (100) texture markedly develops in the surface layer. Various types of (100) texture--for example, (100)[021], (100)[001], and (100)[011]--appear at this stage of annealing, depending on processing conditions. During the subsequent decarburization, the grains at the surface layer grow inward as columnar grains retaining the (100) texture. The decarburized steels with a grain size of a few hundred micrometers exhibit excellent soft-magnetic properties.

  8. Reduction of Postoperative Scar Formation With Silicone Sheeting: 2 Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kirsten A.; Silbernagel, BoniJo

    2011-01-01

    Elective surgeries account for millions of acquired scars annually. Many of these scars can be problematic, being aesthetically unpleasant and causing discomfort. Silicone gel sheeting has been shown to be efficacious for the prevention and treatment of problematic scars. By wound hydration, along with other factors, silicone dressings are thought to decrease scarring. However, we found the usual treatment was commonly started after epithelialization of the incision site. The current standard of care in wound healing is to promote a moist wound environment to ensure quick epithelialization and decrease excessive scar formation. With that standard in mind, after foot surgery was performed on 2 patients, silicone sheeting was applied immediately in order to compare its effects with those of standard moist wound healing (XEROFORM Petrolatum Gauze). PMID:24527150

  9. Using silicone gel sheet for the treatment of facial telangiectasias with sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Misirlioglu, Aykut; Gideroglu, Kaan; Akan, Mithat; Akoz, Tayfun

    2004-03-01

    Telangiectasias are superficial cutaneous vessels that are visible to human eye and are present as a dilated venule, capillary, or arteriole. They are a common cause of concern, especially when located in face. Sclerotherapy is among the treatment alternatives, but facial telangiectasias are less responsive than those located on the leg. To show the effectiveness of silicone gel sheet in improving the results obtained by sclerotherapy in facial telangiectasias. Between 1998 and 2003, 32 patients were treated with sclerotherapy and silicone gel sheet (group 1). Twenty-six patients were treated with sclerotherapy and cotton ball (group 2), and 30 patients were treated only sclerotherapy (group 3). Patients were evaluated for 12 weeks for the degree of improvement and side effects. All complications, side effects, and number of sessions were also recorded at each follow-up visit. The number of sessions is limited to six. After the final follow-up visit, the photographs taken of each treatment site at baseline and at final visit were reviewed in a double-blinded manner based on a 0 to 4 scale by two physicians. Fifty one of the 88 patients showed improvement totally. In the silicone sheet-sclerotherapy group, 22 of the 36 patients showed improvement. In the sclerotherapy-cotton ball group, 14 of the 26 patients showed improvement, and in the sclerotherapy-only group, 15 of the 30 patients showed improvement completely within the 12 weeks. The patients treated with sclerotherapy-silicone gel sheet (group 1) had more improvement than the other groups. Combining silicone gel sheeting to sclerotherapy increases the success rate in treating facial telangiectasias, especially facial subunits, which have bone support.

  10. Reduction of burn scar formation by halofuginone-eluting silicone gel sheets: a controlled study on nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zeplin, Philip H

    2012-03-01

    Burn scar formations can cause disfiguration and loss of dermal function. The purpose of this study was to examine whether application of modified silicone gel sheets with an antifibrotic drug halofuginone-eluting hybrid surface produce an effect on scar development. There were a total of 2 animal groups. The athymic nude mice (nu/nu) of both groups underwent transplantation of full-thickness human skin grafts onto their backs and setting of partial thickness burn injury. The status of local scar development was observed over a period of 3 months after the application of silicone gel sheets and also after application of surface-modified halofuginone-eluting silicone gel sheets. Subsequently, via real-time polymerase chain reaction, the cDNA levels from key mediators of scar formation (transforming growth factor beta, COL1A1, connective tissue growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, matrix metalloproteinase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 9) were established and statistically evaluated. In comparison with uncoated silicone gel sheets, the application of halofuginone-eluting silicone gel sheets lead to a significant difference in gene expression activity in scar tissue. Halofuginone-eluting hybrid surface silicone gel sheets significantly increase the antiscarring effect of adhesive silicone gel sheets by deceleration and downregulation of scar development by normalization of the expression activity.

  11. Large area monolithic organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hui; Tao, Cheng; Hambsch, Mike; Pivrikas, Almantas; Velusamy, Marappan; Aljada, Muhsen; Zhang, Yuliang; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Although efficiencies of > 10% have recently been achieved in laboratory-scale organic solar cells, these competitive performance figures are yet to be translated to large active areas and geometries relevant for viable manufacturing. One of the factors hindering scale-up is a lack of knowledge of device physics at the sub-module level, particularly cell architecture, electrode geometry and current collection pathways. A more in depth understanding of how photocurrent and photovoltage extraction can be optimised over large active areas is urgently needed. Another key factor suppressing conversion efficiencies in large area cells is the relatively high sheet resistance of the transparent conducting anode - typically indium tin oxide. Hence, to replace ITO with alternative transparent conducting anodes is also a high priority on the pathway to viable module-level organic solar cells. In our paper we will focus on large area devices relevant to sub-module scales - 5 cm × 5 cm monolithic geometry. We have applied a range of experimental techniques to create a more comprehensive understanding of the true device physics that could help make large area, monolithic organic solar cells more viable. By employing this knowledge, a novel transparent anode consisting of molybdenum oxide (MoOx) and silver (Ag) is developed to replace ITO and PEDOT-free large area solar cell sub-modules, acting as both a transparent window and hole-collecting electrode. The proposed architecture and anode materials are well suited to high throughput, low cost all-solution processing.

  12. Effect of silicon gel sheeting in nasal injury associated with nasal CPAP in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Günlemez, Ayla; Isken, Tonguç; Gökalp, Ayse S; Türker, Gülcan; Arisoy, Engin A

    2010-03-01

    We conducted this study to investigate the efficacy of the silicon gel application on the nares in prevention of nasal injury in preterm infants ventilated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). Patients (n=179) were randomized into two groups: Group 1 (n=87) had no silicon gel applied to nares, and in Group 2 (n=92), the silicon gel sheeting was used on the surface of nares during ventilation with NCPAP. Nasal injury developed in 13 (14.9%) neonates in Group 1 and 4 (4.3%) newborns in Group 2 (OR:3.43; 95% CI: 1.1-10.1; P<0.05). The incidence of columella necrosis was also significantly higher in the Group 1 (OR: 6.34; 95% CI: 0.78-51.6; P<0.05). We conclude that the silicon gel application may reduce the incidence and the severity of nasal injury in preterm infants on nasal CPAP.

  13. Development of a large area space solar cell assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a large area high efficiency solar cell assembly is described. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon solar cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are the use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and integration of coverglass application and cell fabrications. Cell development experiments concerned optimization of ion implantation processing of 2 ohm-cm boron-doped silicon. Process parameters were selected based on these experiments and cells with area of 34.3 sq cm wre fabricated. The average AMO efficiency of the twenty-five best cells was 13.9% and the best bell had an efficiency of 14.4%. An important innovation in cell encapsulation was also developed. In this technique, the coverglass is applied before the cell is sawed to final size. The coverglass and cell are then sawed as a unit. In this way, the cost of the coverglass is reduced, since the tolerance on glass size is relaxed, and costly coverglass/cell alignment procedures are eliminated. Adhesive investigated were EVA, FEP-Teflon sheet and DC 93-500. Details of processing and results are reported.

  14. Development of a large area space solar cell assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1982-05-01

    The development of a large area high efficiency solar cell assembly is described. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon solar cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are the use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and integration of coverglass application and cell fabrications. Cell development experiments concerned optimization of ion implantation processing of 2 ohm-cm boron-doped silicon. Process parameters were selected based on these experiments and cells with area of 34.3 sq cm wre fabricated. The average AMO efficiency of the twenty-five best cells was 13.9% and the best bell had an efficiency of 14.4%. An important innovation in cell encapsulation was also developed. In this technique, the coverglass is applied before the cell is sawed to final size. The coverglass and cell are then sawed as a unit. In this way, the cost of the coverglass is reduced, since the tolerance on glass size is relaxed, and costly coverglass/cell alignment procedures are eliminated. Adhesive investigated were EVA, FEP-Teflon sheet and DC 93-500. Details of processing and results are reported.

  15. Microstructures and magnetic properties of heatproof domain-refined grain-oriented silicon steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kosuge, K.; Hirose, K.; Kuroki, K. )

    1994-12-01

    Microstructure and magnetic properties of heatproof domain-refined grain-oriented silicon steel sheets were studied. Local strains were introduced using two types of gear roll as well as cog tips, one 35 [mu]m and the other 85 [mu]m. After the local strains were introduced onto sheets, the distribution of hardness near the groove was measured. The nuclei of micrograins were investigated at various applied rolling loads. After stress-relief annealing, various shapes of micrograins and grooves were observed. The effect of these various shapes of grooves and micrograins on magnetic properties was clarified. The role of micrograins and grooves on domain refining is discussed.

  16. The Effect of Creep on the Residual Stresses Generated During Silicon Sheet Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, J. W.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The modeling of stresses generated during the growth of thin silicon sheets at high speeds is an important part of the EFG technique since the experimental measurement of the stresses is difficult and prohibitive. The residual stresses which arise in such a growth process lead to serious problems which make thin Si ribbons unsuitable for fabrication. The constitutive behavior is unrealistic because at high temperature (close to the melting point) Si exhibits considerable creep which significantly relaxes the residual stresses. The effect of creep on the residual stresses generated during the growth of Si sheets at high speeds was addressed and the basic qualitative effect of creep are reported.

  17. Large-area graphene films by simple solution casting of edge-selectively functionalized graphite.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seo-Yoon; Jeon, In-Yup; Yang, Jieun; Park, Noejung; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Park, Sungjin; Ruoff, Rodney S; Dai, Liming; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2011-06-28

    We report edge-selective functionalization of graphite (EFG) for the production of large-area uniform graphene films by simply solution-casting EFG dispersions in dichloromethane on silicon oxide substrates, followed by annealing. The resultant graphene films show ambipolar transport properties with sheet resistances of 0.52-3.11 kΩ/sq at 63-90% optical transmittance. EFG allows solution processing methods for the scalable production of electrically conductive, optically transparent, and mechanically robust flexible graphene films for use in practice.

  18. Adaptable silicon-carbon nanocables sandwiched between reduced graphene oxide sheets as lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Li, Xianglong; Zhang, Xianfeng; Luo, Bin; Jin, Meihua; Liang, Minghui; Dayeh, Shadi A; Picraux, S T; Zhi, Linjie

    2013-02-26

    Silicon has been touted as one of the most promising anode materials for next generation lithium ion batteries. Yet, how to build energetic silicon-based electrode architectures by addressing the structural and interfacial stability issues facing silicon anodes still remains a big challenge. Here, we develop a novel kind of self-supporting binder-free silicon-based anodes via the encapsulation of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with dual adaptable apparels (overlapped graphene (G) sheaths and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) overcoats). In the resulted architecture (namely, SiNW@G@RGO), the overlapped graphene sheets, as adaptable but sealed sheaths, prevent the direct exposure of encapsulated silicon to the electrolyte and enable the structural and interfacial stabilization of silicon nanowires. Meanwhile, the flexible and conductive RGO overcoats accommodate the volume change of embedded SiNW@G nanocables and thus maintain the structural and electrical integrity of the SiNW@G@RGO. As a result, the SiNW@G@RGO electrodes exhibit high reversible specific capacity of 1600 mAh g⁻¹ at 2.1 A g⁻¹, 80% capacity retention after 100 cycles, and superior rate capability (500 mAh g⁻¹ at 8.4 A g⁻¹) on the basis of the total electrode weight.

  19. Structure development in silicon sheet by shaped crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.; De Angelis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Models are presented for the development of a parallel twinned structure of the 110 plane type and the 112 line type in silicon ribbons. The models are believed to be mutually compatible and operable. The first model relates the requirements for super-cooling during crystallization. The existence of reentrant angles associated with the twin structure is proposed to provide a rough interface to reduce super-cooling. The spacing of the twins is proposed to be limited by the geometrical relationship between the thermal gradient in the liquid and the dimensions of the twinned crystallization front. The second model relates the thermal stress configuration to detail dislocation reactions which would be expected to develop twins. While a specific dislocation mechanism cannot yet be defined, a number of alternatives are presented. All of these various dislocation mechanisms would result in the observed crystalline configuration and the choice among them is not critical.

  20. Structure development in silicon sheet by shaped crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.; De Angelis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Models are presented for the development of a parallel twinned structure of the 110 plane type and the 112 line type in silicon ribbons. The models are believed to be mutually compatible and operable. The first model relates the requirements for super-cooling during crystallization. The existence of reentrant angles associated with the twin structure is proposed to provide a rough interface to reduce super-cooling. The spacing of the twins is proposed to be limited by the geometrical relationship between the thermal gradient in the liquid and the dimensions of the twinned crystallization front. The second model relates the thermal stress configuration to detail dislocation reactions which would be expected to develop twins. While a specific dislocation mechanism cannot yet be defined, a number of alternatives are presented. All of these various dislocation mechanisms would result in the observed crystalline configuration and the choice among them is not critical.

  1. The Relationship Between Hot and Cold Rolling Parameters and Secondary Recrystallization Behavior in Silicon Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiri, Mohammadreza

    2015-08-01

    The effect of different hot and cold rolling process variables was evaluated for the secondary recrystallization behavior of silicon steel sheets, and a simple model was developed. On the basis of the model, the following results can be drawn: (a) for complete secondary recrystallization of silicon steel sheets, rolling of cast ingots must precede MnS precipitation start; (b) if it is necessitated, intermediate annealing during hot rolling passes must be carried out in the temperature of about 1000 °C; (c) during hot rolling, the amount of initial strain before the intermediate annealing of rolled strips at 1000 °C must be >70% reduction in thickness; (d) in the two-stage cold rolling method, the thickness reduction in the second cold rolling stage must be <61%; and (e) secondary recrystallization is encouraged by using the non-conventional three-stage cold rolling method with two intermediate anneals.

  2. Technical progress in silicon sheet growth under DOE/JPL FSA program, 1975-1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalejs, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The technical progress made in the Silicon Sheet Growth Program during its 11 years was reviewed. At present, in 1986, only two of the original 9 techniques have survived to the start-up, pilot-plant stage in industry. These two techniques are the edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) technique that produces closed shape polygons, and the WEB dendritic technique that produces single ribbons. Both the status and future concerns of the EFG and WEB techniques were discussed.

  3. Laser crystallization for large-area electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameshima, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Laser crystallization is reviewed for the purpose of fabrication of polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors (poly-Si TFTs). Laser-induced rapid heating is important for formation of crystalline films with a low thermal budget. Reduction of electrically active defects located at grain boundaries is essential for improving electrical properties of poly-Si films and achieving poly-Si TFTs with high performances. The internal film stress is attractive to increase the carrier mobility. Recent developments in laser crystallization methods with pulsed and continuous-wave lasers are also reviewed. Control of heat flow results in crystalline grain growth in the lateral direction, which is important for fabrication of large crystalline grains. We also report an annealing method using a high-power infrared semiconductor laser. High-power lasers will be attractive for rapid formation of crystalline films over a large area and activation of silicon with impurity atoms.

  4. Chest radiography with a large-area detector based on cesium-iodide/amorphous-silicon technology: image quality and dose requirement in comparison with an asymmetric screen-film system.

    PubMed

    Strotzer, M; Völk, M; Reiser, M; Lenhart, M; Manke, C; Gmeinwieser, J; Holzknecht, N; Link, J; Feuerbach, S

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a large-area, flat-panel X-ray detector, which uses cesium-iodide (CsI) and amorphous silicon (a-Si). Conventional images were compared with digital images acquired with equal dose (2.5 microGy) and with 50% dose reduction. Fifteen consecutive patients were studied prospectively using an asymmetric screen-film system (detector dose, 2.5 microGy). Digital images were taken from the same patients in a posteroanterior view with detector doses of 2.5 and 1.25 microGy, respectively. The CsI/a-Si active-matrix imager had a panel-size of 43 x 43 cm, a matrix of 3 x 3k, and a pixel-pitch of 143 microm. Hard copies were presented in a random order to eight independent observers, who rated image quality according to six subjective quality criteria. Statistical significance of differences was evaluated with Student's t test for paired samples (confidence level, 95%). Digital radiographs with 2.5 and 1.25 microGy were superior to conventional images regarding all quality criteria. Statistically significant differences were observed for five of six criteria at a detector dose of 2.5 microGy and for only one quality feature at 1.25 microGy. Flat-panel digital imagers based on CsI/a-Si technique have the potential to replace conventional systems and might allow a reduction of radiation dose by 50% without loss of image quality.

  5. Reduction of iron loss in thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Fukunaga, H.; Ishiyama, K.; Arai, K.I.

    1997-09-01

    The authors investigated the effect of the intermediate annealing conditions on the grain textures and the magnetic properties in thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheets produced by the three-stage rolling method. It was found that the lower the intermediate annealing temperature is, the better the [001] orientation is achieved. In addition, the reduction of the intermediate annealing temperatures improves dc magnetic properties (B{sub 8}, Hc) and enables to reduce the iron loss in thin silicon steels. The measured iron loss W13/50 under the applied tensile strength of 2 kg/mm{sup 2} was 0.28 W/kg, which is less than that of the conventional (300 {micro}m) grain-oriented silicon steels by about 50%.

  6. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  7. Supported growth of polycrystalline silicon sheet on low-cost ceramic, carbon, or reusable substrate. Quarterly report No. 1, September 26-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.W.; Heaps, J.D.; Schuldt, S.B.; Zook, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    The overall objective of this program is to identify and develop high-throughput, supported-growth methods for producing low-cost, large-area polycrystalline silicon sheet on ceramic, carbon, or reusable substrates. The first method being investigated is the SCIM coating technique. (SCIM is an acronym for Silicon Coating by Inverted Meniscus.) With this technique, a low-cost ceramic substrate is silicon-coated in a continuous manner by passing the substrate over a molten silicon meniscus which is contained in a narrow fused-silica trough. During this reporting period, several mullite substrates were silicon-coated with this method. The best coatings were approximately 100 ..mu..m thick with large columnar grains up to 0.5 cm wide and several cm long. Structural characterization of these coatings shows that these large grains are heavily twinned with boundaries perpendicular to the surface of the layer. Minority-carrier diffusion length measurements made on photodiodes fabricated from these coatings indicate diffusion lengths of about 25 ..mu..m. The short-circuit current densities of the diodes were about 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, with open-circuit voltages of approximately 0.49 V. With the substrates positioned horizontally as they pass over the meniscus trough, instability usually occurs, causing a buildup of molten silicon immediately downstream from the trough. This solicon eventually spills over onto key parts of the coater. By tilting the substrate at angles of 10, 15, and 20/sup 0/, stability can be achieved. A theoretical study of meniscus shapes conducted during this reporting period suggests that with an appropriate trough design and the right pressure and substrate height, a SCIM-coating with horizontal substrates should also be possible.

  8. Large-area aircraft scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iddings, Frank A.

    A program to determine the feasibility of present state-of-the-art NDI technology to produce a large-area scanner and to identify commercial equipment available to construct the desired system is presented. Work performed to attain these objectives is described, along with suggested modifications to the existing commercial equipment in order to meet the design criteria as closely as possible. Techniques that show the most promise at present are: D-sight, shearography, and pulse IR thermography (PIRT). D-sight is argued to be inadequate alone, but may well help form a system in conjunction with another technique. Shearography requires additional development in the area of stress application along with interpretation and overall application. PIRT is argued to be satisfactory as a large-area scanner system, at least for thin composite and metal panels.

  9. Evaluation of the ion implantation process for production of solar cells from silicon sheet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is the investigation and evaluation of the capabilities of the ion implantation process for the production of photovoltaic cells from a variety of present-day, state-of-the-art, low-cost silicon sheet materials. Task 1 of the program concerns application of ion implantation and furnace annealing to fabrication of cells made from dendritic web silicon. Task 2 comprises the application of ion implantation and pulsed electron beam annealing (PEBA) to cells made from SEMIX, SILSO, heat-exchanger-method (HEM), edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) and Czochralski (CZ) silicon. The goals of Task 1 comprise an investigation of implantation and anneal processes applied to dendritic web. A further goal is the evaluation of surface passivation and back surface reflector formation. In this way, processes yielding the very highest efficiency can be evaluated. Task 2 seeks to evaluate the use of PEBA for various sheet materials. A comparison of PEBA to thermal annealing will be made for a variety of ion implantation processes.

  10. Practice guidelines for the application of nonsilicone or silicone gels and gel sheets after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Carter, Alissa; Forbes, Lisa; Hsu, Shu-Chuan Chen; McMahon, Margaret; Parry, Ingrid; Ryan, Colleen M; Serghiou, Michael A; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Patricia A; de Oliveira, Ana; Boruff, Jill

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically evaluate available clinical evidence for the application of nonsilicone or silicone gels and gel sheets on hypertrophic scars and keloids after a burn injury so that practice guidelines could be proposed. This review provides evidence based recommendations, specifically for the rehabilitation interventions required for the treatment of aberrant wound healing after burn injury with gels or gel sheets. These guidelines are designed to assist all healthcare providers who are responsible for initiating and supporting scar management interventions prescribed for burn survivors. Summary recommendations were made after the literature, retrieved by systematic review, was critically appraised and the level of evidence determined according to Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria.

  11. Nanosized graphene sheets enhanced photoelectric behavior of carbon film on p-silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Hu, Gaijuan; Zhang, Dongqing; Diao, Dongfeng

    2016-07-18

    We found that nanosized graphene sheets enhanced the photoelectric behavior of graphene sheets embedded carbon (GSEC) film on p-silicon substrate, which was deposited under low energy electron irradiation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The GSEC/p-Si photodiode exhibited good photoelectric performance with photoresponsivity of 206 mA/W, rise and fall time of 2.2, and 4.3 μs for near-infrared (850 nm) light. The origin of the strong photoelectric behavior of GSEC film was ascribed to the appearance of graphene nanosheets, which led to higher barrier height and photoexcited electron-collection efficiency. This finding indicates that GSEC film has the potential for photoelectric applications.

  12. Strain-Magnetization Properties and Domain Structures of Silicon Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notoji, Atsushi; Saito, Akihiko; Hayakawa, Motozo

    The effects of tensile stress and strain on magnetization and magnetic domains in silicon steel sheets were investigated. The magnetization of elastic deformation regions decreased with increase of strain and the strain-magnetization properties of plastic deformation regions under stress showed peculiar characteristics. The magnetization increased with decreasing strain. We observed Lancet and other domains in a sample, especially around the boundary of crystal, after removing stress applied to a plastic deformation region. This phenomenon can be explained by changes in the domain structures, which were partly observed. This results obtained in this investigation can be applied to the nondestructive detection of fatigue in metallic magnetic materials.

  13. Large area mercuric iodide photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Markakis, J.M.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1984-02-01

    Results of an investigation of large area mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) photodetectors are reported. Different entrance contacts were studied, including semitransparent metallic films and conductive liquids. Theoretical calculations of electronic noise of these photodetectors were compared with experimental results. HgI/sub 2/ photodetectors with active area up to 4 cm/sup 2/ were matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and were evaluated as gamma-radiation spectrometers. Energy resolution of 9.3% for gamma radiation of 511 keV with a CsI(Tl) scintillator and energy resolution of 9.0% for gamma radiation of 622 keV with a NaI(Tl) scintillator have been obtained.

  14. Characterizing Grain-Oriented Silicon Steel Sheet Using Automated High-Resolution Laue X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Peter; Barnett, Matthew; Stevenson, Andrew; Hutchinson, Bevis

    2017-09-01

    Controlling texture in grain-oriented (GO) silicon steel sheet is critical for optimization of its magnetization performance. A new automated laboratory system, based on X-ray Laue diffraction, is introduced as a rapid method for large scale grain orientation mapping and texture measurement in these materials. Wide area grain orientation maps are demonstrated for both macroetched and coated GO steel sheets. The large secondary grains contain uniform lattice rotations, the origins of which are discussed.

  15. Ice sheets as a missing component of the global silicon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkings, J.; Hatton, J.; Hendry, K. R.; Wadham, J.; Ivanovic, R. F.; Kohler, T. J.; Stibal, M.; Beaton, A.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Tedstone, A.; Pike, J.; Tranter, M.

    2016-12-01

    Silicon (Si) plays an important role in global biogeochemical cycles. It is required for the growth of diatoms, silicoflagellates, radiolarians and some sponges. Diatoms build their frustules out of silica and account for approximately half of oceanic primary production. Therefore determining the sensitivity of the Si cycle in the past, and its likely response to future climate warming, is important for our understanding of marine ecosystem change, biogeochemical cycling and, by association, the efficiency of the ocean's biological carbon pump. The δ30Si of biogenic silica in marine sediments is increasingly being used as a palaeoceanographic tool. In particular, there has been a focus on the δ30Si change from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21-25 ka) to present, with opal records showing an increase in δ30Si of 0.2-1.0 ‰ from LGM to present day. This has previously been explained by lower biological utilisation of Si and by swings in intermediate and deep-water dissolved silica due to changes in oceanic circulation. Here we challenge the paradigm that the ocean Si input flux and δ30Si composition was uniform over glacial-interglacial timescales. During the LGM glaciers and ice sheets covered nearly 30% of land surface, including much of North America and northern Eurasia. These palaeo ice sheets exported large quantities of eroded sediment into the oceans, and their wastage raised global sea level by 130 m. Research indicates glaciers may export significant quantities of nutrients to downstream ecosystems, including large amounts of reactive silica. Si fluxes and their associated δ30Si signature from the palaeo ice sheets have not been considered in previous interpretations of the marine Si inventory and δ30Si record. Here, we demonstrate the importance of huge ice sheet meltwater fluxes to the marine Si inventory and oceanic δ30Si composition during the last deglaciation. We present the first dissolved and amorphous particulate silica time series with

  16. A bioactive metallurgical grade porous silicon-polytetrafluoroethylene sheet for guided bone regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, E G; Clarkin, O M; Raghavendra, R; Tanner, D A

    2014-01-01

    The properties of porous silicon make it a promising material for a host of applications including drug delivery, molecular and cell-based biosensing, and tissue engineering. Porous silicon has previously shown its potential for the controlled release of pharmacological agents and in assisting bone healing. Hydroxyapatite, the principle constituent of bone, allows osteointegration in vivo, due to its chemical and physical similarities to bone. Synthetic hydroxyapatite is currently applied as a surface coating to medical devices and prosthetics, encouraging bone in-growth at their surface and improving osseointegration. This paper examines the potential for the use of an economically produced porous silicon particulate-polytetrafluoroethylene sheet for use as a guided bone regeneration device in periodontal and orthopaedic applications. The particulate sheet is comprised of a series of microparticles in a polytetrafluoroethylene matrix and is shown to produce a stable hydroxyapatite on its surface under simulated physiological conditions. The microstructure of the material is examined both before and after simulated body fluid experiments for a period of 1, 7, 14 and 30 days using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The composition is examined using a combination of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Thin film X-ray diffraction, Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and the uptake/release of constituents at the fluid-solid interface is explored using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy. Microstructural and compositional analysis reveals progressive growth of crystalline, 'bone-like' apatite on the surface of the material, indicating the likelihood of close bony apposition in vivo.

  17. Rate limits in silicon sheet growth - The connections between vertical and horizontal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul D.; Brown, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Meniscus-defined techniques for the growth of thin silicon sheets fall into two categories: vertical and horizontal growth. The interactions of the temperature field and the crystal shape are analyzed for both methods using two-dimensional finite-element models which include heat transfer and capillarity. Heat transfer in vertical growth systems is dominated by conduction in the melt and the crystal, with almost flat melt/crystal interfaces that are perpendicular to the direction of growth. The high axial temperature gradients characteristic of vertical growth lead to high thermal stresses. The maximum growth rate is also limited by capillarity which can restrict the conduction of heat from the melt into the crystal. In horizontal growth the melt/crystal interface stretches across the surface of the melt pool many times the crystal thickness, and low growth rates are achievable with careful temperature control. With a moderate axial temperature gradient in the sheet a substantial portion of the latent heat conducts along the sheet and the surface of the melt pool becomes supercooled, leading to dendritic growth. The thermal supercooling is surpressed by lowering the axial gradient in the crystal; this configuration is the most desirable for the growth of high quality crystals. An expression derived from scaling analysis relating the growth rate and the crucible temperature is shown to be reliable for horizontal growth.

  18. Rate limits in silicon sheet growth - The connections between vertical and horizontal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul D.; Brown, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Meniscus-defined techniques for the growth of thin silicon sheets fall into two categories: vertical and horizontal growth. The interactions of the temperature field and the crystal shape are analyzed for both methods using two-dimensional finite-element models which include heat transfer and capillarity. Heat transfer in vertical growth systems is dominated by conduction in the melt and the crystal, with almost flat melt/crystal interfaces that are perpendicular to the direction of growth. The high axial temperature gradients characteristic of vertical growth lead to high thermal stresses. The maximum growth rate is also limited by capillarity which can restrict the conduction of heat from the melt into the crystal. In horizontal growth the melt/crystal interface stretches across the surface of the melt pool many times the crystal thickness, and low growth rates are achievable with careful temperature control. With a moderate axial temperature gradient in the sheet a substantial portion of the latent heat conducts along the sheet and the surface of the melt pool becomes supercooled, leading to dendritic growth. The thermal supercooling is surpressed by lowering the axial gradient in the crystal; this configuration is the most desirable for the growth of high quality crystals. An expression derived from scaling analysis relating the growth rate and the crucible temperature is shown to be reliable for horizontal growth.

  19. Large area, low cost solar cell development and production readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, D.

    1982-01-01

    A process sequence for a large area ( or = 25 sq. cm) silicon solar cell was investigated. Generic cell choice was guided by the expected electron fluence, by the packing factors of various cell envelope designs onto each panel to provide needed voltage as well as current, by the weight constraints on the system, and by the cost goals of the contract.

  20. Float zone silicon sheet growth. Technical progress report quarterly report No. 8, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bleil, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    Research continued on float zone silicon sheet growth. Progress is described in the following 8 tasks: heat pipe construction; heat pipe heater and heat extraction system; optical temperature monitoring system; replenishment source development; RF electrode assembly; solid-liquid interface monitors; ribbon seed preparation; and overall system assembly.

  1. Effect of shear stress on platelet adhesion to expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, a silicone sheet, and an endothelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, K S; Ushida, T; Sugano, H; Tamaki, T; Ohshima, N; Tateishi, T

    2000-01-01

    We visualized in real-time platelets adhering to the surface of three representative biomaterials, by using an apparatus consisting of a modified cone and plate rheometer combined with an upright epifluorescence microscope under two shear flows (0.1 and 5.0 dyne/cm2). The materials were expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), silicone sheet, and a monolayer of bovine endothelial cells (ECs) formed on glass, all of which are opaque materials used for artificial blood vessels and medical devices. According to quantitative analysis, the monolayer of ECs formed on glass had better blood compatibility than did either the ePTFE or the silicone sheet under shear flow conditions. Under a shear flow condition of 0.1 dyne/cm2, platelet adhesion was silicone sheet > ePTFE. In contrast, under a shear flow condition of 5.0 dyne/cm2, ePTFE > silicone sheet. These results indicate that the intensity of shear stress could modify the order of hemocompatibility of the materials. Therefore, direct observation of platelet adhesion under shear flow conditions is indispensable for testing and screening biomaterials and for providing a precise quantitative evaluation of platelet adhesion.

  2. Large area CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Guerrini, N.; Sedgwick, I.

    2011-01-01

    CMOS image sensors, also known as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) or Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), are today the dominant imaging devices. They are omnipresent in our daily life, as image sensors in cellular phones, web cams, digital cameras, ... In these applications, the pixels can be very small, in the micron range, and the sensors themselves tend to be limited in size. However, many scientific applications, like particle or X-ray detection, require large format, often with large pixels, as well as other specific performance, like low noise, radiation hardness or very fast readout. The sensors are also required to be sensitive to a broad spectrum of radiation: photons from the silicon cut-off in the IR down to UV and X- and gamma-rays through the visible spectrum as well as charged particles. This requirement calls for modifications to the substrate to be introduced to provide optimized sensitivity. This paper will review existing CMOS image sensors, whose size can be as large as a single CMOS wafer, and analyse the technical requirements and specific challenges of large format CMOS image sensors.

  3. Two-dimensional stress—magnetization effects of grain-oriented silicon steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiko; Murashige, Shinichi; Uehara, Yuji

    1994-05-01

    Changes in the magnetization vector due to tensile stress under a constant magnetic field for grain-oriented silicon-iron sheet strip samples cut at various angles from the rolling direction have been investigated. In a low magnetic field, where the magnetization is less than 1.5 T, the magnetization vector lies in the direction of the sample length and the magnetization decreases with the application of tension. Beyond that magnetic field, the magnetization vector showed a two-dimensional hysteresis loop due to the application of tension. The maximum transverse magnetization change appeared in a 10° sample, where the rotation angle of the magnetization vector was 2.5°.

  4. Phase field modeling of grain structure evolution during directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. K.; Lan, C. W.

    2017-10-01

    Evolution of grain structures and grain boundaries (GBs), especially the coincident site lattice GBs, during directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon sheet are simulated by using a phase field model for the first time. Since the coincident site lattice GBs having lower mobility, tend to follow their own crystallographic directions despite thermal gradients, the anisotropic energy and mobility of GBs are considered in the model. Three basic interactions of GBs during solidification are examined and they are consistent with experiments. The twinning process for new grain formation is further added in the simulation by considering twin nucleation. The effect of initial distribution of GB types and grain orientations is also investigated for the twinning frequency and the evolution of grain size and GB types.

  5. Low cost monocrystalline silicon sheet fabrication for solar cells by advanced ingot technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiegl, G. F.; Bonora, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    The continuous liquid feed (CLF) Czochralski furnace and the enhanced I.D. slicing technology for the low-cost production of monocrystalline silicon sheets for solar cells are discussed. The incorporation of the CLF system is shown to improve ingot production rate significantly. As demonstrated in actual runs, higher than average solidification rates (75 to 100 mm/hr for 150 mm 1-0-0 crystals) can be achieved, when the system approaches steady-state conditions. The design characteristics of the CLF furnace are detailed, noting that it is capable of precise control of dopant impurity incorporation in the axial direction of the crystal. The crystal add-on cost is computed to be $11.88/sq m, considering a projected 1986 25-slice per cm conversion factor with an 86% crystal growth yield.

  6. Tribology study of reduced graphene oxide sheets on silicon substrate synthesized via covalent assembly.

    PubMed

    Ou, Junfei; Wang, Jinqing; Liu, Sheng; Mu, Bo; Ren, Junfang; Wang, Honggang; Yang, Shengrong

    2010-10-19

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets were covalently assembled onto silicon wafers via a multistep route based on the chemical adsorption and thermal reduction of graphene oxide (GO). The formation and microstructure of RGO were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle (WCA) measurements. Characterization by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was performed to evaluate the morphology and microtribological behaviors of the samples. Macrotribological performance was tested on a ball-on-plate tribometer. Results show that the assembled RGO possesses good friction reduction and antiwear ability, properties ascribed to its intrinsic structure, that is, the covalent bonding to the substrate and self-lubricating property of RGO.

  7. Temperature Effects on the Magnetic Properties of Silicon-Steel Sheets Using Standardized Toroidal Frame

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Ju; Lin, Shih-Yu; Chou, Shang-Chin; Tsai, Chia-Yun; Yen, Jia-Yush

    2014-01-01

    This study designed a detachable and standardized toroidal test frame to measure the electromagnetic characteristic of toroidal laminated silicon steel specimens. The purpose of the design was to provide the measurements with standardized and controlled environment. The device also can withstand high temperatures (25–300°C) for short time period to allow high temperature tests. The accompanying driving circuit facilitates testing for high frequency (50–5,000 Hz) and high magnetic flux (0.2–1.8 T) conditions and produces both sinusoidal and nonsinusoidal test waveforms. The thickness of the stacked laminated silicon-steel sheets must be 30~31 mm, with an internal diameter of 72 mm and an outer diameter of 90 mm. With the standardized setup, it is possible to carry out tests for toroidal specimen in high temperature and high flux operation. The test results show that there is a tendency of increased iron loss under high temperature operation. The test results with various driving waveforms also provide references to the required consideration in engineering designs. PMID:25525629

  8. Temperature effects on the magnetic properties of silicon-steel sheets using standardized toroidal frame.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Ju; Lin, Shih-Yu; Chou, Shang-Chin; Tsai, Chia-Yun; Yen, Jia-Yush

    2014-01-01

    This study designed a detachable and standardized toroidal test frame to measure the electromagnetic characteristic of toroidal laminated silicon steel specimens. The purpose of the design was to provide the measurements with standardized and controlled environment. The device also can withstand high temperatures (25-300°C) for short time period to allow high temperature tests. The accompanying driving circuit facilitates testing for high frequency (50-5,000 Hz) and high magnetic flux (0.2-1.8 T) conditions and produces both sinusoidal and nonsinusoidal test waveforms. The thickness of the stacked laminated silicon-steel sheets must be 30~31 mm, with an internal diameter of 72 mm and an outer diameter of 90 mm. With the standardized setup, it is possible to carry out tests for toroidal specimen in high temperature and high flux operation. The test results show that there is a tendency of increased iron loss under high temperature operation. The test results with various driving waveforms also provide references to the required consideration in engineering designs.

  9. High-Throughput Dry Processes for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect

    BUSS,RICHARD J.; HEBNER,GREGORY A.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.; YANG,PIN

    1999-11-01

    In October 1996, an interdisciplinary team began a three-year LDRD project to study the plasma processes of reactive ion etching and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on large-area silicon devices. The goal was to develop numerical models that could be used in a variety of applications for surface cleaning, selective etching, and thin-film deposition. Silicon solar cells were chosen as the experimental vehicle for this project because an innovative device design was identified that would benefit from immediate performance improvement using a combination of plasma etching and deposition processes. This report presents a summary of the technical accomplishments and conclusions of the team.

  10. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal stress models were used to test the effect of melt level on stress generation and growth velocity. The results indicate that melt level has only small effects on stresses but significant effects on growth velocity. These results are consistent with experimental growth from measured melt levels. A new low-stress design concept is being evaluated with the models. A width-limiting version of the low-stress J460 configuration was tested experimentally with results consistent with the design goals.

  11. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Schruben, J.

    1982-01-01

    The "discrete shield' temperature model was completed and verified. Modifications to the J419 low stress configuration were tested experimentally to evaluate effects on growth speed. A composite lid and shield configuration combining the low stress features of the J419 with the width limiting characteristics of the J98M3 was fabricated and tested in the N-furnace. Several long crystals were grown with width limited to about 3.3 cm and with melt replenishment, although the configuration is not yet optimized for steady state growth.

  12. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Schruben, J.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code for calculating web temperature distribution was expanded to provide a graphics output in addition to numerical and punch card output. The new code was used to examine various modifications of the J419 configuration and, on the basis of the results, a new growth geometry was designed. Additionally, several mathematically defined temperature profiles were evaluated for the effects of the free boundary (growth front) on the thermal stress generation. Experimental growth runs were made with modified J419 configurations to complement the modeling work. A modified J435 configuration was evaluated.

  13. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D. L.; Schruben, J.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal models were developed that accurately predict the thermally generated stresses in the web crystal which, if too high, cause the crystal to degenerate. The application of the modeling results to the design of low-stress experimental growth configurations will allow the growth of wider web crystals at higher growth velocities. A new experimental web growth machine was constructed. This facility includes all the features necessary for carrying out growth experiments under steady thermal conditions. Programmed growth initiation was developed to give reproducible crystal starts. Width control permits the growth of long ribbons at constant width. Melt level is controlled to 0.1 mm or better. Thus, the capability exists to grow long web crystals of constant width and thickness with little operator intervention, and web growth experiments can now be performed with growth variables controlled to a degree not previously possible.

  14. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal models used for analyzing dendritic web growth and calculating the thermal stress were reexamined to establish the validity limits imposed by the assumptions of the models. Also, the effects of thermal conduction through the gas phase were evaluated and found to be small. New growth designs, both static and dynamic, were generated using the modeling results. Residual stress effects in dendritic web were examined. In the laboratory, new techniques for the control of temperature distributions in three dimensions were developed. A new maximum undeformed web width of 5.8 cm was achieved. A 58% increase in growth velocity of 150 micrometers thickness was achieved with dynamic hardware. The area throughput goals for transient growth of 30 and 35 sq cm/min were exceeded.

  15. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Schruben, J.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal stress model was used to generate the design of a low stress lid and shield configuration, which was fabricated and tested experimentally. In preliminary tests, the New Experimental Web Growth Facility performed as designed, producing web on the first run. These experiments suggested desirable design modifications in the melt level sensing system to improve further its performance, and these are being implemented.

  16. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Modeling in the development of low stress configurations for wide web growth is presented. Parametric sensitivity to identify design features which can be used for dynamic trimming of the furnace element was studied. Temperature measurements of experimental growth behavior led to modification in the growth system to improve lateral temperature distributions.

  17. Quantification of Sheet Resistance in Boron-Diffused Silicon Using Micro-Photoluminescence Spectroscopy at Room Temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, Hieu T.; Johnston, Steve; Paduthol, Appu; ...

    2017-09-01

    A micro-photoluminescence-based technique is presented, to quantify and map sheet resistances of boron-diffused layers in silicon solar cell precursors with micron-scale spatial resolution at room temperature. The technique utilizes bandgap narrowing effects in the heavily-doped layers, yielding a broader photoluminescence spectrum at the long-wavelength side compared to the spectrum emitted from lightly doped silicon. By choosing an appropriate spectral range as a metric to assess the doping density, the impacts of photon reabsorption on the analysis can be avoided; thus, an accurate characterization of the sheet resistance can be made. This metric is demonstrated to be better representative of themore » sheet resistance than the surface doping density or the total dopant concentration of the diffused layer. The technique is applied to quantify sheet resistances of 12-um-wide diffused fingers in interdigitated back-contact solar cell precursors and large diffused areas. The results are confirmed by both 4-point probe and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements. Lastly, the practical limitations associated with extending the proposed technique into an imaging mode are presented and explained.« less

  18. The investigation of timing large area scintillation detectors with SiPM light sensors properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runtso, M. F.; Naumov, P. Yu; Naumov, P. P.; Maklyaev, E. F.; Kaplin, V. A.; Fomin, V. S.; Razzhivin, I. S.; Melikyan, Yu A.

    2017-01-01

    The timing large area plastic scintillation detectors with silicon photomultipliers as photosensors properties were investigated using a cosmic radiation at the ground level. Different techniques of the amplitude spectra and efficiency measurements were implemented. The measurements results are presented.

  19. Comparison of efficacy of silicone gel, silicone gel sheeting, and topical onion extract including heparin and allantoin for the treatment of postburn hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Karagoz, Huseyin; Yuksel, Fuat; Ulkur, Ersin; Evinc, Rahmi

    2009-12-01

    We compared the efficacy of silicone gel (Scarfade), silicone gel sheet (Epi-Derm), and topical onion extract including heparin and allantoin (Contractubex) for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Forty-five postburn scars were included in the study. Patients with scars less than 6 months from injury were assigned at random to three groups each containing 15 scars, and their treatment was continued for 6 months. Scars were treated with Scarfade, Epiderm and Contractubex. Scar assessment was performed at the beginning of the treatment, and at the end of the sixth month when the treatment was completed by using the Vancouver scar scale. The difference between before and after treatment scores for each three groups was statistically significant. The difference between Scarfade group and Epi-Derm group was not significant; however, the differences of the other groups (Scarfade-Contractubex, Epiderm-Contractubex) were significant. Silicone products, either in gel or sheet, are superior to Contractubex in the treatment of the hypertrophic scar. The therapist should select the most appropriate agent according to the patient's need and guidelines of these signs.

  20. Large area perovskite solar cell module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Longhua; Liang, Lusheng; Wu, Jifeng; Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Fan, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The recent dramatic rise in power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of perovskite solar cells has triggered intense research worldwide. However, their practical development is hampered by poor stability and low PCE values with large areas devices. Here, we developed a gas-pumping method to avoid pinholes and eliminate local structural defects over large areas of perovskite film, even for 5 × 5 cm2 modules, the PCE reached 10.6% and no significant degradation was found after 140 days of outdoor testing. Our approach enables the realization of high performance large-area PSCs for practical application.

  1. The formation of large-area conducting graphene-like platelets.

    PubMed

    Salvio, Riccardo; Krabbenborg, Sven; Naber, Wouter J M; Velders, Aldrik H; Reinhoudt, David N; van der Wiel, Wilfred G

    2009-08-17

    The treatment of a suspension of graphite oxide (GO) with sodium azide leads to a material that, after reduction, features amino groups at the top and bottom of the sheets. These groups react through microcontact printing with an isothiocyanate monolayer on a silicon oxide substrate to form covalent bonds that strongly attach to the particles on the surface. With ultrasonication it is possible to obtain exfoliation of the sheets that are not covalently bound to the surface leaving single-layer platelets attached to the substrate. The azido derivative can be also used to functionalize the graphene oxide with long alkylic chains through a click chemistry approach. This functionalization results in the exfoliation of this material in dimethylformamide. The novel materials were fully characterized by different techniques including IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and solid state NMR spectroscopy. The material with amino groups, after the reduction step, is conductive with a resistivity only approximately seven times larger than that of unprocessed graphite. This implies that after reduction of the GO, the conjugated sp2 network is largely restored. We consider this to be an important step towards a chemical approach for forming conducting large-area platelet films of single-layer graphene.

  2. Preparation of High Silicon Electrical Steel Sheets with Strong {100} Recrystallization Texture by the Texture Inheritance of Initial Columnar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongjiang; Zhang, Zhihao; Xie, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    Texture evolutions and recrystallization texture features in warm- and cold-rolled sheets of high silicon electrical steel with two different initial microstructures (columnar-grained and equiaxed-grained microstructures) were investigated. The relationships between the recrystallization textures and the initial textures (the textures before rolling) of the samples were analyzed. The results showed that after annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 1 hour, strong {100} recrystallization textures with volume fractions of more than 47 pct were obtained in the columnar-grained samples fabricated by warm and cold rolling along the growing direction of the columnar grains. While after rolling and annealing in the same processes, only 12.8 pct volume fractions of {100} recrystallization texture were revealed in the equiaxed-grained samples. The formation of strong {100} recrystallization texture in the annealed sheets of high silicon electrical steel with initial columnar grains was attributed to the favorable texture inheritance of the initial texture during rolling and annealing. The columnar grains of strong near {100}<001> ({100}<001> {310}<001>) orientation in the samples before rolling were transferred into deformed grains with orientations such as {100}<011> and {100}<012>. after rolling. Afterwards, these deformed grains were further transferred into {100} oriented recrystallized grains, which formed strong {100} recrystallization texture in the annealed sheets and exhibited preferable soft magnetic properties.

  3. Toward large-area roll-to-roll printed nanophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karioja, Pentti; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna M.; Alajoki, Teemu; Tuominen, Jarkko; Hiltunen, Marianne; Siitonen, Samuli; Kontturi, Ville; Böhlen, Karl; Hauser, Rene; Charlton, Martin; Boersma, Arjen; Lieberzeit, Peter; Felder, Thorsten; Eustace, David; Haskal, Eliav

    2014-05-01

    Polymers have become an important material group in fabricating discrete photonic components and integrated optical devices. This is due to their good properties: high optical transmittance, versatile processability at relative low temperatures and potential for low-cost production. Recently, nanoimprinting or nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has obtained a plenty of research interest. In NIL, a mould is pressed against a substrate coated with a moldable material. After deformation of the material, the mold is separated and a replica of the mold is formed. Compared with conventional lithographic methods, imprinting is simple to carry out, requires less-complicated equipment and can provide high-resolution with high throughput. Nanoimprint lithography has shown potential to become a method for low-cost and high-throughput fabrication of nanostructures. We show the development process of nano-structured, large-area multi-parameter sensors using Photonic Crystal (PC) and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) methodologies for environmental and pharmaceutical applications. We address these challenges by developing roll-to-roll (R2R) UV-nanoimprint fabrication methods. Our development steps are the following: Firstly, the proof of concept structures are fabricated by the use of wafer-level processes in Si-based materials. Secondly, the master molds of successful designs are fabricated, and they are used to transfer the nanophotonic structures into polymer materials using sheet-level UV-nanoimprinting. Thirdly, the sheet-level nanoimprinting processes are transferred to roll-to-roll fabrication. In order to enhance roll-to-roll manufacturing capabilities, silicone-based polymer material development was carried out. In the different development phases, Photonic Crystal and SERS sensor structures with increasing complexities were fabricated using polymer materials in order to enhance sheet-level and roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. In addition, chemical and molecular

  4. Gold-film coating assisted femtosecond laser fabrication of large-area, uniform periodic surface structures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pin; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Rong, Wenlong; Zhang, Kaihu; Cao, Qiang

    2015-02-20

    A simple, repeatable approach is proposed to fabricate large-area, uniform periodic surface structures by a femtosecond laser. 20 nm gold films are coated on semiconductor surfaces on which large-area, uniform structures are fabricated. In the case study of silicon, cross-links and broken structures of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) are significantly reduced on Au-coated silicon. The good consistency between the scanning lines facilitates the formation of large-area, uniform LIPSSs. The diffusion of hot electrons in the Au films increases the interfacial carrier densities, which significantly enhances interfacial electron-phonon coupling. High and uniform electron density suppresses the influence of defects on the silicon and further makes the coupling field more uniform and thus reduces the impact of laser energy fluctuations, which homogenizes and stabilizes large-area LIPSSs.

  5. Large-area, laterally-grown epitaxial semiconductor layers

    DOEpatents

    Han, Jung; Song, Jie; Chen, Danti

    2017-07-18

    Structures and methods for confined lateral-guided growth of a large-area semiconductor layer on an insulating layer are described. The semiconductor layer may be formed by heteroepitaxial growth from a selective growth area in a vertically-confined, lateral-growth guiding structure. Lateral-growth guiding structures may be formed in arrays over a region of a substrate, so as to cover a majority of the substrate region with laterally-grown epitaxial semiconductor tiles. Quality regions of low-defect, stress-free GaN may be grown on silicon.

  6. Application of a Silicone Sheet in Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy to Treat an Abdominal Wall Defect after Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin Su

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an aggressive soft-tissue infection involving the deep fascia and is characterized by extensive deterioration of the surrounding tissue. Immediate diagnosis and intensive treatment, including debridement and systemic antibiotics, represent the most important factors influencing the survival of NF patients. In this report, we present a case of NF in the abdomen due to an infection caused by a perforated small bowel after abdominal liposuction. It was successfully treated using negative-pressure wound therapy, in which a silicone sheet functioned as a barrier between the sponge and internal organs to protect the small bowel. PMID:28194352

  7. LAMBDA — Large Area Medipix3-Based Detector Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Lange, S.; Smoljanin, S.; Hirsemann, H.; Graafsma, H.

    2012-11-01

    Medipix3 is a photon-counting readout chip for X-ray detection. It has a small pixel size (55 μm) and a high frame rate with zero dead time, which makes it attractive for experiments at synchrotrons. Using Medipix3, DESY are developing the LAMBDA (Large Area Medipix3-Based Detector Array) system. A single LAMBDA module carries either a single large silicon sensor of 1536 by 512 pixels, or two smaller high-Z sensors. The sensor is bonded to 12 Medipix3 chips, and mounted on a ceramic carrier board. The readout system for the module then provides a fast FPGA, a large RAM and four 10 Gigabit Ethernet links to allow operation at high frame rates. Multiple modules may then be tiled together a larger area. Currently, the first large silicon modules have been constructed and tested at low speed, and the firmware for fast readout is being developed.

  8. Method of Making Large Area Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, Alvin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method which enables the high speed formation of nanostructures on large area surfaces is described. The method uses a super sub-micron beam writer (Supersebter). The Supersebter uses a large area multi-electrode (Spindt type emitter source) to produce multiple electron beams simultaneously scanned to form a pattern on a surface in an electron beam writer. A 100,000 x 100,000 array of electron point sources, demagnified in a long electron beam writer to simultaneously produce 10 billion nano-patterns on a 1 meter squared surface by multi-electron beam impact on a 1 cm squared surface of an insulating material is proposed.

  9. Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

    2008-02-05

    The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

  10. The Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    A Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE) was undertaken to prove out an economically important application of remote sensing from space. The experiment focused upon determination of wheat acreages in the U.S. Great Plains and upon the development and testing of yield models. The results and conclusions are presented.

  11. Stowable large area solar power module

    SciTech Connect

    Hanak, J.J.

    1987-12-15

    A stowable, deployable large area solar module is described comprising: discrete, interconnected, flexible, large area solar panels; hinge means operatively disposed on the panels so as to provide for the relative planar displacement of the folded panels of the module when the panels are folded in overlying sandwiched relationship; the hinge means also operatively disposed so as to provide for the folded panels to be rolled into a stowable, substantially cylindrical configuration. The hinge means comprise: hinge knuckles associated with at least one edge of each large area panel, each of the knuckles including a passage therethrough adapted to receive pintle means, the knuckles of adjacent panels disposed in a spaced apart, generally coplanar, interdigitating relationship; and, flexible pintle means disposed so as to sequentially pass through the interdigitating knuckles, whereby the spaced apart knuckles allow for a degree of planar displacement of adjoining large area panels relative to one another, as well as allowing for the folding of the panels in a sandwiched relationship and the flexible pintle means allows for the panels to be rolled into the substantially cylindrical configuration.

  12. STATUS OF THE GLAST LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R

    2003-12-05

    The GLAST Large Area telescope is a modular 4 x 4 tower pair conversion telescope with field of view greater than 2 steradians and energy coverage from 20 MeV to 300 GeV. The observatory is scheduled for launch in September 2006. A status of the instrument construction is presented here.

  13. Progress in amorphous silicon based large-area multijunction modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. E.; Arya, R. R.; Bennett, M.; Chen, L.-F.; Jansen, K.; Li, Y.-M.; Maley, N.; Morris, J.; Newton, J.; Oswald, R. S.; Rajan, K.; Vezzetti, D.; Willing, F.; Yang, L.

    1996-01-01

    Solarex, a business unit of Amoco/Enron Solar, is scaling up its a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H tandem device technology for the production of 8 ft2 modules. The current R&D effort is focused on improving the performance, reliability and cost-effectiveness of the tandem junction technology by systematically optimizing the materials and interfaces in small-area single- and tandem junction cells. Average initial conversion efficiencies of 8.8% at 85% yield have been obtained in pilot production runs with 4 ft2 tandem modules.

  14. High Temperature Thermoelectric Device Concept Using Large Area PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, R.; Angst, S.; Hall, J.; Stoetzel, J.; Kessler, V.; Bitzer, L.; Maculewicz, F.; Benson, N.; Wiggers, H.; Wolf, D.; Schierning, G.; Schmechel, R.

    2014-06-01

    A new high temperature thermoelectric device concept using large area nanostructured silicon p-type and n-type ( PN) junctions is presented. In contrast to conventional thermoelectric generators, where the n-type and p-type semiconductors are connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel, we experimentally demonstrate a device concept in which a large area PN junction made from highly doped densified silicon nanoparticles is subject to a temperature gradient parallel to the PN interface. In the proposed device concept, the electrical contacts are made at the cold side eliminating the hot side substrate and difficulties that go along with high temperature electrical contacts. This concept allows temperature gradients greater than 300 K to be experimentally applied with hot side temperatures larger than 800 K. Electronic properties of the PN junctions and power output characterizations are presented. A fundamental working principle is discussed using a particle network model with temperature and electric fields as variables, and which considers electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity according to Fourier's law, as well as Peltier and Seebeck effects.

  15. Large-area SnO{sub 2}: F thin films by offline APCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Yucheng; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhang, Zhihai; Shi, Chengwu; Zhang, Qingfeng; Li, Changhao; Xia, Xiaohong; Sun, Stanley; Chen, Leon

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Large-area (1245 mm x 635 mm) FTO thin films were successfully deposited by offline APCVD process. {yields} The as-prepared FTO thin films with sheet resistance 8-11 {Omega}/{open_square} and direct transmittance more than 83% exhibited better than that of the online ones. {yields} The maximum quantum efficiency of the solar cells based on offline FTO substrate was 0.750 at wavelength 540 nm. {yields} The power of the solar modules using the offline FTO as glass substrates was 51.639 W, higher than that of the modules based on the online ones. -- Abstract: In this paper, we reported the successful preparation of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) thin films on large-area glass substrates (1245 mm x 635 mm x 3 mm) by self-designed offline atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. The FTO thin films were achieved through a combinatorial chemistry approach using tin tetrachloride, water and oxygen as precursors and Freon (F-152, C2H4F2) as dopant. The deposited films were characterized for crystallinity, morphology (roughness) and sheet resistance to aid optimization of materials suitable for solar cells. We got the FTO thin films with sheet resistance 8-11 {Omega}/{open_square} and direct transmittance more than 83%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization suggested that the as-prepared FTO films were composed of multicrystal, with the average crystal size 200-300 nm and good crystallinity. Further more, the field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images showed that the films were produced with good surface morphology (haze). Selected samples were used for manufacturing tandem amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film solar cells and modules by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Compared with commercially available FTO thin films coated by online chemical vapor deposition, our FTO coatings show excellent performance resulting in a high quantum efficiency yield for a-Si:H solar cells and ideal open voltage

  16. Investigation of solar cells fabricated on low-cost silicon sheet materials using 1 MeV electron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachare, A. H.; Hyland, S. L.; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of high energy electron irradiation is investigated as a controlled means to study in more detail the junction depletion layer processes of solar cells made on various low-cost silicon sheet materials. Results show that solar cells made on Czochralski grown silicon exhibit enhancement of spectral response in the shorter wavelength region when irradiated with high energy electrons. The base region damage can be reduced by subsequent annealing at 450 C which restores the degraded longer wavelength response, although the shorter wavelength enhancement persists. The second diode component of the cell dark forward bias current is also reduced by electron irradiation, while thermal annealing at 450 C without electron irradiation can also produce these same effects. Electron irradiation produces small changes in the shorter wavelength spectral responses and junction improvements in solar cells made on WEB, EFG, and HEM silicon. It is concluded that these beneficial effects on cell characteristics are due to the reduction of oxygen associated deep level recombination centers in the N(+) diffused layer and in the junction.

  17. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P. F.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  18. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P.F.; Cameron, R.A.; Digel, S.W.; Thompson, D.J.; Wood, K.S.

    2007-01-03

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  19. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  20. Large area damage testing of optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, L.; Kozlowski, M.; Stolz, C.

    1996-04-26

    The damage threshold specifications for the National Ignition Facility will include a mixture of standard small-area tests and new large-area tests. During our studies of laser damage and conditioning processes of various materials we have found that some damage morphologies are fairly small and this damage does not grow with further illumination. This type of damage might not be detrimental to the laser performance. We should therefore assume that some damage can be allowed on the optics, but decide on a maximum damage allowance of damage. A new specification of damage threshold termed {open_quotes}functional damage threshold{close_quotes} was derived. Further correlation of damage size and type to system performance must be determined in order to use this measurement, but it is clear that it will be a large factor in the optics performance specifications. Large-area tests have verified that small-area testing is not always sufficient when the optic in question has defect-initiated damage. This was evident for example on sputtered polarizer and mirror coatings where the defect density was low enough that the features could be missed by standard small- area testing. For some materials, the scale-length at which damage non-uniformities occur will effect the comparison of small-area and large-area tests. An example of this was the sub-aperture tests on KD*P crystals on the Beamlet test station. The tests verified the large-area damage threshold to be similar to that found when testing a small-area. Implying that for this KD*P material, the dominate damage mechanism is of sufficiently small scale-length that small-area testing is capable of determining the threshold. The Beamlet test station experiments also demonstrated the use of on-line laser conditioning to increase the crystals damage threshold.

  1. MeerKAT Large Area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeuw, Lerothodi

    2017-01-01

    We present the goals and strategies for a large area MeerKAT survey, that is expected to be proposed under the MeerKAT open time call. The survey will be at least 400 square degrees, detect galaxies up to high redshift and cover various science interests that will exploit synergies with complementary data at other wavebands. For as high impact and legacy value as possible, the survey is open to synergies from the community.

  2. Large-area thin-film modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyan, Y. S.; Perez-Albuerne, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    The low cost potential of thin film solar cells can only be fully realized if large area modules can be made economically with good production yields. This paper deals with two of the critical challenges. A scheme is presented which allows the simple, economical realization of the long recognized, preferred module structure of monolithic integration. Another scheme reduces the impact of shorting defects and, as a result, increases the production yields. Analytical results demonstrating the utilization and advantages of such schemes are discussed.

  3. Large-area thin-film modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyan, Y. S.; Perez-Albuerne, E. A.

    1985-10-01

    The low cost potential of thin film solar cells can only be fully realized if large area modules can be made economically with good production yields. This paper deals with two of the critical challenges. A scheme is presented which allows the simple, economical realization of the long recognized, preferred module structure of monolithic integration. Another scheme reduces the impact of shorting defects and, as a result, increases the production yields. Analytical results demonstrating the utilization and advantages of such schemes are discussed.

  4. NREL Paves the Way to Commercialization of Silicon Ink (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    In 2008, Innovalight, a start-up company in Sunnyvale, California, invented a liquid form of silicon, called Silicon Ink. It contains silicon nanoparticles that are suspended evenly within the solution. Those nanoparticles contain dopant atoms that can be driven into silicon solar cells, which changes the conductivity of the silicon and creates the internal electric fields that are needed to turn photons into electrons -- and thus into electricity. The ink is applied with a standard screen printer, already commonly used in the solar industry. The distinguishing feature of Silicon Ink is that it can be distributed in exact concentrations in precisely the correct locations on the surface of the solar cell. This allows most of the surface to be lightly doped, enhancing its response to blue light, while heavily doping the area around the electrical contacts, raising the conductivity in that area to allow the contact to work more efficiently. The accuracy and uniformity of the ink distribution allows the production of solar cells that achieve higher power production at a minimal additional cost.

  5. Reaction sintering of two-dimensional silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite by sheet stacking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Katsumi; Mukai, Hideki; Imai, Masamitsu; Hashimoto, Kazuaki; Toda, Yoshitomo; Hyuga, Hideki; Kondo, Naoki; Kita, Hideki; Yano, Toyohiko

    2007-08-01

    Two-dimensionally plain woven SiC fiber-reinforced SiC composite has been developed by reaction sintering using a sheet stacking method in order to further increase mechanical and thermal properties of the composite and to obtain flexibility of manufacturing process of 2D woven SiC/SiC composites which can be applied to the fabrication of larger parts. In addition, sinterability and mechanical properties of the composite were investigated. In this study, relative density of the composites was about 90-93% and a dense composite could be obtained by reaction sintering using the sheet stacking method. The bulk density and maximum bending strength of SiC/SiC composite with a C/SiC weight ratio of 0.6 were higher than that of the composite with C/SiC ratios of 0.5 or 0.7. The values were 2.9 g/cm 3 and 200 MPa, respectively. However, the composites obtained in this study fractured in almost brittle manner due to the lower fiber volume fraction.

  6. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  7. Rotational magnetization and rotational losses of grain oriented silicon steel sheets -- fundamental aspects and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuetzner, H. . Bioelectricity and Magnetism Division)

    1994-09-01

    Rotational magnetization of grain oriented SiFe sheets involves three mechanisms: anisotropy, hysteresis and eddy currents. Apart from describing the respective physical background, the paper is focused on a separation of mechanisms. It discusses dependencies between field quantities which in the dynamic case are complicated by the fact that a three-dimensional field problem arises here. It is demonstrated that within a plane inner surface of a sheet, the magnetic behavior is independent of frequency in approximation. On the other hand, eddy currents yield phase shifts between individual surfaces. Respective rotational losses and their portions are discussed on the basis of Poynting's theorem.

  8. Processing experiments on non-Czochralski silicon sheet (MEPSDU support contract). Quarterly technical report No. 1, 14 October 1980-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, R.

    1980-01-01

    A program of six months duration has been initiated to support and promote the further development of processing techniques which may be successfully and cost-effectively applied to low-cost non-Czochralski silicon sheet for solar cell fabrication. Work is proceeding and results are reported in the areas of process technology, cell design, cell metallization, and production cost simulation.

  9. Recent developments in low cost silicon solar cells for terrestrial applications. [sheet production methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1978-01-01

    A variety of techniques may be used for photovoltaic energy systems. Concentrated or not concentrated sunlight may be employed, and a number of materials can be used, including silicon, gallium arsenide, cadmium sulfide, and cadmium telluride. Most of the experience, however, has been obtained with silicon cells employed without sunlight concentration. An industrial base exists at present for producing solar cells at a price in the range from $15 to $30 per peak watt. A major federal program has the objective to reduce the price of power provided by silicon solar systems to approximately $1 per peak watt in the early 1980's and $0.50 per watt by 1986. The approaches considered for achieving this objective are discussed.

  10. Multifunctional graphene sheets embedded in silicone encapsulant for superior performance of light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungae; Hong, Jin-Yong; Jang, Jyongsik

    2013-07-23

    Graphene nanosheets with uniform shape are successfully incorporated into a silicone encapsulant of a light-emitting diode (LED) using a solvent-exchange approach which is a facile and straightforward method. The graphene nanosheets embedded in the silicone encapsulant have a multifunctional role which improves the performance of light-emitting diodes. The presence of graphene gives rise to effective heat dissipation, improvement of protection ability from external stimuli, such as moisture and hazardous gas, and enhancement of mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. Consequently, the LEDs composed of a graphene-embedded silicone encapsulant exhibit long-term stability without loss of luminous efficiency by addition of relatively small amounts of graphene. This novel strategy offers a feasible candidate for their practical or industrial applications.

  11. Supernova Remnants with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caragiulo, M.; Di Venere, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on-board the Fermi satellite, proved to be, after 8 years of data taking, an excellent instrument to detect and observe Supernova Remnants (SNRs) in a range of energies running from few hundred MeV up to few hundred GeV. It provides essential information on physical processes that occur at the source, involving both accelerated leptons and hadrons, in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for the primary Cosmic Ray (CR) acceleration. We show the latest results in the observation of Galactic SNRs by Fermi-LAT.

  12. Large area cold plasma applicator for decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesky, G. A.

    2008-04-01

    Cold plasma applicators have been used in the Medical community for several years for uses ranging from hemostasis ("stop bleeding") to tumor removal. An added benefit of this technology is enhanced wound healing by the destruction of infectious microbial agents without damaging healthy tissue. The beam is typically one millimeter to less than a centimeter in diameter. This technology has been adapted and expanded to large area applicators of potentially a square meter or more. Decontamination applications include both biological and chemical agents, and assisting in the removal of radiological agents, with minimal or no damage to the contaminated substrate material. Linear and planar multiemitter array plasma applicator design and operation is discussed.

  13. High Efficiency Large Area Polysilicon Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S. M.; Winter, C.

    1985-01-01

    Large area (100 sq cm) polysilicon solar cells having efficiencies of up to 14.1% (100 mW/sq cm, 25 C) were fabricated and a detailed analysis was performed to identify the efficiency loss mechanisms. The 1-5 characteristics of the best cell were dominated by recombination in the quasi-neutral base due to the combination of minority carrier diffusion length and base resistivity. An analysis of the microstructural defects present in the material and their effect on the electrical properties is presented.

  14. Large Area X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission concept study continues to evolve strongly following the merging of the LAXS mission with the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White) into the re-named High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission. HTXS retains key elements of the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for risk-reduction and cost savings. A key achievement of the program has been the recommendation by the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEUS) (April 1997) for a new start for the HTXS mission in the 2000-2004 timeframe.

  15. Silicon-sheet and thin-film cell and module technology potential: Issue study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.; Costogue, E. N.; Ferber, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high-efficiency low-cost crystalline silicon ribbon and thih-film solar cells for the energy national photovoltaics program was examined. The findings of an issue study conducted are presented. The collected data identified the status of the technology, future research needs, and problems experienced. The potentials of present research activities to meet the Federal/industry long-term technical goal of achieving 15 cents per kilowatt-hour levelized PV energy cost are assessed. Recommendations for future research needs related to crystalline silicon ribbon and thin-film technologies for flat-plate collectors are also included.

  16. Silicon sheet with molecular beam epitaxy for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the new technique of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) are applied to the growth of high efficiency silicon solar cells. Because MBE can provide well controlled doping profiles of any desired arbitrary design, including doping profiles of such complexity as built-in surface fields or tandem junction cells, it would appear to be the ideal method for development of high efficiency solar cells. It was proposed that UCLA grow and characterize silicon films and p-n junctions of MBE to determine whether the high crystal quality needed for solar cells could be achieved.

  17. The effect of cold-rolling on the magnetic properties of non-oriented silicon steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B.Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kaido, C.; Yamashiro, Y.

    1999-09-01

    Non-oriented 3% silicon steel sheets were cold-rolled to 0.1 mm thick by various methods, and then they were finally annealed in an argon atmosphere for 1.5 hours at 900 C with a cooling rate of 0.025 C/s. Their magnetic properties changed depending on cold-rolling method used. A sample which had magnetic two-easy-directions with strong (100) cubic texture was obtained in the following way. The sample was alternately cold-rolled in two perpendicular directions L and T, and was also subjected to an intermediate anneal. The average grain diameter of the sample was 57 {micro}m. Its magnetic induction at 800 A/m was 1.65 T in the L direction, and 1.62 T in T direction, respectively.

  18. Texture Development in High-Silicon Iron Sheet Produced by Simple Shear Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, Andrew B.; Sagapuram, Dinakar; Trumble, Kevin P.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-01

    Sheet processing of high Si-Fe alloys (up to 6.5 wt pct Si) is demonstrated by application of highly confined shear deformation in cutting-extrusion. This alloy system, of major interest to electromagnetic applications, is characterized by poor workability. By a suitable interactive combination of simple shear, high strain rates, near-adiabatic heating, and large hydrostatic pressure in the deformation zone, flow localization, and cracking inherent to this alloy system are suppressed. This enables creation of sheet and foil forms from bulk ingots, cast or wrought, in a single deformation step, unlike rolling. The sheet is characterized by strong shear textures, described by partial {110} and <111> fibers, and fine-grained microstructures ( 20 µm grain size). The orientation (inclination) of these fibers, with respect to the sheet surface, can be varied over a range of 35 deg through selection of the deformation path. In contrast to rolling textures, the current shear deformation textures are negligibly influenced by recrystallization annealing. A recovery-based continuous recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the texture retention. Some general implications for shear-based processing of alloys of limited workability are discussed.

  19. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  20. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Gorbatkin, Steven M.; Berry, Lee A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  1. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce large-area (5.9 x 5.9 cm) space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/watt is descibed. Five cell types under investigation include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm-cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover-glass simultaneously is being developed. A description of cell developments by Applied Solar Energy Corp., Spectrolab and Spire is included. Results are given for cell and array tests, performed by Lockheed, TRW and NASA. Future large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  2. Large area periodic ferromagnetic nanowires deposited onto a polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zighem, F.; Faurie, D.; Belmeguenai, M.; Garcia-Sanchez, A.; Lupo, P.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2017-07-01

    There are various challenges associated with the fabrication of highly ordered magnetic nanostructures on flexible substrates due to the compatibility with lithography and deposition techniques. In this article, we present a nanofabrication technique to synthesize a large area (5 × 5 mm2) of ferromagnetic nanowires on top of a polymer substrate (Kapton®) using interference lithography and sputtering processes. We have systematically characterized their static and dynamic magnetic behaviors using magneto-optical Kerr magnetometry and broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. To evaluate the quality of our approach, we also deposited an identical array of nanowires on Silicon substrates for comparison. The nanowires deposited on the two substrates display similar static and dynamic properties, including the identical magnetization reversal process, number of resonance modes, and comparable damping parameters. The results suggest the good quality of our nanowires and their suitability in future flexible spintronic devices.

  3. Fabrication of large area Si cylindrical drift detectors. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Kraner, H.W.; Li, Zheng; Rehak, P.; Hess, F.

    1994-04-01

    The processing of an advanced silicon detector, a large area cylindrical drift detector (CDD), was carried out in the BNL Instrumentation Division Fabrication Facility. The double-sided planar process technique was developed for the fabrication of the CDD. Important improvements of the double-sided planar process in this fabrication include the introduction of an Al implantation protection mask and implantation of boron through an 1000 angstrom oxide layer in the step of opening the p-window. Another important aspect of the design of the CDD is the structure called ``river,`` which allows the current generated OD the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface to ``flow`` into the guard anode, and thus minimize the leakage, current at the signal anode. The test result showed that for the best detector most of the signal anodes have leakage currents of about 0.3 nA/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Large-area beryllium metal foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, J. O., Jr.

    1997-02-01

    To manufacture beryllium filters having diameters up to 82 mm and thicknesses in the range 0.1-1 μm, it was necessary to construct apparatus in which the metal could safely be evaporated, and then to find an acceptable substrate and evaporation procedure. The metal was evaporated resistively from a tantalum dimple boat mounted in a baffled enclosure that could be placed in a conventional vacuum bell jar, obviating the need for a dedicated complete vacuum system. Substrates were 102 mm × 127 mm × 0.05 mm cleaved mica sheets, coated with 0.1 μm of NaCl, then with approximately 50 μg/cm 2 of cellulose nitrate. These were mounted on poly(methyl methacrylate) sheets 3 mm thick that were in turn clamped to a massive aluminum block for thermal stability. Details of the processes for evaporation, float off, and mounting are given, and the resulting foils described.

  5. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm2) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates. PMID:27941869

  6. Controlled self-organization of polymer nanopatterns over large areas.

    PubMed

    Eryilmaz, Ilknur Hatice; Mohanraj, John; Dal Zilio, Simone; Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro

    2017-09-05

    Self-assembly methods allow to obtain ordered patterns on surfaces with exquisite precision, but often lack in effectiveness over large areas. Here we report on the realization of hierarchically ordered polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanofibres and nanodots over large areas from solution via a fast, easy and low-cost method named ASB-SANS, based on a ternary solution that is cast on the substrate. Simple changes to the ternary solution composition allow to control the transition from nanofibres to nanodots, via a wide range of intermediate topologies. The ternary solution includes the material to be patterned, a liquid solvent and a solid substance able to sublimate. The analysis of the fibres/dots width and inter-pattern distance variations with respect to the ratio between the solution components suggests that the macromolecular chains mobility in the solidified sublimating substance follows Zimm-like models (mobility of macromolecules in diluted liquid solutions). A qualitative explanation of the self-assembly phenomena originating the observed nanopatterns is given. Finally, ASB-SANS-generated PMMA nanodots arrays have been used as lithographic masks for a silicon substrate and submitted to Inductively Coupled Plasma-Reactive Ion Etching (ICP-RIE). As a result, nanopillars with remarkably high aspect ratios have been achieved over areas as large as several millimeters square, highlighting an interesting potential of ASB-SANS in practical applications like photon trapping in photovoltaic cells, surface-enhanced sensors, plasmonics.

  7. Development of a Large-Area Ultracold Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffel, Jenna; Liu, Chen-Yu; UCN Tau Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    To improve our knowledge in particle physics and cosmology, including big-bang nucleosynthesis, we need a more precise and accurate measurement of the lifetime of free neutrons. Though there have been many attempts to measure the neutron lifetime, discrepancies exist between the two major experimental techniques of the beam and the bottle methods. To resolve this discrepancy, the UCN τ experiment will trap ultracold neutrons (UCNs) to perform lifetime measurements to the 1-second level. To accomplish this goal, we are developing a large-area, high-efficiency UCN detector. We construct a scintillating UCN detector by evaporating a thin film of boron-10 onto an airbrushed layer of zinc sulfide (ZnS); the 10B-coated ZnS scintillating film is then glued to wavelength-shifting plastic, which acts as a light guide to direct photons into modern silicon photomultipliers. This new detector has similar efficiency and background noise as the previously-used ion gas detectors, but can be easily scaled up to cover large areas for many applications. The new detector opens up exciting new ways to study systematic effects, as they hold the key to the interpretation of neutron lifetime.

  8. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A. W.; Charles, E.

    2007-07-12

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration and Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  9. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A.W.; Charles, E.; /SLAC

    2007-10-16

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  10. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgland, A. W.; Charles, E.

    2007-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  11. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-12-12

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm(2)) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates.

  12. Deterministic composite nanophotonic lattices in large area for broadband applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Jolly; Probst, Jürgen; Becker, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Exotic manipulation of the flow of photons in nanoengineered materials with an aperiodic distribution of nanostructures plays a key role in efficiency-enhanced broadband photonic and plasmonic technologies for spectrally tailorable integrated biosensing, nanostructured thin film solarcells, white light emitting diodes, novel plasmonic ensembles etc. Through a generic deterministic nanotechnological route here we show subwavelength-scale silicon (Si) nanostructures on nanoimprinted glass substrate in large area (4 cm2) with advanced functional features of aperiodic composite nanophotonic lattices. These nanophotonic aperiodic lattices have easily tailorable supercell tiles with well-defined and discrete lattice basis elements and they show rich Fourier spectra. The presented nanophotonic lattices are designed functionally akin to two-dimensional aperiodic composite lattices with unconventional flexibility- comprising periodic photonic crystals and/or in-plane photonic quasicrystals as pattern design subsystems. The fabricated composite lattice-structured Si nanostructures are comparatively analyzed with a range of nanophotonic structures with conventional lattice geometries of periodic, disordered random as well as in-plane quasicrystalline photonic lattices with comparable lattice parameters. As a proof of concept of compatibility with advanced bottom-up liquid phase crystallized (LPC) Si thin film fabrication, the experimental structural analysis is further extended to double-side-textured deterministic aperiodic lattice-structured 10 μm thick large area LPC Si film on nanoimprinted substrates.

  13. High-efficiency cell concepts on low-cost silicon sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. O.; Ravi, K. V.

    1985-01-01

    The limitations on sheet growth material in terms of the defect structure and minority carrier lifetime are discussed. The effect of various defects on performance are estimated. Given these limitations designs for a sheet growth cell that will make the best of the material characteristics are proposed. Achievement of optimum synergy between base material quality and device processing variables is proposed. A strong coupling exists between material quality and the variables during crystal growth, and device processing variables. Two objectives are outlined: (1) optimization of the coupling for maximum performance at minimal cost; and (2) decoupling of materials from processing by improvement in base material quality to make it less sensitive to processing variables.

  14. Timing Characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Elagin, Andrey L.; Frisch, H.; Obaid, Razib; Oberla, E; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wagner, Robert G.; Wang, Jingbo; Wetstein, Matthew J.; Northrop, R

    2015-09-21

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultralast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub picosecond laser. We observe single photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm x 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 pm, and median gains higher than 10(7). The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with in of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  15. The CLAS12 large area RICH detector

    SciTech Connect

    M. Contalbrigo, E. Cisbani, P. Rossi

    2011-05-01

    A large area RICH detector is being designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer as part of the 12 GeV upgrade program of the Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall-B. This detector is intended to provide excellent hadron identification from 3 GeV/c up to momenta exceeding 8 GeV/c and to be able to work at the very high design luminosity-up to 1035 cm2 s-1. Detailed feasibility studies are presented for two types of radiators, aerogel and liquid C6F14 freon, in conjunction with a highly segmented light detector in the visible wavelength range. The basic parameters of the RICH are outlined and the resulting performances, as defined by preliminary simulation studies, are reported.

  16. The CLAS12 large area RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contalbrigo, M.; Cisbani, E.; Rossi, P.

    2011-05-01

    A large area RICH detector is being designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer as part of the 12 GeV upgrade program of the Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall-B. This detector is intended to provide excellent hadron identification from 3 GeV/ c up to momenta exceeding 8 GeV/ c and to be able to work at the very high design luminosity-up to 10 35 cm 2 s -1. Detailed feasibility studies are presented for two types of radiators, aerogel and liquid C 6F 14 freon, in conjunction with a highly segmented light detector in the visible wavelength range. The basic parameters of the RICH are outlined and the resulting performances, as defined by preliminary simulation studies, are reported.

  17. The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    A Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) has been installed at JPL. It is primarily intended to be used to illuminate and measure the electrical performance of photovoltaic devices. The simulator, originally manufactured by Spectrolab, Sylmar, California, occupies an area measuring about 3 meters wide by 12 meters long. The data acquisition and data processing subsystems have been modernized. Tests on the LAPSS performance resulted in better than +/- 2 percent uniformity of irradiance at the test plane and better than +/- 0.3 percent measurement repeatability after warm-up. Glass absorption filters are used to reduce the level of ultraviolet light emitted from the xenon flash lamps. This provides a close match to standard airmass zero and airmass 1.5 spectral irradiance distributions. The 2 millisecond light pulse prevents heating of the device under test, resulting in more reliable temperature measurements. Overall, excellent electrical performance measurements have been made of many different types and sizes of photovoltaic devices.

  18. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Patrick Nolan, who died on 2011 November 6. His career spanned much of the history of high-energy astronomy from space and his work on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) began nearly 20 years ago when it was just a concept. Pat was a central member in the operation of the LAT collaboration and he is greatly missed.

  19. Minority carrier diffusion lengths and absorption coefficients in silicon sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, K. A.; Swimm, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the methods which have been developed for the measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon wafers require that the material have either a Schottky or an ohmic contact. The surface photovoltage (SPV) technique is an exception. The SPV technique could, therefore, become a valuable diagnostic tool in connection with current efforts to develop low-cost processes for the production of solar cells. The technique depends on a knowledge of the optical absorption coefficient. The considered investigation is concerned with a reevaluation of the absorption coefficient as a function of silicon processing. A comparison of absorption coefficient values showed these values to be relatively consistent from sample to sample, and independent of the sample growth method.

  20. The immediate use of a silicone sheet wound closure device in scar reduction and prevention.

    PubMed

    Parry, James R; Stupak, Howard D; Johnson, Calvin M

    2016-02-01

    Silicone has been used successfully postoperatively in the prevention of hypertrophic and other types of adverse scars. The Silicone Suture Plate (SSP) is a new, minimally invasive, sterile wound closure device that is applied intraoperatively to prevent adverse scarring. The SSP device permits immediate application of silicone while concurrently allowing for wound-edge tension redistribution. In this prospective, controlled, single-blinded clinical study, 8 consecutive patients undergoing deep-plane rhytidectomy were selected. SSP devices were placed on the patients' posterior rhytidectomy hairline incision; the mirror-image control site underwent standard suturing techniques. Three blinded, independent raters assessed the treatment and control sides at 6-week and 4-month follow-up visits, using the Objective Scar Assessment Scale (OSAS), a validated scar assessment tool. The 6-week OSAS scores revealed an 18.4% improvement on the side with the SSP device (13.3) when compared to the control side (16.3). The 4-month OSAS scores showed a 27.3% improvement on the treatment side from 12.7 (control) to 9.2 (SSP). These OSAS results were found to be statistically significant when taken as an aggregate of the observers' scores, but not when observers' scores were measured individually (p < 0.05). In our series of patients, we showed promising results with the use of the SSP device. Early silicone application and tissue tension distribution contributed to an overall more aesthetically pleasing scar compared to those seen with standard suturing techniques, although more testing is required.

  1. The Quality Issue of the Parts Blanked from Thin Silicon Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Jacek; Jaworski, Jan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the wear mechanism of punches made of M3:2 and M2 steel sheet which are used in blanking process of the rotor part of the low-power asynchronous motor was presented. The influence of additional TiN coating on the punch flank surface degradation intensity was described. The punch wear influence on the hardness changes close the material intersection surface was determined. The research results indicate that the tool durability ensures the quality of parts blanked from electrotechnical steel. The results will allow for selection of new tools materials for this type of tools which are used in difficult tribological conditions.

  2. The Quality Issue of the Parts Blanked from Thin Silicon Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Jacek; Jaworski, Jan

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the wear mechanism of punches made of M3:2 and M2 steel sheet which are used in blanking process of the rotor part of the low-power asynchronous motor was presented. The influence of additional TiN coating on the punch flank surface degradation intensity was described. The punch wear influence on the hardness changes close the material intersection surface was determined. The research results indicate that the tool durability ensures the quality of parts blanked from electrotechnical steel. The results will allow for selection of new tools materials for this type of tools which are used in difficult tribological conditions.

  3. Electrohydrodynamically driven large-area liquid ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Pregenzer, Arian L.

    1988-01-01

    A large-area liquid ion source comprises means for generating, over a large area of the surface of a liquid, an electric field of a strength sufficient to induce emission of ions from a large area of said liquid. Large areas in this context are those distinct from emitting areas in unidimensional emitters.

  4. Large area solar cells from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Read; Calvert, Paul; Corley, Jean

    1992-01-01

    The first goal of the project was to produce polymers from materials available on the Moon. This, apparently simple, aim is made complicated by the fact that there is no carbon on the Moon and there are no polymers (with a couple of irrelevant exceptions) known which do not contain carbon. Because of the abundance of silicon and oxygen in the lunar regolith, it was decided to aim to produce siloxane polymers with the (-Si-O-) backbone found in silicones. A univalent side group is also needed but there are no univalent elements available in the regolith which could plausibly make stable structures. Failing this, hydrogen is a good choice for side group since it accounts for a small fraction of the total weight of the polymer. Thus, a group of target structures such as (-SiH2-O-)n, (-Si(OH)2-O-)n is determined. This goal was approached via a series of simpler syntheses. During the first year, polydimethylsiloxane (-Si(CH3)2-O-)n was made by controlled hydrolysis of SiCl2(CH3)2, which is a routine synthesis, and then an attempt was made to make polydichlorosiloxane by controlled hydrolysis of SiCl4. At the end of the first year, some infra-red spectra indicated that this product had been obtained.

  5. Si Based Large Area Substrates for HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-06

    compliant substrate, molecular beam epitaxy, silicon substrate Orin W. Holland Amethyst Research Incorporated 720 North Commerce Suite 345 Ardmore, OK...Contractors (DD882) Inventions (DD882) Principal Investigator: Orin W. Holland, Amethyst Research, Inc. Final Report of Project Title: Si Based Large Area...characterization tool. Figure1. Raman shift with crystallographic orientation differences. Principal Investigator: Orin W. Holland, Amethyst

  6. Fermi large area telescope second source catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-03-28

    Here, we present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. Furthermore, we provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. Finally, the 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes.

  7. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Babayan, Steve E.; Hicks, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  8. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  9. The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) has been installed at JPL. It is primarily intended to be used to illuminate and measure the electrical performance of photovoltaic devices. The simulator, originally manufactured by Spectrolab, Sylmar, CA, occupies an area measuring about 3 m wide x 12 m long. The data acquisition and data processing subsystems have been modernized. Tests on the LAPSS performance resulted in better than plus or minus 2 percent uniformity of irradiance at the test plane and better than plus or minus 0.3 percent measurement repeatability after warm-up. Glass absorption filters reduce the ultraviolet light emitted from the xenon flash lamps. This results in a close match to three different standard airmass zero and airmass 1.5 spectral irradiances. The 2-ms light pulse prevents heating of the device under test, resulting in more reliable temperature measurements. Overall, excellent electrical performance measurements have been made of many different types and sizes of photovoltaic devices. Since the original printing of this publication, in 1993, the LAPSS has been operational and new capabilities have been added. This revision includes a new section relating to the installation of a method to measure the I-V curve of a solar cell or array exhibiting a large effective capacitance. Another new section has been added relating to new capabilities for plotting single and multiple I-V curves, and for archiving the I-V data and test parameters. Finally, a section has been added regarding the data acquisition electronics calibration.

  10. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-05-25

    Here, we present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions,more » defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. In conclusion, care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.« less

  12. Fermi large area telescope second source catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; ...

    2012-03-28

    Here, we present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are fluxmore » measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. Furthermore, we provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. Finally, the 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes.« less

  13. Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

    2009-01-01

    The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (<10 micron) micrometeorite and secondary ejecta dust particles. To be delivered to the lunar surface, it must also be very low mass, rugged and stow compactly. The instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

  14. Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

    2009-01-01

    The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (<10 micron) micrometeorite and secondary ejecta dust particles. To be delivered to the lunar surface, it must also be very low mass, rugged and stow compactly. The instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

  15. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Berenji, B.; Bisello, D.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Canadas, B.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeKlotz, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S. -H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Scolieri, G.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J. -L.; Stephens, T. E.; Striani, E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-05-25

    Here, we present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. In conclusion, care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  16. Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, Harvey

    1996-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission study concept has evolved strongly over the last year culminating in the merging of LAXS with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) proposal for a similar mission, the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White). The resulting merger, re-named the High Throughput X-rays Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission has also expanded by the inclusion of another SAO proposed new mission concept proposal, the Hard X-Ray Telescope (PI: Paul Gorenstein). The resultant multi-instrument mission retains much of heritage from the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for robustness. These mergers resulted from a series of contacts between various team members, via e-mail, telecons, and in-person meetings. The impetus for the mergers was the fundamental similarity between the missions, and the recognition that all three proposal teams had significant contributions to make in the effort to define the next stage in the X-ray exploration of the universe. We have enclosed four items that represent some of the work that has occurred during the first year of the study: first, a presentation at the Leicester meeting, second a presentation that was made to Dan Goldin following the merging of LAXS and NGXO, third a copy of the first announcement for the Workshop, and finally the interim report that was prepared by the HTXS study team towards the end of the first year. This last document provides the foundation for the HTXS Technology Roadmap that is being generated. The HTXS roadmap will define the near-term goals that the merged mission must achieve over the next few years. A web site has been developed and populated that contains much of the material that has been generated over the past year.

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope third source catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2015-06-12

    Here, we present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV–300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second Fermi LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources abovemore » $$4\\sigma $$ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. As a result, from source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ~3% at 1 GeV.« less

  18. Large-area mapping of biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.M.; Jennings, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The age of discovery, description, and classification of biodiversity is entering a new phase. In responding to the conservation imperative, we can now supplement the essential work of systematics with spatially explicit information on species and assemblages of species. This is possible because of recent conceptual, technical, and organizational progress in generating synoptic views of the earth's surface and a great deal of its biological content, at multiple scales of thematic as well as geographic resolution. The development of extensive spatial data on species distributions and vegetation types provides us with a framework for: (a) assessing what we know and where we know it at meso-scales, and (b) stratifying the biological universe so that higher-resolution surveys can be more efficiently implemented, coveting, for example, geographic adequacy of specimen collections, population abundance, reproductive success, and genetic dynamics. The land areas involved are very large, and the questions, such as resolution, scale, classification, and accuracy, are complex. In this paper, we provide examples from the United States Gap Analysis Program on the advantages and limitations of mapping the occurrence of terrestrial vertebrate species and dominant land-cover types over large areas as joint ventures and in multi-organizational partnerships, and how these cooperative efforts can be designed to implement results from data development and analyses as on-the-ground actions. Clearly, new frameworks for thinking about biogeographic information as well as organizational cooperation are needed if we are to have any hope of documenting the full range of species occurrences and ecological processes in ways meaningful to their management. The Gap Analysis experience provides one model for achieving these new frameworks.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Berenji, B.; Bisello, D.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Canadas, B.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeKlotz, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Scolieri, G.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Striani, E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. Care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  20. Geometric correction methods for Timepix based large area detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlicka, J.; Dudak, J.; Karch, J.; Krejci, F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray micro radiography with the hybrid pixel detectors provides versatile tool for the object inspection in various fields of science. It has proven itself especially suitable for the samples with low intrinsic attenuation contrast (e.g. soft tissue in biology, plastics in material sciences, thin paint layers in cultural heritage, etc.). The limited size of single Medipix type detector (1.96 cm2) was recently overcome by the construction of large area detectors WidePIX assembled of Timepix chips equipped with edgeless silicon sensors. The largest already built device consists of 100 chips and provides fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 14.3 cm2 without any physical gaps between sensors. The pixel resolution of this device is 2560 × 2560 pixels (6.5 Mpix). The unique modular detector layout requires special processing of acquired data to avoid occurring image distortions. It is necessary to use several geometric compensations after standard corrections methods typical for this type of pixel detectors (i.e. flat-field, beam hardening correction). The proposed geometric compensations cover both concept features and particular detector assembly misalignment of individual chip rows of large area detectors based on Timepix assemblies. The former deals with larger border pixels in individual edgeless sensors and their behaviour while the latter grapple with shifts, tilts and steps between detector rows. The real position of all pixels is defined in Cartesian coordinate system and together with non-binary reliability mask it is used for the final image interpolation. The results of geometric corrections for test wire phantoms and paleo botanic material are presented in this article.

  1. Development of large Area Covering Height Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K.

    2014-04-01

    Height information is a basic part of topographic mapping. Only in special areas frequent update of height models is required, usually the update cycle is quite lower as for horizontal map information. Some height models are available free of charge in the internet; for commercial height models a fee has to be paid. Mostly digital surface models (DSM) with the height of the visible surface are given and not the bare ground height, as required for standard mapping. Nevertheless by filtering of DSM, digital terrain models (DTM) with the height of the bare ground can be generated with the exception of dense forest areas where no height of the bare ground is available. These height models may be better as the DTM of some survey administrations. In addition several DTM from national survey administrations are classified, so as alternative the commercial or free of charge available information from internet can be used. The widely used SRTM DSM is available also as ACE-2 GDEM corrected by altimeter data for systematic height errors caused by vegetation and orientation errors. But the ACE-2 GDEM did not respect neighbourhood information. With the worldwide covering TanDEM-X height model, distributed starting 2014 by Airbus Defence and Space (former ASTRIUM) as WorldDEM, higher level of details and accuracy is reached as with other large area covering height models. At first the raw-version of WorldDEM will be available, followed by an edited version and finally as WorldDEM-DTM a height model of the bare ground. With 12 m spacing and a relative standard deviation of 1.2 m within an area of 1° x 1° an accuracy and resolution level is reached, satisfying also for larger map scales. For limited areas with the HDEM also a height model with 6 m spacing and a relative vertical accuracy of 0.5 m can be generated on demand. By bathymetric LiDAR and stereo images also the height of the sea floor can be determined if the water has satisfying transparency. Another method of getting

  2. Measurement of characteristic impedance of silicon fiber sheet based readout strip panel for RPC detector in INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. K.; Kumar, A.; Marimuthu, N.; Singh, V.; Subrahmanyam, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is a mega science project of India, which is going to use about 30,000 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) as active detector elements for the study of atmoshpheric neutrino oscillations. Each RPC detector will consist of two orthogonally placed readout strip panel for picking the signals generated in the gas chamber. The area of RPC detector in INO-ICAL (Iron Calorimeter) experiment will be 2 m × 2 m, therefore the dimensions of readout strip panel should also be 2 m × 2 m. To get undistorted signals pass through the readout strip panel to front-end electronics, their characteristic impedance should be matched with each other. In the present paper, we describe the need and search of new dielectric material for the fabrication of flame resistant, waterproof and flexible readout strip panel. We will also describe the measurement of characteristic impedance of Plastic Honeycomb (PH) based readout strip panel and Silicon Fiber Sheet (SFS) based readout strip panel in a comparative way, and its variation under loading and with time. Based on this study, we found that a 5 mm thick SFS-based readout strip panel has a minimum signal reflection at 49.5 ohm characteristic impedance value. Our study shows that SFS is a good dielectric material for the purpose.

  3. Effect of texture and grain size on the magnetic flux density and core loss of cold-rolled high silicon steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jing; Yang, Ping; Mao, Weimin; Ye, Feng

    2015-11-01

    The effects of texture and grain size on the magnetic flux density and core loss (50-20 kHz) of 0.23 mm-thick cold-rolled high silicon steel sheets are investigated by means of electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), loss separation, and anisotropy parameter (ε) calculation. A model of the hysteresis loss coefficient kh considering average grain size and ε is established. The magnetic flux density at 800 A/m (B8) is closely related to the volume fraction of η-fiber-oriented grains, while the magnetic flux density at 5000 A/m (B50) is closely related to the volume fractions of γ- and λ-fiber-oriented grains in high silicon steel. The hysteresis loss of high silicon steel can be greatly reduced by increasing the grain size and optimizing the texture of the sheets. Although increases in frequencies decrease the effect of texture on core loss, the effect cannot be ignored. As annealing temperature and time increase, the relative difference in core loss between the rolling direction (RD) and the transverse direction (TD) is maintained at higher frequencies because of increases in grain size, decreases in γ texture, and maintenance of a strong η texture. Texture and grain size jointly affect the high-frequency core loss of high silicon steel.

  4. Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope- GLAST Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), and the instrumentation that will be on the spacecraft: Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The presentation revierws in detail the LAT instrument.

  5. Fabrication of metallic nanodots in large-area arrays by mold-to-mold cross imprinting (MTMCI).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sunghoon; Yan, Xiaoming; Contreras, Anthony M; Liddle, J Alexander; Somorjai, Gabor A; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2005-12-01

    We have developed a mold-to-mold cross imprint (MTMCI) process, which redefines an imprint mold with another imprint mold. By performing MTMCI on two identical imprint molds with silicon spacer nanowires in a perpendicular arrangement, we fabricated a large array of sub-30-nm silicon nanopillars. Large-area arrays of Pt dots are then produced using nanoimprint lithography with the silicon nanopillar mold.

  6. Interference and nanoimprint lithography for the patterning of large areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucher, Nico; Hauser, Hubert; Höhn, Oliver; Kübler, Volker; Wellens, Christine; Müller, Claas; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2017-02-01

    Micro- and nanostructures can be used for reflectance reduction or light guidance in applications like photovoltaic solar cells, LEDs or display technology. The combination of interference lithography and nanoimprint lithography enables the fabrication and replication of high resolution structures on large areas. The origination of master structures, seamlessly patterned on areas as large as 1.2 × 1.2 m2 was shown using interference lithography. Within this work we demonstrate our current results on the up-scaling of the replication process chain based on nanoimprint lithography with in-line capable tools. Application examples in the fields of photovoltaics are demonstrated, e.g. the micron-scale patterning of multicrystalline silicon substrates to increase the solar cell efficiency. Furthermore, the lifetime of soft PDMS stamps is investigated. AFM force-distance measurements are introduced as suitable method to quantify the PDMS hardness as a parameter indicating stamp degradation. This technique is subsequently applied to evaluate two different resist materials. Applying the epoxy material (SU-8) with its more complex molecular structure results in a strongly increased stamp lifetime compared to the acrylate resist (Laromer LR 8996). This is a highly valuable result for further developments towards an up-scaled realization of nanoimprint lithography.

  7. Large area flexible solar array design for Space Shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    A large area flexible solar array has been designed for Shuttle power augmentation. The solar array utilizes large area, low cost, weldable solar cells. The paper addresses how the unique requirements of this system are implemented into the design. Economic and reliability issues relating to the optimization of a large area, foldable solar array concomitant to the Shuttle/Orbiter system are reviewed.

  8. Electronic sensor and actuator webs for large-area complex geometry cardiac mapping and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Lu, Nanshu; Wang, Shuodao; Lee, Stephen P.; Keum, Hohyun; D’Angelo, Robert; Klinker, Lauren; Su, Yewang; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Yun-Soung; Ameen, Abid; Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Yihui; de Graff, Bassel; Hsu, Yung-Yu; Liu, ZhuangJian; Ruskin, Jeremy; Xu, Lizhi; Lu, Chi; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Huang, Yonggang; Mansour, Moussa; Slepian, Marvin J.; Rogers, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Curved surfaces, complex geometries, and time-dynamic deformations of the heart create challenges in establishing intimate, nonconstraining interfaces between cardiac structures and medical devices or surgical tools, particularly over large areas. We constructed large area designs for diagnostic and therapeutic stretchable sensor and actuator webs that conformally wrap the epicardium, establishing robust contact without sutures, mechanical fixtures, tapes, or surgical adhesives. These multifunctional web devices exploit open, mesh layouts and mount on thin, bio-resorbable sheets of silk to facilitate handling in a way that yields, after dissolution, exceptionally low mechanical moduli and thicknesses. In vivo studies in rabbit and pig animal models demonstrate the effectiveness of these device webs for measuring and spatially mapping temperature, electrophysiological signals, strain, and physical contact in sheet and balloon-based systems that also have the potential to deliver energy to perform localized tissue ablation. PMID:23150574

  9. Llamas: Large-area microphone arrays and sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Robinson, Josue

    Large-area electronics (LAE) provides a platform to build sensing systems, based on distributing large numbers of densely spaced sensors over a physically-expansive space. Due to their flexible, "wallpaper-like" form factor, these systems can be seamlessly deployed in everyday spaces. They go beyond just supplying sensor readings, but rather they aim to transform the wealth of data from these sensors into actionable inferences about our physical environment. This requires vertically integrated systems that span the entirety of the signal processing chain, including transducers and devices, circuits, and signal processing algorithms. To this end we develop hybrid LAE / CMOS systems, which exploit the complementary strengths of LAE, enabling spatially distributed sensors, and CMOS ICs, providing computational capacity for signal processing. To explore the development of hybrid sensing systems, based on vertical integration across the signal processing chain, we focus on two main drivers: (1) thin-film diodes, and (2) microphone arrays for blind source separation: 1) Thin-film diodes are a key building block for many applications, such as RFID tags or power transfer over non-contact inductive links, which require rectifiers for AC-to-DC conversion. We developed hybrid amorphous / nanocrystalline silicon diodes, which are fabricated at low temperatures (<200 °C) to be compatible with processing on plastic, and have high current densities (5 A/cm2 at 1 V) and high frequency operation (cutoff frequency of 110 MHz). 2) We designed a system for separating the voices of multiple simultaneous speakers, which can ultimately be fed to a voice-command recognition engine for controlling electronic systems. On a device level, we developed flexible PVDF microphones, which were used to create a large-area microphone array. On a circuit level we developed localized a-Si TFT amplifiers, and a custom CMOS IC, for system control, sensor readout and digitization. On a signal processing

  10. Viable route towards large-area 2D MoS2 using magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samassekou, Hassana; Alkabsh, Asma; Wasala, Milinda; Eaton, Miller; Walber, Aaron; Walker, Andrew; Pitkänen, Olli; Kordas, Krisztian; Talapatra, Saikat; Jayasekera, Thushari; Mazumdar, Dipanjan

    2017-06-01

    Structural, interfacial, optical, and transport properties of large-area MoS2 ultra-thin films on BN-buffered silicon substrates fabricated using magnetron sputtering are investigated. A relatively simple growth strategy is demonstrated here that simultaneously promotes superior interfacial and bulk MoS2 properties. Few layers of MoS2 are established using x-ray reflectivity, diffraction, ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy measurements. Layer-specific modeling of optical constants show very good agreement with first-principles calculations. Conductivity measurements reveal that few-layer MoS2 films are more conducting than many-layer films. Photo-conductivity measurements reveal that the sputter deposited MoS2 films compare favorably with other large-area methods. Our work illustrates that sputtering is a viable route for large-area device applications using transition metal dichalcogenides.

  11. Development of large area, low-cost, solar cell processing sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitre, S.; Donon, J.

    1981-01-01

    A cost effective process based on state-of-the-art technology has been developed for the production of large-area (55 sq cm and larger) solar cells. The process is capable of providing silicon and polysilicon cell efficiencies in excess of 10% at an overall cost of 12 c/watt in 1980 dollars. The process provides large throughputs and is suitable for complete automation with high yields. Various stages of the process development are discussed.

  12. Holistic method for evaluating large area transparent conducting electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ritu; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2013-02-01

    Nowadays, specifying the quality of a transparent conducting electrode (TCE) using a figure of merit (FoM) is considered nearly mandatory. However, not much attention is paid to the local variations in the FoM itself across the large area of the TCE. This calls for the definition of a local FoM (LFoM), particularly relevant with regard to several new generation TCEs which have been and are being proposed recently. A LFoM based on local measurements of transmission and sheet resistance, pixel by pixel, would be a Herculean task. The present article addresses this central issue by defining a LFoM based on the diffraction efficiency (DE) of a calibrated high-resolution transmission grating overlaid with a given TCE. The DE value, which critically depends on the periodic nature of the grating material, is shown to be highly sensitive to the various nonuniformities in the TCE overlaid on the grating, with length scales comparable to the grating period. The effectiveness of the so-defined LFoM was demonstrated using a pointer laser and a photodiode in combination with a transmission grating with ∼μm periodicity by taking ITO/glass and ITO/PET as case examples. A metal grating pattern of Cu deposited on seed Pd grating lines was fabricated as an example of new generation TCE and examined for FoM and LFoM, however, without the aid of the external grating. The LFoM based on DE presented here should serve as an excellent screening method for both conventional and emerging TCEs.

  13. Fabrication of large area gratings with sub-micron pitch using mold micromachining

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Barron, C.C.; Stallard, B.; Kaushik, S.

    1997-03-01

    In this work, the authors have applied mold micromachining and standard photolithographic techniques to the fabrication of parts integrated with 0.4 micron pitch diffraction gratings. In principle, the approach should be scaleable to considerably finer pitches. They have achieved this by relying on the thickness of deposited or grown films, instead of photolithography, to determine the grating pitch. The gratings can be made to extend over large areas and the entire process is compatible with batch processing. Literally thousands of parts can be batch fabricated from a single lot of six inch wafers. In the first stage of the process they fabricate a planarized silicon dioxide pad over which the silicon nitride wave guide runs. The grating is formed by first patterning and etching single crystalline silicon to form a series of trenches with well defined pitch. The silicon bounding the trenches is then thinned by thermal oxidation followed by stripping of the silicon dioxide. The trenches are filled by a combination of polysilicon depositions and thermal oxidations. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is used to polish back these structures resulting in a series of alternating 2000 {angstrom} wide lines of silicon and silicon dioxide. The thickness of the lines is determined by the oxidation time and the polysilicon deposition thickness. The silicon lines are selectively recessed by anisotropic reactive ion etching, thus forming the mold for the grating. The mold is filled with low stress silicon nitride deposited by chemical vapor deposition. A wave guide is then patterned into the silicon nitride and the mold is locally removed by a combination of deep silicon trench etching and wet KOH etching. This results in a suspended diffraction grating/membrane over the KOH generated pit.

  14. Low-cost conversion of polycrystalline silicon into sheet by HEM and FAST. [Heat Exchanger Method and Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1980-01-01

    The conversion of polycrystalline silicon to sheet form (the wafers produced are 10 cm x 10 cm cross section with minimum surface damage) by the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and multi-wire Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST), as a means of reducing the cost of solar arrays for adaptation of photovoltaic technology for terrestrial applications, is given. A schematic of a HEM furnace, which includes a silica crucible, and developments in the HEM process are presented. A new machine for slicing with wire was designed and fabricated. The high-speed slicer has been used to slice 19 wafers per cm from 10 cm diameter crystals. Both HEM and FAST are low-cost processes and they have the potential of giving one of the lowest add-on costs ($6.24 and $6.48 per square meter of sheet respectively, with the combination add-on cost of $14.87 per square meter) of this conversion.

  15. Low-cost conversion of polycrystalline silicon into sheet by HEM and FAST. [Heat Exchanger Method and Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1980-01-01

    The conversion of polycrystalline silicon to sheet form (the wafers produced are 10 cm x 10 cm cross section with minimum surface damage) by the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and multi-wire Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST), as a means of reducing the cost of solar arrays for adaptation of photovoltaic technology for terrestrial applications, is given. A schematic of a HEM furnace, which includes a silica crucible, and developments in the HEM process are presented. A new machine for slicing with wire was designed and fabricated. The high-speed slicer has been used to slice 19 wafers per cm from 10 cm diameter crystals. Both HEM and FAST are low-cost processes and they have the potential of giving one of the lowest add-on costs ($6.24 and $6.48 per square meter of sheet respectively, with the combination add-on cost of $14.87 per square meter) of this conversion.

  16. Characterization of large-area pressure sensitive robot skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatzi, Mohammad Nasser; Baptist, Joshua R.; Wijayasinghe, Indika B.; Popa, Dan O.

    2017-05-01

    Sensorized robot skin has considerable promise to enhance robots' tactile perception of surrounding environments. For physical human-robot interaction (pHRI) or autonomous manipulation, a high spatial sensor density is required, typically driven by the skin location on the robot. In our previous study, a 4x4 flexible array of strain sensors were printed and packaged onto Kapton sheets and silicone encapsulants. In this paper, we are extending the surface area of the patch to larger arrays with up to 128 tactel elements. To address scalability, sensitivity, and calibration challenges, a novel electronic module, free of the traditional signal conditioning circuitry was created. The electronic design relies on a software-based calibration scheme using high-resolution analog-to-digital converters with internal programmable gain amplifiers. In this paper, we first show the efficacy of the proposed method with a 4x4 skin array using controlled pressure tests, and then perform procedures to evaluate each sensor's characteristics such as dynamic force-to-strain property, repeatability, and signal-to-noise-ratio. In order to handle larger sensor surfaces, an automated force-controlled test cycle was carried out. Results demonstrate that our approach leads to reliable and efficient methods for extracting tactile models for use in future interaction with collaborative robots.

  17. Lessons Learned During Construction and Test of the GLAST Large Area Telescope Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Latronico, L.; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-08-09

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a satellite gamma-ray observatory designed to explore the sky in the energy range 20MeV {approx_equal} 300GeV, a region populated by emissions from the most energetic and mysterious objects in the cosmos, like black holes, AGNs, supernovae, gamma-ray bursters. The silicon-strip tracker is the heart of the photon detection system, and with its 80 m{sup 2} of surface and almost 1M channels is one of the largest silicon tracker ever built. Its construction, to be completed by 2006, and the stringent requirements from operation in space, represent a major technological challenge. Critical design, technology and system engineering issues are addressed in this paper, as well as the approach being followed during construction, test and qualification of the LAT silicon tracker.

  18. Silicon sheet with molecular beam epitaxy for high efficiency solar cells. Final technical report, March 22, 1982-April 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    A two-year program has been carried out for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which the UCLA silicon MBE facility has been used to attempt to grow silicon solar cells of high efficiency. MBE ofers the potential of growing complex and arbitrary doping profiles with 10 A depth resolution. It is the only technique taht can readily grow built-in front and back surface fields of any desired depth and value in silicon solar cells, or the more complicated profiles needed for a double junction cascade cell, all in silicon, connected in series by a tunnel junction. Although the dopant control required for such structures has been demonstrated in silicon by UCLA, crystal quality at the p-n junctions is still too poor to allow the other advantages to be exploited. Results from other laboratories indicate that this problem will soon be overcome. A computer analysis of the double cascade all in silicon shows that efficiencies can be raised over that of any single silicon cell by 1 or 2%, and that open circuit voltage of almost twice that of a single cell should be possible.

  19. Large-Area Permanent-Magnet ECR Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2007-01-01

    A 40-cm-diameter plasma device has been developed as a source of ions for material-processing and ion-thruster applications. Like the device described in the immediately preceding article, this device utilizes electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) excited by microwave power in a magnetic field to generate a plasma in an electrodeless (noncontact) manner and without need for an electrically insulating, microwave-transmissive window at the source. Hence, this device offers the same advantages of electrodeless, windowless design - low contamination and long operational life. The device generates a uniform, high-density plasma capable of sustaining uniform ion-current densities at its exit plane while operating at low pressure [<10(exp -4) torr (less than about 1.3 10(exp -2) Pa)] and input power <200 W at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. Though the prototype model operates at 2.45 GHz, operation at higher frequencies can be achieved by straightforward modification to the input microwave waveguide. Higher frequency operation may be desirable in those applications that require even higher background plasma densities. In the design of this ECR plasma source, there are no cumbersome, power-hungry electromagnets. The magnetic field in this device is generated by a permanent-magnet circuit that is optimized to generate resonance surfaces. The microwave power is injected on the centerline of the device. The resulting discharge plasma jumps into a "high mode" when the input power rises above 150 W. This mode is associated with elevated plasma density and high uniformity. The large area and uniformity of the plasma and the low operating pressure are well suited for such material-processing applications as etching and deposition on large silicon wafers. The high exit-plane ion-current density makes it possible to attain a high rate of etching or deposition. The plasma potential is <3 V low enough that there is little likelihood of sputtering, which, in plasma processing, is undesired

  20. Binding of carbon coated nano-silicon in graphene sheets by wet ball-milling and pyrolysis as high performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Hu, Renzong; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Jiangwen; Zhu, Min

    2016-06-01

    A novel approach has been developed to prepare silicon@carbon/graphene sheets (Si@C/G) composite with a unique structure, in which carbon coated Si nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in a matrix of graphene sheets, to enhance the cycleability and electronic conductivity of Si-based anodes for Li-ion batteries. In this study, Si nanoparticles and expanded graphite (EG) are treated by combining high-energy wet ball-milling in sucrose solution with subsequent pyrolysis treatment to produce this Si@C/G composite. To achieve better overall electrochemical performance, the carbon content of the composites is also studied systematically. The as-designed Si30@C40/G30 (Si:C:G = 30:40:30, by weight) composite exhibits a high Li-storage capacity of 1259 mAh g-1 at a current density of 0.2 A g-1 in the first cycle. Further, a stable cycleability with 99.1/88.2% capacity retention from initial reversible charge capacity can be achieved over 100/300 cycles, showing great promise for batteries applications. This good electrochemical performance can be attributed to the uniform coating and binding effect of pyrolytic carbon as well as the network of graphene sheets, which increase the electronic conductivity and Li+ diffusion in the composite, and effectively accommodated the volume change of Si nanoparticles during the Li+ alloying and dealloying processes.

  1. Improve large area uniformity and production capacity of laser interference lithography with beam flattening device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yin-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Xiang; Lin, Te-Hsun; Yu, Chun-Wen; Fu, Chien-Chung

    2016-03-01

    Laser interference lithography (LIL) is a maskless lithography technique with many advantages such as simple optical design, inexpensive, infinite depth of focus, and large area patterning with single exposure. However, the intensity of normal laser beam is Gaussian distribution. In order to obtain large area uniform structure, we have to expand the laser beam much bigger than the wafer and use only the center part of the beam. Resulting in wasting lots of energy and the production capacity decrease. In this study, we designed a beam shaping device which consists of two parallel fused silicon optical window with different coating on both side. Two optical window form an air thin film. When the expanded laser beam pass through the device, the beam will experience many refraction and reflection between two optical window and interference with each other. The transmittance of laser beam will depend on the incident angle. The output intensity distribution will change from Gaussian distribution to a flat top distribution. In our experiment, we combined the beam shaping device with a Lloyd's mirror LIL system. Experiment results indicated that the LIL system with beam shaping device can obtain large area uniform pattern. And compare with the traditional Lloyd's mirror LIL system, the exposure time is shorten up to 4.5 times. In conclusion, this study design a beam flattening device for LIL system. The flat top beam can improve the large area uniformity and the production capacity of LIL. Making LIL more suitable for industry application.

  2. Extraordinary suppression of carrier scattering in large area graphene oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Negishi, R. Kobayashi, Y.

    2014-12-22

    In this study, we find that thermal treatment in ethanol vapor has a remarkable suppression effect of carrier scattering occurring between reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes in large area films. We observe excellent electrical properties such as high carrier mobility (∼5 cm{sup 2}/Vs) and low sheet resistance (∼40 KΩ/□) for the rGO films. From the electrical conductivity analysis of large area rGO films using two-dimensional variable range hopping model and structural analysis using Raman spectra measured from the rGO films, we reveal that the significant effect is caused by the expansion of conjugated π-electron system in rGO flake due to the efficient restoration of graphitic structure.

  3. Ultrafast Nanofiltration through Large-Area Single-Layered Graphene Membranes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanzhe; Hu, Yongyou; Koehler, Stephan; Cai, Liheng; Wen, Junjie; Tan, Xiaojun; Xu, Weiwei L; Sheng, Qian; Hou, Xu; Xue, Jianming; Yu, Miao; Weitz, David

    2017-03-22

    Perforated single-layered graphene has demonstrated selectivity and flux that is orders of magnitude greater than state-of-the-art polymer membranes. However, only individual graphene sheets with sizes up to tens of micrometers have been successfully fabricated for pressurized permeation studies. Scaling-up and reinforcement of these atomic membranes with minimum cracks and pinholes remains a major hurdle for practical applications. We develop a large-area in situ, phase-inversion casting technique to create 63 cm(2) high-quality single-layered perforated graphene membranes for ultrafast nanofiltration that can operate at pressures up to 50 bar. This result demonstrates the feasibility of our technique for creating robust large-area, high quality, single-layered graphene and its potential use as a pressurized nanofiltration membrane.

  4. Toward Large-Area Sub-Arcsecond X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Allured, Ryan; Atkins, Carolyn; Burrows, David N.; Cao, Jian; Chalifoux, Brandon D.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Elsner, Ronald F.; Graham, Michael E.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; McMuldroch, Stuart; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Riveros, Raul E.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Saha, Timo T.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Vaynman, Semyon; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Wang, Xiaoli; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The future of x-ray astronomy depends upon development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (>1 sq m) and finer angular resolution(<1).Combined with the special requirements of nested grazing incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of spaceborne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging. Achieving this goal will require precision fabrication, alignment, mounting, and assembly of large areas (>100 sq m) of lightweight (1 kg/sq m areal density) high quality mirrors-possibly entailing active (in-space adjustable) alignment and figure correction. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward large area sub-arcsecond x-ray telescopes. Key words: X-ray telescopes, x-ray optics, active optics, electroactive devices, silicon mirrors, differential deposition, ion implantation.

  5. Design study of large area 8 cm x 8 cm wrapthrough cells for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garlick, George F. J.; Lillington, David R.

    1987-01-01

    The design of large area silicon solar cells for the projected NASA space station is discussed. It is based on the NASA specification for the cells which calls for an 8 cm by 8 cm cell of wrapthrough type with gridded back contacts. The beginning of life (BOL) power must be 1.039 watts per cell or larger and maximum end of life (EOL) after 10 years in the prescribed orbit under an equivalent 1MeV electron radiation damage fluence of 5 times 10 to the 13th power e/square cm. On orbit efficiency is to be optimized by a low thermal absorptance goal (thermal alpha) of .63.

  6. Influence of copper crystal surface on the CVD growth of large area monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Rim, K. T.; Zhou, H.; He, R.; Heinz, Tony; Pinczuk, A.; Flynn, George; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of the surface structure of copper single crystals on the growth of large area monolayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). Using atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we find that graphene grows primarily in registry with the underlying copper lattice for both Cu(111) and Cu(100). The graphene has a hexagonal superstructure on Cu(111) with a significant electronic component, whereas it has a linear superstructure on Cu(100). Graphene on Cu(111) forms a microscopically uniform sheet, the quality of which is determined by the presence of grain boundaries where graphene grains with different orientations meet. Graphene grown on Cu(100) under similar conditions does not form a uniform sheet and instead displays exposed nanoscale edges. Our results indicate the importance of the copper crystal structure on the microstructure of graphene films produced by CVD.

  7. Mass transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals between silicone sheets and through plant leaves and low-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Hamid; Bolinius, Damien Johann; Jahnke, Annika; MacLeod, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    Plant leaves play an important role in the fate of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in the environment. Yet much remains unknown about the permeability of leaves by HOCs. In this pilot study we measured (i) the kinetics of mass transfer of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and six polychlorinated biphenyls between a spiked and an unspiked sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in direct contact with each other for 24 h and (ii) kinetics of mass transfer of two PAHs through leaves and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in a passive dosing experiment by inserting these matrices between the two sheets of PDMS for 48 h. The kinetics of mass transfer of fluoranthene between PDMS sheets in direct contact were a factor of 12 slower than those reported in the literature. The kinetics of mass transfer of fluorene and phenanthrene through leaves were within the range of those previously reported for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid through isolated cuticles. Our results provide a proof-of-concept demonstration that the passive dosing method applied in this study can be used to measure the mass transfer coefficients of organic chemicals through leaves. Key recommendations for future experiments are to load the PDMS at the highest feasible concentrations to avoid working at analyte levels close to the limit of detection, to keep the leaves moist and to minimize potential pathways for contamination of the PDMS sheets by exposure to laboratory air. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-02-28

    Efficient deposition of high-quality coatings often requires controlled application of excited or ionized particles. These particles are either condensing (film-forming) or assisting by providing energy and momentum to the film growth process, resulting in densification, sputtering/etching, modification of stress, roughness, texture, etc. In this review, the technical means are surveyed enabling large area application of ions and plasmas, with ion energies ranging from a few eV to a few keV. Both semiconductortype large area (single wafer or batch processing with {approx} 1000 cm{sup 2}) and in-line web and glass-coating-type large area (> 10{sup 7} m{sup 2} annually) are considered. Characteristics and differences between plasma and ion sources are explained. The latter include gridded and gridless sources. Many examples are given, including sources based on DC, RF, and microwave discharges, some with special geometries like hollow cathodes and E x B configurations.

  9. Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using Nanosphere Photolithography

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Large area periodic nanostructures exhibit unique optical and electronic properties and have found many applications, such as photonic band-gap materials, high dense data storage, and photonic devices. We have developed a maskless photolithography method—Nanosphere Photolithography (NSP)—to produce a large area of uniform nanopatterns in the photoresist utilizing the silica micro-spheres to focus UV light. Here, we will extend the idea to fabricate metallic nanostructures using the NSP method. We produced large areas of periodic uniform nanohole array perforated in different metallic films, such as gold and aluminum. The diameters of these nanoholes are much smaller than the wavelength of UV light used and they are very uniformly distributed. The method introduced here inherently has both the advantages of photolithography and self-assembled methods. Besides, it also generates very uniform repetitive nanopatterns because the focused beam waist is almost unchanged with different sphere sizes.

  10. Perovskite Solar Cells with Large-Area CVD-Graphene for Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Felix; Gluba, Marc A; Albrecht, Steve; Rappich, Jörg; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Nickel, Norbert H

    2015-07-16

    Perovskite solar cells with transparent contacts may be used to compensate for thermalization losses of silicon solar cells in tandem devices. This offers a way to outreach stagnating efficiencies. However, perovskite top cells in tandem structures require contact layers with high electrical conductivity and optimal transparency. We address this challenge by implementing large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition as a highly transparent electrode in perovskite solar cells, leading to identical charge collection efficiencies. Electrical performance of solar cells with a graphene-based contact reached those of solar cells with standard gold contacts. The optical transmission by far exceeds that of reference devices and amounts to 64.3% below the perovskite band gap. Finally, we demonstrate a four-terminal tandem device combining a high band gap graphene-contacted perovskite top solar cell (Eg = 1.6 eV) with an amorphous/crystalline silicon bottom solar cell (Eg = 1.12 eV).

  11. Large-area metallic photonic lattices for military applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    In this project we developed photonic crystal modeling capability and fabrication technology that is scaleable to large area. An intelligent optimization code was developed to find the optimal structure for the desired spectral response. In terms of fabrication, an exhaustive survey of fabrication techniques that would meet the large area requirement was reduced to Deep X-ray Lithography (DXRL) and nano-imprint. Using DXRL, we fabricated a gold logpile photonic crystal in the <100> plane. For the nano-imprint technique, we fabricated a cubic array of gold squares. These two examples also represent two classes of metallic photonic crystal topologies, the connected network and cermet arrangement.

  12. Highly Conductive and Transparent Large-Area Bilayer Graphene Realized by MoCl5 Intercalation.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroki; Jeon, Il; Maruyama, Mina; Kawahara, Kenji; Terao, Yuri; Ding, Dong; Matsumoto, Rika; Matsuo, Yutaka; Okada, Susumu; Ago, Hiroki

    2017-09-18

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) comprises a 2D nanospace sandwiched by two parallel graphene sheets that can be used to intercalate molecules or ions for attaining novel functionalities. However, intercalation is mostly demonstrated with small, exfoliated graphene flakes. This study demonstrates intercalation of molybdenum chloride (MoCl5 ) into a large-area, uniform BLG sheet, which is grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This study reveals that the degree of MoCl5 intercalation strongly depends on the stacking order of the graphene; twist-stacked graphene shows a much higher degree of intercalation than AB-stacked. Density functional theory calculations suggest that weak interlayer coupling in the twist-stacked graphene contributes to the effective intercalation. By selectively synthesizing twist-rich BLG films through control of the CVD conditions, low sheet resistance (83 Ω ▫(-1) ) is realized after MoCl5 intercalation, while maintaining high optical transmittance (≈95%). The low sheet resistance state is relatively stable in air for more than three months. Furthermore, the intercalated BLG film is applied to organic solar cells, realizing a high power conversion efficiency. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Microstructure and texture evolution of ultra-thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheet fabricated using strip casting and three-stage cold rolling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Hai-Tao; Wang, Yin-Ping; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2017-03-01

    A 0.1 mm-thick grain-oriented silicon steel sheet was successfully produced using strip casting and three-stage cold rolling method. The microstructure, texture and inhibitor evolution during the processing was briefly analyzed. It was found that Goss texture was absent in the hot rolled sheet because of the lack of shear deformation. After normalizing, a large number of dispersed MnS precipitates with the size range of 15-90 nm were produced. During first cold rolling, dense shear bands were generated in the deformed ferrite grains, resulting in the intense Goss texture after first intermediate annealing. The microstructure was further refined and homogenized during the subsequent cold rolling and annealing processes. After primary recrystallization annealing, a homogeneous microstructure consisting of fine and equiaxed grains was produced while the associated texture was characterized by a strong γ-fiber texture. Finally, a complete secondary recrystallization microstructure consisting of entirely large Goss grains was produced. The magnetic induction B8 and iron loss P10/400 was 1.79 T and 6.9 W/kg, respectively.

  14. Porous reduced graphene oxide sheet wrapped silicon composite fabricated by steam etching for lithium-ion battery application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y. J.; Xiong, Q. Q.; Tong, Y. Y.; Li, Y.; Wang, X. L.; Gu, C. D.; Tu, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    A novel of Si/porous reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite is fabricated by steam etching of Si/rGO aerogel. The rGO sheets with nano-holes build a unique three-dimensional porous network and can encapsulate the Si nanoparticles. The porous structure of Si/rGO composite can reduce the transfer distance of Li ions and restrain the aggregation and destruction of Si particles. The in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation demonstrates that the porous rGO sheets help the entire electrode to maintain highly conductive and facilitate the lithiation of Si nanoparticles. The composite electrode presents high specific capacity and good cycling stability (1004 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1 up to 100 cycles).

  15. Large area high-speed metrology SPM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapetek, P.; Valtr, M.; Picco, L.; Payton, O. D.; Martinek, J.; Yacoot, A.; Miles, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present a large area high-speed measuring system capable of rapidly generating nanometre resolution scanning probe microscopy data over mm2 regions. The system combines a slow moving but accurate large area XYZ scanner with a very fast but less accurate small area XY scanner. This arrangement enables very large areas to be scanned by stitching together the small, rapidly acquired, images from the fast XY scanner while simultaneously moving the slow XYZ scanner across the region of interest. In order to successfully merge the image sequences together two software approaches for calibrating the data from the fast scanner are described. The first utilizes the low uncertainty interferometric sensors of the XYZ scanner while the second implements a genetic algorithm with multiple parameter fitting during the data merging step of the image stitching process. The basic uncertainty components related to these high-speed measurements are also discussed. Both techniques are shown to successfully enable high-resolution, large area images to be generated at least an order of magnitude faster than with a conventional atomic force microscope.

  16. Large-area Overhead Manipulator for Access of Fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multi-axis, cable-driven manipulators have evolved over many years providing large area suspended platform access, programmability, relatively rigid and flexibly-positioned platform control and full six degree of freedom (DOF) manipulation of sensors and tools. We describe innovations for a new six...

  17. Spatially explicit shallow landslide susceptibility mapping over large areas

    Treesearch

    Dino Bellugi; William E. Dietrich; Jonathan Stock; Jim McKean; Brian Kazian; Paul Hargrove

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in downscaling climate model precipitation predictions now yield spatially explicit patterns of rainfall that could be used to estimate shallow landslide susceptibility over large areas. In California, the United States Geological Survey is exploring community emergency response to the possible effects of a very large simulated storm event and to do so...

  18. Large Area Superconducting TES Spiderweb Bolometer for Multi-mode Cavity Microwave Detect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasotti, M.; Bagliani, D.; Corsini, D.; De Bernardis, P.; Gatti, F.; Gualtieri, R.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.; Pizzigoni, G.; Schillaci, A.

    2014-05-01

    For the cosmic microwave background, the increase of the sensitivity of present superconducting TES Spiderweb Bolometers can be done coupling them to a large set of modes of the EM radiation inside the cavity. This will require a proper shaping of the horn-cavity assembly for the focal plane of the microwave telescope and the use of large area bolometers. Large area spiderweb bolometers of 8 mm diameter and a mesh size of 250 μm are fabricated in order to couple with approximately the first 20 modes of the cavity at about 140 GHz. These bolometers are fabricated with micro machining techniques from silicon wafer covered with SiO2 - Si3N4 CVD thick films, 0.3 μm and 1 μm respectively. The sensor is a Ti/Au/Ti 3 layer TES sensor with Tc tuned in the 330-380 mK and 2 mK transition width. The TES is electronically coupled to the EM gold absorber that is grown on to the spiderweb mesh in order to sense the temperature of the electron gas heated by the EM radiation. The gold absorber mesh has 5 um beam size over a Si3N4 10 μm beam size supporting mesh. The Si3N4 mesh is then fully suspended by means of DRIE back etching of the Si substrate. Here we present the first results of these large area bolometers.

  19. The role of printing techniques for large-area dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Paolo; Vesce, Luigi; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-10-01

    The versatility of printing technologies and their intrinsic ability to outperform other techniques in large-area deposition gives scope to revolutionize the photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing field. Printing methods are commonly used in conventional silicon-based PVs to cover part of the production process. Screen printing techniques, for example, are applied to deposit electrical contacts on the silicon wafer. However, it is with the advent of third generation PVs that printing/coating techniques have been extensively used in almost all of the manufacturing processes. Among all the third generation PVs, dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) technology has been developed up to commercialization levels. DSSCs and modules can be fabricated by adopting all of the main printing techniques on both rigid and flexible substrates. This allows an easy tuning of cell/module characteristics to the desired application. Transparency, colour, shape, layout and other DSSC’s features can be easily varied by changing the printing parameters and paste/ink formulations used in the printing process. This review focuses on large-area printing/coating technologies for the fabrication of DSSCs devices. The most used and promising techniques are presented underlining the process parameters and applications.

  20. Large area self-assembled masking for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, N.; Pap, A. E.; Horváth, E.; Volk, J.; Bársony, I.; Deák, A.; Hórvölgyi, Z.

    2006-08-01

    Ordered porous structures for photonic application were fabricated on p- and n-type silicon by means of masking against ion implantation with Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. LB films from Stöber silica spheres [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 26, 62 (1968)] of 350nm diameter were applied in the boron and phosphorus ion-implantation step, thereby offering a laterally periodic doping pattern. Ordered porous silicon structures were obtained after performing an anodic etch and were then removed by alkaline etching resulting in the required two-dimensional photonic arrangement. The LB silica masks and the resulting silicon structures were studied by field emission scanning electron microscope analysis.

  1. Large-area sheet task: Advanced dendritic-web-growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Schruben, J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermally generated stresses in the growing web crystal were reduced. These stresses, which if too high cause the ribbon to degenerate, were reduced by a factor of three, resulting in the demonstrated growth of high-quality web crystals to widths of 5.4 cm. This progress was brought about chiefly by the application of thermal models to the development of low-stress growth configurations. A new temperature model was developed which can analyze the thermal effects of much more complex lid and top shield configurations than was possible with the old lumped shield model. Growth experiments which supplied input data such as actual shield temperature and melt levels were used to verify the modeling results. Desirable modifications in the melt level-sensing circuitry were made in the new experimental web growth furnace, and this furnace has been used to carry out growth experiments under steady-state conditions. New growth configurations were tested in long growth runs at Westinghouse AESD which produced wider, lower stress and higher quality web crystals than designs previously used.

  2. A novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Dey, Dibyendu; Memis, Omer G.; Katsnelson, Alex; Mohseni, Hooman

    2008-08-01

    With nanotechnology becoming widely used, many applications such as plasmonics, sensors, storage devices, solar cells, nano-filtration and artificial kidneys require the structures with large areas of uniform periodic nanopatterns. Most of the current nano-manufacturing techniques, including photolithography, electron-beam lithography, and focal ion beam milling, are either slow or expensive to be applied into the areas. Here, we demonstrate an alternative and novel lithography technique - Nanosphere Photolithography (NSP) - that generates a large area of highly uniform periodic nanoholes or nanoposts by utilizing the monolayer of hexagonally close packed (HCP) silica microspheres as super-lenses on top of photoresist. The size of the nanopatterns generated is almost independent of the sphere sizes and hence extremely uniform patterns can be obtained. We demonstrate that the method can produce hexagonally packed arrays of hole of sub-250 nm size in positive photoresist using a conventional exposure system with a broadband UV source centered at 400 nm. We also show a large area of highly uniform gold nanoholes (~180 nm) and nanoposts (~300nm) array with the period of 1 μm fabricated by the combination of lift-off and NSP. The process is not limited to gold. Similar structures have been shown with aluminum and silicon dioxide layer. The period and size of the structures can also be tuned by changing proper parameters. The technique applying self-assembled and focusing properties of micro-/nano-spheres into photolithography establishes a new paradigm for mask-less photolithography technique, allowing rapid and economical creation of large areas of periodic nanostructures with a high throughput.

  3. Characterization testing of large area solar cell assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Jay S.; Gelb, Steven W.; Goldhammer, Leland J.; Goodelle, George S.; Judson, Audrey L.

    A complete characterization program has been performed on two large area (7 cm x 6 cm) solar cell types which will be used on the Hughes HS 393 satellite solar arrays. Each type was subjected to a series of tests which provided the data needed to accurately predict the solar array performance at end of life and demonstrated the mechanical integrity of the device. Characterization data presented include optical properties of the devices, cell current-voltage characteristics as a function of temperature and angle of light incidence, and solar cell performance after electron irradiation. Mechanical data presented include the results of cell strength tests, contact solderability tests, and coupon thermal cycling tests. The results indicate that the large-area solar cells are mechanically equivalent and electrically superior to cells of conventional size previously characterized.

  4. Progress on large-area polarization grating fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskiewicz, Matthew N.; Kim, Jihwan; Li, Yanming; Komanduri, Ravi K.; Escuti, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    Over the last several years, we have pioneered liquid crystal polarization gratings (PGs), in both switchable and polymer versions. We have also introduced their use in many applications, including mechanical/non-mechanical laser beam steering and polarization imaging/sensing. Until now, conventional holographic congurations were used to create PGs where the diameter of the active area was limited to 1-2 inches. In this paper, we discuss a new holography setup to fabricate large area PGs using spherical waves as the diverging coherent beams. Various design parameters of this setup are examined for impact on the quality of the recorded PG profile. Using this setup, we demonstrate a large area polymer PG with approximately 66 inch square area, and present detailed characterization.

  5. Updateable 3D Display Using Large Area Photorefractive Polymer Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    holography , photorefractive polymers, 3D display, large area displays, 3D visualization, 3D rendering, dye-doped polymers U U U SAR 38 Charles Lee (703) 696...Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012), MIT Media Lab, Boston MA, June 2012.  Pierre St Hilaire et al., “Are stereograms holograms? A human...perception analysis of sampled perspective holography ” 9th International Symposium on Display Holography (ISDH 2012), MIT Media Lab, Boston MA, June 2012

  6. Fiber-optic large area average temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, L.L.; Forman, P.R.

    1994-05-01

    In many instances the desired temperature measurement is only the spatial average temperature over a large area; eg. ground truth calibration for satellite imaging system, or average temperature of a farm field. By making an accurate measurement of the optical length of a long fiber-optic cable, we can determine the absolute temperature averaged over its length and hence the temperature of the material in contact with it.

  7. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2011-03-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  8. Characterization of Large Area APDs for the EXO-200 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, R.; LePort, F.; Pocar, A.; Kumar, K.; Odian, A.; Prescott, C.Y.; Tenev, V.; Ackerman, N.; Akimov, D.; Auger, M.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Cook, S.; deVoe, R.; Dolinski, M.J.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Fierlinger, P.; Flatt, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bern U., LHEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Alabama U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Carleton U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bern U., LHEP /SLAC /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2011-12-02

    EXO-200 uses 468 large area avalanche photodiodes (LAAPDs) for detection of scintillation light in an ultra-low-background liquid xenon (LXe) detector. We describe initial measurements of dark noise, gain and response to xenon scintillation light of LAAPDs at temperatures from room temperature to 169 K - the temperature of liquid xenon. We also describe the individual characterization of more than 800 LAAPDs for selective installation in the EXO-200 detector.

  9. High Energy Astrophysics with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Observatory. It includes information about the LAT, and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), detection of the quiet sun and the moon in gamma rays, Pulsars observed by the observatory, Globular Star Clusters, Active Galactic Nucleus, and Gamma-Ray Bursts, with specific information about GRB 080916C.

  10. Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

    1999-07-28

    There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

  11. Development of large-area CZT detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl C.; Westergaard, Niels J.; Jonasson, Per; van Pamelen, Mike A.; Reglero, Victor; Eyles, Christopher J.; Neubert, Torsten

    1999-10-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT x-ray and gamma ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed.

  12. Gravure printing of graphene for large-area flexible electronics.

    PubMed

    Secor, Ethan B; Lim, Sooman; Zhang, Heng; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F; Hersam, Mark C

    2014-07-09

    Gravure printing of graphene is demonstrated for the rapid production of conductive patterns on flexible substrates. Development of suitable inks and printing parameters enables the fabrication of patterns with a resolution down to 30 μm. A mild annealing step yields conductive lines with high reliability and uniformity, providing an efficient method for the integration of graphene into large-area printed and flexible electronics.

  13. Toward Highly Efficient Large-Area ITO-Free Organic Solar Cells with a Conductance-Gradient Transparent Electrode.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lijian; Zhang, Shuhua; Li, Hanying; Chen, Hongzheng

    2015-11-18

    Highly efficient large-area organic solar cells (OSCs) with power conversion efficiency up to 7.09%, and device area of 4 cm(2) are demonstrated on flexible substrates. A conductance- or thickness-gradient ultra-thin Ag-based transparent electrode is developed to better balance the light trapping and energy loss, owing to the inhomogeneous energy-loss density on the large OSC sheet. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Fabrication of large area flexible nanoplasmonic templates with flow coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qian; Devetter, Brent M.; Roosendaal, Timothy; LaBerge, Max; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Alvine, Kyle J.

    2017-07-01

    We describe the development of a custom-built two-axis flow coater for the deposition of polymeric nanosphere monolayers that could be used in the fabrication of large area nanoplasmonic films. The technique described here has the capability of depositing large areas (up to 7 in. × 10 in.) of self-assembled monolayers of polymeric nanospheres onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. Here, three sets of films consisting of different diameters (ranging from 100 to 300 nm) of polymeric nanospheres were used to demonstrate the capabilities of this instrument. To improve the surface wettability of the PET substrates during wet-deposition, we enhanced the wettability by using a forced air blown-arc plasma treatment system. Both the local microstructure, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, describing monolayer and multilayer coverage, and the overall macroscopic uniformity of the resultant nanostructured film were optimized by controlling the relative stage to blade speed and nanosphere concentration. We also show using a smaller nanoparticle template that such monolayers can be used to form nanoplasmonic films. As this flow-coating approach is a scalable technique, large area films such as the ones described here have a variety of crucial emerging applications in areas such as energy, catalysis, and chemical sensing.

  15. Chemical doping of large-area stacked graphene films for use as transparent, conducting electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kasry, Amal; Kuroda, Marcelo A; Martyna, Glenn J; Tulevski, George S; Bol, Ageeth A

    2010-07-27

    Graphene is considered a leading candidate to replace conventional transparent conducting electrodes because of its high transparency and exceptional transport properties. The effect of chemical p-type doping on graphene stacks was studied in order to reduce the sheet resistance of graphene films to values approaching those of conventional transparent conducting oxides. In this report, we show that large-area, stacked graphene films are effectively p-doped with nitric acid. The doping decreases the sheet resistance by a factor of 3, yielding films comprising eight stacked layers with a sheet resistance of 90 Omega/(square) at a transmittance of 80%. The films were doped either after all of the layers were stacked (last-layer-doped) or after each layer was added (interlayer-doped). A theoretical model that accurately describes the stacked graphene film system as a resistor network was developed. The model defines a characteristic transfer length where all the channels in the graphene films actively contribute to electrical transport. The experimental data shows a linear increase in conductivity with the number of graphene layers, indicating that each layer provides an additional transport channel, in good agreement with the theoretical model.

  16. Ag paste-based nanomesh electrodes for large-area touch screen panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sung-il; Kyeom Kim, Pan; Ha, Tae-gyu

    2017-10-01

    This study reports a novel method for fabricating a nickel nanomesh mold using phase shift lithography, suitable for use in large-area touch screen panel applications. Generally, the values of light transmittance and sheet resistance of metal mesh transparent conducting electrode (TCE) films are determined by the ratio of the aperture to metal areas. In this study, taking into consideration the optimal light transmittance, sheet resistance, and pattern visibility issues, the line width of the metal mesh pattern was ~1 µm, and the pitch of the pattern was ~100 µm. In addition, a novel method of manufacturing wiring electrodes using a phase shift lithography process was also developed and evaluated. A TCE film with a size of 370 mm  ×  470 mm was prepared and evaluated for its light transmittance and sheet resistance. In addition, wiring electrodes with a length of 70 mm were fabricated and their line resistances evaluated by varying their line width.

  17. A method to characterize the sheet resistance of a laser doped line on crystalline silicon wafers for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kee Soon; Tjahjono, Budi S.; Uddin, Ashraf; Wenham, Stuart R.

    2011-02-28

    A theory is presented that correlates the different sheet resistance (R{sub sh}) values of the same phosphorus laser doped (LD) line approximated by two different methods: the LD box and transfer length measurement (TLM) methods. By modeling the LD line junction profile, an effective R{sub sh} value using the LD box method is obtained and used to derive the R{sub sh} upper limit (R{sub sh.UL}) of the LD line. This value matches within {+-}10% of the R{sub sh.UL} value obtained using the TLM method across four lasing speeds. Subsequently, a LD box method is introduced to determine the LD line R{sub sh.UL} easily without modeling work.

  18. Large area, low cost space solar cells with optional wraparound contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, D.; Mendoza, N.; Williams, R.

    1981-01-01

    Design parameters for two large area, low cost solar cells are presented, and electron irradiation testing, thermal alpha testing, and cell processing are discussed. The devices are a 2 ohm-cm base resistivity silicon cell with an evaporated aluminum reflector produced in a dielectric wraparound cell, and a 10 ohm-cm silicon cell with the BSF/BSR combination and a conventional contact system. Both cells are 5.9 x 5.9 cm and require 200 micron thick silicon material due to mission weight constraints. Normalized values for open circuit voltage, short circuit current, and maximum power calculations derived from electron radiation testing are given. In addition, thermal alpha testing values of absorptivity and emittance are included. A pilot cell processing run produced cells averaging 14.4% efficiencies at AMO 28 C. Manufacturing for such cells will be on a mechanized process line, and the area of coverslide application technology must be considered in order to achieve cost effective production.

  19. Nanostructured arrays of stacked graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Artur; Löffler, Daniel; Bajales, Noelia; Ulas, Seyithan; Machatschek, Rainhard; Malik, Sharali; Brenner, Patrice; Kappes, Manfred M.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular oxygen etching of HOPG surfaces prepatterned by Ga+ focused-ion-beam irradiation (FIB) has been used to generate large-area arrays of nanometer-sized graphite blocks. AFM and SEM imaging show that structures with lateral sizes down to ˜100 nm and heights of between 30 and 55 nm can be routinely fabricated. The trenches separating the graphite blocks form in the early oxidation stages via preferential gasification (into CO and CO2) of the gridlike amorphized carbon regions written by FIB. In the later oxidative etching stages, gasification of the graphite nanoprism faces laterally terminating the graphite blocks becomes the major reaction channel. Correspondingly, graphite blocks are (further) reduced in lateral extent while the trenches in between are widened. Raman and photoionization spectroscopies indicate that the quality of the topmost nG sheet(s) covering the blocks also decreases with increasing etching time—as the size and lateral density of defect-mediated etch pits increases. nG block arrays are useful substrates with which to probe the size-dependent properties of nanographene, as they comprise large numbers of uniform sheets (ca. 4 × 1010 cm-2 for an array of 0.5 × 0.5 μm2) thus allowing for the application of area-integrating spectroscopic methods. We demonstrate this by examining the Raman features of nG block arrays which include a graphene-rim-region fingerprint mode. Individual nG sheets can be exfoliated from nG stacks by means of electron-irradiation-induced charging. We have explored a number of printing/manipulation strategies aimed at controllable electromechanical transfer of nG sheet arrays to silicon wafers.

  20. Development of a large area microstructure photomultiplier assembly (LAMPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, E. T. H.; Dick, M.; Facina, M.; Wakeford, D.; Andrews, H. R.; Ing, H.; Best, D.; Baginski, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    Large area (> m2) position-sensitive readout of scintillators is important for passive/active gamma and neutron imaging for counter-terrorism applications. The goal of the LAMPA project is to provide a novel, affordable, large-area photodetector (8" x 8") by replacing the conventional dynodes of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with electron multiplier microstructure boards (MSBs) that can be produced using industrial manufacturing techniques. The square, planar format of the LAMPA assemblies enables tiling of multiple units to support large area applications. The LAMPA performance objectives include comparable gain, noise, timing, and energy resolution relative to conventional PMTs, as well as spatial resolution in the few mm range. The current LAMPA prototype is a stack of 8" x 8" MSBs made commercially by chemical etching of a molybdenum substrate and coated with hydrogen-terminated boron-doped diamond for high secondary emission yield (SEY). The layers of MSBs are electrically isolated using ceramic standoffs. Field-shaping grids are located between adjacent boards to achieve good transmission of electrons from one board to the next. The spacing between layers and the design of the microstructure pattern and grids were guided by simulations performed using an electro-optics code. A position sensitive anode board at the back of the stack of MSBs provides 2-D readout. This presentation discusses the trade studies performed in the design of the MSBs, the measurements of SEY from various electro-emissive materials, the electro-optics simulations conducted, the design of the 2-D readout, and the mechanical aspects of the LAMPA design, in order to achieve a gain of > 104 in an 8-stage stack of MSBs, suitable for use with various scintillators when coupled to an appropriate photocathode.

  1. Pilot Production of Large Area Microchannel Plates and Picosecond Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minot, M.; Adams, B.; Abiles, M.; Bond, J.; Craven, C.; Cremer, T.; Foley, M.; Lyashenko, A.; Popecki, M.; Stochaj, M.; Worstell, W.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.

    2016-09-01

    Pilot production performance is reported for large area atomic layer deposition (ALD) coated microchannel plates (ALD-GCA-MCPs) and for Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors (LAPPD™) which incorporate them. "Hollowcore" glass capillary array (GCA) substrates are coated with ALD resistive and emissive layers to form the ALDGCA- MCPs, an approach that facilitates independent selection of glass substrates that are mechanically stronger and that have lower levels of radioactive alkali elements compared to conventional MCP lead glass, reducing background noise[1,2,3,4]. ALD-GCA-MCPs have competitive gain ( 104 each or 107 for a chevron pair ), enhanced lifetime and gain stability (7 C cm-2 of charge extraction), reduced background levels (0.028 events cm-2 sec-1) and low gamma-ray detection efficiency. They can be fabricated in large area (20cm X 20 cm) planar and curved formats suitable for use in high radiation environment applications, including astronomy, space instrumentation, and remote night time sensing. The LAPPD™ photodetector incorporates these ALD-GCA-MCPs in an all-glass hermetic package with top and bottom plates and sidewalls made of borosilicate float glass. Signals are generated by a bi-alkali Na2KSb photocathode, amplified with a stacked chevron pair of ALD-GCA-MCPs. Signals are collected on RF strip-line anodes integrated into to the bottom plates which exit the detector via pin-free hermetic seals under the side walls [5]. Tests show that LAPPDTMs have electron gains greater than 107, submillimeter spatial resolution for large (multiphoton) pulses and several mm for single photons, time resolution less than 50 picoseconds for single photons, predicted resolution less than 5 picoseconds for large pulses, high stability versus charge extraction[6], and good uniformity for applications including astrophysics, neutron detection, high energy physics Cherenkov light detection, and quantum-optical photon-correlation experiments.

  2. Uniformity studies in large area triple-GEM based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, M. Abi; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda, A.; Maghrbi, Y.; Mohamed, T.

    2016-10-01

    Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) based detectors have been used in many applications since their introduction in 1997. Large areas, e.g. exceeding 30×30 cm2, of GEM detectors are foreseen in future experiments which puts stringent requirements on the uniformity of response across the detection area. We investigate the effect of small variations of several parameters that could affect the uniformity. Parameters such as the anode pitch, the gas gap, the size and the shape of the holes are investigated. Simulation results are presented and compared to previous experimental data.

  3. Method of manufacturing a large-area segmented photovoltaic module

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl

    2013-11-05

    One embodiment of the invention relates to a segmented photovoltaic (PV) module which is manufactured from laminate segments. The segmented PV module includes rectangular-shaped laminate segments formed from rectangular-shaped PV laminates and further includes non-rectangular-shaped laminate segments formed from rectangular-shaped and approximately-triangular-shaped PV laminates. The laminate segments are mechanically joined and electrically interconnected to form the segmented module. Another embodiment relates to a method of manufacturing a large-area segmented photovoltaic module from laminate segments of various shapes. Other embodiments relate to processes for providing a photovoltaic array for installation at a site. Other embodiments and features are also disclosed.

  4. Application issues for large-area electrochromic windows incommercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    Projections of performance from small-area devices to large-area windows and enterprise marketing have created high expectations for electrochromic glazings. As a result, this paper seeks to precipitate an objective dialog between material scientists and building-application scientists to determine whether actual large-area electrochromic devices will result in significant performance benefits and what material improvements are needed, if any, to make electrochromics more practical for commercial building applications. Few in-situ tests have been conducted with large-area electrochromic windows applied in buildings. This study presents monitored results from a full-scale field test of large-area electrochromic windows to illustrate how this technology will perform in commercial buildings. The visible transmittance (Tv) of the installed electrochromic ranged from 0.11 to 0.38. The data are limited to the winter period for a south-east-facing window. The effect of actual device performance on lighting energy use, direct sun control, discomfort glare, and interior illumination is discussed. No mechanical system loads were monitored. These data demonstrate the use of electrochromics in a moderate climate and focus on the most restrictive visual task: computer use in offices. Through this small demonstration, we were able to determine that electrochromic windows can indeed provide unmitigated transparent views and a level of dynamic illumination control never before seen in architectural glazing materials. Daily lighting energy use was 6-24 percent less compared to the 11 percent-glazing, with improved interior brightness levels. Daily lighting energy use was 3 percent less to 13 percent more compared to the 38 percent-glazing, with improved window brightness control. The electrochromic window may not be able to fulfill both energy-efficiency and visual comfort objectives when low winter direct sun is present, particularly for computer tasks using cathode-ray tube (CRT

  5. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Quigley, Gerard P.

    1996-01-01

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  6. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOEpatents

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  7. Chopped Radiation Measurements With Large Area Si Photodiodes

    PubMed Central

    Eppeldauer, George

    1998-01-01

    Frequency dependent response characteristics of photocurrent meters using large area, radiometric quality Si photodiodes have been analyzed. The current responsivity, the voltage noise and drift amplification, and the gain and bandwidth of the photocurrent-measuring analog control loop were calculated. The photodiodes were selected for high shunt resistance. The effect of the photodiode junction capacitance on the response characteristics was also analyzed. As a result of photocurrent gain dependent frequency compensations, the noise boosting effect was minimized at the output of the current meter. The loop gain and bandwidth were maximized. High-accuracy photocurrent measurements can be achieved using the described procedures for both dc and modulated optical radiation. PMID:28009366

  8. LACIE large area acreage estimation. [United States of America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chhikara, R. S.; Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A sample wheat acreage for a large area is obtained by multiplying its small grains acreage estimate as computed by the classification and mensuration subsystem by the best available ratio of wheat to small grains acreages obtained from historical data. In the United States, as in other countries with detailed historical data, an additional level of aggregation was required because sample allocation was made at the substratum level. The essential features of the estimation procedure for LACIE countries are included along with procedures for estimating wheat acreage in the United States.

  9. Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE), completed June 30, 1978, has met the USDA at-harvest goals (90% accuracy with a 90% confidence level) in the US Great Plains and U.S.S.R. for two consecutive years. In addition, in the U.S.S.R., LACIE indicated a shortfall in the '76-'77 wheat crop about two months prior to harvest, thus demonstrating the capability of LACIE to make accurate preharvest estimates.

  10. Large area nuclear particle detectors using ET materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this SBIR Phase 1 feasibility effort was to demonstrate the usefulness of Quantex electron-trapping (ET) materials for spatial detection of nuclear particles over large areas. This demonstration entailed evaluating the prompt visible scintillation as nuclear particles impinged on films of ET materials, and subsequently detecting the nuclear particle impingement information pattern stored in the ET material, by means of the visible-wavelength luminescence produced by near-infrared interrogation. Readily useful levels of scintillation and luminescence outputs are demonstrated.

  11. LACIE large area acreage estimation. [United States of America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chhikara, R. S.; Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A sample wheat acreage for a large area is obtained by multiplying its small grains acreage estimate as computed by the classification and mensuration subsystem by the best available ratio of wheat to small grains acreages obtained from historical data. In the United States, as in other countries with detailed historical data, an additional level of aggregation was required because sample allocation was made at the substratum level. The essential features of the estimation procedure for LACIE countries are included along with procedures for estimating wheat acreage in the United States.

  12. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  13. A large area, high gain Micro Gap Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Bozzo, M.; Brez, A.; Massai, M. M.; Raffo, R.; Spandre, G.; Spezziga, M.; Toropin, A.

    1995-02-01

    A new approach to the construction of the Micro Gap Chamber is presented. A 10 × 10 cm 2 MGC has been built using a 8 μm thick polyimide layer as anode-cathode insulator. Studies on gas gain, uniformity of response along the strip and charging-up have been carried out in laboratory by using X-ray sources. Very large proportional gains, up to ˜ 210 4, have been reached working with gas mixtures based on Ne-DME. The simplified technology for the detector fabrication opens the possibility to produce very large area MGCs.

  14. Large area nanoscale metal meshes for use as transparent conductive layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuanhao; Li, Qunqing; Chen, Mo; Li, Guanhong; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Jiaping; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-10-01

    We report on the experimental realization of using super-aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) as etching masks for the fabrication of large area nanoscale metal meshes. This method can easily be extended to different metals on both rigid and flexible substrates. The as-fabricated metal meshes, including the ones made of gold, copper, and aluminum, are suitable for use as transparent conductive layers (TCLs). The metal meshes, which are similar to the SACNT networks in their dimensional features of tens of nanometers, exhibit compatible performance in terms of optical transmittance and sheet resistance. Moreover, because the metal meshes are fabricated as an integrated material, there is no junction resistance between the interconnected metal nanostructures, which markedly lowers their sheet resistance at high temperatures. The fabrication of such an effective etching mask involves a simple drawing process of the SACNT networks prepared and a common deposition process. This approach should be easy to extend to various research fields and has broad prospects in commercial applications.We report on the experimental realization of using super-aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) as etching masks for the fabrication of large area nanoscale metal meshes. This method can easily be extended to different metals on both rigid and flexible substrates. The as-fabricated metal meshes, including the ones made of gold, copper, and aluminum, are suitable for use as transparent conductive layers (TCLs). The metal meshes, which are similar to the SACNT networks in their dimensional features of tens of nanometers, exhibit compatible performance in terms of optical transmittance and sheet resistance. Moreover, because the metal meshes are fabricated as an integrated material, there is no junction resistance between the interconnected metal nanostructures, which markedly lowers their sheet resistance at high temperatures. The fabrication of such an effective etching mask involves a simple

  15. A thermal-capillary mechanism for a growth rate limit in edge-defined film-fed growth of silicon sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Ettouney, H. M.; Brown, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Capillarity, acting to set the shape of the melt/gas interfaces, and heat transfer can interact to cause limits to steady-state growth of thin silicon sheets by the Edge-Defined Film-Fed Growth (EFG) method. A finite-element/Newton solution method for a two-dimensional thermal-capillary model of EFG is used to show that limiting values of pull rate exist beyond which steady-state growth is impossible. The pull rate limit is also predicted by a one-dimensional heat transfer model valid when the die sides and menisci are almost parallel and when the thermal conductivities of melt, crystal, and die are all equal. Both the one- and two-dimensional heat transfer models show that heat loss from the melt is dominated by conduction into the crystal and slow heat release to the ambient along the length of the ribbon. The limiting pull rate results from the reduced efficiency of conduction through the melt caused by the curvature of the meniscus which increases height of the die top above the level of the melt. Thermal-capillary limits are predicted for both positive and negative pressure differences across the meniscus.

  16. Successful eradication of helical rim keloids with surgical excision followed by pressure therapy using a combination of magnets and silicone gel sheeting.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Hwan; Rah, Dong Kyun

    2017-04-01

    Extremely limited data are available for the treatment of helical rim keloids. The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate the successful treatment of helical rim keloids using surgical exicison followed by a newly designed pressure therapy device. We treated 40 pure helical rim keloids in 36 patients with surgical excisions followed by pressure therapy using a combination of magnets and silicone gel sheeting for 12 hours over a period of 2 years, from May 2012 to February 2014, at tertiary medical centre. The follow-up period was 18 months. Primary outcome was recurrence of keloids. Secondary outcome was patient satisfaction as assessed by the Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS). The overall recurrence-free rate was 95·0% after a follow-up period of 18 months. Scores obtained from the POSAS showed that most items were reported to be improved. This adjuvant therapy protocol resulted in excellent outcomes in cases of helical rim keloids compared to previously published protocols. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Large-area thermoelectric high-aspect-ratio nanostructures by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoho, Mikko; Juntunen, Taneli; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of large-area high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. We fabricate the structures by atomic layer deposition of conformal ZnO thin films on track-etched polycarbonate substrate. The resulting structure consists of ZnO tubules which continue through the full thickness of the substrate. The electrical and thermal properties of the structures are studied both in-plane and out-of-plane. They exhibit very low out-of-plane thermal conductivity down to 0.15 W m-1 K-1 while the in-plane sheet resistance of the films was found to be half that of the same film on glass substrate, allowing material-independent doubling of output power of any planar thin-film thermoelectric generator. The wall thickness of the fabricated nanotubes was varied within a range of up to 100 nm. The samples show polycrystalline nature with (002) preferred crystal orientation.

  18. Infrared radiometric technique for rapid quantitative evaluation of heat flux distribution over large areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, Stuart; Siebes, Georg

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach for rapid, quantitative measurement of spatially distributed heat flux incident on a plane. The technique utilizes the spatial temperature distribution on an opaque thin film at the location of interest, as measured by an imaging infrared radiometer. Knowledge of film radiative properties, plus quantitative estimates of convection cooling permit the steady state energy balance at any location on the film sheet to be solved for the incident heat flux. Absolute accuracies on the order of 10-15 percent have been obtained in tests performed in air. The method is particularly useful for evaluation of spatial heat flux uniformity from distributed heat sources over large areas. It has recently been used in several applications at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, including flux uniformity measurements from large distributed quartz lamp arrays used during thermal vacuum testing of several spacecraft components, and flux mapping of a low power NdYg laser beam.

  19. Large area nanoimprint by substrate conformal imprint lithography (SCIL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuuren, Marc A.; Megens, Mischa; Ni, Yongfeng; van Sprang, Hans; Polman, Albert

    2017-06-01

    Releasing the potential of advanced material properties by controlled structuring materials on sub-100-nm length scales for applications such as integrated circuits, nano-photonics, (bio-)sensors, lasers, optical security, etc. requires new technology to fabricate nano-patterns on large areas (from cm2 to 200 mm up to display sizes) in a cost-effective manner. Conventional high-end optical lithography such as stepper/scanners is highly capital intensive and not flexible towards substrate types. Nanoimprint has had the potential for over 20 years to bring a cost-effective, flexible method for large area nano-patterning. Over the last 3-4 years, nanoimprint has made great progress towards volume production. The main accelerator has been the switch from rigid- to wafer-scale soft stamps and tool improvements for step and repeat patterning. In this paper, we discuss substrate conformal imprint lithography (SCIL), which combines nanometer resolution, low patterns distortion, and overlay alignment, traditionally reserved for rigid stamps, with the flexibility and robustness of soft stamps. This was made possible by a combination of a new soft stamp material, an inorganic resist, combined with an innovative imprint method. Finally, a volume production solution will be presented, which can pattern up to 60 wafers per hour.

  20. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class; pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  1. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  2. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered p ulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsar s will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar s, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for e lucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric partic le acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theo retical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all un identified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geming a-like pulsars.

  3. Amplifiers dedicated for large area SiC photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroz, P.; Duk, M.; Korwin-Pawlowski, M. L.; Borecki, M.

    2016-09-01

    Large area SiC photodiodes find applications in optoelectronic sensors working at special conditions. These conditions include detection of UV radiation in harsh environment. Moreover, the mentioned sensors have to be selective and resistant to unwanted signals. For this purpose, the modulation of light at source unit and the rejection of constant current and low frequency component of signal at detector unit are used. The popular frequency used for modulation in such sensor is 1kHz. The large area photodiodes are characterized by a large capacitance and low shunt resistance that varies with polarization of the photodiode and can significantly modify the conditions of signal pre-amplification. In this paper two pre-amplifiers topology are analyzed: the transimpedance amplifier and the non-inverting voltage to voltage amplifier with negative feedback. The feedback loops of both pre-amplifiers are equipped with elements used for initial constant current and low frequency signals rejections. Both circuits are analyzed and compared using simulation and experimental approaches.

  4. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-09

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/{Delta}E = 700[1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/{Delta}E = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  5. Large-area ALON windows for reconnaissance and armor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Twedt, Richard; Foti, Robyn; Smith, Mark; Sastri, Suri A.

    2009-05-01

    The demand for large ALON® windows has continued to increase since the material transitioned to Surmet Corporation for commercialization. Two applications which represent opposite ends of the requirements spectrum in terms of required optical performance and cost sensitivity are Reconnaissance windows and transparent armor. Consequently, the approaches to producing large area windows for both applications are quite different. While Recce applications require windows of the highest possible optical quality and stringent refractive index homogeneity across the large aperture sizes of Recce sensors, the optical requirements for transparent armor windows are substantially looser. Furthermore, optical performance is paramount for Recce applications while transparent armor applications are more strongly driven by cost considerations. Surmet has developed processes for producing large (i.e., up to ~17x30-in) ALON® window blanks of extremely high optical quality and refractive index homogeneity, for Recce applications. This material has been optically fabricated into finished windows and characterized for transmitted wavefront and homogeneity. Recent results will be presented. Large area transparent armor windows have been produced using a tiling approach. Since transparent armor laminates consist of multiple layers (i.e., ALON/Glass/Polycarbonate) Smaller ALON® tiles can be face bonded onto the underlying glass and polycarbonate layers to produce very large windows. Excellent ballistic results have been obtained using a tiled configuration. Recent results will be presented.

  6. Large-area CCD mosaic for astronomical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. Anthony; Bernstein, Gary M.; Blouke, Morley; Lee, Robert W.

    1992-08-01

    Large area charge-coupled devices (CCDs) with unprecedentedly low noise and high quantum efficiency are revolutionizing astronomy probing the universe to record faint levels while imaging relatively large areas of the sky. On-line intelligent pattern recognition software transforms these large images into photometrically accurate catalogs of colors sizes and shapes of thousands of stars and galaxies. The scientific driver for this is starvation: much of modern optical and JR astronomy is " photon starved" . Current research involving faint imaging and spectroscopy often requires total exposure times longer than several nights to obtain good signal-to-noise ratio. One must use the highest quantum efficiency detectors on the largest telescopes and develop image acquisition and reduction techniques which cancel systematic errors to high accuracy. We describe here a CCD mosaic camera and data handling system which will make full use of the light collected by the largest existing telescopes. It uses off-the-shelf CCDs in a mosaic configuration together with automated data acquisition and processing. 2. ULTRA-FAINTCCI) IMAGING IN ASTRONOMY In practice an arbitrary precision in photometry cannot be reached even in an arbitrarily long integration time. Accurate surface photometry to 30-3 1 magnitude arcsecond2 requires the correction of systematic errors to iO-4 of the moonless night sky background. New techniques for ultra-deep imaging made possible by the dimensional and temporal stability of CCDs permit photometry at this level. A series of guided exposures each

  7. Large area single crystal (0001) oriented MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Masihhur R.; Ma, Lu; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Sung Park, Pil; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Lu, Wu; Wu, Yiying; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-06-01

    Layered metal dichalcogenide materials are a family of semiconductors with a wide range of energy band gaps and properties, the potential for exciting physics and technology applications. However, obtaining high crystal quality thin films over a large area remains a challenge. Here we show that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) can be used to achieve large area single crystal Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) thin films. Growth temperature and choice of substrate were found to critically impact the quality of film grown, and high temperature growth on (0001) oriented sapphire yielded highly oriented single crystal MoS2 films. Films grown under optimal conditions were found to be of high structural quality from high-resolution X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman measurements, approaching the quality of reference geological MoS2. Photoluminescence and electrical measurements confirmed the growth of optically active MoS2 with a low background carrier concentration, and high mobility. The CVD method reported here for the growth of high quality MoS2 thin films paves the way towards growth of a variety of layered 2D chalcogenide semiconductors and their heterostructures.

  8. Large areas elemental mapping by ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Curado, J. F.; Allegro, P.; Moro, M. V.; Campos, P. H. O. V.; Santos, S. B.; Kajiya, E. A. M.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    The external beam line of the Laboratory for Material Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI) is a versatile setup for multi-technique analysis. X-ray detectors for Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) measurements, a Gamma-ray detector for Particle Induced Gamma- ray Emission (PIGE), and a particle detector for scattering analysis, such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), were already installed. In this work, we present some results, using a large (60-cm range) XYZ computer controlled sample positioning system, completely developed and build in our laboratory. The XYZ stage was installed at the external beam line and its high spacial resolution (better than 5 μm over the full range) enables positioning the sample with high accuracy and high reproducibility. The combination of a sub-millimeter beam with the large range XYZ robotic stage is being used to produce elemental maps of large areas in samples like paintings, ceramics, stones, fossils, and all sort of samples. Due to its particular characteristics, this is a unique device in the sense of multi-technique analysis of large areas. With the continuous development of the external beam line at LAMFI, coupled to the robotic XYZ stage, it is becoming a robust and reliable option for regular analysis of trace elements (Z > 5) competing with the traditional in-vacuum ion-beam-analysis with the advantage of automatic rastering.

  9. Characterization and Calibration of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösel, Philipp; Atlas Muon Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Resistive strip Micromegas detectors have been tested extensively as small detectors of about 10×10 cm2 in size and they work reliably at high rates of 100 kHz/cm2 and above. Tracking resolution well below 100 μm has been observed for 100 GeV muons and pions. Micromegas detectors are meanwhile proposed as large area muon precision trackers of 2-3 m2 in size. To investigate possible differences between small and large detectors, a 1 m2 detector with 2048 resistive strips at a pitch of 450 μm was studied in the LMU Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility (CRMF) using two 4×2.2 m2 large Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for cosmic muon reference tracking. A segmentation of the resistive strip anode plane in 57.6 mm×93 mm large areas has been realized by the readout of 128 strips with one APV25 chip each and by eleven 93 mm broad trigger scintillators placed along the readout strips. This allows for mapping of homogeneity in pulse height and efficiency, determination of signal propagation along the 1 m long anode strips and calibration of the position of the anode strips.

  10. High-efficiency large area flexible organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Noëlla; de Bettignies, Rémi; Bailly, Séverine; Maisse, Pascal; Cros, Stéphane; Guillerez, Stéphane

    2008-08-01

    We report on the realization of high-efficiency bulk heterojunction PV devices based on P3HT/PCBM on transparent plastic substrates, from one elementary cell to large area modules, and we compare with results obtained on glass. The first target consists in the optimisation of the processing parameters in order to obtain the highest possible Power Conversion Efficiency (PCE) values for individual cells. We have reached PCE close to 4% with small dispersion on plastic substrates for cells of 0.28 cm2 active area, compared to 5% on glass. Modules of multiple cells are then elaborated on 5x5 cm substrates with a design aimed to minimize ohmic losses, and interconnection resistances. For glass module, with 12 individual cells on a 5x5 cm2 substrate we obtain PCE of 3.26 % (12.4 cm2 active surface). Larger modules with active area up to 35 cm2 exhibiting PCE of 2.8 % and open circuit voltage higher than 6V are also demonstrated for glass, approaching the requirements for commercial electronic applications. On PET, record efficiency of 2.85 % is obtained for a 8.8 cm2 module and PCE of 2.52 % is demonstrated for a large area module with 53 cm2 active surface. The influence of the geometric parameters of the individual cells and their type of connection (parallel or series) on the module characteristics is also discussed.

  11. ITO with embedded silver grids as transparent conductive electrodes for large area organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Bhushan R; Mirsafaei, Mina; Cielecki, Paweł Piotr; Cauduro, André Luis Fernandes; Fiutowski, Jacek; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    2017-10-06

    In this work, development of semi-transparent electrodes for efficient large area organic solar cells (OSCs) has been demonstrated. Electron beam evaporated silver grids were embedded in commercially available ITO coatings on glass, through a standard negative photolithography process, in order to improve the conductivity of planar ITO substrates. The fabricated electrodes with embedded line and square patterned Ag grids reduced the sheet resistance of ITO by 25% and 40%, respectively, showing optical transmittance drops of less than 6% within the complete visible light spectrum for both patterns. Solution processed bulk heterojunction OSCs based on PTB7:[70]PCBM were fabricated on top of these electrodes with cell areas of 4.38 cm(2), and the performance of these OSCs was compared to reference cells fabricated on pure ITO electrodes. The Fill Factor (FF) of the large-scale OSCs fabricated on ITO with embedded Ag grids was enhanced by 18% for the line grids pattern and 30% for the square grids pattern compared to that of the reference OSCs. The increase in the FF was directly correlated to the decrease in the series resistance of the OSCs. The maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the OSCs was measured to be 4.34%, which is 23% higher than the PCE of the reference OSCs. As the presented method does not involve high temperature processing, it could be considered a general approach for development of large area organic electronics on solvent resistant, flexible substrates.

  12. Multifunctionality and Control of the Crumpling and Unfolding of Large-Area Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Jianfeng; Ryu, Seunghwa; Pugno, Nicola; Wang, Qiming; Tu, Qing; Buehler, Markus J.; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2012-01-01

    Crumpled graphene films are broadly used, for instance in electronics1, energy storage2, 3, composites4, 5, and biomedicine6. Although it is known that the degree of crumpling affects graphene's properties and the performance of graphene-based devices and materials3, 5, 7, the controlled folding and unfolding of crumpled graphene films has not been demonstrated. Here we report an approach to reversibly control the crumpling and unfolding of large-area graphene sheets. We show with experiments, atomistic simulations and theory that, by harnessing the mechanical instabilities of graphene adhered on a biaxially pre-stretched polymer substrate and by controlling the relaxation of the pre-strains in a particular order, graphene films can be crumpled into tailored self-organized hierarchical structures that mimic superhydrophobic leaves. The approach enables us to fabricate large-area conductive coatings and electrodes showing superhydrophobicity, high transparency, and tunable wettability and transmittance. We also demonstrate that crumpled graphene-polymer laminates can be used as artificial-muscle actuators. PMID:23334002

  13. ITO with embedded silver grids as transparent conductive electrodes for large area organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Bhushan R.; Mirsafaei, Mina; Piotr Cielecki, Paweł; Fernandes Cauduro, André Luis; Fiutowski, Jacek; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    2017-10-01

    In this work, development of semi-transparent electrodes for efficient large area organic solar cells (OSCs) has been demonstrated. Electron beam evaporated silver grids were embedded in commercially available ITO coatings on glass, through a standard negative photolithography process, in order to improve the conductivity of planar ITO substrates. The fabricated electrodes with embedded line and square patterned Ag grids reduced the sheet resistance of ITO by 25% and 40%, respectively, showing optical transmittance drops of less than 6% within the complete visible light spectrum for both patterns. Solution processed bulk heterojunction OSCs based on PTB7:[70]PCBM were fabricated on top of these electrodes with cell areas of 4.38 cm2, and the performance of these OSCs was compared to reference cells fabricated on pure ITO electrodes. The Fill Factor (FF) of the large-scale OSCs fabricated on ITO with embedded Ag grids was enhanced by 18% for the line grids pattern and 30% for the square grids pattern compared to that of the reference OSCs. The increase in the FF was directly correlated to the decrease in the series resistance of the OSCs. The maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the OSCs was measured to be 4.34%, which is 23% higher than the PCE of the reference OSCs. As the presented method does not involve high temperature processing, it could be considered a general approach for development of large area organic electronics on solvent resistant, flexible substrates.

  14. Oxide Control for Silicon Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrli, H. A. I.

    1982-01-01

    Web dendrite growth process pulls sheet of newly crystallized silicon from molten silicon. Jets of argon pull outside gas into melt cavity, preventing silicon oxide from passing through heat-shield hold and depositing on it. Generated by aspirators, reversed flow is used in web dendrite process, which produces sheets of single-crystal silicon for low-cost solar cells.

  15. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST): Instrument Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; GLAST Collaboration

    1999-04-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a satellite-based experiment under development to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV. The primary telescope for the mission is a pair-conversion telescope. The telescope design includes a precision tracker/converter section based on silicon-strip detectors, a CsI scintillating crystal calorimeter arranged in a hodoscopic configuration, an anticoincidence shield that is an array of plastic scintillator tiles read out with waveshifting optical fibers, and a powerful distributed data acquisition and triggering system. The design and expected performance of the telescope are presented along with results obtained from a high-energy beam test of a prototype.

  16. Analysis of volatiles present in interplanetary dust and stratospheric particles collected on large area collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of six chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and 22 other stratospheric particles collected on large-area collector, carried out in order to obtain information on the nature, distribution, and form of volatiles in IDPs. A laser microprobe/mass spectrometer (LMMS) was used to extract volatile elements and molecules from particles larger than 10 microns, and an improved hexane rinsing technique was developed for the removal of contaminants. Results show that, because of contamination from silicone oil, freon, and hexane, most of the LMMS signal from IDPs can be interpreted as arising from contamination. Therefore, a species was not considered indigenous unless the signal was an order of magnitude greater in abundance than that released from a pure contaminant coated on gold.

  17. Analysis of volatiles present in interplanetary dust and stratospheric particles collected on large area collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    Results are presented from an analysis of six chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and 22 other stratospheric particles collected on large-area collector, carried out in order to obtain information on the nature, distribution, and form of volatiles in IDPs. A laser microprobe/mass spectrometer (LMMS) was used to extract volatile elements and molecules from particles larger than 10 microns, and an improved hexane rinsing technique was developed for the removal of contaminants. Results show that, because of contamination from silicone oil, freon, and hexane, most of the LMMS signal from IDPs can be interpreted as arising from contamination. Therefore, a species was not considered indigenous unless the signal was an order of magnitude greater in abundance than that released from a pure contaminant coated on gold.

  18. Large-area binary blazed grating coupler between nanophotonic waveguide and LED.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongqiang; Zhou, Wenqian; Zhang, Meiling; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Enbang; Miao, Changyun; Tang, Chunxiao

    2014-01-01

    A large-area binary blazed grating coupler for the arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) demodulation integrated microsystem on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) was designed for the first time. Through the coupler, light can be coupled into the SOI waveguide from the InP-based C-band LED for the AWG demodulation integrated microsystem to function. Both the length and width of the grating coupler are 360 μm, as large as the InP-based C-band LED light emitting area in the system. The coupler was designed and optimized based on the finite difference time domain method. When the incident angle of the light source is 0°, the coupling efficiency of the binary blazed grating is 40.92%, and the 3 dB bandwidth is 72 nm at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  19. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  20. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M.; Fukui, T.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T.

    2012-01-01

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  1. Analysis of volatiles present in interplanetary dust and stratospheric particles collected on large area collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of six chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and 22 other stratospheric particles collected on large-area collector, carried out in order to obtain information on the nature, distribution, and form of volatiles in IDPs. A laser microprobe/mass spectrometer (LMMS) was used to extract volatile elements and molecules from particles larger than 10 microns, and an improved hexane rinsing technique was developed for the removal of contaminants. Results show that, because of contamination from silicone oil, freon, and hexane, most of the LMMS signal from IDPs can be interpreted as arising from contamination. Therefore, a species was not considered indigenous unless the signal was an order of magnitude greater in abundance than that released from a pure contaminant coated on gold.

  2. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Fukui, T.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T.

    2012-01-01

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  3. Large-area photogrammetry based testing of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poozesh, Peyman; Baqersad, Javad; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter; Harvey, Eric; Yarala, Rahul

    2017-03-01

    An optically based sensing system that can measure the displacement and strain over essentially the entire area of a utility-scale blade leads to a measurement system that can significantly reduce the time and cost associated with traditional instrumentation. This paper evaluates the performance of conventional three dimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC) and three dimensional point tracking (3DPT) approaches over the surface of wind turbine blades and proposes a multi-camera measurement system using dynamic spatial data stitching. The potential advantages for the proposed approach include: (1) full-field measurement distributed over a very large area, (2) the elimination of time-consuming wiring and expensive sensors, and (3) the need for large-channel data acquisition systems. There are several challenges associated with extending the capability of a standard 3D DIC system to measure entire surface of utility scale blades to extract distributed strain, deflection, and modal parameters. This paper only tries to address some of the difficulties including: (1) assessing the accuracy of the 3D DIC system to measure full-field distributed strain and displacement over the large area, (2) understanding the geometrical constraints associated with a wind turbine testing facility (e.g. lighting, working distance, and speckle pattern size), (3) evaluating the performance of the dynamic stitching method to combine two different fields of view by extracting modal parameters from aligned point clouds, and (4) determining the feasibility of employing an output-only system identification to estimate modal parameters of a utility scale wind turbine blade from optically measured data. Within the current work, the results of an optical measurement (one stereo-vision system) performed on a large area over a 50-m utility-scale blade subjected to quasi-static and cyclic loading are presented. The blade certification and testing is typically performed using International

  4. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  5. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  6. Optical Distortion Evaluation in Large Area Windows using Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Skow, Miles; Nurge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    It is important that imagery seen through large area windows, such as those used on space vehicles, not be substantially distorted. Many approaches are described in the literature for measuring the distortion of an optical window, but most suffer from either poor resolution or processing difficulties. In this paper a new definition of distortion is presented, allowing accurate measurement using an optical interferometer. This new definition is shown to be equivalent to the definitions provided by the military and the standards organizations. In order to determine the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach the distortion of an acrylic window is measured using three different methods; image comparison, Moiré interferometry, and phase-shifting interferometry.

  7. The world of large-area glazing and displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1999-10-01

    This work covers advances in large-area switchable glazing and flat panel displays. Large flat panels and glazing are being developed by a number of company and university groups. Certain novel flat panels display are made for electronic paper applications. Switchable glazing offers a new way of visualizing the function of a window. Switchable glazing can have a range of adjustable visible properties and shading coefficients. Technologies covered for glazing are electrochromism, suspended particles, encapsulated liquid crystals. Technologies being developed for electronic paper and certain flat display panels include electrophoretics, liquid crystals and bichromal balls. Beyond glazing applications, products based on this technology are flexible displays, electronic paper, switchable modulators, mirrors, and eyeglasses. This study covers developments from several companies including the one square meter electrochromic glazing made by Pilkington/Flabeg and Asahi/Nippon Mitsubishi Oil.

  8. Challenges in large-area, thin-film CIGS modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeman, S.; Kessler, J.; Lommasson, T.; Russell, L.; Fogleboch, J.; Skibo, S.; Arya, R.

    1996-01-01

    Recent effort at Solarex has been directed toward moving the conversion efficiency of CIGS based modules closer to that demonstrated for small area cells of the same material. Analysis of module structures indicates that much of the gap between device and module performance is due to the difficulty in achieving complete current collection in the large area segments used in modules. Optimization of module design for current collection at the operating point is strongly influenced by the interconnect quality. The development of robust, low resistivity interconnects with minimal area loss is crucial to achievement of high module efficiencies. In this work we report on the influence of module material and interconnect parameters on module conversion efficiency, and the recent progress resulting in a substantial reduction in interconnect resistivity and width.

  9. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. With its upcoming launch in 2008, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the collaboration between particle physicists and astrophysicists, the opportunities for guest observers, and the mission status.

  10. Large area radiation source for water and wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael T.; Lee, Seungwoo; Kloba, Anthony; Hellmer, Ronald; Kumar, Nalin; Eaton, Mark; Rambo, Charlotte; Pillai, Suresh

    2011-06-01

    There is a strong desire for processes that improve the safety of water supplies and that minimize disinfection byproducts. Stellarray is developing mercury-free next-generation x-ray and UV-C radiation sources in flat-panel and pipe form factors for water and wastewater treatment applications. These new radiation sources are designed to sterilize sludge and effluent, and to enable new treatment approaches to emerging environmental concerns such as the accumulation of estrogenic compounds in water. Our UV-C source, based on cathodoluminescent technology, differs significantly from traditional disinfection approaches using mercury arc lamps or UV LEDs. Our sources accelerate electrons across a vacuum gap, converting their energy into UV-C when striking a phosphor, or x-rays when striking a metallic anode target. Stellarray's large area radiation sources for wastewater treatment allow matching of the radiation source area to the sterilization target area for maximum coverage and improved efficiency.

  11. Large Area Printing of 3D Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James J.; Beaulieu, Michael R.; Hendricks, Nicholas R.; Kothari, Rohit

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a readily scalable print, lift, and stack approach for producing large area, 3D photonic crystal (PC) structures. UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) was used to pattern grating structures comprised of highly filled nanoparticle polymer composite resists with tune-able refractive indices (RI). The gratings were robust and upon release from a support substrate were oriented and stacked to yield 3D PCs. The RI of the composite resists was tuned between 1.58 and 1.92 at 800 nm while maintaining excellent optical transparency. The grating structure dimensions, line width, depth, and pitch, were easily varied by simply changing the imprint mold. For example, a 6 layer log-pile stack was prepared using a composite resist a RI of 1.72 yielding 72 % reflection at 900 nm. The process is scalable for roll-to-roll (R2R) production. Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing - an NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.

  12. Prospects for GRB science with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Band, D. L.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; ...

    2009-08-04

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi mission will reveal the rich spectral and temporal gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena in the >100 MeV band. The synergy with Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detectors will link these observations to those in the well explored 10-1000 keV range; the addition of the >100 MeV band observations will resolve theoretical uncertainties about burst emission in both the prompt and afterglow phases. Trigger algorithms will be applied to the LAT data both onboard the spacecraft and on the ground. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these triggers will differ because of the available computing resourcesmore » onboard and on the ground. Here we present the LAT's burst detection methodologies and the instrument's GRB capabilities.« less

  13. Doping-dependent THz photoconductivity in large-area graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, Alex; Lui, Chun Hung; Shin, Yong Cheol; Kong, Jing; Gedik, Nuh

    2014-03-01

    We have performed a systematic investigation of the transient terahertz photoconductivity of large-area CVD graphene following femtosecond optical excitation as a function of electrically-tuned carrier density. We observe a dramatic change in the transient response as the photoconductivity changes from positive to negative when the Fermi level is tuned from the charge neutrality point to the electron or hole doped regime. This effect is discussed within the context of the Drude model for free carriers, taking into account the elevated electron and phonon temperatures in photoexcited graphene. Our results demonstrate that previous conflicting measurements of terahertz photoconductivity in epitaxial and CVD graphene arise primarily from their different doping levels. Additionally, our measurements provide a link between ultrafast optical experiments and DC photocurrent measurements.

  14. Large area MEMS based ultrasound device for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodnicki, Robert; Thomenius, Kai; Ming Hooi, Fong; Sinha, Sumedha P.; Carson, Paul L.; Lin, Der-Song; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Woychik, Charles

    2011-08-01

    We present image results obtained using a prototype ultrasound array that demonstrates the fundamental architecture for a large area MEMS based ultrasound device for detection of breast cancer. The prototype array consists of a tiling of capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (cMUTs) that have been flip-chip attached to a rigid organic substrate. The pitch on the cMUT elements is 185 μm and the operating frequency is nominally 9 MHz. The spatial resolution of the new probe is comparable to those of production PZT probes; however the sensitivity is reduced by conditions that should be correctable. Simulated opposed-view image registration and Speed of Sound volume reconstruction results for ultrasound in the mammographic geometry are also presented.

  15. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  16. Large area III-V infrared focal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Nguyen, J.; Soibel, A.; Rafol, S. B.; Keo, S. A.; Mumolo, J. M.; Lee, M. C.; Liu, J. K.; Yang, B.; Liao, A.

    2011-05-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory is actively developing the III-V based infrared detector and focal plane arrays (FPAs) for remote sensing and imaging applications. Currently, we are working on Superlattice detectors, multi-band quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), and quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIPs) technologies suitable for high pixel-pixel uniformity and high pixel operability large area imaging arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the demonstration of long-wavelength 1 K × 1 K QDIP FPA, 1 K × 1K QWIP FPA, the first demonstration of the megapixel-simultaneously-readable and pixel-co-registered dual-band QWIP FPA, and demonstration of the first mid-wave and long-wave 1K × 1K superlattice FPA. In addition, we will discuss the advantages of III-V material system in the context of large format infrared FPAs.

  17. Searches for Axionlike Particles with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Andrea; Meyer, Manuel; Sanchez-Conde, Miguel; Wood, Matthew; LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Axionlike particles (ALPs) are dark-matter candidates that occur in a variety of extensions of the Standard Model. These particles could leave signatures in gamma rays, due to the coupling of ALPs to photons in external electromagnetic fields. To date, observations with Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) provide the strongest constraints on the photon-ALP coupling for ALP masses between 0.5 and 20 neV. Here, we summarize these constraints and present the sensitivity to detect an ALP induced gamma-ray burst from a Galactic core-collapse supernova. ALPs would be produced in the stellar medium via the Primakoff effect and convert into gamma rays in the Galactic magnetic field. Fermi LAT observations would be able to probe couplings where ALPs could constitute the entirety of dark matter. Below 1 neV, the Fermi-LAT sensitivity would surpass that of future laboratory experiments by one order of magnitude.

  18. Satellite image collection modeling for large area hazard emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shufan; Hodgson, Michael E.

    2016-08-01

    Timely collection of critical hazard information is the key to intelligent and effective hazard emergency response decisions. Satellite remote sensing imagery provides an effective way to collect critical information. Natural hazards, however, often have large impact areas - larger than a single satellite scene. Additionally, the hazard impact area may be discontinuous, particularly in flooding or tornado hazard events. In this paper, a spatial optimization model is proposed to solve the large area satellite image acquisition planning problem in the context of hazard emergency response. In the model, a large hazard impact area is represented as multiple polygons and image collection priorities for different portion of impact area are addressed. The optimization problem is solved with an exact algorithm. Application results demonstrate that the proposed method can address the satellite image acquisition planning problem. A spatial decision support system supporting the optimization model was developed. Several examples of image acquisition problems are used to demonstrate the complexity of the problem and derive optimized solutions.

  19. Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Phase 1: Evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    It appears that the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment over the Great Plains, can with a reasonable expectation, be a satisfactory component of a 90/90 production estimator. The area estimator produced more accurate area estimates for the total winter wheat region than for the mixed spring and winter wheat region of the northern Great Plains. The accuracy does appear to degrade somewhat in regions of marginal agriculture where there are small fields and abundant confusion crops. However, it would appear that these regions tend also to be marginal with respect to wheat production and thus increased area estimation errors do not greatly influence the overall production estimation accuracy in the United States. The loss of segments resulting from cloud cover appears to be a random phenomenon that introduces no significant bias into the estimates. This loss does increase the variance of the estimates.

  20. Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Phase 2 evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Documentation of the activities of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment during the 1976 Northern Hemisphere crop year is presented. A brief overview of the experiment is included as well as phase two area, yield, and production estimates for the United States Great Plains, Canada, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics spring winter wheat regions. The accuracies of these estimates are compared with independent government estimates. Accuracy assessment of the United States Great Plains yardstick region based on a through blind sight analysis is given, and reasons for variations in estimating performance are discussed. Other phase two technical activities including operations, exploratory analysis, reporting, methods of assessment, phase three and advanced system design, technical issues, and developmental activities are also included.

  1. SPLASH: A Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Joanne; Caswell, James; Gomez, Jose F.; Mcclure-Griffiths, Naomi; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Dickey, John; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Carretti, Ettore; Ellingsen, Simon; Walsh, Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Hennebelle, Patrick; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Gibson, Steven; Brown, Courtney; Krishnan, Vasaant

    2014-04-01

    The OH 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. The survey is answering critical questions on the global distribution of diffuse OH, the degree to which it traces ‘hidden’ material caught between the regimes probed by traditional tracers of the neutral ISM, and its role as a probe of molecular cloud formation. As a blind survey for all four ground-state transitions, SPLASH is also detecting many new OH masers, facilitating a broad range of astrophysical studies. This proposal requests 250 hours to complete Phase 1 of the SPLASH project, which is mapping 152 square degrees in the inner Galactic Plane, including the Galactic Centre.

  2. The Second Fermi Large Area Telescope GRB Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Daniel; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is a formidable probe of extreme physics, requiring rapid variability from highly relativistic sources. Despite the advancements in our understanding of GRBs through observations by NASA's Swift and Fermi spacecraft, many fundemental questions regarding the particle acceleration and radiative processes associated with these events remain unanswered. Here we present the most extensive search for emission from GRBs above 40 MeV performed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The resulting catalog includes more than 130 detections and represents an improvement in the detection efficency of GRBs at high-energies of over 50% compared to the first LAT GRB catalog. We utilize this improved sensativity to characterize the high-energy emission from GRBs and review how these observations further our understanding of the nature of these events.

  3. A large-area gamma-ray imaging telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The concept definition of using the External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle as the basis for constructing a large area gamma ray imaging telescope in space is detailed. The telescope will be used to locate and study cosmic sources of gamma rays of energy greater than 100 MeV. Both the telescope properties and the means whereby an ET is used for this purpose are described. A parallel is drawn between those systems that would be common to both a Space Station and this ET application. In addition, those systems necessary for support of the telescope can form the basis for using the ET as part of the Space Station. The major conclusions of this concept definition are that the ET is ideal for making into a gamma ray telescope, and that this telescope will provide a substantial increase in collecting area.

  4. Large area nuclear particle detectors using ET materials, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Charles Y.; Storti, George M.; Walter, Lee; Mathews, Scott

    1990-01-01

    This report presents work done under a Phase 2 SBIR contract for demonstrating large area detector planes utilizing Quantex electron trapping materials as a film medium for storing high-energy nuclide impingement information. The detector planes utilize energy dissipated by passage of the high-energy nuclides to produce localized populations of electrons stored in traps. Readout of the localized trapped electron populations is effected by scanning the ET plane with near-infrared, which frees the trapped electrons and results in optical emission at visible wavelengths. The effort involved both optimizing fabrication technology for the detector planes and developing a readout system capable of high spatial resolution for displaying the recorded nuclide passage tracks.

  5. Towards Large Area Growth of 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliauskas, Remigijus; Liljedahl, Rickard; Syvaejaervi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositza

    2010-11-01

    In this work we have analyzed the possibility of upscaling the growth of 3C-SiC. The growth was done at different temperatures to find limiting mechanisms of the growth rate and to examine the morphology of grown layers. Coverage by 3C-SiC increases when increasing temperature, however more twins appeared. Activation energy of the growth is 130 kcal/mol--showing that growth rate limiting mechanism is sublimation of the source. We discuss the influence of large area 6H-SiC wafers on the formation of 3C-SiC, in which the change in basal plane orientation could also influence the growth of 3C-SiC.

  6. Spatially explicit shallow landslide susceptibility mapping over large areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellugi, Dino; Dietrich, William E.; Stock, Jonathan D.; McKean, Jim; Kazian, Brian; Hargrove, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in downscaling climate model precipitation predictions now yield spatially explicit patterns of rainfall that could be used to estimate shallow landslide susceptibility over large areas. In California, the United States Geological Survey is exploring community emergency response to the possible effects of a very large simulated storm event and to do so it has generated downscaled precipitation maps for the storm. To predict the corresponding pattern of shallow landslide susceptibility across the state, we have used the model Shalstab (a coupled steady state runoff and infinite slope stability model) which susceptibility spatially explicit estimates of relative potential instability. Such slope stability models that include the effects of subsurface runoff on potentially destabilizing pore pressure evolution require water routing and hence the definition of upslope drainage area to each potential cell. To calculate drainage area efficiently over a large area we developed a parallel framework to scale-up Shalstab and specifically introduce a new efficient parallel drainage area algorithm which produces seamless results. The single seamless shallow landslide susceptibility map for all of California was accomplished in a short run time, and indicates that much larger areas can be efficiently modelled. As landslide maps generally over predict the extent of instability for any given storm. Local empirical data on the fraction of predicted unstable cells that failed for observed rainfall intensity can be used to specify the likely extent of hazard for a given storm. This suggests that campaigns to collect local precipitation data and detailed shallow landslide location maps after major storms could be used to calibrate models and improve their use in hazard assessment for individual storms.

  7. A new approach for defect inspection on large area masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, Gerd; Döbereiner, Stefan; Hillmann, Frank; Falk, Günther; Brück, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-02-01

    Besides the mask market for IC manufacturing, which mainly uses 6 inch sized masks, the market for the so called large area masks is growing very rapidly. Typical applications of these masks are mainly wafer bumping for current packaging processes, color filters on TFTs, and Flip Chip manufacturing. To expose e.g. bumps and similar features on 200 mm wafers under proximity exposure conditions 9 inch masks are used, while in 300 mm wafer bumping processes (Fig. 1) 14 inch masks are handled. Flip Chip manufacturing needs masks up to 28 by 32 inch. This current maximum mask dimension is expected to hold for the next 5 years in industrial production. On the other hand shrinking feature sizes, just as in case of the IC masks, demand enhanced sensitivity of the inspection tools. A defect inspection tool for those masks is valuable for both the mask maker, who has to deliver a defect free mask to his customer, and for the mask user to supervise the mask behavior conditions during its lifetime. This is necessary because large area masks are mainly used for proximity exposures. During this process itself the mask is vulnerable by contacting the resist on top of the wafers. Therefore a regular inspection of the mask after 25, 50, or 100 exposures has to be done during its whole lifetime. Thus critical resist contamination and other defects, which lead to yield losses, can be recognized early. In the future shrinking feature dimensions will require even more sensitive and reliable defect inspection methods than they do presently. Besides the sole inspection capability the tools should also provide highly precise measurement capabilities and extended review options.

  8. Large-Area Epitaxial Monolayer MoS2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional semiconductors such as MoS2 are an emerging material family with wide-ranging potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and energy harvesting. Large-area growth methods are needed to open the way to applications. Control over lattice orientation during growth remains a challenge. This is needed to minimize or even avoid the formation of grain boundaries, detrimental to electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of MoS2 and other 2D semiconductors. Here, we report on the growth of high-quality monolayer MoS2 with control over lattice orientation. We show that the monolayer film is composed of coalescing single islands with limited numbers of lattice orientation due to an epitaxial growth mechanism. Optical absorbance spectra acquired over large areas show significant absorbance in the high-energy part of the spectrum, indicating that MoS2 could also be interesting for harvesting this region of the solar spectrum and fabrication of UV-sensitive photodetectors. Even though the interaction between the growth substrate and MoS2 is strong enough to induce lattice alignment via van der Waals interaction, we can easily transfer the grown material and fabricate devices. Local potential mapping along channels in field-effect transistors shows that the single-crystal MoS2 grains in our film are well connected, with interfaces that do not degrade the electrical conductivity. This is also confirmed by the relatively large and length-independent mobility in devices with a channel length reaching 80 μm. PMID:25843548

  9. Ultrasensitive gas detection of large-area boron-doped graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Lv, Ruitao; Chen, Gugang; Li, Qing; ...

    2015-11-02

    Heteroatom doping is an efficient way to modify the chemical and electronic properties of graphene. In particular, boron doping is expected to induce a p-type conducting behavior to pristine (undoped) graphene which could lead to diverse applications. But, the experimental progress on atomic scale visualization and sensing properties of large-area boron-doped graphene (BG) sheets is still very scarce. This work describes the controlled growth of centimeter size, high-crystallinity BG sheets. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used to visualize the atomic structure and the local density of states around boron dopants. We confirmed that BG behaves as a p-type conductormore » and a unique croissant-like feature is frequently observed within the BG lattice, which is caused by the presence of B-C trimmers embedded within the hexagonal lattice. Interestingly, it is demonstrated for the first time that BG exhibits unique sensing capabilities when detecting toxic gases, such as NO2 and NH3 , being able to detect extremely low concentrations (e.g. parts per trillion, parts per billion). Our work envisions that other attractive applications could now be explored based on as-synthesized BG.« less

  10. Micro- and nanoscale electrical characterization of large-area graphene transferred to functional substrates.

    PubMed

    Fisichella, Gabriele; Di Franco, Salvatore; Fiorenza, Patrick; Lo Nigro, Raffaella; Roccaforte, Fabrizio; Tudisco, Cristina; Condorelli, Guido G; Piluso, Nicolò; Spartà, Noemi; Lo Verso, Stella; Accardi, Corrado; Tringali, Cristina; Ravesi, Sebastiano; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on catalytic metals is one of main approaches for high-quality graphene growth over large areas. However, a subsequent transfer step to an insulating substrate is required in order to use the graphene for electronic applications. This step can severely affect both the structural integrity and the electronic properties of the graphene membrane. In this paper, we investigated the morphological and electrical properties of CVD graphene transferred onto SiO2 and on a polymeric substrate (poly(ethylene-2,6-naphthalene dicarboxylate), briefly PEN), suitable for microelectronics and flexible electronics applications, respectively. The electrical properties (sheet resistance, mobility, carrier density) of the transferred graphene as well as the specific contact resistance of metal contacts onto graphene were investigated by using properly designed test patterns. While a sheet resistance R sh ≈ 1.7 kΩ/sq and a specific contact resistance ρc ≈ 15 kΩ·μm have been measured for graphene transferred onto SiO2, about 2.3× higher R sh and about 8× higher ρc values were obtained for graphene on PEN. High-resolution current mapping by torsion resonant conductive atomic force microscopy (TRCAFM) provided an insight into the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for the very high ρc in the case of graphene on PEN, showing a ca. 10× smaller "effective" area for current injection than in the case of graphene on SiO2.

  11. Large-area soft-imprinted nanowire networks as light trapping transparent conductors

    PubMed Central

    van de Groep, Jorik; Gupta, Dhritiman; Verschuuren, Marc A.; M. Wienk, Martijn; Janssen, Rene A. J.; Polman, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Using soft-imprint nanolithography, we demonstrate large-area application of engineered two-dimensional polarization-independent networks of silver nanowires as transparent conducting electrodes. These networks have high optical transmittance, low electrical sheet resistance, and at the same time function as a photonic light-trapping structure enhancing optical absorption in the absorber layer of thin-film solar cells. We study the influence of nanowire width and pitch on the network transmittance and sheet resistance, and demonstrate improved performance compared to ITO. Next, we use P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells as a model system to show the realization of nanowire network based functional devices. Using angle-resolved external quantum efficiency measurements, we demonstrate engineered light trapping by coupling to guided modes in the thin absorber layer of the solar cell. Concurrent to the direct observation of controlled light trapping we observe a reduction in photocurrent as a result of increased reflection and parasitic absorption losses; such losses can be minimized by re-optimization of the NW network geometry. Together, these results demonstrate how engineered 2D NW networks can serve as multifunctional structures that unify the functions of a transparent conductor and a light trapping structure. These results are generic and can be applied to any type of optoelectronic device. PMID:26091006

  12. Ultrasensitive gas detection of large-area boron-doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Ruitao; Chen, Gugang; Li, Qing; McCreary, Amber; Botello-Méndez, Andrés; Morozov, S. V.; Declerck, Xavier; Perea-López, Nestor; Cullen, David A.; Feng, Simin; Elías, Ana Laura; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Endo, Morinobu; Kang, Feiyu; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Meunier, Vincent; Pan, Minghu; Harutyunyan, Avetik R.; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Terrones, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Heteroatom doping is an efficient way to modify the chemical and electronic properties of graphene. In particular, boron doping is expected to induce a p-type (boron)-conducting behavior to pristine (nondoped) graphene, which could lead to diverse applications. However, the experimental progress on atomic scale visualization and sensing properties of large-area boron-doped graphene (BG) sheets is still very scarce. This work describes the controlled growth of centimeter size, high-crystallinity BG sheets. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used to visualize the atomic structure and the local density of states around boron dopants. It is confirmed that BG behaves as a p-type conductor and a unique croissant-like feature is frequently observed within the BG lattice, which is caused by the presence of boron-carbon trimers embedded within the hexagonal lattice. More interestingly, it is demonstrated for the first time that BG exhibits unique sensing capabilities when detecting toxic gases, such as NO2 and NH3, being able to detect extremely low concentrations (e.g., parts per trillion, parts per billion). This work envisions that other attractive applications could now be explored based on as-synthesized BG. PMID:26575621

  13. Large-area soft-imprinted nanowire networks as light trapping transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Groep, Jorik; Gupta, Dhritiman; Verschuuren, Marc A.; M. Wienk, Martijn; Janssen, Rene A. J.; Polman, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Using soft-imprint nanolithography, we demonstrate large-area application of engineered two-dimensional polarization-independent networks of silver nanowires as transparent conducting electrodes. These networks have high optical transmittance, low electrical sheet resistance, and at the same time function as a photonic light-trapping structure enhancing optical absorption in the absorber layer of thin-film solar cells. We study the influence of nanowire width and pitch on the network transmittance and sheet resistance, and demonstrate improved performance compared to ITO. Next, we use P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells as a model system to show the realization of nanowire network based functional devices. Using angle-resolved external quantum efficiency measurements, we demonstrate engineered light trapping by coupling to guided modes in the thin absorber layer of the solar cell. Concurrent to the direct observation of controlled light trapping we observe a reduction in photocurrent as a result of increased reflection and parasitic absorption losses; such losses can be minimized by re-optimization of the NW network geometry. Together, these results demonstrate how engineered 2D NW networks can serve as multifunctional structures that unify the functions of a transparent conductor and a light trapping structure. These results are generic and can be applied to any type of optoelectronic device.

  14. Ultrathin Fluidic Laminates for Large-Area Façade Integration and Smart Windows.

    PubMed

    Heiz, Benjamin P V; Pan, Zhiwen; Lautenschläger, Gerhard; Sirtl, Christin; Kraus, Matthias; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2017-03-01

    Buildings represent more than 40% of Europe's energy demands and about one third of its CO2 emissions. Energy efficient buildings and, in particular, building skins have therefore been among the key priorities of international research agendas. Here, glass-glass fluidic devices are presented for large-area integration with adaptive façades and smart windows. These devices enable harnessing and dedicated control of various liquids for added functionality in the building envelope. Combining a microstructured glass pane, a thin cover sheet with tailored mechanical performance, and a liquid for heat storage and transport, a flat-panel laminate is generated with thickness adapted to a single glass sheet in conventional windows. Such multimaterial devices can be integrated with state-of-the-art window glazings or façades to harvest and distribute thermal as well as solar energy by wrapping buildings into a fluidic layer. High visual transparency is achieved through adjusting the optical properties of the employed liquid. Also secondary functionality, such as chromatic windows, polychromatism, or adaptive energy uptake can be generated on part of the liquid.

  15. Quenching and partitioning response of carbon-manganese-silicon sheet steels containing nickel, molybdenum, aluminum and copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahkonen, Joonas

    In order to produce passenger vehicles with improved fuel economy and increased passenger safety, car manufacturers are in need of steels with enhanced strength levels and good formability. Recently, promising combinations of strength and ductility have been reported for several, so-called third generation advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and quenching and partitioning (Q&P) steels are increasingly being recognized as a promising third generation AHSS candidate. Early Q research used conventional TRIP steel chemistries and richer alloying strategies have been explored in more recent studies. However, systematic investigations of the effects of alloying elements on tensile properties and retained austenite fractions of Q&P steels are sparse. The objective of the present research was to investigate the alloying effects of carbon, manganese, molybdenum, aluminum, copper and nickel on tensile properties and microstructural evolution of Q&P heat treated sheet steels. Seven alloys were investigated with 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si (wt pct) and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys used to study carbon effects, a 0.3C-5Mn-1.6Si alloy to study manganese effects, 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo and 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo-0.85Al alloys to study molybdenum and aluminum effects and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu-1.5Ni alloys to study copper and nickel effects. Increasing alloy carbon content was observed to mainly increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 1865 MPa without significantly affecting total elongation (TE) levels. Increasing alloy carbon content also increased the resulting retained austenite (RA) fractions up to 22 vol pct. Measured maximum RA fractions were significantly lower than the predicted maximum RA levels in the 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys, likely resulting from transition carbide formation. Increasing alloy manganese content increased UTS, TE and RA levels, and decreased yield strength (YS) and austenite carbon content (Cgamma) levels

  16. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce 5.9 x 5.9 cm space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/W is described. Cell types investigated include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm/cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover glass simultaneously is being developed. Results for cell and array tests are given. Large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  17. Gleam: the GLAST Large Area Telescope Simulation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, Richard

    2003-08-22

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented.

  18. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce 5.9 x 5.9 cm space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/W is described. Cell types investigated include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm/cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover glass simultaneously is being developed. Results for cell and array tests are given. Large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  19. Substrate for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.E.

    1982-08-10

    A substrate is made for silicon solar cells by heating a sheet of large-grained silicon steel at a temperature of at least about 1300* C. In an atmosphere of hydrogen and tungsten hexafluo (Or hexachloride) at a partial pressure ratio of hydrogen to tungsten hexafluoride of about 3 to about 6 to deposit an epitaxial layer of tungsten on said sheet of silicon steel. Epitaxial silicon can then be deposited in a conventional manner on the layer of epitaxial tungsten.

  20. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  1. Methods for Finding Legacy Wells in Large Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, Richard W.; Veloski, Garret A.; Hodges, D. Greg; White, Jr., Curt M.

    2016-06-16

    United States. When abandoned, many wells were not adequately sealed and now provide a potential conduit for the vertical movement of liquids and gases. Today, groundwater aquifers can be contaminated by surface pollutants flowing down wells or by deep, saline water diffusing upwards. Likewise, natural gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), or radon can travel upwards via these wells to endanger structures or human health on the surface. Recently, the need to find and plug wells has become critical with the advent of carbon dioxide injection into geologic formations for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or carbon storage. The potential for natural gas or brine leakage through existing wells has also been raised as a concern in regions where shale resources are hydraulically fractured for hydrocarbon recovery. In this study, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) updated existing, effective well finding techniques to be able to survey large areas quickly using helicopter or ground-vehicle-mounted magnetometers, combined with mobile methane detection. For this study, magnetic data were collected using airborne and ground vehicles equipped with two boom-mounted magnetometers, or on foot using a hand-held magnetometer with a single sensor. Data processing techniques were employed to accentuate well-casing-type magnetic signatures. To locate wells with no magnetic signature (wells where the steel well casing had been removed), the team monitored for anomalous concentrations of methane, which could indicate migration of volatile compounds from deeper sedimentary strata along a well or fracture pathway. Methane measurements were obtained using the ALPIS DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) sensor for helicopter surveys and the Apogee leak detection system (LDS) for ground surveys. These methods were evaluated at a 100-year-old oilfield in Wyoming, where a helicopter magnetic survey accurately located 93% of visible wells. In addition, 20% of the wells found by the survey were

  2. Methods for Finding Legacy Wells in Large Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, Richard; Veloski, Garret; Hodges, D. Greg; White, Jr., Charles E.

    2016-06-16

    More than 10 million wells have been drilled during 150 years of oil and gas production in the United States. When abandoned, many wells were not adequately sealed and now provide a potential conduit for the vertical movement of liquids and gases. Today, groundwater aquifers can be contaminated by surface pollutants flowing down wells or by deep, saline water diffusing upwards. Likewise, natural gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), or radon can travel upwards via these wells to endanger structures or human health on the surface. Recently, the need to find and plug wells has become critical with the advent of carbon dioxide injection into geologic formations for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or carbon storage. The potential for natural gas or brine leakage through existing wells has also been raised as a concern in regions where shale resources are hydraulically fractured for hydrocarbon recovery. In this study, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) updated existing, effective well finding techniques to be able to survey large areas quickly using helicopter or ground-vehicle-mounted magnetometers, combined with mobile methane detection. For this study, magnetic data were collected using airborne and ground vehicles equipped with two boom-mounted magnetometers, or on foot using a hand-held magnetometer with a single sensor. Data processing techniques were employed to accentuate well-casing-type magnetic signatures. To locate wells with no magnetic signature (wells where the steel well casing had been removed), the team monitored for anomalous concentrations of methane, which could indicate migration of volatile compounds from deeper sedimentary strata along a well or fracture pathway. Methane measurements were obtained using the ALPIS DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) sensor for helicopter surveys and the Apogee leak detection system (LDS) for ground surveys. These methods were evaluated at a 100-year-old oilfield in Wyoming, where a helicopter magnetic

  3. Large area flexible SERS active substrates using engineered nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Aram J.; Huh, Yun Suk; Erickson, David

    2011-07-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an analytical sensing method that provides label-free detection, molecularly specific information, and extremely high sensitivity. The Raman enhancement that makes this method attractive is mainly attributed to the local amplification of the incident electromagnetic field that occurs when a surface plasmon mode is excited at a metallic nanostructure. Here, we present a simple, cost effective method for creating flexible, large area SERS-active substrates using a new technique we call shadow mask assisted evaporation (SMAE). The advantage of large, flexible SERS substrates such as these is they have more area for multiplexing and can be incorporated into irregular surfaces such as clothing. We demonstrate the formation of four different types of nanostructure arrays (pillar, nib, ellipsoidal cylinder, and triangular tip) by controlling the evaporation angle, substrate rotation, and deposition rate of metals onto anodized alumina nanoporous membranes as large as 27 mm. In addition, we present experimental results showing how a hybrid structure comprising of gold nanospheres embedded in a silver nano-pillar structure can be used to obtain a 50× SERS enhancement over the raw nanoparticles themselves.Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an analytical sensing method that provides label-free detection, molecularly specific information, and extremely high sensitivity. The Raman enhancement that makes this method attractive is mainly attributed to the local amplification of the incident electromagnetic field that occurs when a surface plasmon mode is excited at a metallic nanostructure. Here, we present a simple, cost effective method for creating flexible, large area SERS-active substrates using a new technique we call shadow mask assisted evaporation (SMAE). The advantage of large, flexible SERS substrates such as these is they have more area for multiplexing and can be incorporated into irregular surfaces such as

  4. Large-area graphene-based nanofiltration membranes by shear alignment of discotic nematic liquid crystals of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Abozar; Sheath, Phillip; Martin, Samuel T.; Shinde, Dhanraj B.; Shaibani, Mahdokht; Banerjee, Parama Chakraborty; Tkacz, Rachel; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar; Majumder, Mainak

    2016-03-01

    Graphene-based membranes demonstrating ultrafast water transport, precise molecular sieving of gas and solvated molecules shows great promise as novel separation platforms; however, scale-up of these membranes to large-areas remains an unresolved problem. Here we demonstrate that the discotic nematic phase of graphene oxide (GO) can be shear aligned to form highly ordered, continuous, thin films of multi-layered GO on a support membrane by an industrially adaptable method to produce large-area membranes (13 × 14 cm2) in <5 s. Pressure driven transport data demonstrate high retention (>90%) for charged and uncharged organic probe molecules with a hydrated radius above 5 Å as well as modest (30-40%) retention of monovalent and divalent salts. The highly ordered graphene sheets in the plane of the membrane make organized channels and enhance the permeability (71+/-5 l m-2 hr-1 bar-1 for 150+/-15 nm thick membranes).

  5. Low defect large area semi-polar (112) GaN grown on patterned (113) silicon

    PubMed Central

    Pristovsek, Markus; Han, Yisong; Zhu, Tongtong; Frentrup, Martin; Kappers, Menno J; Humphreys, Colin J; Kozlowski, Grzegorz; Maaskant, Pleun; Corbett, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We report on the growth of semi-polar GaN (112) templates on patterned Si (113) substrates. Trenches were etched in Si (113) using KOH to expose Si {111} sidewalls. Subsequently an AlN layer to prevent meltback etching, an AlGaN layer for stress management, and finally two GaN layers were deposited. Total thicknesses up to 5 m were realised without cracks in the layer. Transmission electron microscopy showed that most dislocations propagate along [0001] direction and hence can be covered by overgrowth from the next trench. The defect densities were below and stacking fault densities less than 100 cm . These numbers are similar to reports on patterned r-plane sapphire. Typical X-ray full width at half maximum (FHWM) were 500” for the asymmetric (00.6) and 450” for the (11.2) reflection. These FHWMs were 50 % broader than reported for patterned r-plane sapphire which is attributed to different defect structures and total thicknesses. The surface roughness shows strong variation on templates. For the final surface roughness the roughness of the sidewalls of the GaN ridges at the time of coalescence are critical. PMID:26212392

  6. A Large-Area Transferable Wide Band Gap 2D Silicon Dioxide Layer.

    PubMed

    Büchner, Christin; Wang, Zhu-Jun; Burson, Kristen M; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Heyde, Markus; Schlögl, Robert; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-23

    An atomically smooth silica bilayer is transferred from the growth substrate to a new support via mechanical exfoliation at millimeter scale. The atomic structure and morphology are maintained perfectly throughout the process. A simple heating treatment results in complete removal of the transfer medium. Low-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy show the success of the transfer steps. Excellent chemical and thermal stability result from the absence of dangling bonds in the film structure. By adding this wide band gap oxide to the toolbox of 2D materials, possibilities for van der Waals heterostructures will be broadened significantly.

  7. Fabrication of large-area CCD detectors on high-purity, float-zone silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. A.; Burke, B. E.; Cooper, M. J.; Mountain, R. W.; Kosicki, B. B.

    1995-01-01

    In this report on the fabrication of a 1024 x 1024 charge coupled device (CCD) imager to be used as a soft x-ray sensor onboard the Advanced X-ray Astronomical Facility (AXAF), the following conclusions were found: the dislocations that limited the performance of the high resistivity imager were characterized; the sources of stress were identified and the dislocations found were eliminated; and a charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) of 10(exp -6) and read noise as low as 1.3/e was demonstrated. This sensor must have low noise and a low CTI and must be radiation hardened to withstand any radiation damage from a space environment.

  8. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  9. Ultraflexible, large-area, physiological temperature sensors for multipoint measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Yusuke; Terakawa, Yuki; Reeder, Jonathan; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Ware, Taylor; Yang, Kejia; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Sekino, Masaki; Voit, Walter; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We report a fabrication method for flexible and printable thermal sensors based on composites of semicrystalline acrylate polymers and graphite with a high sensitivity of 20 mK and a high-speed response time of less than 100 ms. These devices exhibit large resistance changes near body temperature under physiological conditions with high repeatability (1,800 times). Device performance is largely unaffected by bending to radii below 700 µm, which allows for conformal application to the surface of living tissue. The sensing temperature can be tuned between 25 °C and 50 °C, which covers all relevant physiological temperatures. Furthermore, we demonstrate flexible active-matrix thermal sensors which can resolve spatial temperature gradients over a large area. With this flexible ultrasensitive temperature sensor we succeeded in the in vivo measurement of cyclic temperatures changes of 0.1 °C in a rat lung during breathing, without interference from constant tissue motion. This result conclusively shows that the lung of a warm-blooded animal maintains surprising temperature stability despite the large difference between core temperature and inhaled air temperature. PMID:26554008

  10. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-04-20

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ∼5.1σ. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, Γ ∼ 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy γ-rays. The very hard GeV γ-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the γ-rays. The γ-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347.

  11. Complex protein nanopatterns over large areas via colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Stine H; Pedersen, Gitte A; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Bochenkov, Vladimir; Nejsum, Lene N; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2013-04-01

    The patterning of biomolecules at the nanoscale provides a powerful method to investigate cellular adhesion processes. A novel method for patterning is presented that is based on colloidal monolayer templating combined with multiple and angled deposition steps. Patterns of gold and SiO2 layers are used to generate complex protein nanopatterns over large areas. Simple circular patches or more complex ring structures are produced in addition to hierarchical patterns of smaller patches. The gold regions are modified through alkanethiol chemistry, which enables the preparation of extracellular matrix proteins (vitronectin) or cellular ligands (the extracellular domain of E-cadherin) in the nanopatterns, whereas the selective poly(l-lysine)-poly(ethylene glycol) functionalization of the SiO2 matrix renders it protein repellent. Cell studies, as a proof of principle, demonstrate the potential for using sets of systematically varied samples with simpler or more complex patterns for studies of cellular adhesive behavior and reveal that the local distribution of proteins within a simple patch critically influences cell adhesion. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Large-area nanogap plasmon resonator arrays for plasmonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; van Wolferen, Henk; Wormeester, Herbert; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin T.

    2012-07-01

    Large-area (~8000 mm2) Au nanogap plasmon resonator array substrates manufactured using maskless laser interference lithography (LIL) with high uniformity are presented. The periodically spaced subwavelength nanogap arrays are formed between adjacent nanopyramid (NPy) structures with precisely defined pitch and high length density (~1 km cm-2), and are ideally suited as scattering sites for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as well as refractive index sensing. The two-dimensional grid arrangement of NPy structures renders the excitation of the plasmon resonators minimally dependent on the incident polarization. The SERS average enhancement factor (AEF) has been characterized using over 30 000 individual measurements of benzenethiol (BT) chemisorbed on the Au NPy surfaces. From the 1(a1), βCCC + νCS ring mode (1074 cm-1) of BT on surfaces with pitch λg = 200 nm, AEF = 0.8 × 106 and for surfaces with λg = 500 nm, AEF = 0.3 × 107 from over 99% of the imaged spots. Maximum AEFs > 108 have been measured in both cases.

  13. A large area detector for x-ray applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rodricks, B.; Huang, Qiang; Hopf, R.; Wang, Kemei

    1993-10-01

    A large area detector for x-ray synchrotron applications has been developed. The front end of this device consist of a scintillator coupled to a fiber-optic taper. The fiber-optic taper is comprised of 4 smaller (70 mm x 70 mm) tapers fused together in a square matrix giving an active area of 140 mm x 140 mm. Each taper has a demagnification of 5.5 resulting in four small ends that are 12 mm diagonally across. The small ends of each taper are coupled to four microchannel-plate-based image intensifiers. The output from each image intensifier is focused onto a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detector. The four CCDs are read out in parallel and are independently controlled. The image intensifiers also act as fast (20 ns) electronic shutters. The system is capable of displaying images in real time. Additionally, with independent control on the readout of each row of data from the CCD, the system is capable of performing high speed imaging through novel readout manipulation.

  14. Ultra-stiff large-area carpets of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Dallas, Panagiotis; Britton, Jude; Lozano, Juan G; Murdock, Adrian T; Ferraro, Claudio; Gutierrez, Eduardo Saiz; Rijnveld, Niek; Holdway, Philip; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Grobert, Nicole

    2016-06-09

    Herewith, we report the influence of post-synthesis heat treatment (≤2350 °C and plasma temperatures) on the crystal structure, defect density, purity, alignment and dispersibility of free-standing large-area (several cm(2)) carpets of ultra-long (several mm) vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs). VA-MWCNTs were produced in large quantities (20-30 g per batch) using a semi-scaled-up aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) setup. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that the heat treatment at 2350 °C under inert atmosphere purifies, removes residual catalyst particles, and partially aligns adjacent single crystals (crystallites) in polycrystalline MWCNTs. The purification and improvement in the crystallites alignment within the MWCNTs resulted in reduced dispersibility of the VA-MWCNTs in liquid media. High-resolution microscopy revealed that the crystallinity is improved in scales of few tens of nanometres while the point defects remain largely unaffected. The heat treatment also had a marked benefit on the mechanical properties of the carpets. For the first time, we report compression moduli as high as 120 MPa for VA-MWCNT carpets, i.e. an order of magnitude higher than previously reported figures. The application of higher temperatures (arc-discharge plasma, ≥4000 °C) resulted in the formation of a novel graphite-matrix composite reinforced with CVD and arc-discharge-like carbon nanotubes.

  15. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  16. Large area flexible SERS active substrates using engineered nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Aram J; Huh, Yun Suk; Erickson, David

    2011-07-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an analytical sensing method that provides label-free detection, molecularly specific information, and extremely high sensitivity. The Raman enhancement that makes this method attractive is mainly attributed to the local amplification of the incident electromagnetic field that occurs when a surface plasmon mode is excited at a metallic nanostructure. Here, we present a simple, cost effective method for creating flexible, large area SERS-active substrates using a new technique we call shadow mask assisted evaporation (SMAE). The advantage of large, flexible SERS substrates such as these is they have more area for multiplexing and can be incorporated into irregular surfaces such as clothing. We demonstrate the formation of four different types of nanostructure arrays (pillar, nib, ellipsoidal cylinder, and triangular tip) by controlling the evaporation angle, substrate rotation, and deposition rate of metals onto anodized alumina nanoporous membranes as large as 27 mm. In addition, we present experimental results showing how a hybrid structure comprising of gold nanospheres embedded in a silver nano-pillar structure can be used to obtain a 50× SERS enhancement over the raw nanoparticles themselves.

  17. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bartelt, J.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Atwood, W. B.; Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bisello, D.; Baughman, B. M. E-mail: massimiliano.razzano@pi.infn.it

    2009-05-10

    The Vela pulsar is the brightest persistent source in the GeV sky and thus is the traditional first target for new {gamma}-ray observatories. We report here on initial Fermi Large Area Telescope observations during verification phase pointed exposure and early sky survey scanning. We have used the Vela signal to verify Fermi timing and angular resolution. The high-quality pulse profile, with some 32,400 pulsed photons at E {>=} 0.03 GeV, shows new features, including pulse structure as fine as 0.3 ms and a distinct third peak, which shifts in phase with energy. We examine the high-energy behavior of the pulsed emission; initial spectra suggest a phase-averaged power-law index of {gamma} = 1.51{sup +0.05} {sub -0.04} with an exponential cutoff at E{sub c} = 2.9 {+-} 0.1 GeV. Spectral fits with generalized cutoffs of the form e{sup -(E/E{sub c}){sup b}} require b {<=} 1, which is inconsistent with magnetic pair attenuation, and thus favor outer-magnetosphere emission models. Finally, we report on upper limits to any unpulsed component, as might be associated with a surrounding pulsar wind nebula.

  18. Ultraflexible, large-area, physiological temperature sensors for multipoint measurements.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Yusuke; Terakawa, Yuki; Reeder, Jonathan; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Ware, Taylor; Yang, Kejia; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Sekino, Masaki; Voit, Walter; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-11-24

    We report a fabrication method for flexible and printable thermal sensors based on composites of semicrystalline acrylate polymers and graphite with a high sensitivity of 20 mK and a high-speed response time of less than 100 ms. These devices exhibit large resistance changes near body temperature under physiological conditions with high repeatability (1,800 times). Device performance is largely unaffected by bending to radii below 700 µm, which allows for conformal application to the surface of living tissue. The sensing temperature can be tuned between 25 °C and 50 °C, which covers all relevant physiological temperatures. Furthermore, we demonstrate flexible active-matrix thermal sensors which can resolve spatial temperature gradients over a large area. With this flexible ultrasensitive temperature sensor we succeeded in the in vivo measurement of cyclic temperatures changes of 0.1 °C in a rat lung during breathing, without interference from constant tissue motion. This result conclusively shows that the lung of a warm-blooded animal maintains surprising temperature stability despite the large difference between core temperature and inhaled air temperature.

  19. High Redshift QSOs in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venemans, B. P.

    2007-12-01

    In this proceeding, I will present the first results on our ongoing search for z⪆6 quasars in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS). The unique infrared sky coverage of the LAS combined with SDSS i and z observations allows us to efficiently search for high redshift quasars with minimal contamination from foreground objects, e.g. galactic cool stars. Analysis of 106 deg^2 of sky from UKIDSS Data Release 1 (DR1) has resulted in the discovery of ULAS J020332.38+001229.2, a luminous (J_{AB}=20.0, M_{1450}=-26.2) quasar at z=5.86. The quasar is not present in the SDSS DR5 catalogue and the continuum spectral index of α=-1.4 (F_{ν}∝ν^{α}) is redder than a composite of SDSS quasars at similar redshifts (α=-0.5). Although it is difficult to draw any strong conclusions regarding the space density of quasars from one object, the discovery of this quasar in ˜100 deg^2 in a complete sample within our selection criteria down to a median depth of Y_{AB}=20.4 (7σ) is consistent with existing SDSS results. Finally, I will present the expected number density of high redshift z>6.5 quasars using future infrared surveys with VISTA.

  20. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.