Science.gov

Sample records for large-scale field experiment

  1. Effects of larval density in Ambystoma opacum: An experiment in large-scale field enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.E. )

    1990-02-01

    This experiment was designed to measure the effects of larval density on larval traits in the salamander Ambystoma opacum, and to ascertain whether previous studies conducted at smaller spatial scales or higher densities produced artifactual results. Density effects on larval growth, body size at metamorphosis, length of larval period, and survival to metamorphosis were studied in A. opacum in large-scale (41 m{sup 2} and 23 m{sup 2}) field enclosures in two temporary ponds. Each enclosure contained indigenous populations of prey (zooplankton and insects) and predators, as well as the range of microhabitats present in these natural ponds. Initial larval densities were chosen to represent high and low levels of naturally occurring mean densities. The results suggest that, in natural ponds, the importance of intraspecific competition is dependent upon hydroperiod, and the intensity of competition influences predation risk. Thus, both density-dependent and density-independent factors affect body size and recruitment of larval A. opacum into the adult population. The use of large-scale field enclosures has advantages and disadvantages: it allows the examination of density-dependent processes under natural conditions and provides high statistical power because of low variability in larval traits; however, experimental designs must be simple and underlying mechanisms are difficult to identify.

  2. Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil in a large-scale field simulated experiment.

    PubMed

    Bao, Mutai; Sun, Peiyan; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xinping; Wang, Lina; Cao, Lixin; Li, Fujuan

    2014-08-01

    Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil with hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients was carried out by a large-scale field simulated experiment in this paper. After a 103 day experiment, for n-alkanes, the maximum biodegradation rate reached 71% and the results showed hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients have a comprehensive effect. It also showed that rhamnolipid biosurfactants could shorten the biodegradation time through an emulsifying function; the nutrients could greatly increase the biodegradation rate by promoting HDB production. For PAHs, the chrysene series had higher weathering resistance. For the same series, the weathering resistance ability is C1- < C2- < C3- < C4-. After 53 days, no comprehensive effect occurred and more biodegradation was found for different n-alkanes in two pools which only had added rhamnolipid biosurfactants or nutrients, respectively. Except for C14, C15 and C16 sesquiterpanes, most of the steranes and terpanes had high antibiodegradability.

  3. Powering up with indirect reciprocity in a large-scale field experiment.

    PubMed

    Yoeli, Erez; Hoffman, Moshe; Rand, David G; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-06-18

    A defining aspect of human cooperation is the use of sophisticated indirect reciprocity. We observe others, talk about others, and act accordingly. We help those who help others, and we cooperate expecting that others will cooperate in return. Indirect reciprocity is based on reputation, which spreads by communication. A crucial aspect of indirect reciprocity is observability: reputation effects can support cooperation as long as peoples' actions can be observed by others. In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, natural selection favors cooperation when observability is sufficiently high. Complimenting this theoretical work are experiments where observability promotes cooperation among small groups playing games in the laboratory. Until now, however, there has been little evidence of observability's power to promote large-scale cooperation in real world settings. Here we provide such evidence using a field study involving 2413 subjects. We collaborated with a utility company to study participation in a program designed to prevent blackouts. We show that observability triples participation in this public goods game. The effect is over four times larger than offering a $25 monetary incentive, the company's previous policy. Furthermore, as predicted by indirect reciprocity, we provide evidence that reputational concerns are driving our observability effect. In sum, we show how indirect reciprocity can be harnessed to increase cooperation in a relevant, real-world public goods game.

  4. Evaluating Experience-Based Geologic Field Instruction: Lessons Learned from A Large-Scale Eye-Tracking Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Walders, K.; Bono, R. K.; Pelz, J.; Jacobs, R.

    2015-12-01

    A course centered on experience-based learning in field geology has been offered ten times at the University of Rochester. The centerpiece of the course is a 10-day field excursion to California featuring a broad cross-section of the geology of the state, from the San Andreas Fault to Death Valley. Here we describe results from a large-scale eye-tracking experiment aimed at understanding how experts and novices acquire visual geologic information. One ultimate goal of the project is to determine whether expert gaze patterns can be quantified to improve the instruction of beginning geology students. Another goal is to determine if aspects of the field experience can be transferred to the classroom/laboratory. Accordingly, ultra-high resolution segmented panoramic images have been collected at key sites visited during the field excursion. We have found that strict controls are needed in the field to obtain meaningful data; this often involves behavior atypical of geologists (e.g. limiting the field of view prior to data collection and placing time limits on scene viewing). Nevertheless some general conclusions can be made from a select data set. After an initial quick search, experts tend to exhibit scanning behavior that appears to support hypothesis testing. Novice fixations appear to define a scattered search pattern and/or one distracted by geologic noise in a scene. Noise sources include modern erosion features and vegetation. One way to quantify noise is through the use of saliency maps. With the caveat that our expert data set is small, our preliminary analysis suggests that experts tend to exhibit top-down behavior (indicating hypothesis driven responses) whereas novices show bottom-up gaze patterns, influenced by more salient features in a scene. We will present examples and discuss how these observations might be used to improve instruction.

  5. Rapid Evolution of Parasite Resistance in a Warmer Environment: Insights from a Large Scale Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Gonzalez, Fernando; Sundström, L. Fredrik; Schmid, Marian; Björklund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to have major effects on host-parasite dynamics, with potentially enormous consequences for entire ecosystems. To develop an accurate prognostic framework, theoretical models must be supported by empirical research. We investigated potential changes in host-parasite dynamics between a fish parasite, the eyefluke Diplostomum baeri, and an intermediate host, the European perch Perca fluviatilis, in a large-scale semi-enclosed area in the Baltic Sea, the Biotest Lake, which since 1980 receives heated water from a nuclear power plant. Two sample screenings, in two consecutive years, showed that fish from the warmer Biotest Lake were now less parasitized than fish from the Baltic Sea. These results are contrasting previous screenings performed six years after the temperature change, which showed the inverse situation. An experimental infection, by which perch from both populations were exposed to D. baeri from the Baltic Sea, revealed that perch from the Baltic Sea were successfully infected, while Biotest fish were not. These findings suggest that the elevated temperature may have resulted, among other outcomes, in an extremely rapid evolutionary change through which fish from the experimental Biotest Lake have gained resistance to the parasite. Our results confirm the need to account for both rapid evolutionary adaptation and biotic interactions in predictive models, and highlight the importance of empirical research in order to validate future projections. PMID:26035300

  6. SCALES: SEVIRI and GERB CaL/VaL area for large-scale field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Belda, Fernando; Bodas, Alejandro; Crommelynck, Dominique; Dewitte, Steven; Domenech, Carlos; Gimeno, Jaume F.; Harries, John E.; Jorge Sanchez, Joan; Pineda, Nicolau; Pino, David; Rius, Antonio; Saleh, Kauzar; Tarruella, Ramon; Velazquez, Almudena

    2004-02-01

    The main objective of the SCALES Project is to exploit the unique opportunity offered by the recent launch of the first European METEOSAT Second Generation geostationary satellite (MSG-1) to generate and validate new radiation budget and cloud products provided by the GERB (Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget) instrument. SCALES" specific objectives are: (i) definition and characterization of a large reasonably homogeneous area compatible to GERB pixel size (around 50 x 50 km2), (ii) validation of GERB TOA radiances and fluxes derived by means of angular distribution models, (iii) development of algorithms to estimate surface net radiation from GERB TOA measurements, and (iv) development of accurate methodologies to measure radiation flux divergence and analyze its influence on the thermal regime and dynamics of the atmosphere, also using GERB data. SCALES is highly innovative: it focuses on a new and unique space instrument and develops a new specific validation methodology for low resolution sensors that is based on the use of a robust reference meteorological station (Valencia Anchor Station) around which 3D high resolution meteorological fields are obtained from the MM5 Meteorological Model. During the 1st GERB Ground Validation Campaign (18th-24th June, 2003), CERES instruments on Aqua and Terra provided additional radiance measurements to support validation efforts. CERES instruments operated in the PAPS mode (Programmable Azimuth Plane Scanning) focusing the station. Ground measurements were taken by lidar, sun photometer, GPS precipitable water content, radiosounding ascents, Anchor Station operational meteorological measurements at 2m and 15m., 4 radiation components at 2m, and mobile stations to characterize a large area. In addition, measurements during LANDSAT overpasses on June 14th and 30th were also performed. These activities were carried out within the GIST (GERB International Science Team) framework, during GERB Commissioning Period.

  7. Using Permanent Wetlands as Polishing Ponds to Remove Monomethylmercury: Results of a Large Scale Replicated Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, W. A.; Negrey, J.; Stephenson, M.; Coale, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seasonally inundated wetlands in the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area (YBWA; Davis, CA) are producers of monomethylmercury (MeHg) during fall flood up. The export of MeHg from the YBWA is of serious concern to downstream habitats as it is a neurotoxin and poses a serious health concern to humans and wildlife. In this experiment, we routed water from a 40 hectare seasonal wetland through nine replicated 100 x 25 m constructed ponds to determine their efficiency at lowering MeHg. All of the sampling was conducted over a three year period (2011-2013) during fall months. We measured total and filtered (<0.45 µm) methyl and total mercury as well as nutrients in incoming tail water and at the outflow of each pond. Residence times in the ponds were modeled using rhodamine dye and ranged from 0.7 to 13.0 days in depending on flow (Q = 0.08 - 1.39 cfs). Reductions of dissolved (filtered) MeHg concentrations ranged from 0.024 - 0.455 ng L-1 d-1 and particulate (total - filtered) MeHg reductions ranged from 0.028 - 1.02 ng L-1 d-1 in the outflow of the ponds. We observed little to no change in dissolved MeHg concentrations at high flow rates, however, there was still a significant decrease in the particulate fraction of MeHg. In contrast, ponds with lower flow rates (e.g. longer residence times) were efficient at lowering both dissolved and particulate MeHg concentrations. During polishing periods when overlying water MeHg concentrations were highest dissolved MeHg flux was into sediments where we hypothesize bacterial demethylation was responsible for transformation back to inorganic mercury species. Loss of particulate MeHg from the water column was attributed to particle settling. Results from this experiment indicate small ponds with short residence times can be efficient at lowering MeHg concentrations. The design of the pond will vary depending on the volume of the seasonal wetland being drained and needs of the wetland manager.

  8. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Tien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Toth, Balazs; Jomaas, Grunde

    2012-01-01

    Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant knowhow about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due to the complexity, cost and risk associated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment of a relevant size in microgravity. Therefore, there is currently a gap in knowledge of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The entire body of low-gravity fire research has either been conducted in short duration ground-based microgravity facilities or has been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date has shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour, flame colour and flame structure. As a result, the prediction of the behaviour of fires in reduced gravity is at present not validated. To address this gap in knowledge, a collaborative international project, Spacecraft Fire Safety, has been established with its cornerstone being the development of an experiment (Fire Safety 1) to be conducted on an ISS resupply vehicle, such as the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) or Orbital Cygnus after it leaves the ISS and before it enters the atmosphere. A computer modelling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the possibility of examining fire behaviour on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This unprecedented opportunity will expand the understanding of the fundamentals of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The experiment is being

  9. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Jomaas, Grunde

    2012-01-01

    Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant know how about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due to the complexity, cost and risk associated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment of a relevant size in microgravity. Therefore, there is currently a gap in knowledge of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The entire body of low-gravity fire research has either been conducted in short duration ground-based microgravity facilities or has been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date has shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal-gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour, flame colour and flame structure. As a result, the prediction of the behaviour of fires in reduced gravity is at present not validated. To address this gap in knowledge, a collaborative international project, Spacecraft Fire Safety, has been established with its cornerstone being the development of an experiment (Fire Safety 1) to be conducted on an ISS resupply vehicle, such as the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) or Orbital Cygnus after it leaves the ISS and before it enters the atmosphere. A computer modelling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the possibility of examining fire behaviour on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This unprecedented opportunity will expand the understanding of the fundamentals of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The experiment is being

  10. Experiments of Bouyant Thermocapillary Convection of Large Scale Liquid Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Li; Kang, Qi

    Thermocapillary-driven convection in a large scale liquid bridge was investigated by experiments in this paper. We used 2cst silicone oil (Pr=28.571) ,observed the onset of liquid bridge with different aspect ratio (A=l/d) and volume, analyze the transformation of temperature oscillation frequency and phase , discussed the problems of hydrothermal waves. The column diameter of liquid bridge was 20mm. Due to the limit by gravity, we constructed bridge with 3mm-4.25mm height. With the help of five azimuthal thermocouples inserted in the bridge interior, we discovered that temperature oscillation in flow field occurs at the same time, bridges with different aspect ratio and volume have different flow mode, and with the increase of temperature difference, the frequency approximately increases linearly, oscillation phase of each temperature oscillation curve continuously changes. Bridges with different aspect ratio have different ways to chaos.

  11. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  12. Deciphering landslide behavior using large-scale flume experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Iverson, Richard M.; Iverson, Neal R.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Brien, Dianne L.; Logan, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Landslides can be triggered by a variety of hydrologic events and they can exhibit a wide range of movement dynamics. Effective prediction requires understanding these diverse behaviors. Precise evaluation in the field is difficult; as an alternative we performed a series of landslide initiation experiments in the large-scale, USGS debris-flow flume. We systematically investigated the effects of three different hydrologic triggering mechanisms, including groundwater exfiltration from bedrock, prolonged rainfall infiltration, and intense bursts of rain. We also examined the effects of initial soil porosity (loose or dense) relative to the soil’s critical-state porosity. Results show that all three hydrologic mechanisms can instigate landsliding, but water pathways, sensor response patterns, and times to failure differ. Initial soil porosity has a profound influence on landslide movement behavior. Experiments using loose soil show rapid soil contraction during failure, with elevated pore pressures liquefying the sediment and creating fast-moving debris flows. In contrast, dense soil dilated upon shearing, resulting in slow, gradual, and episodic motion. These results have fundamental implications for forecasting landslide behavior and developing effective warning systems.

  13. Large-scale flow experiments for managing river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.; Olden, Julian D.; Lytle, David A.; Melis, Theodore S.; Schmidt, John C.; Bray, Erin N.; Freeman, Mary C.; Gido, Keith B.; Hemphill, Nina P.; Kennard, Mark J.; McMullen, Laura E.; Mims, Meryl C.; Pyron, Mark; Robinson, Christopher T.; Williams, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental manipulations of streamflow have been used globally in recent decades to mitigate the impacts of dam operations on river systems. Rivers are challenging subjects for experimentation, because they are open systems that cannot be isolated from their social context. We identify principles to address the challenges of conducting effective large-scale flow experiments. Flow experiments have both scientific and social value when they help to resolve specific questions about the ecological action of flow with a clear nexus to water policies and decisions. Water managers must integrate new information into operating policies for large-scale experiments to be effective. Modeling and monitoring can be integrated with experiments to analyze long-term ecological responses. Experimental design should include spatially extensive observations and well-defined, repeated treatments. Large-scale flow manipulations are only a part of dam operations that affect river systems. Scientists can ensure that experimental manipulations continue to be a valuable approach for the scientifically based management of river systems.

  14. Turbulent amplification of large-scale magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Chen, H.

    1984-01-01

    Previously-introduced methods for analytically estimating the effects of small-scale turbulent fluctuations on large-scale dynamics are extended to fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. The problem becomes algebraically tractable in the presence of sufficiently large spectral gaps. The calculation generalizes 'alpha dynamo' calculations, except that the velocity fluctuations and magnetic fluctuations are treated on an independent and equal footing. Earlier expressions for the 'alpha coefficients' of turbulent magnetic field amplification are recovered as a special case.

  15. Relic vector field and CMB large scale anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.

  16. The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

  17. Stability of large scale chromomagnetic fields in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmfors, Per; Persson, David

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that Yang-Mills theory in vacuum has a perturbative instability to spontaneously form a large scale magnetic field (the Savvidy mechanism) and that a constant field is unstable so that a possible ground state has to be inhomogenous over the non-perturbative scale Λ (the Copenhagen vacuum). We argue that this spontaneous instability does not occur at high temperature when the induced field strength gB~Λ2 is much weaker than the magnetic mass squared (g2T)2. At high temperature, oscillations of gauge fields acquire a thermal mass M~gT and we show that this mass stabilizes a magnetic field which is constant over length scales shorter than the magnetic screening length (g2T)-1. We therefore conclude that there is no indication for any spontaneous generation of weak non-abelian magnetic fields in the early universe.

  18. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.

  19. Measuring ignitability for in situ burning of oil spills weathered under Arctic conditions: from laboratory studies to large-scale field experiments.

    PubMed

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Brandvik, Per Johan

    2011-08-01

    This paper compares the ignitability of Troll B crude oil weathered under simulated Arctic conditions (0%, 50% and 90% ice cover). The experiments were performed in different scales at SINTEF's laboratories in Trondheim, field research station on Svalbard and in broken ice (70-90% ice cover) in the Barents Sea. Samples from the weathering experiments were tested for ignitability using the same laboratory burning cell. The measured ignitability from the experiments in these different scales showed a good agreement for samples with similar weathering. The ice conditions clearly affected the weathering process, and 70% ice or more reduces the weathering and allows a longer time window for in situ burning. The results from the Barents Sea revealed that weathering and ignitability can vary within an oil slick. This field use of the burning cell demonstrated that it can be used as an operational tool to monitor the ignitability of oil spills.

  20. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  1. Investigation of flow fields within large scale hypersonic inlet models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnos, A. V.; Watson, E. C.; Seebaugh, W. R.; Sanator, R. J.; Decarlo, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to determine the internal flow characteristics in model passages representative of hypersonic inlets for use at Mach numbers to about 12. The passages were large enough to permit measurements to be made in both the core flow and boundary layers. The analytical techniques for designing the internal contours and predicting the internal flow-field development accounted for coupling between the boundary layers and inviscid flow fields by means of a displacement-thickness correction. Three large-scale inlet models, each having a different internal compression ratio, were designed to provide high internal performance with an approximately uniform static-pressure distribution at the throat station. The models were tested in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 7.4 and a unit free-stream Reynolds number of 8.86 X one million per meter.

  2. Field-aligned currents and large-scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1979-01-01

    The existence of field-aligned currents (FAC) at northern and southern high latitudes was confirmed by a number of observations, most clearly by experiments on the TRIAD and ISIS 2 satellites. The high-latitude FAC system is used to relate what is presently known about the large-scale pattern of high-latitude ionospheric electric fields and their relation to solar wind parameters. Recently a simplified model was presented for polar cap electric fields. The model is of considerable help in visualizing the large-scale features of FAC systems. A summary of the FAC observations is given. The simplified model is used to visualize how the FAC systems are driven by their generators.

  3. Automated workflow for large-scale selected reaction monitoring experiments.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Rosenberger, George; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-03-02

    Targeted proteomics allows researchers to study proteins of interest without being drowned in data from other, less interesting proteins or from redundant or uninformative peptides. While the technique is mostly used for smaller, focused studies, there are several reasons to conduct larger targeted experiments. Automated, highly robust software becomes more important in such experiments. In addition, larger experiments are carried out over longer periods of time, requiring strategies to handle the sometimes large shift in retention time often observed. We present a complete proof-of-principle software stack that automates most aspects of selected reaction monitoring workflows, a targeted proteomics technology. The software allows experiments to be easily designed and carried out. The steps automated are the generation of assays, generation of mass spectrometry driver files and methods files, and the import and analysis of the data. All data are normalized to a common retention time scale, the data are then scored using a novel score model, and the error is subsequently estimated. We also show that selected reaction monitoring can be used for label-free quantification. All data generated are stored in a relational database, and the growing resource further facilitates the design of new experiments. We apply the technology to a large-scale experiment studying how Streptococcus pyogenes remodels its proteome under stimulation of human plasma.

  4. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; ...

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate itsmore » efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.« less

  5. Numerically modelling the large scale coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Mayukh; Nandi, Dibyendu

    2016-07-01

    The solar corona spews out vast amounts of magnetized plasma into the heliosphere which has a direct impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. Thus it is important that we develop an understanding of the dynamics of the solar corona. With our present technology it has not been possible to generate 3D magnetic maps of the solar corona; this warrants the use of numerical simulations to study the coronal magnetic field. A very popular method of doing this, is to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field using NLFF or PFSS codes. However the extrapolations at different time intervals are completely independent of each other and do not capture the temporal evolution of magnetic fields. On the other hand full MHD simulations of the global coronal field, apart from being computationally very expensive would be physically less transparent, owing to the large number of free parameters that are typically used in such codes. This brings us to the Magneto-frictional model which is relatively simpler and computationally more economic. We have developed a Magnetofrictional Model, in 3D spherical polar co-ordinates to study the large scale global coronal field. Here we present studies of changing connectivities between active regions, in response to photospheric motions.

  6. Field-aligned currents and large scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    D'Angelo's model of polar cap electric fields (1977) was used to visualize how high-latitude field-aligned currents are driven by the solar wind generator. The region 1 and region 2 currents of Iijima and Potemra (1976) and the cusp field-aligned currents of Wilhjelm et al. (1978) and McDiarmid et al. (1978) are apparently driven by different generators, although in both cases the solar wind is their ultimate source.

  7. Planck intermediate results. XLII. Large-scale Galactic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Alves, M. I. R.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent models for the large-scale Galactic magnetic fields in the literature have been largely constrained by synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation measures. We use three different but representative models to compare their predicted polarized synchrotron and dust emission with that measured by the Planck satellite. We first update these models to match the Planck synchrotron products using a common model for the cosmic-ray leptons. We discuss the impact on this analysis of the ongoing problems of component separation in the Planck microwave bands and of the uncertain cosmic-ray spectrum. In particular, the inferred degree of ordering in the magnetic fields is sensitive to these systematic uncertainties, and we further show the importance of considering the expected variations in the observables in addition to their mean morphology. We then compare the resulting simulated emission to the observed dust polarization and find that the dust predictions do not match the morphology in the Planck data but underpredict the dust polarization away from the plane. We modify one of the models to roughly match both observables at high latitudes by increasing the field ordering in the thin disc near the observer. Though this specific analysis is dependent on the component separation issues, we present the improved model as a proof of concept for how these studies can be advanced in future using complementary information from ongoing and planned observational projects.

  8. Large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W. Charles

    1955-01-01

    In this discussion of the methods to be used in large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents and of the results to be expected from such trials, special emphasis is laid on pertussis vaccine trials in Great Britain. After a review of the criteria for strictly controlled field studies and of the investigation of typhoid vaccines conducted in 1904-08 by the Antityphoid Committee of the British Army, the author describes the pertussis vaccine studies which have been and are now being carried by the Whooping-Cough Immunization Committee of the Medical Research Council of Great Britain. The original strictly controlled trials have been completed and the results published. Studies are now being made of vaccines prepared by different methods and evaluated both in the field and in the laboratory. Each vaccine is given to some 2000-3000 children of 4-6 months to 4 years of age. By the end of the studies 30 000-40 000 children will have been followed up for a period of two years. Since in the current studies all the children are vaccinated and none are left as unvaccinated controls, the relative and not the absolute protective value of the vaccines will be measured. PMID:13270079

  9. Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugnion, Louis; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna; Roth, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Open shallow landslides occur regularly in a wide range of natural terrains. Generally, they are difficult to predict and result in damages to properties and disruption of transportation systems. In order to improve the knowledge about the physical process itself and to develop new protection measures, large-scale field experiments were conducted in Veltheim, Switzerland. Material was released down a 30° inclined test slope into a flexible barrier. The flow as well as the impact into the barrier was monitored using various measurement techniques. Laser devices recording flow heights, a special force plate measuring normal and shear basal forces as well as load cells for impact pressures were installed along the test slope. In addition, load cells were built in the support and retaining cables of the barrier to provide data for detailed back-calculation of load distribution during impact. For the last test series an additional guiding wall in flow direction on both sides of the barrier was installed to achieve higher impact pressures in the middle of the barrier. With these guiding walls the flow is not able to spread out before hitting the barrier. A special constructed release mechanism simulating the sudden failure of the slope was designed such that about 50 m3 of mixed earth and gravel saturated with water can be released in an instant. Analysis of cable forces combined with impact pressures and velocity measurements during a test series allow us now to develop a load model for the barrier design. First numerical simulations with the software tool FARO, originally developed for rockfall barriers and afterwards calibrated for debris flow impacts, lead already to structural improvements on barrier design. Decisive for the barrier design is the first dynamic impact pressure depending on the flow velocity and afterwards the hydrostatic pressure of the complete retained material behind the barrier. Therefore volume estimation of open shallow landslides by assessing

  10. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  11. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    DOE PAGES

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local inmore » space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.« less

  12. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. We describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/k{sub NL} and k/k{sub M}, where k is the wavenumber of interest, k{sub NL} is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and k{sub M} is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  13. Depositional processes in large-scale debris-flow experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the depositional process and characteristics of deposits of large-scale experimental debris flows (to 15 m3) composed of mixtures of gravel (to 32 mm), sand, and mud. The experiments were performed using a 95-m-long, 2-m-wide debris-flow flume that slopes 31??. Following release, experimental debris flows invariably developed numerous shallow (???10 cm deep) surges. Sediment transported by surges accumulated abruptly on a 3?? runout slope at the mouth of the flume. Deposits developed in a complex manner through a combination of shoving forward and shouldering aside previously deposited debris and through progressive vertical accretion. Progressive accretion by the experimental flows is contrary to commonly assumed en masse sedimentation by debris flows. Despite progressive sediment emplacement, deposits were composed of unstratified accumulations of generally unsorted debris; hence massively textured, poorly sorted debris-flow deposits are not emplaced uniquely en masse. The depositional process was recorded mainly by deposit morphology and surface texture and was not faithfully registered by interior sedimentary texture; homogeneous internal textures could be misinterpreted as the result of en masse emplacement by a single surge. Deposition of sediment by similar, yet separate, debris flows produced a homogenous, massively textured composite deposit having little stratigraphic distinction. Similar deposit characteristics and textures are observed in natural debris-flow deposits. Experimental production of massively textured deposits by progressive sediment accretion limits interpretations that can be drawn from deposit characteristics and casts doubt on methods of estimating flow properties from deposit thickness or from relations between particle size and bed thickness.

  14. Measuring Instructional Differentiation in a Large-Scale Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ryan T.; Swanlund, Andrew; Miller, Shazia; Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Eno, Jared; van der Ploeg, Arie; Meyers, Coby

    2014-01-01

    This study operationalizes four measures of instructional differentiation: one for Grade 2 English language arts (ELA), one for Grade 2 mathematics, one for Grade 5 ELA, and one for Grade 5 mathematics. Our study evaluates their measurement properties of each measure in a large field experiment: the Indiana Diagnostic Assessment Tools Study, which…

  15. Large-scale experience with biological treatment of contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz-Berendt, V.; Poetzsch, E.

    1995-12-31

    The efficiency of biological methods for the cleanup of soil contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was demonstrated by a large-scale example in which 38,000 tons of TPH- and PAH-polluted soil was treated onsite with the TERRAFERM{reg_sign} degradation system to reach the target values of 300 mg/kg TPH and 5 mg/kg PAH. Detection of the ecotoxicological potential (Microtox{reg_sign} assay) showed a significant decrease during the remediation. Low concentrations of PAH in the ground were treated by an in situ technology. The in situ treatment was combined with mechanical measures (slurry wall) to prevent the contamination from dispersing from the site.

  16. Earthquake Prediction in Large-scale Faulting Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junger, J.; Kilgore, B.; Beeler, N.; Dieterich, J.

    2004-12-01

    nucleation in these experiments is consistent with observations and theory of Dieterich and Kilgore (1996). Precursory strains can be detected typically after 50% of the total loading time. The Dieterich and Kilgore approach implies an alternative method of earthquake prediction based on comparing real-time strain monitoring with previous precursory strain records or with physically-based models of accelerating slip. Near failure, time to failure t is approximately inversely proportional to precursory slip rate V. Based on a least squares fit to accelerating slip velocity from ten or more events, the standard deviation of the residual between predicted and observed log t is typically 0.14. Scaling these results to natural recurrence suggests that a year prior to an earthquake, failure time can be predicted from measured fault slip rate with a typical error of 140 days, and a day prior to the earthquake with a typical error of 9 hours. However, such predictions require detecting aseismic nucleating strains, which have not yet been found in the field, and on distinguishing earthquake precursors from other strain transients. There is some field evidence of precursory seismic strain for large earthquakes (Bufe and Varnes, 1993) which may be related to our observations. In instances where precursory activity is spatially variable during the interseismic period, as in our experiments, distinguishing precursory activity might be best accomplished with deep arrays of near fault instruments and pattern recognition algorithms such as principle component analysis (Rundle et al., 2000).

  17. Large-scale Cyclic Features of Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Wang, J.

    It is well accepted that the solar cycle originates from a magnetohydrodynamics dynamo deep inside the Sun Many dynamo models have long been proposed based on a lot of observational constraints In this paper using 342 NSO Kitt Peak synoptic charts we study the large-scale solar cycle features of photospheric magnetic flux to set further constraints According to the flux behaviors we categorize each hemisphere into four typical latitudinal zones the polar region the high latitude region the activity belt and the low latitude region 1 We find the mean latitudes of the boundaries of polar regions to be near 55 35° during solar minimums and 67 61° during solar maximums 2 There is an unipolar poleward magnetic flux found in the high latitude region during solar maximums 3 For the activity belt the flux peak time or the main phase of solar cycle are steady and has a period near 11 years From the higher latitudinal strips to the lower ones the total positive or negative magnetic flux accumulates with a speed of 2 48 times10 20 Mx deg Moreover we find that the latitude migration of magnetic flux which represents the Sp o rer law starts in this belt and can be written in a formula like phi 29 02-3 150t 0 1123t 2 4 The flux peak time of the low latitude region shifts forward with an average speed of 32 2 day deg From the higher latitudinal strips to the lower ones the total magnetic flux dissipates with a speed of 3 63 times10 20 Mx deg General speaking dynamo theories are developed for

  18. Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Early theoretical work of Parker is presented along with the observational evidence supporting his Archimedes spiral model. Variations present in the interplanetary magnetic field from the spiral angle are related to structures in the solar wind. The causes of these structures are found to be either nonuniform radial solar wind flow or the time evolution of the photospheric field. Coronal magnetic models are related to the connection between the solar magnetic field and the interplanetary magnetic field. Direct extension of the solar field-magnetic nozzle controversy is discussed along with the coronal magnetic models. Effects of active regions on the interplanetary magnetic field is discussed with particular reference to the evolution of interplanetary sectors. Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude variations are shown throughout the solar cycle. The percentage of time the field magnitude is greater than 10 gamma is shown to closely parallel sunspot number. The sun's polar field influence on the interplanetary field and alternative views of the magnetic field structure out of the ecliptic plane are presented. In addition, a variety of significantly different interplanetary field structures are discussed.

  19. Investigation of models for large-scale meteorological prediction experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of extended and long-range weather prediction by means of global atmospheric models was studied. A number of computer experiments were conducted at GISS with the GISS global general circulation model. Topics discussed include atmospheric response to sea-surface temperature anomalies, and monthly mean forecast experiments with the global model.

  20. Results from a large-scale MHD propulsion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, M.; Libera, J.; Bouillard, J. X.; Pierson, E. S.; Hill, D.

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrusters have long been recognized as potentially attractive candidates for ship propulsion because such systems eliminate the conventional rotating drive components. The MHD thruster is essentially an electromagnetic (EM) pump operating in seawater. An electrical current is passed directly through the seawater and interacts with an applied magnetic field; the interaction of the magnetic field and the electrode current in the seawater results in a Lorentz force acting on the water, and the reaction to this force propels the vessel forward. The concept of EM propulsion has been examined periodically during the past 35 years as an alternative method of propulsion for surface ships and submersibles. The conclusions reached in early studies were that MHD thrusters restricted to fields of 2 T (the state-of-the-art at that time) were impractical and very inefficient. With the evolution of superconducting magnet technology, later studies investigated the performance of MHD thrusters with much higher magnetic field strengths and concluded that at higher fields (greater than 6-T) practical MHD propulsion systems appear possible. The feasibility of attaining the requisite higher magnetic fields has increased markedly because of rapid advances in building high-field superconducting magnets and the recent evolution of high-temperature superconductors.

  1. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A. B.; Littlewood, R.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-10-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work and from field observations: (1) Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; (2) when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides (`calving'); and (3) when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first-order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  2. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A.; Littlewood, R. C.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work, and from field observations: Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides ('calving'); and when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  3. CONSTRAINING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS THROUGH LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas; Maravin, Yurii; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2013-06-10

    We study primordial magnetic field effects on the matter perturbations in the universe. We assume magnetic field generation prior to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), i.e., during the radiation-dominated epoch of the universe expansion, but do not limit analysis by considering a particular magnetogenesis scenario. Contrary to previous studies, we limit the total magnetic field energy density and not the smoothed amplitude of the magnetic field at large (of the order of 1 Mpc) scales. We review several cosmological signatures, such as halo abundance, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and Ly{alpha} data. For a cross-check, we compare our limits with that obtained through the cosmic microwave background faraday rotation effect and BBN. The limits range between 1.5 nG and 4.5 nG for n{sub B} in (- 3; -1.5).

  4. Large Scale High-Latitude Ionospheric Electrodynamic Fields and Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides an overview as well as the application of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure. AMIE synthesizes observations from various ground-based and space-born instruments to derive global patterns of ionospheric conductance, electric fields, ionospheric equivalent current, horizontal currents, field-aligned currents, and other related electrodynamic fields simultaneously. Examples are presented to illustrate the effects of the different data inputs on the AMIE outputs. The AMIE patterns derived from ground magnetometer data are generally similar to those derived from satellite magnetometer data. But ground magnetometer data yield a cross-polar potential drop that is about 15-45 % smaller than that derived from satellite magnetometer data. Ground magnetometers also grossly underestimate the magnetic perturbations in space when compared with the in situ satellite magnetometer data. However, when satellite magnetometer data are employed, AMIE is able to replicate the observed magnetic perturbations along the satellite tracks with a mean root-mean-square (RMS) error of 17-21 %. In addition to derive snapshots of ionospheric electrodynamic fields, the utility of AMIE can be easily expanded to obtain the average distributions of these fields along with their associated variability. Such information should be valuable to the analysis and interpretation of the Swarm observations.

  5. Development of Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Jomaas, Grunde

    2013-01-01

    The status is presented of a spacecraft fire safety research project that is under development to reduce the uncertainty and risk in the design of spacecraft fire safety systems by testing at nearly full scale in low-gravity. Future crewed missions are expected to be more complex and longer in duration than previous exploration missions outside of low-earth orbit. This will increase the challenge of ensuring a fire-safe environment for the crew throughout the mission. Based on our fundamental uncertainty of the behavior of fires in low-gravity, the need for realistic scale testing at reduced gravity has been demonstrated. To address this gap in knowledge, a project has been established under the NASA Advanced Exploration Systems Program under the Human Exploration and Operations Mission directorate with the goal of substantially advancing our understanding of the spacecraft fire safety risk. Associated with the project is an international topical team of fire experts from other space agencies who conduct research that is integrated into the overall experiment design. The experiments are under development to be conducted in an Orbital Science Corporation Cygnus vehicle after it has undocked from the ISS. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. The tests will be fully automated with the data downlinked at the conclusion of the test before the Cygnus vehicle reenters the atmosphere. A computer modeling effort will complement the experimental effort. The international topical team is collaborating with the NASA team in the definition of the experiment requirements and performing supporting analysis, experimentation and technology development. The status of the overall experiment and the associated international technology development efforts are summarized.

  6. Investigation of models for large scale meteorological prediction experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.

    1982-01-01

    Long-range numerical prediction and climate simulation experiments with various global atmospheric general circulation models are reported. A chronological listing of the titles of all publications and technical reports already distributed is presented together with an account of the most recent reseach. Several reports on a series of perpetual January climate simulations with the GISS coarse mesh climate model are listed. A set of perpetual July climate simulations with the same model is presented and the results are described.

  7. Children's Cognitive Maps of Large-Scale Spaces: Effects of Exploration, Direction, and Repeated Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, James F.

    1980-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to examine the particular aspects of repeated experiences in a large-scale environment on the development of children's cognitive maps. Subjects were kindergartners and third graders. (MP)

  8. Large scale clear-water local pier scour experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheppard, D.M.; Odeh, M.; Glasser, T.

    2004-01-01

    Local clear-water scour tests were performed with three different diameter circular piles (0. 114, 0.305, and 0.914 m), three different uniform cohesionless sediment diameters (0.22, 0.80, and 2.90 mm) and a range of water depths and flow velocities. The tests were performed in the 6.1 m wide, 6.4 m deep, and 38.4 m long flume at the United States Geological Survey Conte Research Center in Turners Falls, Mass. These tests extend local scour data obtained in controlled experiments to prototype size piles and ratios of pile diameter to sediment diameter to 4,155. Supply water for this flow through flume was supplied by a hydroelectric power plant reservoir and the concentration of suspended fine sediment (wash load) could not be controlled. Equilibrium scour depths were found to depend on the wash load concentration. ?? ASCE.

  9. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Noreña, Jorge; Simonović, Marko; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: jorge.norena@icc.ub.edu E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2013-12-01

    We derive consistency relations for the late universe (CDM and ΛCDM): relations between an n-point function of the density contrast δ and an (n+1)-point function in the limit in which one of the (n+1) momenta becomes much smaller than the others. These are based on the observation that a long mode, in single-field models of inflation, reduces to a diffeomorphism since its freezing during inflation all the way until the late universe, even when the long mode is inside the horizon (but out of the sound horizon). These results are derived in Newtonian gauge, at first and second order in the small momentum q of the long mode and they are valid non-perturbatively in the short-scale δ. In the non-relativistic limit our results match with [1]. These relations are a consequence of diffeomorphism invariance; they are not satisfied in the presence of extra degrees of freedom during inflation or violation of the Equivalence Principle (extra forces) in the late universe.

  10. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Robert M; Didham, Raphael K; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L; Turner, Edgar C

    2011-11-27

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification.

  11. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Robert M.; Didham, Raphael K.; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D.; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L.; Turner, Edgar C.

    2011-01-01

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification. PMID:22006969

  12. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    DOE PAGES

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic naturemore » of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.« less

  13. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.

  14. Nonlinear Generation of shear flows and large scale magnetic fields by small scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburjania, G.

    2009-04-01

    EGU2009-233 Nonlinear Generation of shear flows and large scale magnetic fields by small scale turbulence in the ionosphere by G. Aburjania Contact: George Aburjania, g.aburjania@gmail.com,aburj@mymail.ge

  15. Large-scale dynamo growth rates from numerical simulations and implications for mean-field theories.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiwan; Blackman, Eric G; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2013-05-01

    Understanding large-scale magnetic field growth in turbulent plasmas in the magnetohydrodynamic limit is a goal of magnetic dynamo theory. In particular, assessing how well large-scale helical field growth and saturation in simulations match those predicted by existing theories is important for progress. Using numerical simulations of isotropically forced turbulence without large-scale shear with its implications, we focus on several additional aspects of this comparison: (1) Leading mean-field dynamo theories which break the field into large and small scales predict that large-scale helical field growth rates are determined by the difference between kinetic helicity and current helicity with no dependence on the nonhelical energy in small-scale magnetic fields. Our simulations show that the growth rate of the large-scale field from fully helical forcing is indeed unaffected by the presence or absence of small-scale magnetic fields amplified in a precursor nonhelical dynamo. However, because the precursor nonhelical dynamo in our simulations produced fields that were strongly subequipartition with respect to the kinetic energy, we cannot yet rule out the potential influence of stronger nonhelical small-scale fields. (2) We have identified two features in our simulations which cannot be explained by the most minimalist versions of two-scale mean-field theory: (i) fully helical small-scale forcing produces significant nonhelical large-scale magnetic energy and (ii) the saturation of the large-scale field growth is time delayed with respect to what minimalist theory predicts. We comment on desirable generalizations to the theory in this context and future desired work.

  16. Recovering the full velocity and density fields from large-scale redshift-distance samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund; Dekel, Avishai

    1989-01-01

    A new method for extracting the large-scale three-dimensional velocity and mass density fields from measurements of the radial peculiar velocities is presented. Galaxies are assumed to trace the velocity field rather than the mass. The key assumption made is that the Lagrangian velocity field has negligible vorticity, as might be expected from perturbations that grew by gravitational instability. By applying the method to cosmological N-body simulations, it is demonstrated that it accurately reconstructs the velocity field. This technique promises a direct determination of the mass density field and the initial conditions for the formation of large-scale structure from galaxy peculiar velocity surveys.

  17. Large-scale negative polarity magnetic fields on the sun and particle-emitting flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Some observational facts about the large-scale patterns formed by solar negative polarity magnetic fields during the 19th and 20th cycles of solar activity are presented. The close relation of the position of occurrence of very large flares accompanied by cosmic ray and PCA events as well as other phenomena of solar activity during the declining part of the 19th cycle of the regularities in the internal structure of large scale negative polarity features are demonstrated.

  18. Pulsar Rotation Measures and the Large-Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.; Manchester, R. N.; Lyne, A. G.; Qiao, G. J.; van Straten, W.

    2006-05-01

    The large-scale magnetic field of our Galaxy can be probed in three dimensions using Faraday rotation of pulsar signals. We report on the determination of 223 rotation measures from polarization observations of relatively distant southern pulsars made using the Parkes radio telescope. Combined with previously published observations, these data give clear evidence for large-scale counterclockwise fields (viewed from the north Galactic pole) in the spiral arms interior to the Sun and weaker evidence for a counterclockwise field in the Perseus arm. However, in interarm regions, including the solar neighborhood, we present evidence that suggests that large-scale fields are clockwise. We propose that the large-scale Galactic magnetic field has a bisymmetric structure with reversals on the boundaries of the spiral arms. Streaming motions associated with spiral density waves can directly generate such a structure from an initial, inwardly directed radial field. Large-scale fields increase toward the Galactic center, with a mean value of about 2 μG in the solar neighborhood and 4 μG at a galactocentric radius of 3 kpc.

  19. Generation of large-scale structures and vortex systems in numerical experiments for rotating annular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledzer, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Methods for solving shallow-water equations that describe flows in rotating annular channels are considered and the results of numerical calculations are analyzed for the possible generation of global large-scale flows, narrow jets, and numerous small-scale vortices in laboratory experiments. External effects in fluids are induced using a mass source-sink and the MHD-method of interaction of radial electric current with the magnetic field generated by the field of permanent magnets. A central-upwind scheme modified to suit the specific aspects of geophysical hydrodynamics. Initially, this method was used to solve shallow-water equations only in hydraulic problems, such as for flows in dam breaks, channels, rivers, and lakes. Geophysical hydrodynamics (in addition to free surface and topography) requires a rotation of the system as a whole, which is accompanied by the appearance of a complex system of vortices, jets, and turbulence (these should be taken into account in the formulation of the problem). Accordingly, the basic features of the central-upwind method should be changed. The modifications should ensure that the scheme is well-balanced and choose interpolation methods for desired variables. The main result of this modification is the control over numerical viscosity affecting the fluid motion variety. The active dynamics of a large number of vortices transformed into jets or generating large-scale streams is the general result of modifications suitable for geophysical hydrodynamics. Because there are technical difficulties in the creation of an appropriate laboratory setup for modeling of geophysical flows with the help of numerous source-sinks, it will be appropriate to use numerical experiments for studying the motions generated by this method. Unlike this method, the MHD-method can be rather easily used in laboratory conditions to generate a large variety of flows and vortex currents in the channel by a relatively small number of permanent magnets

  20. Large-scale magnetic field generation by randomly forced shearing waves.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, T; McWilliams, J C; Schekochihin, A A

    2011-12-16

    A rigorous theory for the generation of a large-scale magnetic field by random nonhelically forced motions of a conducting fluid combined with a linear shear is presented in the analytically tractable limit of low magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) and weak shear. The dynamo is kinematic and due to fluctuations in the net (volume-averaged) electromotive force. This is a minimal proof-of-concept quasilinear calculation aiming to put the shear dynamo, a new effect recently found in numerical experiments, on a firm theoretical footing. Numerically observed scalings of the wave number and growth rate of the fastest-growing mode, previously not understood, are derived analytically. The simplicity of the model suggests that shear dynamo action may be a generic property of sheared magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  1. Galactic winds and the origin of large-scale magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Sokoloff, D.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Observations of dwarf galaxies suggest the presence of large-scale magnetic fields. However the size and slow rotation of these galaxies appear insufficient to support a mean-field dynamo action to excite such fields. Aims: Here we suggest a new mechanism to explain large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies that are too small to support mean-field dynamo action. The key idea is that we do not identify large-scale and mean magnetic fields. In our scenario the magnetic structures originate from a small-scale dynamo which produces small-scale magnetic field in the galactic disc and a galactic wind that transports this field into the galactic halo where the large turbulent diffusion increases the scale and order of the field. As a result, the magnetic field becomes large-scale; however its mean value remains vanishing in a strict sense. Methods: We verify the idea by numerical modelling of two distinct simplified configurations, a thin disc model using the no-z approximation, and an axisymmetric model using cylindrical r,z coordinates. Results: Each of these allows reduction of the problem to two spatial dimensions. Taken together, the models support the proposition that the general trends will persist in a fully 3D model. We demonstrate that a pronounced large-scale pattern can develop in the galactic halo for a wide choice of the dynamo governing parameters. Conclusions: We believe that our mechanism can be relevant to explaining the presence of the fields observed in the halos of dwarf galaxies, and maybe elsewhere. We emphasize that detailed modelling of the proposed scenario needs 3D simulations, and adjustment to the specific dynamo governing parameters of dwarf galaxies.

  2. Manifestations of dynamo driven large-scale magnetic field in accretion disks of compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chagelishvili, G. D.; Chanishvili, R. G.; Lominadze, J. G.; Sokhadze, Z. A.

    1991-01-01

    A turbulent dynamo nonlinear theory of turbulence was developed that shows that in the compact objects of accretion disks, the generated large-scale magnetic field (when the generation takes place) has a practically toroidal configuration. Its energy density can be much higher than turbulent pulsations energy density, and it becomes comparable with the thermal energy density of the medium. On this basis, the manifestations to which the large-scale magnetic field can lead at the accretion onto black holes and gravimagnetic rotators, respectively, are presented.

  3. Non-Gaussianity and large-scale structure in a two-field inflationary model

    SciTech Connect

    Tseliakhovich, Dmitriy; Hirata, Christopher

    2010-08-15

    Single-field inflationary models predict nearly Gaussian initial conditions, and hence a detection of non-Gaussianity would be a signature of the more complex inflationary scenarios. In this paper we study the effect on the cosmic microwave background and on large-scale structure from primordial non-Gaussianity in a two-field inflationary model in which both the inflaton and curvaton contribute to the density perturbations. We show that in addition to the previously described enhancement of the galaxy bias on large scales, this setup results in large-scale stochasticity. We provide joint constraints on the local non-Gaussianity parameter f-tilde{sub NL} and the ratio {xi} of the amplitude of primordial perturbations due to the inflaton and curvaton using WMAP and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data.

  4. Non-Gaussianity and Large Scale Structure in a two-field Inflationary model

    SciTech Connect

    Tseliakhovich, D.; Slosar, A.; Hirata, C.

    2010-08-30

    Single-field inflationary models predict nearly Gaussian initial conditions, and hence a detection of non-Gaussianity would be a signature of the more complex inflationary scenarios. In this paper we study the effect on the cosmic microwave background and on large-scale structure from primordial non-Gaussianity in a two-field inflationary model in which both the inflaton and curvaton contribute to the density perturbations. We show that in addition to the previously described enhancement of the galaxy bias on large scales, this setup results in large-scale stochasticity. We provide joint constraints on the local non-Gaussianity parameter f*{sub NL} and the ratio {zeta} of the amplitude of primordial perturbations due to the inflaton and curvaton using WMAP and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data.

  5. Mechanisation of large-scale agricultural fields in developing countries - a review.

    PubMed

    Onwude, Daniel I; Abdulstter, Rafia; Gomes, Chandima; Hashim, Norhashila

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisation of large-scale agricultural fields often requires the application of modern technologies such as mechanical power, automation, control and robotics. These technologies are generally associated with relatively well developed economies. The application of these technologies in some developing countries in Africa and Asia is limited by factors such as technology compatibility with the environment, availability of resources to facilitate the technology adoption, cost of technology purchase, government policies, adequacy of technology and appropriateness in addressing the needs of the population. As a result, many of the available resources have been used inadequately by farmers, who continue to rely mostly on conventional means of agricultural production, using traditional tools and equipment in most cases. This has led to low productivity and high cost of production among others. Therefore this paper attempts to evaluate the application of present day technology and its limitations to the advancement of large-scale mechanisation in developing countries of Africa and Asia. Particular emphasis is given to a general understanding of the various levels of mechanisation, present day technology, its management and application to large-scale agricultural fields. This review also focuses on/gives emphasis to future outlook that will enable a gradual, evolutionary and sustainable technological change. The study concludes that large-scale-agricultural farm mechanisation for sustainable food production in Africa and Asia must be anchored on a coherent strategy based on the actual needs and priorities of the large-scale farmers. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Field-omics—understanding large-scale molecular data from field crops

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersson, Erik; Jacobson, Dan; Vivier, Melané A.; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Andreasson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The recent advances in gene expression analysis as well as protein and metabolite quantification enable genome-scale capturing of complex biological processes at the molecular level in crop field trials. This opens up new possibilities for understanding the molecular and environmental complexity of field-based systems and thus shedding light on the black box between genotype and environment, which in agriculture always is influenced by a multi-stress environment and includes management interventions. Nevertheless, combining different types of data obtained from the field and making biological sense out of large datasets remain challenging. Here we highlight the need to create a cross-disciplinary platform for innovative experimental design, sampling and subsequent analysis of large-scale molecular data obtained in field trials. For these reasons we put forward the term field-omics: “Field-omics strives to couple information from genomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes and metagenomes to the long-established practice in crop science of conducting field trials as well as to adapt current strategies for recording and analysing field data to facilitate integration with ‘-omics’ data.” PMID:24999347

  7. Turbulence and magnetic fields in the large-scale structure of the universe.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung; Cho, Jungyeon; Das, Santabrata

    2008-05-16

    The nature and origin of turbulence and magnetic fields in the intergalactic space are important problems that are yet to be understood. We propose a scenario in which turbulent-flow motions are induced via the cascade of the vorticity generated at cosmological shocks during the formation of the large-scale structure. The turbulence in turn amplifies weak seed magnetic fields of any origin. Supercomputer simulations show that the turbulence is subsonic inside clusters and groups of galaxies, whereas it is transonic or mildly supersonic in filaments. Based on a turbulence dynamo model, we then estimated that the average magnetic field strength would be a few microgauss (microG) inside clusters and groups, approximately 0.1 muG around clusters and groups, and approximately 10 nanogauss in filaments. Our model presents a physical mechanism that transfers the gravitational energy to the turbulence and magnetic field energies in the large-scale structure of the universe.

  8. Signatures of large-scale magnetic fields in active galactic nuclei jets: transverse asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen-Brown, E.; Lyutikov, M.; Kharb, P.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the emission properties that a large-scale helical magnetic field imprints on active galactic nuclei (AGN) jet synchrotron radiation. A cylindrically symmetric relativistic jet and large-scale helical magnetic field produce significant asymmetrical features in transverse profiles of fractional linear polarization, intensity, the Faraday rotation and spectral index. The asymmetrical features of these transverse profiles correlate with one another in ways specified by the handedness of the helical field, the jet viewing angle (θob) and the bulk Lorentz factor of the flow (Γ). Thus, these correlations may be used to determine the structure of the magnetic field in the jet. In the case of radio galaxies (θob˜ 1 rad) and a subclass of blazars with particularly small viewing angles (θob≪ 1/Γ), we find an edge-brightened intensity profile that is similar to that observed in the radio galaxy M87. We present observations of the AGNs 3C 78 and NRAO 140 that display the type of transverse asymmetries that may be produced by large-scale helical magnetic fields.

  9. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to resum the effect of large scale motions in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because the linear power spectrum in ΛCDM is not scale free the effects of the large scale flows are enhanced. Although previous EFT calculations of the equal-time density power spectrum at one and two loops showed a remarkable agreement with numerical results, they also showed a 2% residual which appeared related to the BAO oscillations. We show that this was indeed the case, explain the physical origin and show how a Lagrangian based calculation removes this differences. We propose a simple method to upgrade existing Eulerian calculations to effectively make them Lagrangian and compare the new results with existing fits to numerical simulations. Our new two-loop results agrees with numerical results up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} to within 1% with no oscillatory residuals. We also compute power spectra involving momentum which is significantly more affected by the large scale flows. We show how keeping track of these velocities significantly enhances the UV reach of the momentum power spectrum in addition to removing the BAO related residuals. We compute predictions for the real space correlation function around the BAO scale and investigate its sensitivity to the EFT parameters and the details of the resummation technique.

  10. Destruction of large-scale magnetic field in non-linear simulations of the shear dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teed, Robert J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun's magnetic field exhibits coherence in space and time on much larger scales than the turbulent convection that ultimately powers the dynamo. In the past the α-effect (mean-field) concept has been used to model the solar cycle, but recent work has cast doubt on the validity of the mean-field ansatz under solar conditions. This indicates that one should seek an alternative mechanism for generating large-scale structure. One possibility is the recently proposed `shear dynamo' mechanism where large-scale magnetic fields are generated in the presence of a simple shear. Further investigation of this proposition is required, however, because work has been focused on the linear regime with a uniform shear profile thus far. In this paper we report results of the extension of the original shear dynamo model into the non-linear regime. We find that whilst large-scale structure can initially persist into the saturated regime, in several of our simulations it is destroyed via large increase in kinetic energy. This result casts doubt on the ability of the simple uniform shear dynamo mechanism to act as an alternative to the α-effect in solar conditions.

  11. Large-scale peculiar velocity field in flat models of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Vittorio, N.; Turner, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    The inflationary universe scenario predicts a flat universe and both adiabatic and isocurvature primordial density perturbations with the Zel'dovich spectrum. The two simplest realizations, models dominated by hot or cold dark matter, seem to be in conflict with observations. Flat models with two components of mass density, where one of the components of mass density is smoothly distributed, are examined, and the large-scale peculiar velocity field for these models is computed. For the smooth component the authors consider relativistic particles, a relic cosmological term, and light strings. At present the observational situation is unsettled, but, in principle, the large-scale peculiar velocity field is a very powerful discriminator between these different models. 66 references.

  12. Estimating field-of-view loss in bathymetric lidar: application to large-scale simulations.

    PubMed

    Carr, Domenic; Tuell, Grady

    2014-07-20

    When designing a bathymetric lidar, it is important to study simulated waveforms for various combinations of system and environmental parameters. To predict a system's ranging accuracy, it is often necessary to analyze thousands of waveforms. In these large-scale simulations, estimating field-of-view loss is a challenge because the calculation is complex and computationally intensive. This paper describes a new procedure for quickly approximating this loss, and illustrates how it can be used to efficiently predict ranging accuracy.

  13. Effects of Interim Assessments on Student Achievement: Evidence from a Large-Scale Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Miller, Shazia R.; van der Ploeg, Arie; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We use data from a large-scale, school-level randomized experiment conducted in 2010-2011 in public schools in Indiana. Our sample includes more than 30,000 students in 70 schools. We examine the impact of two interim assessment programs (i.e., mCLASS in Grades K-2 and Acuity in Grades 3--8) on mathematics and reading achievement. Two-level models…

  14. Operating experience and multi-fuel capability of large-scale CFB boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Cleve, K.; Smith, T.V.

    1997-12-31

    Large scale (250 MW{sub e}) circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers capable of effectively utilising a wide range of low grade fuels in an environmentally acceptable manner are now a well proven and reliable technology. Development of this technology and innovative design features continues and three plants - each in their own way representing a significant advance - are discussed. Key technical features and operating experience including availability are reviewed. Fuel variability and test data are also presented. 9 figs.

  15. Solar large-scale positive polarity magnetic fields and geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Unlike the negative polarity solar magnetic field large-scale regular features that correlate with enhanced solar activity regions, the positive polarity regular formations formed in the weak and old background magnetic fields seem to correlate well with geomagnetically enhanced periods of time (shifted for 4 days), which means that they seem to be the source of the quiet solar wind. This behavior of the large intervals of heliographic longitude with prevailing positive polarity fields may be followed to the end of the 18th cycle, during the declining part of the 19th cycle, and during the first half of the present 20th cycle of solar activity.

  16. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  17. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Pinilla, Severin; Pander, Tanja; von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R.; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU). We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs. PMID:25699108

  18. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, Severin; Pander, Tanja; von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU). We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  19. Dynamics of large-scale instabilities in conductors electrically exploded in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsko, I. M.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    The growth of large-scale instabilities during the propagation of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave through a conductor was studied experimentally. The experiment was carried out using the MIG terawatt pulsed power generator at a peak current up to 2.5 MA with 100 ns rise time. It was observed that instabilities with a wavelength of 150 μm developed on the surface of the conductor hollow part within 160 ns after the onset of current flow, whereas the surface of the solid rod remained almost unperturbed. A system of equations describing the propagation of a nonlinear diffusion wave through a conductor and the growth of thermal instabilities has been solved numerically. It has been revealed that the development of large- scale instabilities is obviously related to the propagation of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave.

  20. Statistical relationship between large-scale upward field-aligned currents and electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Haje; Zhang, Yongliang; Anderson, Brian J.; Sotirelis, Thomas; Waters, Colin L.

    2014-08-01

    Simultaneous observations of Birkeland currents by the constellation of Iridium satellites and N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) auroral emissions measured by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) onboard the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite are used to establish relationships between large-scale upward field-aligned currents and electron precipitation during stable current configurations. The electron precipitation was inferred from GUVI data using a statistical relationship between LBH intensity and electron energy flux. LBH emissions with >5% contribution from protons, identified by Lyman-alpha intensity, were excluded from the analysis. The Birkeland currents were derived with a spatial resolution of 3° in latitude and 2 h in local time. For southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the electron precipitation occurred primarily within and near large-scale upward currents. The correspondence was less evident for northward IMF, presumably because the spatial variability is large compared to the areas of interest so that the number of events identified is smaller and the derived statistical distributions are less reliable. At dusk, the correlation between upward current and precipitation was especially high, where a larger fraction of the electron precipitation is accelerated downward by a field-aligned potential difference. Unaccelerated electron precipitation dominated in the morning sector, presumably induced by scattering of eastward-drifting energetic electrons into the loss cone through interaction with whistler-mode waves (diffuse precipitation) rather than by field-aligned acceleration. In the upward Region 1 on the dayside, where the electron precipitation is almost exclusively due to field-aligned acceleration, a quadratic relationship between current density and electron energy flux was observed, implying a linear current-voltage relationship in this region. Current density and electron energy flux in

  1. On the renormalization of the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pajer, Enrico; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2013-08-01

    Standard perturbation theory (SPT) for large-scale matter inhomogeneities is unsatisfactory for at least three reasons: there is no clear expansion parameter since the density contrast is not small on all scales; it does not fully account for deviations at large scales from a perfect pressureless fluid induced by short-scale non-linearities; for generic initial conditions, loop corrections are UV-divergent, making predictions cutoff dependent and hence unphysical. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures successfully addresses all three issues. Here we focus on the third one and show explicitly that the terms induced by integrating out short scales, neglected in SPT, have exactly the right scale dependence to cancel all UV-divergences at one loop, and this should hold at all loops. A particularly clear example is an Einstein deSitter universe with no-scale initial conditions P{sub in} ∼ k{sup n}. After renormalizing the theory, we use self-similarity to derive a very simple result for the final power spectrum for any n, excluding two-loop corrections and higher. We show how the relative importance of different corrections depends on n. For n ∼ −1.5, relevant for our universe, pressure and dissipative corrections are more important than the two-loop corrections.

  2. How pyroclastic flows attain high velocities- new insights from large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, E.; Lube, G.; Jones, J.; Valentine, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are most deadly when highly mobile pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) sweep down mountain flanks after eruption columns or lava domes collapse. An important goal in volcanic hazard assessment is to predict the velocity of PDCs in numerical hazard models. To date, this has only been partially successful for dilute PDCs, and major uncertainties remain with regard to the dynamics of PDCs that have coupled dense underflow and dilute ash-cloud regions. Interrogating these complex multiphase processes is only practical in the laboratory, but this introduces the problem of scale where it is difficult to minimise the boundary layer effects which, in small flows, can dominate behaviour. To bridge the gap, we synthesized large-scale PDCs by gravitational collapse of 1300 kg of a natural pyroclastic mixture and examined flow front velocity fields on inclined slopes. We show that, proximally, PDCs experience rapid expulsion of gas that entrains particles and yields a fast-moving turbulent and dilute cloud that becomes the flow head and moves at 200-250% of the impact velocity. Downstream, the turbulent cloud moves ahead of the underflow. We show that the velocity-dependent friction coefficient (which represents the major dissipative form of energy) directly relates to the kinematics of the underflow front. In experimental situations where the dilute flow front velocity exceeds at all times the underflow velocity, we propose a new analytical model to quantify the asymptotic waning of the flow front velocity with distance. Using measurements of the flow head geometry and density, we show that our model successfully predicts the flow front kinematics including a long-lasting period of deceleration. Importantly, the interplay between the turbulent flow front and the presence of an underflow leads to the formation of a wedge-shaped head characterized by unexpectedly high coefficients of entrainment of ambient air.

  3. Comparing the Large-Scale Magnetic Field During the Last Three Solar Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Large-scale magnetic field observations show that the current extended solar cycle minimum differs from the two previous well-observed minima in several respects. The weaker polar fields increase the relative influence of middle and low-latitude flux patterns on the configuration of the corona and heliosphere. A much larger fraction of the open flux originates in equatorial coronal holes. Even though the heliospheric field magnitude and the mean solar magnetic field are the weakest since direct measurements began, the sector structure of the interplanetary field that reflects the shape of the heliospheric current sheet continues to extend to fairly high latitude. The pattern of emergence of active regions through the cycle and the transport of flux from low to high latitudes also show quite different patterns, providing insight into the meridional flow that influences the dynamo that drives the cycle. The long records of synoptic observations that provide a rich source of information about solar activity must be maintained.

  4. CMB temperature anisotropy at large scales induced by a causal primordial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvin, Camille; Caprini, Chiara E-mail: camille.bonvin@cea.fr

    2010-05-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the Sachs Wolfe effect sourced by a primordial magnetic field. In order to consistently specify the initial conditions, we assume that the magnetic field is generated by a causal process, namely a first order phase transition in the early universe. As for the topological defects case, we apply the general relativistic junction conditions to match the perturbation variables before and after the phase transition which generates the magnetic field, in such a way that the total energy momentum tensor is conserved across the transition and Einstein's equations are satisfied. We further solve the evolution equations for the metric and fluid perturbations at large scales analytically including neutrinos, and derive the magnetic Sachs Wolfe effect. We find that the relevant contribution to the magnetic Sachs Wolfe effect comes from the metric perturbations at next-to-leading order in the large scale limit. The leading order term is in fact strongly suppressed due to the presence of free-streaming neutrinos. We derive the neutrino compensation effect dynamically and confirm that the magnetic Sachs Wolfe spectrum from a causal magnetic field behaves as l(l+1) C{sup B}{sub l}∝l{sup 2} as found in the latest numerical analyses.

  5. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  6. Definitive design of the solar total energy large-scale experiment at Shenandoah, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunke, R. W.; Leonard, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Construction of a Solar Total Energy Large Scale Experiment at Shenandoah, Georgia, is described. The Solar Total Energy System (STES) is designed with capacity to supply electricity and thermal energy to a knitwear plant at the Shenandoah site. The system will provide 400 kilowatts electrical and 3.5 megawatts thermal energy. The STES is a cascaded total energy system configuration. It uses parabolic disch collectors and a steam turbine-generator. The electrical system will be grid connected to the Georgia Power Company system.

  7. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  8. Electron Acceleration at Coronal Shocks Propagating Through a Large-scale Streamer-like Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.

    2015-12-01

    Solar type II radio bursts are generally believed to be excited by energetic electrons that are accelerated at solar eruption-driven shocks. Some recent studies have pointed out that coronal streamers may be important on the generation of type II bursts and the morphology of radio dynamic spectra. In our previous study, it was found that closed field of the streamer can play the role of an electron trap via which electrons would receive multiple reflection and acceleration. We further developed a numerical model consisting of a spherical coronal shock moving through a large-scale streamer-like coronal magnetic field. The complex local shock geometry should affect both the efficiency of electron acceleration and properties of accelerated electrons. By examining the injection and escape locations of energetic electrons, it is found that shock electron acceleration is most efficient mainly in two different regions, one is at the shock flank (foreshock regions) when the shock is at lower altitude, the other is at the shock nose (apexes of closed loops) at higher altitude. The effects of large-scale coronal field, pitch-angle scattering and shock compression ratio on the distribution of energetic electrons and electron energy spectrum are also investigated.

  9. Large-scale rotational perturbations of a Friedmann universe with collisionless matter and primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebhan, Anton

    1992-06-01

    The dynamical equations for rotational (vector) perturbations of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe containing a perfect fluid of massive matter and radiation together with relativistic collisionless matter are established. These equations have solutions which remain regular as the initial singularity is approached, in contrast to the purely perfect-fluid case, where small rotational perturbations cannot coexist with a Friedmann-type singularity due to the Helmholtz-Kelvin circulation theorem. With collisionless matter present (e.g., gravitons after the Planck era), this obstruction is circumvented, and solutions which exhibit a growing mode of vorticity on superhorizon scales are obtained. The anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background caused by these small vector perturbations are analyzed, and limits on admissible primordial vorticity are derived. In the radiation era, large-scale vorticity gives rise to large-scale primordial magnetic fields, which are shown potentially to have the right magnitude to act as seed fields for galactic dynamo action and thereby to explain the presently observed galactic magnetic fields.

  10. EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE NON-AXISYMMETRIC PERTURBATIONS IN THE MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2015-11-10

    We explore the response of a nonlinear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation that is anchored at 0.9 R{sub ⊙} has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric, with respect to the equator, perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fields depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number R{sub m}. In the range of R{sub m} = 10{sup 4}–10{sup 6} the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a nonlinear α-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state, the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of “active longitudes” with cyclic 180° “flip-flop” changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However, this effect disappears in the model, which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period and carries important information about the dynamo process.

  11. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at two loops

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k{sub NL}, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields. We find that the EFTofLSS prediction at two loops matches to percent accuracy the non-linear matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1}, requiring just one unknown coefficient that needs to be fit to observations. Given that Standard Perturbation Theory stops converging at redshift zero at k∼ 0.1 h Mpc{sup −1}, our results demonstrate the possibility of accessing a factor of order 200 more dark matter quasi-linear modes than naively expected. If the remaining observational challenges to accessing these modes can be addressed with similar success, our results show that there is tremendous potential for large scale structure surveys to explore the primordial universe.

  12. Mantle convection and the large scale structures of the Earth's gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    The connection between the observed large scale structure of the Earths' gravitational field, as represented by the GEM10 model, and the surface kinematic manifestations of plate tectonics, as represented by the absolute plate motion model of Minster and Jordan, is explored using a somewhat novel method of analysis. Two scalar derivatives of the field of surface plate velocities, namely the horizontal divergence and the radial vorticity, are computed from the plate motion data. These two scalars are respectively determined by the poloidal and toroidal scalars in terms of which any essentially solenoidal vector field may be completely represented. They provide a compact summary of the observed plate boundary types in nature, with oceanic ridges and trenches being essentially boundaries of divergence, and transform faults being essentially boundaries of vorticity.

  13. Overview of large scale experiments performed within the LBB project in the Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Kadecka, P.; Lauerova, D.

    1997-04-01

    During several recent years NRI Rez has been performing the LBB analyses of safety significant primary circuit pipings of NPPs in Czech and Slovak Republics. The analyses covered the NPPs with reactors WWER 440 Type 230 and 213 and WWER 1000 Type 320. Within the relevant LBB projects undertaken with the aim to prove the fulfilling of the requirements of LBB, a series of large scale experiments were performed. The goal of these experiments was to verify the properties of the components selected, and to prove the quality and/or conservatism of assessments used in the LBB-analyses. In this poster, a brief overview of experiments performed in Czech Republic under guidance of NRI Rez is presented.

  14. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [interplanetary magnetic fields/solar activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    A large-scale, three dimensional magnetic field in the interplanetary medium with an expected classical spiral pattern to zeroth order is discussed. Systematic and random deviations which are expected are treated. The sector structure which should be evident at high latitudes is examined. Interplanetary streams are discussed as determining the patterns of magnetic field intensity. It was proposed that the large-scale spiral field can induce a meridional flow which might alter the field geometry somewhat. The nonuniformities caused by streams will probably significantly influence the motion of solar and galactic particles. It was concluded that knowledge of the 3-dimensional field and its dynamical effects can be obtained by in situ measurements by a probe which goes over the sun's poles. Diagrams of the magnetic fields are given.

  15. A review of large-scale LNG spills: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay

    2006-05-20

    The prediction of the possible hazards associated with the storage and transportation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) by ship has motivated a substantial number of experimental and analytical studies. This paper reviews the experimental and analytical work performed to date on large-scale spills of LNG. Specifically, experiments on the dispersion of LNG, as well as experiments of LNG fires from spills on water and land are reviewed. Explosion, pool boiling, and rapid phase transition (RPT) explosion studies are described and discussed, as well as models used to predict dispersion and thermal hazard distances. Although there have been significant advances in understanding the behavior of LNG spills, technical knowledge gaps to improve hazard prediction are identified. Some of these gaps can be addressed with current modeling and testing capabilities. A discussion of the state of knowledge and recommendations to further improve the understanding of the behavior of LNG spills on water is provided.

  16. A review of large-scale LNG spills : experiment and modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01

    The prediction of the possible hazards associated with the storage and transportation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) by ship has motivated a substantial number of experimental and analytical studies. This paper reviews the experimental and analytical work performed to date on large-scale spills of LNG. Specifically, experiments on the dispersion of LNG, as well as experiments of LNG fires from spills on water and land are reviewed. Explosion, pool boiling, and rapid phase transition (RPT) explosion studies are described and discussed, as well as models used to predict dispersion and thermal hazard distances. Although there have been significant advances in understanding the behavior of LNG spills, technical knowledge gaps to improve hazard prediction are identified. Some of these gaps can be addressed with current modeling and testing capabilities. A discussion of the state of knowledge and recommendations to further improve the understanding of the behavior of LNG spills on water is provided.

  17. Gaining insight into river ecosystem processes from a large-scale flow experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L.; Pike, A.; Boughton, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In rivers throughout the world, anthropogenic impacts related to large dams have altered or eliminated the habitat necessary for many aquatic organisms. Flow experiments, both planned and unplanned, provide unique opportunities to evaluate the extent to which alternative dam operations can provide downstream ecological benefits. Here we use an unanticipated, reservoir release on the Santa Ynez River in southern California to investigate how a large flood influenced river ecosystem processes. We directly measured the flood-induced, topographic changes over 80 km of the river and floodplain using two high-resolution field and remote sensing data sets that bracketed the flood event. DEM-differencing of the pre- and post-flood topography was used to calculate shifts in the active channel planform and the net volumetric fluxes in gravel storage along the channel and floodplain. LiDAR and image-based habitat mapping was conducted to quantify the proportion of different habitat units before and after the flood. Large-scale geomorphic changes were observed as a result of the flood, including lateral migration of the river channel, gravel bar formation and the development of off-channel chute habitat. Spatial patterns of gravel storage changed with distance from the dam, with the upper 20 km experiencing a net sediment deficit and the lower 60 km undergoing net deposition. The longitudinal trends in gravel transport and storage reflect differences in the channel gradient, valley confinement and density of floodplain vegetation. We found that the flood nearly doubled the extent of pool habitat, primarily by converting runs to pools and by incising new pools adjacent to valley walls and terraces. The increase in the number of pools was predicted to have positive impacts on steelhead habitat, by providing a broader range of water depths and micro-habitats utilized by different age classes. Results from this study highlight the value of using flow pulses as opportunities to

  18. On the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mercolli, Lorenzo; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    We compute the renormalized two-point functions of density, divergence and vorticity of the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because of momentum and mass conservation, the corrections from short scales to the large-scale power spectra of density, divergence and vorticity must start at order k{sup 4}. For the vorticity this constitutes one of the two leading terms. Exact (approximated) self-similarity of an Einstein-de Sitter (ΛCDM) background fixes the time dependence so that the vorticity power spectrum at leading order is determined by the symmetries of the problem and the power spectrum around the non-linear scale. We show that to cancel all divergences in the velocity correlators one needs new counterterms. These fix the definition of velocity and do not represent new properties of the system. For an Einstein-de Sitter universe, we show that all three renormalized cross- and auto-correlation functions have the same structure but different numerical coefficients, which we compute. We elucidate the differences between using momentum and velocity.

  19. The beginning of observations of large-scale solar magnetic fields at the Sayan Observatory - Instrument, plans, preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, V. M.; Peshcherov, V. S.; Demidov, M. L.

    A telescope and a system for measuring large-scale magnetic fields and the large-scale field of line-of-sight velocities in the sun photosphere have been constructed at the Sayan Observatory (USSR). The instrument permits the following synoptic observations of large-scale structures: (1) magnetograms of a large-scale magnetic field with a 3-arcmin resolution and 0.1-0.2 Gs sensitivity; (2) solar disk magnetograms in the form of half-tone images of the magnetic field distribution with 15 Gs sensitivity and 8 x 8 arcsec resolution; and (3) measurement of the mean magnetic field of the sun as a star with about 0.1 Gs sensitivity. Preliminary results of toroidal magnetic field observations are briefly discussed.

  20. NESC-VII: Fracture Mechanics Analyses of WPS Experiments on Large-scale Cruciform Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Williams, Paul T; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes numerical analyses performed to simulate warm pre-stress (WPS) experiments conducted with large-scale cruciform specimens within the Network for Evaluation of Structural Components (NESC-VII) project. NESC-VII is a European cooperative action in support of WPS application in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity assessment. The project aims in evaluation of the influence of WPS when assessing the structural integrity of RPVs. Advanced fracture mechanics models will be developed and performed to validate experiments concerning the effect of different WPS scenarios on RPV components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA contributes to the Work Package-2 (Analyses of WPS experiments) within the NESCVII network. A series of WPS type experiments on large-scale cruciform specimens have been conducted at CEA Saclay, France, within the framework of NESC VII project. This paper first describes NESC-VII feasibility test analyses conducted at ORNL. Very good agreement was achieved between AREVA NP SAS and ORNL. Further analyses were conducted to evaluate the NESC-VII WPS tests conducted under Load-Cool-Transient- Fracture (LCTF) and Load-Cool-Fracture (LCF) conditions. This objective of this work is to provide a definitive quantification of WPS effects when assessing the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels. This information will be utilized to further validate, refine, and improve the WPS models that are being used in probabilistic fracture mechanics computer codes now in use by the NRC staff in their effort to develop risk-informed updates to Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G.

  1. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  2. Integrated observations of processes and products of large scale cratering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.; Ross, P.; White, J. D.; Taddeucci, J.; Zimanowski, B.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed analysis of volcanic craters and ballistic deposits can provide insight into eruption dynamics and evolution. As fully exposed craters and associated unmodified deposits are rarely preserved, the dynamics involved can only be inferred. Large-scale blast experiments conducted at the University at Buffalo Geohazards Field Station produced deposits from single and multiple subsurface explosions at individual craters, along with a range of observational data, and provide a unique opportunity to link dynamics with geologic structures and deposits. Meter-scale craters were produced through repeated blasts using chemical explosives in 15 cm thick strata constructed of compacted aggregates (e.g. sands and gravels). Each experiment had 1-3 individual explosions with the same epicenter to form a single crater, with a total of 12 blasts and five craters. Three craters were produced through a series of shallow blasts (34-75 cm depth, six blasts) and two additional craters were produced by deeper blasts (75-100 cm, six blasts). The experiments successfully reproduced crater structures similar to those of maar volcanoes, which are the product of one or more subsurface explosions resulting from the interaction of magma with groundwater. Deep explosion tests successfully reproduced mixing and structures similar to maar-diatremes. The ballistics produced were collected in sample boxes up to 18 m from the blast center. The pits were later excavated and the vertical structures and deposits were described and sampled. Deposits can be described as bedded-diatreme (fallback/inter-crater deposits), unbedded diatreme (disturbed subsurface material), tephra ring (debris on the pre-blast surface) and distal extra-crater deposits. Granulometry and componentry were acquired for all samples. The diatreme structures and deposit componentry were interpreted using high-speed video recordings of the blasts. A comparison of ballistic source depth and collection location revealed the

  3. Are large-scale flow experiments informing the science and management of freshwater ecosystems?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olden, Julian D.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Melis, Theodore S.; Kennard, Mark J.; Freeman, Mary C.; Mims, Meryl C.; Bray, Erin N.; Gido, Keith B.; Hemphill, Nina P.; Lytle, David A.; McMullen, Laura E.; Pyron, Mark; Robinson, Christopher T.; Schmidt, John C.; Williams, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Greater scientific knowledge, changing societal values, and legislative mandates have emphasized the importance of implementing large-scale flow experiments (FEs) downstream of dams. We provide the first global assessment of FEs to evaluate their success in advancing science and informing management decisions. Systematic review of 113 FEs across 20 countries revealed that clear articulation of experimental objectives, while not universally practiced, was crucial for achieving management outcomes and changing dam-operating policies. Furthermore, changes to dam operations were three times less likely when FEs were conducted primarily for scientific purposes. Despite the recognized importance of riverine flow regimes, four-fifths of FEs involved only discrete flow events. Over three-quarters of FEs documented both abiotic and biotic outcomes, but only one-third examined multiple taxonomic responses, thus limiting how FE results can inform holistic dam management. Future FEs will present new opportunities to advance scientifically credible water policies.

  4. The trispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the connected four point correlation function (the trispectrum in Fourier space) of cosmological density perturbations at one-loop order in Standard Perturbation Theory (SPT) and the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure (EFT of LSS). This paper is a companion to our earlier work on the non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum, which corresponds to a particular wavenumber configuration of the trispectrum. In the present calculation, we highlight and clarify some of the subtle aspects of the EFT framework that arise at third order in perturbation theory for general wavenumber configurations of the trispectrum. We consistently incorporate vorticity and non-locality in time into the EFT counterterms and lay out a complete basis of building blocks for the stress tensor. We show predictions for the one-loop SPT trispectrum and the EFT contributions, focusing on configurations which have particular relevance for using LSS to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity.

  5. Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2010-08-01

    A primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large scale structure(LSS). In this article, we demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales as follows, We also report the newest constraints on the PMF amplitude Bλ and the power spectral index nB which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework and the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In particular we find that |Bλ|<2.10(68%CL) nG and < 2.98(95%CL) nG and nB<-1.19(68%CL) and <-0.25(95%CL) at a present scale of 1 Mpc.

  6. The large-scale integration of high-performance silicon nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiliang; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Yang; Ioannou, Dimitris E; Xiong, Hao D; Kwon, Doo-Won; Suehle, John S; Richter, Curt A

    2009-10-14

    In this work we present a CMOS-compatible self-aligning process for the large-scale-integration of high-performance nanowire field effect transistors with well-saturated drain currents, steep subthreshold slopes at low drain voltage and a large on/off current ratio (>10(7)). The subthreshold swing is as small as 45 mV/dec, which is substantially beyond the thermodynamic limit (60 mV/dec) of conventional planar MOSFETs. These excellent device characteristics are achieved by using a clean integration process and a device structure that allows effective gate-channel-source coupling to tune the source/drain Schottky barriers at the nanoscale.

  7. The persistence of large-scale blowouts in largely vegetated coastal dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Smyth, Thomas; Jackson, Derek; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Smith, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Coastal dunes move through natural phases of stability and instability during their evolution, displaying various temporal and spatial patterns across the dune field. Recent observations, however, have shown exceptionally rapid rates of stability through increased vegetative growth. This progressive vegetation colonisation and consequent loss of bare sand on coastal dune systems has been noted worldwide. Percentage reductions in bare sand of as much as 80% within just a few decades can been seen in examples from South Africa, Canada and Brazil as well as coastal dune sites across NW Europe. Despite these dramatic trends towards dune stabilisation, it is not uncommon to find particular examples of large-scale active blowouts and parabolic dunes within largely vegetated coastal dunes. While turbulence and airflow dynamics within features such as blowouts and other dune forms has been studied in detail within recent years, there is a lack of knowledge about what maintains dune mobility at these specific points in otherwise largely stabilized dune fields. This work explores the particular example of the 'Devil's Hole' blowout, Sefton Dunes, NW England. Approximately 300 m long by 100 m wide, its basin is below the water-table which leads to frequent flooding. Sefton Dunes in general have seen a dramatic loss of bare sand since the 1940s. However, and coinciding with this period of dune stabilisation, the 'Devil's Hole' has not only remained active but also grown in size at a rate of 4.5 m year-1 along its main axis. An exploration of factors controlling the maintenance of open bare sand areas at this particular location is examined using a variety of techniques including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) airflow modelling and in situ empirical measurements of (short-term experiments) of wind turbulence and sand transport. Field measurements of wind parameters and transport processes were collected over a 2 week period during October 2015. Twenty three 3D ultrasonic

  8. Constraining Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Field Models with Optical Coronal Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific success of the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) and Solar Orbiter (SO) missions will depend to a large extent on the accuracy of the available coronal magnetic field models describing the connectivity of plasma disturbances in the inner heliosphere with their source regions. We argue that ground based and satellite coronagraph images can provide robust geometric constraints for the next generation of improved coronal magnetic field extrapolation models. In contrast to the previously proposed loop segmentation codes designed for detecting compact closed-field structures above solar active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal regions located at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Details on the new feature detection algorithms will be presented. By applying the developed image processing methodology to high-resolution Mauna Loa Solar Observatory images, we perform an optimized 3D B-line tracing for a full Carrington rotation using the magnetic field extrapolation code presented in a companion talk by S.Jones at al. Tracing results are shown to be in a good qualitative agreement with the large-scalie configuration of the optical corona. Subsequent phases of the project and the related data products for SSP and SO missions as wwll as the supporting global heliospheric simulations will be discussed.

  9. Development of Dynamic Flow Field Pressure Probes Suitable for Use in Large Scale Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10-by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor staff and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  10. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; ...

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 hmore » Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.« less

  11. Automated tracing of open-field coronal structures for an optimized large-scale magnetic field reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter will provide detailed measurements in the inner heliosphere magnetically connected with the topologically complex and eruptive solar corona. Interpretation of these measurements will require accurate reconstruction of the large-scale coronal magnetic field. In a related presentation by S. Jones et al., we argue that such reconstruction can be performed using photospheric extrapolation methods constrained by white-light coronagraph images. Here, we present the image-processing component of this project dealing with an automated segmentation of fan-like coronal loop structures. In contrast to the existing segmentation codes designed for detecting small-scale closed loops in the vicinity of active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal features observed at significant radial distances from the solar surface. The coronagraph images used for the loop segmentation are transformed into a polar coordinate system and undergo radial detrending and initial noise reduction. The preprocessed images are subject to an adaptive second order differentiation combining radial and azimuthal directions. An adjustable thresholding technique is applied to identify candidate coronagraph features associated with the large-scale coronal field. A blob detection algorithm is used to extract valid features and discard noisy data pixels. The obtained features are interpolated using higher-order polynomials which are used to derive empirical directional constraints for magnetic field extrapolation procedures based on photospheric magnetograms.

  12. Gene Expression Browser: large-scale and cross-experiment microarray data integration, management, search & visualization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last decade, a large amount of microarray gene expression data has been accumulated in public repositories. Integrating and analyzing high-throughput gene expression data have become key activities for exploring gene functions, gene networks and biological pathways. Effectively utilizing these invaluable microarray data remains challenging due to a lack of powerful tools to integrate large-scale gene-expression information across diverse experiments and to search and visualize a large number of gene-expression data points. Results Gene Expression Browser is a microarray data integration, management and processing system with web-based search and visualization functions. An innovative method has been developed to define a treatment over a control for every microarray experiment to standardize and make microarray data from different experiments homogeneous. In the browser, data are pre-processed offline and the resulting data points are visualized online with a 2-layer dynamic web display. Users can view all treatments over control that affect the expression of a selected gene via Gene View, and view all genes that change in a selected treatment over control via treatment over control View. Users can also check the changes of expression profiles of a set of either the treatments over control or genes via Slide View. In addition, the relationships between genes and treatments over control are computed according to gene expression ratio and are shown as co-responsive genes and co-regulation treatments over control. Conclusion Gene Expression Browser is composed of a set of software tools, including a data extraction tool, a microarray data-management system, a data-annotation tool, a microarray data-processing pipeline, and a data search & visualization tool. The browser is deployed as a free public web service (http://www.ExpressionBrowser.com) that integrates 301 ATH1 gene microarray experiments from public data repositories (viz. the Gene

  13. Combined Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition Experiments: System Identification Rack Hardware Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Randy; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The System Identification (SysID) Rack is a real-time hardware-in-the-loop data acquisition (DAQ) and control instrument rack that was designed and built to support inlet testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. This instrument rack is used to support experiments on the Combined-Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition Experiment (CCE? LIMX). The CCE?LIMX is a testbed for an integrated dual flow-path inlet configuration with the two flow paths in an over-and-under arrangement such that the high-speed flow path is located below the lowspeed flow path. The CCE?LIMX includes multiple actuators that are designed to redirect airflow from one flow path to the other; this action is referred to as "inlet mode transition." Multiple phases of experiments have been planned to support research that investigates inlet mode transition: inlet characterization (Phase-1) and system identification (Phase-2). The SysID Rack hardware design met the following requirements to support Phase-1 and Phase-2 experiments: safely and effectively move multiple actuators individually or synchronously; sample and save effector control and position sensor feedback signals; automate control of actuator positioning based on a mode transition schedule; sample and save pressure sensor signals; and perform DAQ and control processes operating at 2.5 KHz. This document describes the hardware components used to build the SysID Rack including their function, specifications, and system interface. Furthermore, provided in this document are a SysID Rack effectors signal list (signal flow); system identification experiment setup; illustrations indicating a typical SysID Rack experiment; and a SysID Rack performance overview for Phase-1 and Phase-2 experiments. The SysID Rack described in this document was a useful tool to meet the project objectives.

  14. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; ...

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  15. Status of the Combined-Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, J. Dave

    2011-01-01

    The Large-Scale Inlet Mode Transition (LIMX) experiment is currently being conducted in the 10x10 foot supersonic wind tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The experiment has involved the efforts of a team for over four years to get to the first phase of testing, which is examining the aerodynamic characteristics of the inlet. The LIMX inlet involves dual flowpaths: one to provide flow to a turbine engine and one to provide flow to a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet. A rotating splitter cowl can close off the turbine flowpath, which would occur as the propulsion system transitions from turbine power to ramjet/scramjet power at Mach 4. The first phase of the experiment will simulate the turbine and ramjet/scramjet flows using cold pipes with flow rates controlled by mass-flow plugs. Much of the testing will characterize the performance of the turbine flowpath (total pressure recovery and distortion at the engine face location) as factors such as bleed rates and configuration and vortex generators are varied during the inlet mode transition. The performance of the inlet will also be examined at off-design Mach numbers (2.5-3.0) and at angle-of-attack.

  16. The large-scale organization of "visual" streams emerges without visual experience.

    PubMed

    Striem-Amit, Ella; Dakwar, Ornella; Reich, Lior; Amedi, Amir

    2012-07-01

    A key question in sensory perception is the role of experience in shaping the functional architecture of the sensory neural systems. Here we studied dependence on visual experience in shaping the most fundamental division of labor in vision, namely between the ventral "what" and the dorsal "where and how" processing streams. We scanned 11 fully congenitally blind (CB) and 9 sighted individuals performing location versus form identification tasks following brief training on a sensory substitution device used for artificial vision. We show that the dorsal/ventral visual pathway division of labor can be revealed in the adult CB when perceiving sounds that convey the relevant visual information. This suggests that the most important large-scale organization of the visual system into the 2 streams can develop even without any visual experience and can be attributed at least partially to innately determined constraints and later to cross-modal plasticity. These results support the view that the brain is organized into task-specific but sensory modality-independent operators.

  17. Large-scale full-field metrology using projected fringes: some challenges and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntley, Jonathan M.; Ogundana, Tokunbo; Burguete, Richard L.; Coggrave, C. Russell

    2007-06-01

    The application of optical techniques to the measurement of shape and deformation of structures in the aerospace industry poses unique challenges resulting from the large length scales involved, which are typically in the 1-10 m range. For example, the relative immobility of large samples requires a network of sensors to be linked into a common global coordinate system; traceable calibration requires the development of new types of calibration artefact; and traditional interferometric techniques for displacement field mapping are frequently too sensitive to observe the physical effect of interest. We describe a system designed to address some of these problems based on the projected fringe technique combined with temporal phase unwrapping. Multiple cameras and projectors are linked into a common coordinate system using calibration concepts borrowed from the photogrammetry field. Traceable calibration is achieved through the use of reference spheres separated by a bar of known length. Traditional two-dimensional image processing techniques for recognizing circles (Hough transforms) have been extended to the automatic detection of spheres within the measured 3-D point clouds. Bundle adjustment software has been developed to refine the camera and projector calibration parameters as well as the rigid body translation and rotation coordinates defining the poses of the calibration artefact. An overview of all these aspects of the developed techniques is given in the paper. Typical results from a compression test on a large scale aluminium structure, performed on-site at Airbus UK using the developed system, are also presented.

  18. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part II: resummation and redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2014-02-01

    We generalize the recently derived single-field consistency relations of Large Scale Structure in two directions. First, we treat the effect of the long modes (with momentum q) on the short ones (with momentum k) non-perturbatively, by writing resummed consistency relations which do not require k/q⋅δ{sub q} << 1. These relations do not make any assumptions on the short-scales physics and are extended to include (an arbitrary number of) multiple long modes, internal lines with soft momenta and soft loops. We do several checks of these relations in perturbation theory and we verify that the effect of soft modes always cancels out in equal-time correlators. Second, we write the relations directly in redshift space, without assuming the single-stream approximation: not only the long mode affects the short scales as a homogeneous gravitational field, but it also displaces them by its velocity along the line-of-sight. Redshift space consistency relations still vanish when short modes are taken at equal time: an observation of a signal in the squeezed limit would point towards multifield inflation or a violation of the equivalence principle.

  19. The Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Porto, Rafael A.; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory (LEFT) formalism for the study of cosmological large scale structures. Unlike the previous Eulerian-space construction, it is naturally formulated as an effective field theory of extended objects in Lagrangian space. In LEFT the resulting finite size effects are described using a multipole expansion parameterized by a set of time dependent coefficients and organized in powers of the ratio of the wavenumber of interest k over the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. The multipoles encode the effects of the short distance modes on the long-wavelength universe and absorb UV divergences when present. There are no IR divergences in LEFT. Some of the parameters that control the perturbative approach are not assumed to be small and can be automatically resummed. We present an illustrative one-loop calculation for a power law universe. We describe the dynamics both at the level of the equations of motion and through an action formalism.

  20. Viewing inside Pyroclastic Flows - Large-scale Experiments on hot pyroclast-gas mixture flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, E. C.; Lube, G.; Cronin, S. J.; Jones, J.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents are the largest threat from volcanoes. Direct observations of natural flows are persistently prevented because of their violence and remain limited to broad estimates of bulk flow behaviour. The Pyroclastic Flow Generator - a large-scale experimental facility to synthesize hot gas-particle mixture flows scaled to pyroclastic flows and surges - allows investigating the physical processes behind PDC behaviour in safety. The ability to simulate natural eruption conditions and to view and measure inside the hot flows allows deriving validation and calibration data sets for existing numerical models, and to improve the constitutive relationships necessary for their effective use as powerful tools in hazard assessment. We here report on a systematic series of large-scale experiments on up to 30 ms-1 fast, 2-4.5 m thick, 20-35 m long flows of natural pyroclastic material and gas. We will show high-speed movies and non-invasive sensor data that detail the internal structure of the analogue pyroclastic flows. The experimental PDCs are synthesized by the controlled 'eruption column collapse' of variably diluted suspensions into an instrumented channel. Experiments show four flow phases: mixture acceleration and dilution during free fall; impact and lateral blasting; PDC runout; and co-ignimbrite cloud formation. The fully turbulent flows reach Reynolds number up to 107 and depositional facies similar to natural deposits. In the PDC runout phase, the shear flows develop a four-partite structure from top to base: a fully turbulent, strongly density-stratified ash cloud with average particle concentrations <<1vol%; a transient, turbulent dense suspension region with particle concentrations between 1 and 10 vol%; a non-turbulent, aerated and highly mobile dense underflows with particle concentrations between 40 and 50 vol%; and a vertically aggrading bed of static material. We characterise these regions and the exchanges of energy and momentum

  1. LUMINOUS RED GALAXY HALO DENSITY FIELD RECONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION TO LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Spergel, David N.; Bode, Paul E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    The nontrivial relationship between observations of galaxy positions in redshift space and the underlying matter field complicates our ability to determine the linear theory power spectrum and extract cosmological information from galaxy surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalog has the potential to place powerful constraints on cosmological parameters. LRGs are bright, highly biased tracers of large-scale structure. However, because they are highly biased, the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies to the galaxy power spectrum is large and fingers-of-God (FOGs) are significant. The combination of these effects leads to a {approx}10% correction in the underlying power spectrum at k = 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {approx}40% correction at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} in the LRG P(k) analysis of Tegmark et al., thereby compromising the cosmological constraints when this potentially large correction is left as a free parameter. We propose an alternative approach to recovering the matter field from galaxy observations. Our approach is to use halos rather than galaxies to trace the underlying mass distribution. We identify FOGs and replace each FOG with a single halo object. This removes the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies, the one-halo term. We test our method on a large set of high-fidelity mock SDSS LRG catalogs and find that the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field deviates from the underlying matter power spectrum at the {<=}1% level for k {<=} 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {<=}4% at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}. The reconstructed halo density field also removes the bias in the measurement of the redshift space distortion parameter {beta} induced by the FOG smearing of the linear redshift space distortions.

  2. Assessing nutrient limitation in complex forested ecosystems: alternatives to large-scale fertilization experiments.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Benjamin W; Alvarez-Clare, Silvia; Castle, Sarah C; Porder, Stephen; Reed, Sasha C; Schreeg, Laura; Townsend, Alan R; Cleveland, Cory C

    2014-03-01

    Quantifying nutrient limitation of primary productivity is a fundamental task of terrestrial ecosystem ecology, but in a high carbon dioxide environment it is even more critical that we understand potential nutrient constraints on plant growth. Ecologists often manipulate nutrients with fertilizer to assess nutrient limitation, yet for a variety of reasons, nutrient fertilization experiments are either impractical or incapable of resolving ecosystem responses to some global changes. The challenges of conducting large, in situ fertilization experiments are magnified in forests, especially the high-diversity forests common throughout the lowland tropics. A number of methods, including fertilization experiments, could be seen as tools in a toolbox that ecologists may use to attempt to assess nutrient limitation, but there has been no compilation or synthetic discussion of those methods in the literature. Here, we group these methods into one of three categories (indicators of soil nutrient supply, organismal indicators of nutrient limitation, and lab-based experiments and nutrient depletions), and discuss some of the strengths and limitations of each. Next, using a case study, we compare nutrient limitation assessed using these methods to results obtained using large-scale fertilizations across the Hawaiian Archipelago. We then explore the application of these methods in high-diversity tropical forests. In the end, we suggest that, although no single method is likely to predict nutrient limitation in all ecosystems and at all scales, by simultaneously utilizing a number of the methods we describe, investigators may begin to understand nutrient limitation in complex and diverse ecosystems such as tropical forests. In combination, these methods represent our best hope for understanding nutrient constraints on the global carbon cycle, especially in tropical forest ecosystems.

  3. Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments with an Assistance of the NIED Shaking Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, E.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.; Togo, T.; Kawakata, H.; Yoshimitsu, N.; Shimamoto, T.; Mikoshiba, T.; Sato, M.; Minowa, C.

    2012-12-01

    We constructed a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus using a large shaking table working at NIED (table dimension is 15m x 15m). The actuator of the shaking table becomes the engine of the constant speed loading. We used a 1.5m long rock sample overlaid on a 2m one. Their height and width are both 0.5m. Therefore, the slip area is 1.5m x 0.5m. The 2m long sample moves with the shaking table and the 1.5m sample is fixed to the basement of the shaking table. Thus, the shaking table displacement controls the dislocation between two rock samples. The shaking table can generate 0.4m displacement with a velocity ranging between 0.0125mm/s and 1m/s. We used Indian gabbro for the rock sample of the present experiments. Original flatness of the sliding surface was formed less than 0.024mm undulation using a large-scale plane grinder. Surface roughness evolved as subsequent experiments were done. Wear material was generated during each experiment, whose grain size becomes bigger as the experiments proceed. This might suggest a damage evolution on the sliding surface. In some experiments we did not remove the gouge material before sliding to examine the effect of gouge layer. Normal stress can be applied up to 1.3MPa. The stiffness of this apparatus was measured experimentally and was of the order of 0.1GN/m. We first measured the coefficient of friction at low sliding velocity (0.1~1mm/s) where the steady state was achieved after the slip of ~5mm. The coefficient of friction was about 0.75 under the normal stress between 0.13 and 1.3MPa. This is consistent with those estimated by previous works using smaller rock samples. We observed that the coefficient of friction decreased gradually with increasing slip velocity, but simultaneously the friction curves at the higher velocities are characterized by stick-slip vibration. Our main aim of the experiments is to understand the rupture propagation from slow nucleation to fast unstable rupture during the loading of two contact

  4. Issues in Estimating Program Effects and Studying Implementation in Large-Scale Educational Experiments: The Case of a Connected Classroom Technology Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Hye Sook

    2009-01-01

    Using data from a nationwide, large-scale experimental study of the effects of a connected classroom technology on student learning in algebra (Owens et al., 2004), this dissertation focuses on challenges that can arise in estimating treatment effects in educational field experiments when samples are highly heterogeneous in terms of various…

  5. Morphotectonic evolution of passive margins undergoing active surface processes: large-scale experiments using numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Romain; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere can lead to the formation of a wide range of rifted margins styles with contrasting tectonic and geomorphological characteristics. It is now understood that many of these characteristics depend on the manner extension is distributed depending on (among others factors) rheology, structural inheritance, thermal structure and surface processes. The relative importance and the possible interactions of these controlling factors is still largely unknown. Here we investigate the feedbacks between tectonics and the transfers of material at the surface resulting from erosion, transport, and sedimentation. We use large-scale (1200 x 600 km) and high-resolution (~1km) numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM). We test the sensitivity of the coupled models to varying crust-lithosphere rheology and erosional efficiency ranging from no-erosion to very efficient erosion. We discuss how fast, when and how the topography of the continents evolves and how it can be compared to actual passive margins escarpment morphologies. We show that although tectonics is the main factor controlling the rift geometry, transfers of masses at the surface affect the timing of faulting and the initiation of sea-floor spreading. We discuss how such models may help to understand the evolution of high-elevated passive margins around the world.

  6. ECOKATS-2: A Large Scale Experiment on Melt Spreading and Subsequent Cooling by Top Flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmeyer, H.; Cron, T.; Messemer, G.; Haefner, W.

    2004-07-01

    Spreading of a melt and subsequent top flooding are investigated in a large scale experiment, using a 2 m by 2 m concrete cavity that is filled with 3200 kg high temperature steel and oxide melt. During the first phase of intense concrete erosion, the surface of the spread melt is flooded with coolant water. The interaction of melt and coolant water is mild and does not produce energetic interactions. A closed surface crust is formed that is strictly anchored to the concrete sidewalls. Efficient cooling through formation of an upper crust with high porosity is restricted to the upper 4 cm of the original melt. The contribution of volcanic eruptions to coolability is small, as no loose particles were ejected. The bulk of the oxide melt and the iron layer at the bottom are not cooled by water ingression from the top. With respect to reactor application it is concluded that top flooding alone is unlikely to stop concrete erosion through deeper corium melts. (authors)

  7. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Senatore, Leonardo; Schmittfull, Marcel E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2015-10-01

    Given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/k{sub NL}, where k is the wavenumber of interest and k{sub NL} is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k≅ 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} and k≅ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which k{sub NL} is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ{sub 8}=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k≅ 0.25 h Mpc{sup −1}, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k≅ 0.25 h Mpc{sup −1}, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  8. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  9. Principal shapes and squeezed limits in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Solon, Mikhail P.

    2016-11-01

    We apply an orthogonalization procedure on the effective field theory of large scale structure (EFT of LSS) shapes, relevant for the angle-averaged bispectrum and non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum at one loop. Assuming natural-sized EFT parameters, this identifies a linear combination of EFT shapes—referred to as the principal shape—that gives the dominant contribution for the whole kinematic plane, with subdominant combinations suppressed by a few orders of magnitude. For the covariance, our orthogonal transformation is in excellent agreement with a principal component analysis applied to available data. Additionally we find that, for both observables, the coefficients of the principal shapes are well approximated by the EFT coefficients appearing in the squeezed limit, and are thus measurable from power spectrum response functions. Employing data from N-body simulations for the growth-only response, we measure the single EFT coefficient describing the angle-averaged bispectrum with 𝒪(10%) precision. These methods of shape orthogonalization and measurement of coefficients from response functions are valuable tools for developing the EFT of LSS framework, and can be applied to more general observables.

  10. The R3/R5 impoundment study: a large-scale management experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, J.E.; Laskowski, H.P.; Runge, M.C.; Lor, S.; Kendall, W.L.; Talbott, S.

    2005-01-01

    Managed wetlands provide a broad spectrum of resources to migratory waterbirds (shorebirds, wading birds, and waterfowl) throughout the annual cycle. Successful conservation and management of waterbirds depends on integrated approaches that (1) incorporate larger spatial and temporal scales than traditional approaches to wetland management, and (2) use experimental designs to reduce uncertainty about the response of the systems to management. In a previous experiment on USFWS National Wildlife Refuges in the Northeast, we explored the effects of water-level management on migratory shorebirds in spring. We documented regional patterns of shorebird use of Refuge wetlands and showed that across the region, a slow drawdown was superior to 2 alternatives. USGS and USFWS have now cooperatively undertaken an expanded study focusing on 3 waterbird guilds in the context of the complete annual cycle and over a larger spatial extent. For this 3-yr study, now in its first year, 2 impoundments were selected at each of 23 NWRs across the Northeast and Upper Midwest Regions. Two experimental treatments (annual water regimes focused on early-season or late-season drawdowns) are being applied each year in a cross-over design. This experimental design will increase our understanding of cross-seasonal interactions which result from specific hydrologic regimes aimed at a particular waterbird guild. Monitoring will allow waterbird responses to be linked with direct effects of water management on plant and invertebrate populations. Results of this large-scale experiment will be used to motivate formal adaptive management of wetlands and waterbirds at refuges following completion of this experiment.

  11. Generation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in Ionospheric HF Heating Experiments: Simulating Large-Scale Natural Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, Rezy

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence in the ionospheric layer. The main hypothesis is that, the thermal gradients associated with the heat wave fronts could act as a source of powerful AGW capable of triggering ionospheric plasma turbulence over extensive areas. In our investigations, first we are going to examine a case study of the summer 2006 North American heat wave event. Our examination of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) data over the North American sector reveals a quite noticeable increase in the level of daily plasma density fluctuations during the summer 2006 heat wave period. Comparison with the summer 2005 and summer 2007 data further confirms that the observed increase of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the summer 2006 heat wave period was not simply a regular seasonal phenomenon. Furthermore, a series of field experiments had been carried out at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in order to physically simulate the process of AGW/TID generation by large-scale thermal gradients in the ionosphere. In these ionospheric HF heating experiments, we create some time-varying artificial thermal gradients at an altitude of 200--300 km above the Earth's surface using vertically-transmitted amplitude-modulated 0-mode HF heater waves. For our experiments, a number of radio diagnostic instruments had been utilized to detect the characteristic signatures of heater-generated AGW/TID. So far, we have been able to obtain several affirmative indications that some artificial AGW/TID are indeed being radiated out from the heated plasma volume during the HAARP-AGW experiments. Based on the experimental evidence, we may conclude that it is certainly quite plausible for large-scale thermal gradients associated with severe heat wave

  12. Four large-scale field-aligned current systmes in the dayside high-latitude region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T. A.; Newell, P.T.; Zanetti, L. J.; Iijima, T.; Watanabe, M.; Blomberg, L. G.; Elphinstone, R. D.; Murphree, J. S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A system of four current sheets of large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) was discovered in the data set of simultaneous Viking and Defense Meteorological Satellire Program-F7 (DMSP-F7) crossing of the dayside high-latitude region. This paper reports four examples of this system that were observed in the prenoon sector. The flow polarities of FACs are upward, downward, upward, and downward, from equatorward to poleward. The lowest-latitude upward current is flowing mostly in the central plasma sheet (CPS) precipitation region, often overlapping with the boundary plasma sheet (BPS) at its poleward edge, andis interpreted as a region 2 current. The pair of downward and upward FACs in the middle of te structure are collocated with structured electron precipitation. The precipitation of high-energy (greater than 1 keV) electrons is more intense in the lower-latitude downward current sheet. The highest-latitude downward flowing current sheet is located in a weak, low-energy particle precipitation region, suggesting that this current is flowing on open field lines. Simulaneous observations in the postnoon local time sector reveal the standard three-sheet structure of FACs, sometimes described as region 2, region 1, and mantle (referred to the midday region O) currents. A high correlation was found between the occurrence of the four FAC sheet structure and negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub Y). We discuss the FAC structurein terms of three types of convection cells: the merging, viscous, andlobe cells. During strongly negative IMF B(sub Y), two convection reversals exist in the prenoon sector; one is inside the viscous cell, and the other is between the viscous cell and the lobe cell. This structure of convection flow is supported by the Viking electric field and auroral UV image data. Based on the convection pattern, the four FAC sheet structure is interpreted as the latitude overlap of midday and morning FAC systems. We suggest that the for

  13. Novel method to construct large-scale design space in lubrication process utilizing Bayesian estimation based on a small-scale design-of-experiment and small sets of large-scale manufacturing data.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jin; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-12-01

    A large-scale design space was constructed using a Bayesian estimation method with a small-scale design of experiments (DoE) and small sets of large-scale manufacturing data without enforcing a large-scale DoE. The small-scale DoE was conducted using various Froude numbers (X(1)) and blending times (X(2)) in the lubricant blending process for theophylline tablets. The response surfaces, design space, and their reliability of the compression rate of the powder mixture (Y(1)), tablet hardness (Y(2)), and dissolution rate (Y(3)) on a small scale were calculated using multivariate spline interpolation, a bootstrap resampling technique, and self-organizing map clustering. The constant Froude number was applied as a scale-up rule. Three experiments under an optimal condition and two experiments under other conditions were performed on a large scale. The response surfaces on the small scale were corrected to those on a large scale by Bayesian estimation using the large-scale results. Large-scale experiments under three additional sets of conditions showed that the corrected design space was more reliable than that on the small scale, even if there was some discrepancy in the pharmaceutical quality between the manufacturing scales. This approach is useful for setting up a design space in pharmaceutical development when a DoE cannot be performed at a commercial large manufacturing scale.

  14. Large scale features of the Pliocene climate: Results from the PlioMIP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, A. M.; Hill, D. J.; Dolan, A. M.; Salzmann, U.; Dowsett, H. J.; Robinson, M. M.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Rosenbloom, N.; Chandler, M. A.; Lunt, D. J.; Pickering, S. J.; PlioMP Participants

    2012-04-01

    PlioMIP (Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project) is a recent addition to the Palaeoclimate Intercomparison Project. It represents the first time that a period with higher than pre-industrial levels of atmospheric CO2 and global temperatures within the range predicted for 2100AD has been subjected to rigorous model intercomparison. Currently around 8 modelling groups from around the world have completed each of the two PlioMIP experiments. The first experiment is for atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs), utilising the sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions of the USGS PRISM group, while the second is for coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs. The mid-Pliocene warm period has provided a focus for data synthesis and palaeoclimate modelling for the last two decades. Though numerous GCM simulations of the Pliocene have been conducted, rarely has any systematic attempt been made to conduct experiments in a fashion that would make direct comparisons possible, and our view of the mid-Pliocene world is still largely based on outputs from only a few GCMs. Although palaeoclimate reconstructions and climate models give a generally consistent picture of the Pliocene, significant regions of data-model mismatch remain. Here we present the first results of the project, showing the large scale features of the mid-Pliocene climate from the PlioMIP ensemble. Particular focus is given to surface air temperature, sea surface temperature and precipitation simulations. These results are used to produce meridional and zonal profiles for the mid-Pliocene and as the basis for detailed global data-model comparisons against both terrestrial and marine records. Modelled surface air temperature data is tested against estimates from reconstructed vegetation biomes, while the SST simulations of the atmosphere-ocean GCMs are tested against the PRISM data. While all the models show a general Pliocene warming of comparable magnitude (~ 2 - 4°C), there are significant differences between the

  15. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Experiments in ISS Resupply Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the fire safety risk in manned spacecraft has been limited by the small scale of the testing we have been able to conduct in low-gravity. Fire growth and spread cannot be expected to scale linearly with sample size so we cannot make accurate predictions of the behavior of realistic scale fires in spacecraft based on the limited low-g testing to date. As a result, spacecraft fire safety protocols are necessarily very conservative and costly. Future crewed missions are expected to be longer in duration than previous exploration missions outside of low-earth orbit and accordingly, more complex in terms of operations, logistics, and safety. This will increase the challenge of ensuring a fire-safe environment for the crew throughout the mission. Based on our fundamental uncertainty of the behavior of fires in low-gravity, the need for realistic scale testing at reduced gravity has been demonstrated. To address this concern, a spacecraft fire safety research project is underway to reduce the uncertainty and risk in the design of spacecraft fire safety systems by testing at nearly full scale in low-gravity. This project is supported by the NASA Advanced Exploration Systems Program Office in the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The activity of this project is supported by an international topical team of fire experts from other space agencies to maximize the utility of the data and to ensure the widest possible scrutiny of the concept. The large-scale space flight experiment will be conducted on three missions; each in an Orbital Sciences Corporation Cygnus vehicle after it has deberthed from the ISS. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew allows the fire products to be released into the cabin. The tests will be fully automated with the data downlinked at the conclusion of the test before the Cygnus vehicle reenters the

  16. Effective Extensive Reading outside the Classroom: A Large-Scale Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Thomas; Kano, Makimi

    2013-01-01

    We report on a large-scale implementation of extensive reading (ER) in a university setting in Japan where all students were required to read outside class time as part of their course requirement. A pre/posttest comparison between the 2009 cohort of students who read outside of class and the 2008 cohort who did no outside reading shows that the…

  17. Converting Data to Knowledge: One District's Experience Using Large-Scale Proficiency Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davin, Kristin J.; Rempert, Tania A.; Hammerand, Amy A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports data from a large-scale foreign language proficiency assessment to explore trends across a large urban school district. These data were used in conjunction with data from teacher and student questionnaires to make recommendations for foreign language programs across the district. This evaluation process resulted in…

  18. Increasing accuracy and throughput in large-scale microsatellite fingerprinting of cacao field germplasm collections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite-based DNA fingerprinting has been increasingly applied in crop genebank management. However, efficiency and cost-saving remain a major challenge for large scale genotyping, even when middle or high throughput genotyping facility is available. In this study we report on increasing the...

  19. The Greatest Legacy of the Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA): A Bibliometric Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is an international continental scale effort led by Brazil to understand how land use change and climate change affects the role of Amazonia in the Earth system. During the first decade of studies (1998-2007), LBA researchers generated new understanding of Amazonia and published over 1000 papers. However, most LBA participants agree that training and education of a large cohort of scientists, especially students from Brazil, was the greatest contribution of LBA. I analyzed bibliographic data from the NASA supported component project known as LBA-ECO. This component covered a large cross-section of the LBA subject areas highlighting land use and land cover change, carbon cycling, nutrient cycling and other aspects of terrestrial and aquatic ecology. I reviewed the complete bibliography of peer-reviewed papers reported by LBA-ECO researchers (http://www.lbaeco.org/cgi-bin/web/investigations/lbaeco_refs.pl). The researchers reported 691 contributions from 1996 through 2013 of which 24 were theses that were removed them from further analysis. Of 667 papers and book chapters, I tallied the first authors separating categories for Brazilians, all students, and Brazilian students. Numerically, LBA-ECO production of papers peaked in 2004. Publication by Brazilians, students, and Brazilian students generally followed the same pattern as publication in general. However, student and Brazilian student contributions as first authors showed clearly increasing proportions of the papers from project initiation through peak publication. Brazilian student participation as first authors averaged more than 20% of all publications from 2003 to 2010 and more than half of all student publications had Brazilians as first authors. Foreign researchers, some initially reluctant to invest in Brazilian students, almost universally adapted the belief that the greatest legacy of LBA would be the contribution to building a cadre of

  20. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir E-mail: matteorf@stanford.edu E-mail: zvlah@stanford.edu

    2015-09-01

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describe the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ{sub 8} = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k≅ 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k≅ 0.15 h Mpc{sup −1} for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. This is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.

  1. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describe the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.

  2. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; ...

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describemore » the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.« less

  3. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  4. Simultaneous excitation of large-scale geomagnetic field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities by powerful radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanism of thermal filamentation instability of radio waves whose frequencies can be as low as in the VLF band and as high as in the SHF band are investigated. This instability can excite large-scale magnetic and plasma density fluctuations simultaneously in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Relevant experiments are reviewed in terms of this instability and other mechanisms.

  5. TRMM Latent Heating Retrieval: Applications and Comparisons with Field Campaigns and Large-Scale Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Lang, Steve; Shige, Shoichi; Olson, William S.; Hou, Arthur; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Jiang, Xining; Zhang, Chidong; Lau, William K.; Krishnamurti, T.; Waliser, D.; Grecu, M.; Ciesielski, Paul; Johnson, Richard; Houze, Robert A.; Kakar, R.; Nakamura, K.; Braun, S.; Hagos, Samson M.; Oki, R.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2016-05-05

    Yanai et al. (1973) utilized the meteorological data collected from a sounding network to present a pioneering work on thermodynamic budgets, which are referred to as the apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Latent heating (LH) is one of the most dominant terms in Q1. Yanai’s paper motivated the development of satellite-based LH algorithms and provided a theoretical background for imposing large-scale advective forcing into cloud-resolving models (CRMs). These CRM-simulated LH and Q1 data have been used to generate the look-up tables in Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) LH algorithms. A set of algorithms developed for retrieving LH profiles from TRMM-based rainfall profiles are described and evaluated, including details concerning their intrinsic space-time resolutions. Included in the paper are results from a variety of validation analyses that define the uncertainty of the LH profile estimates. Also, examples of how TRMM-retrieved LH profiles have been used to understand the lifecycle of the MJO and improve the predictions of global weather and climate models as well as comparisons with large-scale analyses are provided. Areas for further improvement of the TRMM products are discussed.

  6. Sensitivity of full-sky experiments to large scale cosmic ray anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Peter B.; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2015-12-01

    The two main advantages of space-based observation of extreme energy (≳ 5 ×1019 eV) cosmic rays (EECRs) over ground based observatories are the increased field of view and the full-sky coverage with nearly uniform systematics across the entire sky. The former guarantees increased statistics, whereas the latter enables a clean partitioning of the sky into spherical harmonics. The discovery of anisotropies would help to identify the long sought origin of EECRs. We begin an investigation of the reach of a full-sky space-based experiment such as EUSO to detect anisotropies in the extreme-energy cosmic-ray sky compared to ground based partial-sky experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The technique is explained here, and simulations for a Universe with just two nonzero multipoles, monopole plus either dipole or quadrupole, are presented. These simulations quantify the advantages of space-based, all-sky coverage.

  7. Coronal mass ejection and solar flare initiation processes without appreciable changes of the large-scale magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, I. S.; Panasenco, O. A.

    We demonstrate that spurious three-dimensional re-constructions from two-dimensional images and movies of solar flares and coronal mass ejections can arise as a result of viewing conditions and projection effects, which are not always properly taken into account in the current literature. Theory and observations indicate that eruptions can proceed with or without large-scale topological changes of prominences and coronal magnetic fields. Electric currents and plasma drifts in crossed electric and magnetic fields play not negligible, but important role. This means that large-scale magnetic reconnections understood as topological transitions in the magnetic field are not always necessary for eruptions. The scenario of expanding and rising non-planar systems of preexisting loops and arcades, which are deforming when shearing at bottom parts, twisting and rotating at summits, satisfactory fits available observations. Movies are presented demonstrating this type of behavior with a preserved magnetic connectivity.

  8. On the Coexistence of a Radial Magnetic Field with the Large Scale Field in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, S. R.; Woo, R.; Arnaud, J.

    2001-05-01

    Polarimetric measurements of the corona out to 2 Rs in the Fe XIII 10747 A line, the strongest of the iron forbidden lines, are placed for the first time in the context of spatially resolved images of coronal density structures. These measurements, which are the only tool currently available to yield the direction of the magnetic field, date to 1980, the only year when they were available with polarized brightness images of the corona. Through this comparison, the observed predominance of the radial component of the coronal magnetic field, discovered over three decades ago from eclipse observations, and established systematically by Arnaud (1982), is shown to point to the existence of two components of the coronal magnetic field: a non-radial component associated with the large scale structures known as streamers, and the second, more dominant one, a pervasive radial magnetic field. The coexistence of these two components provides new information for the distribution of open and closed magnetic flux in the solar corona.

  9. Performance of the first Japanese large-scale facility for radon inhalation experiments with small animals.

    PubMed

    Ishimori, Yuu; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Takahiro; Sakoda, Akihiro

    2011-07-01

    A radon test facility for small animals was developed in order to increase the statistical validity of differences of the biological response in various radon environments. This paper illustrates the performances of that facility, the first large-scale facility of its kind in Japan. The facility has a capability to conduct approximately 150 mouse-scale tests at the same time. The apparatus for exposing small animals to radon has six animal chamber groups with five independent cages each. Different radon concentrations in each animal chamber group are available. Because the first target of this study is to examine the in vivo behaviour of radon and its effects, the major functions to control radon and to eliminate thoron were examined experimentally. Additionally, radon progeny concentrations and their particle size distributions in the cages were also examined experimentally to be considered in future projects.

  10. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part III: test of the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Hui, Lam; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: msimonov@sissa.it

    2014-06-01

    The recently derived consistency relations for Large Scale Structure do not hold if the Equivalence Principle (EP) is violated. We show it explicitly in a toy model with two fluids, one of which is coupled to a fifth force. We explore the constraints that galaxy surveys can set on EP violation looking at the squeezed limit of the 3-point function involving two populations of objects. We find that one can explore EP violations of order 10{sup −3}÷10{sup −4} on cosmological scales. Chameleon models are already very constrained by the requirement of screening within the Solar System and only a very tiny region of the parameter space can be explored with this method. We show that no violation of the consistency relations is expected in Galileon models.

  11. TRMM Latent Heating Retrieval and Comparisons with Field Campaigns and Large-Scale Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Takayabu, Yukuri; Lang, S.; Shige, S.; Olson, W.; Hou, A.; Jiang, X.; Zhang, C.; Lau, W.; Krishnamurti, T.; Waliser, D.; Grecu, M.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Johnson, R. H.; Houze, R.; Kakar, R.; Nakamura, K.; Braun, S.; Hagos, S.; Oki, R.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall production is a fundamental process within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it represents both a principal forcing term in surface water budgets, and its energetics corollary, latent heating (LH), is one of the principal sources of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The vertical distribution of LH has a strong influence on the atmosphere, controlling large-scale tropical circulations, exciting and modulating tropical waves, maintaining the intensities of tropical cyclones, and even providing the energetics of midlatitude cyclones and other mobile midlatitude weather systems. Moreover, the processes associated with LH result in significant non-linear changes in atmospheric radiation through the creation, dissipation and modulation of clouds and precipitation. Yanai et al. (1973) utilized the meteorological data collected from a sounding network to present a pioneering work on thermodynamic budgets, which are referred to as the apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Yanai's paper motivated the development of satellite-based LH algorithms and provided a theoretical background for imposing large-scale advective forcing into cloud-resolving models (CRMs). These CRM-simulated LH and Q1 data have been used to generate the look-up tables used in LH algorithms. This paper examines the retrieval, validation, and application of LH estimates based on rain rate quantities acquired from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite (TRMM). TRMM was launched in November 1997 as a joint enterprise between the American and Japanese space agencies -- with overriding goals of providing accurate four-dimensional estimates of rainfall and LH over the global Tropics and subtropics equatorward of 35o. Other literature has acknowledged the achievement of the first goal of obtaining an accurate rainfall climatology. This paper describes the

  12. Large-scale, high-resolution electrophysiological imaging of field potentials in brain slices with microelectronic multielectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ferrea, E.; Maccione, A.; Medrihan, L.; Nieus, T.; Ghezzi, D.; Baldelli, P.; Benfenati, F.; Berdondini, L.

    2012-01-01

    Multielectrode arrays (MEAs) are extensively used for electrophysiological studies on brain slices, but the spatial resolution and field of recording of conventional arrays are limited by the low number of electrodes available. Here, we present a large-scale array recording simultaneously from 4096 electrodes used to study propagating spontaneous and evoked network activity in acute murine cortico-hippocampal brain slices at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate that multiple chemically induced epileptiform episodes in the mouse cortex and hippocampus can be classified according to their spatio-temporal dynamics. Additionally, the large-scale and high-density features of our recording system enable the topological localization and quantification of the effects of antiepileptic drugs in local neuronal microcircuits, based on the distinct field potential propagation patterns. This novel high-resolution approach paves the way to detailed electrophysiological studies in brain circuits spanning spatial scales from single neurons up to the entire slice network. PMID:23162432

  13. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  14. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  15. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, V; Subramanian, V; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  16. Plausible Boosting of Millimeter-Galaxies in the COSMOS Field by Intervening Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretxaga, I.; Wilson, G. W.; Aguilar, E.; Alberts, S.; Scott, K. S.; Scoville, N.; Yun, M. S.; Austermann, J.; Downes, T. D.; Ezawa, H.; Hatsukade, B.; Hughes, D. H.; Kawabe, R.; Kohno, K.; Oshima, T.; Perera, T. A.; Tamura, Y.; Zeballos, M.

    2011-10-01

    The 0.72 sq. deg. contiguous 1.1mm survey in the central area of the COSMOS field, carried out to a 1σ≍1.26 mJy beam-1 depth with the AzTEC camera mounted on the 10m Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE), shows number counts with a significant excess of sources when compared to the number counts derived from the ˜0.5 sq. deg. area sampled at similar depths in the Scuba HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES, Austermann et al. 2010). They are, however, consistent with those derived from fields that were considered too small to characterize the overall blank-field population. We identify differences to be more significant in the S1.1mm ˜> 5 mJy regime, and demonstrate that these excesses in number counts are related to the areas where galaxies at redshifts ˜< 1.1 are more densely clustered. The positions of optical-IR galaxies in the redshift interval 0.6 ˜< z ˜< 0.75 are the ones that show the strongest correlation with the positions of the 1.1mm bright population (S1.mm ˜>5 mJy), a result which does not depend exclusively on the presence of rich clusters within the survey sampled area. The most likely explanation for the observed excess in number counts at 1.1mm is galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-group lensing at moderate amplification levels, that increases in amplitude as one samples larger and larger flux densities.

  17. Electron acceleration at a coronal shock propagating through a large-scale streamer-like magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Guo, Fan; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Gang

    2016-04-05

    With a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featured by partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature is larger than that of magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. We also found that in general the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not so efficient as that at the top of closed field since at the top a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons is power-law like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of -3 to -6. In conclusion, physical interpretations of the results and implications on the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.

  18. Expediting SRM assay development for large-scale targeted proteomics experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chaochao; Shi, Tujin; Brown, Joseph N.; ...

    2014-08-22

    Due to their high sensitivity and specificity, targeted proteomics measurements, e.g. selected reaction monitoring (SRM), are becoming increasingly popular for biological and translational applications. Selection of optimal transitions and optimization of collision energy (CE) are important assay development steps for achieving sensitive detection and accurate quantification; however, these steps can be labor-intensive, especially for large-scale applications. Herein, we explored several options for accelerating SRM assay development evaluated in the context of a relatively large set of 215 synthetic peptide targets. We first showed that HCD fragmentation is very similar to CID in triple quadrupole (QQQ) instrumentation, and by selection ofmore » top six y fragment ions from HCD spectra, >86% of top transitions optimized from direct infusion on QQQ instrument are covered. We also demonstrated that the CE calculated by existing prediction tools was less accurate for +3 precursors, and a significant increase in intensity for transitions could be obtained using a new CE prediction equation constructed from the present experimental data. Overall, our study illustrates the feasibility of expediting the development of larger numbers of high-sensitivity SRM assays through automation of transitions selection and accurate prediction of optimal CE to improve both SRM throughput and measurement quality.« less

  19. Expediting SRM assay development for large-scale targeted proteomics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Shi, Tujin; Brown, Joseph N.; He, Jintang; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-08-22

    Due to their high sensitivity and specificity, targeted proteomics measurements, e.g. selected reaction monitoring (SRM), are becoming increasingly popular for biological and translational applications. Selection of optimal transitions and optimization of collision energy (CE) are important assay development steps for achieving sensitive detection and accurate quantification; however, these steps can be labor-intensive, especially for large-scale applications. Herein, we explored several options for accelerating SRM assay development evaluated in the context of a relatively large set of 215 synthetic peptide targets. We first showed that HCD fragmentation is very similar to CID in triple quadrupole (QQQ) instrumentation, and by selection of top six y fragment ions from HCD spectra, >86% of top transitions optimized from direct infusion on QQQ instrument are covered. We also demonstrated that the CE calculated by existing prediction tools was less accurate for +3 precursors, and a significant increase in intensity for transitions could be obtained using a new CE prediction equation constructed from the present experimental data. Overall, our study illustrates the feasibility of expediting the development of larger numbers of high-sensitivity SRM assays through automation of transitions selection and accurate prediction of optimal CE to improve both SRM throughput and measurement quality.

  20. EXPLAINING THE COEXISTENCE OF LARGE-SCALE AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN FULLY CONVECTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Wolk, Scott J.; Christensen, Ulrich R.; Gastine, Thomas; Morin, Julien; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-11-10

    Despite the lack of a shear-rich tachocline region, low-mass fully convective (FC) stars are capable of generating strong magnetic fields, indicating that a dynamo mechanism fundamentally different from the solar dynamo is at work in these objects. We present a self-consistent three-dimensional model of magnetic field generation in low-mass FC stars. The model utilizes the anelastic magnetohydrodynamic equations to simulate compressible convection in a rotating sphere. A distributed dynamo working in the model spontaneously produces a dipole-dominated surface magnetic field of the observed strength. The interaction of this field with the turbulent convection in outer layers shreds it, producing small-scale fields that carry most of the magnetic flux. The Zeeman–Doppler-Imaging technique applied to synthetic spectropolarimetric data based on our model recovers most of the large-scale field. Our model simultaneously reproduces the morphology and magnitude of the large-scale field as well as the magnitude of the small-scale field observed on low-mass FC stars.

  1. Prospective Large-Scale Field Study Generates Predictive Model Identifying Major Contributors to Colony Losses

    PubMed Central

    Kielmanowicz, Merav Gleit; Inberg, Alex; Lerner, Inbar Maayan; Golani, Yael; Brown, Nicholas; Turner, Catherine Louise; Hayes, Gerald J. R.; Ballam, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV) in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees). The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health. PMID:25875764

  2. Prospective large-scale field study generates predictive model identifying major contributors to colony losses.

    PubMed

    Kielmanowicz, Merav Gleit; Inberg, Alex; Lerner, Inbar Maayan; Golani, Yael; Brown, Nicholas; Turner, Catherine Louise; Hayes, Gerald J R; Ballam, Joan M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV) in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees). The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health.

  3. Designing and developing portable large-scale JavaScript web applications within the Experiment Dashboard framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, J.; Dzhunov, I.; Karavakis, E.; Kokoszkiewicz, L.; Nowotka, M.; Saiz, P.; Tuckett, D.

    2012-12-01

    Improvements in web browser performance and web standards compliance, as well as the availability of comprehensive JavaScript libraries, provides an opportunity to develop functionally rich yet intuitive web applications that allow users to access, render and analyse data in novel ways. However, the development of such large-scale JavaScript web applications presents new challenges, in particular with regard to code sustainability and team-based work. We present an approach that meets the challenges of large-scale JavaScript web application design and development, including client-side model-view-controller architecture, design patterns, and JavaScript libraries. Furthermore, we show how the approach leads naturally to the encapsulation of the data source as a web API, allowing applications to be easily ported to new data sources. The Experiment Dashboard framework is used for the development of applications for monitoring the distributed computing activities of virtual organisations on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. We demonstrate the benefits of the approach for large-scale JavaScript web applications in this context by examining the design of several Experiment Dashboard applications for data processing, data transfer and site status monitoring, and by showing how they have been ported for different virtual organisations and technologies.

  4. Monthly mean large-scale analyses of upper-tropospheric humidity and wind field divergence derived from three geostationary satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schmetz, J.; Menzel, W.P.; Hayden, C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the results from a collaborative study between the European Space Operations Center, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Cooperative Institute for Meterological Satellite Studies investigating the relationship between satellite-derived monthly mean fields of wind and humidity in the upper troposphere for March 1994. Three geostationary meteorological satellites GOES-7, Meteosat-3, and Meteosat-5 are used to cover an area from roughly 160{degrees}W to 50{degrees}E. The wind fields are derived from tracking features in successive images of upper-tropospheric water vapor (WV) as depicted in the 6.5-{mu} absorption band. The upper-tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) is inferred from measured water vapor radiances with a physical retrieval scheme based on radiative forward calculations. Quantitative information on large-scale circulation patterns in the upper troposphere is possible with the dense spatial coverage of the WV wind vectors. The monthly mean wind field is used to estimate the large-scale divergence; values range between about -5 x 10{sup -6} and 5 x 10{sup -6} sec{sup -1} when averaged over a scale length of about 1000-2000 km. The spatial patterns of the UTH field and the divergence of the wind field closely resemble one another, suggesting that UTH patterns are principally determined by the large-scale circulation. Since the upper-tropospheric humidity absorbs upwelling radiation from lower-tropospheric levels and therefore contributes significantly to the atmospheric greenhouse effect, this work implies that studies on the climate relevance of water vapor should include three-dimensional modeling of the atmospheric dynamics. The fields of UTH and WV winds are useful parameters for a climate-monitoring system based on satellite data. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Monthly mean large-scale analyses of upper-tropospheric humidity and wind field divergence derived from three geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmetz, Johannes; Menzel, W. Paul; Velden, Christopher; Wu, Xiangqian; Vandeberg, Leo; Nieman, Steve; Hayden, Christopher; Holmlund, Kenneth; Geijo, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results from a collaborative study between the European Space Operations Center, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies investigating the relationship between satellite-derived monthly mean fields of wind and humidity in the upper troposphere for March 1994. Three geostationary meteorological satellites GOES-7, Meteosat-3, and Meteosat-5 are used to cover an area from roughly 160 deg W to 50 deg E. The wind fields are derived from tracking features in successive images of upper-tropospheric water vapor (WV) as depicted in the 6.5-micron absorption band. The upper-tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) is inferred from measured water vapor radiances with a physical retrieval scheme based on radiative forward calculations. Quantitative information on large-scale circulation patterns in the upper-troposphere is possible with the dense spatial coverage of the WV wind vectors. The monthly mean wind field is used to estimate the large-scale divergence; values range between about-5 x 10(exp -6) and 5 x 10(exp 6)/s when averaged over a scale length of about 1000-2000 km. The spatial patterns of the UTH field and the divergence of the wind field closely resemble one another, suggesting that UTH patterns are principally determined by the large-scale circulation. Since the upper-tropospheric humidity absorbs upwelling radiation from lower-tropospheric levels and therefore contributes significantly to the atmospheric greenhouse effect, this work implies that studies on the climate relevance of water vapor should include three-dimensional modeling of the atmospheric dynamics. The fields of UTH and WV winds are useful parameters for a climate-monitoring system based on satellite data. The results from this 1-month analysis suggest the desirability of further GOES and Meteosat studies to characterize

  6. Generation of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields during large- scale chemical and nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Adushkin, V.V.; Dubinya, V.A.; Karaseva, V.A.; Soloviev, S.P.; Surkov, V.V.

    1995-06-01

    We discuss the main parameters of the electric field in the surface layer of the atmosphere and the results of the investigations of the natural electric field variations. Experimental investigations of the electromagnetic field for explosions in air are presented. Electromagnetic signals generated by underground nuclear and chemical explosions are discussed and explosions for 1976--1991 are listed. Long term anomalies of the earth`s electromagnetic field in the vicinity of underground explosions were also investigated. Study of the phenomenon of the irreversible shock magnetization showed that in the zone nearest to the explosion the quasistatic magnetic field decreases in inverse proportion to the distance.

  7. Stability Analysis for a Large-scale Space Power Network, International Space Station and Japanese Experiment Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Masaaki; Arai, Satoaki

    The International Space Station (ISS), which is scheduled to start the operation fully in early 2000’s, is being developed and assembled on orbit since 1998 with international cooperation of the USA, Russia, Europe, Canada, and Japan. Japan participates in this ISS program and will provide the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, named “Kibo") which will be attached to the ISS core. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), which is responsible for the JEM system development and integration, has been developed JEM Electric Power System (JEM EPS) as part of the Space Station Electric Power System (EPS). The International Space Station Electric Power System is the world’s largest orbiting direct-current (DC) power system. The ISS electric power is generated by solar arrays, and distributed to the each module in 120 Vdc bus voltage rating. When designing a large-scale Space Power System using direct current (DC), special attention must be placed on the electrical stability and control of the system and individual load on the system. For a large-scale Space Power System, it is not feasible to design the entire system as a whole. Instead, the system can be defined in term of numerous small blocks, and each block then designed individually. The individual blocks are then integrated to form a complete system. The International Space Station (ISS) is one of good example for these issue and concerns as a large-scale Space Power System. This paper describes the approach of the stability analysis for a large-scale space power network.

  8. Large-scale pollination experiment demonstrates the importance of insect pollination in winter oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sandra A M; Herbertsson, Lina; Rundlöf, Maj; Smith, Henrik G; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Insect pollination, despite its potential to contribute substantially to crop production, is not an integrated part of agronomic planning. A major reason for this are knowledge gaps in the contribution of pollinators to yield, which partly result from difficulties in determining area-based estimates of yield effects from insect pollination under field conditions. We have experimentally manipulated honey bee Apis mellifera densities at 43 oilseed rape Brassica napus fields over 2 years in Scandinavia. Honey bee hives were placed in 22 fields; an additional 21 fields without large apiaries in the surrounding landscape were selected as controls. Depending on the pollination system in the parental generation, the B. napus cultivars in the crop fields are classified as either open-pollinated or first-generation hybrids, with both types being open-pollinated in the generation of plants cultivated in the fields. Three cultivars of each type were grown. We measured the activity of flower-visiting insects during flowering and estimated yields by harvesting with small combine harvesters. The addition of honey bee hives to the fields dramatically increased abundance of flower-visiting honey bees in those fields. Honey bees affected yield, but the effect depended on cultivar type (p = 0.04). Post-hoc analysis revealed that open-pollinated cultivars, but not hybrid cultivars, had 11% higher yields in fields with added honey bees than those grown in the control fields (p = 0.07). To our knowledge, this is the first whole-field study in replicated landscapes to assess the benefit of insect pollination in oilseed rape. Our results demonstrate that honey bees have the potential to increase oilseed rape yields, thereby emphasizing the importance of pollinator management for optimal cultivation of oilseed rape.

  9. Three-dimensional mechanical modeling of large-scale crustal deformation in China constrained by the GPS velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Ye, Zheng-Ren; He, Jian-Kun

    2008-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for the crustal movement in China with respect to the Eurasia plate by using the three-dimensional finite element code ADELI. The model consists of an elastoplastic upper lithosphere and a viscoelastic lower lithosphere. The lithosphere is supported by the hydrostatic pressure at its base. The India-Eurasia collision is modeled as a velocity boundary condition. Ten large-scale faults are introduced as Coulomb-type frictional zones in the modeling. The values for the root mean square (RMS) of the east and north velocity components differences (RMS(Ue) and RMS(Un)), which are between the observation and the prediction, are regarded as the measurements to evaluate our simulations. We model the long-term crustal deformation in China by adjusting the faults frictions ranged from 0.01 to 0.5 and considering the effects resulted from lithospheric viscosity variation and topographic loading. Our results suggest most of the large-scale faults frictions are not larger than 0.1, which is consistent with other large-scale faults such as the North Anatolian fault (Provost, A.S., Chery, J., Hassani, R., 2003. Three-dimensional mechanical modeling of the GPS velocity field along the North Anatolian fault. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 209, 361-377) and the San Andreas fault (Mount, V.S., Suppe, J., 1987. State of stress near the San Andreas fault: implications for wrench tectonics. Geology, 15, 1143-1146). Further, we examine the effects on the long-term crustal deformation in China of three causes: the large-scale faults, lithospheric viscosity structure and topographic loading. Results indicate that the lithospheric viscosity structure and the topographic loading have important influences on the crustal deformation in China, while the influences caused by the large-scale faults are small. Although our simulations satisfactorily reproduce the general picture of crustal movement in China, there is a poor agreement between the model and the observed GPS

  10. Merging Large-Scale Assessment Data for Secondary Analysis: Experiences with EQAO's Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarwar, Gul Shahzad; Zerpa, Carlos; van Barneveld, Christina; Simon, Marielle; Brinson, Karieann

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a narrative of our experience in analyzing and merging data files provided to us by the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO). In the paper, we propose a scheme of merging data files by means of Structured Query Language (SQL, pronounced as "sequel"). Although, the narrative of our experiences using this…

  11. A Review of Large-Scale Fracture Experiments Relevant to Pressure Vessel Integrity Under Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-29

    Numerous large-scale fracture experiments have been performed over the past thirty years to advance fracture mechanics methodologies applicable to thick-wall pressure vessels. This report first identifies major factors important to nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. It then covers 20 key experiments that have contributed to identifying fracture behavior of RPVs and to validating applicable assessment methodologies. The experiments are categorized according to four types of specimens: (1) cylindrical specimens, (2) pressurized vessels, (3) large plate specimens, and (4) thick beam specimens. These experiments were performed in laboratories in six different countries. This report serves as a summary of those experiments, and provides a guide to references for detailed information.

  12. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-01-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near- Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterizing the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  13. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2017-03-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near-Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterising the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  14. The HyperHydro (H^2) experiment for comparing different large-scale models at various resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, E.; Bosmans, J.; Chaney, N.; Clark, M. P.; Condon, L. E.; David, C. H.; De Roo, A. P. J.; Doll, P. M.; Drost, N.; Eisner, S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Floerke, M.; Gilbert, J. M.; Gochis, D. J.; Hut, R.; Keune, J.; Kollet, S. J.; Maxwell, R. M.; Pan, M.; Rakovec, O.; Reager, J. T., II; Samaniego, L. E.; Mueller Schmied, H.; Trautmann, T.; Van Beek, L. P.; Van De Giesen, N.; Wood, E. F.; Bierkens, M. F.; Kumar, R.

    2015-12-01

    HyperHydro (http://www.hyperhydro.org/) is an open network of scientists with the objective of simulating large-scale terrestrial hydrology and water resources at hyper-resolution (Bierkens et al., 2014, DOI: 10.1002/hyp.10391). Within the HyperHydro network, a modeling workshop was held at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, on 9-12 June 2015. The goal of the workshop was to start the HyperHydro (H^2) experiment for comparing different large-scale hydrological models, at different spatial resolutions, from 50 km to 1 km. Model simulation results (e.g. discharge, soil moisture, evaporation, snow, groundwater depth, etc.) are evaluated to available observation data and compared across various models and resolutions. In AGU 2015, we would like to present the results of this inter-comparison experiment. During the workshop in Utrecht, the models compared were CLM, LISFLOOD, mHM, ParFlow-CLM, PCR-GLOBWB, TerrSysMP, VIC and WaterGAP. We invite participation from the hydrology community on this experiment. As test-beds, we focus on two river basins: San Joaquin (~82000 km2) and Rhine (~185000 km2). In the near future, we will escalate this experiment to the CONUS and CORDEX-EU domains. The picture below was taken during the workshop in Utrecht (9-12 June 2015).

  15. ELECTRON ACCELERATION AT A CORONAL SHOCK PROPAGATING THROUGH A LARGE-SCALE STREAMER-LIKE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2016-04-10

    Using a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featuring a partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature is larger than that of the magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of the efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. We also find that, in general, the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not as efficient as that at the top of the closed field because a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed at the top. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons are power-law-like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of −3 to −6. Physical interpretations of the results and implications for the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.

  16. Electron acceleration at a coronal shock propagating through a large-scale streamer-like magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Guo, Fan; ...

    2016-04-05

    With a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featured by partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature ismore » larger than that of magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. We also found that in general the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not so efficient as that at the top of closed field since at the top a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons is power-law like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of -3 to -6. In conclusion, physical interpretations of the results and implications on the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.« less

  17. Control Theoretic Approach to Iterative Methods for Large-scale Toeplitz-type Systems with Application to Magnetic Field Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Tomohito; Kashima, Kenji; Imura, Jun-Ichi; Miyazaki, Shuji; Morita, Hiroshi

    In this paper, stationary iterative methods for large-scale Toeplitz-type systems are investigated from a control theoretic point of view. We utilize spatially invariant structure of Toeplitz matrices, to avoid the curse of dimensionality arising in analysis and design of the convergence properties. Nonlinearities in the system are theoretically handled within the small gain and stability analysis for Lur'e systems. This theory enables us to achieve the desired global convergence of the proposed numerical scheme. We also evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method through an application to magnetic field analysis.

  18. Formation of the inner electron radiation belt by enhanced large-scale electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Jiun; Selesnick, Richard S.; Blake, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional bounce-averaged test particle code was developed to examine trapped electron trajectories during geomagnetic storms with the assumption of conservation of the first and second adiabatic invariants. The March 2013 storm was selected as an example because the geomagnetic activity Kp index sharply increased from 2 + to 7- at 6:00 UT on 17 March. Electron measurements with energies between 37 and 460 keV from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument onboard Van Allen Probes (VAP) are used as initial conditions prior to the storm onset and served to validate test particle simulations during the storm. Simulation results help to interpret the observed electron injection as nondiffusive radial transport over a short distance in the inner belt and slot region based on various electric field models, although the quantitative comparisons are not precise. We show that electron drift trajectories are sensitive to the selection of electric field models. Moreover, our simulation results suggest that the actual field strength of penetration electric fields during this storm is stronger than any existing electric field model, particularly for L ≤ 2.

  19. Large-scale electric fields resulting from magnetic reconnection in the corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopp, R. A.; Poletto, G.

    1986-01-01

    The method of Forbes and Priest (2-D model) is applied to the large two-ribbon flare of July 29, 1973, for which both detailed H observations and magnetic data are available. For this flare the ribbons were long, nearly straight, and parallel to each other, and the 2-D model for the coronal field geometry may be adequate. The temporal profile E(t) is calculated and indicates that reconnection sets in at the beginning of the decay phase. From this time the electric field grows rapidly to a maximum value of about 2 V/cm within just a few minutes. Thereafter it decreases monotonically with time.

  20. Latitudinal variability of large-scale coronal temperature and its association with the density and the global magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, M.; Fisher, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we utilize the latitiude distribution of the coronal temperature during the period 1984-1992 that was derived in a paper by Guhathakurta et al, 1993, utilizing ground-based intensity observations of the green (5303 A Fe XIV) and red (6374 A Fe X) coronal forbidden lines from the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak, and establish it association with the global magnetic field and the density distributions in the corona. A determination of plasma temperature, T, was estimated from the intensity ratio Fe X/Fe XIV (where T is inversely proportional to the ratio), since both emission lines come from ionized states of Fe, and the ratio is only weakly dependent on density. We observe that there is a large-scale organization of the inferred coronal temperature distribution that is associated with the large-scale, weak magnetic field structures and bright coronal features; this organization tends to persist through most of the magnetic activity cycle. These high-temperature structures exhibit time-space characteristics which are similar to those of the polar crown filaments. This distribution differs in spatial and temporal characterization from the traditional picture of sunspot and active region evolution over the range of the sunspot cycle, which are manifestations of the small-scale, strong magnetic field regions.

  1. Correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure behind an interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    From a survey of observations on ISEE-3, an example of correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure is presented. Bidirectional proton fluxes were observed for a period of 40 hours in the energy range 35-1600 keV approximately 12 hours after the passage of the interplanetary shock of December 11, 1980, and directly after the passage of a discontinuity. For each of the eight logarithmically spaced energy channels, a three-dimensional anisotropy analysis reveals streaming along both directions of the magnetic field. The magnetic field rotated slowly but steadily through approximately 180 deg during this same 40-hour period; this is consistent with the existence of a large-scale loop with extent greater than 0.5 AU. The observations suggest that the particles are being injected into the loop sunward of the spacecraft; they appear as bidirectional fluxes in the outermost regions of the loop arising from a combination of focusing and near scatter-free transport.

  2. The HyperHydro (H2) experiment for comparing different large-scale models at various resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin

    2016-04-01

    HyperHydro (http://www.hyperhydro.org/) is an open network of scientists with the objective of simulating large-scale terrestrial hydrology and water resources at hyper-resolution (Wood et al., 2011, DOI: 10.1029/2010WR010090; Bierkens et al., 2014, DOI: 10.1002/hyp.10391). Within the HyperHydro network, a modeling workshop was held at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, on 9-12 June 2015. The goal of the workshop was to start the HyperHydro (H^2) experiment for comparing different large-scale hydrological models, at different spatial resolutions, from 50 km to 1 km. Model simulation results (e.g. discharge, soil moisture, evaporation, snow, groundwater depth, etc.) are evaluated to available observation data and compared across various models and resolutions. At EGU 2016, we would like to present the latest results of this inter-comparison experiment. We also invite participation from the hydrology community on this experiment. Up to now, the models compared are CLM, LISFLOOD, mHM, ParFlow-CLM, PCR-GLOBWB, TerrSysMP, VIC, WaterGAP, and wflow. As initial test-beds, we mainly focus on two river basins: San Joaquin/California (82000 km^2) and Rhine (185000 km^2). Moreover, comparison at a larger region, such for the CONUS (Contiguous-US) domain, is also explored and presented.

  3. Online Learning Experiences of New versus Continuing Learners: A Large-Scale Replication Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Nai; Marsh, Vicky; Rienties, Bart; Whitelock, Denise

    2017-01-01

    A vast body of research has indicated the importance of distinguishing new vs. continuing students' learning experiences in blended and online environments. Continuing learners may have developed learning and coping mechanisms for "surviving" in such learning environments, while new learners might still need to adjust their learning…

  4. Inquiry-Based Experiments for Large-Scale Introduction to PCR and Restriction Enzyme Digests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digest are important techniques that should be included in all Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory curriculums. These techniques are frequently taught at an advanced level, requiring many hours of student and faculty time. Here we present two inquiry-based experiments that are…

  5. Control of the innermost electron radiation belt by large-scale electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Su, Y.-J.; Blake, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    Electron measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instruments on Van Allen Probes, for kinetic energies ˜100 to 400 keV, show characteristic dynamical features of the innermost (L≲1.3) radiation belt: rapid injections, slow decay, and structured energy spectra. There are also periods of steady or slowly increasing intensity and of fast decay following injections. Local time asymmetry, with higher intensity near dawn, is interpreted as evidence for drift shell distortion by a convection electric field of magnitude ˜0.4 mV/m during geomagnetically quiet times. Fast fluctuations in the electric field, on the drift time scale, cause inward diffusion. Assuming that they are proportional to changes in Kp, the resulting diffusion coefficient is sufficient to replenish trapped electrons lost by atmospheric scattering. Major electric field increases cause injections by inward electron transport. An injection associated with the June 2015 magnetic storm is consistent with an enhanced field magnitude ˜5 mV/m. Subsequent drift echoes cause spectral structure.

  6. Inquiry-based experiments for large-scale introduction to PCR and restriction enzyme digests.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Kelly E; Watt, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digest are important techniques that should be included in all Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory curriculums. These techniques are frequently taught at an advanced level, requiring many hours of student and faculty time. Here we present two inquiry-based experiments that are designed for introductory laboratory courses and combine both techniques. In both approaches, students must determine the identity of an unknown DNA sequence, either a gene sequence or a primer sequence, based on a combination of PCR product size and restriction digest pattern. The experimental design is flexible, and can be adapted based on available instructor preparation time and resources, and both approaches can accommodate large numbers of students. We implemented these experiments in our courses with a combined total of 584 students and have an 85% success rate. Overall, students demonstrated an increase in their understanding of the experimental topics, ability to interpret the resulting data, and proficiency in general laboratory skills.

  7. Quantitative patterns of large-scale field-aligned currents in the auroral ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C.; Fuller-Rowell, T.; Evans, D.S.

    1989-03-01

    Quantitative patterns of the distribution of field-aligned current (FAC) density have been derived from gradients of the average patterns of the Hall and Pedersen currents at high latitudes under the assumption that the total current is divergence-free. The horizontal currents were calculated from empirical convection electric field models, derived from Millstone Hill radar observations, and the ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductances, based on satellite observations of the precipitating particle energy flux and spectrum and including an average (equinox) solar contribution. These independent empirical models, and the resultant patterns of the field-aligned currents, are keyed to an auroral precipitation index which quantifies the intensity and spatial extent of high-latitude particle precipitation and which is determined from a single satellite crossing of the auroral precipitation pattern. The patterns detail the spatial distribution of the currents as a function of increasing disturbance level. The magnitudes of the total single-hemisphere currents into or out of the ionosphere are closely balanced at each activity level and increase exponentially between 0.1 and 6 MA with increasing values of the precipitation index. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) sector dependence of the FAC patterns is investigated for disturbed conditions. A large portion of the FAC pattern is closed by local Pedersen currents (current into the ionosphere is balanced by an equal current out of the ionosphere at that local time). This locally balanced portion of the FAC system is enhanced in the prenoon (postnoon) sector for IMF B/sub v/>+1 nT (B/sub y/<-1 nT). In addition, there are net currents into the ionosphere postnoon and out of the ionosphere in the premidnight sector.

  8. The perfect debris flow? Aggregated results from 28 large-scale experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.; Logan, Matthew; LaHusen, Richard G.; Berti, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Aggregation of data collected in 28 controlled experiments reveals reproducible debris-flow behavior that provides a clear target for model tests. In each experiment ∼10 m3 of unsorted, water-saturated sediment composed mostly of sand and gravel discharged from behind a gate, descended a steep, 95-m flume, and formed a deposit on a nearly horizontal runout surface. Experiment subsets were distinguished by differing basal boundary conditions (1 versus 16 mm roughness heights) and sediment mud contents (1 versus 7 percent dry weight). Sensor measurements of evolving flow thicknesses, basal normal stresses, and basal pore fluid pressures demonstrate that debris flows in all subsets developed dilated, coarse-grained, high-friction snouts, followed by bodies of nearly liquefied, finer-grained debris. Mud enhanced flow mobility by maintaining high pore pressures in flow bodies, and bed roughness reduced flow speeds but not distances of flow runout. Roughness had these effects because it promoted debris agitation and grain-size segregation, and thereby aided growth of lateral levees that channelized flow. Grain-size segregation also contributed to development of ubiquitous roll waves, which had diverse amplitudes exhibiting fractal number-size distributions. Despite the influence of these waves and other sources of dispersion, the aggregated data have well-defined patterns that help constrain individual terms in a depth-averaged debris-flow model. The patterns imply that local flow resistance evolved together with global flow dynamics, contradicting the hypothesis that any consistent rheology applied. We infer that new evolution equations, not new rheologies, are needed to explain how characteristic debris-flow behavior emerges from the interactions of debris constituents.

  9. A large-scale deforestation experiment: Effects of patch area and isolation on Amazon birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferraz, G.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Stouffer, P.C.; Bierregaard, R.O.; Lovejoy, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    As compared with extensive contiguous areas, small isolated habitat patches lack many species. Some species disappear after isolation; others are rarely found in any small patch, regardless of isolation. We used a 13-year data set of bird captures from a large landscape-manipulation experiment in a Brazilian Amazon forest to model the extinction-colonization dynamics of 55 species and tested basic predictions of island biogeography and metapopulation theory. From our models, we derived two metrics of species vulnerability to changes in isolation and patch area. We found a strong effect of area and a variable effect of isolation on the predicted patch occupancy by birds.

  10. A large-scale deforestation experiment: effects of patch area and isolation on Amazon birds.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Gonçalo; Nichols, James D; Hines, James E; Stouffer, Philip C; Bierregaard, Richard O; Lovejoy, Thomas E

    2007-01-12

    As compared with extensive contiguous areas, small isolated habitat patches lack many species. Some species disappear after isolation; others are rarely found in any small patch, regardless of isolation. We used a 13-year data set of bird captures from a large landscape-manipulation experiment in a Brazilian Amazon forest to model the extinction-colonization dynamics of 55 species and tested basic predictions of island biogeography and metapopulation theory. From our models, we derived two metrics of species vulnerability to changes in isolation and patch area. We found a strong effect of area and a variable effect of isolation on the predicted patch occupancy by birds.

  11. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km per second with a low-power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and approx. 1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km per second solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs, Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  12. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km/s, with a low power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and -1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km/s. solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs. Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  13. Practical experience from the Office of Adolescent Health's large scale implementation of an evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Amy Lynn; Roper, Allison Yvonne

    2014-03-01

    After 3 years of experience overseeing the implementation and evaluation of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs in a diversity of populations and settings across the country, the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) has learned numerous lessons through practical application and new experiences. These lessons and experiences are applicable to those working to implement evidence-based programs on a large scale. The lessons described in this paper focus on what it means for a program to be implementation ready, the role of the program developer in replicating evidence-based programs, the importance of a planning period to ensure quality implementation, the need to define and measure fidelity, and the conditions necessary to support rigorous grantee-level evaluation.

  14. Entrainment of bed sediment by debris flows: results from large-scale experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Iverson, Richard M.; Logan, Matthew; LaHusen, Richard G.; Godt, Jonathan W.; Griswold, Julie P.

    2011-01-01

    When debris flows grow by entraining sediment, they can become especially hazardous owing to increased volume, speed, and runout. To investigate the entrainment process, we conducted eight largescale experiments in the USGS debris-flow flume. In each experiment, we released a 6 m3 water-saturated debris flow across a 47-m long, ~12-cm thick bed of partially saturated sediment lining the 31º flume. Prior to release, we used low-intensity overhead sprinkling and real-time monitoring to control the bed-sediment wetness. As each debris flow descended the flume, we measured the evolution of flow thickness, basal total normal stress, basal pore-fluid pressure, and sediment scour depth. When debris flows traveled over relatively dry sediment, net scour was minimal, but when debris flows traveled over wetter sediment (volumetric water content > 0.22), debris-flow volume grew rapidly and flow speed and runout were enhanced. Data from scour sensors showed that entrainment occurred by rapid (5-10 cm/s), progressive scour rather than by mass failure at depth. Overriding debris flows rapidly generated high basal pore-fluid pressures when they loaded and deformed bed sediment, and in wetter beds these pressures approached lithostatic levels. Reduction of intergranular friction within the bed sediment thereby enhanced scour efficiency, entrainment, and runout.

  15. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  16. Towards Automated Large-Scale 3D Phenotyping of Vineyards under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Rose, Johann Christian; Kicherer, Anna; Wieland, Markus; Klingbeil, Lasse; Töpfer, Reinhard; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2016-12-15

    In viticulture, phenotypic data are traditionally collected directly in the field via visual and manual means by an experienced person. This approach is time consuming, subjective and prone to human errors. In recent years, research therefore has focused strongly on developing automated and non-invasive sensor-based methods to increase data acquisition speed, enhance measurement accuracy and objectivity and to reduce labor costs. While many 2D methods based on image processing have been proposed for field phenotyping, only a few 3D solutions are found in the literature. A track-driven vehicle consisting of a camera system, a real-time-kinematic GPS system for positioning, as well as hardware for vehicle control, image storage and acquisition is used to visually capture a whole vine row canopy with georeferenced RGB images. In the first post-processing step, these images were used within a multi-view-stereo software to reconstruct a textured 3D point cloud of the whole grapevine row. A classification algorithm is then used in the second step to automatically classify the raw point cloud data into the semantic plant components, grape bunches and canopy. In the third step, phenotypic data for the semantic objects is gathered using the classification results obtaining the quantity of grape bunches, berries and the berry diameter.

  17. Towards Automated Large-Scale 3D Phenotyping of Vineyards under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Johann Christian; Kicherer, Anna; Wieland, Markus; Klingbeil, Lasse; Töpfer, Reinhard; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    In viticulture, phenotypic data are traditionally collected directly in the field via visual and manual means by an experienced person. This approach is time consuming, subjective and prone to human errors. In recent years, research therefore has focused strongly on developing automated and non-invasive sensor-based methods to increase data acquisition speed, enhance measurement accuracy and objectivity and to reduce labor costs. While many 2D methods based on image processing have been proposed for field phenotyping, only a few 3D solutions are found in the literature. A track-driven vehicle consisting of a camera system, a real-time-kinematic GPS system for positioning, as well as hardware for vehicle control, image storage and acquisition is used to visually capture a whole vine row canopy with georeferenced RGB images. In the first post-processing step, these images were used within a multi-view-stereo software to reconstruct a textured 3D point cloud of the whole grapevine row. A classification algorithm is then used in the second step to automatically classify the raw point cloud data into the semantic plant components, grape bunches and canopy. In the third step, phenotypic data for the semantic objects is gathered using the classification results obtaining the quantity of grape bunches, berries and the berry diameter. PMID:27983669

  18. An analytical dynamo solution for large-scale magnetic fields of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamandy, Luke

    2016-11-01

    We present an effectively global analytical asymptotic galactic dynamo solution for the regular magnetic field of an axisymmetric thin disc in the saturated state. This solution is constructed by combining two well-known types of local galactic dynamo solution, parametrized by the disc radius. Namely, the critical (zero growth) solution obtained by treating the dynamo equation as a perturbed diffusion equation is normalized using a non-linear solution that makes use of the `no-z' approximation and the dynamical α-quenching non-linearity. This overall solution is found to be reasonably accurate when compared with detailed numerical solutions. It is thus potentially useful as a tool for predicting observational signatures of magnetic fields of galaxies. In particular, such solutions could be painted on to galaxies in cosmological simulations to enable the construction of synthetic polarized synchrotron and Faraday rotation measure data sets. Further, we explore the properties of our numerical solutions, and their dependence on certain parameter values. We illustrate and assess the degree to which numerical solutions based on various levels of approximation, common in the dynamo literature, agree with one another.

  19. SPOrt: an experiment aimed at measuring the large scale cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, Ettore; Cortiglioni, Stefano; Bernardi, Gianni; Cecchini, Stefano; Macculi, Claudio; Sbarra, Carla; Monari, Jader; Orfei, Alessandro; Poloni, Marco; Poppi, Sergio; Boella, Giuliano; Bonometto, Silvio; Gervasi, Massimo; Sironi, Giorgio; Zannoni, Mario; Tucci, Marco; Baralis, Massino; Peverini, Oscar A.; Tascone, Riccardo; Virone, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Roberto; Nicastro, Luciano; Ng, Kin-Wang; Razin, V. A.; Vinyajkin, Evgenij N.; Sazhin, Mikhail V.; Strukov, Igor A.

    2003-02-01

    SPOrt (Sky Polarization Observatory) is a space experiment to be flown on the International Space Station during Early Utilization Phase aimed at measuring the microwave polarized emission with FWHM = 7 deg, in the frequency range 22-90 GHz. The Galactic polarized emission can be observed at the lower frequencies and the polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at 90 GHz, where contaminants are expected to be less important. The extremely low level of the CMB Polarization signal calls for intrinsically stable radiometers. The SPOrt instrument is expressly devoted to CMB polarization measurements and the whole design has been optimized for minimizing instrumental polarization effects. In this contribution we present the receiver architecture based on correlation techniques, the analysis showing its intrinsic stability and the custom hardware development carried out to detect such a low signal.

  20. Friction in debris flows: inferences from large-scale flume experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.; LaHusen, Richard G.; ,

    1993-01-01

    A recently constructed flume, 95 m long and 2 m wide, permits systematic experimentation with unsteady, nonuniform flows of poorly sorted geological debris. Preliminary experiments with water-saturated mixtures of sand and gravel show that they flow in a manner consistent with Coulomb frictional behavior. The Coulomb flow model of Savage and Hutter (1989, 1991), modified to include quasi-static pore-pressure effects, predicts flow-front velocities and flow depths reasonably well. Moreover, simple scaling analyses show that grain friction, rather than liquid viscosity or grain collisions, probably dominates shear resistance and momentum transport in the experimental flows. The same scaling indicates that grain friction is also important in many natural debris flows.

  1. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  2. The Ophidia Stack: Toward Large Scale, Big Data Analytics Experiments for Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, S.; Williams, D. N.; D'Anca, A.; Nassisi, P.; Aloisio, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Ophidia project is a research effort on big data analytics facing scientific data analysis challenges in multiple domains (e.g. climate change). It provides a "datacube-oriented" framework responsible for atomically processing and manipulating scientific datasets, by providing a common way to run distributive tasks on large set of data fragments (chunks). Ophidia provides declarative, server-side, and parallel data analysis, jointly with an internal storage model able to efficiently deal with multidimensional data and a hierarchical data organization to manage large data volumes. The project relies on a strong background on high performance database management and On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) systems to manage large scientific datasets. The Ophidia analytics platform provides several data operators to manipulate datacubes (about 50), and array-based primitives (more than 100) to perform data analysis on large scientific data arrays. To address interoperability, Ophidia provides multiple server interfaces (e.g. OGC-WPS). From a client standpoint, a Python interface enables the exploitation of the framework into Python-based eco-systems/applications (e.g. IPython) and the straightforward adoption of a strong set of related libraries (e.g. SciPy, NumPy). The talk will highlight a key feature of the Ophidia framework stack: the "Analytics Workflow Management System" (AWfMS). The Ophidia AWfMS coordinates, orchestrates, optimises and monitors the execution of multiple scientific data analytics and visualization tasks, thus supporting "complex analytics experiments". Some real use cases related to the CMIP5 experiment will be discussed. In particular, with regard to the "Climate models intercomparison data analysis" case study proposed in the EU H2020 INDIGO-DataCloud project, workflows related to (i) anomalies, (ii) trend, and (iii) climate change signal analysis will be presented. Such workflows will be distributed across multiple sites - according to the

  3. Triggering proccesses in fracture and compaction experiments: On the importance of large-scale heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T.; Davidsen, J.; Kwiatek, G.; Stanchits, S. A.; Dresen, G. H.; Charalampidou, E. M.; Rueck, M.

    2015-12-01

    Natural seismicity is characterized by empirical laws such as the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Omori-Utsu law. The latter is a typical example for the spatio-temporal clustering of seismicity arising from triggering processes related to static and/or dynamic stress changes, yet the microscopic origin of the Omori-Utsu law is not well understood. Here, we study triggering processes in tri-axial compaction and fracture experiments under constant displacement on sandstone and granite samples using spatially located acoustic emission events and their focal mechanisms. We present strong evidence that triggering of such events by other acoustic emission events plays an important role in the presence of large heterogeneities while such triggering is basically absent if no significant heterogeneities are present. In the former case, we recover all established empirical laws of seismicity including the Gutenberg-Richter law, a modified version of the Omori-Utsu law and the productivity law. For the Gutenberg-Richter law, we find that the b-value is smaller for triggered events compared to background events. Moreover, we show that triggered acoustic emission events have a focal mechanism much more similar to their associated trigger than expected by random chance.

  4. Large-Scale Cooperative Dissemination of Governmental Information in Emergency — An Experiment and Future Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiba, Katsuhiro; Okawa, Keiko; Murai, Jun

    On the 11th of March, 2011, a massive earthquake hit the northeast region of Japan. The government of Japan needed to publish information regarding the earthquake and its influences. However, their capacity of Web services overflowed. They called the industry and academia for help for providing stable information service to the people. Industry and academia formed a team to answer the call and named themselves the “EQ project”. This paper describes how the EQ Project was organized and operated, and gives analyses of the statistics. An academic organization took the lead in the EQ Project. Ten organizations which consisted of commercial IT industry and academics specialized in Internet technology, were participating in the EQ Project and they structured the three clusters based on their relationships and technological approach. In WIDE Cluster, one of three clusters in the structure of EQ, the peak number of file accesses per day was over 90 thousand, the mobile browsers was 3.4% and foreign languages (translated contents) were referred 35%. We have also discussed the future information distribution strategies in emergency situation based on the experiences of the EQ Project, and proposed nine suggestions to the MEXT as a future strategy.

  5. Growth and survival of tree seedlings in a large-scale rainfall manipulation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, N.R.; Holmgren, M.; Huston, M.

    1995-06-01

    Seedlings of three species with different tolerance to shade and drought, Acer saccharum, Liriodendron tulipifera, and Quercus alba, were planted on the hillslope site of the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment during the winter of 1993-1994, and their growth measured during the following growing season. Volumetric soil moisture in the upper 35cm of soil was measured twice monthly, and relative light availability above each seedling was measured in August. The most shade tolerant species, sugar maple, leafed out earlier and by the beginning of April had produced 80% of its total leaf area, compared with only 16% for tulip poplar and 39% for white oak. Leaf area and stem growth of sugar maple were positively correlated with soil moisture, but not with light, while stem growth of tulip poplar and white oak were positively correlated with light, but not with soil moisture. Tulip poplar had the highest mortality (15%) followed by sugar maple (3%). Mortality was higher in dry locations, but was not related to growth during the season.

  6. Large-scale analysis and forecast experiments with wind data from the Seasat A scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Atlas, R.; Kalnay, E.; Halem, M.; Woiceshyn, P. M.; Peteherych, S.; Edelmann, D.

    1984-01-01

    A series of data assimilation experiments is performed to assess the impact of Seasat A satellite scatterometer (SASS) wind data on Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) model forecasts. The SASS data are dealiased as part of an objective analysis system utilizing a three-pass procedure. The impact of the SASS data is evaluated with and without temperature soundings from the NOAA 4 Vertical Temperature Profile Radiometer (VTPR) instrument in order to study possible redundancy between surface wind data and upper air temperature data. In the northern hemisphere the SASS data are generally found to have a negligible effect on the forecasts. In the southern hemisphere the forecast impact from SASS data is somewhat larger and primarily beneficial in the absence of VTPR data. However, the inclusion of VTPR data effectively eliminates the positive impact over Australia and South America. This indicates that SASS data can be beneficial for numerical weather prediction in regions with large data gaps, but in the presence of satellite soundings the usefulness of SASS data is significantly reduced.

  7. Imaginary time propagation code for large-scale two-dimensional eigenvalue problems in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukko, P. J. J.; Räsänen, E.

    2013-03-01

    We present a code for solving the single-particle, time-independent Schrödinger equation in two dimensions. Our program utilizes the imaginary time propagation (ITP) algorithm, and it includes the most recent developments in the ITP method: the arbitrary order operator factorization and the exact inclusion of a (possibly very strong) magnetic field. Our program is able to solve thousands of eigenstates of a two-dimensional quantum system in reasonable time with commonly available hardware. The main motivation behind our work is to allow the study of highly excited states and energy spectra of two-dimensional quantum dots and billiard systems with a single versatile code, e.g., in quantum chaos research. In our implementation we emphasize a modern and easily extensible design, simple and user-friendly interfaces, and an open-source development philosophy. Catalogue identifier: AENR_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11310 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 97720 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ and Python. Computer: Tested on x86 and x86-64 architectures. Operating system: Tested under Linux with the g++ compiler. Any POSIX-compliant OS with a C++ compiler and the required external routines should suffice. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes, with OpenMP. RAM: 1 MB or more, depending on system size. Classification: 7.3. External routines: FFTW3 (http://www.fftw.org), CBLAS (http://netlib.org/blas), LAPACK (http://www.netlib.org/lapack), HDF5 (http://www.hdfgroup.org/HDF5), OpenMP (http://openmp.org), TCLAP (http://tclap.sourceforge.net), Python (http://python.org), Google Test (http://code.google.com/p/googletest/) Nature of problem: Numerical calculation

  8. Cyclicity in slug-driven basaltic eruptions: insights from large-scale analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, Ed; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Lane, Steve; Capponi, Antonio; Mathias, Simon; Taddeucci, Jacopo

    2013-04-01

    Basaltic eruptions commonly exhibit cyclical or pulsatory behaviour. Strombolian eruptions are typically discrete and rhythmic, with return interval of minutes-to-hours; lava fountains may fluctuate over similar, or shorter, timescales. In both cases the cyclicity results from the separation of gas from the magma, and its localization into discrete gas slugs or gas-rich packets. We report analogue experiments which model the fluid dynamics of slug-driven basaltic eruptions. Experiments were conducted in liquid-filled vertical pipes at a range of scales, from 0.02 to 0.2 m in diameter, and 2 to 13 m in height, allowing us to investigate Reynolds numbers 10-3 < Re < 105, encompassing the natural range for volcanoes. The dynamics of both discrete gas slugs (Taylor bubbles) and continuous sluggy flow were quantified. A significant novelty of this study is that we explore the role played by the boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the conduit, which may be either closed (zero flux) or held at constant pressure. This setup allows us to mimic plugged or open vent, and the influence of a magma chamber. Our study combines the direct observation of in-conduit fluid dynamic processes with measured pressure variations inside the conduit. Our results demonstrate that, when discrete gas slugs are injected, plugging the vent has a strong influence on the development of overpressure in the system, and on the potential for the system to manifest cyclic behaviour. When gas is injected continuously, with constant pressure boundaries at the top and bottom of the conduit, the system spontaneously self-organizes into rhythmic sluggy flow when the injection rate exceeds a critical value. In both cases we find that the capacity of the system to sustain well-formed, discrete slugs depends strongly on the Reynolds number of the flow. Well-formed Taylor bubbles - which have a smooth hemispherical cap, occupy the width of the conduit, and ascend relatively slowly - only form when the

  9. Analysis of large-scale tablet coating: Modeling, simulation and experiments.

    PubMed

    Boehling, P; Toschkoff, G; Knop, K; Kleinebudde, P; Just, S; Funke, A; Rehbaum, H; Khinast, J G

    2016-07-30

    This work concerns a tablet coating process in an industrial-scale drum coater. We set up a full-scale Design of Simulation Experiment (DoSE) using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) to investigate the influence of various process parameters (the spray rate, the number of nozzles, the rotation rate and the drum load) on the coefficient of inter-tablet coating variation (cv,inter). The coater was filled with up to 290kg of material, which is equivalent to 1,028,369 tablets. To mimic the tablet shape, the glued sphere approach was followed, and each modeled tablet consisted of eight spheres. We simulated the process via the eXtended Particle System (XPS), proving that it is possible to accurately simulate the tablet coating process on the industrial scale. The process time required to reach a uniform tablet coating was extrapolated based on the simulated data and was in good agreement with experimental results. The results are provided at various levels of details, from thorough investigation of the influence that the process parameters have on the cv,inter and the amount of tablets that visit the spray zone during the simulated 90s to the velocity in the spray zone and the spray and bed cycle time. It was found that increasing the number of nozzles and decreasing the spray rate had the highest influence on the cv,inter. Although increasing the drum load and the rotation rate increased the tablet velocity, it did not have a relevant influence on the cv,inter and the process time.

  10. A large-scale field assessment of carbon stocks in human-modified tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Erika; Ferreira, Joice; Gardner, Toby Alan; Aragão, Luiz Eduardo Oliveira Cruz; De Camargo, Plínio Barbosa; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo; Durigan, Mariana; Cosme De Oliveira Junior, Raimundo; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães; Barlow, Jos

    2014-12-01

    Tropical rainforests store enormous amounts of carbon, the protection of which represents a vital component of efforts to mitigate global climate change. Currently, tropical forest conservation, science, policies, and climate mitigation actions focus predominantly on reducing carbon emissions from deforestation alone. However, every year vast areas of the humid tropics are disturbed by selective logging, understory fires, and habitat fragmentation. There is an urgent need to understand the effect of such disturbances on carbon stocks, and how stocks in disturbed forests compare to those found in undisturbed primary forests as well as in regenerating secondary forests. Here, we present the results of the largest field study to date on the impacts of human disturbances on above and belowground carbon stocks in tropical forests. Live vegetation, the largest carbon pool, was extremely sensitive to disturbance: forests that experienced both selective logging and understory fires stored, on average, 40% less aboveground carbon than undisturbed forests and were structurally similar to secondary forests. Edge effects also played an important role in explaining variability in aboveground carbon stocks of disturbed forests. Results indicate a potential rapid recovery of the dead wood and litter carbon pools, while soil stocks (0-30 cm) appeared to be resistant to the effects of logging and fire. Carbon loss and subsequent emissions due to human disturbances remain largely unaccounted for in greenhouse gas inventories, but by comparing our estimates of depleted carbon stocks in disturbed forests with Brazilian government assessments of the total forest area annually disturbed in the Amazon, we show that these emissions could represent up to 40% of the carbon loss from deforestation in the region. We conclude that conservation programs aiming to ensure the long-term permanence of forest carbon stocks, such as REDD+, will remain limited in their success unless they effectively

  11. An experiment to assess the cost-benefits of code inspections in large scale software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, A.; Siy, H.; Toman, C. A.; Votta, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    This experiment (currently in progress) is designed to measure costs and benefits of different code inspection methods. It is being performed with a real development team writing software for a commercial product. The dependent variables for each code unit's inspection are the elapsed time and the number of defects detected. We manipulate the method of inspection by randomly assigning reviewers, varying the number of reviewers and the number of teams, and, when using more than one team, randomly assigning author repair and non-repair of detected defects between code inspections. After collecting and analyzing the first 17 percent of the data, we have discovered several interesting facts about reviewers, about the defects recorded during reviewer preparation and during the inspection collection meeting, and about the repairs that are eventually made. (1) Only 17 percent of the defects that reviewers record in their preparations are true defects that are later repaired. (2) Defects recorded at the inspection meetings fall into three categories: 18 percent false positives requiring no author repair, 57 percent soft maintenance where the author makes changes only for readability or code standard enforcement, and 25 percent true defects requiring repair. (3) The median elapsed calendar time for code inspections is 10 working days - 8 working days before the collection meeting and 2 after. (4) In the collection meetings, 31 percent of the defects discovered by reviewers during preparation are suppressed. (5) Finally, 33 percent of the true defects recorded are discovered at the collection meetings and not during any reviewer's preparation. The results to date suggest that inspections with two sessions (two different teams) of two reviewers per session (2sX2p) are the most effective. These two-session inspections may be performed with author repair or with no author repair between the two sessions. We are finding that the two-session, two-person with repair (2sX2p

  12. Computational techniques for elucidating plant-pathogen interactions from large-scale experiments on fungi and oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol

    2009-11-01

    Eukaryotic plant pathogens are responsible for the destruction of billions of dollars worth of crops each year. With large-scale genomics of both pathogens and hosts and the corresponding computational analysis, biologists are now able to gain knowledge about many pathogenic and defense genes concurrently. To study the interactions between these two organism groups, it is necessary to design experiments to elucidate the genes being expressed during the invasion of the pathogen into the host. For the most part, this does not require new software development, though it does require the use of existing software in novel ways. This article provides a broad overview of several key and illustrative experiments and the corresponding computational analyses, outlining the knowledge gained in each. It goes on to describe databases for plant-pathogen data and important initiatives such as Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology. It discusses how various emerging approaches will increase the power of computers in host-pathogen interaction studies.

  13. Large-scale, near-field magnetic fields from external sources and the corresponding induced internal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Data from Magsat analyzed as a function of the Dst index to determine the first degree/order spherical harmonic description of the near-earth external field and its corresponding induced field. The analysis was done separately for data from dawn and dusk. The Magsat data was compared with POGO data. A local time variation of the external field persists even during very quiet magnetic conditions; both a diurnal and 8-hour period are present. A crude estimate of Sq current in the 45 deg geomagnetic latitude range is obtained for 1966 to 1970. The current strength, located in the ionosphere and induced in the earth, is typical of earlier determinations from surface data, although its maximum is displaced in local time from previous results.

  14. The role of coarse woody debris in southeastern pine forests; preliminary results from a large-scale experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    McCay Timothy, S.; Hanula, James, L.; Loeb, Susan, C.; Lohr, Steven, M.; McMinn, James, W.; Wright-Miley. Bret, D.

    2002-08-01

    McCay, Timothy S., James L. Hanula, Susan C. Loeb, Steven M. Lohr, James W. McMinn, and Bret D. Wright-Miley. 2002. The role of coarse woody debris in southeastern pine forests; preliminary results from a large-scale experiment. 135-144. In: Proceedings of the symposium on the ecology and management of dead wood in western forests. 1999 November 2-4; Reno, NV. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture 949 p. ABSTRACT: We initiated a long-term experiment involving manipulation of coarse woody debris (CWD) at the Savannah River National Environmental Research Park in the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Each of four 9.3-ha plots in each of four blocks was subject to one of the following treatments: removal of all snags and fallen logs, removal of fallen logs only, felling and girdling to simulate a catastrophic pulse of CWD, and control. Removal treatments were applied in 1996, and the felling or snag-creation treatment will be applied in 2000-2001. Monitoring of invertebrate, herptile, avian, and mammalian assemblages and CWD dynamics began immediately after CWD removal and continues through the present. Removal treatments resulted in a fivefold to tenfold reduction in CWD abundance. To date, significant differences among treatments have only been detected for a few animal taxa. However, preliminary results underscore the benefits of large-scale experiments. This experiment allowed unambiguous tests of hypotheses regarding the effect of CWD abundance on fauna. Coupled with studies of habitat use and trophic interactions, the experimental approach may result in stronger inferences regarding the function of CWD than results obtained through natural history observation or uncontrolled correlative studies.

  15. Radial transport of large-scale magnetic fields in accretion disks. I. Steady solutions and an upper limit on the vertical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Muto, Takayuki

    2014-04-20

    Large-scale magnetic fields are key ingredients of magnetically driven disk accretion. We study how large-scale poloidal fields evolve in accretion disks, with the primary aim of quantifying the viability of magnetic accretion mechanisms in protoplanetary disks. We employ a kinematic mean-field model for poloidal field transport and focus on steady states where inward advection of a field balances with outward diffusion due to effective resistivities. We analytically derive the steady-state radial distribution of poloidal fields in highly conducting accretion disks. The analytic solution reveals an upper limit on the strength of large-scale vertical fields attainable in steady states. Any excess poloidal field will diffuse away within a finite time, and we demonstrate this with time-dependent numerical calculations of the mean-field equations. We apply this upper limit to large-scale vertical fields threading protoplanetary disks. We find that the maximum attainable strength is about 0.1 G at 1 AU, and about 1 mG at 10 AU from the central star. When combined with recent magnetic accretion models, the maximum field strength translates into the maximum steady-state accretion rate of ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, in agreement with observations. We also find that the maximum field strength is ∼1 kG at the surface of the central star provided that the disk extends down to the stellar surface. This implies that any excess stellar poloidal field of strength ≳ kG can be transported to the surrounding disk. This might in part resolve the magnetic flux problem in star formation.

  16. Hydroelastic Response of Surface-Effect Ship Bow Seals: Large-Scale Experiments and Post-Buckling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Andrew D.

    Bow seals are critical components on advanced marine vehicles that rely on aerostatic support to reduce drag. They consist of a series of open-ended fabric cylinders ("fingers") that contact the free surface and, when inflated, form a compliant pressure barrier. Bow seals are unique in that, unlike a majority of structures in civil and mechanical engineering, bow seals operate in a buckled state. The response characteristics of these structures are of practical interest due to unacceptable wear rates on seal components and difficulties in predicting seal performance. Despite this, the hydroelastic response of the seal system, particularly basic information on seal vibration modes and the mechanisms responsible for seal wear, remains largely unknown. Similarly, estimates of the hydrodynamic loads on the seal system are inaccurate and based on heuristic scaling of data from small-scale experiments, where similitude is challenging to maintain. Thus, a large-scale test system is necessary to obtain accurate estimates of bow seal response. The work is comprised of three parts. Part one presents detailed observations of bow seal response acquired using a large-scale test platform developed as part of the present study. These high-resolution observations, the first of their kind, show bow seal response to be characterized by complex post-buckling behavior. Part two proposes an analytical framework for interpreting the wide range of behavior observed at large scale. Using this framework, key parameters driving seal conformation and stability are identified. It is found that, due to their buckled state, bow seals are highly susceptible to a mode switching instability, which may be a potential mechanism responsible for the damaging vibrations. In part three, a benchtop experiment is used to demonstrate that the scalings identified in this study hold across a wide range of bending rigidities. This work has implications for improving drag and wear characteristics in future bow

  17. Workplan for Catalyzing Collaboration with Amazonian Universities in the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. Foster; Moreira, Adriana

    1997-01-01

    Success of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmospheric Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) program depends on several critical factors, the most important being the effective participation of Amazonian researchers and institutions. Without host-county counterparts, particularly in Amazonia, many important studies cannot he undertaken due either to lack of qualified persons or to legal constraints. No less important, the acceptance of the LBA program in Amazonia is also dependent on what LBA can do for improving the scientific expertise in Amazonia. Gaining the active investment of Amazonian scientists in a comprehensive research program is not a trivial task. Potential collaborators are few, particularly where much of the research was to be originally focused - the southern arc of Brazilian Amazonia. The mid-term goals of the LBA Committee on Training and Education are to increase the number of collaborators and to demonstrate that LBA will be of benefit to the region.

  18. Beginning of the new solar cycle (cycle 24) in the large-scale open solar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2008-06-01

    It is proposed to determined minimums of the 11-year solar cycles based on a minimal flux of the large-scale open solar magnetic field. The minimal fluxes before the finished cycle 23 (Carrington rotation CR 1904) and the started cycle 24 (CR 2054, April 2007) were equal to 1.8 × 1022 and 1.2 × 1022 μs, respectively. The long-term tendency toward an approach to a deep minimum of solar activity is confirmed. On the assumption that magnetic flux variations from minimums to maximums are proportional to each other, the anticipated value of the maximal Wolf number during cycle 24 is estimated as W max = 80.

  19. Effects of landscape transformation on bird colonization and extinction patterns in a large-scale, long-term natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Mortelliti, Alessio; Lindenmayer, David B

    2015-10-01

    Conversion of agricultural land to forest plantations is a major driver of global change. Studies on the impact of forest plantations on biodiversity in plantations and in the surrounding native vegetation have been inconclusive. Consequently, it is not known how to best manage the extensive areas of the planet currently covered by plantations. We used a novel, long-term (16 years) and large-scale (30,000 ha) landscape transformation natural experiment (the Nanangroe experiment, Australia) to test the effects of land conversion on population dynamics of 64 bird species associated with woodland and forest. A unique aspect of our study is that we focused on the effects of plantations on birds in habitat patches within plantations. Our study design included 56 treatment sites (Eucalyptus patches where the surrounding matrix was converted from grazed land to pine plantations), 55 control sites (Eucalyptus patches surrounded by grazed land), and 20 matrix sites (sites within the pine plantations and grazed land). Bird populations were studied through point counts, and colonization and extinction patterns were inferred through multiple season occupancy models. Large-scale pine plantation establishment affected the colonization or extinction patterns of 89% of studied species and thus led to a comprehensive turnover in bird communities inhabiting Eucalyptus patches embedded within the maturing plantations. Smaller bodied species appeared to respond positively to plantations (i.e., colonization increased and extirpation of these species decreased in patches surrounded by plantations) because they were able to use the newly created surrounding matrix. We found that the effects of forest plantations affected the majority of the bird community, and we believe these effects could lead to the artificial selection of one group of species at the expense of another.

  20. A unique large-scale undergraduate research experience in molecular systems biology for non-mathematics majors.

    PubMed

    Kappler, Ulrike; Rowland, Susan L; Pedwell, Rhianna K

    2016-12-28

    Systems biology is frequently taught with an emphasis on mathematical modeling approaches. This focus effectively excludes most biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology students, who are not mathematics majors. The mathematical focus can also present a misleading picture of systems biology, which is a multi-disciplinary pursuit requiring collaboration between biochemists, bioinformaticians, and mathematicians. This article describes an authentic large-scale undergraduate research experience (ALURE) in systems biology that incorporates proteomics, bacterial genomics, and bioinformatics in the one exercise. This project is designed to engage students who have a basic grounding in protein chemistry and metabolism and no mathematical modeling skills. The pedagogy around the research experience is designed to help students attack complex datasets and use their emergent metabolic knowledge to make meaning from large amounts of raw data. On completing the ALURE, participants reported a significant increase in their confidence around analyzing large datasets, while the majority of the cohort reported good or great gains in a variety of skills including "analysing data for patterns" and "conducting database or internet searches." An environmental scan shows that this ALURE is the only undergraduate-level system-biology research project offered on a large-scale in Australia; this speaks to the perceived difficulty of implementing such an opportunity for students. We argue however, that based on the student feedback, allowing undergraduate students to complete a systems-biology project is both feasible and desirable, even if the students are not maths and computing majors. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2016.

  1. Motions of charged particles in the magnetosphere under the influence of a time-varying large scale convection electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1979-01-01

    The motions of charged particles under the influence of the geomagnetic and electric fields are quite complex in the region of the inner magnetosphere. The Volland-Stern type large-scale convection electric field with gamma = 2 has been used successfully to predict both the plasmapause location and particle enhancements determined from Explorer 45 (S3-A) measurements. Recently introduced into the trajectory calculations of Ejiri et al. (1978) is a time dependence in this electric field based on the variation in Kp for actual magnetic storm conditions. The particle trajectories are computed as they change in this time-varying electric field. Several storm fronts of particles of different magnetic moments are allowed to be injected into the inner magnetosphere from L = 10 in the equatorial plane. The motions of these fronts are presented in a movie format. The local time of injection, the particle magnetic moments and the subsequent temporal history of the magnetospheric electric field play important roles in determining whether the injected particles are trapped within the ring current region or whether they are convected to regions outside the inner magnetosphere.

  2. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.; Klein, L. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU were used to investigate the large scale structure of the IMF in a period of increasing solar activity. The Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from the Parker axial model. These deviations are attributed both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations were found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. Both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of transverse fluctuations in the averaged field strength (B) which are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind, although and necessarily implying the presence of them. Fluctuations in the strength of B (relative to mean field strength) were found to be small in amplitude, with a RMS which is approximately one third of that for the transverse fluctuations and they are essentially independent of distance from the Sun.

  3. A Technique for Incorporating Large-scale Magnetic Fields Within Stellar Models: Implications for the Variability of the Solar Radius, Luminosity, and Pulsation Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydon, T. J.; Sofia, S.

    1994-12-01

    A set of physically consistent approximations are employed to include the effects of magnetic fields within the equations of stellar structure. A series of solar models are then constructed with large-scale (~0.1R_sun), intense (~10(6) gauss) magnetic fields. The results of such models are then compared to measurements of changes in the solar radius (from the Solar Disk Sextant Experiment) and changes in the solar p-mode frequencies in order to determine if such fields are associated with the solar cycle. This work was supported in part by an appointment to the Global Change Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health and Enviromental Research, and administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

  4. The role of the large-scale coronal magnetic field in the eruption of prominence/cavity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Toma, G.; Gibson, S. E.; Fan, Y.; Torok, T.

    2013-12-01

    Prominence/cavity systems are large-scale coronal structures that can live for many weeks and even months and often end their life in the form of large coronal eruptions. We investigate the role of the surrounding ambient coronal field in stabilizing these systems against eruption. In particular, we examine the extent to which the decline with height of the external coronal magnetic field influences the evolution of these coronal systems and their likelihood to erupt. We study prominence/cavity systems during the rising phase of cycle 24 in 2010-2013, when a significant number of CMEs were associated with polar crown or large filament eruptions. We use EUV observations from SDO/AIA to identify stable and eruptive coronal cavities, and SDO/HMI magnetograms as boundary conditions to PFSS extrapolation to derive the ambient coronal field. We compute the decay index of the potential field for the two groups and find that systematic differences exist between eruptive and non-eruptive systems.

  5. The Recent Rejuvenation of the Sun's Large-scale Magnetic Field: A Clue for Understanding Past and Future Sunspot Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Wang, Y.-M.

    2015-08-01

    The quiet nature of sunspot cycle 24 was disrupted during the second half of 2014 when the Sun’s large-scale field underwent a sudden rejuvenation: the solar mean field reached its highest value since 1991, the interplanetary field strength doubled, and galactic cosmic rays showed their strongest 27-day modulation since neutron-monitor observations began in 1957; in the outer corona, the large increase of field strength was reflected by unprecedentedly large numbers of coronal loops collapsing inward along the heliospheric current sheet. Here, we show that this rejuvenation was not caused by a significant increase in the level of solar activity as measured by the smoothed sunspot number and CME rate, but instead was caused by the systematic emergence of flux in active regions whose longitudinal distribution greatly increased the Sun’s dipole moment. A similar post-maximum increase in the dipole moment occurred during each of the previous three sunspot cycles, and marked the start of the declining phase of each cycle. We note that the north-south component of this peak dipole moment provides an early indicator of the amplitude of the next cycle, and conclude that the amplitude of cycle 25 may be comparable to that of cycle 24, and well above the amplitudes obtained during the Maunder Minimum.

  6. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  7. Large-scale laboratory testing of bedload-monitoring technologies: overview of the StreamLab06 Experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marr, Jeffrey D.G.; Gray, John R.; Davis, Broderick E.; Ellis, Chris; Johnson, Sara; Gray, John R.; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-month-long, large-scale flume experiment involving research and testing of selected conventional and surrogate bedload-monitoring technologies was conducted in the Main Channel at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory under the auspices of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics. These experiments, dubbed StreamLab06, involved 25 researchers and volunteers from academia, government, and the private sector. The research channel was equipped with a sediment-recirculation system and a sediment-flux monitoring system that allowed continuous measurement of sediment flux in the flume and provided a data set by which samplers were evaluated. Selected bedload-measurement technologies were tested under a range of flow and sediment-transport conditions. The experiment was conducted in two phases. The bed material in phase I was well-sorted siliceous sand (0.6-1.8 mm median diameter). A gravel mixture (1-32 mm median diameter) composed the bed material in phase II. Four conventional bedload samplers – a standard Helley-Smith, Elwha, BLH-84, and Toutle River II (TR-2) sampler – were manually deployed as part of both experiment phases. Bedload traps were deployed in study Phase II. Two surrogate bedload samplers – stationarymounted down-looking 600 kHz and 1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers – were deployed in experiment phase II. This paper presents an overview of the experiment including the specific data-collection technologies used and the ambient hydraulic, sediment-transport and environmental conditions measured as part of the experiment. All data collected as part of the StreamLab06 experiments are, or will be available to the research community.

  8. Using historical woodland creation to construct a long-term, large-scale natural experiment: the WrEN project.

    PubMed

    Watts, Kevin; Fuentes-Montemayor, Elisa; Macgregor, Nicholas A; Peredo-Alvarez, Victor; Ferryman, Mark; Bellamy, Chloe; Brown, Nigel; Park, Kirsty J

    2016-05-01

    Natural experiments have been proposed as a way of complementing manipulative experiments to improve ecological understanding and guide management. There is a pressing need for evidence from such studies to inform a shift to landscape-scale conservation, including the design of ecological networks. Although this shift has been widely embraced by conservation communities worldwide, the empirical evidence is limited and equivocal, and may be limiting effective conservation. We present principles for well-designed natural experiments to inform landscape-scale conservation and outline how they are being applied in the WrEN project, which is studying the effects of 160 years of woodland creation on biodiversity in UK landscapes. We describe the study areas and outline the systematic process used to select suitable historical woodland creation sites based on key site- and landscape-scale variables - including size, age, and proximity to other woodland. We present the results of an analysis to explore variation in these variables across sites to test their suitability as a basis for a natural experiment. Our results confirm that this landscape satisfies the principles we have identified and provides an ideal study system for a long-term, large-scale natural experiment to explore how woodland biodiversity is affected by different site and landscape attributes. The WrEN sites are now being surveyed for a wide selection of species that are likely to respond differently to site- and landscape-scale attributes and at different spatial and temporal scales. The results from WrEN will help develop detailed recommendations to guide landscape-scale conservation, including the design of ecological networks. We also believe that the approach presented demonstrates the wider utility of well-designed natural experiments to improve our understanding of ecological systems and inform policy and practice.

  9. A computationally efficient scheme for the inversion of large scale potential field data: Application to synthetic and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Meng, Xiaohong; Li, Fang

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional (3D) inversion of potential field data from large scale surveys attempts to recover density or magnetic susceptibility distribution in the subspace for geological interpretation. It is computationally challenging and is not feasible on desktop computers. We propose an integrated scheme to address this problem. We adopt adaptive sampling to compress the dataset, and the cross curve of the data compression ratio and correlation coefficient between the initial and sampled data is used to choose the damping factor for adaptive sampling. Then, the conventional inversion algorithm in model space is transformed to data space, using the identity relationship between different matrices, which greatly reduces the memory requirement. Finally, parallel computation is employed to accelerate calculation of the kernel function. We use the conjugate gradient method to minimize the objective function and a damping factor is introduced to stabilize the iterative process. A wide variety of constraint options are also considered, such as depth weighing, sparseness, and boundary limits. We design a synthetic magnetic model with three prismatic susceptibility causative bodies to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. Tests on synthetic data show that the proposed scheme provides significant reduction in memory and time consumption, and the inversion result is reliable. These advantages hold true for practical field magnetic data from the Hawsons mining area in Australia, verifying the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  10. Experiment on large scale plume interaction with a stratified gas environment resembling the thermal activity of a autocatalytic recombiner

    SciTech Connect

    Mignot, G.; Kapulla, R.; Paladino, D.; Zboray, R.

    2012-07-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics codes (CFD) are increasingly being used to simulate containment conditions after various transient accident scenarios. Consequently, the reliability of such codes must be tested against experimental data. Such validation experiments related to gas mixing and hydrogen transport within containment compartments addressing the effect of heat source are presented in this paper. The experiments were conducted in the large-scale thermal-hydraulics PANDA facility located at the Paul-Scherrer-Inst. (PSI) in Switzerland, in the frame of the OECD/SETH-2 project. A 10 kW electric heater simulating the thermal activity of the autocatalytic recombiner was activated at full power in a containment vessel at the top of which a thick helium layer is initially present. The hot plume interacts with the bottom of the helium layer which is slowly eroded until complete break up at 1350 s. After final erosion of the layer a strong temperature and concentration gradient is maintained in the vessel below the heater inlet as well as in the adjacent vessel below the interconnecting pipe. A detailed characterization of the operating heater suggests the presence of cold gas ingress at the outlet that affects the flow in the chimney. This can be of concern if present in a real PAR unit. (authors)

  11. Testing of the NASA Hypersonics Project Combined Cycle Engine Large Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE LlMX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J. D.; Stueber, T. J.; Thomas, S. R.; Suder, K. L.; Weir, L. J.; Sanders, B. W.

    2012-01-01

    Status on an effort to develop Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion is described. This propulsion technology can enable reliable and reusable space launch systems. TBCC propulsion offers improved performance and safety over rocket propulsion. The potential to realize aircraft-like operations and reduced maintenance are additional benefits. Among most the critical TBCC enabling technologies are: 1) mode transition from turbine to scramjet propulsion, 2) high Mach turbine engines and 3) TBCC integration. To address these TBCC challenges, the effort is centered on a propulsion mode transition experiment and includes analytical research. The test program, the Combined-Cycle Engine Large Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE LIMX), was conceived to integrate TBCC propulsion with proposed hypersonic vehicles. The goals address: (1) dual inlet operability and performance, (2) mode-transition sequences enabling a switch between turbine and scramjet flow paths, and (3) turbine engine transients during transition. Four test phases are planned from which a database can be used to both validate design and analysis codes and characterize operability and integration issues for TBCC propulsion. In this paper we discuss the research objectives, features of the CCE hardware and test plans, and status of the parametric inlet characterization testing which began in 2011. This effort is sponsored by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Hypersonics project

  12. Auxilliary Method Or Sophisticated Field Method? - Thoughts On The Use of Large Scale Magnetometer Surveying In Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, M.

    The contribution presents large scale magnetometer surveys at early neolithic sites (Linearbandkeramik, 5500-4900 B.C.) in Germany. They serve to supply a prospect for future use of magnetometer survey in archaeological research. It is claimed that it ought to be a major goal to make geophysical survey and magnetometer survey espe- cially an independent field method in archaeology becoming used with the same ob- viousness as excavation or fieldwalking etc. Geophysical surveying, especially mag- netometer survey, is used in archaeology for planning excavations of sites in detail with the aim to save time and costs. Furthermore some sites are investigated by geo- physical methods for research reasons when it is impossible or not necessary to exca- vate them. Though geophysics did precious aid for archaeology in many cases it still lacks acknowledgement, which is necessary to develop its complete potentiality as an archaeological field method. One of the basic reasons for this situation is the evalua- tion geophysics` results suffer from traditional archaeology. Occasionaly geophysics and excavations produce seemingly inconsistent results. Such contradictions then are assigned to the lack of reliability of geophsical survey techniques. Wrongly, as this paper is to show. The seeming contradiction of the results can be explained by a mis- understanding of the possibilities and restrictions of geophysics. Both fieldmethods - excavation and survey - bear their very own fundamentals and allow a restricted set of statements. Therefore a comparison of both methods needs to consider the differ- ences of both methods in detail. The contribution is pictured with the survey maps of neolithic longhouses, which have been detected in several recent projects in the western center of Germany. The maps of these houses produced by magnetometer survey show many of the fine structures the archaeologist is used to know from the excavation of respective sites. For the first time postholes

  13. Shifts in plant respiration and carbon use efficiency at a large-scale drought experiment in the eastern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, D B; Meir, P; Aragão, L E O C; Lobo-do-Vale, R; Galbraith, D; Fisher, R A; Chaves, M M; Maroco, J P; da Costa, A C L; de Almeida, S S; Braga, A P; Gonçalves, P H L; de Athaydes, J; da Costa, M; Portela, T T B; de Oliveira, A A R; Malhi, Y; Williams, M

    2010-08-01

    *The effects of drought on the Amazon rainforest are potentially large but remain poorly understood. Here, carbon (C) cycling after 5 yr of a large-scale through-fall exclusion (TFE) experiment excluding about 50% of incident rainfall from an eastern Amazon rainforest was compared with a nearby control plot. *Principal C stocks and fluxes were intensively measured in 2005. Additional minor components were either quantified in later site measurements or derived from the available literature. *Total ecosystem respiration (R(eco)) and total plant C expenditure (PCE, the sum of net primary productivity (NPP) and autotrophic respiration (R(auto))), were elevated on the TFE plot relative to the control. The increase in PCE and R(eco) was mainly caused by a rise in R(auto) from foliage and roots. Heterotrophic respiration did not differ substantially between plots. NPP was 2.4 +/- 1.4 t C ha(-1) yr(-1) lower on the TFE than the control. Ecosystem carbon use efficiency, the proportion of PCE invested in NPP, was lower in the TFE plot (0.24 +/- 0.04) than in the control (0.32 +/- 0.04). *Drought caused by the TFE treatment appeared to drive fundamental shifts in ecosystem C cycling with potentially important consequences for long-term forest C storage.

  14. The Feasibility of Using Large-Scale Text Mining to Detect Adverse Childhood Experiences in a VA-Treated Population.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Kenric W; Ben-Ari, Alon Y; Laundry, Ryan J; Boyko, Edward J; Samore, Matthew H

    2015-12-01

    Free text in electronic health records resists large-scale analysis. Text records facts of interest not found in encoded data, and text mining enables their retrieval and quantification. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) clinical data repository affords an opportunity to apply text-mining methodology to study clinical questions in large populations. To assess the feasibility of text mining, investigation of the relationship between exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and recorded diagnoses was conducted among all VA-treated Gulf war veterans, utilizing all progress notes recorded from 2000-2011. Text processing extracted ACE exposures recorded among 44.7 million clinical notes belonging to 243,973 veterans. The relationship of ACE exposure to adult illnesses was analyzed using logistic regression. Bias considerations were assessed. ACE score was strongly associated with suicide attempts and serious mental disorders (ORs = 1.84 to 1.97), and less so with behaviorally mediated and somatic conditions (ORs = 1.02 to 1.36) per unit. Bias adjustments did not remove persistent associations between ACE score and most illnesses. Text mining to detect ACE exposure in a large population was feasible. Analysis of the relationship between ACE score and adult health conditions yielded patterns of association consistent with prior research.

  15. Mean Field Analysis of Large-Scale Interacting Populations of Stochastic Conductance-Based Spiking Neurons Using the Klimontovich Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfo, Daniel; Rodriguez, Roger; Tuckwell, Henry C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of large-scale interacting neural populations, composed of conductance based, spiking model neurons with modifiable synaptic connection strengths, which are possibly also subjected to external noisy currents. The network dynamics is controlled by a set of neural population probability distributions (PPD) which are constructed along the same lines as in the Klimontovich approach to the kinetic theory of plasmas. An exact non-closed, nonlinear, system of integro-partial differential equations is derived for the PPDs. As is customary, a closing procedure leads to a mean field limit. The equations we have obtained are of the same type as those which have been recently derived using rigorous techniques of probability theory. The numerical solutions of these so called McKean-Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, which are only valid in the limit of infinite size networks, actually shows that the statistical measures as obtained from PPDs are in good agreement with those obtained through direct integration of the stochastic dynamical system for large but finite size networks. Although numerical solutions have been obtained for networks of Fitzhugh-Nagumo model neurons, which are often used to approximate Hodgkin-Huxley model neurons, the theory can be readily applied to networks of general conductance-based model neurons of arbitrary dimension.

  16. Large-Scale Graphene on Hexagonal-BN Hall Elements: Prediction of Sensor Performance without Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Joo, Min-Kyu; Kim, Joonggyu; Park, Ji-Hoon; Nguyen, Van Luan; Kim, Ki Kang; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    2016-09-27

    A graphene Hall element (GHE) is an optimal system for a magnetic sensor because of its perfect two-dimensional (2-D) structure, high carrier mobility, and widely tunable carrier concentration. Even though several proof-of-concept devices have been proposed, manufacturing them by mechanical exfoliation of 2-D material or electron-beam lithography is of limited feasibility. Here, we demonstrate a high quality GHE array having a graphene on hexagonal-BN (h-BN) heterostructure, fabricated by photolithography and large-area 2-D materials grown by chemical vapor deposition techniques. A superior performance of GHE was achieved with the help of a bottom h-BN layer, and showed a maximum current-normalized sensitivity of 1986 V/AT, a minimum magnetic resolution of 0.5 mG/Hz(0.5) at f = 300 Hz, and an effective dynamic range larger than 74 dB. Furthermore, on the basis of a thorough understanding of the shift of charge neutrality point depending on various parameters, an analytical model that predicts the magnetic sensor operation of a GHE from its transconductance data without magnetic field is proposed, simplifying the evaluation of each GHE design. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this highly performing graphene device using large-scale manufacturing-friendly fabrication methods.

  17. Non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Walsh, Jonathan R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the non-Gaussian contribution to the covariance of the matter power spectrum at one-loop order in standard perturbation theory (SPT), using the framework of the effective field theory (EFT) of large scale structure (LSS). The complete one-loop contributions are evaluated for the first time, including the leading EFT corrections that involve seven independent operators, of which four appear in the power spectrum and bispectrum. We compare the non-Gaussian part of the one-loop covariance computed with both SPT and EFT of LSS to two separate simulations. In one simulation, we find that the one-loop prediction from SPT reproduces the simulation well to ki+kj˜0.25 h /Mpc , while in the other simulation we find a substantial improvement of EFT of LSS (with one free parameter) over SPT, more than doubling the range of k where the theory accurately reproduces the simulation. The disagreement between these two simulations points to unaccounted for systematics, highlighting the need for improved numerical and analytic understanding of the covariance.

  18. Large-Scale Single Particle and Cell Trapping based on Rotating Electric Field Induced-Charge Electroosmosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yupan; Ren, Yukun; Tao, Ye; Hou, Likai; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-12-06

    We propose a simple, inexpensive microfluidic chip for large-scale trapping of single particles and cells based on induced-charge electroosmosis in a rotating electric field (ROT-ICEO). A central floating electrode array, was placed in the center of the gap between four driving electrodes with a quadrature configuration and used to immobilize single particles or cells. Cells were trapped on the electrode array by the interaction between ROT-ICEO flow and buoyancy flow. We experimentally optimized the efficiency of trapping single particles by investigating important parameters like particle or cell density and electric potential. Experimental and numerical results showed good agreement. The operation of the chip was verified by trapping single polystyrene (PS) microspheres with diameters of 5 and 20 μm and single yeast cells. The highest single particle occupancy of 73% was obtained using a floating electrode array with a diameter of 20 μm with an amplitude voltage of 5 V and frequency of 10 kHz for PS microbeads with a 5-μm diameter and density of 800 particles/μL. The ROT-ICEO flow could hold cells against fluid flows with a rate of less than 0.45 μL/min. This novel, simple, robust method to trap single cells has enormous potential in genetic and metabolic engineering.

  19. Mean Field Analysis of Large-Scale Interacting Populations of Stochastic Conductance-Based Spiking Neurons Using the Klimontovich Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfo, Daniel; Rodriguez, Roger; Tuckwell, Henry C.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of large-scale interacting neural populations, composed of conductance based, spiking model neurons with modifiable synaptic connection strengths, which are possibly also subjected to external noisy currents. The network dynamics is controlled by a set of neural population probability distributions (PPD) which are constructed along the same lines as in the Klimontovich approach to the kinetic theory of plasmas. An exact non-closed, nonlinear, system of integro-partial differential equations is derived for the PPDs. As is customary, a closing procedure leads to a mean field limit. The equations we have obtained are of the same type as those which have been recently derived using rigorous techniques of probability theory. The numerical solutions of these so called McKean-Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, which are only valid in the limit of infinite size networks, actually shows that the statistical measures as obtained from PPDs are in good agreement with those obtained through direct integration of the stochastic dynamical system for large but finite size networks. Although numerical solutions have been obtained for networks of Fitzhugh-Nagumo model neurons, which are often used to approximate Hodgkin-Huxley model neurons, the theory can be readily applied to networks of general conductance-based model neurons of arbitrary dimension.

  20. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of DNA: implementation and validation of the AMBER98 force field in LAMMPS.

    PubMed

    Grindon, Christina; Harris, Sarah; Evans, Tom; Novik, Keir; Coveney, Peter; Laughton, Charles

    2004-07-15

    Molecular modelling played a central role in the discovery of the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick. Today, such modelling is done on computers: the more powerful these computers are, the more detailed and extensive can be the study of the dynamics of such biological macromolecules. To fully harness the power of modern massively parallel computers, however, we need to develop and deploy algorithms which can exploit the structure of such hardware. The Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) is a scalable molecular dynamics code including long-range Coulomb interactions, which has been specifically designed to function efficiently on parallel platforms. Here we describe the implementation of the AMBER98 force field in LAMMPS and its validation for molecular dynamics investigations of DNA structure and flexibility against the benchmark of results obtained with the long-established code AMBER6 (Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement, version 6). Extended molecular dynamics simulations on the hydrated DNA dodecamer d(CTTTTGCAAAAG)(2), which has previously been the subject of extensive dynamical analysis using AMBER6, show that it is possible to obtain excellent agreement in terms of static, dynamic and thermodynamic parameters between AMBER6 and LAMMPS. In comparison with AMBER6, LAMMPS shows greatly improved scalability in massively parallel environments, opening up the possibility of efficient simulations of order-of-magnitude larger systems and/or for order-of-magnitude greater simulation times.

  1. Complementing the ground-based CMB-S4 experiment on large scales with the PIXIE satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Alonso, David; Dunkley, Jo

    2017-03-01

    We present forecasts for cosmological parameters from future cosmic microwave background (CMB) data measured by the stage-4 (S4) generation of ground-based experiments in combination with large-scale anisotropy data from the PIXIE satellite. We demonstrate the complementarity of the two experiments and focus on science targets that benefit from their combination. We show that a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization provided by PIXIE, with error σ (τ )=0.002 , is vital for enabling a 5 σ detection of the sum of the neutrino masses when combined with a CMB-S4 lensing measurement and with lower-redshift constraints on the growth of structure and the distance-redshift relation. Parameters characterizing the epoch of reionization will also be tightly constrained; PIXIE's τ constraint converts into σ (zre)=0.2 for the mean time of reionization, and a kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurement from S4 gives σ (Δ zre)=0.03 for the duration of reionization. Both PIXIE and S4 will put strong constraints on primordial tensor fluctuations, vital for testing early-Universe models, and will do so at distinct angular scales. We forecast σ (r )≈5 ×10-4 for a signal with a tensor-to-scalar ratio r =10-3, after accounting for diffuse foreground removal and delensing. The wide and dense frequency coverage of PIXIE results in an expected foreground-degradation factor on r of only ≈25 %. By measuring large and small scales PIXIE and S4 will together better limit the energy injection at recombination from dark matter annihilation, with pann<0.09 ×10-6 m3/s /kg projected at 95% confidence. Cosmological parameters measured from the damping tail with S4 will be best constrained by polarization, which has the advantage of minimal contamination from extragalactic emission.

  2. Pattern of mutation rates in the germline of Drosophila melanogaster males from a large-scale mutation screening experiment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Jun; Pan, Xue-Rong; Hu, Jing; Ma, Li; Wu, Jian-Min; Shao, Ye-Lin; Ai, Shi-Meng; Liu, Shu-Qun; Barton, Sara A; Woodruff, Ronny C; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Fu, Yun-Xin

    2014-06-11

    The sperm or eggs of sexual organisms go through a series of cell divisions from the fertilized egg; mutations can occur at each division. Mutations in the lineage of cells leading to the sperm or eggs are of particular importance because many such mutations may be shared by somatic tissues and also may be inherited, thus having a lasting consequence. For decades, little has been known about the pattern of the mutation rates along the germline development. Recently it was shown from a small portion of data that resulted from a large-scale mutation screening experiment that the rates of recessive lethal or nearly lethal mutations differ dramatically during the germline development of Drosophila melanogaster males. In this paper the full data set from the experiment and its analysis are reported by taking advantage of a recent methodologic advance. By analyzing the mutation patterns with different levels of recessive lethality, earlier published conclusions based on partial data are found to remain valid. Furthermore, it is found that for most nearly lethal mutations, the mutation rate at the first cell division is even greater than previous thought compared with those at other divisions. There is also some evidence that the mutation rate at the second division decreases rapidly but is still appreciably greater than those for the rest of the cleavage stage. The mutation rate at spermatogenesis is greater than late cleavage and stem-cell stages, but there is no evidence that rates are different among the five cell divisions of the spermatogenesis. We also found that a modestly biased sampling, leading to slightly more primordial germ cells after the eighth division than those reported in the literature, provides the best fit to the data. These findings provide conceptual and numerical basis for exploring the consequences of differential mutation rates during individual development.

  3. Biochemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviors of high food waste content MSW landfill: Preliminary findings from a large-scale experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Liang-Tong; Xu, Hui; Chen, Yun-Min; Lü, Fan; Lan, Ji-Wu; Shao, Li-Min; Lin, Wei-An; He, Pin-Jing

    2017-03-18

    A large-scale bioreactor experiment lasting for 2years was presented in this paper to investigate the biochemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviors of high food waste content (HFWC) MSW. The experimental cell was 5m in length, 5m in width and 7.5m in depth, filled with unprocessed HFWC-MSWs of 91.3 tons. In the experiment, a surcharge loading of 33.4kPa was applied on waste surface, mature leachate refilling and warm leachate recirculation were performed to improve the degradation process. In this paper, the measurements of leachate quantity, leachate level, leachate biochemistry, gas composition, waste temperature, earth pressure and waste settlement were presented, and the following observations were made: (1) 26.8m(3) leachate collected from the 91.3 tons HFWC-MSW within the first two months, being 96% of the total amount collected in one year. (2) The leachate level was 88% of the waste thickness after waste filling in a close system, and reached to over 100% after a surcharge loading of 33.4kPa. (3) The self-weight effective stress of waste was observed to be close to zero under the condition of high leachate mound. Leachate drawdown led to a gain of self-weight effective stress. (4) A rapid development of waste settlement took place within the first two months, with compression strains of 0.38-0.47, being over 95% of the strain recorded in one year. The compression strain tended to increase linearly with an increase of leachate draining rate during that two months.

  4. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [astronomical models of interplanetary magnetics and the solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review is presented of theoretical models of the interaction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic fields. Observations of interplanetary magnetic fields by the IMP and OSO spacecraft are discussed. The causes for cosmic ray variations (Forbush decreases) by the solar wind are examined. The model of Parker is emphasized. This model shows the three dimensional magnetic field lines of the solar wind to have the form of spirals wrapped on cones. It is concluded that an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission would allow the testing and verification of the various theoretical models examined. Diagrams of the various models are shown.

  5. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: 1+1d conformal field theories as natural languages for asymptotically large-scale quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedan, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    An abstract argument is offered that the ideal physical systems for asymptotically large-scale quantum computers are near-critical quantum circuits, critical in the bulk, whose bulk universality classes are described by 1+1d conformal field theories. One in particular -- the Monster conformal field theory -- is especially ideal, because all of its bulk couplings are irrelevant.

  6. Early positive effects of tree species richness on herbivory in a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment influence tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Andreas; Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Assmann, Thorsten; Li, Ying; Ma, Keping; von Oheimb, Goddert; Zhang, Jiayong

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of herbivory for the structure and functioning of species-rich forests, little is known about how herbivory is affected by tree species richness, and more specifically by random vs. non-random species loss. We assessed herbivore damage and its effects on tree growth in the early stage of a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment in subtropical China that features random and non-random extinction scenarios of tree mixtures numbering between one and 24 species. In contrast to random species loss, the non-random extinction scenarios were based on the tree species’ local rarity and specific leaf area – traits that may strongly influence the way herbivory is affected by plant species richness. Herbivory increased with tree species richness across all scenarios and was unaffected by the different species compositions in the random and non-random extinction scenarios. Whereas tree growth rates were positively related to herbivory on plots with smaller trees, growth rates significantly declined with increasing herbivory on plots with larger trees. Our results suggest that the effects of herbivory on growth rates increase from monocultures to the most species-rich plant communities and that negative effects with increasing tree species richness become more pronounced with time as trees grow larger. Synthesis. Our results indicate that key trophic interactions can be quick to become established in forest plantations (i.e. already 2.5 years after tree planting). Stronger herbivory effects on tree growth with increasing tree species richness suggest a potentially important role of herbivory in regulating ecosystem functions and the structural development of species-rich forests from the very start of secondary forest succession. The lack of significant differences between the extinction scenarios, however, contrasts with findings from natural forests of higher successional age, where rarity had negative effects on herbivory. This indicates that

  7. Early positive effects of tree species richness on herbivory in a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment influence tree growth.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Andreas; Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Assmann, Thorsten; Li, Ying; Ma, Keping; von Oheimb, Goddert; Zhang, Jiayong

    2015-05-01

    Despite the importance of herbivory for the structure and functioning of species-rich forests, little is known about how herbivory is affected by tree species richness, and more specifically by random vs. non-random species loss. We assessed herbivore damage and its effects on tree growth in the early stage of a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment in subtropical China that features random and non-random extinction scenarios of tree mixtures numbering between one and 24 species. In contrast to random species loss, the non-random extinction scenarios were based on the tree species' local rarity and specific leaf area - traits that may strongly influence the way herbivory is affected by plant species richness. Herbivory increased with tree species richness across all scenarios and was unaffected by the different species compositions in the random and non-random extinction scenarios. Whereas tree growth rates were positively related to herbivory on plots with smaller trees, growth rates significantly declined with increasing herbivory on plots with larger trees. Our results suggest that the effects of herbivory on growth rates increase from monocultures to the most species-rich plant communities and that negative effects with increasing tree species richness become more pronounced with time as trees grow larger. Synthesis. Our results indicate that key trophic interactions can be quick to become established in forest plantations (i.e. already 2.5 years after tree planting). Stronger herbivory effects on tree growth with increasing tree species richness suggest a potentially important role of herbivory in regulating ecosystem functions and the structural development of species-rich forests from the very start of secondary forest succession. The lack of significant differences between the extinction scenarios, however, contrasts with findings from natural forests of higher successional age, where rarity had negative effects on herbivory. This indicates that the

  8. Retention of habitat complexity minimizes disassembly of reef fish communities following disturbance: a large-scale natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Emslie, Michael J; Cheal, Alistair J; Johns, Kerryn A

    2014-01-01

    High biodiversity ecosystems are commonly associated with complex habitats. Coral reefs are highly diverse ecosystems, but are under increasing pressure from numerous stressors, many of which reduce live coral cover and habitat complexity with concomitant effects on other organisms such as reef fishes. While previous studies have highlighted the importance of habitat complexity in structuring reef fish communities, they employed gradient or meta-analyses which lacked a controlled experimental design over broad spatial scales to explicitly separate the influence of live coral cover from overall habitat complexity. Here a natural experiment using a long term (20 year), spatially extensive (∼ 115,000 kms(2)) dataset from the Great Barrier Reef revealed the fundamental importance of overall habitat complexity for reef fishes. Reductions of both live coral cover and habitat complexity had substantial impacts on fish communities compared to relatively minor impacts after major reductions in coral cover but not habitat complexity. Where habitat complexity was substantially reduced, species abundances broadly declined and a far greater number of fish species were locally extirpated, including economically important fishes. This resulted in decreased species richness and a loss of diversity within functional groups. Our results suggest that the retention of habitat complexity following disturbances can ameliorate the impacts of coral declines on reef fishes, so preserving their capacity to perform important functional roles essential to reef resilience. These results add to a growing body of evidence about the importance of habitat complexity for reef fishes, and represent the first large-scale examination of this question on the Great Barrier Reef.

  9. Large-scale, near-Earth, magnetic fields from external sources and the corresponding induced internal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Data from MAGSAT analyzed as a function of the Dst index to determine the first degree/order spherical harmonic description of the near-Earth external field and its corresponding induced field. The analysis was done separately for data from dawn and dusk. The MAGSAT data was compared with POGO data. A local time variation of the external field persists even during very quiet magnetic conditions; both a diurnal and 8-hour period are present. A crude estimate of Sq current in the 45 deg geomagnetic latitude range is obtained for 1966 to 1970. The current strength, located in the ionosphere and induced in the Earth, is typical of earlier determinations from surface data, although its maximum is displaced in local time from previous results.

  10. The relationship of the large-scale solar field to the interplanetary magnetic field - What will Ulysses find?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Using photospheric magnetic field observations obtained at the Stanford Wilcox Solar Observatory, results from a potential field model for the present solar cycle are given, and qualitative predictions of the IMF that Ulysses may encounter are presented. Results indicate that the IMF consists of large regions of opposite polarity separated by a neutral sheet (NS) (extended to at least 50 deg) and a four-sector structure near solar minimum (produced by small quadripolar NS warps). The latitudinal extent of the NS increases following minimum and the structure near maximum includes multiple NSs, while a simplified IMF is found during the declining phase.

  11. Developing large-scale forcing data for single-column and cloud-resolving models from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Zhang, Minghua; Yio, John J.; Cederwall, Richard T.; McCoy, Renata

    2006-10-05

    [1] This study represents an effort to develop Single-Column Model (SCM) and Cloud-Resolving Model large-scale forcing data from a sounding array in the high latitudes. An objective variational analysis approach is used to process data collected from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which was conducted over the North Slope of Alaska in October 2004. In this method the observed surface and top of atmosphere measurements are used as constraints to adjust the sounding data from M-PACE in order to conserve column-integrated mass, heat, moisture, and momentum. Several important technical and scientific issues related to the data analysis are discussed. It is shown that the analyzed data reasonably describe the dynamic and thermodynamic features of the Arctic cloud systems observed during M-PACE. Uncertainties in the analyzed forcing fields are roughly estimated by examining the sensitivity of those fields to uncertainties in the upper-air data and surface constraints that are used in the analysis. Impacts of the uncertainties in the analyzed forcing data on SCM simulations are discussed. Results from the SCM tests indicate that the bulk features of the observed Arctic cloud systems can be captured qualitatively well using the forcing data derived in this study, and major model errors can be detected despite the uncertainties that exist in the forcing data as illustrated by the sensitivity tests. Lastly, the possibility of using the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis data to derive the large-scale forcing over the Arctic region is explored.

  12. Developing large-scale forcing data for single-column and cloud-resolving models from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Zhang, Minghua; ...

    2006-10-05

    [1] This study represents an effort to develop Single-Column Model (SCM) and Cloud-Resolving Model large-scale forcing data from a sounding array in the high latitudes. An objective variational analysis approach is used to process data collected from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which was conducted over the North Slope of Alaska in October 2004. In this method the observed surface and top of atmosphere measurements are used as constraints to adjust the sounding data from M-PACE in order to conserve column-integrated mass, heat, moisture, and momentum. Several important technical and scientific issues related tomore » the data analysis are discussed. It is shown that the analyzed data reasonably describe the dynamic and thermodynamic features of the Arctic cloud systems observed during M-PACE. Uncertainties in the analyzed forcing fields are roughly estimated by examining the sensitivity of those fields to uncertainties in the upper-air data and surface constraints that are used in the analysis. Impacts of the uncertainties in the analyzed forcing data on SCM simulations are discussed. Results from the SCM tests indicate that the bulk features of the observed Arctic cloud systems can be captured qualitatively well using the forcing data derived in this study, and major model errors can be detected despite the uncertainties that exist in the forcing data as illustrated by the sensitivity tests. Lastly, the possibility of using the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis data to derive the large-scale forcing over the Arctic region is explored.« less

  13. Exploring the feasibility of using copy number variants as genetic markers through large-scale whole genome sequencing experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy number variants (CNV) are large scale duplications or deletions of genomic sequence that are caused by a diverse set of molecular phenomena that are distinct from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) formation. Due to their different mechanisms of formation, CNVs are often difficult to track us...

  14. Local coupling (LoCo) vs. large-scale coupled (LsCo) land-atmosphere interactions in idealized experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, P.; Lintner, B. R.; Findell, K. L.; Rochetin, N.; Sobel, A. H.; Anber, U. M.

    2014-12-01

    We will present two idealized epxeriments/methodologies to investigate local (LoCo) and large-scale (LsCo) coupling between the surface and the atmsophere: the contiental Radiative-Convective Equilibrium (RCE) and the continental Weak Temperature Gradient (WTG). The RCE defines an equilibrium state of coupling between the surafce and the atmosphere isolated from any large-scale dependence, which were investigated within the single column model of the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) coupled to a simple bucket land model. This studies emphasizes the role of low-level cloud and the diurnal cylce of the boundary layer on the final state of the system. In the WTG we investigate the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere during the dry and wet season of the Amazon with the WRF model coupled to the NOAH land-surface model. Large-scale coupling is obtained with the WTG. The dry and wet season demonstrate very fundamental behavior: in the dry season deep convection is generated by radiative cooling in the higher troposhere and is disconnected from the surface. In the wet season the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere is much tighter. We suggest that the WTG is a powerful tool to investigate the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere, which solves two major issues: the limited resolution of convection in GCMs and the lack of large-scale coupling in CRM. Later investigation will look at the effect of deforestation, water table and distance from the ocean.

  15. Connecting small-scale turbulence to large-scale dynamics in the mesosphere using the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere Turbulence Experiment (MTeX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triplett, C. C.; Collins, R. L.; Lehmacher, G. A.; Barjatya, A.; Fritts, D. C.; Luebken, F. J.; Thurairajah, B.; Harvey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    The general circulation of the middle and upper atmosphere is determined by waves that form in the lower atmosphere. Large-scale Rossby waves and small-scale gravity waves propagate upward and release their energy in regions of instability such as critical layers. Rossby wave breaking leads to large scale disturbances in the wind and temperature fields known as a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW). These have a great impact on the seasonal weather and climate of the middle atmosphere. SSW events have a particular relationship with gravity waves in the Arctic middle atmosphere. During these events gravity waves reestablish geostrophic balance in the wind field, i.e. the stratospheric polar jet. This return to geostrophic balance, called geostrophic adjustment, generates gravity waves. We used the data from a recent rocket mission, lidar measurements, satellites, and MERRA to understand the coupling of small scale turbulent motions to large scale wave motions in the atmosphere. The Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere Turbulence Experiment (MTeX) rocket investigation was composed of two rockets launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 25-26 January 2015. MTeX was launched into a mesospheric inversion layer (MIL) giving us a known meteorology. A neutral density sensor that measured turbulence at 20 cm scales flew on both MTeX payloads. Rayleigh lidar measurements of the stratosphere and mesosphere give us the temperature and density structure at kilometer scales characterized the mean environment as well as gravity waves and the MIL. Satellite measurements allow us to characterize the planetary wave activity. MERRA reanalysis gives us a characterization of the winds and planetary waves and their effect on the generation and propagation of waves from scales of tens to thousands of km. The combination of these three data sources and MERRA reanalysis gives us a view of the waves from the synoptic-scale generation and propagation of waves to the small-scale generation of

  16. Large-Scale Velocity Fields and Small-Scale Magnetic Fields During the Maximum of Solar Cycle 22

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    abstract describing this process of filament formation is published in the Proceedings of IAU Colloquium 133 on Eruptive flares held in Iguazu Argentina...July 1991 and at the IAU Coloquium on Eruptive Flares in Iguazu , Argentina, August 1991. 17 3.4 THE ROLE OF CANCELLING MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE BUILD-UP TO...Jackson, 2-6 August 1991, Iguazu , Argentina. 2. Invited Review Paper on ’The Formation of Prominences’ for Solar Physics, by S.F. Martin and C

  17. LyMAS: Predicting large-scale Lyα forest statistics from the dark matter density field

    SciTech Connect

    Peirani, Sébastien; Colombi, Stéphane; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe; Weinberg, David H.; Blaizot, Jérémy

    2014-03-20

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the 'Horizon-MareNostrum' simulation, a 50 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) of the transmitted flux F{sub s} , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ {sub s}, smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h {sup –1} Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ({sup F}luctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation{sup )}, often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 1024{sup 3} N-body simulations of a 300 h {sup –1} Mpc and 1.0 h {sup –1} Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful

  18. Inside pyroclastic density currents - uncovering the enigmatic flow structure and transport behaviour in large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are the most lethal threat from volcanoes. While there are two main types of PDCs (fully turbulent, fully dilute pyroclastic surges and more concentrated pyroclastic flows encompassing non-turbulent to turbulent transport) pyroclastic flows, which are the subject of the present study, are far more complex than dilute pyroclastic surges and remain the least understood type despite their far greater hazard, greater runout length and ability to transport vast quantities of material across the Earth's surface. Here we present large-scale experiments of natural volcanic material and gas in order to provide the missing quantitative view of the internal structure and gas-particle transport mechanisms in pyroclastic flows. We show that the outer flow structure with head, body and wake regions broadly resembles current PDC analogues of dilute gravity currents. However, the internal structure, in which lower levels consist of a concentrated granular fluid and upper levels are more dilute, contrasts significantly with the internal structure of fully dilute gravity currents. This bipartite vertical structure shows strong analogy to current conceptual models of high-density turbidity currents, which are responsible for the distribution of coarse sediment in marine basins and of great interest to the hydrocarbon industry. The lower concentrated and non-turbulent levels of the PDC (granular-fluid basal flow) act as a fast-flowing carrier for the more dilute and turbulent upper levels of the current (ash-cloud surge). Strong kinematic coupling between these flow parts reduces viscous dissipation and entrainment of ambient air into the lower part of the ash-cloud surge. This leads to a state of forced super-criticality whereby fast and destructive PDCs can endure even at large distances from volcanoes. Importantly, the basal flow/ash-cloud surge coupling yields a characteristically smooth rheological boundary across the non

  19. A Large-Scale Experiment to Determine the Effectiveness of Controlled Floods and Tamarisk Removal in Rehabilitating the Green River, Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. C.; Cooper, D. J.; Larson, G. P.

    2002-12-01

    A large-scale field experiment is underway on the Green River in the Canyon of Lodore to evaluate the effectiveness of tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima) removal and increased magnitude and duration of floods released from Flaming Gorge Dam (FGD) for the purpose of increasing active channel width and increasing entrainment rates on gravel bars where there are large proportions of fines. Results to date demonstrate that effectiveness varies with small scale geomorphic setting, and that channel widening in some parts of the river may be impossible without regular removal, which is unlikely. Our approach is important in channel rehabilitation planning, yet the difficulties of conducting such experiments are apparent in the first 2 yrs of the project. All tamarisk are being removed in 3, 0.8 to 1.6 km long study reaches. Three control reaches, immediately upstream or downstream from removal reaches, are also being monitored. We are making detailed measurements of scour and fill, substrate, and composition of riparian vegetation communities in removal and control reaches, and in response to high flood releases from FGD. Difficulties in implementation of the experiment include the multi-year process of tamarisk removal. Tamarisk immediately reestablishes itself on moist substrate following removal; thus, some parts of removal reaches have young tamarisk seedlings and other parts have tamarisk not yet removed. Experimental dam releases have not yet occurred due to drought in the watershed and other water delivery imperatives. We have also compared the distribution of tamarisk on the nearby Yampa River, where an unregulated flow regime exists and where tamarisk are absent or in low densities. The comparison between the distribution, density, and age characteristics of tamarisk on the 2 streams will lead to recommendations as to the sites on the Green River where eradication efforts are best directed. Despite the difficulties of experiment implementation, such large-scale

  20. Growth of large-scale boron nanowire patterns with identical base-up mode and in situ field emission studies of individual boron nanowire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Gan, Haibo; Tang, Dai-Ming; Cao, Yunzhe; Mo, Xiaoshu; Chen, Jun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2014-02-26

    Boron nanowires (BNWs) are considered as an ideal optoelectronic nanomaterial, but controlling them in identical growth mode and large-area patterns is technically challenging. Here, large-scale BNW patterns with a uniform base-up growth mode are successfully fabricated by choosing Ni film as the catalyst. Moreover, they exhibit low turn-on field (4.3 V/μm) and excellent field emission uniformity (88%).

  1. Evolution of Large-scale Solar Magnetic Fields in a Flux-Transport Model Including a Multi-cell Meridional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, E.; Dikpati, M.

    2003-12-01

    Advances in helioseismology over the past decade have enabled us to detect subsurface meridional flows in the Sun. Some recent helioseismological analysis (Giles 1999, Haber et al. 2002) has indicated a submerged, reverse flow cell occurring at high latitudes of the Sun's northern hemisphere between 1998 and 2001. Meridional circulation plays an important role in the operation of a class of large-scale solar dynamo, the so-called "flux-transport" dynamo. In such dynamo models, the poleward drift of the large-scale solar magnetic fields and the polar reversal process are explained by the advective-diffusive transport of magnetic flux by a meridional circulation with a poleward surface flow component. Any temporal and spatial variations in the meridional flow pattern are expected to greatly influence the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in a flux-transport dynamo. The aim of this paper is to explore the implications of a steady, multi-cell flow on the advection of weak, large-scale, magnetic flux. We present a simple, two-cell flux transport model operating in an r-theta cross-section of the northern hemisphere. Azimuthal symmetry is assumed. Performing numerical flux-transport simulations with a reverse flow cell at various latitudes, we demonstrate the effect of this cell on the evolutionary pattern of the large-scale diffuse fields. We also show how a flux concentration may occur at the latitude where the radial flows of the two cells are sinking downward. This work is supported by NASA grants W-19752, W-10107, and W-10175. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  2. Splitting failure in side walls of a large-scale underground cavern group: a numerical modelling and a field study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhishen; Li, Yong; Zhu, Weishen; Xue, Yiguo; Yu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Vertical splitting cracks often appear in side walls of large-scale underground caverns during excavations owing to the brittle characteristics of surrounding rock mass, especially under the conditions of high in situ stress and great overburden depth. This phenomenon greatly affects the integral safety and stability of the underground caverns. In this paper, a transverse isotropic constitutive model and a splitting failure criterion are simultaneously proposed and secondly programmed in FLAC3D to numerically simulate the integral stability of the underground caverns during excavations in Dagangshan hydropower station in Sichuan province, China. Meanwhile, an in situ monitoring study on the displacement of the key points of the underground caverns has also been carried out, and the monitoring results are compared with the numerical results. From the comparative analysis, it can be concluded that the depths of splitting relaxation area obtained by numerical simulation are almost consistent with the actual in situ monitoring values, as well as the trend of the displacement curves, which shows that the transverse isotropic constitutive model combining with the splitting failure criterion is appropriate for investigating the splitting failure in side walls of large-scale underground caverns and it will be a helpful guidance of predicting the depths of splitting relaxation area in surrounding rock mass.

  3. Surface mass balance on Fimbul ice shelf, East Antarctica: Comparison of field measurements and large-scale studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinisalo, Anna; Anschütz, Helgard; Aasen, Anne Târând; Langley, Kirsty; Deschwanden, Angela; Kohler, Jack; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Hamran, Svein-Erik; Øyan, Mats-Jørgen; Schlosser, Elisabeth; Hagen, Jon Ove; Nøst, Ole Anders; Isaksson, Elisabeth

    2013-10-01

    challenges remain for estimating the Antarctic ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), which represents a major uncertainty in predictions of future sea-level rise. Validating continental scale studies is hampered by the sparse distribution of in situ data. Here we present a 26 year mean SMB of the Fimbul ice shelf in East Antarctica between 1983-2009, and recent interannual variability since 2010. We compare these data to the results of large-scale SMB studies for similar time periods, obtained from regional atmospheric modeling and remote sensing. Our in situ data include ground penetrating radar, firn cores, and mass balance stakes and provide information on both temporal and spatial scales. The 26 year mean SMB on the Fimbul ice shelf varies between 170 and 620 kg m-2 a-1 giving a regional average value of 310 ± 70 kg m-2 a-1. Our measurements indicate higher long-term accumulation over large parts of the ice shelf compared to the large-scale studies. We also show that the variability of the mean annual SMB, which can be up to 90%, can be a dominant factor in short-term estimates. The results emphasize the importance of using a combination of ground-based validation data, regional climate models, and remote sensing over a relevant time period in order to achieve a reliable SMB for Antarctica.

  4. A refined regional modeling approach for the Corn Belt - Experiences and recommendations for large-scale integrated modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagopoulos, Yiannis; Gassman, Philip W.; Jha, Manoj K.; Kling, Catherine L.; Campbell, Todd; Srinivasan, Raghavan; White, Michael; Arnold, Jeffrey G.

    2015-05-01

    Nonpoint source pollution from agriculture is the main source of nitrogen and phosphorus in the stream systems of the Corn Belt region in the Midwestern US. This region is comprised of two large river basins, the intensely row-cropped Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) and Ohio-Tennessee River Basin (OTRB), which are considered the key contributing areas for the Northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone according to the US Environmental Protection Agency. Thus, in this area it is of utmost importance to ensure that intensive agriculture for food, feed and biofuel production can coexist with a healthy water environment. To address these objectives within a river basin management context, an integrated modeling system has been constructed with the hydrologic Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model, capable of estimating river basin responses to alternative cropping and/or management strategies. To improve modeling performance compared to previous studies and provide a spatially detailed basis for scenario development, this SWAT Corn Belt application incorporates a greatly refined subwatershed structure based on 12-digit hydrologic units or 'subwatersheds' as defined by the US Geological Service. The model setup, calibration and validation are time-demanding and challenging tasks for these large systems, given the scale intensive data requirements, and the need to ensure the reliability of flow and pollutant load predictions at multiple locations. Thus, the objectives of this study are both to comprehensively describe this large-scale modeling approach, providing estimates of pollution and crop production in the region as well as to present strengths and weaknesses of integrated modeling at such a large scale along with how it can be improved on the basis of the current modeling structure and results. The predictions were based on a semi-automatic hydrologic calibration approach for large-scale and spatially detailed modeling studies, with the use of the Sequential

  5. A large-scale field study examining effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on honey bee colony health, development, and overwintering success

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D.; Sultan, Maryam; McFarlane, Andrew D.; Brewer, Larry

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2012, we initiated a large-scale field experiment in southern Ontario, Canada, to determine whether exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola (oil seed rape) has any adverse impacts on honey bees. Colonies were placed in clothianidin seed-treated or control canola fields during bloom, and thereafter were moved to an apiary with no surrounding crops grown from seeds treated with neonicotinoids. Colony weight gain, honey production, pest incidence, bee mortality, number of adults, and amount of sealed brood were assessed in each colony throughout summer and autumn. Samples of honey, beeswax, pollen, and nectar were regularly collected, and samples were analyzed for clothianidin residues. Several of these endpoints were also measured in spring 2013. Overall, colonies were vigorous during and after the exposure period, and we found no effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on any endpoint measures. Bees foraged heavily on the test fields during peak bloom and residue analysis indicated that honey bees were exposed to low levels (0.5–2 ppb) of clothianidin in pollen. Low levels of clothianidin were detected in a few pollen samples collected toward the end of the bloom from control hives, illustrating the difficulty of conducting a perfectly controlled field study with free-ranging honey bees in agricultural landscapes. Overwintering success did not differ significantly between treatment and control hives, and was similar to overwintering colony loss rates reported for the winter of 2012–2013 for beekeepers in Ontario and Canada. Our results suggest that exposure to canola grown from seed treated with clothianidin poses low risk to honey bees. PMID:25374790

  6. A large-scale field study examining effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on honey bee colony health, development, and overwintering success.

    PubMed

    Cutler, G Christopher; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D; Sultan, Maryam; McFarlane, Andrew D; Brewer, Larry

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2012, we initiated a large-scale field experiment in southern Ontario, Canada, to determine whether exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola (oil seed rape) has any adverse impacts on honey bees. Colonies were placed in clothianidin seed-treated or control canola fields during bloom, and thereafter were moved to an apiary with no surrounding crops grown from seeds treated with neonicotinoids. Colony weight gain, honey production, pest incidence, bee mortality, number of adults, and amount of sealed brood were assessed in each colony throughout summer and autumn. Samples of honey, beeswax, pollen, and nectar were regularly collected, and samples were analyzed for clothianidin residues. Several of these endpoints were also measured in spring 2013. Overall, colonies were vigorous during and after the exposure period, and we found no effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on any endpoint measures. Bees foraged heavily on the test fields during peak bloom and residue analysis indicated that honey bees were exposed to low levels (0.5-2 ppb) of clothianidin in pollen. Low levels of clothianidin were detected in a few pollen samples collected toward the end of the bloom from control hives, illustrating the difficulty of conducting a perfectly controlled field study with free-ranging honey bees in agricultural landscapes. Overwintering success did not differ significantly between treatment and control hives, and was similar to overwintering colony loss rates reported for the winter of 2012-2013 for beekeepers in Ontario and Canada. Our results suggest that exposure to canola grown from seed treated with clothianidin poses low risk to honey bees.

  7. Validation of a simple model to predict the performance of methane oxidation systems, using field data from a large scale biocover test field.

    PubMed

    Geck, Christoph; Scharff, Heijo; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Gebert, Julia

    2016-10-01

    On a large scale test field (1060m(2)) methane emissions were monitored over a period of 30months. During this period, the test field was loaded at rates between 14 and 46gCH4m(-2)d(-1). The total area was subdivided into 60 monitoring grid fields at 17.7m(2) each, which were individually surveyed for methane emissions and methane oxidation efficiency. The latter was calculated both from the direct methane mass balance and from the shift of the carbon dioxide - methane ratio between the base of the methane oxidation layer and the emitted gas. The base flux to each grid field was back-calculated from the data on methane oxidation efficiency and emission. Resolution to grid field scale allowed the analysis of the spatial heterogeneity of all considered fluxes. Higher emissions were measured in the upslope area of the test field. This was attributed to the capillary barrier integrated into the test field resulting in a higher diffusivity and gas permeability in the upslope area. Predictions of the methane oxidation potential were estimated with the simple model Methane Oxidation Tool (MOT) using soil temperature, air filled porosity and water tension as input parameters. It was found that the test field could oxidize 84% of the injected methane. The MOT predictions seemed to be realistic albeit the higher range of the predicted oxidations potentials could not be challenged because the load to the field was too low. Spatial and temporal emission patterns were found indicating heterogeneity of fluxes and efficiencies in the test field. No constant share of direct emissions was found as proposed by the MOT albeit the mean share of emissions throughout the monitoring period was in the range of the expected emissions.

  8. Large-scale Estimation of River Discharge from SWOT Satellite Observations: A Fraternal Twin Data Assimilation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreadis, K.; Moller, D.; Rodriguez, E.; Sanders, B. F.; Bates, P. D.; Chaubell, M.; McCann, M.; Durand, M. T.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to observe and monitor the volume of water stored and flowing in rivers, lakes and wetlands globally is of paramount importance. Nevertheless, river discharge is not measured directly, either by satellite or in-situ methods. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite, a "Decadal Survey" mission, will be able to provide measurements of water surface elevation in both the ocean and land surface. One of the approaches to estimate discharge will be within a multi-scale data assimilation framework that will correct for uncertainties in model predictions. These model errors are caused by uncertainties in precipitation and other meteorological forcings, as well as uncertainties in river channel characteristics such as depth. We present the implementation and evaluation of a data assimilation system that will produce river discharge estimates from SWOT observations of water surface elevation. The experimental design is based on a fraternal twin synthetic experiment, wherein "true" fields of discharge and water elevation are generated from a detailed hydrodynamics model (BreZo). These "true" fields are then fed into the SWOT instrument simulator, in order to generate SWOT observations of water surface elevation with the correct orbital characteristics and error information (wet troposphere, topographic layover effects, etc.). A simpler and computationally efficient hydrodynamics model (LISFLOOD-FP), that includes errors in model parameters and boundary inflows, is then used along with the synthetic SWOT observations to retrieve the "true" river discharge across multiple scales of the Ohio River basin.

  9. On the use of helium-filled soap bubbles for large-scale tomographic PIV in wind tunnel experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarano, Fulvio; Ghaemi, Sina; Caridi, Giuseppe Carlo Alp; Bosbach, Johannes; Dierksheide, Uwe; Sciacchitano, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    The flow-tracing fidelity of sub-millimetre diameter helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) for low-speed aerodynamics is studied. The main interest of using HFSB in relation to micron-size droplets is the large amount of scattered light, enabling larger-scale three-dimensional experiments by tomographic PIV. The assessment of aerodynamic behaviour closely follows the method proposed in the early work of Kerho and Bragg (Exp Fluids 50:929-948, 1994) who evaluated the tracer trajectories around the stagnation region at the leading edge of an airfoil. The conclusions of the latter investigation differ from the present work, which concludes sub-millimetre HFSB do represent a valid alternative for quantitative velocimetry in wind tunnel aerodynamic experiments. The flow stagnating ahead of a circular cylinder of 25 mm diameter is considered at speeds up to 30 m/s. The tracers are injected in the free-stream and high-speed PIV, and PTV are used to obtain the velocity field distribution. A qualitative assessment based on streamlines is followed by acceleration and slip velocity measurements using PIV experiments with fog droplets as a term of reference. The tracing fidelity is controlled by the flow rates of helium, liquid soap and air in HFSB production. A characteristic time response, defined as the ratio of slip velocity and the fluid acceleration, is obtained. The feasibility of performing time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements over large volumes in aerodynamic wind tunnels is also studied. The flow past a 5-cm-diameter cylinder is measured over a volume of 20 × 20 × 12 cm3 at a rate of 2 kHz. The achieved seeding density of <0.01 ppp enables resolving the Kármán vortices, whereas turbulent sub-structures cannot be captured.

  10. A SPECTRAL INDEX FOR ASSESSING SURFACE WATER DEPTH: CASE STUDY FROM A LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGICAL MANIPULATION EXPERIMENT IN ARCTIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, S.; Gamon, J. A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    Large-scale hydrological changes in arctic tundra associated with climate change calls for remote sensing tools that can characterize changing surface hydrology over large regions. The NSF-supported Biocomplexity project in Barrow, Alaska, involves experimental manipulation of water table (drained, flooded, and control treatments) in an Arctic thaw lake basin to investigate the effects of altered hydrology on land-atmosphere carbon balance. Throughout the 2008 growing season, hyperspectral reflectance data were collected in the visible and near IR using a robotic tram system that operated along a 300m tramline situated in each treatment. Water table depths were also collected from water wells placed along transects. A spectral index was developed using reflectance in the IR region (1000 nm, where water absorbs strongly) and reflectance in the blue region (460 nm, where water absorbs poorly). Indices formulate from these two bands were strongly correlated with the depth of standing water. This index successfully captured treatment effects on standing water depth, and may have larger utility as a sensitive measure of hydrological change in arctic regions.

  11. Modelling high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions in laboratory experiments using large-scale free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R. Jason; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-03-01

    A turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence is investigated in order to ascertain the scale interactions that dominate the near-wall region. The results are discussed in relation to a canonical high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer because previous studies have reported considerable similarities between these two flows. Measurements were acquired simultaneously from four hot wires mounted to a rake which was traversed through the boundary layer. Particular focus is given to two main features of both canonical high Reynolds number boundary layers and boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence: (i) the footprint of the large scales in the logarithmic region on the near-wall small scales, specifically the modulating interaction between these scales, and (ii) the phase difference in amplitude modulation. The potential for a turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence to `simulate' high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions is discussed. The results of this study have encouraging implications for future investigations of the fundamental scale interactions that take place in high Reynolds number flows as it demonstrates that these can be achieved at typical laboratory scales.

  12. NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment: A large-scale study of environmental change in Western North America and its implications for ecological systems and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Hayes, D. J.; Griffith, P. C.; Larson, E. K.; Wickland, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change in high northern latitudes is unfolding faster than anywhere else on Earth, resulting in widespread changes in landscape structure and ecosystem function in the Arctic-Boreal Region (ABR). Recognizing its sensitivity, vulnerability and global importance, national- and international-level scientific efforts are now advancing our ability to observe, understand and model the complex, multi-scale processes that drive the ABR's natural and social systems. Long at the edge of our mental map of the world, environmental change in the ABR is increasingly becoming the focus of numerous policy discussions at the highest levels of decision-making. To improve our understanding of environmental change and its impacts in the ABR, the Terrestrial Ecology Program of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is planning its next major field campaign for Western Canada and Alaska. The field campaign will be based on the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) concept as described in the Revised Executive Summary from the ABoVE Scoping Study Report. The original Scoping Study Report provided the proof-of-concept demonstration of scientific importance and feasibility for this large-scale study. In early 2013, NASA announced the selection of the ABoVE Science Definition Team, which is charged with developing the Concise Experiment Plan for the campaign. Here, we outline the conceptual basis for ABoVE and present the compelling rationale explaining the scientific and societal importance of the study. We present the current status of the planning process, which includes development of the science questions to drive ABoVE research; the study design for the field campaign to address them; and the interagency and international collaborations necessary for implementation. The ABoVE study will focus on 1) developing a fuller understanding of ecosystem vulnerability to climate change in the ABR, and 2) providing the scientific information required to

  13. First field results on the use of stallion sex-sorted semen in a large-scale embryo transfer program.

    PubMed

    Panarace, M; Pellegrini, R O; Basualdo, M O; Belé, M; Ursino, D A; Cisterna, R; Desimone, G; Rodríguez, E; Medina, M J

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometry sex-sorting technology was developed in 1989. However, it is only the bovine species in which offspring of the desired sex are obtained at a commercial level. The aim of the present work was to evaluate efficiency parameters when using fresh sexed semen in a large-scale equine commercial embryo transfer program. During the 2009, 2010 and 2011 breeding seasons, 938 synchronized cycles were artificially inseminated. One hundred (10.6%) mares failed to ovulate, and for the remaining 838 useable cycles, 887 doses of sexed semen were used, representing 1.06 doses per cycle. In general, 435 (51.9%) out of 838 flushing performed resulted in the recovery of at least one embryo and 496 (59.1%) embryos were recovered, including twins and triplets. Pregnancy rate at 25 days achieved 81.5% (one embryo transferred per recipient). Embryo recovery rate was not statistically different either between preovulatory and postovulatory artificially inseminated mares or when increased quantities of sexed sperm per dose were used (15-45 million) (P > 0.05). A broad variation in embryo recovery rate was observed between the different stallions used in this study. Sex accuracy of the sex sorting assessed by ultrasound fetal sex determination was 90.3%. Finally, overall efficiency (female embryo pregnancies per useable cycles) was 39% (325/838), meaning that to obtain a female pregnancy of at least 75 days it was necessary to perform 2.5 flushing.

  14. The magnetic shear-current effect: Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-03-14

    A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. Here, the effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo – in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean field${\\it\\alpha}$coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.

  15. Impact of Arctic sea ice loss on large-scale atmospheric circulation based on fully-coupled sensitivity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudar, Thomas; Sanchez, Emilia; Terray, Laurent; Chauvin, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Arctic sea ice decline in the recent decades has been reported in observational studies. Modeling studies have confirmed that this downward trend in Arctic sea ice is mainly caused by increasing Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) concentrations into the atmosphere. The IPCC-AR5 report concluded that Arctic sea ice will continue to decrease and is projected to disappear in the middle of the 21st century, yielding to a ice-free region during boreal summer season. Arctic sea ice loss is expected to strongly impact the climate system. Recently, the climate community has conducted a number of studies to evaluate and understand the Arctic sea ice loss implications on climate. While some studies have shown that Arctic sea ice decline can significantly affect the large-scale atmospheric dynamics at high and mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, by altering the storm-tracks, the jet stream (position and strength) and the planetary waves, large uncertainties remain due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and experimental protocol differences leading to a large inter-model spread. In this work, we investigate the respective roles of Arctic sea ice loss and GHGs increase on the atmospheric dynamics by means of an idealized experimental set-up that uses the coupled model CNRM-CM5. The experimental set-up, based on a flux correction technique, will allow separating the contributions of Arctic sea ice loss from the GHGs increasing. We will focus mainly on the atmospheric circulation response in the Northern Hemisphere and on the associated synoptic variability, represented by the storm-tracks. We show that Arctic sea ice loss is responsible for an equatorward shift of the northern hemisphere jet, which is opposed to the GHGs effect. Finally we show that these shifts are consistent with the storm-tracks response.

  16. Integrating canopy and large-scale effects in the convective boundary-layer dynamics during the CHATS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapkalijevski, Metodija M.; Ouwersloot, Huug G.; Moene, Arnold F.; Vilà-Guerau de Arrellano, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    By characterizing the dynamics of a convective boundary layer above a relatively sparse and uniform orchard canopy, we investigated the impact of the roughness-sublayer (RSL) representation on the predicted diurnal variability of surface fluxes and state variables. Our approach combined numerical experiments, using an atmospheric mixed-layer model including a land-surface-vegetation representation, and measurements from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) field experiment near Dixon, California. The RSL is parameterized using an additional factor in the standard Monin-Obukhov similarity theory flux-profile relationships that takes into account the canopy influence on the atmospheric flow. We selected a representative case characterized by southerly wind conditions to ensure well-developed RSL over the orchard canopy. We then investigated the sensitivity of the diurnal variability of the boundary-layer dynamics to the changes in the RSL key scales, the canopy adjustment length scale, Lc, and the β = u*/|U| ratio at the top of the canopy due to their stability and dependence on canopy structure. We found that the inclusion of the RSL parameterization resulted in improved prediction of the diurnal evolution of the near-surface mean quantities (e.g. up to 50 % for the wind velocity) and transfer (drag) coefficients. We found relatively insignificant effects on the modelled surface fluxes (e.g. up to 5 % for the friction velocity, while 3 % for the sensible and latent heat), which is due to the compensating effect between the mean gradients and the drag coefficients, both of which are largely affected by the RSL parameterization. When varying Lc (from 10 to 20 m) and β (from 0.25 to 0.4 m), based on observational evidence, the predicted friction velocity is found to vary by up to 25 % and the modelled surface-energy fluxes (sensible heat, SH, and latent heat of evaporation, LE) vary up to 2 and 9 %. Consequently, the boundary-layer height varies up to

  17. The magnetic shear-current effect: Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    DOE PAGES

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-03-14

    A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. Here, the effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo – in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean fieldmore » $${\\it\\alpha}$$coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.« less

  18. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF A CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE SUPPORTING A LARGE-SCALE SOLAR FILAMENT FROM A PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang; Feng, Xueshang E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2014-05-10

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength ≲ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  19. Daylight photodynamic therapy with MAL cream for large-scale photodamaged skin based on the concept of 'actinic field damage': recommendations of an international expert group.

    PubMed

    Philipp-Dormston, W G; Sanclemente, G; Torezan, L; Tretti Clementoni, M; Le Pillouer-Prost, A; Cartier, H; Szeimies, R M; Bjerring, P

    2016-01-01

    Conventional PDT (c-PDT) is a widely used and approved non-invasive treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). Recent clinical, histological and immunohistochemical observations have shown that c-PDT with methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) may also partially reverse the signs of photodamage. However, pain and the need for special light source equipment are limiting factors for its use, especially in the treatment of large areas. More recently, daylight PDT (DL-PDT) has been shown to be similar to c-PDT in the treatment of AK, nearly painless and more convenient to perform. To establish consensus on recommendations for the use of MAL DL-PDT in patients with large-scale photodamaged skin. The expert group was comprised of eight dermatologists. Consensus was developed based on the personal experience of the experts in c-PDT and DL-PDT, and results of an extensive literature review. MAL DL-PDT for large areas of photodamaged skin was evaluated and recommendations based on broad clinical experience were provided. As supported by evidence-based data from multicentre studies conducted in Australia and Europe, the authors defined the concept of 'actinic field damage' which refers to photodamage associated with actinic epidermal dysplasia, and provide comprehensive guidelines for the optimal use of DL-PDT in the treatment of actinic field damage. The authors concluded that MAL DL-PDT has a similar efficacy to c-PDT at 3-month (lesion complete response rate of 89% vs. 93% in the Australian study and 70% vs. 74% in the European study (95% C.I. = [-6.8;-0.3] and [-9.5;2.4] respectively) and 6-month follow-ups (97% maintenance of complete lesion response) in the treatment of AKs. The authors agree that DL-PDT is not only efficacious but also nearly pain-free and easy to perform, and therefore results in high patient acceptance especially for the treatment of areas of actinic field damage.

  20. Large scale measurements of soil moisture for validation of remotely sensed data: Georgia soil moisture experiment of 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, D. D.; Lakshmi, V.; Jackson, T. J.; Choi, M.; Jacobs, J. M.

    2006-05-01

    A series of soil moisture experiments were conducted in 2003 (SMEX03) to develop enhanced datasets necessary to improve spatiotemporal characterization of soil moisture and to enhance satellite-based retrievals. One component of this research was conducted in South Central Georgia of the US, from June 17th to July 21st (SMEX03 GA). This study analyzes measurements of soil moisture and temperature collected during SMEX03 GA. A network of in situ soil moisture measurement devices, established to provide validation data for the satellite collections and for long-term estimation of soil moisture conditions throughout the region, provided continuous measurements at 19 sites. Additional soil moisture and temperature validation data were collected daily from 49 field sites. These sites represented a diversity of land covers including forest, cotton, peanut, and pasture. Precipitation that occurred prior to June 22nd and from June 29th through July 2nd produced drying conditions from June 23rd to June 28th and gradual wetting from June 29th through July 2nd. Soil moisture in the top 0-1 cm of the soil was found to be more responsive to precipitation and to have greater variability than soil moisture at the 0-3 or 3-6 cm layers. Within different land covers, soil moisture followed the same trends, but varied with land use. Pasture sites were consistently the wettest while row-crop sites were normally the driest. Good agreement was observed between soil moisture measurements collected with the in situ network and the 49 SMEX sites. For the study period, soil moisture across the entire 50 km by 75 km region and five of the six 25 km by 25 km EASE-Grids demonstrated time stable characteristics. Time stability analysis and statistical tests demonstrated the in situ stations had a small dry bias as compared to the SMEX03 GA measurements. These results indicate that the in situ network will be a good resource for long-term calibration of remotely sensed soil moisture and provide

  1. Saharan dust in Brazil and Suriname during the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) - Cooperative LBA Regional Experiment (CLAIRE) in March 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, P.; Andreae, M. O.; Lange, L.; Roberts, G.; Cafmeyer, J.; Rajta, I.; Maenhaut, W.; Holben, B. N.; Artaxo, P.; Lelieveld, J.

    2001-07-01

    Advection of Saharan dust was observed via chemical and optical measurements during March 1998 in Brazil and Suriname during the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)-Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (CLAIRE)-98 experiment. In Brazil the dust outbreak produced an increase of a factor of 3 in the daily mean mass concentration (up to 26±7 μg m-3) of particles smaller than 10 μm equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD), and in the daily mean aerosol particle scattering coefficient σs (up to 26±8 Mm-1 STP, ambient humidity). Background levels of aerosol scattering (ambient) were σs ˜ 10 Mm-1. The effect of dust advection was evident for all major crustal elements (Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe), as well as the sea-salt elements (Na, Cl, and S), as the dust layer was transported at low altitude (below 800 hPa). Coarse P and organic carbon (OC) concentrations were not influenced by the occurrence of dust, and were mainly emitted by the rain forest. The dry scattering mass efficiency of dust (particles smaller than 10 μm EAD) was estimated to be between 0.65 (±0.06) and 0.89 (±0.08) m2 g-1. Airborne profiles of aerosol scattering showed two distinct types of vertical structure in the dust layer over Suriname, either vertically uniform (15, 26 March), or plume-like (25 March). Dust layers extended generally up to 700 hPa, while scattering layers occasionally encountered at higher altitudes resulted from smoke emitted by biomass burning in Venezuela and Colombia. Observations in South America were supported by measurements in Israel and Tenerife (Canary Islands), where the dust outbreaks were also detected.

  2. Passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from Oil Fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Thompson, David R.; Thorpe, Andrew K.; Kolyer, Richard W.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Frankenberg, Christian; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Fladeland, Matthew; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2016-04-01

    The CO2 and MEthane EXperiment (COMEX) was a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities. As a part of this effort, seven flights were performed between June 3 and September 4, 2014 with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields located in California's San Joaquin Valley. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with: a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC; a 5-hole turbulence probe; and an atmospheric measurement package operated by CIRPAS measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Three of the flights were accompanied by the Next Generation Airborne Visual InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft. Large-scale, high-concentration CH4 plumes were detected by the MAMAP instrument over the fields and tracked over several kilometers. The spatial distribution of the MAMAP observed plumes was compared to high spatial resolution CH4 anomaly maps derived by AVIRIS-NG imaging spectroscopy data. Remote sensing data collected by MAMAP was used to infer CH4 emission rates and their distributions over the three fields. Aggregated emission estimates for the three fields were compared to aggregated emissions inferred by subsequent airborne in-situ validation measurements collected by the Picarro instrument. Comparison of remote sensing and in-situ flux estimates will be presented, demonstrating the ability of airborne remote sensing data to provide accurate emission estimates for concentrations above the

  3. Simulation of large scale motions and small scale structures in planetary atmospheres and oceans: From laboratory to space experiments on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egbers, Christoph; Futterer, Birgit; Zaussinger, Florian; Harlander, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Baroclinic waves are responsible for the transport of heat and momentum in the oceans, in the Earth's atmosphere as well as in other planetary atmospheres. The talk will give an overview on possibilities to simulate such large scale as well as co-existing small scale structures with the help of well defined laboratory experiments like the baroclinic wave tank (annulus experiment). The analogy between the Earth's atmosphere and the rotating cylindrical annulus experiment only driven by rotation and differential heating between polar and equatorial regions is obvious. From the Gulf stream single vortices seperate from time to time. The same dynamics and the co-existence of small and large scale structures and their separation can be also observed in laboratory experiments as in the rotating cylindrical annulus experiment. This experiment represents the mid latitude dynamics quite well and is part as a central reference experiment in the German-wide DFG priority research programme ("METSTRÖM", SPP 1276) yielding as a benchmark for lot of different numerical methods. On the other hand, those laboratory experiments in cylindrical geometry are limited due to the fact, that the surface and real interaction between polar and equatorial region and their different dynamics can not be really studied. Therefore, I demonstrate how to use the very successful Geoflow I and Geoflow II space experiment hardware on ISS with future modifications for simulations of small and large scale planetary atmospheric motion in spherical geometry with differential heating between inner and outer spheres as well as between the polar and equatorial regions. References: Harlander, U., Wenzel, J., Wang, Y., Alexandrov, K. & Egbers, Ch., 2012, Simultaneous PIV- and thermography measurements of partially blocked flow in a heated rotating annulus, Exp. in Fluids, 52 (4), 1077-1087 Futterer, B., Krebs, A., Plesa, A.-C., Zaussinger, F., Hollerbach, R., Breuer, D. & Egbers, Ch., 2013, Sheet-like and

  4. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties. Part II: Scale-awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Sha; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Li, Zhijin; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin; Zhang, Minghua; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi

    2015-01-20

    Fine-resolution three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multi-scale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scales larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.

  5. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties: 2. Scale awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sha; Li, Zhijin; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin; Zhang, Minghua; Toto, Tami; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Endo, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multiscale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scales larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.

  6. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties. Part II: Scale-awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Sha; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Li, Zhijin; ...

    2015-01-20

    Fine-resolution three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multi-scale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scalesmore » larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.« less

  7. A Systematic, Large-Scale Study of Synaesthesia: Implications for the Role of Early Experience in Lexical-Colour Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, A. N.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Mattingley, J. B.

    2005-01-01

    For individuals with synaesthesia, stimuli in one sensory modality elicit anomalous experiences in another modality. For example, the sound of a particular piano note may be "seen" as a unique colour, or the taste of a familiar food may be "felt" as a distinct bodily sensation. We report a study of 192 adult synaesthetes, in…

  8. Effects of the scatter in sunspot group tilt angles on the large-scale magnetic field at the solar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-08-10

    The tilt angles of sunspot groups represent the poloidal field source in Babcock-Leighton-type models of the solar dynamo and are crucial for the build-up and reversals of the polar fields in surface flux transport (SFT) simulations. The evolution of the polar field is a consequence of Hale's polarity rules, together with the tilt angle distribution which has a systematic component (Joy's law) and a random component (tilt-angle scatter). We determine the scatter using the observed tilt angle data and study the effects of this scatter on the evolution of the solar surface field using SFT simulations with flux input based upon the recorded sunspot groups. The tilt angle scatter is described in our simulations by a random component according to the observed distributions for different ranges of sunspot group size (total umbral area). By performing simulations with a number of different realizations of the scatter we study the effect of the tilt angle scatter on the global magnetic field, especially on the evolution of the axial dipole moment. The average axial dipole moment at the end of cycle 17 (a medium-amplitude cycle) from our simulations was 2.73 G. The tilt angle scatter leads to an uncertainty of 0.78 G (standard deviation). We also considered cycle 14 (a weak cycle) and cycle 19 (a strong cycle) and show that the standard deviation of the axial dipole moment is similar for all three cycles. The uncertainty mainly results from the big sunspot groups which emerge near the equator. In the framework of Babcock-Leighton dynamo models, the tilt angle scatter therefore constitutes a significant random factor in the cycle-to-cycle amplitude variability, which strongly limits the predictability of solar activity.

  9. Neutron-induced Backgrounds in 134Xe for Large-Scale Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriguchi, Nina; Kidd, Mary; Tornow, Werner

    2016-09-01

    136Xe is used in large neutrinoless double-beta (0 νββ) decay experiments, such as KamLAND- Zen and EXO 200. Though highly purified, 136Xe still contains a significant amount of 134Xe. Recently, a new nuclear energy level was found in 134Xe. If 134Xe decays from this proposed excited state, it will emit a 2485.7 keV gamma ray. Because this energy lies near the region of interest of 136Xe νββ decay experiments (Q value 2457.8 keV), it could make a significant contribution to the background. A purified gaseous sample of 134Xe will be irradiated with neutrons of an incident energy of 4.0 MeV at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory and monitored with high-purity germanium detectors. The spectra obtained from these detectors will be analyzed for the presence of the 2581 keV gamma ray. We will report on the status of this experiment. Future plans include expanding this measurement to higher initial neutron energies. Tennesse Tech University CISE Grant program.

  10. Large-scale magnetic field perturbation arising from the 18 May 1980 eruption from Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, R.J.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    1989-01-01

    A traveling magnetic field disturbance generated by the 18 may 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens at 1532 UT was detected on an 800-km linear array of recording magnetometers installed along the San Andreas fault system in California, from San Francisco to the Salton Sea. Arrival times of the disturbance field, from the most northern of these 24 magnetometers (996 km south of the volcano) to the most southern (1493 km S23?? E), are consistent with the generation of a traveling ionospheric disturbance stimulated by the blast pressure wave in the atmosphere. The first arrivals at the north and the south ends of the array occurred at 26 and 48 min, respectively, after the initial eruption. Apparent average wave velocity through the array is 309 ?? 14 m s-1 but may have approached 600 m s-1 close to the volcano. The horizontal phase and the group velocity of ??? 300 m s-1 at periods of 70-80 min, and the attenuation with distance, strongly suggest that the magnetic field perturbations at distances of 1000-1500 km are caused by gravity mode acoustic-gravity waves propagating at F-region heights in the ionosphere. ?? 1989.

  11. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters (b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{c} ), keeping the direct effect parameter (a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{c} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{c} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{c} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  12. Radiation Fields in Blazars - a Possible Extension of the Small Scale Symbiosis (Disk/Jet) into a Large Scale (Dust/Dust) Symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donea, Alina-C.; Protheroe, Raymond J.

    In blazar models both protons and electrons may be efficiently accelerated in jets and produce γ-rays. Here we discuss the interactions of these γ-rays with different radiation fields. The external radiation fields within a few parsecs from the black hole involved in such interactions could be the direct radiation from the accretion disk coupled with the jet, the infrared radiation from a dusty torus, and the emission line radiation from the broad line region surrounding the accretion disk. The optical thickness for absorption of γ-ray photons in the external radiation fields is analysed for blazars and quasars. Based on the unification theory of active galactic nuclei we briefly review the evidence for the existence of small scale dust tori in blazars/FR I. We propose that the existing jet-accretion disk symbiosis extrapolates to a large scale symbiosis between other important dusty constituents of the blazar/FR I family.

  13. Rapid large-scale magnetic-field dissipation in a collisionless current sheet via coupling between Kelvin-Helmholtz and lower-hybrid drift instabilities.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, I; Suzuki, H; Fujimoto, M; Hoshino, M

    2001-08-27

    Rapid large-scale magnetic-field dissipation is observed in a full kinetic simulation of cross-field current instabilities in a current sheet even when the thickness of the current sheet is at ion scale. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability caused by the velocity shear between the current-carrying ions and the cold background ions excites the lower-hybrid drift instability at the edges of the undulated current sheet. We show that the nonlinear coupling between these two instabilities is responsible for the observed rapid dissipation. The simulation result presents a new route for magnetic-field dissipation in an ion-scale current sheet and demonstrates the general significance of nonlinear cross-scale coupling in collisionless plasmas.

  14. Eta vs. sigma: review of past results, Gallus-Klemp test, and large-scale wind skill in ensemble experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesinger, Fedor; Veljovic, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effect of switching between the eta and the sigma coordinate in numerical weather prediction involving topography, five sets of tests were performed. The eta version did better in all of them particularly with precipitation scores and more accurate placement of storms. However, a problem of flow separation in the lee of the bell-shaped topography discovered by Gallus and Klemp seemed to many to suggest the eta coordinate to be ill suited for high-resolution models. Flow separation is shown not to occur following a refinement of the eta discretization. Trying to identify a primary cause of the improvement in 250 hPa winds previously demonstrated in Eta ensemble members over their ECMWF driver members, ten of the Eta members were run switched to sigma. At a critical time, the Eta members in eta mode showed a tendency for more accurate tilt of a 250 hPa trough than the members run in sigma mode. The experiment was rerun for a more recent and higher resolution ECMWF ensemble, and for an increased number of members. The advantage of the Eta over ECMWF is seen again, even though this time, the Eta resolution during the first 10 days of the experiment was about the same as that of driver members. Rerunning the Eta ensemble switched to sigma showed an advantage in the Eta/eta 250 hPa wind scores used, again associated with an upper-air trough's movement across the Rockies. Better positioning of lee lows ahead of these troughs using Eta/eta is suggested to be making significant contributions to its better precipitation scores. Implications of experiments done for regional climate modeling are discussed as well.

  15. STEADY GENERAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INFLOW/OUTFLOW SOLUTION ALONG LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT THREAD A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Nakamura, Masanori; Hirotani, Kouichi; Asada, Keiichi; Wu, Kinwah

    2015-03-01

    General relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) flows along magnetic fields threading a black hole can be divided into inflow and outflow parts, according to the result of the competition between the black hole gravity and magneto-centrifugal forces along the field line. Here we present the first self-consistent, semi-analytical solution for a cold, Poynting flux–dominated (PFD) GRMHD flow, which passes all four critical (inner and outer, Alfvén, and fast magnetosonic) points along a parabolic streamline. By assuming that the dominating (electromagnetic) component of the energy flux per flux tube is conserved at the surface where the inflow and outflow are separated, the outflow part of the solution can be constrained by the inflow part. The semi-analytical method can provide fiducial and complementary solutions for GRMHD simulations around the rotating black hole, given that the black hole spin, global streamline, and magnetizaion (i.e., a mass loading at the inflow/outflow separation) are prescribed. For reference, we demonstrate a self-consistent result with the work by McKinney in a quantitative level.

  16. Medium and large-scale variations of dynamo-induced electric fields from AE ion drift measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coley, W. R.; Mcclure, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Current models of the low latitude electric field are largely based on data from incoherent scatter radars. These observations are extended through the addition of the rather extensive high quality electric field measurements from the Ion Drift Meter (IDM) aboard the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) spacecraft. Some preliminary results obtained from the Unified Abstract files of satellite AE-E are presented. This satellite was active from the end of 1975 through June 1981 in various elliptical and circular orbits having an inclination near 20 deg. The resulting data can be examined for the variation of ion drift with latitude, longitude, season, solar cycle, altitude, and magnetic activity. The results presented deal primarily with latitudinal variations of the drift features. Diagrams of data are given and briefly interpreted. The preliminary results presented here indicate that IDM data from the AE and the more recent Dynamics Explorer B spacecraft should continue to disclose some interesting and previously unobserved dynamical features of the low latitude F region.

  17. The reproducibility of liquid chromatography separation technology and its potential impact on large scale plant metabolomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Arens, Nadja; Döll, Stefanie; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2015-06-01

    Unraveling the constituents of biological samples using HPLC is a central core technology in metabolomics experiments. Consistency in retention time across many samples is a critical criterion for judging the quality of a data set, which must be met before further analysis are possible. Here, the performance of two ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) systems has been compared using an established separation protocol optimized for phenylpropanoids, a class of secondary compounds found in plants displaying intermediate polarity. The two systems differed markedly with respect to their reproducibility and pressure stability. The standard deviation of the retention time of representative peaks differs up to 30-folds between the systems. Adjustments made to the gradient profiles succeeded in equalizing their level of performance. However, the modifications made to the separation protocol reduced the quality of the separation, particularly of the more rapidly eluting components, and lengthened the run time.

  18. Gap junctions mediate large-scale Turing structures in a mean-field cortex driven by subcortical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Wilson, M. T.; Sleigh, J. W.

    2007-07-01

    One of the grand puzzles in neuroscience is establishing the link between cognition and the disparate patterns of spontaneous and task-induced brain activity that can be measured clinically using a wide range of detection modalities such as scalp electrodes and imaging tomography. High-level brain function is not a single-neuron property, yet emerges as a cooperative phenomenon of multiply-interacting populations of neurons. Therefore a fruitful modeling approach is to picture the cerebral cortex as a continuum characterized by parameters that have been averaged over a small volume of cortical tissue. Such mean-field cortical models have been used to investigate gross patterns of brain behavior such as anesthesia, the cycles of natural sleep, memory and erasure in slow-wave sleep, and epilepsy. There is persuasive and accumulating evidence that direct gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons promote synchronous oscillatory behavior both locally and across distances of some centimeters, but, to date, continuum models have ignored gap-junction connectivity. In this paper we employ simple mean-field arguments to derive an expression for D2 , the diffusive coupling strength arising from gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons. Using recent neurophysiological measurements reported by Fukuda [J. Neurosci. 26, 3434 (2006)], we estimate an upper limit of D2≈0.6cm2 . We apply a linear stability analysis to a standard mean-field cortical model, augmented with gap-junction diffusion, and find this value for the diffusive coupling strength to be close to the critical value required to destabilize the homogeneous steady state. Computer simulations demonstrate that larger values of D2 cause the noise-driven model cortex to spontaneously crystalize into random mazelike Turing structures: centimeter-scale spatial patterns in which regions of high-firing activity are intermixed with regions of low-firing activity. These structures are consistent with the

  19. A large-scale measurement of electromagnetic fields near GSM base stations in Guangxi, China for risk communication.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongning; Shao, Qing; Yang, Lei; Qi, Dianyuan; Lin, Jun; Lin, Xiaojun; Yu, Zongying

    2013-06-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure from wireless telecommunication base station antennae can lead to debates, conflicts or litigations among the adjacent residents if inappropriately managed. This paper presents a measurement campaign for the GSM band EMF exposure in the vicinity of 827 base station sites (totally 6207 measurement points) in Guangxi, China. Measurement specifications are designed for risk communication with the residents who previously complained of over-exposure. The EMF power densities with the global positioning system coordinate at each measured point were recorded. Compliance with the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines and Chinese environmental EMF safety standards was studied. The results show that the GSM band EMF level near the base stations is very low. The measurement results and the EMF risk communication procedures positively influence public perception of the RF EMF exposure from the base stations and promote the exchange of EMF exposure-related knowledge.

  20. Observing Dynamics in Large-Scale Birkeland Currents with the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.; Olson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) provides continuous global observations of the magnetic perturbations that predominantly reflect Birkeland currents. The data are acquired by avionics magnetometers of the Iridium satellites and allow measurements from 66 satellites in near-polar circular, low altitude orbits. The configuration of the Iridium satellite constellation determines the longitude sampling spacing of ~ 2 hours and the re-sampling cadence of the system which is 9 minutes. From 2008 to 2013 the AMPERE system was developed which included new flight software on the Iridium satellites to allow telemetry of higher rate data to the ground and the Science Data Center to derive Birkeland current perturbations from the data and invert these signals to derive the global distributions of the currents using data windows of ten minutes. There were many challenges in developing AMPERE including automating inter-calibration between satellites and the baseline determination and removals. The results of AMPERE provide stunning confirmation of many of the statistical estimates for the distribution of currents but more significantly open a new window to understand their instantaneous distribution and dynamics. Examples of new features of the currents and their dynamics revealed by AMPERE are presented. In addition, prospects for new data products and increased data quality anticipated from AMPERE-NEXT to be implemented on the Iridium-NEXT generation of satellites are discussed.

  1. Variations over time in latitudinal distribution of the large-scale magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere at heights from the photosphere to the source surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtemov, Z. S.; Andreyeva, O. A.; Rudenko, G. V.; Stepanian, N. N.; Fainshtein, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    Calculations of magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and the "potential field-source surface" model have been used to study time variations in several parameters of the large-scale magnetic field at various heights during the last four solar cycles. At ten heights from the solar surface (R = Ro) to the source surface (R = 2.5Ro), we have constructed synoptic charts (SC) of the radial component Br of the estimated magnetic field. For these SC, we have identified 10-degree latitudinal zones. Within these zones, we found values of Sp (positive Br values averaged within the latitudinal zone over latitude and longitude), Sm (averaged modulus of negative Br values) and S + fields (a part of the latitudinal zone area (in %) occupied by positive Br values). At lower latitudes, cyclic variations in the Sp + Sm parameter are demonstrated to be similar (but not in detail) to time variations in Wolf numbers. Latitudes of 55° and higher exhibited virtually no cyclic peculiarities of time variations in this parameter. The authors believe that this indicates the diverse nature of the large-scale magnetic field in the near-equatorial and polar regions of the solar atmosphere. At R = 2.5Ro, Sp + Sm cyclic variations are almost invisible at all latitudes and only slightly apparent near the equator. The analysis of S + fields variations revealed that at low latitudes at R = 2.5Ro during solar cycles 21, 22 and ascending phase of cycle 23 there were almost no mixed-polarity periods. However, beginning from the maximum of cycle 23, in the near-equatorial region the mixed polarity was observed until the end of the long solar activity minimum. An assumption has been made that this might have been one of the forerunners and manifestations of the prolonged minimum between cycles 23 and 24. It has been found that during solar activity minima poleward there appears motion of magnetic fields with polarity opposite to that of the field at the pole. We have estimated the velocity of such a

  2. A large-scale field trial of malathion as an insecticide for antimalarial work in southern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Najera, J. A.; Shidrawi, G. R.; Gibson, F. D.; Stafford, J. S.

    1967-01-01

    Malathion shows promise as a substitute for chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticides in the control of malaria whenever the latter are unsuitable because of Anopheles resistance or other reasons. A field trial of malathion was carried out in 1963-64, covering an area of about 500 km2 with a population of about 26 000, in Masaka District, southern Uganda. All houses and animal shelters were sprayed with malathion at 2 g/m2 at roughly 4-month intervals. The average combined densities of the females of the two main malaria vectors, Anopheles funestus and An. gambiae, fell from an average of 66 per shelter per day in a pre-trial survey in 1960-61 to 0.0011 at the end of 1964 in the sprayed area; no significant changes were noted in unsprayed comparison areas. The transmission of the infection in humans was apparently interrupted when allowance was made for imported cases. The presence of unsprayed surfaces in houses which had recently been built or altered interfered somewhat with complete coverage. Case detection was reliable and achieved excellent coverage. No toxic effects of malathion in humans were noted, while the effect on mosquitos was considerable even in the absence of direct contact. This effect of malathion lasted for a considerably shorter period of time in houses roofed with corrugated iron than with thatch; this should be borne in mind in the design of spraying programmes. PMID:5299860

  3. Thermocline deepening boosts ecosystem metabolism: evidence from a large-scale lake enclosure experiment simulating a summer storm.

    PubMed

    Giling, Darren P; Nejstgaard, Jens C; Berger, Stella A; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kirillin, Georgiy; Penske, Armin; Lentz, Maren; Casper, Peter; Sareyka, Jörg; Gessner, Mark O

    2017-04-01

    Extreme weather events can pervasively influence ecosystems. Observations in lakes indicate that severe storms in particular can have pronounced ecosystem-scale consequences, but the underlying mechanisms have not been rigorously assessed in experiments. One major effect of storms on lakes is the redistribution of mineral resources and plankton communities as a result of abrupt thermocline deepening. We aimed at elucidating the importance of this effect by mimicking in replicated large enclosures (each 9 m in diameter, ca. 20 m deep, ca. 1300 m(3) in volume) a mixing event caused by a severe natural storm that was previously observed in a deep clear-water lake. Metabolic rates were derived from diel changes in vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen concentrations using a Bayesian modelling approach, based on high-frequency measurements. Experimental thermocline deepening stimulated daily gross primary production (GPP) in surface waters by an average of 63% for >4 weeks even though thermal stratification re-established within 5 days. Ecosystem respiration (ER) was tightly coupled to GPP, exceeding that in control enclosures by 53% over the same period. As GPP responded more strongly than ER, net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of the entire water column was also increased. These protracted increases in ecosystem metabolism and autotrophy were driven by a proliferation of inedible filamentous cyanobacteria released from light and nutrient limitation after they were entrained from below the thermocline into the surface water. Thus, thermocline deepening by a single severe storm can induce prolonged responses of lake ecosystem metabolism independent of other storm-induced effects, such as inputs of terrestrial materials by increased catchment run-off. This highlights that future shifts in frequency, severity or timing of storms are an important component of climate change, whose impacts on lake thermal structure will superimpose upon climate trends to influence algal

  4. Five Years of Land Surface Phenology in a Large Scale Hydrological Manipulation Experiment in an Arctic Tundra Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, S.; Gamon, J. A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change appears to be most pronounced at high northern latitudes. Many of the observed and modeled climate change responses in arctic tundra ecosystems have profound effects on surface energy budgets, land-atmosphere carbon exchange, plant phenology, and geomorphic processes. Detecting biotic responses to a changing environment is essential for understanding the consequences of global change. Plants can work as very effective indicators of changing conditions and, depending on the nature of the change, respond by increasing or decreasing amounts of green-leaf biomass, chlorophyll, and water content. Shifts in the composition and abundance of plant species have important effects on ecosystem processes such as net primary production and nutrient cycling. Vegetation is expected to be responsive to arctic warming, although there is some uncertainty as to how the interplay between geomorphic, hydrologic, climatic and other biotic will manifest over a range of spatial scales. The NSF-supported Biocomplexity project in Barrow, Alaska, involves experimental manipulation of water table (drained, flooded, and control treatments) in a vegetated arctic thaw lake basin to investigate the effects of altered hydrology on land-atmosphere carbon balance. In each experimental treatment, hyperspectral reflectance data were collected in the visible and near IR range of the spectrum using a robotic tram system that operated along a 300m tramline during the snow free growing period between June and August 2005-09. Water table depths and soil volumetric water content was also collected along these transects. The years 2005-2007 were control or unmanipulated experimental years and 2008 and 2009 were experimental years where water table was raised (+10cm) and lowered (-10cm) in flooding and draining experiments respectively. This presentation will document the change in phenology (NDVI) between years, treatments, and land cover types. Findings from this research have implications

  5. Assessment and mitigation of errors associated with a large-scale field investigation of methane emissions from the Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulton, D.; Golston, L.; Li, Q.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Pan, D.; Lane, H.; Lu, J.; Fitts, J. P.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work suggests the distribution of methane emissions from fracking operations is a skewed distributed with a small percentage of emitters contributing a large proportion of the total emissions. In order to provide a statistically robust distributions of emitters and determine the presence of super-emitters, errors in current techniques need to be constrained and mitigated. The Marcellus shale, the most productive natural gas shale field in the United States, has received less intense focus for well-level emissions and is here investigated to provide the distribution of methane emissions. In July of 2015 approximately 250 unique well pads were sampled using the Princeton Atmospheric Chemistry Mobile Acquisition Node (PAC-MAN). This mobile lab includes a Garmin GPS unit, Vaisala weather station (WTX520), LICOR 7700 CH4 open path sensor and LICOR 7500 CO2/H2O open path sensor. Sampling sites were preselected based on wind direction, sampling distance and elevation grade. All sites were sampled during low boundary layer conditions (600-1000 and 1800-2200 local time). The majority of sites were sampled 1-3 times while selected test sites were sampled multiple times or resampled several times during the day. For selected sites a sampling tower was constructed consisting of a Metek uSonic-3 Class A sonic anemometer, and an additional LICOR 7700 and 7500. Data were recorded for at least one hour at these sites. A robust study and inter-comparison of different methodologies will be presented. The Gaussian plume model will be used to calculate fluxes for all sites and compare results from test sites with multiple passes. Tower data is used to provide constraints on the Gaussian plume model. Additionally, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) modeling will be used to calculate emissions from the tower sites. Alternative techniques will also be discussed. Results from these techniques will be compared to identify best practices and provide robust error estimates.

  6. Near and far field contamination modeling in a large scale enclosure: Fire Dynamics Simulator comparisons with measured observations.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Noah L; Schemel, Christopher F; Jankiewicz, Sean P

    2006-03-17

    The occurrence of a fire, no matter how small, often exposes objects to significant levels of contamination from the products of combustion. The production and dispersal of these contaminants has been an issue of relevance in the field of fire science for many years, though little work has been done to examine the contamination levels accumulated within an enclosure some time after an incident. This phenomenon is of great importance when considering the consequences associated with even low level contamination of sensitive materials, such as food, pharmaceuticals, clothing, electrical equipment, etc. Not only does such exposure present a localized hazard, but also the shipment of contaminated goods places distant recipients at risk. It is the intent of this paper to use a well-founded computational fluid dynamic (CFD) program, the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), a large eddy simulation (LES) code developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to model smoke dispersion in order to assess the subject of air contamination and post fire surface contamination in a warehouse facility. Measured results are then compared with the results from the FDS model. Two components are examined: the production rate of contaminates and the trajectory of contaminates caused by the forced ventilation conditions. Each plays an important role in determining the extent to which the products of combustion are dispersed and the levels to which products are exposed to the contaminants throughout the enclosure. The model results indicate a good first-order approximation to the measured surface contamination levels. The proper application of the FDS model can provide a cost and time efficient means of evaluating contamination levels within a defined volume.

  7. Constructing a large-scale 3D Geologic Model for Analysis of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J; Myers, S

    2008-04-09

    We have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern Great Basin, in support of a seismic wave propagation investigation of the 1993 Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The model is centered on the NPE and spans longitude -119.5{sup o} to -112.6{sup o} and latitude 34.5{sup o} to 39.8{sup o}; the depth ranges from the topographic surface to 150 km below sea level. The model includes the southern half of Nevada, as well as parts of eastern California, western Utah, and a portion of northwestern Arizona. The upper crust is constrained by both geologic and geophysical studies, while the lower crust and upper mantle are constrained by geophysical studies. The mapped upper crustal geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary deposits, pre-Tertiary deposits, intrusive rocks of all ages, and calderas. The lower crust and upper mantle are parameterized with 5 layers, including the Moho. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geology at the NTS. Digital geologic outcrop data were available for both Nevada and Arizona, whereas geologic maps for California and Utah were scanned and hand-digitized. Published gravity data (2km spacing) were used to determine the thickness of the Cenozoic deposits and thus estimate the depth of the basins. The free surface is based on a 10m lateral resolution DEM at the NTS and a 90m lateral resolution DEM elsewhere. Variations in crustal thickness are based on receiver function analysis and a framework compilation of reflection/refraction studies. We used Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. For seismic studies, the geologic units are mapped to specific seismic velocities. The gross geophysical structure of the crust and upper mantle is taken from regional surface

  8. Toward Elimination of Dog-Mediated Human Rabies: Experiences from Implementing a Large-scale Demonstration Project in Southern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mpolya, Emmanuel Abraham; Lembo, Tiziana; Lushasi, Kennedy; Mancy, Rebecca; Mbunda, Eberhard M.; Makungu, Selemani; Maziku, Matthew; Sikana, Lwitiko; Jaswant, Gurdeep; Townsend, Sunny; Meslin, François-Xavier; Abela-Ridder, Bernadette; Ngeleja, Chanasa; Changalucha, Joel; Mtema, Zacharia; Sambo, Maganga; Mchau, Geofrey; Rysava, Kristyna; Nanai, Alphoncina; Kazwala, Rudovick; Cleaveland, Sarah; Hampson, Katie

    2017-01-01

    A Rabies Elimination Demonstration Project was implemented in Tanzania from 2010 through to 2015, bringing together government ministries from the health and veterinary sectors, the World Health Organization, and national and international research institutions. Detailed data on mass dog vaccination campaigns, bite exposures, use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), and human rabies deaths were collected throughout the project duration and project areas. Despite no previous experience in dog vaccination within the project areas, district veterinary officers were able to implement district-wide vaccination campaigns that, for most part, progressively increased the numbers of dogs vaccinated with each phase of the project. Bite exposures declined, particularly in the southernmost districts with the smallest dog populations, and health workers successfully transitioned from primarily intramuscular administration of PEP to intradermal administration, resulting in major cost savings. However, even with improved PEP provision, vaccine shortages still occurred in some districts. In laboratory diagnosis, there were several logistical challenges in sample handling and submission but compared to the situation before the project started, there was a moderate increase in the number of laboratory samples submitted and tested for rabies in the project areas with a decrease in the proportion of rabies-positive samples over time. The project had a major impact on public health policy and practice with the formation of a One Health Coordination Unit at the Prime Minister’s Office and development of the Tanzania National Rabies Control Strategy, which lays a roadmap for elimination of rabies in Tanzania by 2030 by following the Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination (SARE). Overall, the project generated many important lessons relevant to rabies prevention and control in particular and disease surveillance in general. Lessons include the need for (1) a specific unit in the

  9. Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter system to measure the flow field around a large scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Brashears, M. R.; Jordan, A. J.; Shrider, K. R.; Vought, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The flow field measured around a hovering 70 percent scale vertical takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft model is described. The velocity measurements were conducted with a ground based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation and experimental tests of the velocity surveys are discussed. The distribution of vertical velocity in the fan jet and fountain; the radial velocity in the wall jet and the horizontal velocity along the aircraft underside are presented for different engine rpms and aircraft height above ground. Results show that it is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to measure the flow field generated by a large scale V/STOL aircraft operating in ground effect.

  10. Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter system to measure the flow field of a large scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Brashears, M. R.; Jordan, A. J.; Shrider, K. R.; Vought, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the flow field around a 70 percent scale V/STOL aircraft model in ground effect is described. The velocity measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter at an outdoor test pad. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and results of the velocity surveys are discussed. The distribution of vertical velocity in the fan jet and fountain, the radial velocity in the wall jet and the horizontal velocity along the aircraft underside are presented for different engine rpms and aircraft heights above ground. The study shows that it is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to measure the flow field generated by a large scale V/STOL aircraft operating in ground effect.

  11. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Śacute; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşąu, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60°, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the ~ 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for.

  12. A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship Between Local-Scale Radar Observations of Cloud Occurrence and Large-Scale Atmospheric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Marchand, Roger T.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Thompson, Sandra E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Schultz, David M.

    2006-11-01

    In this paper an atmospheric classification scheme based on fields that are resolved by global climate models (and numerical weather prediction models) is investigated as a mechanism to map the large-scale (synoptic-scale) atmospheric state to distributions of local-scale cloud properties. Using a bootstrap resampling technique, the temporal stability and distinctness of vertical profiles of cloud occurrence (obtained from a vertically pointing millimeter wavelength cloud-radar) are analyzed as a function of the atmospheric state. A stable class-based map from the large-scale to local-scale cloud properties could be of great utility in the analysis of GCM-predicted cloud properties, by providing a physical context from which to understand any differences between the model output and observations, as well as to separate differences (in total distribution) that are caused by having different weather regimes (or synoptic scale activity) rather than problems in the representation of clouds for a particular regime. Furthermore, if sufficiently robust mappings can be established, it could form the basis of a statistical GCM cloud parameterization.

  13. Large-scale structure and microwave-background anisotropies in cosmological models and stellar photometry techniques with wide-field/planetary camera of the Hubble space telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two separate parts. The first presents calculations of microwave background anisotropies at various angular scales and of expected large scale bulk velocities and mass correlation functions for a variety of models which include baryons, radiation, cold dark matter (CDM), and massive and massless neutrinos. Free parameters include {Omega}, H{sub 0}, the mass fractions of each component, and the initial conditions; nearly 100 different models are considered. Open and flat models with blot adiabatic and isocurvature initial conditions are calculated for models without massive neutrinos. A set of flat models with both massive neutrinos and CDM with adiabatic initial conditions is also considered. Fitting functions for the mass transfer function and small angle radiation correlation function are provided for all of the models. A discussion of the evolution of the perturbations is presented. Results are compared with some recent observations of large scale velocities and limits on microwave background anisotropies. CDM and baryon models have difficulty satisfying observational limits, although they are not completely ruled out. Hybrid models with massive neutrinos and CDM satisfy current observational data. The second part of the dissertation is a discussion with the Wide Field/Planetary Camer (WF/PC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Detailed simulations are used to determine optimum techniques to use and to assess the expected accuracy of such techniques.

  14. Nutrient enrichment modifies temperature-biodiversity relationships in large-scale field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun; Pan, Feiyan; Soininen, Janne; Heino, Jani; Shen, Ji

    2016-12-01

    Climate effects and human impacts, that is, nutrient enrichment, simultaneously drive spatial biodiversity patterns. However, there is little consensus about their independent effects on biodiversity. Here we manipulate nutrient enrichment in aquatic microcosms in subtropical and subarctic regions (China and Norway, respectively) to show clear segregation of bacterial species along temperature gradients, and decreasing alpha and gamma diversity toward higher nutrients. The temperature dependence of species richness is greatest at extreme nutrient levels, whereas the nutrient dependence of species richness is strongest at intermediate temperatures. For species turnover rates, temperature effects are strongest at intermediate and two extreme ends of nutrient gradients in subtropical and subarctic regions, respectively. Species turnover rates caused by nutrients do not increase toward higher temperatures. These findings illustrate direct effects of temperature and nutrients on biodiversity, and indirect effects via primary productivity, thus providing insights into how nutrient enrichment could alter biodiversity under future climate scenarios.

  15. Nutrient enrichment modifies temperature-biodiversity relationships in large-scale field experiments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianjun; Pan, Feiyan; Soininen, Janne; Heino, Jani; Shen, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Climate effects and human impacts, that is, nutrient enrichment, simultaneously drive spatial biodiversity patterns. However, there is little consensus about their independent effects on biodiversity. Here we manipulate nutrient enrichment in aquatic microcosms in subtropical and subarctic regions (China and Norway, respectively) to show clear segregation of bacterial species along temperature gradients, and decreasing alpha and gamma diversity toward higher nutrients. The temperature dependence of species richness is greatest at extreme nutrient levels, whereas the nutrient dependence of species richness is strongest at intermediate temperatures. For species turnover rates, temperature effects are strongest at intermediate and two extreme ends of nutrient gradients in subtropical and subarctic regions, respectively. Species turnover rates caused by nutrients do not increase toward higher temperatures. These findings illustrate direct effects of temperature and nutrients on biodiversity, and indirect effects via primary productivity, thus providing insights into how nutrient enrichment could alter biodiversity under future climate scenarios. PMID:28000677

  16. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  17. Actual Condition of Paddy Field Levee Maintenance by Various Farm Households including Large-scale Farming in the Developed Land Renting Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yasuyo

    The survey of interview, resource acquisition, photographic operation, and questionnaire were carried out in the “n” Community in the “y” District in Hakusan City in Ishikawa Prefecture to investigate the actual condition of paddy field levee maintenance in the area where land-renting market was proceeding, large-scale farming was dominant, and the problems of geographically scattered farm-land existed. In the study zone, 1) an agricultural production legal person rent-cultivated some of the paddy fields and maintained the levees, 2) another agricultural production legal person rent-cultivated some of the soy bean fields for crop changeover and land owners maintained the levees. The results indicated that sufficient maintenance was executed on the levees of the paddy fields cultivated by the agricultural production legal person, the soy bean fields for crop changeover, and the paddy fields cultivated by the land owners. Each reason is considered to be the managerial strategy, the economic incentive, the mutual monitoring and cross-regulatory mechanism, etc.

  18. Experience in managing a large-scale rescreening of Papanicolaou smears and the pros and cons of measuring proficiency with visual and written examinations.

    PubMed

    Rube, I F

    1989-01-01

    Experiences in a large-scale interlaboratory rescreening of Papanicolaou smears are detailed, and the pros and cons of measuring proficiency in cytology are discussed. Despite the additional work of the rescreening project and some psychological and technical problems, it proved to be a useful measure of the laboratory's performance as a whole. One problem to be avoided in future similar studies is the creation of too many diagnostic categories. Individual testing and certification have been shown to be accurate predictors of proficiency. For cytology, such tests require a strong visual component to test interpretation and judgment skills, such as by the use of glass slides or photomicrographs. The potential of interactive videodisc technology for facilitating cytopathologic teaching and assessment is discussed.

  19. Early Soil Moisture Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmugge, T.

    2008-12-01

    Before the large scale field experiments described in the call for papers, there were a number of experiments devoted to a single parameter, e.g. soil moisture. In the early 1970's, before the launch of the first microwave radiometer by NASA, there were a number of aircraft experiments to determine utility of these sensors for land observations. For soil moisture, these experiments were conducted in southwestern United States over irrigated agricultural areas which could provide a wide range of moisture conditions on a given day. The radiometers covered the wavelength range from 0.8 to 21 cm. These experiments demonstrated that it is possible to observe soil moisture variations remotely using a microwave radiometer with a sensitivity of about 3 K / unit of soil moisture. The results also showed that the longer wavelengths were better, with a radiometer at the 21 cm wavelength giving the best results. These positive results led to the development of Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) and the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instruments at the 21-cm wavelength. They have been used extensively in the large-scale experiments such as HAPEX-MOBILHY, FIFE, Monsoon90, SMEX, etc. The multi-beam nature of these instruments makes it possible to obtain more extensive coverage and thus to map spatial variations of surface soil moisture. Examples of the early results along with the more recent soil moisture maps will be presented.

  20. QUANTIFYING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD FROM LARGE-SCALE CLOUD TO COLLAPSING CORE: SELF-SIMILARITY, MASS-TO-FLUX RATIO, AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Patrick M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2012-03-01

    Dust polarization observational results are analyzed for the high-mass star formation region W51 from the largest parent cloud ({approx}2 pc, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) to the large-scale envelope ({approx}0.5 pc, BIMA array) down to the collapsing core e2 ({approx}60 mpc, Submillimeter Array). Magnetic field and dust emission gradient orientations reveal a correlation which becomes increasingly more tight with higher resolution. The previously developed polarization-intensity-gradient method is applied in order to quantify the magnetic field significance. This technique provides a way to estimate the local magnetic field force compared to gravity without the need of any mass or field strength measurements, solely making use of measured angles which reflect the geometrical imprint of the various forces. All three data sets clearly show regions with distinct features in the field-to-gravity force ratio. Azimuthally averaged radial profiles of this force ratio reveal a transition from a field dominance at larger distances to a gravity dominance closer to the emission peaks. Normalizing these profiles to a characteristic core scale points toward self-similarity. Furthermore, the polarization-intensity-gradient method is linked to the mass-to-flux ratio, providing a new approach to estimate the latter one without mass and field strength inputs. A transition from a magnetically supercritical to a subcritical state as a function of distance from the emission peak is found for the e2 core. Finally, based on the measured radius-dependent field-to-gravity force ratio we derive a modified star formation efficiency with a diluted gravity force. Compared to a standard (free-fall) efficiency, the observed field is capable of reducing the efficiency down to 10% or less.

  1. Large scale 3D geometry of deformation structures in the Aar massif and overlying Helvetic nappes (Central Alps, Switzerland) - A combined remote sensing and field work approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, R.; Wehrens, Ph.; Herwegh, M.

    2012-04-01

    Allowing deep insight into the formation history of a rock complex, shear zones, faults and joint systems represent important sources of geological information. The granitic rocks of the Haslital valley (Switzerland) show very good outcrop conditions to study these mechanical anisotropies. Furthermore, they permit a quantitative characterisation of the above-mentioned deformation structures on the large-scale, in terms of their 3D orientation, 3D spatial distribution, kinematics and evolution in 3D. A key problem while developing valid geological 3D models is the three-dimensional spatial distribution of geological structures, particularly with increasing distance from the surface. That is especially true in regions, where only little or even no "hard" underground data (e.g. bore holes, tunnel mappings and seismics) is available. In the study area, many subsurface data are available (e.g. cross sections, tunnel and pipeline mappings, bore holes etc.). Therefore, two methods dealing with the problems mentioned are developed: (1) A data acquisition, processing and visualisation method, (2) A methodology to improve the reliability of 3D models regarding the spatial trend of geological structures with increasing depth: 1) Using aerial photographs and a high-resolution digital elevation model, a GIS-based remote-sensing structural map of large-scale structural elements (shear zones, faults) of the study area was elaborated. Based on that lineament map, (i) a shear zone map was derived and (ii) a geostatistical analysis was applied to identify sub regions applicable for serving as field areas to test the methodology presented above. During fieldwork, the shear zone map was evaluated by verifying the occurrence and spatial distribution of the structures designated by remote sensing. Additionally, the geometry of the structures (e.g. 3D orientation, width, kinematics) was characterised and parameterised accordingly. These tasks were partially done using a GPS based Slate

  2. THE RECENT REJUVENATION OF THE SUN’S LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD: A CLUE FOR UNDERSTANDING PAST AND FUTURE SUNSPOT CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Wang, Y.-M.

    2015-08-20

    The quiet nature of sunspot cycle 24 was disrupted during the second half of 2014 when the Sun’s large-scale field underwent a sudden rejuvenation: the solar mean field reached its highest value since 1991, the interplanetary field strength doubled, and galactic cosmic rays showed their strongest 27-day modulation since neutron-monitor observations began in 1957; in the outer corona, the large increase of field strength was reflected by unprecedentedly large numbers of coronal loops collapsing inward along the heliospheric current sheet. Here, we show that this rejuvenation was not caused by a significant increase in the level of solar activity as measured by the smoothed sunspot number and CME rate, but instead was caused by the systematic emergence of flux in active regions whose longitudinal distribution greatly increased the Sun’s dipole moment. A similar post-maximum increase in the dipole moment occurred during each of the previous three sunspot cycles, and marked the start of the declining phase of each cycle. We note that the north–south component of this peak dipole moment provides an early indicator of the amplitude of the next cycle, and conclude that the amplitude of cycle 25 may be comparable to that of cycle 24, and well above the amplitudes obtained during the Maunder Minimum.

  3. Large-scale growth of well-aligned SiC tower-like nanowire arrays and their field emission properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Li, Chengming; Yang, Yang; Chen, Shanliang; Gao, Fengmei; Wei, Guodong; Yang, Weiyou

    2015-01-14

    Fabrication of well-aligned one-dimensional (1D) nanostrucutres is critically important and highly desired since it is the key step to realize the patterned arrays to be used as the display units. In the present work, we report the large-scale and well-aligned growth of n-type SiC nanowire arrays on the 6H-SiC wafer substrates via pyrolysis of polymeric precursors assisted by Au catalysts. The obtained n-type SiC nanowires are highly qualified with sharp tips and numerous sharp corners around the wire bodies, which bring the emitters excellent field emission (FE) performance with low turn-on fields (1.50 V/μm), low threshold fields (2.65 V/μm), and good current emission stabilities (fluctuation <3.8%). The work abilities of the n-type SiC tower-like nanowire arrays under high-temperature harsh environments have been investigated, suggesting that the resultant field emitters could be well serviced up to 500 °C. The temperature-enhanced FE behaviors could be attributed to the reduction of the work function induced by the rise of temperatures and the incorporated N dopants. It is believed that the present well-aligned n-type SiC tower-like nanowire arrays could meet nearly all stringent requirements for an ideal FE emitter with excellent FE properties, making their applications very promising in displays and other electronic nanodevices.

  4. A facile route for the fabrication of large-scale gate-all-around nanofluidic field-effect transistors with low leakage current.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangwoo; Kim, Beom Seok; Song, Jiwoon; Lee, Hwanseong; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2012-07-21

    Active modulation of ions and molecules via field-effect gating in nanofluidic channels is a crucial technology for various promising applications such as DNA sequencing, drug delivery, desalination, and energy conversion. Developing a rapid and facile fabrication method for ionic field-effect transistors (FET) over a large area may offer exciting opportunities for both fundamental research and innovative applications. Here, we report a rapid, cost-effective route for the fabrication of large-scale nanofluidic field-effect transistors using a simple, lithography-free two-step fabrication process that consists of sputtering and barrier-type anodization. A robust alumina gate dielectric layer, which is formed by anodizing sputtered aluminium, can be rapidly fabricated in the order of minutes. When anodizing aluminium, we employ a hemispherical counter electrode in order to give a uniform electric field that encompasses the whole sputtered aluminium layer which has high surface roughness. In consequence, a well-defined thin layer of alumina with perfect step coverage is formed on a highly rough aluminium surface. A gate-all-around nanofluidic FET with a leak-free gate dielectric exhibits outstanding gating performance despite a large channel size. The thin and robust anodized alumina gate dielectric plays a crucial role in achieving such excellent capacitive coupling. The combination of a gate-all-around structure with a leak-free gate dielectric over a large area could yield breakthroughs in areas ranging from biotechnology to energy and environmental applications.

  5. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L. |; Rickert, M. |

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Large scale tracking algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  7. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  8. Dynamic investigation of nutrient consumption and injection strategy in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) by means of large-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiyong; Zhu, Weiyao; Sun, Gangzheng; Blanckaert, Koen

    2015-08-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) depends on the in situ microbial activity to release trapped oil in reservoirs. In practice, undesired consumption is a universal phenomenon but cannot be observed effectively in small-scale physical simulations due to the scale effect. The present paper investigates the dynamics of oil recovery, biomass and nutrient consumption in a series of flooding experiments in a dedicated large-scale sand-pack column. First, control experiments of nutrient transportation with and without microbial consumption were conducted, which characterized the nutrient loss during transportation. Then, a standard microbial flooding experiment was performed recovering additional oil (4.9 % Original Oil in Place, OOIP), during which microbial activity mostly occurred upstream, where oil saturation declined earlier and steeper than downstream in the column. Subsequently, more oil remained downstream due to nutrient shortage. Finally, further research was conducted to enhance the ultimate recovery by optimizing the injection strategy. An extra 3.5 % OOIP was recovered when the nutrients were injected in the middle of the column, and another additional 11.9 % OOIP were recovered by altering the timing of nutrient injection.

  9. Large-scale deployment of seed treatments has driven rapid increase in use of neonicotinoid insecticides and preemptive pest management in US field crops.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Margaret R; Tooker, John F

    2015-04-21

    Neonicotinoids are the most widely used class of insecticides worldwide, but patterns of their use in the U.S. are poorly documented, constraining attempts to understand their role in pest management and potential nontarget effects. We synthesized publicly available data to estimate and interpret trends in neonicotinoid use since their introduction in 1994, with a special focus on seed treatments, a major use not captured by the national pesticide-use survey. Neonicotinoid use increased rapidly between 2003 and 2011, as seed-applied products were introduced in field crops, marking an unprecedented shift toward large-scale, preemptive insecticide use: 34-44% of soybeans and 79-100% of maize hectares were treated in 2011. This finding contradicts recent analyses, which concluded that insecticides are used today on fewer maize hectares than a decade or two ago. If current trends continue, neonicotinoid use will increase further through application to more hectares of soybean and other crop species and escalation of per-seed rates. Alternatively, our results, and other recent analyses, suggest that carefully targeted efforts could considerably reduce neonicotinoid use in field crops without yield declines or economic harm to farmers, reducing the potential for pest resistance, nontarget pest outbreaks, environmental contamination, and harm to wildlife, including pollinator species.

  10. Determination of longitudinal dispersion coefficient and net advection in the tidal hudson river with a large-scale, high resolution SF6 tracer release experiment.

    PubMed

    Ho, David T; Schlosser, Peter; Caplow, Theodore

    2002-08-01

    Physical processes such as advection, dispersion, and air-water gas exchange play important roles in determining the movement and change in concentration of contaminants discharged into rivers. In the following, we report results from a large-scale SF6 tracer release experiment conducted in the tidal Hudson Riverto examine longitudinal dispersion and net advection. SF6 was injected into the Hudson River near Newburgh, NY, and surveyed for 13 days using a new, fully automated, high-resolution SF6 sampling and analysis system. Net down river advection of the water body originally tagged with SF6 was slow, averaging mean displacement rates of about 0.5 +/- 0.2 km d(-1). In contrast, spreading of the tracer was driven by tidal movement, causing rapid mixing of the water up and down river. By examining the change in the second moment of the tracer distribution with time, we determined the mean longitudinal dispersion coefficient to be 70.1 +/- 4.3 m2 s(-1). Temporal evolution of the SF6 inventory indicates an average gas transfer velocity over the period of the experiment of 6.5 +/- 0.5 cm h(-1) (1.56 +/- 0.12 m d(-1)). Vertical profiles show that mixing into the bottom layers of the river, in places reaching more than 53 m, seemed to be rapid.

  11. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua; Schumacher, Courtney; Upton, Hannah; Jensen, Michael P.; Johnson, Karen L.; Wang, Meng; Ahlgrimm, Maike; Feng, Zhe; Minnis, Patrick; Thieman, Mandana

    2016-11-01

    This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs) that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season) and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season) near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia - i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems - is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  12. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; ...

    2016-11-16

    This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs) that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season) and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season) near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wetmore » season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.« less

  13. Dynamics of the large-scale open solar magnetic field and its specific features in the zone of the main active longitudes in 2006-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of the absolute global values (Φ) of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) fluxes at an interval of one solar rotation in 2006-2012 has been studied based on the Wilcox Solar Observatory data and using the ISOPAK original package for modeling the solar magnetic field. The reference points and the duration of the final quasi-biennial interval in cycle 23 (January 2006-May 2007; 17 months) and the phases of the cycle 24 minimum (May 2007-November 2009; 30 months), growth (November 2009-May 2012; 30 months), and the beginning of the maximum (May 2012-January 2013) have been determined. It has been indicated that the absolute values (Φ) decreased sharply at the beginning of the minimum, growth, and the maximum phases to ˜(2, 1.25, 0.75) × 1022 Mx, respectively. During the entire minimum phase, LOSMF corotated super-quasi-rigidly westward in the direction of solar rotation; at the beginning of the growth phase, this field started corotating mostly eastward. The LOSMF polarity reversal in the current cycle 24 started in May-June 2012 (CR 2123-2124), when fields of southern polarity rushed from the Sun's southern hemisphere toward the north. The statement that the solar cycle is a continuous series of quasi-biennial LOSMF intervals is confirmed. In particular, the minimum and growth phases are characterized by opposite LOSMF rotation directions, i.e., super-quasi-rigid corotation (twisting) and detwisting, with identical duration at least in cycle 24.

  14. Influence of a compost layer on the attenuation of 28 selected organic micropollutants under realistic soil aquifer treatment conditions: insights from a large scale column experiment.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Mario; Kröger, Kerrin Franziska; Nödler, Karsten; Ayora, Carlos; Carrera, Jesús; Hernández, Marta; Licha, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Soil aquifer treatment is widely applied to improve the quality of treated wastewater in its reuse as alternative source of water. To gain a deeper understanding of the fate of thereby introduced organic micropollutants, the attenuation of 28 compounds was investigated in column experiments using two large scale column systems in duplicate. The influence of increasing proportions of solid organic matter (0.04% vs. 0.17%) and decreasing redox potentials (denitrification vs. iron reduction) was studied by introducing a layer of compost. Secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant was used as water matrix for simulating soil aquifer treatment. For neutral and anionic compounds, sorption generally increases with the compound hydrophobicity and the solid organic matter in the column system. Organic cations showed the highest attenuation. Among them, breakthroughs were only registered for the cationic beta-blockers atenolol and metoprolol. An enhanced degradation in the columns with organic infiltration layer was observed for the majority of the compounds, suggesting an improved degradation for higher levels of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon. Solely the degradation of sulfamethoxazole could clearly be attributed to redox effects (when reaching iron reducing conditions). The study provides valuable insights into the attenuation potential for a wide spectrum of organic micropollutants under realistic soil aquifer treatment conditions. Furthermore, the introduction of the compost layer generally showed positive effects on the removal of compounds preferentially degraded under reducing conditions and also increases the residence times in the soil aquifer treatment system via sorption.

  15. A large-scale experiment in the control of aquatic snails by the use of molluscicides on a sugar estate in the Northern Region of Tanganyika*

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, N. O.

    1963-01-01

    The author describes a large-scale experiment in which the molluscicide Bayer 73 (Bayluscide) was used in an attempt to eliminate Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the snail host of Schistosoma mansoni, from an irrigation system in Tanganyika. Applied at a concentration of 1 p.p.m., the molluscicide gave a very high kill of snails and much of the treated area remained completely free of vector snails for seven months after treatment. However, there were a few survivors in small pockets associated with a drainage area that became flooded during heavy rains coincident with the application of molluscicide. From these survivors a dramatic resurgence of snails occurred in some of the treated canals. This resurgence may be analogous to similar phenomena observed in some insecticide work. The suggestion is made that removal of parasites and predators, in particular trematode parasites, by a molluscicide might increase the snail's capacity for repopulation. Studies of the seasonal fluctuations of snail population density in an adjacent, but separate, irrigation system suggest that molluscicide applications would be more effective if timed to coincide with the end of the rainy seasons. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:14103411

  16. Large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, X L; Tong, P

    2001-09-01

    A systematic study of large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection is carried out in three different aspect-ratio cells filled with water. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the velocity profiles and statistics over varying Rayleigh numbers Ra and at various spatial positions across the whole convection cell. Large velocity fluctuations are found both in the central region and near the cell boundary. Despite the large velocity fluctuations, the flow field still maintains a large-scale quasi-two-dimensional structure, which rotates in a coherent manner. This coherent single-roll structure scales with Ra and can be divided into three regions in the rotation plane: (1) a thin viscous boundary layer, (2) a fully mixed central core region with a constant mean velocity gradient, and (3) an intermediate plume-dominated buffer region. The experiment reveals a unique driving mechanism for the large-scale coherent rotation in turbulent convection.

  17. Do You Kiss Your Mother with That Mouth? An Authentic Large-Scale Undergraduate Research Experience in Mapping the Human Oral Microbiome†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack T. H.; Daly, Joshua N.; Willner, Dana L.; Patil, Jayee; Hall, Roy A.; Schembri, Mark A.; Tyson, Gene W.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Clinical microbiology testing is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of community and hospital-acquired infections. Laboratory scientists need to utilize technical and problem-solving skills to select from a wide array of microbial identification techniques. The inquiry-driven laboratory training required to prepare microbiology graduates for this professional environment can be difficult to replicate within undergraduate curricula, especially in courses that accommodate large student cohorts. We aimed to improve undergraduate scientific training by engaging hundreds of introductory microbiology students in an Authentic Large-Scale Undergraduate Research Experience (ALURE). The ALURE aimed to characterize the microorganisms that reside in the healthy human oral cavity—the oral microbiome—by analyzing hundreds of samples obtained from student volunteers within the course. Students were able to choose from selective and differential culture media, Gram-staining, microscopy, as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques, in order to collect, analyze, and interpret novel data to determine the collective oral microbiome of the student cohort. Pre- and postsurvey analysis of student learning gains across two iterations of the course (2012–2013) revealed significantly higher student confidence in laboratory skills following the completion of the ALURE (p < 0.05 using the Mann-Whitney U-test). Learning objectives on effective scientific communication were also met through effective student performance in laboratory reports describing the research outcomes of the project. The integration of undergraduate research in clinical microbiology has the capacity to deliver authentic research experiences and improve scientific training for large cohorts of undergraduate students. PMID:25949757

  18. Do you kiss your mother with that mouth? An authentic large-scale undergraduate research experience in mapping the human oral microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jack T H; Daly, Joshua N; Willner, Dana L; Patil, Jayee; Hall, Roy A; Schembri, Mark A; Tyson, Gene W; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Clinical microbiology testing is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of community and hospital-acquired infections. Laboratory scientists need to utilize technical and problem-solving skills to select from a wide array of microbial identification techniques. The inquiry-driven laboratory training required to prepare microbiology graduates for this professional environment can be difficult to replicate within undergraduate curricula, especially in courses that accommodate large student cohorts. We aimed to improve undergraduate scientific training by engaging hundreds of introductory microbiology students in an Authentic Large-Scale Undergraduate Research Experience (ALURE). The ALURE aimed to characterize the microorganisms that reside in the healthy human oral cavity-the oral microbiome-by analyzing hundreds of samples obtained from student volunteers within the course. Students were able to choose from selective and differential culture media, Gram-staining, microscopy, as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques, in order to collect, analyze, and interpret novel data to determine the collective oral microbiome of the student cohort. Pre- and postsurvey analysis of student learning gains across two iterations of the course (2012-2013) revealed significantly higher student confidence in laboratory skills following the completion of the ALURE (p < 0.05 using the Mann-Whitney U-test). Learning objectives on effective scientific communication were also met through effective student performance in laboratory reports describing the research outcomes of the project. The integration of undergraduate research in clinical microbiology has the capacity to deliver authentic research experiences and improve scientific training for large cohorts of undergraduate students.

  19. Are The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment In Amazonia (LBA) Representative Of Long-Term Climatology? A Study Using Climate Weather Stations In Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, R.; Shuttleworth, W. J.; Goncalves, L. G.

    2007-12-01

    The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia has already contributed understanding of the flux exchange between the Amazonian rainforest and atmosphere and other significant components of the ecohydrometeorological system, and it will continue to do so. However, when considering LBA-derived information on whether the Amazon is a source or sink of carbon, or whether land use changes in the Amazon are affecting the local and perhaps global climate, it is important to characterize the period during which the LBA project has been carried out in terms of its climatological context. In other words, to address the question "How does the climate during the LBA data collection period compare with the long-term climatology in Amazon." Such information is not only useful for future project planning but is crucial information for modeling purposes: the calibration or validation of models using LBA data may be influenced by the climate conditions prevalent when these data were collected. This investigates the extent to which the actual period of data collection at LBA sites is representative of the long-term climatology for the sites. The research uses long-term weather station data taken from the databases of Brazilian National Water Agency (Agencia Nacional de Aguas - ANA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - National Climatic Data Center division (NOAA-NCDC) for stations located near the Sao Gabriel da Cachoeira, Manaus, Santarem, Caxiuana, Jaru, Sinop, and Bananal LBA sites, and compares these weather station data during the LBA data collection period with the entire dataset available for each weather station. Analysis of the precipitation records demonstrates that the precipitation climate during the LBA study period was not significant different from the long- term climatology at all the LBA sites but that at a few sites the temperature climate during LBA was statistically different.

  20. Resistance management strategies in malaria vector mosquito control. Baseline data for a large-scale field trial against Anopheles albimanus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Penilla, R P; Rodríguez, A D; Hemingway, J; Torres, J L; Arredondo-Jiménez, J I; Rodríguez, M H

    1998-07-01

    A high level of DDT resistance and low levels of resistance to organophosphorus, carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides were detected by discriminating dose assays in field populations of Anopheles albimanus in Chiapas, southern Mexico, prior to a large-scale resistance management project described by Hemingway et al. (1997). Biochemical assays showed that the DDT resistance was caused by elevated levels of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity leading to increased rates of metabolism of DDT to DDE. The numbers of individuals with elevated GST and DDT resistance were well correlated, suggesting that this is the only major DDT resistance mechanism in this population. The carbamate resistance in this population is conferred by an altered acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-based resistance mechanism. The level of resistance observed in the bioassays correlates with the frequency of individuals homozygous for the altered AChE allele. This suggests that the level of resistance conferred by this mechanism in its heterozygous state is below the level of detection by the WHO carbamate discriminating dosage bioassay. The low levels of organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid resistance could be conferred by either the elevated esterase or monooxygenase enzymes. The esterases were elevated only with the substrate pNPA, and are unlikely to be causing broad spectrum OP resistance. The altered AChE mechanism may also be contributing to the OP but not the pyrethroid resistance. Significant differences in resistance gene frequencies were obtained from the F1 mosquitoes resulting from adults obtained by different collection methods. This may be caused by different insecticide selection pressures on the insects immediately prior to collection, or may be an indication that the indoor- and outdoor-resting A. albimanus collections are not from a randomly mating single population. The underlying genetic variability of the populations is currently being investigated by molecular methods.

  1. Large-Time Behavior of GW Pollutant Plumes Subject to Biodegradation at the Fringe: Mathematical Analysis and its Application to a Large-Scale (~10 km) Field Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. J.; Kitanidis, P. K.; McCarty, P. L.

    2003-12-01

    instantaneous for the purpose of mathematical modeling. This simplification allows us to efficiently find the steady-state solutions for large scale field problems. We will present a field application which indicates the mixing with the ambient oxygen at the plume fringe may successfully constrain the spread of a high total organic carbon (500mg/L) plume, generated from a passive bio-reactive barrier. But the concentration reduction along the center line of the plume is insignificant.

  2. Seismic texture and amplitude analysis of large scale fluid escape pipes using time lapses seismic surveys: examples from the Loyal Field (Scotland, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrelli, Daniele; Jihad, Ali; Iacopini, David; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    ) affected by large scale fracture (semblance image) and seem consistent with a suspended mud/sand mixture non-fluidized fluid flow. Near-Middle-Far offsets amplitude analysis confirms that most of the amplitude anomalies within the pipes conduit and terminus are only partly related to gas. An interpretation of the possible texture observed is proposed with a discussion of the noise and artefact induced by resolution and migration problems. Possible hypothetical formation mechanisms for those Pipes are discussed.

  3. Ciliate and mesozooplankton community response to increasing CO2 levels in the Baltic Sea: insights from a large-scale mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischka, Silke; Bach, Lennart T.; Schulz, Kai-Georg; Riebesell, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Community approaches to investigating ocean acidification (OA) effects suggest a high tolerance of micro- and mesozooplankton to carbonate chemistry changes expected to occur within this century. Plankton communities in the coastal areas of the Baltic Sea frequently experience pH variations partly exceeding projections for the near future both on a diurnal and seasonal basis. We conducted a large-scale mesocosm CO2 enrichment experiment ( ˜ 55 m3) enclosing the natural plankton community in Tvärminne-Storfjärden for 8 weeks during June-August 2012 and studied community and species-taxon response of ciliates and mesozooplankton to CO2 elevations expected for this century. In addition to the response to fCO2, we also considered temperature and chlorophyll a variations in our analyses. Shannon diversity of ciliates significantly decreased with fCO2 and temperature with a greater dominance of smaller species. The mixotrophic Myrionecta rubra seemed to indirectly and directly benefit from higher CO2 concentrations in the post-bloom phase through increased occurrence of picoeukaryotes (most likely Cryptophytes) and Dinophyta at higher CO2 levels. With respect to mesozooplankton, we did not detect significant effects for either total abundance or for Shannon diversity. The cladocera Bosmina sp. occurred at distinctly higher abundance for a short time period during the second half of the experiment in three of the CO2-enriched mesocosms except for the highest CO2 level. The ratio of Bosmina sp. with empty to embryo- or resting-egg-bearing brood chambers, however, was significantly affected by CO2, temperature, and chlorophyll a. An indirect CO2 effect via increased food availability (Cyanobacteria) stimulating Bosmina sp. reproduction cannot be ruled out. Although increased regenerated primary production diminishes trophic transfer in general, the presence of organisms able to graze on bacteria such as cladocerans may positively impact organic matter transfer to higher

  4. Micro- and mesozooplankton community response to increasing CO2 levels in the Baltic Sea: insights from a large-scale mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischka, S.; Bach, L. T.; Schulz, K.-G.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-12-01

    Community approaches investigating ocean acidification (OA) effects suggest a high tolerance of micro- and mesozooplankton to carbonate chemistry changes expected to occur within this century. Plankton communities in the coastal areas of the Baltic Sea frequently experience pH variations partly exceeding projections for the near future both on a diurnal and seasonal basis, thus some level of tolerance/adaptation may be expected. We conducted a large-scale mesocosm CO2 enrichment experiment (~ 55 m3) enclosing the natural plankton community in Tvärminne/Storfjärden for eight weeks during June-August 2012 and studied community and species/taxon response of microzooplankton (ciliates) and mesozooplankton to CO2 elevations expected for this century. Besides the response to fCO2 and associate changes in carbonate chemistry speciation, we also considered temperature and chlorophyll a variations in our analyses. Shannon diversity of microzooplankton significantly decreased with fCO2 and temperature with a greater dominance of smaller species. Small sized ciliates (Myrionecta rubra, Balanion comatum, Strombidium cf. epidemum, Strobilidium sp.) showed significant relations with one or more of the factors. The phototrophic Myrionecta rubra seemed to directly benefit from higher CO2 concentrations and showed increased abundance in the pre-bloom phase. With respect to meszooplankton, we neither detected significant effects for total abundance nor for Shannon diversity. The cladocera Bosmina occurred at distinctly higher abundance (more than twice as high compared to the control mesocosms) for a short time period during the second half of the experiment in three of the CO2-enriched mesocosms except for the highest CO2 level. The ratio of Bosmina with empty to embryo/resting egg bearing brood chambers, however, was significantly affected by all three factors. An indirect CO2 effect via increased food availability stimulating Bosmina reproduction is suggested, but too low

  5. The Management of Social and Economic Impacts Associated with the Construction of Large-Scale Projects: Experiences from the Western Coal Development Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Marjorie R.; Curry, Martha G.

    Large-scale energy or resource development projects in rural areas cause environmental, social, and economic changes in the community. The negative aspects of these impacts can be mitigated and the positive aspects enhanced, through the use of effective impact management strategies by local and state governments (together and separately), the…

  6. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus Disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera; Apidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present the first successful use of RNAi under a large-scale real-world application for disease control. Israeli acute paralysis virus, IAPV, has been linked as a contributing factor in coolly collapse, CCD, of honey bees. IAPV specific homologous dsRNA were designed to reduce impacts from IAPV i...

  7. Large Scale Magnetostrictive Valve Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.; Holleman, Elizabeth; Eddleman, David

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Valves, Actuators and Ducts Design and Development Branch developed a large scale magnetostrictive valve actuator. The potential advantages of this technology are faster, more efficient valve actuators that consume less power and provide precise position control and deliver higher flow rates than conventional solenoid valves. Magnetostrictive materials change dimensions when a magnetic field is applied; this property is referred to as magnetostriction. Magnetostriction is caused by the alignment of the magnetic domains in the material s crystalline structure and the applied magnetic field lines. Typically, the material changes shape by elongating in the axial direction and constricting in the radial direction, resulting in no net change in volume. All hardware and testing is complete. This paper will discuss: the potential applications of the technology; overview of the as built actuator design; discuss problems that were uncovered during the development testing; review test data and evaluate weaknesses of the design; and discuss areas for improvement for future work. This actuator holds promises of a low power, high load, proportionally controlled actuator for valves requiring 440 to 1500 newtons load.

  8. Final Report: Process Models of the Equilibrium Size & State of Organic/Inorganic Aerosols for the Development of Large Scale Atmospheric Models & the Analysis of Field Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Anthony Stein; Clegg, Simon Leslie

    2013-10-26

    Our work addressed the following elements of the Call for Proposals: (i) “to improve the theoretical representation of aerosol processes studied in ASP laboratory or field studies”, (ii) “to enhance the incorporation of aerosol process information into modules suitable for large-scale or global atmospheric models”, and (iii) “provide systematic experimental validation of process model predictions ... using data from targeted laboratory and field experiments”. Achievements to the end of 2012 are described in four previous reports, and include: new models of densities and surface tensions of pure (single solute) and mixed aqueous solutions of typical aerosol composition under all atmospheric conditions (0 to 100% RH and T > 150 K); inclusion of these models into the widely used Extended Aerosol Inorganics model (E-AIM, http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php); the addition of vapor pressure calculators for organic compounds to the E-AIM website; the ability of include user-defined organic compounds and/or lumped surrogates in gas/aerosol partitioning calculations; the development of new equations to represent the properties of soluble aerosols over the entire concentration range (using methods based upon adsorption isotherms, and derived using statistical mechanics), including systems at close to zero RH. These results are described in publications 1-6 at the end of this report, and on the “News” page of the E-AIM website (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/info/news.html). During 2012 and 2013 we have collaborated in a combined observation and lab-based study of the water uptake of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols (PI Gannet Hallar, of the Desert Research Institute). The aerosol samples were analyzed using several complementary techniques (GC/MS, FT-ICR MS, and ion chromatography) to produce a very complete organic “speciation” including both polar and non-polar compounds. Hygroscopic growth factors of the samples were measured, and

  9. Soil carbon sequestration due to post-Soviet cropland abandonment: estimates from a large-scale soil organic carbon field inventory.

    PubMed

    Wertebach, Tim-Martin; Hölzel, Norbert; Kämpf, Immo; Yurtaev, Andrey; Tupitsin, Sergey; Kiehl, Kathrin; Kamp, Johannes; Kleinebecker, Till

    2017-02-04

    The break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 triggered cropland abandonment on a continental scale, which in turn led to carbon accumulation on abandoned land across Eurasia. Previous studies have estimated carbon accumulation rates across Russia based on large-scale modelling. Studies that assess carbon sequestration on abandoned land based on robust field sampling are rare. We investigated soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks using a randomized sampling design along a climatic gradient from forest steppe to Sub-Taiga in Western Siberia (Tyumen Province). In total, SOC contents were sampled on 470 plots across different soil and land-use types. The effect of land use on changes in SOC stock was evaluated, and carbon sequestration rates were calculated for different age stages of abandoned cropland. While land-use type had an effect on carbon accumulation in the topsoil (0-5 cm), no independent land-use effects were found for deeper SOC stocks. Topsoil carbon stocks of grasslands and forests were significantly higher than those of soils managed for crops and under abandoned cropland. SOC increased significantly with time since abandonment. The average carbon sequestration rate for soils of abandoned cropland was 0.66 Mg C ha(-1)  yr(-1) (1-20 years old, 0-5 cm soil depth), which is at the lower end of published estimates for Russia and Siberia. There was a tendency towards SOC saturation on abandoned land as sequestration rates were much higher for recently abandoned (1-10 years old, 1.04 Mg C ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) compared to earlier abandoned crop fields (11-20 years old, 0.26 Mg C ha(-1)  yr(-1) ). Our study confirms the global significance of abandoned cropland in Russia for carbon sequestration. Our findings also suggest that robust regional surveys based on a large number of samples advance model-based continent-wide SOC prediction.

  10. Far-Field Tsunami Impact in the North Atlantic Basin from Large Scale Flank Collapses of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano, La Palma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehranirad, Babak; Harris, Jeffrey C.; Grilli, Annette R.; Grilli, Stephan T.; Abadie, Stéphane; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan

    2015-12-01

    In their pioneering work, Ward and Day suggested that a large scale flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV) on La Palma (Canary Islands) could trigger a mega-tsunami throughout the North Atlantic Ocean basin, causing major coastal impact in the far-field. While more recent studies indicate that near-field waves from such a collapse would be more moderate than originally predicted by Ward and Day [Løvholt et al. (J Geophy Res 113:C09026, 2008); Abadie et al. (J Geophy Res 117:C05030, 2012)], these would still be formidable and devastate the Canary Island, while causing major impact in the far-field at many locations along the western European, African, and the US east coasts. Abadie et al. (J Geophy Res 117:C05030, 2012) simulated tsunami generation and near-field tsunami impact from a few CVV subaerial slide scenarios, with volumes ranging from 20 to 450 km^3; the latter representing the most extreme scenario proposed by Ward and Day. They modeled tsunami generation, i.e., the tsunami source, using THETIS, a 3D Navier-Stokes (NS) multi-fluid VOF model, in which slide material was considered as a nearly inviscid heavy fluid. Near-field tsunami impact was then simulated for each source using FUNWAVE-TVD, a dispersive and fully nonlinear long wave Boussinesq model [ Shi et al. (Ocean Modell 43-44:36-51, 2012); Kirby et al. (Ocean Modeling, 62:39-55, 2013)]. Here, using FUNWAVE-TVD for a series of nested grids of increasingly fine resolution, we model and analyze far-field tsunami impact from two of Abadie et al.'s extreme CVV flank collapse scenarios: (i) that deemed the most "credible worst case scenario" based on a slope stability analysis, with a 80 km^3 volume; and (ii) the most extreme scenario, similar to Ward and Day's, with a 450 km^3 volume. Simulations are performed using a one-way coupling scheme in between two given levels of nested grids. Based on the simulation results, the overall tsunami impact is first assessed in terms of maximum surface

  11. Rock-avalanche dynamics revealed by large-scale field mapping and seismic signals at a highly mobile avalanche in the West Salt Creek valley, western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Baum, Rex L.; Allstadt, Kate; Kochevar, Bernard; Schmitt, Robert G.; Morgan, Matthew L.; White, Jonathan L.; Stratton, Benjamin T.; Hayashi, Timothy A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    On 25 May 2014, a rain-on-snow–induced rock avalanche occurred in the West Salt Creek valley on the northern flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado (United States). The avalanche mobilized from a preexisting rock slide in the Green River Formation and traveled 4.6 km down the confined valley, killing three people. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous United States because of its large size (54.5 Mm3) and high mobility (height/length = 0.14). To understand the avalanche failure sequence, mechanisms, and mobility, we conducted a forensic analysis using large-scale (1:1000) structural mapping and seismic data. We used high-resolution, unmanned aircraft system imagery as a base for field mapping, and analyzed seismic data from 22 broadband stations (distances < 656 km from the rock-slide source area) and one short-period network. We inverted broadband data to derive a time series of forces that the avalanche exerted on the earth and tracked these forces using curves in the avalanche path. Our results revealed that the rock avalanche was a cascade of landslide events, rather than a single massive failure. The sequence began with an early morning landslide/debris flow that started ∼10 h before the main avalanche. The main avalanche lasted ∼3.5 min and traveled at average velocities ranging from 15 to 36 m/s. For at least two hours after the avalanche ceased movement, a central, hummock-rich core continued to move slowly. Since 25 May 2014, numerous shallow landslides, rock slides, and rock falls have created new structures and modified avalanche topography. Mobility of the main avalanche and central core was likely enhanced by valley floor material that liquefied from undrained loading by the overriding avalanche. Although the base was likely at least partially liquefied, our mapping indicates that the overriding avalanche internally deformed predominantly by sliding along discrete shear surfaces in material that was nearly dry and had substantial frictional

  12. Large scale cluster computing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dane Skow; Alan Silverman

    2002-12-23

    Recent revolutions in computer hardware and software technologies have paved the way for the large-scale deployment of clusters of commodity computers to address problems heretofore the domain of tightly coupled SMP processors. Near term projects within High Energy Physics and other computing communities will deploy clusters of scale 1000s of processors and be used by 100s to 1000s of independent users. This will expand the reach in both dimensions by an order of magnitude from the current successful production facilities. The goals of this workshop were: (1) to determine what tools exist which can scale up to the cluster sizes foreseen for the next generation of HENP experiments (several thousand nodes) and by implication to identify areas where some investment of money or effort is likely to be needed. (2) To compare and record experimences gained with such tools. (3) To produce a practical guide to all stages of planning, installing, building and operating a large computing cluster in HENP. (4) To identify and connect groups with similar interest within HENP and the larger clustering community.

  13. Creation of the dam for the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP by large-scale blasting: analysis of planning experience and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Shuifer, M. I.; Argal, E. S.

    2012-05-15

    Results of complex instrument observations and video taping during large-scale blasts detonated for creation of the dam at the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP on the Naryn River in the Kyrgyz Republic are analyzed. Tests of the energy effectiveness of the explosives are evaluated, characteristics of LSB manifestations in seismic and air waves are revealed, and the shaping and movement of the rock mass are examined. A methodological analysis of the planning and production of the LSB is given.

  14. Constraints on the power spectrum of the primordial density field from large-scale data - Microwave background and predictions of inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown here that, by using galaxy catalog correlation data as input, measurements of microwave background radiation (MBR) anisotropies should soon be able to test two of the inflationary scenario's most basic predictions: (1) that the primordial density fluctuations produced were scale-invariant and (2) that the universe is flat. They should also be able to detect anisotropies of large-scale structure formed by gravitational evolution of density fluctuations present at the last scattering epoch. Computations of MBR anisotropies corresponding to the minimum of the large-scale variance of the MBR anisotropy are presented which favor an open universe with P(k) significantly different from the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum predicted by most inflationary models.

  15. US National Large-scale City Orthoimage Standard Initiative

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, G.; Song, C.; Benjamin, S.; Schickler, W.

    2003-01-01

    The early procedures and algorithms for National digital orthophoto generation in National Digital Orthophoto Program (NDOP) were based on earlier USGS mapping operations, such as field control, aerotriangulation (derived in the early 1920's), the quarter-quadrangle-centered (3.75 minutes of longitude and latitude in geographic extent), 1:40,000 aerial photographs, and 2.5 D digital elevation models. However, large-scale city orthophotos using early procedures have disclosed many shortcomings, e.g., ghost image, occlusion, shadow. Thus, to provide the technical base (algorithms, procedure) and experience needed for city large-scale digital orthophoto creation is essential for the near future national large-scale digital orthophoto deployment and the revision of the Standards for National Large-scale City Digital Orthophoto in National Digital Orthophoto Program (NDOP). This paper will report our initial research results as follows: (1) High-precision 3D city DSM generation through LIDAR data processing, (2) Spatial objects/features extraction through surface material information and high-accuracy 3D DSM data, (3) 3D city model development, (4) Algorithm development for generation of DTM-based orthophoto, and DBM-based orthophoto, (5) True orthophoto generation by merging DBM-based orthophoto and DTM-based orthophoto, and (6) Automatic mosaic by optimizing and combining imagery from many perspectives.

  16. Large-scale structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1983-01-01

    Problems encountered by aerospace designers in attempting to optimize whole aircraft are discussed, along with possible solutions. Large scale optimization, as opposed to component-by-component optimization, is hindered by computational costs, software inflexibility, concentration on a single, rather than trade-off, design methodology and the incompatibility of large-scale optimization with single program, single computer methods. The software problem can be approached by placing the full analysis outside of the optimization loop. Full analysis is then performed only periodically. Problem-dependent software can be removed from the generic code using a systems programming technique, and then embody the definitions of design variables, objective function and design constraints. Trade-off algorithms can be used at the design points to obtain quantitative answers. Finally, decomposing the large-scale problem into independent subproblems allows systematic optimization of the problems by an organization of people and machines.

  17. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  18. Experimental investigation of effects of suction-side squealer tip geometry on the flow field in a large-scale axial compressor using SPIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei; Wei, Wei; Wang, Lixiang; Tian, Yangtao

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that the non-uniform tip geometry is a promising passive flow control technique in turbomachinery.However, detailed investigation of its effects on the unsteady flow field of turbomachinery is rare in the existingliteratures. This paper presents an experimental investigation of effects of suction side squealer tip configurationon both the steady and unsteady flow field of an isolated compressor rotor. The flow field at 10% chord downstream from the trailing edge was measured using a mini five-hole probe. Meanwhile, the unsteady flow field inside the passage was investigated using stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV). The steady results show that the SSQ tip configuration exerts positive effect on the static pressure rise performance of this compressor,and the radial equilibrium at the rotor outlet is obviously rearranged. The SSQ tip configuration would create a stronger tip leakage vortex at the formation phase, and it experiences a faster dissipation process around the rear chord. Also, the splitting process of the tip leakage vortex is severer, which is the main cause of the relatively higher probability of the presence of the streamwise reverse flow. The quantitatively analysis of the tip leakage vortex indicates that the velocity loss inside the blockage region is direct response of the evolutionary procedure of the tip leakage vortex. It keeps increasing until the end of the splitting process. Although the blockage coefficientgrows sustainably, the velocity loss will reduce once the turbulent mixing procedure is dominant.

  19. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-01-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  20. A large-scale field trial of thin-layer capping of PCDD/F-contaminated sediments: Sediment-to-water fluxes up to 5 years post-amendment.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Schaanning, Morten; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Eek, Espen

    2016-04-01

    The longer-term effect (3-5 y) of thin-layer capping on in situ sediment-to-surface water fluxes was monitored in a large-scale field experiment in the polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) contaminated Grenlandfjords, Norway (4 trial plots of 10,000 to 40,000 m(2) at 30 to 100 m water depth). Active caps (designed thickness 2.5 cm) were established in 2 fjords, consisting of dredged clean clay amended with powdered activated carbon (PAC) from anthracite. These active caps were compared to 2 nonactive caps in one of the fjords (designed thickness 5 cm) consisting of either clay only (i.e., without PAC) or crushed limestone. Sediment-to-water PCDD/F fluxes were measured in situ using diffusion chambers. An earlier study showed that during the first 2 years after thin-layer capping, flux reductions relative to noncapped reference fields were more extensive at the fields capped with nonactive caps (70%-90%) than at the ones with PAC-containing caps (50%-60%). However, the present work shows that between 3 and 5 years after thin-layer capping, this trend was reversed and cap effectiveness in reducing fluxes was increasing to 80% to 90% for the PAC caps, whereas cap effectiveness of the nonactive caps decreased to 20% to 60%. The increasing effectiveness over time of PAC-containing "active" caps is explained by a combination of slow sediment-to-PAC mass transfer of PCDD/Fs and bioturbation by benthic organisms. The decreasing effectiveness of "nonactive" limestone and clay caps is explained by deposition of contaminated particles on top of the caps. The present field data indicate that the capping efficiency of thin active caps (i.e., enriched with PAC) can improve over time as a result of slow diffusive PCDD/F transfer from sediment to PAC particles and better mixing of the PAC by bioturbation.

  1. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Parker, V. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  2. The role of fine material and grain size distribution on excess pore pressure dissipation and particle support mechanisms in granular deposits based in large-scale physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Kaitna, R.; Tewoldebrhan, B.; Hill, K. M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant mechanisms behind sustained mobilization in granular debris flows are poorly understood, and experiments are needed to determine the conditions under which the fluid can fully support the coarse fraction. However, field-scale studies are difficult to instrument and constrain and laboratory studies suffer from scaling issues. A 4-m rotating drum located at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station allowed us to perform reproducible experiments with materials similar to those in the field to explore mechanisms relevant to slow pore fluid pressure dissipation. Specifically, we performed a series of experiments to assess the role of fines and grain size distribution on the rate of pore fluid pressure dissipation upon deposition of a granular mass. For each experiment we kept the total mass of the gravel particles constant and varied the amount of fines (from no fines to amounts found in an actual debris flow deposit) and the gravel particle size distribution (from a single grain size to a range found in natural flows). We first rotated each mixture in the drum, during which we monitored fluid pressures at the base of the flows (near the wall of the drum and at the center). Then we stopped the drum and continued to monitor the fluid pressures. Immediately upon stopping, the pore fluid pressure was nearly hydrostatic for the gravel-water flows, and any elevated pore pressure quickly dissipated. On the other hand, the mixtures with fines contents close to those found in actual debris flows had elevated pore pressures indicating they were almost fully liquefied. Furthermore, the rate of pore pressure dissipation was an order of magnitude slower than when no fines were present; the grain size distribution of the coarse fraction did not strongly influence the dissipation rates in either case. We also placed a cobble upon a fines-rich mixture after cessation of motion above the center pressure sensor, and observed that the pore fluid pressure rose instantly, bearing

  3. Remote sensing of large scale methane emission sources with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument over the Kern River and Kern Front Oil fields and validation through airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, K.; Krautwurst, S.; Kolyer, R.; Jonsson, H.; Krings, T.; Horstjann, M.; Leifer, I.; Schuettemeyer, D.; Fladeland, M. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    During three flights performed with the MAMAP (Methane Airborne MAPper) airborne remote sensing instrument in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - large scale methane plumes were detected over the Kern River and Kern Front Oil fields in the period between June 3 and 13, 2014. MAMAP was installed for these flights aboard of the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operate by the Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5 hole turbulence probe as well as a atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point and other atmospheric parameters. Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer will be used for validation of MAMAP remotely sensed data by acquiring vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at a fixed downwind distance. Precise airborne wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground based wind data from the nearby airport will be used to estimate emission rates from the remote sensed and in-situ measured data. Remote sensed and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for the three flights will be presented.

  4. Model-based analysis of push-pull experiments in deep aquifers to predict large-scale impacts of CSG product water reinjection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prommer, H.; Rathi, B.; Morris, R.; Helm, L.; Siade, A. J.; Davis, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the next two decades coal seam gas production in Australia will require the management of large quantities of production water. For some sites the most viable option is to treat the water to a high standard via reverse osmosis (RO) and to inject it into deep aquifers. The design and implementation of these field-scale injection schemes requires a thorough understanding of the anticipated water quality changes within the target aquifers. In this study we use reactive transport modeling to integrate the results of a multi-scale hydrogeological and geochemical characterization, and to analyze a series of short-term push-pull experiments with the aim to better understand and reliably accurately predict long-term water quality evolution and the risks for mobilizing geogenic arsenic. Sequential push-pull tests with varying injectant compositions were undertaken, with concentrations recorded during the recovery phase reaching levels of up to 180 ppb above the ambient concentrations observed prior to the push-pull experiments. The highest As concentrations were observed in conjunction with the injection of aerobic water, while de-oxygenation of the injectant lowered As concentrations significantly. The lowest As concentrations were observed when the injectant was de-oxygenated and acid-amended. The latter was underpinned by complementary laboratory As sorption experiments using sediments from the target aquifer at various pHs, which, consistent with literature, show a decrease in As sorption affinity under alkaline conditions. In the model-based analysis of the experimental data, model parameters for each conceptual model variant were estimated through an automatic calibration procedure using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) whereby bromide and temperature data were used to constrain flow, solute and heat transport parameters. A series of predictive model scenarios were performed to determine whether advanced manipulation of the injectant composition is required.

  5. Large-scale screening of nasal swabs for Bacillus anthracis: descriptive summary and discussion of the National Institutes of Health's experience.

    PubMed

    Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Fukuda, Caroline D; Wong, Alexandra; Stock, Frida; Preuss, Jeanne C; Ediger, Laura; Brahmbhatt, Trupti N; Fischer, Steven H; Fedorko, Daniel P; Witebsky, Frank G; Gill, Vee J

    2002-08-01

    In October 2001, a letter containing a large number of anthrax spores was sent through the Brentwood post office in Washington, D.C., to a United States Senate office on Capitol Hill, resulting in contamination in both places. Several thousand people who worked at these sites were screened for spore exposure by collecting nasal swab samples. We describe here a screening protocol which we, as a level A laboratory, used on very short notice to process a large number of specimens (3,936 swabs) in order to report preliminary results as quickly as possible. Six isolates from our screening met preliminary criteria for Bacillus anthracis identification and were referred for definitive testing. Although none of the isolates was later confirmed to be B. anthracis, we studied these isolates further to define their biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA sequences. Four of the six isolates were identified as Bacillus megaterium, one was identified as Bacillus cereus, and one was an unidentifiable Bacillus sp. Our results suggest that large-scale nasal-swab screening for potential exposure to anthrax spores, particularly if not done immediately postexposure, may not be very effective for detecting B. anthracis but may detect a number of Bacillus spp. that are phenotypically very similar to B. anthracis.

  6. Monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of the Brazilian Cerrado physiognomies with spectral vegetation indices: An assessment within the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Laerte Guimaraes, Junior

    The large extension and diversity of the Cerrado vegetative cover, the second largest biome in South America, has a strong impact on regional, and possibly global, energy, water, and carbon balances. Nevertheless, as a major farming frontier in Brazil, it is estimated that about 40% of the Cerrado land cover has already been converted into cultivated pastures, field crops, urban development, and degraded areas. Despite this aggressive pace of land conversion, there have been few investigations on the operational utilization of remote sensing data to effectively monitor and understand this biome. Within this context, and within the goals and framework of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), we evaluated the usefulness of spectral vegetation indices (VIs), to effectively monitor the Cerrado, detect land conversions, and discriminate and assess the conditions of the major structural types of Cerrado vegetation. Using a full hydrologic year (1995) of AVHRR, local-area-coverage (LAC), data over the Cerrado, converted to normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), we were able to spatially discriminate three major communities based on their phenologic patterns. These included savanna formations and pasture sites, forested areas, and agricultural crops. We also analyzed wet and dry season, aircraft-based radiometric data and a ground-based set of biophysical measurements, collected over the Brasilia National Park (BNP), the largest LBA core site in the Cerrado biome. Overall, we found the MODIS vegetation indices, which include a continuity NDVI and the new enhanced vegetation index (EVI), to provide better performance capabilities with improved dynamic ranges and contrasts in seasonal dynamics. Land cover discrimination was favored by the NDVI, while the EVI more strongly responded to the seasonal contrast of the vegetative cover. Thus, the synergistic use of the MODIS VI products will very likely

  7. Experimental Simulations of Large-Scale Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the effects of target porosity on the mechanics of impact cratering. Impact experiments conducted on a centrifuge provide direct simulations of large-scale cratering on porous asteroids. The experiments show that large craters in porous materials form mostly by compaction, with essentially no deposition of material into the ejecta blanket that is a signature of cratering in less-porous materials. The ratio of ejecta mass to crater mass is shown to decrease with increasing crater size or target porosity. These results are consistent with the observation that large closely-packed craters on asteroid Mathilde appear to have formed without degradation to earlier craters.

  8. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  9. Airborne passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from oil fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Initial results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Kolyer, Richard W.; Thompson, David R.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    On several flights performed over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields in California between June 3 and September 4, 2014, in the framework of the CO2 and MEthane Experiment (COMEX) - a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities - the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) detected large-scale, high-concentration, methane plumes. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer (operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC), a 5-hole turbulence probe and an atmospheric measurement package (operated by CIRPAS), measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Some of the flights were accompanied by the next generation of the Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft (operated by Twin Otter International). Data collected with the in-situ GHG analyzer were used for validation of the MAMAP and AVIRIS-NG remotely sensed data. The in-situ measurements were acquired in vertical cross sections of the discovered plumes at fixed distances downwind of the sources. Emission rates are estimated from both the remote and in-situ data using wind information from the turbulence probe together with ground-based wind data from the nearby airport. Remote sensing and in-situ data as well as initial flux estimates for selected flights will be presented.

  10. Large-scale instabilities of helical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Alexandre; Alexakis, Alexandros; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities of periodic helical flows of a given wave number K are investigated using three-dimensional Floquet numerical computations. In the Floquet formalism the unstable field is expanded in modes of different spacial periodicity. This allows us (i) to clearly distinguish large from small scale instabilities and (ii) to study modes of wave number q of arbitrarily large-scale separation q ≪K . Different flows are examined including flows that exhibit small-scale turbulence. The growth rate σ of the most unstable mode is measured as a function of the scale separation q /K ≪1 and the Reynolds number Re. It is shown that the growth rate follows the scaling σ ∝q if an AKA effect [Frisch et al., Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena 28, 382 (1987), 10.1016/0167-2789(87)90026-1] is present or a negative eddy viscosity scaling σ ∝q2 in its absence. This holds both for the Re≪1 regime where previously derived asymptotic results are verified but also for Re=O (1 ) that is beyond their range of validity. Furthermore, for values of Re above a critical value ReSc beyond which small-scale instabilities are present, the growth rate becomes independent of q and the energy of the perturbation at large scales decreases with scale separation. The nonlinear behavior of these large-scale instabilities is also examined in the nonlinear regime where the largest scales of the system are found to be the most dominant energetically. These results are interpreted by low-order models.

  11. Large-scale magnetic field in the accretion discs of young stars: the influence of magnetic diffusion, buoyancy and Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaibrakhmanov, S. A.; Dudorov, A. E.; Parfenov, S. Yu.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the fossil magnetic field in the accretion and protoplanetary discs using the Shakura and Sunyaev approach. The distinguishing feature of this study is the accurate solution of the ionization balance equations and the induction equation with Ohmic diffusion, magnetic ambipolar diffusion, buoyancy and the Hall effect. We consider the ionization by cosmic rays, X-rays and radionuclides, radiative recombinations, recombinations on dust grains and also thermal ionization. The buoyancy appears as the additional mechanism of magnetic flux escape in the steady-state solution of the induction equation. Calculations show that Ohmic diffusion and magnetic ambipolar diffusion constraint the generation of the magnetic field inside the `dead' zones. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-vertical. The buoyancy constraints the toroidal magnetic field strength close to the disc inner edge. As a result, the toroidal and vertical magnetic fields become comparable. The Hall effect is important in the regions close to the borders of the `dead' zones because electrons are magnetized there. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-radial. We calculate the magnetic field strength and geometry for the discs with accretion rates (10^{-8}-10^{-6}) {M}_{⊙} {yr}^{-1}. The fossil magnetic field geometry does not change significantly during the disc evolution while the accretion rate decreases. We construct the synthetic maps of dust emission polarized due to the dust grain alignment by the magnetic field. In the polarization maps, the `dead' zones appear as the regions with the reduced values of polarization degree in comparison to those in the adjacent regions.

  12. An interpretation of the large scale ionospheric magnetic fields and the altitude distribution of the ionospheric plasma on the dayside of Venus and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krymskii, A. M.

    Due to the sensitivity of the plasma scale height to the ability of the ionospheres of Venus and Mars to stand off the solar wind flow, as well as its sensitivity to the details of ionospheric plasma convection, the features of the magnetic field can manifest themselves in the plasma scale height. It is presently demonstrated that the scale height of the plasma is proportional to the neutral atmosphere scale height if the magnetic field pressure is low and the vertical magnetic field is small, as is typical for the 'overpressure' region where the solar wind pressure exceeds ionospheric thermal pressure. In other cases, diffusive equilibrium exists.

  13. Thermophoretically induced large-scale deformations around microscopic heat centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puljiz, Mate; Orlishausen, Michael; Köhler, Werner; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-05-01

    Selectively heating a microscopic colloidal particle embedded in a soft elastic matrix is a situation of high practical relevance. For instance, during hyperthermic cancer treatment, cell tissue surrounding heated magnetic colloidal particles is destroyed. Experiments on soft elastic polymeric matrices suggest a very long-ranged, non-decaying radial component of the thermophoretically induced displacement fields around the microscopic heat centers. We theoretically confirm this conjecture using a macroscopic hydrodynamic two-fluid description. Both thermophoretic and elastic effects are included in this theory. Indeed, we find that the elasticity of the environment can cause the experimentally observed large-scale radial displacements in the embedding matrix. Additional experiments confirm the central role of elasticity. Finally, a linearly decaying radial component of the displacement field in the experiments is attributed to the finite size of the experimental sample. Similar results are obtained from our theoretical analysis under modified boundary conditions.

  14. Method and infrastructure for cycle-reproducible simulation on large scale digital circuits on a coordinated set of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Asaad, Sameh W; Bellofatto, Ralph E; Brezzo, Bernard; Haymes, Charles L; Kapur, Mohit; Parker, Benjamin D; Roewer, Thomas; Tierno, Jose A

    2014-01-28

    A plurality of target field programmable gate arrays are interconnected in accordance with a connection topology and map portions of a target system. A control module is coupled to the plurality of target field programmable gate arrays. A balanced clock distribution network is configured to distribute a reference clock signal, and a balanced reset distribution network is coupled to the control module and configured to distribute a reset signal to the plurality of target field programmable gate arrays. The control module and the balanced reset distribution network are cooperatively configured to initiate and control a simulation of the target system with the plurality of target field programmable gate arrays. A plurality of local clock control state machines reside in the target field programmable gate arrays. The local clock state machines are configured to generate a set of synchronized free-running and stoppable clocks to maintain cycle-accurate and cycle-reproducible execution of the simulation of the target system. A method is also provided.

  15. What is a large-scale dynamo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, G.; Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in a sheared helical flow at moderate to high values of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). We find exponentially growing solutions which, for large enough shear, take the form of a coherent part embedded in incoherent fluctuations. We argue that at large Rm large-scale dynamo action should be identified by the presence of structures coherent in time, rather than those at large spatial scales. We further argue that although the growth rate is determined by small-scale processes, the period of the coherent structures is set by mean-field considerations.

  16. The Cosmic Large-Scale Structure in X-rays (CLASSIX) Cluster Survey. I. Probing galaxy cluster magnetic fields with line of sight rotation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Kronberg, Philipp P.

    2016-11-01

    To search for a signature of an intracluster magnetic field, we compare measurements of Faraday rotation of polarised extragalactic radio sources in the line of sight of galaxy clusters with those outside. To this end, we correlated a catalogue of 1383 rotation measures of extragalactic polarised radio sources with galaxy clusters from the CLASSIX survey (combining REFLEX II and NORAS II) detected by their X-ray emission in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The survey covers 8.25 ster of the sky at | bII | ≥ 20°. We compared the rotation measures in the line of sight of clusters within their projected radii of r500 with those outside and found a significant excess of the dispersion of the rotation measures in the cluster regions. Since the observed rotation measure is the result of Faraday rotation in several presumably uncorrelated magnetised cells of the intracluster medium, the observations correspond to quantities averaged over several magnetic field directions and strengths. Therefore the interesting quantity is the dispersion or standard deviation of the rotation measure for an ensemble of clusters. In the analysis of the observations we found a standard deviation of the rotation measure inside r500 of about 120 (± 21) rad m-2. This compares to about 56 (± 8) rad m-2 outside. Correcting for the effect of the Galaxy with the mean rotation measure in a region of 10 deg radius in the outskirts of the clusters does not change the outcome quoted above. We show that the most X-ray luminous and thus most massive clusters contribute most to the observed excess rotation measure. Modelling the electron density distribution in the intracluster medium with a self-similar model based on the REXCESS Survey, we found that the dispersion of the rotation measure increases with the column density, and we deduce a magnetic field value of about 2-6 (l/ 10 kpc)- 1/2μG assuming a constant magnetic field strength, where l is the size of the coherently magnetised intracluster medium

  17. Large-Scale Oceanic Variability Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation during the CINDY/DYNAMO Field Campaign from Satellite Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-29

    dynamical ocean feedback mechanism for the Madden- Julian oscillation. Quart. J. Roy. Meteorol. Soc. 2010,136, 740-754. 42. McCreary , J.P.; Kundu, P.K...Variability Associated with the Madden- Julian Oscillation During the CINDY/DYNAMO Field Campaign from Satellite Observations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...measurements based on the comparison with in-situ observations. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Indian Ocean, Madden- Julian Oscillation, CINDY/DYNAMO, aquarius

  18. Large-scale PACS implementation.

    PubMed

    Carrino, J A; Unkel, P J; Miller, I D; Bowser, C L; Freckleton, M W; Johnson, T G

    1998-08-01

    The transition to filmless radiology is a much more formidable task than making the request for proposal to purchase a (Picture Archiving and Communications System) PACS. The Department of Defense and the Veterans Administration have been pioneers in the transformation of medical diagnostic imaging to the electronic environment. Many civilian sites are expected to implement large-scale PACS in the next five to ten years. This presentation will related the empirical insights gleaned at our institution from a large-scale PACS implementation. Our PACS integration was introduced into a fully operational department (not a new hospital) in which work flow had to continue with minimal impact. Impediments to user acceptance will be addressed. The critical components of this enormous task will be discussed. The topics covered during this session will include issues such as phased implementation, DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) standard-based interaction of devices, hospital information system (HIS)/radiology information system (RIS) interface, user approval, networking, workstation deployment and backup procedures. The presentation will make specific suggestions regarding the implementation team, operating instructions, quality control (QC), training and education. The concept of identifying key functional areas is relevant to transitioning the facility to be entirely on line. Special attention must be paid to specific functional areas such as the operating rooms and trauma rooms where the clinical requirements may not match the PACS capabilities. The printing of films may be necessary for certain circumstances. The integration of teleradiology and remote clinics into a PACS is a salient topic with respect to the overall role of the radiologists providing rapid consultation. A Web-based server allows a clinician to review images and reports on a desk-top (personal) computer and thus reduce the number of dedicated PACS review workstations. This session

  19. Large-Scale Sequence Comparison.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi

    2017-01-01

    There are millions of sequences deposited in genomic databases, and it is an important task to categorize them according to their structural and functional roles. Sequence comparison is a prerequisite for proper categorization of both DNA and protein sequences, and helps in assigning a putative or hypothetical structure and function to a given sequence. There are various methods available for comparing sequences, alignment being first and foremost for sequences with a small number of base pairs as well as for large-scale genome comparison. Various tools are available for performing pairwise large sequence comparison. The best known tools either perform global alignment or generate local alignments between the two sequences. In this chapter we first provide basic information regarding sequence comparison. This is followed by the description of the PAM and BLOSUM matrices that form the basis of sequence comparison. We also give a practical overview of currently available methods such as BLAST and FASTA, followed by a description and overview of tools available for genome comparison including LAGAN, MumMER, BLASTZ, and AVID.

  20. Properties of a large-scale interplanetary loop structure as deduced from low-energy proton anisotropy and magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranquille, C.; Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Correlated particle and magnetic field measurements by the ISEE 3 spacecraft are presented for the loop structure behind the interplanetary traveling shock event of Nov. 12, 1978. Following the passage of the turbulent shock region, strong bidirectional streaming of low-energy protons is observed for approximately 6 hours, corresponding to a loop thickness of about 0.07 AU. This region is also characterized by a low relative variance of the magnetic field, a depressed proton intensity, and a reduction in the magnetic power spectral density. Using quasi-linear theory applied to a slab model, a value of 3 AU is derived for the mean free path during the passage of the closed loop. It is inferred from this observation that the proton regime associated with the loop structure is experiencing scatter-free transport and that either the length of the loop is approximately 3 AU between the sun and the earth or else the protons are being reflected at both ends of a smaller loop.

  1. Large scale motions of Neptune's bow shock: Evidence for control of the shock position by the rotation phase of Neptune's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Smith, Charles W.; Kurth, William S.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Moses, Stewart L.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager 2 spacecraft observed high levels of Langmuir waves before the inbound crossing of Neptune's bow shock, thereby signifying magnetic connection of the bow shock. The Langmuir waves occurred in multiple bursts throughout two distinct periods separated by an 85 minute absence of wave activity. The times of onsets, peaks, and disappearances of the waves were used together with the magnetic field directions and spacecraft position, to perform a 'remote-sensing' analysis of the shape and location of Neptune's bow shock prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. The bow shock is assumed to have a parabolidal shape with a nose location and flaring parameter determined independently for each wave event. The remote-sensing analysis give a shock position consistent with the time of the inbound shock crossing. The flaring parameter of the shock remains approximately constant throughout each period of wave activity but differs by a factor of 10 between the two periods. The absence of waves between two periods of wave activity coincides with a large rotation of the magnetic field and a large increase in the solar wind ram pressure' both these effects lead to magnetic disconnection of the spacecraft from shock. The planetwards motion of the shock's nose from 38.5 R(sub N) to 34.5 R(sub N) during the second time period occurred while the solar wind ram pressure remained constant to within 15 percent. This second period of planetwards motion of the shock is therefore strong evidence for Neptune's bow shock moving in response to the rotation of Neptune's oblique, tilted magnetic dipole. Normalizing the ram pressure, the remotely-sensed shock moves sunwards during the first wave period and planetwards in the second wave period. The maximum standoff distance occurs while the dipole axis is close to being perpendicular to the Sun-Neptune direction. The remote-sensing analysis provides strong evidence that the location of Neptune's bow shock is controlled by Neptune's rotation

  2. Using large-scale flow experiments to rehabilitate Colorado River ecosystem function in Grand Canyon: Basis for an adaptive climate-resilient strategy: Chapter 17

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melis, Theodore S.; Pine, William E.; Korman, Josh; Yard, Michael D.; Jain, Shaleen; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Miller, Kathleen; Hamlet, Alan F.; Kenney, Douglas S.; Redmond, Kelly T.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive management of Glen Canyon Dam is improving downstream resources of the Colorado River in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park. The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (AMP), a federal advisory committee of 25 members with diverse special interests tasked to advise the U.S. Department of the Interior), was established in 1997 in response to the 1992 Grand Canyon Protection Act. Adaptive management assumes that ecosystem responses to management policies are inherently complex and unpredictable, but that understanding and management can be improved through monitoring. Best known for its high-flow experiments intended to benefit physical and biological resources by simulating one aspect of pre-dam conditions—floods, the AMP promotes collaboration among tribal, recreation, hydropower, environmental, water and other natural resource management interests. Monitoring has shown that high flow experiments move limited new tributary sand inputs below the dam from the bottom of the Colorado River to shorelines; rebuilding eroded sandbars that support camping areas and other natural and cultural resources. Spring-timed high flows have also been shown to stimulate aquatic productivity by disturbing the river bed below the dam in Glen Canyon. Understanding about how nonnative tailwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and downstream endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha) respond to dam operations has also increased, but this learning has mostly posed “surprise” adaptation opportunities to managers. Since reoperation of the dam to Modified Low Fluctuating Flows in 1996, rainbow trout now benefit from more stable daily flows and high spring releases, but possibly at a risk to humpback chub and other native fishes downstream. In contrast, humpback chub have so far proven robust to all flows, and native fish have increased under the combination of warmer river temperatures associated with reduced storage in Lake Powell, and a

  3. RHUM-RUM, a Large-Scale Effort to Seismologically Image a Mantle Plume Under the Reunion Hotspot: Experiment Presentation and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigloch, K.; Barruol, G.

    2014-12-01

    RHUM-RUM is a German-French geophysical experiment based on the seafloor and on islands surrounding the hotspot of La Réunion, western Indian Ocean. Its primary objective is to clarify the presence or absence of a mantle plume beneath the Reunion hotspot, which is thought to have first pierced the surface 65 million years ago with the eruption of the Deccan Traps on India. RHUM-RUM's central component is a one-year deployment (Oct 2012 - Nov 2013) of 57 broadband ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and hydrophones on an area of 2000x2000 km2 surrounding the hotspot. All OBS have been successfully recovered. We also have been operating 37 land seismometers on the islands of La Réunion, Mauritius, Rodrigues, southern Seychelles, îles Eparses, and on Madagascar between 2011 and 2014. As the data collection stage is drawing to a close, we discuss data yield and quality with respect to RHUM-RUM's primary purpose (passive seismological imaging through all depth levels of the mantle) and secondary applications ("environmental seismology" in a sparsely instrumented area, e.g., tracking of tropical cyclones). We give an overview of the research questions investigated by the RHUM-RUM group, and present preliminary results.

  4. 'Mom by choice, single by life's circumstance...' Findings from a large scale survey of the experiences of single mothers by choice.

    PubMed

    Jadva, V; Badger, S; Morrissette, M; Golombok, S

    2009-12-01

    There has been a rise in recent years in the number of women choosing to have a child without the involvement of a partner. These women, often referred to as 'single mothers by choice' or 'choice mothers' differ from single mothers who find themselves parenting alone following divorce or separation. The present study collected data on the motivations and experiences of 291 single mothers by choice using online questionnaires. The findings showed that women often sought advice from others and made practical changes before becoming choice mothers. The most common method used to have a child was sperm donation with most opting for an anonymous donor. The majority felt that it was important for their child to have a male role model, and most ensured that their child had a male figure in their lives. Many choice mothers expressed some concern about their child of growing up without a father, although this did not necessarily mean that they wished to form a relationship in the future. Single mothers by choice are a distinct group of single mothers and more detailed studies are required to focus on issues that are of most relevance to them.

  5. The sensitivity of tropical leaf litter decomposition to temperature: results from a large-scale leaf translocation experiment along an elevation gradient in Peruvian forests.

    PubMed

    Salinas, N; Malhi, Y; Meir, P; Silman, M; Roman Cuesta, R; Huaman, J; Salinas, D; Huaman, V; Gibaja, A; Mamani, M; Farfan, F

    2011-03-01

    • We present the results from a litter translocation experiment along a 2800-m elevation gradient in Peruvian tropical forests. The understanding of the environmental factors controlling litter decomposition is important in the description of the carbon and nutrient cycles of tropical ecosystems, and in predicting their response to long-term increases in temperature. • Samples of litter from 15 species were transplanted across all five sites in the study, and decomposition was tracked over 448 d. • Species' type had a large influence on the decomposition rate (k), most probably through its influence on leaf quality and morphology. When samples were pooled across species and elevations, soil temperature explained 95% of the variation in the decomposition rate, but no direct relationship was observed with either soil moisture or rainfall. The sensitivity of the decay rate to temperature (κ(T)) varied seven-fold across species, between 0.024 and 0.169 °C⁻¹, with a mean value of 0.118 ± 0.009 °C⁻¹ (SE). This is equivalent to a temperature sensitivity parameter (Q₁₀) for litter decay of 3.06 ± 0.28, higher than that frequently assumed for heterotrophic processes. • Our results suggest that the warming of approx. 0.9 °C experienced in the region in recent decades may have increased decomposition and nutrient mineralization rates by c. 10%.

  6. Larval development and settling of Macoma balthica in a large-scale mesocosm experiment at different fCO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, A.; Lischka, S.; Boxhammer, T.; Schulz, K. G.; Norkko, J.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are causing severe changes in the global inorganic carbon balance of the oceans. Associated ocean acidification is expected to impose a major threat to marine ecosystems worldwide, and it is also expected to be amplified in the Baltic Sea where the system is already at present exposed to relatively large natural seasonal and diel pH fluctuations. The response of organisms to future ocean acidification has primarily been studied in single-species experiments, whereas the knowledge of community-wide responses is still limited. To study responses of the Baltic Sea pelagic community to a range of future CO2-scenarios, six ∼ 55 m3 pelagic mesocosms were deployed in the northern Baltic Sea in June 2012. In this specific study we focused on the tolerance, development and subsequent settlement process of the larvae of the benthic key-species Macoma balthica when exposed to different levels of future CO2. We found that the settling of M. balthica was delayed along the increasing CO2 gradient of the mesocosms. Also, when exposed to increasing CO2 levels larvae settled at a larger size, indicating a developmental delay. With on-going climate change, both the frequency and extent of regularly occurring high CO2 conditions is likely to increase, and a permanent pH decrease will likely occur. The strong impact of increasing CO2 levels on early-stage bivalves is alarming as these stages are crucial for sustaining viable populations, and a failure in their recruitment would ultimately lead to negative effects on the population.

  7. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  8. Are large-scale submarine erosive features created by erosive debris flows or turbidity currents?: Field evidence from the Middle Eocene Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakin, N. C.; Pickering, K. T.; Millington, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    hydrocarbon reservoir continuity and heterogeneity, including the origin and recognition of mudstone-filled chutes or channels identified in seismic profiles. Reference Dakin, N., Pickering, K.T., Mohrig, D. & Bayliss, N.J. 2013. Channel-like features created by erosive submarine debris flows: Field evidence from the Middle Eocene Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Mar. Petrol. Geol., 41, 62-71.

  9. Large-scale atmospheric state and cloud/precipitation characteristics during MC3E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, M. P.; Kollias, P.; Giangrande, S. E.; Collis, S. M.; Petersen, W. A.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a joint field campaign of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, took place at the ARM Southern Great Plains site between April 22 and June 6, 2011. The major objective of this campaign was the collection of a comprehensive data set for the study of a variety of convective cloud/storm conditions targeting processes important for the parameterization of convection in large-scale models and the retrieval of precipitation from space-borne sensors over land. This poster presents analysis of representations of the large-scale atmospheric state derived from the MC3E sounding network, including both integrated convective indices and large-scale forcing fields (e.g., vertical velocity and advective tendency) derived using an advanced objective analysis approach, in conjunction with cloud and precipitation observations from MC3E radar systems and in-situ measurements.

  10. High Speed Networking and Large-scale Simulation in Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Gary, Patrick; Seablom, Michael; Truszkowski, Walt; Odubiyi, Jide; Jiang, Weiyuan; Liu, Dong

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale numerical simulation has been one of the most important approaches for understanding global geodynamical processes. In this approach, peta-scale floating point operations (pflops) are often required to carry out a single physically-meaningful numerical experiment. For example, to model convective flow in the Earth's core and generation of the geomagnetic field (geodynamo), simulation for one magnetic free-decay time (approximately 15000 years) with a modest resolution of 150 in three spatial dimensions would require approximately 0.2 pflops. If such a numerical model is used to predict geomagnetic secular variation over decades and longer, with e.g. an ensemble Kalman filter assimilation approach, approximately 30 (and perhaps more) independent simulations of similar scales would be needed for one data assimilation analysis. Obviously, such a simulation would require an enormous computing resource that exceeds the capacity of a single facility currently available at our disposal. One solution is to utilize a very fast network (e.g. 10Gb optical networks) and available middleware (e.g. Globus Toolkit) to allocate available but often heterogeneous resources for such large-scale computing efforts. At NASA GSFC, we are experimenting with such an approach by networking several clusters for geomagnetic data assimilation research. We shall present our initial testing results in the meeting.

  11. Large scale static and dynamic friction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtar, K.; Barton, N.

    1984-12-31

    A series of nineteen shear tests were performed on fractures 1 m/sup 2/ in area, generated in blocks of sandstone, granite, tuff, hydrostone and concrete. The tests were conducted under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. A vertical stress assisted fracturing technique was developed to create the fractures through the large test blocks. Prior to testing, the fractured surface of each block was characterized using the Barton JRC-JCS concept. the results of characterization were used to generate the peak strength envelope for each fractured surface. Attempts were made to model the stress path based on the classical transformation equations which assumes a theoretical plane, elastic isotropic properties, and therefore no slip. However, this approach gave rise to a stress path passing above the strength envelope which is clearly unacceptable. The results of the experimental investigations indicated that actual stress path is affected by the dilatancy due to fracture roughness, as well as by the side friction imposed by the boundary conditions. By introducing the corrections due to the dilation and boundary conditions into the stress transformation equation, the fully corrected stress paths for predicting the strength of fractured blocks were obtained.

  12. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Large-scale parametric survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sushil; Madigan, David; Cheng, Jerry Q; Burd, Randall S

    2013-10-15

    Survival analysis has been a topic of active statistical research in the past few decades with applications spread across several areas. Traditional applications usually consider data with only a small numbers of predictors with a few hundreds or thousands of observations. Recent advances in data acquisition techniques and computation power have led to considerable interest in analyzing very-high-dimensional data where the number of predictor variables and the number of observations range between 10(4) and 10(6). In this paper, we present a tool for performing large-scale regularized parametric survival analysis using a variant of the cyclic coordinate descent method. Through our experiments on two real data sets, we show that application of regularized models to high-dimensional data avoids overfitting and can provide improved predictive performance and calibration over corresponding low-dimensional models.

  14. Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ababou, R.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs.

  15. Needs, opportunities, and options for large scale systems research

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.L.

    1984-10-01

    The Office of Energy Research was recently asked to perform a study of Large Scale Systems in order to facilitate the development of a true large systems theory. It was decided to ask experts in the fields of electrical engineering, chemical engineering and manufacturing/operations research for their ideas concerning large scale systems research. The author was asked to distribute a questionnaire among these experts to find out their opinions concerning recent accomplishments and future research directions in large scale systems research. He was also requested to convene a conference which included three experts in each area as panel members to discuss the general area of large scale systems research. The conference was held on March 26--27, 1984 in Pittsburgh with nine panel members, and 15 other attendees. The present report is a summary of the ideas presented and the recommendations proposed by the attendees.

  16. Population generation for large-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Andrew C.; King, Gary; Morrison, Clayton; Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Computer simulation is used to research phenomena ranging from the structure of the space-time continuum to population genetics and future combat.1-3 Multi-agent simulations in particular are now commonplace in many fields.4, 5 By modeling populations whose complex behavior emerges from individual interactions, these simulations help to answer questions about effects where closed form solutions are difficult to solve or impossible to derive.6 To be useful, simulations must accurately model the relevant aspects of the underlying domain. In multi-agent simulation, this means that the modeling must include both the agents and their relationships. Typically, each agent can be modeled as a set of attributes drawn from various distributions (e.g., height, morale, intelligence and so forth). Though these can interact - for example, agent height is related to agent weight - they are usually independent. Modeling relations between agents, on the other hand, adds a new layer of complexity, and tools from graph theory and social network analysis are finding increasing application.7, 8 Recognizing the role and proper use of these techniques, however, remains the subject of ongoing research. We recently encountered these complexities while building large scale social simulations.9-11 One of these, the Hats Simulator, is designed to be a lightweight proxy for intelligence analysis problems. Hats models a "society in a box" consisting of many simple agents, called hats. Hats gets its name from the classic spaghetti western, in which the heroes and villains are known by the color of the hats they wear. The Hats society also has its heroes and villains, but the challenge is to identify which color hat they should be wearing based on how they behave. There are three types of hats: benign hats, known terrorists, and covert terrorists. Covert terrorists look just like benign hats but act like terrorists. Population structure can make covert hat identification significantly more

  17. Voids in the Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ad, Hagai; Piran, Tsvi

    1997-12-01

    Voids are the most prominent feature of the large-scale structure of the universe. Still, their incorporation into quantitative analysis of it has been relatively recent, owing essentially to the lack of an objective tool to identify the voids and to quantify them. To overcome this, we present here the VOID FINDER algorithm, a novel tool for objectively quantifying voids in the galaxy distribution. The algorithm first classifies galaxies as either wall galaxies or field galaxies. Then, it identifies voids in the wall-galaxy distribution. Voids are defined as continuous volumes that do not contain any wall galaxies. The voids must be thicker than an adjustable limit, which is refined in successive iterations. In this way, we identify the same regions that would be recognized as voids by the eye. Small breaches in the walls are ignored, avoiding artificial connections between neighboring voids. We test the algorithm using Voronoi tesselations. By appropriate scaling of the parameters with the selection function, we apply it to two redshift surveys, the dense SSRS2 and the full-sky IRAS 1.2 Jy. Both surveys show similar properties: ~50% of the volume is filled by voids. The voids have a scale of at least 40 h-1 Mpc and an average -0.9 underdensity. Faint galaxies do not fill the voids, but they do populate them more than bright ones. These results suggest that both optically and IRAS-selected galaxies delineate the same large-scale structure. Comparison with the recovered mass distribution further suggests that the observed voids in the galaxy distribution correspond well to underdense regions in the mass distribution. This confirms the gravitational origin of the voids.

  18. Improving Recent Large-Scale Pulsar Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rogerio Fernando; Ransom, S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsars are unique in that they act as celestial laboratories for precise tests of gravity and other extreme physics (Kramer 2004). There are approximately 2000 known pulsars today, which is less than ten percent of pulsars in the Milky Way according to theoretical models (Lorimer 2004). Out of these 2000 known pulsars, approximately ten percent are known millisecond pulsars, objects used for their period stability for detailed physics tests and searches for gravitational radiation (Lorimer 2008). As the field and instrumentation progress, pulsar astronomers attempt to overcome observational biases and detect new pulsars, consequently discovering new millisecond pulsars. We attempt to improve large scale pulsar surveys by examining three recent pulsar surveys. The first, the Green Bank Telescope 350MHz Drift Scan, a low frequency isotropic survey of the northern sky, has yielded a large number of candidates that were visually inspected and identified, resulting in over 34.000 thousands candidates viewed, dozens of detections of known pulsars, and the discovery of a new low-flux pulsar, PSRJ1911+22. The second, the PALFA survey, is a high frequency survey of the galactic plane with the Arecibo telescope. We created a processing pipeline for the PALFA survey at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville- VA, in addition to making needed modifications upon advice from the PALFA consortium. The third survey examined is a new GBT 820MHz survey devoted to find new millisecond pulsars by observing the target-rich environment of unidentified sources in the FERMI LAT catalogue. By approaching these three pulsar surveys at different stages, we seek to improve the success rates of large scale surveys, and hence the possibility for ground-breaking work in both basic physics and astrophysics.

  19. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-08-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  20. Large-scale search for dark-matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Kinion, D; van Bibber, K

    2000-08-30

    We review the status of two ongoing large-scale searches for axions which may constitute the dark matter of our Milky Way halo. The experiments are based on the microwave cavity technique proposed by Sikivie, and marks a ''second-generation'' to the original experiments performed by the Rochester-Brookhaven-Fermilab collaboration, and the University of Florida group.

  1. Large-scale tides in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Hiu Yan; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-02-01

    Density perturbations in cosmology, i.e. spherically symmetric adiabatic perturbations of a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime, are locally exactly equivalent to a different FLRW solution, as long as their wavelength is much larger than the sound horizon of all fluid components. This fact is known as the "separate universe" paradigm. However, no such relation is known for anisotropic adiabatic perturbations, which correspond to an FLRW spacetime with large-scale tidal fields. Here, we provide a closed, fully relativistic set of evolutionary equations for the nonlinear evolution of such modes, based on the conformal Fermi (CFC) frame. We show explicitly that the tidal effects are encoded by the Weyl tensor, and are hence entirely different from an anisotropic Bianchi I spacetime, where the anisotropy is sourced by the Ricci tensor. In order to close the system, certain higher derivative terms have to be dropped. We show that this approximation is equivalent to the local tidal approximation of Hui and Bertschinger [1]. We also show that this very simple set of equations matches the exact evolution of the density field at second order, but fails at third and higher order. This provides a useful, easy-to-use framework for computing the fully relativistic growth of structure at second order.

  2. Lyα Emitter Galaxies at z˜ 2.8 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. I. Tracing the Large-scale Structure via Lyα Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Wang, Jun-Xian; Jiang, Chun-Yan; Cai, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    We present a narrowband survey with three adjacent filters for z = 2.8-2.9 Lyman alpha (Lyα) emitter (LAE) galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), along with spectroscopic follow-up. With a complete sample of 96 LAE candidates in the narrowband NB466, we confirm the large-scale structure at z ˜ 2.8 suggested by previous spectroscopic surveys. Compared to the blank field detected with the other two narrowband filters NB470 and NB475, the LAE-density excess in NB466 (900 arcmin2) is ˜ 6.0 ± 0.8 times the standard deviation expected at z ˜ 2.8, assuming a linear bias of 2. The overdense large-scale structure in NB466 can be decomposed into four protoclusters, whose overdensities (each within an equivalent comoving volume 153 Mpc3) relative to the blank field (NB470+NB475) are in the range of 4.6-6.6. These four protoclusters are expected to evolve into a Coma-like cluster (M ≥ 1015 M ⊙) at z ˜ 0. We also investigate the various properties of LAEs at z = 2.8-2.9 and their dependence on the environment. The average star formation rates derived from the Lyα, rest-frame UV, and X-ray bands are ˜4, 10, and <16 M ⊙ yr-1, respectively, implying a Lyα escape fraction of 25% ≲ {f}{{ESC}}{Lyα } ≲ 40% and a UV continuum escape fraction of {f}{{ESC}}{{UV,cont}} ≳ 62% for LAEs at z ˜ 2.8. The Lyα photon density calculated from the integrated Lyα luminosity function in the overdense field (NB466) is ˜50% higher than that in the blank field (NB470+NB475), and more bright LAEs are found in the overdense field. The three brightest LAEs, including a quasar at z = 2.81, are all detected in the X-ray band and in NB466. These three LAE-active galactic nuclei contribute an extra 20%-30% Lyα photon density compared to other LAE galaxies. Furthermore, we find that LAEs in overdense regions have larger equivalent width values, bluer U - B and V - R (˜2-3σ) colors compared with those in lower density regions, indicating that LAEs in overdense

  3. Resprout and Survival of Willow ( Salix) Cuttings on Bioengineering Structures in Actively Eroding Gullies in Marls in a Mountainous Mediterranean Climate: A Large-Scale Experiment in the Francon Catchment (Southern Alps, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, F.; Labonne, S.

    2015-10-01

    Improving the understanding of the role of vegetation and bioengineering structures on erosion and sedimentation control, especially in torrent-prone catchments in a mountainous Mediterranean climate, has become a key issue today for the scientific community working in ecological engineering and restoration ecology. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of willow ( Salix) cuttings in resprouting and survival on bioengineering structures in actively eroding gullies in marls and to identify the factors influencing this performance. Measurements were taken from 2008 to 2011 on 336 bioengineering structures, namely brush layers on wooden sills (BL) and brush layers with brush mats on wooden sills (BLM), using 8890 cuttings of Salix purpurea and Salix incana. These structures were built in 18 gullies of the Francon Catchment in marls (73 ha) in the Southern French Alps. After four growing seasons, the results revealed a total cutting survival rate of 45 %. They also demonstrated that in BLM, brush mats provided better survival (56 %) than brush layers (37 %). In BL, brush layers alone showed 51 % cutting survival. Cutting resprout and survival were observed for all structure aspects. They were positively related to increasing gully size and vegetation cover on gully sides. The results of this large-scale experiment clarified previous data obtained on a limited sample of bioengineering structures, providing further detail and showing that it is possible to use such structures made of willow cuttings to revegetate actively eroding gullies in marls within a mountainous Mediterranean climate.

  4. Resprout and Survival of Willow (Salix) Cuttings on Bioengineering Structures in Actively Eroding Gullies in Marls in a Mountainous Mediterranean Climate: A Large-Scale Experiment in the Francon Catchment (Southern Alps, France).

    PubMed

    Rey, F; Labonne, S

    2015-10-01

    Improving the understanding of the role of vegetation and bioengineering structures on erosion and sedimentation control, especially in torrent-prone catchments in a mountainous Mediterranean climate, has become a key issue today for the scientific community working in ecological engineering and restoration ecology. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of willow (Salix) cuttings in resprouting and survival on bioengineering structures in actively eroding gullies in marls and to identify the factors influencing this performance. Measurements were taken from 2008 to 2011 on 336 bioengineering structures, namely brush layers on wooden sills (BL) and brush layers with brush mats on wooden sills (BLM), using 8890 cuttings of Salix purpurea and Salix incana. These structures were built in 18 gullies of the Francon Catchment in marls (73 ha) in the Southern French Alps. After four growing seasons, the results revealed a total cutting survival rate of 45%. They also demonstrated that in BLM, brush mats provided better survival (56%) than brush layers (37%). In BL, brush layers alone showed 51% cutting survival. Cutting resprout and survival were observed for all structure aspects. They were positively related to increasing gully size and vegetation cover on gully sides. The results of this large-scale experiment clarified previous data obtained on a limited sample of bioengineering structures, providing further detail and showing that it is possible to use such structures made of willow cuttings to revegetate actively eroding gullies in marls within a mountainous Mediterranean climate.

  5. Large Scale Metal Additive Techniques Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nycz, Andrzej; Adediran, Adeola I; Noakes, Mark W; Love, Lonnie J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years additive manufacturing made long strides toward becoming a main stream production technology. Particularly strong progress has been made in large-scale polymer deposition. However, large scale metal additive has not yet reached parity with large scale polymer. This paper is a review study of the metal additive techniques in the context of building large structures. Current commercial devices are capable of printing metal parts on the order of several cubic feet compared to hundreds of cubic feet for the polymer side. In order to follow the polymer progress path several factors are considered: potential to scale, economy, environment friendliness, material properties, feedstock availability, robustness of the process, quality and accuracy, potential for defects, and post processing as well as potential applications. This paper focuses on current state of art of large scale metal additive technology with a focus on expanding the geometric limits.

  6. Large scale digital atlases in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawrylycz, M.; Feng, D.; Lau, C.; Kuan, C.; Miller, J.; Dang, C.; Ng, L.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging in neuroscience has revolutionized our current understanding of brain structure, architecture and increasingly its function. Many characteristics of morphology, cell type, and neuronal circuitry have been elucidated through methods of neuroimaging. Combining this data in a meaningful, standardized, and accessible manner is the scope and goal of the digital brain atlas. Digital brain atlases are used today in neuroscience to characterize the spatial organization of neuronal structures, for planning and guidance during neurosurgery, and as a reference for interpreting other data modalities such as gene expression and connectivity data. The field of digital atlases is extensive and in addition to atlases of the human includes high quality brain atlases of the mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and other model organisms. Using techniques based on histology, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as gene expression data, modern digital atlases use probabilistic and multimodal techniques, as well as sophisticated visualization software to form an integrated product. Toward this goal, brain atlases form a common coordinate framework for summarizing, accessing, and organizing this knowledge and will undoubtedly remain a key technology in neuroscience in the future. Since the development of its flagship project of a genome wide image-based atlas of the mouse brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has used imaging as a primary data modality for many of its large scale atlas projects. We present an overview of Allen Institute digital atlases in neuroscience, with a focus on the challenges and opportunities for image processing and computation.

  7. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  8. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  9. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  10. Clearing and Labeling Techniques for Large-Scale Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jinyoung; Choe, Minjin; Kim, Sung-Yon

    2016-01-01

    Clearing and labeling techniques for large-scale biological tissues enable simultaneous extraction of molecular and structural information with minimal disassembly of the sample, facilitating the integration of molecular, cellular and systems biology across different scales. Recent years have witnessed an explosive increase in the number of such methods and their applications, reflecting heightened interest in organ-wide clearing and labeling across many fields of biology and medicine. In this review, we provide an overview and comparison of existing clearing and labeling techniques and discuss challenges and opportunities in the investigations of large-scale biological systems. PMID:27239813

  11. Recursive architecture for large-scale adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanahara, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Yoshihiko

    1994-09-01

    'Large scale' is one of major trends in the research and development of recent engineering, especially in the field of aerospace structural system. This term expresses the large scale of an artifact in general, however, it also implies the large number of the components which make up the artifact in usual. Considering a large scale system which is especially used in remote space or deep-sea, such a system should be adaptive as well as robust by itself, because its control as well as maintenance by human operators are not easy due to the remoteness. An approach to realizing this large scale, adaptive and robust system is to build the system as an assemblage of components which are respectively adaptive by themselves. In this case, the robustness of the system can be achieved by using a large number of such components and suitable adaptation as well as maintenance strategies. Such a system gathers many research's interest and their studies such as decentralized motion control, configurating algorithm and characteristics of structural elements are reported. In this article, a recursive architecture concept is developed and discussed towards the realization of large scale system which consists of a number of uniform adaptive components. We propose an adaptation strategy based on the architecture and its implementation by means of hierarchically connected processing units. The robustness and the restoration from degeneration of the processing unit are also discussed. Two- and three-dimensional adaptive truss structures are conceptually designed based on the recursive architecture.

  12. A relativistic signature in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Verde, Licia; Wands, David

    2016-09-01

    In General Relativity, the constraint equation relating metric and density perturbations is inherently nonlinear, leading to an effective non-Gaussianity in the dark matter density field on large scales-even if the primordial metric perturbation is Gaussian. Intrinsic non-Gaussianity in the large-scale dark matter overdensity in GR is real and physical. However, the variance smoothed on a local physical scale is not correlated with the large-scale curvature perturbation, so that there is no relativistic signature in the galaxy bias when using the simplest model of bias. It is an open question whether the observable mass proxies such as luminosity or weak lensing correspond directly to the physical mass in the simple halo bias model. If not, there may be observables that encode this relativistic signature.

  13. Corridors Increase Plant Species Richness at Large Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Damschen, Ellen I.; Haddad, Nick M.; Orrock,John L.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2006-09-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the largest threats to biodiversity. Landscape corridors, which are hypothesized to reduce the negative consequences of fragmentation, have become common features of ecological management plans worldwide. Despite their popularity, there is little evidence documenting the effectiveness of corridors in preserving biodiversity at large scales. Using a large-scale replicated experiment, we showed that habitat patches connected by corridors retain more native plant species than do isolated patches, that this difference increases over time, and that corridors do not promote invasion by exotic species. Our results support the use of corridors in biodiversity conservation.

  14. Acoustic Studies of the Large Scale Ocean Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menemenlis, Dimitris

    1999-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of ocean circulation and its transport properties is prerequisite to an understanding of the earth's climate and of important biological and chemical cycles. Results from two recent experiments, THETIS-2 in the Western Mediterranean and ATOC in the North Pacific, illustrate the use of ocean acoustic tomography for studies of the large scale circulation. The attraction of acoustic tomography is its ability to sample and average the large-scale oceanic thermal structure, synoptically, along several sections, and at regular intervals. In both studies, the acoustic data are compared to, and then combined with, general circulation models, meteorological analyses, satellite altimetry, and direct measurements from ships. Both studies provide complete regional descriptions of the time-evolving, three-dimensional, large scale circulation, albeit with large uncertainties. The studies raise serious issues about existing ocean observing capability and provide guidelines for future efforts.

  15. Lactococcus lactis BFE920 activates the innate immune system of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), resulting in protection against Streptococcus iniae infection and enhancing feed efficiency and weight gain in large-scale field studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel; Beck, Bo Ram; Heo, Saet-Byeol; Kim, Jungjoon; Kim, Hyun Duk; Lee, Sun-Min; Kim, Youngchan; Oh, So Young; Lee, Kyungro; Do, HyungKi; Lee, KwanHee; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H; Song, Seong Kyu

    2013-11-01

    The protective effect of a food-grade lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis BFE920 against disease of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) cultivated on a large scale was studied. Initially, antimicrobial activity of L. lactis against several fish pathogens was evaluated in vitro; the probiotic showed strong antibacterial activity against Streptococcus iniae, Streptococcus parauberis and Enterococcus viikkiensis, and moderate activity against Lactococcus garviae. When olive flounders were fed for two weeks with experimental diets containing varying concentrations of L. lactis (1 × 10(6), 5 × 10(6), 2.5 × 10(7) and 1.25 × 10(8) CFU/g feed), all the experimental feed groups showed 68-77% survival upon challenge with S. iniae. A field-scale feeding trial with L. lactis dietary supplement was conducted in a local fish farm (n = 12,000) for three months, and disease resistance, innate immune parameters and growth performance were evaluated. The average weight gain and feed efficiency were increased up to 6.8% and 8.5%, respectively. At the end of the feeding trial, the olive flounders were challenged with S. iniae. The L. lactis-fed group was protected from S. iniae challenge with a 66% survival rate. This disease protection is due to the flounder's innate immunity activated by the L. lactis administration: increased lysosomal activities and production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. These data clearly indicated that L. lactis BFE920 may be developed as a functional feed additive for protection against diseases, and for enhancement of feed efficiency and weight gain in olive flounder farming.

  16. Large-scale cortical networks and cognition.

    PubMed

    Bressler, S L

    1995-03-01

    The well-known parcellation of the mammalian cerebral cortex into a large number of functionally distinct cytoarchitectonic areas presents a problem for understanding the complex cortical integrative functions that underlie cognition. How do cortical areas having unique individual functional properties cooperate to accomplish these complex operations? Do neurons distributed throughout the cerebral cortex act together in large-scale functional assemblages? This review examines the substantial body of evidence supporting the view that complex integrative functions are carried out by large-scale networks of cortical areas. Pathway tracing studies in non-human primates have revealed widely distributed networks of interconnected cortical areas, providing an anatomical substrate for large-scale parallel processing of information in the cerebral cortex. Functional coactivation of multiple cortical areas has been demonstrated by neurophysiological studies in non-human primates and several different cognitive functions have been shown to depend on multiple distributed areas by human neuropsychological studies. Electrophysiological studies on interareal synchronization have provided evidence that active neurons in different cortical areas may become not only coactive, but also functionally interdependent. The computational advantages of synchronization between cortical areas in large-scale networks have been elucidated by studies using artificial neural network models. Recent observations of time-varying multi-areal cortical synchronization suggest that the functional topology of a large-scale cortical network is dynamically reorganized during visuomotor behavior.

  17. Survey on large scale system control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    The problem inherent to large scale systems such as power network, communication network and economic or ecological systems were studied. The increase in size and flexibility of future spacecraft has put those dynamical systems into the category of large scale systems, and tools specific to the class of large systems are being sought to design control systems that can guarantee more stability and better performance. Among several survey papers, reference was found to a thorough investigation on decentralized control methods. Especially helpful was the classification made of the different existing approaches to deal with large scale systems. A very similar classification is used, even though the papers surveyed are somehow different from the ones reviewed in other papers. Special attention is brought to the applicability of the existing methods to controlling large mechanical systems like large space structures. Some recent developments are added to this survey.

  18. The large-scale distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies in the universe is characterized on the basis of the six completed strips of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics redshift-survey extension. The design of the survey is briefly reviewed, and the results are presented graphically. Vast low-density voids similar to the void in Bootes are found, almost completely surrounded by thin sheets of galaxies. Also discussed are the implications of the results for the survey sampling problem, the two-point correlation function of the galaxy distribution, the possibility of detecting large-scale coherent flows, theoretical models of large-scale structure, and the identification of groups and clusters of galaxies.

  19. Metal fluxing in a large-scale intra-arc fault: insights from the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and associated geothermal fields in southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardani, D.; Reich, M.; Sano, Y.; Takahata, N.; Wen, H.; Roulleau, E.; Sanchez-Alfaro, P.; González-Jiménez, J. M.; Shinohara, H.; Yang, T. F.; Cembrano, J. M.; Arancibia, G.

    2014-12-01

    along NWN-faults (1.5 ppb, 8 ppb and 25 ppm, respectively), while measured concentrations of PGEs in fumaroles are detectable (between 0.6 and 14 ppt of Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) along both NWE and NNE-trending structures. This study point out towards provide new insights about large-scale metal fluxing along an active intra-arc fault system.

  20. Large-scale Alfvén vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Scullion, E.; Fedun, V.

    2015-12-15

    The new type of large-scale vortex structures of dispersionless Alfvén waves in collisionless plasma is investigated. It is shown that Alfvén waves can propagate in the form of Alfvén vortices of finite characteristic radius and characterised by magnetic flux ropes carrying orbital angular momentum. The structure of the toroidal and radial velocity, fluid and magnetic field vorticity, the longitudinal electric current in the plane orthogonal to the external magnetic field are discussed.

  1. Management of large-scale technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two major themes are addressed in this assessment of the management of large-scale NASA programs: (1) how a high technology agency was a decade marked by a rapid expansion of funds and manpower in the first half and almost as rapid contraction in the second; and (2) how NASA combined central planning and control with decentralized project execution.

  2. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  3. Towards physics responsible for large-scale Lyman-α forest bias parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Slosar, Anže E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2016-03-01

    Using a series of carefully constructed numerical experiments based on hydrodynamic cosmological SPH simulations, we attempt to build an intuition for the relevant physics behind the large scale density (b{sub δ}) and velocity gradient (b{sub η}) biases of the Lyman-α forest. Starting with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation applied to the smoothed total density field in real-space, and progressing through redshift-space with no thermal broadening, redshift-space with thermal broadening and hydrodynamically simulated baryon fields, we investigate how approximations found in the literature fare. We find that Seljak's 2012 analytical formulae for these bias parameters work surprisingly well in the limit of no thermal broadening and linear redshift-space distortions. We also show that his b{sub η} formula is exact in the limit of no thermal broadening. Since introduction of thermal broadening significantly affects its value, we speculate that a combination of large-scale measurements of b{sub η} and the small scale flux PDF might be a sensitive probe of the thermal state of the IGM. We find that large-scale biases derived from the smoothed total matter field are within 10–20% to those based on hydrodynamical quantities, in line with other measurements in the literature.

  4. Towards physics responsible for large-scale Lyman-α forest bias parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Slosar, Anže

    2016-03-01

    Using a series of carefully constructed numerical experiments based on hydrodynamic cosmological SPH simulations, we attempt to build an intuition for the relevant physics behind the large scale density (bδ) and velocity gradient (bη) biases of the Lyman-α forest. Starting with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation applied to the smoothed total density field in real-space, and progressing through redshift-space with no thermal broadening, redshift-space with thermal broadening and hydrodynamically simulated baryon fields, we investigate how approximations found in the literature fare. We find that Seljak's 2012 analytical formulae for these bias parameters work surprisingly well in the limit of no thermal broadening and linear redshift-space distortions. We also show that his bη formula is exact in the limit of no thermal broadening. Since introduction of thermal broadening significantly affects its value, we speculate that a combination of large-scale measurements of bη and the small scale flux PDF might be a sensitive probe of the thermal state of the IGM. We find that large-scale biases derived from the smoothed total matter field are within 10-20% to those based on hydrodynamical quantities, in line with other measurements in the literature.

  5. Towards physics responsible for large-scale Lyman-α forest bias parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Agnieszka M. Cieplak; Slosar, Anze

    2016-03-08

    Using a series of carefully constructed numerical experiments based on hydrodynamic cosmological SPH simulations, we attempt to build an intuition for the relevant physics behind the large scale density (bδ) and velocity gradient (bη) biases of the Lyman-α forest. Starting with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation applied to the smoothed total density field in real-space, and progressing through redshift-space with no thermal broadening, redshift-space with thermal broadening and hydrodynamically simulated baryon fields, we investigate how approximations found in the literature fare. We find that Seljak's 2012 analytical formulae for these bias parameters work surprisingly well in the limit of no thermalmore » broadening and linear redshift-space distortions. We also show that his bη formula is exact in the limit of no thermal broadening. Since introduction of thermal broadening significantly affects its value, we speculate that a combination of large-scale measurements of bη and the small scale flux PDF might be a sensitive probe of the thermal state of the IGM. Lastly, we find that large-scale biases derived from the smoothed total matter field are within 10–20% to those based on hydrodynamical quantities, in line with other measurements in the literature.« less

  6. Towards physics responsible for large-scale Lyman-α forest bias parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Agnieszka M. Cieplak; Slosar, Anze

    2016-03-08

    Using a series of carefully constructed numerical experiments based on hydrodynamic cosmological SPH simulations, we attempt to build an intuition for the relevant physics behind the large scale density (bδ) and velocity gradient (bη) biases of the Lyman-α forest. Starting with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation applied to the smoothed total density field in real-space, and progressing through redshift-space with no thermal broadening, redshift-space with thermal broadening and hydrodynamically simulated baryon fields, we investigate how approximations found in the literature fare. We find that Seljak's 2012 analytical formulae for these bias parameters work surprisingly well in the limit of no thermal broadening and linear redshift-space distortions. We also show that his bη formula is exact in the limit of no thermal broadening. Since introduction of thermal broadening significantly affects its value, we speculate that a combination of large-scale measurements of bη and the small scale flux PDF might be a sensitive probe of the thermal state of the IGM. Lastly, we find that large-scale biases derived from the smoothed total matter field are within 10–20% to those based on hydrodynamical quantities, in line with other measurements in the literature.

  7. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Ludemann, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The propfan is an advanced propeller concept which maintains the high efficiencies traditionally associated with conventional propellers at the higher aircraft cruise speeds associated with jet transports. The large-scale advanced propfan (LAP) program extends the research done on 2 ft diameter propfan models to a 9 ft diameter article. The program includes design, fabrication, and testing of both an eight bladed, 9 ft diameter propfan, designated SR-7L, and a 2 ft diameter aeroelastically scaled model, SR-7A. The LAP program is complemented by the propfan test assessment (PTA) program, which takes the large-scale propfan and mates it with a gas generator and gearbox to form a propfan propulsion system and then flight tests this system on the wing of a Gulfstream 2 testbed aircraft.

  8. Condition Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted for the NASA Ames Research Center under grant NAG2-1182 (Condition-Based Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities). The information includes copies of view graphs presented at NASA Ames in the final Workshop (held during December of 1998), as well as a copy of a technical report provided to the COTR (Dr. Anne Patterson-Hine) subsequent to the workshop. The material describes the experimental design, collection of data, and analysis results associated with monitoring the health of large-scale facilities. In addition to this material, a copy of the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory data fusion visual programming tool kit was also provided to NASA Ames researchers.

  9. Large Scale Deformation of the Western US Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    Destructive earthquakes occur throughout the western US Cordillera (WUSC), not just within the San Andreas fault zone. But because we do not understand the present-day large-scale deformations of the crust throughout the WUSC, our ability to assess the potential for seismic hazards in this region remains severely limited. To address this problem, we are using a large collection of Global Positioning System (GPS) networks which spans the WUSC to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work can roughly be divided into an analysis of the GPS observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics.

  10. Large-Scale Aerosol Modeling and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    aerosol species up to six days in advance anywhere on the globe. NAAPS and COAMPS are particularly useful for forecasts of dust storms in areas...impact cloud processes globally. With increasing dust storms due to climate change and land use changes in desert regions, the impact of the...bacteria in large-scale dust storms is expected to significantly impact warm ice cloud formation, human health, and ecosystems globally. In Niemi et al

  11. Economically viable large-scale hydrogen liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, U.; Decker, L.; Klein, H.

    2017-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen demand, particularly driven by clean energy applications, will rise in the near future. As industrial large scale liquefiers will play a major role within the hydrogen supply chain, production capacity will have to increase by a multiple of today’s typical sizes. The main goal is to reduce the total cost of ownership for these plants by increasing energy efficiency with innovative and simple process designs, optimized in capital expenditure. New concepts must ensure a manageable plant complexity and flexible operability. In the phase of process development and selection, a dimensioning of key equipment for large scale liquefiers, such as turbines and compressors as well as heat exchangers, must be performed iteratively to ensure technological feasibility and maturity. Further critical aspects related to hydrogen liquefaction, e.g. fluid properties, ortho-para hydrogen conversion, and coldbox configuration, must be analysed in detail. This paper provides an overview on the approach, challenges and preliminary results in the development of efficient as well as economically viable concepts for large-scale hydrogen liquefaction.

  12. Large-Scale Visual Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Modern high performance computers have speeds measured in petaflops and handle data set sizes measured in terabytes and petabytes. Although these machines offer enormous potential for solving very large-scale realistic computational problems, their effectiveness will hinge upon the ability of human experts to interact with their simulation results and extract useful information. One of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century is to effectively understand and make use of the vast amount of information being produced. Visual data analysis will be among our most most important tools in helping to understand such large-scale information. Our research at the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute at the University of Utah has focused on innovative, scalable techniques for large-scale 3D visual data analysis. In this talk, I will present state- of-the-art visualization techniques, including scalable visualization algorithms and software, cluster-based visualization methods and innovate visualization techniques applied to problems in computational science, engineering, and medicine. I will conclude with an outline for a future high performance visualization research challenges and opportunities.

  13. Large-scale neuromorphic computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furber, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Neuromorphic computing covers a diverse range of approaches to information processing all of which demonstrate some degree of neurobiological inspiration that differentiates them from mainstream conventional computing systems. The philosophy behind neuromorphic computing has its origins in the seminal work carried out by Carver Mead at Caltech in the late 1980s. This early work influenced others to carry developments forward, and advances in VLSI technology supported steady growth in the scale and capability of neuromorphic devices. Recently, a number of large-scale neuromorphic projects have emerged, taking the approach to unprecedented scales and capabilities. These large-scale projects are associated with major new funding initiatives for brain-related research, creating a sense that the time and circumstances are right for progress in our understanding of information processing in the brain. In this review we present a brief history of neuromorphic engineering then focus on some of the principal current large-scale projects, their main features, how their approaches are complementary and distinct, their advantages and drawbacks, and highlight the sorts of capabilities that each can deliver to neural modellers.

  14. The large-scale anisotropy with the PAMELA calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelin, A.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.; Bazilevskaya, G.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A.; Koldashov, S.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krut'kov, S.; Kvashnin, A.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S.; Sarkar, R.; Simon, M.; Scotti, V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S.; Yurkin, Y.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The large-scale anisotropy (or the so-called star-diurnal wave) has been studied using the calorimeter of the space-born experiment PAMELA. The cosmic ray anisotropy has been obtained for the Southern and Northern hemispheres simultaneously in the equatorial coordinate system for the time period 2006-2014. The dipole amplitude and phase have been measured for energies 1-20 TeV n-1.

  15. A model of plasma heating by large-scale flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Boldyrev, S.; Mason, J.; Perez, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we study the process of energy dissipation triggered by a slow large-scale motion of a magnetized conducting fluid. Our consideration is motivated by the problem of heating the solar corona, which is believed to be governed by fast reconnection events set off by the slow motion of magnetic field lines anchored in the photospheric plasma. To elucidate the physics governing the disruption of the imposed laminar motion and the energy transfer to small scales, we propose a simplified model where the large-scale motion of magnetic field lines is prescribed not at the footpoints but rather imposed volumetrically. As a result, the problem can be treated numerically with an efficient, highly accurate spectral method, allowing us to use a resolution and statistical ensemble exceeding those of the previous work. We find that, even though the large-scale deformations are slow, they eventually lead to reconnection events that drive a turbulent state at smaller scales. The small-scale turbulence displays many of the universal features of field-guided magnetohydrodynamic turbulence like a well-developed inertial range spectrum. Based on these observations, we construct a phenomenological model that gives the scalings of the amplitude of the fluctuations and the energy-dissipation rate as functions of the input parameters. We find good agreement between the numerical results and the predictions of the model.

  16. Development of Large-Scale Forcing Data for GoAmazon2014/5 Cloud Modeling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.; Schumacher, C.; Upton, H. M.; Ahlgrimm, M.; Feng, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean 2014-2015 (GoAmazon2014/5) field campaign is an international collaborated experiment conducted near Manaus, Brazil from January 2014 through December 2015. This experiment is designed to enable the study of aerosols, tropical clouds, convections and their interactions. To support modeling studies of these processes with data collected from the GoAmazon2014/5 campaign, we have developed a large-scale forcing data (e.g., vertical velocities and advective tendencies) during the second intensive operational period (IOP) of GoAmazon2014/5 from 1 Sep to 10 Oct, 2014. The method used in this study is the constrained variational analysis method in which the large-scale state fields are constrained by the surface and top-of-atmosphere observations (e.g. surface precipitation and outgoing longwave radiation) to conserve column-integrated mass, moisture and dry static energy. To address potential uncertainties in the derived forcing data due to uncertainties in surface precipitation, two sets of large-scale forcing data are developed based on the ECMWF analysis constrained by the two precipitation products respectively from SIPAM radar and TRMM 3B42 products. Our initial analysis shows large differences in these two precipitation products, which causes considerable differences in the derived large-scale forcing data. Potential uncertainties in the large-scale forcing data to other surface constraints such as surface latent and sensible fluxes will be explored. The characteristics of the large-scale forcing structures for selected cases will be discussed.

  17. Design of a large-scale CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, S.; Li, S.

    1997-12-31

    Many CFB boilers sized 100--150 MWe are in operation, and several others sized 150--250 MWe are in operation or under construction. The next step for CFB technology is the 300--400 MWe size range. This paper will describe Foster Wheeler`s large-scale CFB boiler experience and the design for a 300 MWe CFB boiler. The authors will show how the design incorporates Foster Wheeler`s unique combination of extensive utility experience and CFB boiler experience. All the benefits of CFB technology which include low emissions, fuel flexibility, low maintenance and competitive cost are now available in the 300--400 MWe size range.

  18. Large-scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Blackman, Eric G.

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large-scale (planar averaged) fields in unstratified shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal (x-y) averaging, we also demonstrate the presence of large-scale fields when vertical (y-z) averaging is employed instead. By computing space-time planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large-scale dynamo action in the early MRI growth phase - a previously unidentified feature. Non-axisymmetric linear MRI modes with low horizontal wavenumbers and vertical wavenumbers near that of expected maximal growth, amplify the large-scale fields exponentially before turbulence and high wavenumber fluctuations arise. Thus the large-scale dynamo requires only linear fluctuations but not non-linear turbulence (as defined by mode-mode coupling). Vertical averaging also allows for monitoring the evolution of the large-scale vertical field and we find that a feedback from horizontal low wavenumber MRI modes provides a clue as to why the large-scale vertical field sustains against turbulent diffusion in the non-linear saturation regime. We compute the terms in the mean field equations to identify the individual contributions to large-scale field growth for both types of averaging. The large-scale fields obtained from vertical averaging are found to compare well with global simulations and quasi-linear analytical analysis from a previous study by Ebrahimi & Blackman. We discuss the potential implications of these new results for understanding the large-scale MRI dynamo saturation and turbulence.

  19. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W. F.

    2015-08-21

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.

  20. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W. F.

    2015-08-21

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a factor twomore » faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.« less

  1. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  2. Large-scale planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidnyk, Serge; Zhang, Hua; Pearson, Matt; Balakrishnan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging advanced wafer processing and flip-chip bonding techniques, we have succeeded in hybrid integrating a myriad of active optical components, including photodetectors and laser diodes, with our planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. We have combined hybrid integration of active components with monolithic integration of other critical functions, such as diffraction gratings, on-chip mirrors, mode-converters, and thermo-optic elements. Further process development has led to the integration of polarization controlling functionality. Most recently, all these technological advancements have been combined to create large-scale planar lightwave circuits that comprise hundreds of optical elements integrated on chips less than a square inch in size.

  3. Colloquium: Large scale simulations on GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Bisson, Mauro; Fatica, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    Graphics processing units (GPU) are currently used as a cost-effective platform for computer simulations and big-data processing. Large scale applications require that multiple GPUs work together but the efficiency obtained with cluster of GPUs is, at times, sub-optimal because the GPU features are not exploited at their best. We describe how it is possible to achieve an excellent efficiency for applications in statistical mechanics, particle dynamics and networks analysis by using suitable memory access patterns and mechanisms like CUDA streams, profiling tools, etc. Similar concepts and techniques may be applied also to other problems like the solution of Partial Differential Equations.

  4. Large scale phononic metamaterials for seismic isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, N.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we numerically examine structures that could be characterized as large scale phononic metamaterials. These novel structures could have band gaps in the frequency spectrum of seismic waves when their dimensions are chosen appropriately, thus raising the belief that they could be serious candidates for seismic isolation structures. Different and easy to fabricate structures were examined made from construction materials such as concrete and steel. The well-known finite difference time domain method is used in our calculations in order to calculate the band structures of the proposed metamaterials.

  5. Large-scale Heterogeneous Network Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-31

    Data for Multi-Player Influence Maximization on Social Networks.” KDD 2012 (Demo).  Po-Tzu Chang , Yen-Chieh Huang, Cheng-Lun Yang, Shou-De Lin, Pu...Jen Cheng. “Learning-Based Time-Sensitive Re-Ranking for Web Search.” SIGIR 2012 (poster)  Hung -Che Lai, Cheng-Te Li, Yi-Chen Lo, and Shou-De Lin...Exploiting and Evaluating MapReduce for Large-Scale Graph Mining.” ASONAM 2012 (Full, 16% acceptance ratio).  Hsun-Ping Hsieh , Cheng-Te Li, and Shou

  6. Large-scale linear nonparallel support vector machine solver.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yingjie; Ping, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Twin support vector machines (TWSVMs), as the representative nonparallel hyperplane classifiers, have shown the effectiveness over standard SVMs from some aspects. However, they still have some serious defects restricting their further study and real applications: (1) They have to compute and store the inverse matrices before training, it is intractable for many applications where data appear with a huge number of instances as well as features; (2) TWSVMs lost the sparseness by using a quadratic loss function making the proximal hyperplane close enough to the class itself. This paper proposes a Sparse Linear Nonparallel Support Vector Machine, termed as L1-NPSVM, to deal with large-scale data based on an efficient solver-dual coordinate descent (DCD) method. Both theoretical analysis and experiments indicate that our method is not only suitable for large scale problems, but also performs as good as TWSVMs and SVMs.

  7. Instrumentation Development for Large Scale Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gregory T.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology is currently being considered for multiple atmospheric entry applications as the limitations of traditional entry vehicles have been reached. The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) has successfully demonstrated this technology as a viable candidate with a 3.0 m diameter vehicle sub-orbital flight. To further this technology, large scale HIADs (6.0 8.5 m) must be developed and tested. To characterize the performance of large scale HIAD technology new instrumentation concepts must be developed to accommodate the flexible nature inflatable aeroshell. Many of the concepts that are under consideration for the HIAD FY12 subsonic wind tunnel test series are discussed below.

  8. Radially dependent large-scale dynamos in global cylindrical shear flows and the local cartesian limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Blackman, E. G.

    2016-06-01

    For cylindrical differentially rotating plasmas, we study large-scale magnetic field generation from finite amplitude non-axisymmetric perturbations by comparing numerical simulations with quasi-linear analytic theory. When initiated with a vertical magnetic field of either zero or finite net flux, our global cylindrical simulations exhibit the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and large-scale dynamo growth of radially alternating mean fields, averaged over height and azimuth. This dynamo growth is explained by our analytic calculations of a non-axisymmetric fluctuation-induced electromotive force that is sustained by azimuthal shear of the fluctuating fields. The standard `Ω effect' (shear of the mean field by differential rotation) is unimportant. For the MRI case, we express the large-scale dynamo field as a function of differential rotation. The resulting radially alternating large-scale fields may have implications for angular momentum transport in discs and corona. To connect with previous work on large-scale dynamos with local linear shear and identify the minimum conditions needed for large-scale field growth, we also solve our equations in local Cartesian coordinates. We find that large-scale dynamo growth in a linear shear flow without rotation can be sustained by shear plus non-axisymmetric fluctuations - even if not helical, a seemingly previously unidentified distinction. The linear shear flow dynamo emerges as a more restricted version of our more general new global cylindrical calculations.

  9. Large-scale Intelligent Transporation Systems simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Canfield, T.; Hannebutte, U.; Levine, D.; Tentner, A.

    1995-06-01

    A prototype computer system has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) capable of running on massively parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems. The prototype includes the modelling of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of our design is that vehicles will be represented by autonomus computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  10. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  11. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves.

    PubMed

    Warmuth, Alexander

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  12. Mojave remote sensing field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.; Petroy, S. B.; Plaut, J. J.; Shepard, Michael K.; Evans, D.; Farr, T.; Greeley, Ronald; Gaddis, L.; Lancaster, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Mojave Remote Sensing Field Experiment (MFE), conducted in June 1988, involved acquisition of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS); C, L, and P-band polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data; and simultaneous field observations at the Pisgah and Cima volcanic fields, and Lavic and Silver Lake Playas, Mojave Desert, California. A LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) scene is also included in the MFE archive. TM-based reflectance and TIMS-based emissivity surface spectra were extracted for selected surfaces. Radiative transfer procedures were used to model the atmosphere and surface simultaneously, with the constraint that the spectra must be consistent with field-based spectral observations. AIRSAR data were calibrated to backscatter cross sections using corner reflectors deployed at target sites. Analyses of MFE data focus on extraction of reflectance, emissivity, and cross section for lava flows of various ages and degradation states. Results have relevance for the evolution of volcanic plains on Venus and Mars.

  13. Not much helicity is needed to drive large-scale dynamos.

    PubMed

    Pietarila Graham, Jonathan; Blackman, Eric G; Mininni, Pablo D; Pouquet, Annick

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the in situ amplification of large-scale magnetic fields in turbulent astrophysical rotators has been a core subject of dynamo theory. When turbulent velocities are helical, large-scale dynamos that substantially amplify fields on scales that exceed the turbulent forcing scale arise, but the minimum sufficient fractional kinetic helicity f(h,C) has not been previously well quantified. Using direct numerical simulations for a simple helical dynamo, we show that f(h,C) decreases as the ratio of forcing to large-scale wave numbers k(F)/k(min) increases. From the condition that a large-scale helical dynamo must overcome the back reaction from any nonhelical field on the large scales, we develop a theory that can explain the simulations. For k(F)/k(min)≥8 we find f(h,C)≲3%, implying that very small helicity fractions strongly influence magnetic spectra for even moderate-scale separation.

  14. Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment.

    PubMed Central

    Hose, J E

    1994-01-01

    There are a number of techniques for detecting genotoxicity in the marine environment, and many are applicable to large-scale field assessments. Certain tests can be used to evaluate responses in target organisms in situ while others utilize surrogate organisms exposed to field samples in short-term laboratory bioassays. Genotoxicity endpoints appear distinct from traditional toxicity endpoints, but some have chemical or ecotoxicologic correlates. One versatile end point, the frequency of anaphase aberrations, has been used in several large marine assessments to evaluate genotoxicity in the New York Bight, in sediment from San Francisco Bay, and following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. PMID:7713029

  15. Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hose, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    There are a number of techniques for detecting genotoxicity in the marine environment, and many are applicable to large-scale field assessments. Certain tests can be used to evaluate responses in target organisms in situ while others utilize surrogate organisms exposed to field samples in short-term laboratory bioassays. Genotoxicity endpoints appear distinct from traditional toxicity endpoints, but some have chemical or ecotoxicologic correlates. One versatile end point, the frequency of anaphase aberrations, has been used in several large marine assessments to evaluate genotoxicity in the New York Bight, in sediment from San Francisco Bay, and following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. 31 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Magnetic field experiment for Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Aluna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Ness, N. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment to be carried on the Voyager 1 and 2 missions consists of dual low field (LFM) and high field magnetometer (HFM) systems. The dual systems provide greater reliability and, in the case of the LFM's, permit the separation of spacecraft magnetic fields from the ambient fields. Additional reliability is achieved through electronics redundancy. The wide dynamic ranges of plus or minus 0.5G for the LFM's and plus or minus 20G for the HFM's, low quantization uncertainty of plus or minus 0.002 gamma in the most sensitive (plus or minus 8 gamma) LFM range, low sensor RMS noise level of 0.006 gamma, and use of data compaction schemes to optimize the experiment information rate all combine to permit the study of a broad spectrum of phenomena during the mission. Planetary fields at Jupiter, Saturn, and possibly Uranus; satellites of these planets; solar wind and satellite interactions with the planetary fields; and the large-scale structure and microscale characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field are studied. The interstellar field may also be measured.

  17. Sparse deconvolution for the large-scale ill-posed inverse problem of impact force reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Baijie; Zhang, Xingwu; Gao, Jiawei; Liu, Ruonan; Chen, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    Most previous regularization methods for solving the inverse problem of force reconstruction are to minimize the l2-norm of the desired force. However, these traditional regularization methods such as Tikhonov regularization and truncated singular value decomposition, commonly fail to solve the large-scale ill-posed inverse problem in moderate computational cost. In this paper, taking into account the sparse characteristic of impact force, the idea of sparse deconvolution is first introduced to the field of impact force reconstruction and a general sparse deconvolution model of impact force is constructed. Second, a novel impact force reconstruction method based on the primal-dual interior point method (PDIPM) is proposed to solve such a large-scale sparse deconvolution model, where minimizing the l2-norm is replaced by minimizing the l1-norm. Meanwhile, the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm is used to compute the search direction of PDIPM with high computational efficiency. Finally, two experiments including the small-scale or medium-scale single impact force reconstruction and the relatively large-scale consecutive impact force reconstruction are conducted on a composite wind turbine blade and a shell structure to illustrate the advantage of PDIPM. Compared with Tikhonov regularization, PDIPM is more efficient, accurate and robust whether in the single impact force reconstruction or in the consecutive impact force reconstruction.

  18. Effects of large-scale wind driven turbulence on sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, John M.; Bass, Henry E.; Raspet, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic measurements made in the atmosphere have shown significant fluctuations in amplitude and phase resulting from the interaction with time varying meteorological conditions. The observed variations appear to have short term and long term (1 to 5 minutes) variations at least in the phase of the acoustic signal. One possible way to account for this long term variation is the use of a large scale wind driven turbulence model. From a Fourier analysis of the phase variations, the outer scales for the large scale turbulence is 200 meters and greater, which corresponds to turbulence in the energy-containing subrange. The large scale turbulence is assumed to be elongated longitudinal vortex pairs roughly aligned with the mean wind. Due to the size of the vortex pair compared to the scale of the present experiment, the effect of the vortex pair on the acoustic field can be modeled as the sound speed of the atmosphere varying with time. The model provides results with the same trends and variations in phase observed experimentally.

  19. Cleanliness improvements of NIF (National Ignition Facility) amplifiers as compared to previous large-scale lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J

    2004-06-09

    Prior to the recent commissioning of the first NIF (National Ignition Facility) beamline, full-scale laser-amplifier-glass cleanliness experiments were performed. Aerosol measurements and obscuration data acquired using a modified flatbed scanner compare favorably to historical large-scale lasers and indicate that NIF is the cleanest large-scale laser built to date.

  20. Case Study: Commercialization of sweet sorghum juice clarification for large-scale syrup manufacture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The precipitation and burning of insoluble granules of starch from sweet sorghum juice on heating coils prevented the large scale manufacture of syrup at a new industrial plant in Missouri, USA. To remove insoluble starch granules, a series of small and large-scale experiments were conducted at the...

  1. Sparse approximation through boosting for learning large scale kernel machines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Yao, Xin

    2010-06-01

    Recently, sparse approximation has become a preferred method for learning large scale kernel machines. This technique attempts to represent the solution with only a subset of original data points also known as basis vectors, which are usually chosen one by one with a forward selection procedure based on some selection criteria. The computational complexity of several resultant algorithms scales as O(NM(2)) in time and O(NM) in memory, where N is the number of training points and M is the number of basis vectors as well as the steps of forward selection. For some large scale data sets, to obtain a better solution, we are sometimes required to include more basis vectors, which means that M is not trivial in this situation. However, the limited computational resource (e.g., memory) prevents us from including too many vectors. To handle this dilemma, we propose to add an ensemble of basis vectors instead of only one at each forward step. The proposed method, closely related to gradient boosting, could decrease the required number M of forward steps significantly and thus a large fraction of computational cost is saved. Numerical experiments on three large scale regression tasks and a classification problem demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. Nuclide-migration field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erdal, B.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Johnstone, J.K.; Erickson, K.L.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.; Hines, J.J.

    1981-03-01

    When considering groundwater flow and radionuclide retention in the complex flow systems that can occur in geologic formations, one has a serious problem in determining if laboratory studies are being performed under conditions appropriate to natural systems. This document is the project plan for a program designed to begin to address these problems. The project is being carried out jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Argonne National Laboratory. The work has three principal objectives: (1) to develop the experimental, instrumental, and safety techniques necessary to conduct controlled, small-scale radionuclide migration field experiments, including those involving actinides; (2) to use these techniques to define radionuclide migration through rock by performing generic, at-depth experiments under closely monitored conditions; and (3) to determine whether available lithologic, geochemical, and hydrologic properties together with existing or developing transport models are sufficient and appropriate to describe real field conditions.

  3. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

    2004-05-06

    Significant improvements in the properties ofsuperconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements arebeing incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapesthat are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devicesinclude new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusionpower experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines.These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applicationsthat utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments suchas ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising newmaterials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied inorder to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, wewill review the key developments that are leading to these newapplications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factoris improved understanding or development of materials with significantlyimproved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Snfor use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, thedevelopment is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort todevelop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materialsthat can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications ofthese two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, wewill discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order fornew applications to be realized.

  4. Halo detection via large-scale Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merson, Alexander I.; Jasche, Jens; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer; Wandelt, Benjamin; Jones, D. Heath; Colless, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    We present a proof-of-concept of a novel and fully Bayesian methodology designed to detect haloes of different masses in cosmological observations subject to noise and systematic uncertainties. Our methodology combines the previously published Bayesian large-scale structure inference algorithm, HAmiltonian Density Estimation and Sampling algorithm (HADES), and a Bayesian chain rule (the Blackwell-Rao estimator), which we use to connect the inferred density field to the properties of dark matter haloes. To demonstrate the capability of our approach, we construct a realistic galaxy mock catalogue emulating the wide-area 6-degree Field Galaxy Survey, which has a median redshift of approximately 0.05. Application of HADES to the catalogue provides us with accurately inferred three-dimensional density fields and corresponding quantification of uncertainties inherent to any cosmological observation. We then use a cosmological simulation to relate the amplitude of the density field to the probability of detecting a halo with mass above a specified threshold. With this information, we can sum over the HADES density field realisations to construct maps of detection probabilities and demonstrate the validity of this approach within our mock scenario. We find that the probability of successful detection of haloes in the mock catalogue increases as a function of the signal to noise of the local galaxy observations. Our proposed methodology can easily be extended to account for more complex scientific questions and is a promising novel tool to analyse the cosmic large-scale structure in observations.

  5. Modeling of the dielectrophoretic conveyer-belt assembling microparticles into large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusid, Boris; Jacqmin, David; Kumar, Anil; Acrivos, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    A dielectrophoretic conveyor-belt method for assembling negatively polarized microparticles into large-scale structures was recently developed (APL 90, 154104, 2007). To do this, first, an array of microelectrodes is energized to generate a spatially periodic AC electric field that causes the particles to aggregate into boluses in positions of the field intensity- minima, which are located mid-way along the height of the channel. The minima and their associated boluses are then moved by periodically grounding and energizing the electrode array so as to generate an electrical field moving along the electrode array. We simulate this experiment numerically via a two- dimensional electro-hydrodynamic model (PRE 69, 021402, 2004). The numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experiments in that they show similar particle aggregation rates, bolus sizes and bolus transport speeds.

  6. Engineering management of large scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Serita; Gill, Tepper L.; Paul, Arthur S.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of high technology and engineering problem solving, has given rise to an emerging concept. Reasoning principles for integrating traditional engineering problem solving with system theory, management sciences, behavioral decision theory, and planning and design approaches can be incorporated into a methodological approach to solving problems with a long range perspective. Long range planning has a great potential to improve productivity by using a systematic and organized approach. Thus, efficiency and cost effectiveness are the driving forces in promoting the organization of engineering problems. Aspects of systems engineering that provide an understanding of management of large scale systems are broadly covered here. Due to the focus and application of research, other significant factors (e.g., human behavior, decision making, etc.) are not emphasized but are considered.

  7. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-06-15

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects.

  8. Large scale preparation of pure phycobiliproteins.

    PubMed

    Padgett, M P; Krogmann, D W

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes simple procedures for the purification of large amounts of phycocyanin and allophycocyanin from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. A homogeneous natural bloom of this organism provided hundreds of kilograms of cells. Large samples of cells were broken by freezing and thawing. Repeated extraction of the broken cells with distilled water released phycocyanin first, then allophycocyanin, and provides supporting evidence for the current models of phycobilisome structure. The very low ionic strength of the aqueous extracts allowed allophycocyanin release in a particulate form so that this protein could be easily concentrated by centrifugation. Other proteins in the extract were enriched and concentrated by large scale membrane filtration. The biliproteins were purified to homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE cellulose. Purity was established by HPLC and by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The proteins were examined for stability at various pHs and exposures to visible light.

  9. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  10. Efficient, large scale separation of coal macerals

    SciTech Connect

    Dyrkacz, G.R.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors believe that the separation of macerals by continuous flow centrifugation offers a simple technique for the large scale separation of macerals. With relatively little cost (/approximately/ $10K), it provides an opportunity for obtaining quite pure maceral fractions. Although they have not completely worked out all the nuances of this separation system, they believe that the problems they have indicated can be minimized to pose only minor inconvenience. It cannot be said that this system completely bypasses the disagreeable tedium or time involved in separating macerals, nor will it by itself overcome the mental inertia required to make maceral separation an accepted necessary fact in fundamental coal science. However, they find their particular brand of continuous flow centrifugation is considerably faster than sink/float separation, can provide a good quality product with even one separation cycle, and permits the handling of more material than a conventional sink/float centrifuge separation.

  11. Large scale cryogenic fluid systems testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Cryogenic Fluid Systems Branch (CFSB) within the Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) has the ultimate goal of enabling the long term storage and in-space fueling/resupply operations for spacecraft and reusable vehicles in support of space exploration. Using analytical modeling, ground based testing, and on-orbit experimentation, the CFSB is studying three primary categories of fluid technology: storage, supply, and transfer. The CFSB is also investigating fluid handling, advanced instrumentation, and tank structures and materials. Ground based testing of large-scale systems is done using liquid hydrogen as a test fluid at the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Facility (K-site) at Lewis' Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. A general overview of tests involving liquid transfer, thermal control, pressure control, and pressurization is given.

  12. Large-scale optimization of neuron arbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Christopher; Changizi, Mark; Won Kang, Du

    1999-05-01

    At the global as well as local scales, some of the geometry of types of neuron arbors-both dendrites and axons-appears to be self-organizing: Their morphogenesis behaves like flowing water, that is, fluid dynamically; waterflow in branching networks in turn acts like a tree composed of cords under tension, that is, vector mechanically. Branch diameters and angles and junction sites conform significantly to this model. The result is that such neuron tree samples globally minimize their total volume-rather than, for example, surface area or branch length. In addition, the arbors perform well at generating the cheapest topology interconnecting their terminals: their large-scale layouts are among the best of all such possible connecting patterns, approaching 5% of optimum. This model also applies comparably to arterial and river networks.

  13. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  14. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05

  15. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-01-01

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects. PMID:9611248

  16. Large scale study of tooth enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Martin, M.Th.

    1981-04-01

    Human tooth enamel contains traces of foreign elements. The presence of these elements is related to the history and the environment of the human body and can be considered as the signature of perturbations which occur during the growth of a tooth. A map of the distribution of these traces on a large scale sample of the population will constitute a reference for further investigations of environmental effects. One hundred eighty samples of teeth were first analysed using PIXE, backscattering and nuclear reaction techniques. The results were analysed using statistical methods. Correlations between O, F, Na, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sr were observed and cluster analysis was in progress. The techniques described in the present work have been developed in order to establish a method for the exploration of very large samples of the Belgian population.

  17. Modeling the Internet's large-scale topology

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Soon-Hyung; Jeong, Hawoong; Barabási, Albert-László

    2002-01-01

    Network generators that capture the Internet's large-scale topology are crucial for the development of efficient routing protocols and modeling Internet traffic. Our ability to design realistic generators is limited by the incomplete understanding of the fundamental driving forces that affect the Internet's evolution. By combining several independent databases capturing the time evolution, topology, and physical layout of the Internet, we identify the universal mechanisms that shape the Internet's router and autonomous system level topology. We find that the physical layout of nodes form a fractal set, determined by population density patterns around the globe. The placement of links is driven by competition between preferential attachment and linear distance dependence, a marked departure from the currently used exponential laws. The universal parameters that we extract significantly restrict the class of potentially correct Internet models and indicate that the networks created by all available topology generators are fundamentally different from the current Internet. PMID:12368484

  18. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  19. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R., LLNL

    1998-02-19

    Business needs have driven the development of commercial database systems since their inception. As a result, there has been a strong focus on supporting many users, minimizing the potential corruption or loss of data, and maximizing performance metrics like transactions per second, or TPC-C and TPC-D results. It turns out that these optimizations have little to do with the needs of the scientific community, and in particular have little impact on improving the management and use of large-scale high-dimensional data. At the same time, there is an unanswered need in the scientific community for many of the benefits offered by a robust DBMS. For example, tying an ad-hoc query language such as SQL together with a visualization toolkit would be a powerful enhancement to current capabilities. Unfortunately, there has been little emphasis or discussion in the VLDB community on this mismatch over the last decade. The goal of the paper is to identify the specific issues that need to be resolved before large-scale scientific applications can make use of DBMS products. This topic is addressed in the context of an evaluation of commercial DBMS technology applied to the exploration of data generated by the Department of Energy`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The paper describes the data being generated for ASCI as well as current capabilities for interacting with and exploring this data. The attraction of applying standard DBMS technology to this domain is discussed, as well as the technical and business issues that currently make this an infeasible solution.

  20. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  1. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 12 and 13 entitled: Large scale field test of the Lasagna{trademark} process, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, Sa V.; Hughes, B.M.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. This technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to instant degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electroosmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report summarizes the results of the field experiment conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, KY. The test site covered 15 feet wide by 10 feet across and 15 feet deep with steel panels as electrodes and wickdrains containing granular activated carbon as treatment zone& The electrodes and treatment zones were installed utilizing innovative adaptation of existing emplacement technologies. The unit was operated for four months, flushing TCE by electroosmosis from the soil into the treatment zones where it was trapped by the activated carbon. The scale up from laboratory units to this field scale was very successful with respect to electrical parameters as weft as electroosmotic flow. Soil samples taken throughout the site before and after the test showed over 98% TCE removal, with most samples showing greater than 99% removal.

  2. Dominant modes of variability in large-scale Birkeland currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, E. D. P.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Richmond, A. D.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-08-01

    Properties of variability in large-scale Birkeland currents are investigated through empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of 1 week of data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). Mean distributions and dominant modes of variability are identified for both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Differences in the results from the two hemispheres are observed, which are attributed to seasonal differences in conductivity (the study period occurred near solstice). A universal mean and set of dominant modes of variability are obtained through combining the hemispheric results, and it is found that the mean and first three modes of variability (EOFs) account for 38% of the total observed squared magnetic perturbations (δB2) from both hemispheres. The mean distribution represents a standard Region 1/Region 2 (R1/R2) morphology of currents and EOF 1 captures the strengthening/weakening of the average distribution and is well correlated with the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). EOF 2 captures a mixture of effects including the expansion/contraction and rotation of the (R1/R2) currents; this mode correlates only weakly with possible external driving parameters. EOF 3 captures changes in the morphology of the currents in the dayside cusp region and is well correlated with the dawn-dusk component of the IMF. The higher-order EOFs capture more complex, smaller-scale variations in the Birkeland currents and appear generally uncorrelated with external driving parameters. The results of the EOF analysis described here are used for describing error covariance in a data assimilation procedure utilizing AMPERE data, as described in a companion paper.

  3. Multi-Resolution Modeling of Large Scale Scientific Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C; Abdulla, G; Critchlow, T

    2002-02-25

    Data produced by large scale scientific simulations, experiments, and observations can easily reach tera-bytes in size. The ability to examine data-sets of this magnitude, even in moderate detail, is problematic at best. Generally this scientific data consists of multivariate field quantities with complex inter-variable correlations and spatial-temporal structure. To provide scientists and engineers with the ability to explore and analyze such data sets we are using a twofold approach. First, we model the data with the objective of creating a compressed yet manageable representation. Second, with that compressed representation, we provide the user with the ability to query the resulting approximation to obtain approximate yet sufficient answers; a process called adhoc querying. This paper is concerned with a wavelet modeling technique that seeks to capture the important physical characteristics of the target scientific data. Our approach is driven by the compression, which is necessary for viable throughput, along with the end user requirements from the discovery process. Our work contrasts existing research which applies wavelets to range querying, change detection, and clustering problems by working directly with a decomposition of the data. The difference in this procedures is due primarily to the nature of the data and the requirements of the scientists and engineers. Our approach directly uses the wavelet coefficients of the data to compress as well as query. We will provide some background on the problem, describe how the wavelet decomposition is used to facilitate data compression and how queries are posed on the resulting compressed model. Results of this process will be shown for several problems of interest and we will end with some observations and conclusions about this research.

  4. Large scale propagation intermittency in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Ali

    2000-11-01

    Long-term (several minutes to hours) amplitude variations observed in outdoor sound propagation experiments at Disneyland, California, in February 1998 are explained in terms of a time varying index of refraction. The experimentally propagated acoustic signals were received and recorded at several locations ranging from 300 meters to 2,800 meters. Meteorological data was taken as a function of altitude simultaneously with the received signal levels. There were many barriers along the path of acoustic propagation that affected the received signal levels, especially at short ranges. In a downward refraction situation, there could be a random change of amplitude in the predicted signals. A computer model based on the Fast Field Program (FFP) was used to compute the signal loss at the different receiving locations and to verify that the variations in the received signal levels can be predicted numerically. The calculations agree with experimental data with the same trend variations in average amplitude.

  5. Improving Design Efficiency for Large-Scale Heterogeneous Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregerson, Anthony

    Despite increases in logic density, many Big Data applications must still be partitioned across multiple computing devices in order to meet their strict performance requirements. Among the most demanding of these applications is high-energy physics (HEP), which uses complex computing systems consisting of thousands of FPGAs and ASICs to process the sensor data created by experiments at particles accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Designing such computing systems is challenging due to the scale of the systems, the exceptionally high-throughput and low-latency performance constraints that necessitate application-specific hardware implementations, the requirement that algorithms are efficiently partitioned across many devices, and the possible need to update the implemented algorithms during the lifetime of the system. In this work, we describe our research to develop flexible architectures for implementing such large-scale circuits on FPGAs. In particular, this work is motivated by (but not limited in scope to) high-energy physics algorithms for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC. To make efficient use of logic resources in multi-FPGA systems, we introduce Multi-Personality Partitioning, a novel form of the graph partitioning problem, and present partitioning algorithms that can significantly improve resource utilization on heterogeneous devices while also reducing inter-chip connections. To reduce the high communication costs of Big Data applications, we also introduce Information-Aware Partitioning, a partitioning method that analyzes the data content of application-specific circuits, characterizes their entropy, and selects circuit partitions that enable efficient compression of data between chips. We employ our information-aware partitioning method to improve the performance of the hardware validation platform for evaluating new algorithms for the CMS <