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Sample records for large-scale open quantum

  1. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05 quantum simulations, in particular, allow us to also study the role and impact of the nuclear symmetry energy on these pasta configurations. This work is supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  2. Quantum gravity and the large scale anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenshchik, Alexander Y.; Tronconi, Alessandro; Venturi, Giovanni E-mail: Alessandro.Tronconi@bo.infn.it

    2015-04-01

    The spectrum of primordial perturbations obtained by calculating the quantum gravitational corrections to the dynamics of scalar perturbations is compared with Planck 2013 and BICEP2/Keck Array public data. The quantum gravitational effects are calculated in the context of a Wheeler-De Witt approach and have quite distinctive features. We constrain the free parameters of the theory by comparison with observations.

  3. Quantum computation for large-scale image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yue; Chen, Hanwu; Tan, Jianing; Li, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Due to the lack of an effective quantum feature extraction method, there is currently no effective way to perform quantum image classification or recognition. In this paper, for the first time, a global quantum feature extraction method based on Schmidt decomposition is proposed. A revised quantum learning algorithm is also proposed that will classify images by computing the Hamming distance of these features. From the experimental results derived from the benchmark database Caltech 101, and an analysis of the algorithm, an effective approach to large-scale image classification is derived and proposed against the background of big data.

  4. Large-scale quantum networks based on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epping, Michael; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2016-05-01

    Society relies and depends increasingly on information exchange and communication. In the quantum world, security and privacy is a built-in feature for information processing. The essential ingredient for exploiting these quantum advantages is the resource of entanglement, which can be shared between two or more parties. The distribution of entanglement over large distances constitutes a key challenge for current research and development. Due to losses of the transmitted quantum particles, which typically scale exponentially with the distance, intermediate quantum repeater stations are needed. Here we show how to generalise the quantum repeater concept to the multipartite case, by describing large-scale quantum networks, i.e. network nodes and their long-distance links, consistently in the language of graphs and graph states. This unifying approach comprises both the distribution of multipartite entanglement across the network, and the protection against errors via encoding. The correspondence to graph states also provides a tool for optimising the architecture of quantum networks.

  5. Very-large-scale coherent motions in open channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiang; Hussain, Fazle; Li, Dan-Xun

    2016-11-01

    Very-large-scale coherent structures (VLSSs) - whose characteristic length is of the order of 10 h (h is the water depth) - are found to exist in the log and outer layers near the bed of open channel flows. For decades researchers have speculated that large coherent structures may exist in open channel flows. However, conclusive evidence is still lacking. The present study employed pre-multiplied velocity power spectral and co-spectral analyses of time-resolved PIV data obtained in open channel flows. In all cases, two modes - large-scale structures (of the order of h) and VLSSs - dominate the log and outer layers of the turbulent boundary layer. More than half of TKE and 40% of the Reynolds shear stress in the log and outer layers are contributed by VLSSs. The strength difference of VLSSs between open and closed channel flows leads to pronounced redistribution of TKE near the free surface of open channel flows, which is a unique phenomenon that sets the open channel flows apart from other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Funded by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No.2015M580105), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.51127006).

  6. Large-scale quantum photonic circuits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas C.; Bunandar, Darius; Pant, Mihir; Steinbrecher, Greg R.; Mower, Jacob; Prabhu, Mihika; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Quantum information science offers inherently more powerful methods for communication, computation, and precision measurement that take advantage of quantum superposition and entanglement. In recent years, theoretical and experimental advances in quantum computing and simulation with photons have spurred great interest in developing large photonic entangled states that challenge today's classical computers. As experiments have increased in complexity, there has been an increasing need to transition bulk optics experiments to integrated photonics platforms to control more spatial modes with higher fidelity and phase stability. The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanophotonics platform offers new possibilities for quantum optics, including the integration of bright, nonclassical light sources, based on the large third-order nonlinearity (χ(3)) of silicon, alongside quantum state manipulation circuits with thousands of optical elements, all on a single phase-stable chip. How large do these photonic systems need to be? Recent theoretical work on Boson Sampling suggests that even the problem of sampling from e30 identical photons, having passed through an interferometer of hundreds of modes, becomes challenging for classical computers. While experiments of this size are still challenging, the SOI platform has the required component density to enable low-loss and programmable interferometers for manipulating hundreds of spatial modes. Here, we discuss the SOI nanophotonics platform for quantum photonic circuits with hundreds-to-thousands of optical elements and the associated challenges. We compare SOI to competing technologies in terms of requirements for quantum optical systems. We review recent results on large-scale quantum state evolution circuits and strategies for realizing high-fidelity heralded gates with imperfect, practical systems. Next, we review recent results on silicon photonics-based photon-pair sources and device architectures, and we discuss a path towards

  7. Ferroelectric opening switches for large-scale pulsed power drivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Glover, Steven Frank

    2009-11-01

    Fast electrical energy storage or Voltage-Driven Technology (VDT) has dominated fast, high-voltage pulsed power systems for the past six decades. Fast magnetic energy storage or Current-Driven Technology (CDT) is characterized by 10,000 X higher energy density than VDT and has a great number of other substantial advantages, but it has all but been neglected for all of these decades. The uniform explanation for neglect of CDT technology is invariably that the industry has never been able to make an effective opening switch, which is essential for the use of CDT. Most approaches to opening switches have involved plasma of one sort or another. On a large scale, gaseous plasmas have been used as a conductor to bridge the switch electrodes that provides an opening function when the current wave front propagates through to the output end of the plasma and fully magnetizes the plasma - this is called a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Opening can be triggered in a POS using a magnetic field to push the plasma out of the A-K gap - this is called a Magnetically Controlled Plasma Opening Switch (MCPOS). On a small scale, depletion of electron plasmas in semiconductor devices is used to affect opening switch behavior, but these devices are relatively low voltage and low current compared to the hundreds of kilo-volts and tens of kilo-amperes of interest to pulsed power. This work is an investigation into an entirely new approach to opening switch technology that utilizes new materials in new ways. The new materials are Ferroelectrics and using them as an opening switch is a stark contrast to their traditional applications in optics and transducer applications. Emphasis is on use of high performance ferroelectrics with the objective of developing an opening switch that would be suitable for large scale pulsed power applications. Over the course of exploring this new ground, we have discovered new behaviors and properties of these materials that were here to fore unknown. Some of

  8. Cryogenic Control Architecture for Large-Scale Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornibrook, J. M.; Colless, J. I.; Conway Lamb, I. D.; Pauka, S. J.; Lu, H.; Gossard, A. C.; Watson, J. D.; Gardner, G. C.; Fallahi, S.; Manfra, M. J.; Reilly, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    Solid-state qubits have recently advanced to the level that enables them, in principle, to be scaled up into fault-tolerant quantum computers. As these physical qubits continue to advance, meeting the challenge of realizing a quantum machine will also require the development of new supporting devices and control architectures with complexity far beyond the systems used in today's few-qubit experiments. Here, we report a microarchitecture for controlling and reading out qubits during the execution of a quantum algorithm such as an error-correcting code. We demonstrate the basic principles of this architecture using a cryogenic switch matrix implemented via high-electron-mobility transistors and a new kind of semiconductor device based on gate-switchable capacitance. The switch matrix is used to route microwave waveforms to qubits under the control of a field-programmable gate array, also operating at cryogenic temperatures. Taken together, these results suggest a viable approach for controlling large-scale quantum systems using semiconductor technology.

  9. Open TG-GATEs: a large-scale toxicogenomics database.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Tomoya; Ono, Atsushi; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Toxicogenomics focuses on assessing the safety of compounds using gene expression profiles. Gene expression signatures from large toxicogenomics databases are expected to perform better than small databases in identifying biomarkers for the prediction and evaluation of drug safety based on a compound's toxicological mechanisms in animal target organs. Over the past 10 years, the Japanese Toxicogenomics Project consortium (TGP) has been developing a large-scale toxicogenomics database consisting of data from 170 compounds (mostly drugs) with the aim of improving and enhancing drug safety assessment. Most of the data generated by the project (e.g. gene expression, pathology, lot number) are freely available to the public via Open TG-GATEs (Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System). Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the database, including both gene expression data and metadata, with a description of experimental conditions and procedures used to generate the database. Open TG-GATEs is available from http://toxico.nibio.go.jp/english/index.html.

  10. Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations using Quantum Chemistry Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-03-01

    This talk will address our recent efforts in developing fast, linear scaling electronic structure methods for large scale applications. Of special importance is our fast multipole method( M. C. Strain, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Science 271), 51 (1996). (FMM) for achieving linear scaling for the quantum Coulomb problem (GvFMM), the traditional bottleneck in quantum chemistry calculations based on Gaussian orbitals. Fast quadratures(R. E. Stratmann, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 257), 213 (1996). combined with methods that avoid the Hamiltonian diagonalization( J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 106), 5569 (1997) have resulted in density functional theory (DFT) programs that can be applied to systems containing many hundreds of atoms and ---depending on computational resources or level of theory-- to many thousands of atoms.( A. D. Daniels, J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 107), 425 (1997). Three solutions for the diagonalization bottleneck will be analyzed and compared: a conjugate gradient density matrix search (CGDMS), a Hamiltonian polynomial expansion of the density matrix, and a pseudo-diagonalization method. Besides DFT, our near-field exchange method( J. C. Burant, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 105), 8969 (1996). for linear scaling Hartree-Fock calculations will be discussed. Based on these improved capabilities, we have also developed programs to obtain vibrational frequencies (via analytic energy second derivatives) and excitation energies (through time-dependent DFT) of large molecules like porphyn or C_70. Our GvFMM has been extended to periodic systems( K. N. Kudin and G. E. Scuseria, Chem. Phys. Lett., in press.) and progress towards a Gaussian-based DFT and HF program for polymers and solids will be reported. Last, we will discuss our progress on a Laplace-transformed \\cal O(N^2) second-order pertubation theory (MP2) method.

  11. Challenges for large scale ab initio Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio Quantum Monte Carlo is an electronic structure method that is highly accurate, well suited to large scale computation, and potentially systematically improvable in accuracy. Due to increases in computer power, the method has been applied to systems where established electronic structure methods have difficulty reaching the accuracies desired to inform experiment without empiricism, a necessary step in the design of materials and a helpful step in the improvement of cheaper and less accurate methods. Recent applications include accurate phase diagrams of simple materials through to phenomena in transition metal oxides. Nevertheless there remain significant challenges to achieving a methodology that is robust and systematically improvable in practice, as well as capable of exploiting the latest generation of high-performance computers. In this talk I will describe the current state of the art, recent applications, and several significant challenges for continued improvement. Supported through the Predictive Theory and Modeling for Materials and Chemical Science program by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Department of Energy (DOE).

  12. Efficient algorithms for large-scale quantum transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brück, Sascha; Calderara, Mauro; Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost; Luisier, Mathieu

    2017-08-01

    Massively parallel algorithms are presented in this paper to reduce the computational burden associated with quantum transport simulations from first-principles. The power of modern hybrid computer architectures is harvested in order to determine the open boundary conditions that connect the simulation domain with its environment and to solve the resulting Schrödinger equation. While the former operation takes the form of an eigenvalue problem that is solved by a contour integration technique on the available central processing units (CPUs), the latter can be cast into a linear system of equations that is simultaneously processed by SplitSolve, a two-step algorithm, on general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). A significant decrease of the computational time by up to two orders of magnitude is obtained as compared to standard solution methods.

  13. Large scale obscuration and related climate effects open literature bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N.A.; Geitgey, J.; Behl, Y.K.; Zak, B.D.

    1994-05-01

    Large scale obscuration and related climate effects of nuclear detonations first became a matter of concern in connection with the so-called ``Nuclear Winter Controversy`` in the early 1980`s. Since then, the world has changed. Nevertheless, concern remains about the atmospheric effects of nuclear detonations, but the source of concern has shifted. Now it focuses less on global, and more on regional effects and their resulting impacts on the performance of electro-optical and other defense-related systems. This bibliography reflects the modified interest.

  14. Open source tools for large-scale neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    New technologies for monitoring and manipulating the nervous system promise exciting biology but pose challenges for analysis and computation. Solutions can be found in the form of modern approaches to distributed computing, machine learning, and interactive visualization. But embracing these new technologies will require a cultural shift: away from independent efforts and proprietary methods and toward an open source and collaborative neuroscience. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Large Scale Quantum Coherence of Nearly Circular Wavepackets

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, Carlos O; Yoshida, S.; Burgdorfer, J.; Wyker, B.; Mestayer, J. J.; Dunning, F. B.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the quantum coherence of mesoscopic very-high-n, n {approx} 305, Rydberg wave packets travelling along nearly circular orbits can be maintained on microsecond time scales corresponding to hundreds of classical orbital periods. The coherence is probed through collapses and revivals of periodic oscillations in the average electron position. The temporal interferences of spatially separated Schroedinger cat-like wave packets are also observed. A novel hybrid quantum-classical trajectory method is employed to simulate the wave packet dynamics.

  16. Large-scale structure from quantum fluctuations in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Turner

    2000-05-25

    A better understanding of the formation of large-scale structure in the Universe is arguably the most pressing question in cosmology. The most compelling and promising theoretical paradigm, Inflation + Cold Dark Matter, holds that the density inhomogeneities that seeded the formation of structure in the Universe originated from quantum fluctuations arising during inflation and that the bulk of the dark matter exists as slowing moving elementary particles (cold dark matter) left over from the earliest, fiery moments. Large redshift surveys (such as the SDSS and 2dF) and high-resolution measurements of CBR anisotropy (to be made by the MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites) have the potential to decisively test Inflation + Cold Dark Matter and to open a window to the very early Universe and fundamental physics.

  17. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Synthesis Approaches Towards Large-Scale Industrial Production for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Michael Z.; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  18. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Synthesis Approaches Towards Large-Scale Industrial Production for Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Michael Z; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  19. Semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dot synthesis approaches towards large-scale industrial production for energy applications

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Michael Z.; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-04

    This study reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  20. On the large-scale structures formed by wakes of open cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, Tetsuya; Morioka, Shoji; Miyoshi, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    Large-scale structures of the universe have been variously described as sheetlike, filamentary, cellular, bubbles or spongelike. Recently cosmic strings became one of viable candidates for a galaxy formation scenario, and some of the large-scale structures seem to be simply explained by the open cosmic strings. According to this scenario, sheets are wakes which are traces of moving open cosmic strings where dark matter and baryonic matter have accumulated. Filaments are intersections of such wakes and high density regions are places where three wakes intersect almost orthogonally. The wakes formed at t sub eq become the largest surface density among all wakes, where t sub eq is the epoch when matter density equals to radiation density. If we assume that there is one open cosmic string per each horizon, then it can be explained that the typical distances among wakes, filaments and clusters are also approx. 10(exp 2) Mpc. This model does not exclude a much more large scale structure. Open cosmic string may move even now and accumulate cold dark matter after its traces. However, the surface density is much smaller than the ones formed at t sub eq. From this model, it is expected that the typical high density region will have extended features such as six filaments and three sheets and be surrounded by eight empty regions (voids). Here, the authors are mainly concerned with such structures and have made numerical simulations for the formation of such large scale structures.

  1. A Study on Fast Gates for Large-Scale Quantum Simulation with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Richard L.; Bentley, Christopher D. B.; Pedernales, Julen S.; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Carvalho, André R. R.; Hope, Joseph J.

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale digital quantum simulations require thousands of fundamental entangling gates to construct the simulated dynamics. Despite success in a variety of small-scale simulations, quantum information processing platforms have hitherto failed to demonstrate the combination of precise control and scalability required to systematically outmatch classical simulators. We analyse how fast gates could enable trapped-ion quantum processors to achieve the requisite scalability to outperform classical computers without error correction. We analyze the performance of a large-scale digital simulator, and find that fidelity of around 70% is realizable for π-pulse infidelities below 10-5 in traps subject to realistic rates of heating and dephasing. This scalability relies on fast gates: entangling gates faster than the trap period.

  2. A Study on Fast Gates for Large-Scale Quantum Simulation with Trapped Ions

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Richard L.; Bentley, Christopher D. B.; Pedernales, Julen S.; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Carvalho, André R. R.; Hope, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale digital quantum simulations require thousands of fundamental entangling gates to construct the simulated dynamics. Despite success in a variety of small-scale simulations, quantum information processing platforms have hitherto failed to demonstrate the combination of precise control and scalability required to systematically outmatch classical simulators. We analyse how fast gates could enable trapped-ion quantum processors to achieve the requisite scalability to outperform classical computers without error correction. We analyze the performance of a large-scale digital simulator, and find that fidelity of around 70% is realizable for π-pulse infidelities below 10−5 in traps subject to realistic rates of heating and dephasing. This scalability relies on fast gates: entangling gates faster than the trap period. PMID:28401945

  3. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states. PMID:26780858

  4. Large Scale Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutrino Interactions Using the Open Science Grid and Commercial Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A.; Boyd, J.; Davies, G.; Flumerfelt, E.; Herner, K.; Mayer, N.; Mhashilhar, P.; Tamsett, M.; Timm, S.

    2015-12-01

    Modern long baseline neutrino experiments like the NOvA experiment at Fermilab, require large scale, compute intensive simulations of their neutrino beam fluxes and backgrounds induced by cosmic rays. The amount of simulation required to keep the systematic uncertainties in the simulation from dominating the final physics results is often 10x to 100x that of the actual detector exposure. For the first physics results from NOvA this has meant the simulation of more than 2 billion cosmic ray events in the far detector and more than 200 million NuMI beam spill simulations. Performing these high statistics levels of simulation have been made possible for NOvA through the use of the Open Science Grid and through large scale runs on commercial clouds like Amazon EC2. We details the challenges in performing large scale simulation in these environments and how the computing infrastructure for the NOvA experiment has been adapted to seamlessly support the running of different simulation and data processing tasks on these resources.

  5. Statistical analysis of error rate of large-scale single flux quantum logic circuit by considering fluctuation of timing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanashi, Yuki; Masubuchi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between the timing margin and the error rate of the large-scale single flux quantum logic circuits is quantitatively investigated to establish a timing design guideline. We observed that the fluctuation in the set-up/hold time of single flux quantum logic gates caused by thermal noises is the most probable origin of the logical error of the large-scale single flux quantum circuit. The appropriate timing margin for stable operation of the large-scale logic circuit is discussed by taking the fluctuation of setup/hold time and the timing jitter in the single flux quantum circuits. As a case study, the dependence of the error rate of the 1-million-bit single flux quantum shift register on the timing margin is statistically analyzed. The result indicates that adjustment of timing margin and the bias voltage is important for stable operation of a large-scale SFQ logic circuit.

  6. An Open, Large-Scale, Collaborative Effort to Estimate the Reproducibility of Psychological Science.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science. However, because of strong incentives for innovation and weak incentives for confirmation, direct replication is rarely practiced or published. The Reproducibility Project is an open, large-scale, collaborative effort to systematically examine the rate and predictors of reproducibility in psychological science. So far, 72 volunteer researchers from 41 institutions have organized to openly and transparently replicate studies published in three prominent psychological journals in 2008. Multiple methods will be used to evaluate the findings, calculate an empirical rate of replication, and investigate factors that predict reproducibility. Whatever the result, a better understanding of reproducibility will ultimately improve confidence in scientific methodology and findings. © The Author(s) 2012.

  7. Comparison of the KAMELEON fire model to large-scale open pool fire data

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolette, V.F.; Gritzo, L.A.; Holen, J.; Magnussen, B.F.

    1994-06-01

    A comparison of the KAMELEON Fire model to large-scale open pool fire experimental data is presented. The model was used to calculate large-scale JP-4 pool fires with and without wind, and with and without large objects in the fire. The effect of wind and large objects on the fire environment is clearly seen. For the pool fire calculations without any object in the fire, excellent agreement is seen in the location of the oxygen-starved region near the pool center. Calculated flame temperatures are about 200--300 K higher than measured. This results in higher heat fluxes back to the fuel pool and higher fuel evaporation rates (by a factor of 2). Fuel concentrations at lower elevations and peak soot concentrations are in good agreement with data. For pool fire calculations with objects, similar trends in the fire environment are observed. Excellent agreement is seen in the distribution of the heat flux around a cylindrical calorimeter in a rectangular pool with wind effects. The magnitude of the calculated heat flux to the object is high by a factor of 2 relative to the test data, due to the higher temperatures calculated. For the case of a large flat plate adjacent to a circular pool, excellent qualitative agreement is seen in the predicted and measured flame shapes as a function of wind.

  8. Neural ensemble communities: open-source approaches to hardware for large-scale electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Siegle, Joshua H; Hale, Gregory J; Newman, Jonathan P; Voigts, Jakob

    2015-06-01

    One often-overlooked factor when selecting a platform for large-scale electrophysiology is whether or not a particular data acquisition system is 'open' or 'closed': that is, whether or not the system's schematics and source code are available to end users. Open systems have a reputation for being difficult to acquire, poorly documented, and hard to maintain. With the arrival of more powerful and compact integrated circuits, rapid prototyping services, and web-based tools for collaborative development, these stereotypes must be reconsidered. We discuss some of the reasons why multichannel extracellular electrophysiology could benefit from open-source approaches and describe examples of successful community-driven tool development within this field. In order to promote the adoption of open-source hardware and to reduce the need for redundant development efforts, we advocate a move toward standardized interfaces that connect each element of the data processing pipeline. This will give researchers the flexibility to modify their tools when necessary, while allowing them to continue to benefit from the high-quality products and expertise provided by commercial vendors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. How to organize for a large-scale openEHR-based Electronic Patient Record.

    PubMed

    Ulriksen, Gro-Hilde; Pedersen, Rune; Wynn, Rolf; Ellingsen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports from a large-scale openEHR-based EPR project 2012-2016 in the North Norway Regional Health Authority. To be able to support patient pathways across the health region's trusts, there is a need for standardized routines and practices. Therefore, the North Norway Regional Health Authority has since 2011 had an increased regional focus to prepare for this new system. This includes a) centralizing its IT portfolio to one location, b) creating regional work standards for using the EPR system, and c) establishing a Regional Department for functional ICT. There are several challenges connected to changing the focus from working as individual health trusts to work as one region. There are issues of power balance and local influence that will need a careful consideration to ensure a successful outcome.

  10. A Fractal Model for the Shear Behaviour of Large-Scale Opened Rock Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Oh, J.; Mitra, R.; Canbulat, I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a joint constitutive model that represents the shear behaviour of a large-scale opened rock joint. Evaluation of the degree of opening is made by considering the ratio between the joint wall aperture and the joint amplitude. Scale dependence of the surface roughness is investigated by approximating a natural joint profile to a fractal curve patterned in self-affinity. Developed scaling laws show the slopes of critical waviness and critical unevenness tend to flatten with increased sampling length. Geometrical examination of four 400-mm joint profiles agrees well with the suggested formulations involving multi-order asperities and fractal descriptors. Additionally, a fractal-based formulation is proposed to estimate the peak shear displacements of rock joints at varying scales, which shows a good correlation with experimental data taken from the literature. Parameters involved in the constitutive law can be acquired by inspecting roughness features of sampled rock joints. Thus, the model can be implemented in numerical software for the stability analysis of the rock mass with opened joints.

  11. Large-scale diversity patterns of cephalopods in the Atlantic open ocean and deep sea.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rui; Dierssen, Heidi M; Gonzalez, Liliana; Seibel, Brad A

    2008-12-01

    Although the oceans cover 70% of the Earth's surface and the open ocean is by far the largest ecosystem on the planet, our knowledge regarding diversity patterns of pelagic fauna is very scarce. Here, we examine large-scale latitudinal and depth-related patterns of pelagic cephalopod richness in the Atlantic Ocean in relation to ambient thermal and productive energy availability. Diversity, across 17 biogeochemical regions in the open ocean, does not decline monotonically with latitude, but is positively correlated to the availability of oceanic resources. Mean net primary productivity (NPP), determined from ocean color satellite imagery, explains 37% of the variance in species richness. Outside the poles, the range in NPP explains over 40% of the variability. This suggests that cephalopods are well adapted to the spatial patchiness and seasonality of open-ocean resources. Pelagic richness is also correlated to sea surface temperature, with maximum richness occurring around 15 degrees C and decreasing with both colder and warmer temperatures. Both pelagic and benthos-associated diversities decline sharply from sublittoral and epipelagic regions to the slope and bathypelagic habitats and then steadily to abyssal depths. Thus, higher energy availability at shallow depths seems to promote diversification rates. This strong depth-related trend in diversity also emphasizes the greater influence of the sharp vertical thermal gradient than the smoother and more seasonal horizontal (latitudinal) one on marine diversity.

  12. Neural ensemble communities: Open-source approaches to hardware for large-scale electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Siegle, Joshua H.; Hale, Gregory J.; Newman, Jonathan P.; Voigts, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    One often-overlooked factor when selecting a platform for large-scale electrophysiology is whether or not a particular data acquisition system is “open” or “closed”: that is, whether or not the system’s schematics and source code are available to end users. Open systems have a reputation for being difficult to acquire, poorly documented, and hard to maintain. With the arrival of more powerful and compact integrated circuits, rapid prototyping services, and web-based tools for collaborative development, these stereotypes must be reconsidered. We discuss some of the reasons why multichannel extracellular electrophysiology could benefit from open-source approaches and describe examples of successful community-driven tool development within this field. In order to promote the adoption of open-source hardware and to reduce the need for redundant development efforts, we advocate a move toward standardized interfaces that connect each element of the data processing pipeline. This will give researchers the flexibility to modify their tools when necessary, while allowing them to continue to benefit from the high-quality products and expertise provided by commercial vendors. PMID:25528614

  13. Continuous Purification of Colloidal Quantum Dots in Large-Scale Using Porous Electrodes in Flow Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hosub; Woo, Ju Young; Lee, Doh C.; Lee, Jinkee; Jeong, Sohee; Kim, Duckjong

    2017-02-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) afford huge potential in numerous applications owing to their excellent optical and electronic properties. After the synthesis of QDs, separating QDs from unreacted impurities in large scale is one of the biggest issues to achieve scalable and high performance optoelectronic applications. Thus far, however, continuous purification method, which is essential for mass production, has rarely been reported. In this study, we developed a new continuous purification process that is suitable to the mass production of high-quality QDs. As-synthesized QDs are driven by electrophoresis in a flow channel and captured by porous electrodes and finally separated from the unreacted impurities. Nuclear magnetic resonance and ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared absorption spectroscopic data clearly showed that the impurities were efficiently removed from QDs with the purification yield, defined as the ratio of the mass of purified QDs to that of QDs in the crude solution, up to 87%. Also, we could successfully predict the purification yield depending on purification conditions with a simple theoretical model. The proposed large-scale purification process could be an important cornerstone for the mass production and industrial use of high-quality QDs.

  14. Continuous Purification of Colloidal Quantum Dots in Large-Scale Using Porous Electrodes in Flow Channel.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hosub; Woo, Ju Young; Lee, Doh C; Lee, Jinkee; Jeong, Sohee; Kim, Duckjong

    2017-02-27

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) afford huge potential in numerous applications owing to their excellent optical and electronic properties. After the synthesis of QDs, separating QDs from unreacted impurities in large scale is one of the biggest issues to achieve scalable and high performance optoelectronic applications. Thus far, however, continuous purification method, which is essential for mass production, has rarely been reported. In this study, we developed a new continuous purification process that is suitable to the mass production of high-quality QDs. As-synthesized QDs are driven by electrophoresis in a flow channel and captured by porous electrodes and finally separated from the unreacted impurities. Nuclear magnetic resonance and ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared absorption spectroscopic data clearly showed that the impurities were efficiently removed from QDs with the purification yield, defined as the ratio of the mass of purified QDs to that of QDs in the crude solution, up to 87%. Also, we could successfully predict the purification yield depending on purification conditions with a simple theoretical model. The proposed large-scale purification process could be an important cornerstone for the mass production and industrial use of high-quality QDs.

  15. Continuous Purification of Colloidal Quantum Dots in Large-Scale Using Porous Electrodes in Flow Channel

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hosub; Woo, Ju Young; Lee, Doh C.; Lee, Jinkee; Jeong, Sohee; Kim, Duckjong

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) afford huge potential in numerous applications owing to their excellent optical and electronic properties. After the synthesis of QDs, separating QDs from unreacted impurities in large scale is one of the biggest issues to achieve scalable and high performance optoelectronic applications. Thus far, however, continuous purification method, which is essential for mass production, has rarely been reported. In this study, we developed a new continuous purification process that is suitable to the mass production of high-quality QDs. As-synthesized QDs are driven by electrophoresis in a flow channel and captured by porous electrodes and finally separated from the unreacted impurities. Nuclear magnetic resonance and ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared absorption spectroscopic data clearly showed that the impurities were efficiently removed from QDs with the purification yield, defined as the ratio of the mass of purified QDs to that of QDs in the crude solution, up to 87%. Also, we could successfully predict the purification yield depending on purification conditions with a simple theoretical model. The proposed large-scale purification process could be an important cornerstone for the mass production and industrial use of high-quality QDs. PMID:28240242

  16. Robust predictions for the large-scale cosmological power deficit from primordial quantum nonequilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Samuel; Valentini, Antony

    2016-04-01

    The de Broglie-Bohm pilot-wave formulation of quantum theory allows the existence of physical states that violate the Born probability rule. Recent work has shown that in pilot-wave field theory on expanding space relaxation to the Born rule is suppressed for long-wavelength field modes, resulting in a large-scale power deficit ξ(k) which for a radiation-dominated expansion is found to have an approximate inverse-tangent dependence on k (assuming that the width of the initial distribution is smaller than the width of the initial Born-rule distribution and that the initial quantum states are evenly-weighted superpositions of energy states). In this paper, we show that the functional form of ξ(k) is robust under changes in the initial nonequilibrium distribution — subject to the limitation of a subquantum width — as well as under the addition of an inflationary era at the end of the radiation-dominated phase. In both cases, the predicted deficit ξ(k) remains an inverse-tangent function of k. Furthermore, with the inflationary phase the dependence of the fitting parameters on the number of superposed pre-inflationary energy states is comparable to that found previously. Our results indicate that, for the assumed broad class of initial conditions, an inverse-tangent power deficit is likely to be a fairly general and robust signature of quantum relaxation in the early universe.

  17. Vertical resonant tunneling transistors with molecular quantum dots for large-scale integration.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Ryoma; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Wakayama, Yutaka

    2017-08-10

    Quantum molecular devices have a potential for the construction of new data processing architectures that cannot be achieved using current complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The relevant basic quantum transport properties have been examined by specific methods such as scanning probe and break-junction techniques. However, these methodologies are not compatible with current CMOS applications, and the development of practical molecular devices remains a persistent challenge. Here, we demonstrate a new vertical resonant tunneling transistor for large-scale integration. The transistor channel is comprised of a MOS structure with C60 molecules as quantum dots, and the structure behaves like a double tunnel junction. Notably, the transistors enabled the observation of stepwise drain currents, which originated from resonant tunneling via the discrete molecular orbitals. Applying side-gate voltages produced depletion layers in Si substrates, to achieve effective modulation of the drain currents and obvious peak shifts in the differential conductance curves. Our device configuration thus provides a promising means of integrating molecular functions into future CMOS applications.

  18. Large-scale quantum mechanical simulations of high-Z metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L H; Hood, R; Pask, J; Klepeis, J

    2007-01-03

    High-Z metals constitute a particular challenge for large-scale ab initio calculations, as they require high resolution due to the presence of strongly localized states and require many eigenstates to be computed due to the large number of electrons and need to accurately resolve the Fermi surface. Here, we report recent findings on high-Z materials, using an efficient massively parallel planewave implementation on some of the largest computational architectures currently available. We discuss the particular architectures employed and methodological advances required to harness them effectively. We present a pair-correlation function for U, calculated using quantum molecular dynamics, and discuss relaxations of Pu atoms in the vicinity of defects in aged and alloyed Pu. We find that the self-irradiation associated with aging has a negligible effect on the compressibility of Pu relative to other factors such as alloying.

  19. Large Scale Synthesis and Light Emitting Fibers of Tailor-Made Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Park, Hun; Noh, Sung Hyun; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Won Jun; Jaung, Jae Yun; Lee, Seung Geol; Han, Tae Hee

    2015-09-18

    Graphene oxide (GO), which is an oxidized form of graphene, has a mixed structure consisting of graphitic crystallites of sp(2) hybridized carbon and amorphous regions. In this work, we present a straightforward route for preparing graphene-based quantum dots (GQDs) by extraction of the crystallites from the amorphous matrix of the GO sheets. GQDs with controlled functionality are readily prepared by varying the reaction temperature, which results in precise tunability of their optical properties. Here, it was concluded that the tunable optical properties of GQDs are a result of the different fraction of chemical functionalities present. The synthesis approach presented in this paper provides an efficient strategy for achieving large-scale production and long-time optical stability of the GQDs, and the hybrid assembly of GQD and polymer has potential applications as photoluminescent fibers or films.

  20. An Open-Source Galaxy Redshift Survey Simulator for next-generation Large Scale Structure Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijak, Uros

    Galaxy redshift surveys produce three-dimensional maps of the galaxy distribution. On large scales these maps trace the underlying matter fluctuations in a relatively simple manner, so that the properties of the primordial fluctuations along with the overall expansion history and growth of perturbations can be extracted. The BAO standard ruler method to measure the expansion history of the universe using galaxy redshift surveys is thought to be robust to observational artifacts and understood theoretically with high precision. These same surveys can offer a host of additional information, including a measurement of the growth rate of large scale structure through redshift space distortions, the possibility of measuring the sum of neutrino masses, tighter constraints on the expansion history through the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and constraints on the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations. Extracting this broadband clustering information hinges on both our ability to minimize and subtract observational systematics to the observed galaxy power spectrum, and our ability to model the broadband behavior of the observed galaxy power spectrum with exquisite precision. Rapid development on both fronts is required to capitalize on WFIRST's data set. We propose to develop an open-source computational toolbox that will propel development in both areas by connecting large scale structure modeling and instrument and survey modeling with the statistical inference process. We will use the proposed simulator to both tailor perturbation theory and fully non-linear models of the broadband clustering of WFIRST galaxies and discover novel observables in the non-linear regime that are robust to observational systematics and able to distinguish between a wide range of spatial and dynamic biasing models for the WFIRST galaxy redshift survey sources. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach in a pilot study of the SDSS-III BOSS galaxies, in which we

  1. Open source database of images DEIMOS: extension for large-scale subjective image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vítek, Stanislav

    2014-09-01

    DEIMOS (Database of Images: Open Source) is an open-source database of images and video sequences for testing, verification and comparison of various image and/or video processing techniques such as compression, reconstruction and enhancement. This paper deals with extension of the database allowing performing large-scale web-based subjective image quality assessment. Extension implements both administrative and client interface. The proposed system is aimed mainly at mobile communication devices, taking into account advantages of HTML5 technology; it means that participants don't need to install any application and assessment could be performed using web browser. The assessment campaign administrator can select images from the large database and then apply rules defined by various test procedure recommendations. The standard test procedures may be fully customized and saved as a template. Alternatively the administrator can define a custom test, using images from the pool and other components, such as evaluating forms and ongoing questionnaires. Image sequence is delivered to the online client, e.g. smartphone or tablet, as a fully automated assessment sequence or viewer can decide on timing of the assessment if required. Environmental data and viewing conditions (e.g. illumination, vibrations, GPS coordinates, etc.), may be collected and subsequently analyzed.

  2. Large-Scale 1:1 Computing Initiatives: An Open Access Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jayson W.; McLeod, Scott; Flora, Kevin; Sauers, Nick J.; Kannan, Sathiamoorthy; Sincar, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    This article details the spread and scope of large-scale 1:1 computing initiatives around the world. What follows is a review of the existing literature around 1:1 programs followed by a description of the large-scale 1:1 database. Main findings include: 1) the XO and the Classmate PC dominate large-scale 1:1 initiatives; 2) if professional…

  3. NWChem: A comprehensive and scalable open-source solution for large scale molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, M.; Bylaska, E. J.; Govind, N.; Kowalski, K.; Straatsma, T. P.; Van Dam, H. J. J.; Wang, D.; Nieplocha, J.; Apra, E.; Windus, T. L.; de Jong, W. A.

    2010-09-01

    The latest release of NWChem delivers an open-source computational chemistry package with extensive capabilities for large scale simulations of chemical and biological systems. Utilizing a common computational framework, diverse theoretical descriptions can be used to provide the best solution for a given scientific problem. Scalable parallel implementations and modular software design enable efficient utilization of current computational architectures. This paper provides an overview of NWChem focusing primarily on the core theoretical modules provided by the code and their parallel performance. Program summaryProgram title: NWChem Catalogue identifier: AEGI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Open Source Educational Community License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11 709 543 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 680 696 106 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77, C Computer: all Linux based workstations and parallel supercomputers, Windows and Apple machines Operating system: Linux, OS X, Windows Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Code is parallelized Classification: 2.1, 2.2, 3, 7.3, 7.7, 16.1, 16.2, 16.3, 16.10, 16.13 Nature of problem: Large-scale atomistic simulations of chemical and biological systems require efficient and reliable methods for ground and excited solutions of many-electron Hamiltonian, analysis of the potential energy surface, and dynamics. Solution method: Ground and excited solutions of many-electron Hamiltonian are obtained utilizing density-functional theory, many-body perturbation approach, and coupled cluster expansion. These solutions or a combination thereof with classical descriptions are then used to analyze potential energy surface and perform dynamical simulations. Additional comments: Full

  4. Reproducible Large-Scale Neuroimaging Studies with the OpenMOLE Workflow Management System.

    PubMed

    Passerat-Palmbach, Jonathan; Reuillon, Romain; Leclaire, Mathieu; Makropoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Emma C; Parisot, Sarah; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    OpenMOLE is a scientific workflow engine with a strong emphasis on workload distribution. Workflows are designed using a high level Domain Specific Language (DSL) built on top of Scala. It exposes natural parallelism constructs to easily delegate the workload resulting from a workflow to a wide range of distributed computing environments. OpenMOLE hides the complexity of designing complex experiments thanks to its DSL. Users can embed their own applications and scale their pipelines from a small prototype running on their desktop computer to a large-scale study harnessing distributed computing infrastructures, simply by changing a single line in the pipeline definition. The construction of the pipeline itself is decoupled from the execution context. The high-level DSL abstracts the underlying execution environment, contrary to classic shell-script based pipelines. These two aspects allow pipelines to be shared and studies to be replicated across different computing environments. Workflows can be run as traditional batch pipelines or coupled with OpenMOLE's advanced exploration methods in order to study the behavior of an application, or perform automatic parameter tuning. In this work, we briefly present the strong assets of OpenMOLE and detail recent improvements targeting re-executability of workflows across various Linux platforms. We have tightly coupled OpenMOLE with CARE, a standalone containerization solution that allows re-executing on a Linux host any application that has been packaged on another Linux host previously. The solution is evaluated against a Python-based pipeline involving packages such as scikit-learn as well as binary dependencies. All were packaged and re-executed successfully on various HPC environments, with identical numerical results (here prediction scores) obtained on each environment. Our results show that the pair formed by OpenMOLE and CARE is a reliable solution to generate reproducible results and re-executable pipelines. A

  5. Reproducible Large-Scale Neuroimaging Studies with the OpenMOLE Workflow Management System

    PubMed Central

    Passerat-Palmbach, Jonathan; Reuillon, Romain; Leclaire, Mathieu; Makropoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Emma C.; Parisot, Sarah; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    OpenMOLE is a scientific workflow engine with a strong emphasis on workload distribution. Workflows are designed using a high level Domain Specific Language (DSL) built on top of Scala. It exposes natural parallelism constructs to easily delegate the workload resulting from a workflow to a wide range of distributed computing environments. OpenMOLE hides the complexity of designing complex experiments thanks to its DSL. Users can embed their own applications and scale their pipelines from a small prototype running on their desktop computer to a large-scale study harnessing distributed computing infrastructures, simply by changing a single line in the pipeline definition. The construction of the pipeline itself is decoupled from the execution context. The high-level DSL abstracts the underlying execution environment, contrary to classic shell-script based pipelines. These two aspects allow pipelines to be shared and studies to be replicated across different computing environments. Workflows can be run as traditional batch pipelines or coupled with OpenMOLE's advanced exploration methods in order to study the behavior of an application, or perform automatic parameter tuning. In this work, we briefly present the strong assets of OpenMOLE and detail recent improvements targeting re-executability of workflows across various Linux platforms. We have tightly coupled OpenMOLE with CARE, a standalone containerization solution that allows re-executing on a Linux host any application that has been packaged on another Linux host previously. The solution is evaluated against a Python-based pipeline involving packages such as scikit-learn as well as binary dependencies. All were packaged and re-executed successfully on various HPC environments, with identical numerical results (here prediction scores) obtained on each environment. Our results show that the pair formed by OpenMOLE and CARE is a reliable solution to generate reproducible results and re-executable pipelines. A

  6. Visualization of large scale geologically related data in virtual 3D scenes with OpenGL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Dewen; Liang, Xi; Wang, Hongxia; Yue, Guoying

    2007-11-01

    This paper demonstrates a method for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and visualization of large scale multidimensional surficial, geological and mine planning data with the programmable visualization environment OpenGL. A simulation system developed by the authors is presented for importing, filtering and visualizing of multidimensional geologically related data. The approach for the visual simulation of complicated mining engineering environment implemented in the system is described in detail. Aspects like presentations of multidimensional data with spatial dependence, navigation in the surficial and geological frame of reference and in time, interaction techniques are presented. The system supports real 3D landscape representations. Furthermore, the system provides many visualization methods for rendering multidimensional data within virtual 3D scenes and combines them with several navigation techniques. Real data derived from an iron mine in Wuhan City of China demonstrates the effectiveness and efficiency of the system. A case study with the results and benefits achieved by using real 3D representations and navigations of the system is given.

  7. MultispeQ Beta: a tool for large-scale plant phenotyping connected to the open PhotosynQ network

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlgert, Sebastian; Austic, Greg; Zegarac, Robert; Osei-Bonsu, Isaac; Hoh, Donghee; Chilvers, Martin I.; Roth, Mitchell G.; Bi, Kevin; TerAvest, Dan; Weebadde, Prabode; Kramer, David M.

    2016-10-26

    Large-scale high-throughput plant phenotyping (sometimes called phenomics) is becoming increasingly important in plant biology and agriculture and is essential to cutting-edge plant breeding and management approaches needed to meet the food and fuel needs for the next century. Currently, the application of these approaches is severely limited by the availability of appropriate instrumentation and by the ability to communicate experimental protocols, results and analyses. To address these issues, we have developed a low-cost, yet sophisticated open-source scientific instrument designed to enable communities of researchers, plant breeders, educators, farmers and citizen scientists to collect high-quality field data on a large scale. The MultispeQ provides measurements in the field or laboratory of both, environmental conditions (light intensity and quality, temperature, humidity, CO2 levels, time and location) and useful plant phenotypes, including photosynthetic parameters—photosystem II quantum yield (ΦII), non-photochemical exciton quenching (NPQ), photosystem II photoinhibition, light-driven proton translocation and thylakoid proton motive force, regulation of the chloroplast ATP synthase and potentially many others—and leaf chlorophyll and other pigments. Plant phenotype data are transmitted from the MultispeQ to mobile devices, laptops or desktop computers together with key metadata that gets saved to the PhotosynQ platform (https://photosynq.org) and provides a suite of web-based tools for sharing, visualization, filtering, dissemination and analyses. We present validation experiments, comparing MultispeQ results with established platforms, and show that it can be usefully deployed in both laboratory and field settings. We present evidence that MultispeQ can be used by communities of researchers to rapidly measure, store and analyse multiple environmental and plant properties, allowing for deeper understanding of the complex

  8. MultispeQ Beta: a tool for large-scale plant phenotyping connected to the open PhotosynQ network

    PubMed Central

    Austic, Greg; Zegarac, Robert; Osei-Bonsu, Isaac; Hoh, Donghee; Chilvers, Martin I.; Roth, Mitchell G.; Bi, Kevin; TerAvest, Dan; Weebadde, Prabode; Kramer, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale high-throughput plant phenotyping (sometimes called phenomics) is becoming increasingly important in plant biology and agriculture and is essential to cutting-edge plant breeding and management approaches needed to meet the food and fuel needs for the next century. Currently, the application of these approaches is severely limited by the availability of appropriate instrumentation and by the ability to communicate experimental protocols, results and analyses. To address these issues, we have developed a low-cost, yet sophisticated open-source scientific instrument designed to enable communities of researchers, plant breeders, educators, farmers and citizen scientists to collect high-quality field data on a large scale. The MultispeQ provides measurements in the field or laboratory of both, environmental conditions (light intensity and quality, temperature, humidity, CO2 levels, time and location) and useful plant phenotypes, including photosynthetic parameters—photosystem II quantum yield (ΦII), non-photochemical exciton quenching (NPQ), photosystem II photoinhibition, light-driven proton translocation and thylakoid proton motive force, regulation of the chloroplast ATP synthase and potentially many others—and leaf chlorophyll and other pigments. Plant phenotype data are transmitted from the MultispeQ to mobile devices, laptops or desktop computers together with key metadata that gets saved to the PhotosynQ platform (https://photosynq.org) and provides a suite of web-based tools for sharing, visualization, filtering, dissemination and analyses. We present validation experiments, comparing MultispeQ results with established platforms, and show that it can be usefully deployed in both laboratory and field settings. We present evidence that MultispeQ can be used by communities of researchers to rapidly measure, store and analyse multiple environmental and plant properties, allowing for deeper understanding of the complex interactions between plants

  9. MultispeQ Beta: a tool for large-scale plant phenotyping connected to the open PhotosynQ network

    DOE PAGES

    Kuhlgert, Sebastian; Austic, Greg; Zegarac, Robert; ...

    2016-10-26

    Large-scale high-throughput plant phenotyping (sometimes called phenomics) is becoming increasingly important in plant biology and agriculture and is essential to cutting-edge plant breeding and management approaches needed to meet the food and fuel needs for the next century. Currently, the application of these approaches is severely limited by the availability of appropriate instrumentation and by the ability to communicate experimental protocols, results and analyses. To address these issues, we have developed a low-cost, yet sophisticated open-source scientific instrument designed to enable communities of researchers, plant breeders, educators, farmers and citizen scientists to collect high-quality field data on a large scale.more » The MultispeQ provides measurements in the field or laboratory of both, environmental conditions (light intensity and quality, temperature, humidity, CO2 levels, time and location) and useful plant phenotypes, including photosynthetic parameters—photosystem II quantum yield (ΦII), non-photochemical exciton quenching (NPQ), photosystem II photoinhibition, light-driven proton translocation and thylakoid proton motive force, regulation of the chloroplast ATP synthase and potentially many others—and leaf chlorophyll and other pigments. Plant phenotype data are transmitted from the MultispeQ to mobile devices, laptops or desktop computers together with key metadata that gets saved to the PhotosynQ platform (https://photosynq.org) and provides a suite of web-based tools for sharing, visualization, filtering, dissemination and analyses. We present validation experiments, comparing MultispeQ results with established platforms, and show that it can be usefully deployed in both laboratory and field settings. We present evidence that MultispeQ can be used by communities of researchers to rapidly measure, store and analyse multiple environmental and plant properties, allowing for deeper understanding of the complex interactions between

  10. Open-path Fourier transform infrared studies of large-scale laboratory biomass fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokelson, Robert J.; Griffith, David W. T.; Ward, Darold E.

    1996-09-01

    A series of nine large-scale, open fires was conducted in the Intermountain Fire Sciences Laboratory (IFSL) controlled-environment combustion facility. The fuels were pure pine needles or sagebrush or mixed fuels simulating forest-floor, ground fires; crown fires; broadcast burns; and slash pile burns. Mid-infrared spectra of the smoke were recorded throughout each fire by open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy at 0.12 cm-1 resolution over a 3 m cross-stack pathlength and analyzed to provide pseudocontinuous, simultaneous concentrations of up to 16 compounds. Simultaneous measurements were made of fuel mass loss, stack gas temperature, and total mass flow up the stack. The products detected are classified by the type of process that dominates in producing them. Carbon dioxide is the dominant emission of (and primarily produced by) flaming combustion, from which we also measure nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and most of the water vapor from combustion and fuel moisture. Carbon monoxide is the dominant emission formed primarily by smoldering combustion from which we also measure carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, and ethane. A significant fraction of the total emissions is unoxidized pyrolysis products; examples are methanol, formaldehyde, acetic and formic acid, ethene (ethylene), ethyne (acetylene), and hydrogen cyanide. Relatively few previous data exist for many of these compounds and they are likely to have an important but as yet poorly understood role in plume chemistry. Large differences in emissions occur from different fire and fuel types, and the observed temporal behavior of the emissions is found to depend strongly on the fuel bed and product type.

  11. Repurposing of open data through large scale hydrological modelling - hypeweb.smhi.se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strömbäck, Lena; Andersson, Jafet; Donnelly, Chantal; Gustafsson, David; Isberg, Kristina; Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Strömqvist, Johan; Arheimer, Berit

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological modelling demands large amounts of spatial data, such as soil properties, land use, topography, lakes and reservoirs, ice and snow coverage, water management (e.g. irrigation patterns and regulations), meteorological data and observed water discharge in rivers. By using such data, the hydrological model will in turn provide new data that can be used for new purposes (i.e. re-purposing). This presentation will give an example of how readily available open data from public portals have been re-purposed by using the Hydrological Predictions for the Environment (HYPE) model in a number of large-scale model applications covering numerous subbasins and rivers. HYPE is a dynamic, semi-distributed, process-based, and integrated catchment model. The model output is launched as new Open Data at the web site www.hypeweb.smhi.se to be used for (i) Climate change impact assessments on water resources and dynamics; (ii) The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) for characterization and development of measure programs to improve the ecological status of water bodies; (iii) Design variables for infrastructure constructions; (iv) Spatial water-resource mapping; (v) Operational forecasts (1-10 days and seasonal) on floods and droughts; (vi) Input to oceanographic models for operational forecasts and marine status assessments; (vii) Research. The following regional domains have been modelled so far with different resolutions (number of subbasins within brackets): Sweden (37 000), Europe (35 000), Arctic basin (30 000), La Plata River (6 000), Niger River (800), Middle-East North-Africa (31 000), and the Indian subcontinent (6 000). The Hype web site provides several interactive web applications for exploring results from the models. The user can explore an overview of various water variables for historical and future conditions. Moreover the user can explore and download historical time series of discharge for each basin and explore the performance of the model

  12. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  13. Escript: Open Source Environment For Solving Large-Scale Geophysical Joint Inversion Problems in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Lutz; Altinay, Cihan; Fenwick, Joel; Smith, Troy

    2014-05-01

    inversion and appropriate solution schemes in escript. We will also give a brief introduction into escript's open framework for defining and solving geophysical inversion problems. Finally we will show some benchmark results to demonstrate the computational scalability of the inversion method across a large number of cores and compute nodes in a parallel computing environment. References: - L. Gross et al. (2013): Escript Solving Partial Differential Equations in Python Version 3.4, The University of Queensland, https://launchpad.net/escript-finley - L. Gross and C. Kemp (2013) Large Scale Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data using the Finite Element Method in escript. ASEG Extended Abstracts 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/ASEG2013ab306 - T. Poulet, L. Gross, D. Georgiev, J. Cleverley (2012): escript-RT: Reactive transport simulation in Python using escript, Computers & Geosciences, Volume 45, 168-176. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cageo.2011.11.005.

  14. User Friendly Open GIS Tool for Large Scale Data Assimilation - a Case Study of Hydrological Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P. K.

    2012-08-01

    Open source software (OSS) coding has tremendous advantages over proprietary software. These are primarily fuelled by high level programming languages (JAVA, C++, Python etc...) and open source geospatial libraries (GDAL/OGR, GEOS, GeoTools etc.). Quantum GIS (QGIS) is a popular open source GIS package, which is licensed under GNU GPL and is written in C++. It allows users to perform specialised tasks by creating plugins in C++ and Python. This research article emphasises on exploiting this capability of QGIS to build and implement plugins across multiple platforms using the easy to learn - Python programming language. In the present study, a tool has been developed to assimilate large spatio-temporal datasets such as national level gridded rainfall, temperature, topographic (digital elevation model, slope, aspect), landuse/landcover and multi-layer soil data for input into hydrological models. At present this tool has been developed for Indian sub-continent. An attempt is also made to use popular scientific and numerical libraries to create custom applications for digital inclusion. In the hydrological modelling calibration and validation are important steps which are repetitively carried out for the same study region. As such the developed tool will be user friendly and used efficiently for these repetitive processes by reducing the time required for data management and handling. Moreover, it was found that the developed tool can easily assimilate large dataset in an organised manner.

  15. Large-scale atomistic density functional theory calculations of phosphorus-doped silicon quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenman, Loren; Whitley, Heather D.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2013-10-01

    We present density functional theory calculations of phosphorus dopants in bulk silicon and of several properties relating to their use as spin qubits for quantum computation. Rather than a mixed pseudopotential or a Heitler-London approach, we have used an explicit treatment for the phosphorus donor and examined the detailed electronic structure of the system as a function of the isotropic doping fraction, including lattice relaxation due to the presence of the impurity. Doping electron densities (ρdoped-ρbulk) and spin densities (ρ↑-ρ↓) are examined in order to study the properties of the dopant electron as a function of the isotropic doping fraction. Doping potentials (Vdoped-Vbulk) are also calculated for use in calculations of the scattering cross sections of the phosphorus dopants, which are important in the understanding of electrically detected magnetic resonance experiments. We find that the electron density around the dopant leads to nonspherical features in the doping potentials, such as trigonal lobes in the (001) plane at energy scales of +12 eV near the nucleus and of -700 meV extending away from the dopants. These features are generally neglected in effective mass theory and will affect the coupling between the donor electron and the phosphorus nucleus. Our density functional calculations reveal detail in the densities and potentials of the dopants which are not evident in calculations that do not include explicit treatment of the phosphorus donor atom and relaxation of the crystal lattice. These details can also be used to parametrize tight-binding models for simulation of large-scale devices.

  16. Opening the Black Box: Prospects for Using International Large-Scale Assessments to Explore Classroom Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William H.; Burroughs, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors review International Large-Scale Assessment (ILSA)-based research over the last several decades, with specific attention on cross-national analysis of mean differences between and variation within countries in mathematics education. They discuss the role of sampling design and "opportunity to learn" (OTL)…

  17. Large-scale frequency- and time-domain quantum entanglement over the optical frequency comb (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    When it comes to practical quantum computing, the two main challenges are circumventing decoherence (devastating quantum errors due to interactions with the environmental bath) and achieving scalability (as many qubits as needed for a real-life, game-changing computation). We show that using, in lieu of qubits, the "qumodes" represented by the resonant fields of the quantum optical frequency comb of an optical parametric oscillator allows one to create bona fide, large scale quantum computing processors, pre-entangled in a cluster state. We detail our recent demonstration of 60-qumode entanglement (out of an estimated 3000) and present an extension to combining this frequency-tagged with time-tagged entanglement, in order to generate an arbitrarily large, universal quantum computing processor.

  18. Openwebglobe - AN Open Source Sdk for Creating Large-Scale Virtual Globes on a Webgl Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loesch, B.; Christen, M.; Nebiker, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper introduces the OpenWebGlobe project (www.openwebglobe.org) and the OpenWebGlobe SDK (Software Development Kit) - an open source virtual globe environment using WebGL. Unlike other (web-based) 3d geovisualisation technologies and toolkits, the OpenWebGlobe SDK not only supports the content authoring and web visualization aspects, but also the data processing functionality for generating multi-terabyte terrain, image, map and 3d point cloud data sets in high-performance and cloud-based parallel computing environments. The OpenWebGlobe architecture is described and the paper outlines the processing and the viewer functionality provided by the OpenWebGlobe SDK. It then discusses the generation and updating of a global 3d base map using OpenStreetMap data and finally presents two show cases employing the technology a) for implementing an interactive national 3d geoportal incorporating high resolution national geodata sets and b) for implementing a 3d geoinformation service supporting the real-time incorporation of 3d point cloud data.

  19. The implementation of universal quantum memory and gates based on large-scale diamond surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers implanted beneath the diamond surface have been demonstrated to be effective in the processing of controlling and reading-out. In this paper, NV center entangled with the fluorine nuclei collective ensemble is simplified to Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model. Based on this system, we discussed the implementation of quantum state storage and single-qubit quantum gate.

  20. Giant photon gain in large-scale quantum dot-circuit QED systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Kulkarni, Manas; Mukamel, Shaul; Segal, Dvira

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on the generation of coherent light in engineered hybrid quantum systems, we investigate gain in a microwave photonic cavity coupled to quantum dot structures and develop concrete directions for achieving a giant amplification in photon transmission. We propose two architectures for scaling up the electronic gain medium: (i) N -double quantum dot systems and (ii) M -quantum dots arranged in series akin to a quantum cascade laser setup. In both setups, the fermionic reservoirs are voltage biased, and the quantum dots are coupled to a single-mode cavity. Optical amplification is explained based on a sum rule for the transmission function, and it is determined by an intricate competition between two different processes: charge-density response in the gain medium and cavity losses to input and output ports. The same design principle is also responsible for the corresponding giant amplification in other photonic observables, mean photon number, and emission spectrum, thereby realizing a quantum device that behaves as a giant microwave amplifier.

  1. Automated tracing of open-field coronal structures for an optimized large-scale magnetic field reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter will provide detailed measurements in the inner heliosphere magnetically connected with the topologically complex and eruptive solar corona. Interpretation of these measurements will require accurate reconstruction of the large-scale coronal magnetic field. In a related presentation by S. Jones et al., we argue that such reconstruction can be performed using photospheric extrapolation methods constrained by white-light coronagraph images. Here, we present the image-processing component of this project dealing with an automated segmentation of fan-like coronal loop structures. In contrast to the existing segmentation codes designed for detecting small-scale closed loops in the vicinity of active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal features observed at significant radial distances from the solar surface. The coronagraph images used for the loop segmentation are transformed into a polar coordinate system and undergo radial detrending and initial noise reduction. The preprocessed images are subject to an adaptive second order differentiation combining radial and azimuthal directions. An adjustable thresholding technique is applied to identify candidate coronagraph features associated with the large-scale coronal field. A blob detection algorithm is used to extract valid features and discard noisy data pixels. The obtained features are interpolated using higher-order polynomials which are used to derive empirical directional constraints for magnetic field extrapolation procedures based on photospheric magnetograms.

  2. Agent-based Large-Scale Emergency Evacuation Using Real-Time Open Government Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Liu, Cheng; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The open government initiatives have provided tremendous data resources for the transportation system and emergency services in urban areas. This paper proposes a traffic simulation framework using high temporal resolution demographic data and real time open government data for evacuation planning and operation. A comparison study using real-world data in Seattle, Washington is conducted to evaluate the framework accuracy and evacuation efficiency. The successful simulations of selected area prove the concept to take advantage open government data, open source data, and high resolution demographic data in emergency management domain. There are two aspects of parameters considered in this study: user equilibrium (UE) conditions of traffic assignment model (simple Non-UE vs. iterative UE) and data temporal resolution (Daytime vs. Nighttime). Evacuation arrival rate, average travel time, and computation time are adopted as Measure of Effectiveness (MOE) for evacuation performance analysis. The temporal resolution of demographic data has significant impacts on urban transportation dynamics during evacuation scenarios. Better evacuation performance estimation can be approached by integrating both Non-UE and UE scenarios. The new framework shows flexibility in implementing different evacuation strategies and accuracy in evacuation performance. The use of this framework can be explored to day-to-day traffic assignment to support daily traffic operations.

  3. Free energies of binding from large-scale first-principles quantum mechanical calculations: application to ligand hydration energies.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Tautermann, Christofer S; Fox, Thomas; Christ, Clara; Malcolm, N O J; Essex, Jonathan W; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2013-08-15

    Schemes of increasing sophistication for obtaining free energies of binding have been developed over the years, where configurational sampling is used to include the all-important entropic contributions to the free energies. However, the quality of the results will also depend on the accuracy with which the intermolecular interactions are computed at each molecular configuration. In this context, the energy change associated with the rearrangement of electrons (electronic polarization and charge transfer) upon binding is a very important effect. Classical molecular mechanics force fields do not take this effect into account explicitly, and polarizable force fields and semiempirical quantum or hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) calculations are increasingly employed (at higher computational cost) to compute intermolecular interactions in free-energy schemes. In this work, we investigate the use of large-scale quantum mechanical calculations from first-principles as a way of fully taking into account electronic effects in free-energy calculations. We employ a one-step free-energy perturbation (FEP) scheme from a molecular mechanical (MM) potential to a quantum mechanical (QM) potential as a correction to thermodynamic integration calculations within the MM potential. We use this approach to calculate relative free energies of hydration of small aromatic molecules. Our quantum calculations are performed on multiple configurations from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The quantum energy of each configuration is obtained from density functional theory calculations with a near-complete psinc basis set on over 600 atoms using the ONETEP program.

  4. Sustainability of Open-Source Software Organizations as Underpinning for Sustainable Interoperability on Large Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulker, D. W.; Gallagher, J. H. R.

    2015-12-01

    OPeNDAP's Hyrax data server is an open-source framework fostering interoperability via easily-deployed Web services. Compatible with solutions listed in the (PA001) session description—federation, rigid standards and brokering/mediation—the framework can support tight or loose coupling, even with dependence on community-contributed software. Hyrax is a Web-services framework with a middleware-like design and a handler-style architecture that together reduce the interoperability challenge (for N datatypes and M user contexts) to an O(N+M) problem, similar to brokering. Combined with an open-source ethos, this reduction makes Hyrax a community tool for gaining interoperability. E.g., in its response to the Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI), NASA references OPeNDAP-based interoperability. Assuming its suitability, the question becomes: how sustainable is OPeNDAP, a small not-for-profit that produces open-source software, i.e., has no software-sales? In other words, if geoscience interoperability depends on OPeNDAP and similar organizations, are those entities in turn sustainable? Jim Collins (in Good to Great) highlights three questions that successful companies can answer (paraphrased here): What is your passion? Where is your world-class excellence? What drives your economic engine? We attempt to shed light on OPeNDAP sustainability by examining these. Passion: OPeNDAP has a focused passion for improving the effectiveness of scientific data sharing and use, as deeply-cooperative community endeavors. Excellence: OPeNDAP has few peers in remote, scientific data access. Skills include computer science with experience in data science, (operational, secure) Web services, and software design (for servers and clients, where the latter vary from Web pages to standalone apps and end-user programs). Economic Engine: OPeNDAP is an engineering services organization more than a product company, despite software being key to OPeNDAP's reputation. In essence, provision of

  5. Large-scale quantum-emitter arrays in atomically thin semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Berraquero, Carmen; Kara, Dhiren M.; Montblanch, Alejandro R.-P.; Barbone, Matteo; Latawiec, Pawel; Yoon, Duhee; Ott, Anna K.; Loncar, Marko; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Atatüre, Mete

    2017-01-01

    Quantum light emitters have been observed in atomically thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, they are found at random locations within the host material and usually in low densities, hindering experiments aiming to investigate this new class of emitters. Here, we create deterministic arrays of hundreds of quantum emitters in tungsten diselenide and tungsten disulphide monolayers, emitting across a range of wavelengths in the visible spectrum (610–680 nm and 740–820 nm), with a greater spectral stability than their randomly occurring counterparts. This is achieved by depositing monolayers onto silica substrates nanopatterned with arrays of 150-nm-diameter pillars ranging from 60 to 190 nm in height. The nanopillars create localized deformations in the material resulting in the quantum confinement of excitons. Our method may enable the placement of emitters in photonic structures such as optical waveguides in a scalable way, where precise and accurate positioning is paramount. PMID:28530249

  6. Large-scale quantum-emitter arrays in atomically thin semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Berraquero, Carmen; Kara, Dhiren M.; Montblanch, Alejandro R.-P.; Barbone, Matteo; Latawiec, Pawel; Yoon, Duhee; Ott, Anna K.; Loncar, Marko; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Atatüre, Mete

    2017-05-01

    Quantum light emitters have been observed in atomically thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, they are found at random locations within the host material and usually in low densities, hindering experiments aiming to investigate this new class of emitters. Here, we create deterministic arrays of hundreds of quantum emitters in tungsten diselenide and tungsten disulphide monolayers, emitting across a range of wavelengths in the visible spectrum (610-680 nm and 740-820 nm), with a greater spectral stability than their randomly occurring counterparts. This is achieved by depositing monolayers onto silica substrates nanopatterned with arrays of 150-nm-diameter pillars ranging from 60 to 190 nm in height. The nanopillars create localized deformations in the material resulting in the quantum confinement of excitons. Our method may enable the placement of emitters in photonic structures such as optical waveguides in a scalable way, where precise and accurate positioning is paramount.

  7. Leveraging human oversight and intervention in large-scale parallel processing of open-source data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, Enrico; Suri, Niranjan; Bradshaw, Jeffrey M.

    2015-05-01

    The popularity of cloud computing along with the increased availability of cheap storage have led to the necessity of elaboration and transformation of large volumes of open-source data, all in parallel. One way to handle such extensive volumes of information properly is to take advantage of distributed computing frameworks like Map-Reduce. Unfortunately, an entirely automated approach that excludes human intervention is often unpredictable and error prone. Highly accurate data processing and decision-making can be achieved by supporting an automatic process through human collaboration, in a variety of environments such as warfare, cyber security and threat monitoring. Although this mutual participation seems easily exploitable, human-machine collaboration in the field of data analysis presents several challenges. First, due to the asynchronous nature of human intervention, it is necessary to verify that once a correction is made, all the necessary reprocessing is done in chain. Second, it is often needed to minimize the amount of reprocessing in order to optimize the usage of resources due to limited availability. In order to improve on these strict requirements, this paper introduces improvements to an innovative approach for human-machine collaboration in the processing of large amounts of open-source data in parallel.

  8. Open source large-scale high-resolution environmental modelling with GEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baarsma, Rein; Alberti, Koko; Marra, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Many environmental, topographic and climate data sets are freely available at a global scale, creating the opportunities to run environmental models for every location on Earth. Collection of the data necessary to do this and the consequent conversion into a useful format is very demanding however, not to mention the computational demand of a model itself. We developed GEMS (Global Environmental Modelling System), an online application to run environmental models on various scales directly in your browser and share the results with other researchers. GEMS is open-source and uses open-source platforms including Flask, Leaflet, GDAL, MapServer and the PCRaster-Python modelling framework to process spatio-temporal models in real time. With GEMS, users can write, run, and visualize the results of dynamic PCRaster-Python models in a browser. GEMS uses freely available global data to feed the models, and automatically converts the data to the relevant model extent and data format. Currently available data includes the SRTM elevation model, a selection of monthly vegetation data from MODIS, land use classifications from GlobCover, historical climate data from WorldClim, HWSD soil information from WorldGrids, population density from SEDAC and near real-time weather forecasts, most with a ±100m resolution. Furthermore, users can add other or their own datasets using a web coverage service or a custom data provider script. With easy access to a wide range of base datasets and without the data preparation that is usually necessary to run environmental models, building and running a model becomes a matter hours. Furthermore, it is easy to share the resulting maps, timeseries data or model scenarios with other researchers through a web mapping service (WMS). GEMS can be used to provide open access to model results. Additionally, environmental models in GEMS can be employed by users with no extensive experience with writing code, which is for example valuable for using models

  9. Novel approach for extinguishing large-scale coal fires using gas-liquid foams in open pit mines.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinxiao; Wang, Deming; Qin, Botao; Tian, Fuchao; Shi, Guangyi; Dong, Shuaijun

    2015-12-01

    Coal fires are a serious threat to the workers' security and safe production in open pit mines. The coal fire source is hidden and innumerable, and the large-area cavity is prevalent in the coal seam after the coal burned, causing the conventional extinguishment technology difficult to work. Foams are considered as an efficient means of fire extinguishment in these large-scale workplaces. A noble foam preparation method is introduced, and an original design of cavitation jet device is proposed to add foaming agent stably. The jet cavitation occurs when the water flow rate and pressure ratio reach specified values. Through self-building foaming system, the high performance foams are produced and then infused into the blast drilling holes at a large flow. Without complicated operation, this system is found to be very suitable for extinguishing large-scale coal fires. Field application shows that foam generation adopting the proposed key technology makes a good fire extinguishment effect. The temperature reduction using foams is 6-7 times higher than water, and CO concentration is reduced from 9.43 to 0.092‰ in the drilling hole. The coal fires are controlled successfully in open pit mines, ensuring the normal production as well as the security of personnel and equipment.

  10. Large-scale maximal entanglement and Majorana bound states in coupled circuit quantum electrodynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2013-03-01

    We study the effect of ultrastrong cavity-qubit coupling on the low-lying excitations of a chain of coupled circuit quantum electrodynamic (QED) systems. We show that, in the presence of the onsite ultrastrong coupling, the photon hopping between cavities can be mapped to the Ising interaction between the lowest two levels of individual circuit QED of the chain. Based on our mapping, we predict two nearly degenerate ground states whose wave functions involve maximal entanglement between the macroscopic quantum states of the cavities and the states of qubits and identify that they are mathematically equivalent to Majorana bound states. Further, we devise a scheme for the dispersive measurement of the ground states using an additional resonator attached to one end of the circuit QED chain. Finally, we discuss the effects of disorders and local noises on the coherence of the ground states.

  11. Large scale two-dimensional arrays of magnesium diboride superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane A. Dynes, R. C.; Wong, T. J.; Cho, E. Y.; Beeman, J. W.; Yung, C. S.; Moeckly, B. H.

    2014-05-05

    Magnetic field sensors based on two-dimensional arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices were constructed from magnesium diboride thin films. Each array contained over 30 000 Josephson junctions fabricated by ion damage of 30 nm weak links through an implant mask defined by nano-lithography. Current-biased devices exhibited very large voltage modulation as a function of magnetic field, with amplitudes as high as 8 mV.

  12. Size-Dependent Plasmonic Resonances from Large-Scale Quantum Simulations.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hongping; Zhang, Xu; Neuhauser, Daniel; Lu, Gang

    2014-04-03

    For metallic nanoparticles less than 10 nm in diameter, localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) become sensitive to the quantum nature of conduction electrons. In this regime, experimental probes of size-dependent LSPRs are particularly challenging, and contradictory results are often reported. Unfortunately, quantum mechanical simulations based on time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TD-KSDFT) are computationally too expensive to tackle metal particles larger than 2 nm. Herein, we present a time-dependent orbital-free density functional theory (TD-OFDFT) that accurately captures the dynamic response of electrons in the presence of realistic ionic potentials. The TD-OFDFT method offers a comparable accuracy as TD-KSDFT but with a much lower computational cost. Using TD-OFDFT, we study size-dependent LSPRs on Na nanoparticles with diameters from 0.7 to 12.3 nm. The optical absorption spectra exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior from blue shift to red shift and back to blue shift as the particle size decreases. Three principal plasmon modes are identified, and their physical origins are elucidated. Competing physical mechanisms responsible for the nonmonotonic size dependence are discussed. The TD-OFDFT provides a unified theoretical framework that bridges the gap between classical electromagnetic theory and quantum mechanical theory for plasmonics and nanophotonics.

  13. A Scalable Open-Source Pipeline for Large-Scale Root Phenotyping of Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Slovak, Radka; Göschl, Christian; Su, Xiaoxue; Shimotani, Koji; Shiina, Takashi; Busch, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale phenotyping of multicellular organisms is one of the current challenges in biology. We present a comprehensive and scalable pipeline that allows for the efficient phenotyping of root growth traits on a large scale. This includes a high-resolution, low-cost acquisition setup as well as the automated image processing software BRAT. We assess the performance of this pipeline in Arabidopsis thaliana under multiple growth conditions and show its utility by performing genome-wide association studies on 16 root growth traits quantified by BRAT each day during a 5-d time-course experiment. The most significantly associated genome region for root growth rate is a locus encoding a calcium sensing receptor. We find that loss of function and overexpression of this gene can significantly alter root growth in a growth condition dependent manner and that the minor natural allele of the Calcium Sensor Receptor locus is highly significantly enriched in populations in coastal areas, demonstrating the power of our approach to identify regulators of root growth that might have adaptive relevance. PMID:24920330

  14. Enhanced photocarrier generation in large-scale photonic nanostructures fabricated from vertically aligned quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Kishimoto, Yuko; Usami, Noritaka

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate enhanced photocarrier generation using photonic nanostructures fabricated by a wet etching technique with vertically aligned quantum dots (QDs). Using photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, we found that the photocarrier generation in Ge/Si QDs placed close to the surface is enhanced below the band gap energy of crystalline silicon. The enhancement is explained by light trapping owing to the photonic nanostructures. Electromagnetic wave simulations indicate that the photonic nanostructure with a subwavelength size will be available to light trapping for efficient photocarrier generation by increasing their dip depth.

  15. Large-Scale Programmable Synthesis of PbS Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Preske, Amanda; Liu, Jin; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Krauss, Todd D

    2016-03-03

    The most common method of synthesizing colloidal quantum dots (QDs) relies on an increasing particle size through increasing reaction time. We demonstrate a synthesis where the QD size is programmable through the use of a secondary phosphine sulfide precursor. The reaction runs to thermodynamic completion, resulting in a desired PbS diameter for a given set of specific reaction conditions, with no need for reaction quenching or post-synthesis size-separation. Moreover, this method is shown to produce high-quality PbS QDs on the grams scale. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Electrostatic embedding in large-scale first principles quantum mechanical calculations on biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Fox, Thomas; Tautermann, Christofer S; Malcolm, Noj; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-12-14

    Biomolecular simulations with atomistic detail are often required to describe interactions with chemical accuracy for applications such as the calculation of free energies of binding or chemical reactions in enzymes. Force fields are typically used for this task but these rely on extensive parameterisation which in cases can lead to limited accuracy and transferability, for example for ligands with unusual functional groups. These limitations can be overcome with first principles calculations with methods such as density functional theory (DFT) but at a much higher computational cost. The use of electrostatic embedding can significantly reduce this cost by representing a portion of the simulated system in terms of highly localised charge distributions. These classical charge distributions are electrostatically coupled with the quantum system and represent the effect of the environment in which the quantum system is embedded. In this paper we describe and evaluate such an embedding scheme in which the polarisation of the electronic density by the embedding charges occurs self-consistently during the calculation of the density. We have implemented this scheme in a linear-scaling DFT program as our aim is to treat with DFT entire biomolecules (such as proteins) and large portions of the solvent. We test this approach in the calculation of interaction energies of ligands with biomolecules and solvent and investigate under what conditions these can be obtained with the same level of accuracy as when the entire system is described by DFT, for a variety of neutral and charged species.

  17. Beginning of the new solar cycle (cycle 24) in the large-scale open solar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2008-06-01

    It is proposed to determined minimums of the 11-year solar cycles based on a minimal flux of the large-scale open solar magnetic field. The minimal fluxes before the finished cycle 23 (Carrington rotation CR 1904) and the started cycle 24 (CR 2054, April 2007) were equal to 1.8 × 1022 and 1.2 × 1022 μs, respectively. The long-term tendency toward an approach to a deep minimum of solar activity is confirmed. On the assumption that magnetic flux variations from minimums to maximums are proportional to each other, the anticipated value of the maximal Wolf number during cycle 24 is estimated as W max = 80.

  18. Explaining recurring maser flares in the ISM through large-scale entangled quantum mechanical states

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Fereshteh; Houde, Martin

    2017-01-01

    We apply Dicke’s theory of superradiance (introduced in 1954) to the 6.7-GHz methanol and 22-GHz water spectral lines, often detected in molecular clouds as signposts for the early stages of the star formation process. We suggest that superradiance, characterized by burst-like features taking place over a wide range of time scales, may provide a natural explanation for the recent observations of periodic and seemingly alternating methanol and water maser flares in G107.298+5.639. Although these observations would be very difficult to explain within the context of maser theory, we show that these flares may result from simultaneously initiated 6.7-GHz methanol and 22-GHz water superradiant bursts operating on different time scales, thus providing a natural mechanism for their observed durations and time ordering. The evidence of superradiance in this source further suggests the existence of entangled quantum mechanical states, involving a very large number of molecules, over distances of up to a few kilometers in the interstellar medium. PMID:28378015

  19. Explaining recurring maser flares in the ISM through large-scale entangled quantum mechanical states.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Fereshteh; Houde, Martin

    2017-03-01

    We apply Dicke's theory of superradiance (introduced in 1954) to the 6.7-GHz methanol and 22-GHz water spectral lines, often detected in molecular clouds as signposts for the early stages of the star formation process. We suggest that superradiance, characterized by burst-like features taking place over a wide range of time scales, may provide a natural explanation for the recent observations of periodic and seemingly alternating methanol and water maser flares in G107.298+5.639. Although these observations would be very difficult to explain within the context of maser theory, we show that these flares may result from simultaneously initiated 6.7-GHz methanol and 22-GHz water superradiant bursts operating on different time scales, thus providing a natural mechanism for their observed durations and time ordering. The evidence of superradiance in this source further suggests the existence of entangled quantum mechanical states, involving a very large number of molecules, over distances of up to a few kilometers in the interstellar medium.

  20. CO2 biofixation and carbonic anhydrase activity in Scenedesmus obliquus SA1 cultivated in large scale open system.

    PubMed

    Basu, Samarpita; Roy, Abhijit Sarma; Mohanty, Kaustubha; Ghoshal, Aloke K

    2014-07-01

    The present study deals with the large scale open system cultivation of the novel microalga: Scenedesmus obliquus SA1 (KC733762) previously isolated in our laboratory. SA1 strain was cultivated in open system at varying CO2 levels ranging from 0.03% to 35% (v/v) and subsequently the carbonic anhydrase activity (CA) and the biochemical properties were monitored. Maximum biomass concentration (1.39 ± 0.023 g L(-1)), CO2 fixation rate (97.65 ± 1.03 mg L(-1)d(-1)) and total CA activity (166.86 ± 3.30 E.U./mg chla) were obtained at 35% CO2. CA inhibitors: acetazolamide and ethoxyzolamide inhibited the external and internal enzyme activity in SA1. High CO2 levels were favorable for the accumulation of lipids and chlorophyll. The present results suggested that SA1 possessed high CO2 tolerance and high carbohydrate, lipid and chlorophyll content when cultivated in open system thus being suitable for CO2 mitigation in outdoor ponds and subsequent generation of value added products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: 1+1d conformal field theories as natural languages for asymptotically large-scale quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedan, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    An abstract argument is offered that the ideal physical systems for asymptotically large-scale quantum computers are near-critical quantum circuits, critical in the bulk, whose bulk universality classes are described by 1+1d conformal field theories. One in particular -- the Monster conformal field theory -- is especially ideal, because all of its bulk couplings are irrelevant.

  2. One-Pot Large-Scale Synthesis of Carbon Quantum Dots: Efficient Cathode Interlayers for Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuzhao; Lin, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenlang; Ou, Jiemei; Yuan, Zhongke; Xie, Fangyan; Hong, Wei; Yu, Dingshan; Ma, Yuguang; Chi, Zhenguo; Chen, Xudong

    2017-05-03

    Cathode interlayers (CILs) with low-cost, low-toxicity, and excellent cathode modification ability are necessary for the large-scale industrialization of polymer solar cells (PSCs). In this contribution, we demonstrated one-pot synthesized carbon quantum dots (C-dots) with high production to serve as efficient CIL for inverted PSCs. The C-dots were synthesized by a facile, economical microwave pyrolysis in a household microwave oven within 7 min. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) studies showed that the C-dots possessed the ability to form a dipole at the interface, resulting in the decrease of the work function (WF) of cathode. External quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements and 2D excitation-emission topographical maps revealed that the C-dots down-shifted the high energy near-ultraviolet light to low energy visible light to generate more photocurrent. Remarkably improvement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) was attained by incorporation of C-dots as CIL. The PCE was boosted up from 4.14% to 8.13% with C-dots as CIL, which is one of the best efficiency for i-PSCs used carbon based materials as interlayers. These results demonstrated that C-dots can be a potential candidate for future low cost and large area PSCs producing.

  3. Partition-of-unity finite-element method for large scale quantum molecular dynamics on massively parallel computational platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pask, J E; Sukumar, N; Guney, M; Hu, W

    2011-02-28

    Over the course of the past two decades, quantum mechanical calculations have emerged as a key component of modern materials research. However, the solution of the required quantum mechanical equations is a formidable task and this has severely limited the range of materials systems which can be investigated by such accurate, quantum mechanical means. The current state of the art for large-scale quantum simulations is the planewave (PW) method, as implemented in now ubiquitous VASP, ABINIT, and QBox codes, among many others. However, since the PW method uses a global Fourier basis, with strictly uniform resolution at all points in space, and in which every basis function overlaps every other at every point, it suffers from substantial inefficiencies in calculations involving atoms with localized states, such as first-row and transition-metal atoms, and requires substantial nonlocal communications in parallel implementations, placing critical limits on scalability. In recent years, real-space methods such as finite-differences (FD) and finite-elements (FE) have been developed to address these deficiencies by reformulating the required quantum mechanical equations in a strictly local representation. However, while addressing both resolution and parallel-communications problems, such local real-space approaches have been plagued by one key disadvantage relative to planewaves: excessive degrees of freedom (grid points, basis functions) needed to achieve the required accuracies. And so, despite critical limitations, the PW method remains the standard today. In this work, we show for the first time that this key remaining disadvantage of real-space methods can in fact be overcome: by building known atomic physics into the solution process using modern partition-of-unity (PU) techniques in finite element analysis. Indeed, our results show order-of-magnitude reductions in basis size relative to state-of-the-art planewave based methods. The method developed here is

  4. Large-scale synthesis of N-doped carbon quantum dots and their phosphorescence properties in a polyurethane matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jing; Zou, Rui; Zhang, Jie; Li, Wang; Zhang, Liqun; Yue, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    An easy, large-scale synthesis of N-doped carbon quantum dots (CQDs) was developed by using isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) as a single carbon source under microwave irradiation. The yield of raw N-doped CQDs was about 83%, which is suitable for industrial-scale production. A detailed formation mechanism for N-doped CQDs involving self-polymerization and condensation of IPDI was demonstrated. Moreover, the obtained N-doped CQDs can be homogeneously dispersed in various organic monomers and do not need toxic organic solvents as dispersing agents. This advantage expands the range of applications of CQDs in composites. The N-doped CQDs dispersed in polyurethane (PU) matrixes emit not only fluorescence but also phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence at room temperature upon excitation with ultraviolet (UV) light. Furthermore, the phosphorescence of CQD/PU composites is sensitive to oxygen and therefore, the obtained-CQDs could be exploited in the development of novel oxygen sensors.An easy, large-scale synthesis of N-doped carbon quantum dots (CQDs) was developed by using isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) as a single carbon source under microwave irradiation. The yield of raw N-doped CQDs was about 83%, which is suitable for industrial-scale production. A detailed formation mechanism for N-doped CQDs involving self-polymerization and condensation of IPDI was demonstrated. Moreover, the obtained N-doped CQDs can be homogeneously dispersed in various organic monomers and do not need toxic organic solvents as dispersing agents. This advantage expands the range of applications of CQDs in composites. The N-doped CQDs dispersed in polyurethane (PU) matrixes emit not only fluorescence but also phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence at room temperature upon excitation with ultraviolet (UV) light. Furthermore, the phosphorescence of CQD/PU composites is sensitive to oxygen and therefore, the obtained-CQDs could be exploited in the development of novel oxygen sensors. Electronic

  5. Using CyberShake Workflows to Manage Big Seismic Hazard Data on Large-Scale Open-Science HPC Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, S.; Maechling, P. J.; Juve, G.; Vahi, K.; Deelman, E.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The CyberShake computational platform, developed by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), is an integrated collection of scientific software and middleware that performs 3D physics-based probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Southern California. CyberShake integrates large-scale and high-throughput research codes to produce probabilistic seismic hazard curves for individual locations of interest and hazard maps for an entire region. A recent CyberShake calculation produced about 500,000 two-component seismograms for each of 336 locations, resulting in over 300 million synthetic seismograms in a Los Angeles-area probabilistic seismic hazard model. CyberShake calculations require a series of scientific software programs. Early computational stages produce data used as inputs by later stages, so we describe CyberShake calculations using a workflow definition language. Scientific workflow tools automate and manage the input and output data and enable remote job execution on large-scale HPC systems. To satisfy the requests of broad impact users of CyberShake data, such as seismologists, utility companies, and building code engineers, we successfully completed CyberShake Study 15.4 in April and May 2015, calculating a 1 Hz urban seismic hazard map for Los Angeles. We distributed the calculation between the NSF Track 1 system NCSA Blue Waters, the DOE Leadership-class system OLCF Titan, and USC's Center for High Performance Computing. This study ran for over 5 weeks, burning about 1.1 million node-hours and producing over half a petabyte of data. The CyberShake Study 15.4 results doubled the maximum simulated seismic frequency from 0.5 Hz to 1.0 Hz as compared to previous studies, representing a factor of 16 increase in computational complexity. We will describe how our workflow tools supported splitting the calculation across multiple systems. We will explain how we modified CyberShake software components, including GPU implementations and

  6. Open Quantum Walks and Dissipative Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco

    2012-02-01

    Open Quantum Walks (OQWs) have been recently introduced as quantum Markov chains on graphs [S. Attal, F. Petruccione, C. Sabot, and I. Sinayskiy, E-print: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00581553/fr/]. The formulation of the OQWs is exclusively based upon the non-unitary dynamics induced by the environment. It will be shown that OQWs are a very useful tool for the formulation of dissipative quantum computing and quantum state preparation. In particular, it will be shown how to implement single qubit gates and the CNOT gate as OQWs on fully connected graphs. Also, OQWS make possible the dissipative quantum state preparation of arbitrary single qubit states and of all two-qubit Bell states. Finally, it will be shown how to reformulate efficiently a discrete time version of dissipative quantum computing in the language of OQWs.

  7. From C60 to Infinity: Large-Scale Quantum Chemistry Calculations of the Heats of Formation of Higher Fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bun; Kawashima, Yukio; Katouda, Michio; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2016-02-03

    We have carried out large-scale computational quantum chemistry calculations on the K computer to obtain heats of formation for C60 and some higher fullerenes with the DSD-PBE-PBE/cc-pVQZ double-hybrid density functional theory method. Our best estimated values are 2520.0 ± 20.7 (C60), 2683.4 ± 17.7 (C70), 2862.0 ± 18.5 (C76), 2878.8 ± 13.3 (C78), 2946.4 ± 14.5 (C84), 3067.3 ± 15.4 (C90), 3156.6 ± 16.2 (C96), 3967.7 ± 33.4 (C180), 4364 (C240) and 5415 (C320) kJ mol(-1). In our assessment, we also find that the B3-PW91-D3BJ and BMK-D3(BJ) functionals perform reasonably well. Using the convergence behavior for the calculated per-atom heats of formation, we obtained the formula ΔfH per carbon = 722n(-0.72) + 5.2 kJ mol(-1) (n = the number of carbon atoms), which enables an estimation of ΔfH for higher fullerenes more generally. A slow convergence to the graphene limit is observed, which we attribute to the relatively small proportion of fullerene carbons that are in "low-strain" regions. We further propose that it would take tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of carbons for a fullerene to roughly approach the limit. Such a distinction may be a contributing factor to the discrete properties between the two types of nanomaterials. During the course of our study, we also observe a fairly reliable means for the theoretical calculation of heats of formation for medium-sized fullerenes. This involves the use of isodesmic-type reactions with fullerenes of similar sizes to provide a good balance of the chemistry and to minimize the use of accompanying species.

  8. Inducing a health-promoting change process within an organization: the effectiveness of a large-scale intervention on social capital, openness, and autonomous motivation toward health.

    PubMed

    van Scheppingen, Arjella R; de Vroome, Ernest M M; Ten Have, Kristin C J M; Bos, Ellen H; Zwetsloot, Gerard I J M; van Mechelen, W

    2014-11-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an organizational large-scale intervention applied to induce a health-promoting organizational change process. A quasi-experimental, "as-treated" design was used. Regression analyses on data of employees of a Dutch dairy company (n = 324) were used to examine the effects on bonding social capital, openness, and autonomous motivation toward health and on employees' lifestyle, health, vitality, and sustainable employability. Also, the sensitivity of the intervention components was examined. Intervention effects were found for bonding social capital, openness toward health, smoking, healthy eating, and sustainable employability. The effects were primarily attributable to the intervention's dialogue component. The change process initiated by the large-scale intervention contributed to a social climate in the workplace that promoted health and ownership toward health. The study confirms the relevance of collective change processes for health promotion.

  9. GATECloud.net: a platform for large-scale, open-source text processing on the cloud.

    PubMed

    Tablan, Valentin; Roberts, Ian; Cunningham, Hamish; Bontcheva, Kalina

    2013-01-28

    Cloud computing is increasingly being regarded as a key enabler of the 'democratization of science', because on-demand, highly scalable cloud computing facilities enable researchers anywhere to carry out data-intensive experiments. In the context of natural language processing (NLP), algorithms tend to be complex, which makes their parallelization and deployment on cloud platforms a non-trivial task. This study presents a new, unique, cloud-based platform for large-scale NLP research--GATECloud. net. It enables researchers to carry out data-intensive NLP experiments by harnessing the vast, on-demand compute power of the Amazon cloud. Important infrastructural issues are dealt with by the platform, completely transparently for the researcher: load balancing, efficient data upload and storage, deployment on the virtual machines, security and fault tolerance. We also include a cost-benefit analysis and usage evaluation.

  10. Cascading Effects of Canopy Opening and Debris Deposition from a Large-Scale Hurricane Experiment in a Tropical Rain Forest

    Treesearch

    Aaron B. Shiels; Grizelle Gonzalez; D. Jean Lodge; Michael R Willig; Jess K. Zimmerman

    2015-01-01

    Intense hurricanes disturb many tropical forests, but the key mechanisms driving post-hurricane forest changes are not fully understood. In Puerto Rico, we used a replicated factorial experiment to determine the mechanisms of forest change associated with canopy openness and organic matter (debris) addition. Cascading effects from canopy openness accounted for...

  11. Quantum Entanglement in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, Aurelian

    2008-01-24

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, the master equation for two independent harmonic oscillators interacting with an environment is solved in the asymptotic long-time regime. Using the Peres-Simon necessary and sufficient condition for separability of two-mode Gaussian states, we show that the two non-interacting systems become asymptotically entangled for certain environments, so that in the long-time regime they manifest non-local quantum correlations. We calculate also the logarithmic negativity characterizing the degree of entanglement of the asymptotic state.

  12. Three-Dimensional Architecture at Chip Level for Large-Scale-Integration of Superconducting Quantum Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göppl, Martin; Kurpiers, Philipp; Wallraff, Andreas

    We propose a novel way to realize three-dimensional circuit QED systems at chip level. System components such as qubits, transmission lines, capacitors, inductors or cross-overs can be implemented as suspended, electromagnetically shielded and optionally, as hermetically sealed structures. Compared to known state-of-the-art devices, volumes of dielectrics penetrated by electromagnetic fields can be drastically reduced. Our intention is to harness process technologies for very-large-scale-integration, reliably applied and improved over decades in micro-sensor- and semiconductor industry, for the realization of highly integrated circuit QED systems. Process capabilities are demonstrated by fabricating first exploratory devices using the back-end-of-line part of a commercial 180 nm CMOS foundry process in conjunction with HF vapor phase release etching.

  13. CHASTE: incorporating a novel multi-scale spatial and temporal algorithm into a large-scale open source library.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Miguel O; Bordas, Rafel; Pathmanathan, Pras; Pitt-Francis, Joe; Cooper, Jonathan; Garny, Alan; Gavaghan, David J; Rodriguez, Blanca; Southern, James A; Whiteley, Jonathan P

    2009-05-28

    Recent work has described the software engineering and computational infrastructure that has been set up as part of the Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment (CHASTE) project. CHASTE is an open source software package that currently has heart and cancer modelling functionality. This software has been written using a programming paradigm imported from the commercial sector and has resulted in a code that has been subject to a far more rigorous testing procedure than that is usual in this field. In this paper, we explain how new functionality may be incorporated into CHASTE. Whiteley has developed a numerical algorithm for solving the bidomain equations that uses the multi-scale (MS) nature of the physiology modelled to enhance computational efficiency. Using a simple geometry in two dimensions and a purpose-built code, this algorithm was reported to give an increase in computational efficiency of more than two orders of magnitude. In this paper, we begin by reviewing numerical methods currently in use for solving the bidomain equations, explaining how these methods may be developed to use the MS algorithm discussed above. We then demonstrate the use of this algorithm within the CHASTE framework for solving the monodomain and bidomain equations in a three-dimensional realistic heart geometry. Finally, we discuss how CHASTE may be developed to include new physiological functionality--such as modelling a beating heart and fluid flow in the heart--and how new algorithms aimed at increasing the efficiency of the code may be incorporated.

  14. Directionality of large-scale resting-state brain networks during eyes open and eyes closed conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Delong; Liang, Bishan; Wu, Xia; Wang, Zengjian; Xu, Pengfei; Chang, Song; Liu, Bo; Liu, Ming; Huang, Ruiwang

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined directional connections in the brain among resting-state networks (RSNs) when the participant had their eyes open (EO) or had their eyes closed (EC). The resting-state fMRI data were collected from 20 healthy participants (9 males, 20.17 ± 2.74 years) under the EO and EC states. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to identify the separated RSNs (i.e., the primary/high-level visual, primary sensory-motor, ventral motor, salience/dorsal attention, and anterior/posterior default-mode networks), and the Gaussian Bayesian network (BN) learning approach was then used to explore the conditional dependencies among these RSNs. The network-to-network directional connections related to EO and EC were depicted, and a support vector machine (SVM) was further employed to identify the directional connection patterns that could effectively discriminate between the two states. The results indicated that the connections among RSNs are directionally connected within a BN during the EO and EC states. The directional connections from the salience network (SN) to the anterior/posterior default-mode networks and the high-level to primary-level visual network were the obvious characteristics of both the EO and EC resting-state BNs. Of the directional connections in BN, the directional connections of the salience and dorsal attention network (DAN) were observed to be discriminative between the EO and EC states. In particular, we noted that the properties of the salience and DANs were in opposite directions. Overall, the present study described the directional connections of RSNs using a BN learning approach during the EO and EC states, and the results suggested that the directionality of the attention systems (i.e., mainly for the salience and the DAN) in resting state might have important roles in switching between the EO and EC conditions. PMID:25745394

  15. Efficient simulation of open quantum system in duality quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-11-01

    Practical quantum systems are open systems due to interactions with their environment. Understanding the evolution of open systems dynamics is important for quantum noise processes , designing quantum error correcting codes, and performing simulations of open quantum systems. Here we proposed an efficient quantum algorithm for simulating the evolution of an open quantum system on a duality quantum computer. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality algorithm, the time evolution of open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally realized in duality quantum computing. Compared to the Lloyd's quantum algorithm [Science.273, 1073(1996)] , the dependence on the dimension of the open quantum system in our algorithm is decreased. Moreover, our algorithm uses a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, exponentially improving the performance on the precision compared with existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations.

  16. Hypothesis testing with open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-01-30

    Using a quantum circuit model we derive the maximal ability to distinguish which of several candidate Hamiltonians describe an open quantum system. This theory, in particular, provides the maximum information retrievable from continuous quantum measurement records, available when a quantum system is perturbatively coupled to a broadband quantized environment.

  17. Quasiequilibria in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Jamie D.

    2010-03-15

    In this work, the steady-state or quasiequilibrium resulting from periodically modulating the Liouvillian of an open quantum system, L-circumflex-circumflex(t), is investigated. It is shown that differences between the quasiequilibrium and the instantaneous equilibrium occur due to nonadiabatic contributions from the gauge field connecting the instantaneous eigenstates of L-circumflex-circumflex(t) to a fixed basis. These nonadiabatic contributions are shown to result in an additional rotation and/or depolarization for a single spin-1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field and to affect the thermal mixing of two coupled spins interacting with a time-dependent magnetic field.

  18. Rapid Conversion from Carbohydrates to Large-Scale Carbon Quantum Dots for All-Weather Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qunwei; Zhu, Wanlu; He, Benlin; Yang, Peizhi

    2017-02-28

    A great challenge for state-of-the-art solar cells is to generate electricity in all weather. We present here the rapid conversion of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) from carbohydrates (including glucose, maltol, sucrose) for an all-weather solar cell, which comprises a CQD-sensitized mesoscopic titanium dioxide/long-persistence phosphor (m-TiO2/LPP) photoanode, a I(-)/I3(-) redox electrolyte, and a platinum counter electrode. In virtue of the light storing and luminescent behaviors of LPP phosphors, the generated all-weather solar cells can not only convert sunlight into electricity on sunny days but persistently realize electricity output in all dark-light conditions. The maximized photoelectric conversion efficiency is as high as 15.1% for so-called all-weather CQD solar cells in dark conditions.

  19. Distributed chemical computing using ChemStar: an open source java remote method invocation architecture applied to large scale molecular data from PubChem.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, M; Krishnan, S; Pandey, Anil Kumar; Bender, Andreas; Tropsha, Alexander

    2008-04-01

    We present the application of a Java remote method invocation (RMI) based open source architecture to distributed chemical computing. This architecture was previously employed for distributed data harvesting of chemical information from the Internet via the Google application programming interface (API; ChemXtreme). Due to its open source character and its flexibility, the underlying server/client framework can be quickly adopted to virtually every computational task that can be parallelized. Here, we present the server/client communication framework as well as an application to distributed computing of chemical properties on a large scale (currently the size of PubChem; about 18 million compounds), using both the Marvin toolkit as well as the open source JOELib package. As an application, for this set of compounds, the agreement of log P and TPSA between the packages was compared. Outliers were found to be mostly non-druglike compounds and differences could usually be explained by differences in the underlying algorithms. ChemStar is the first open source distributed chemical computing environment built on Java RMI, which is also easily adaptable to user demands due to its "plug-in architecture". The complete source codes as well as calculated properties along with links to PubChem resources are available on the Internet via a graphical user interface at http://moltable.ncl.res.in/chemstar/.

  20. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L. |; Rickert, M. |

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A new technology of CO2 supplementary for microalgae cultivation on large scale - A spraying absorption tower coupled with an outdoor open runway pond.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Dan; Li, Wei; Shi, Yun-Hai; Li, Yuan-Guang; Huang, Jian-Ke; Li, Hong-Xia

    2016-06-01

    An effective CO2 supply system of a spraying absorption tower combined with an outdoor ORWP (open raceway pond) for microalgae photoautotrophic cultivation is developed in this paper. The microalgae yield, productivity and CO2 fixation efficiency were investigated, and compared with those of bubbling method. The maximum yield and productivity of biomass were achieved 0.927gL(-1) and 0.114gL(-1)day(-1), respectively. The fixation efficiency of CO2 by microalgae with the spraying tower reached 50%, whereas only 11.17% for bubbling method. Pure CO2 can be used in the spraying absorption tower, and the flow rate was only about one third of the bubbling cultivation. It shows that this new method of quantifiable control CO2 supply can meet the requirements of the growth of microalgae cultivation on large-scale.

  2. Large scale infrared imaging of tissue micro arrays (TMAs) using a tunable Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) based microscope.

    PubMed

    Bassan, Paul; Weida, Miles J; Rowlette, Jeremy; Gardner, Peter

    2014-08-21

    Chemical imaging in the field of vibrational spectroscopy is developing into a promising tool to complement digital histopathology. Applications include screening of biopsy tissue via automated recognition of tissue/cell type and disease state based on the chemical information from the spectrum. For integration into clinical practice, data acquisition needs to be speeded up to implement a rack based system where specimens are rapidly imaged to compete with current visible scanners where 100's of slides can be scanned overnight. Current Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging with focal plane array (FPA) detectors are currently the state-of-the-art instrumentation for infrared absorption chemical imaging, however recent development in broadly tunable lasers in the mid-IR range is considered the most promising potential candidate for next generation microscopes. In this paper we test a prototype quantum cascade laser (QCL) based spectral imaging microscope with a focus on discrete frequency chemical imaging. We demonstrate how a protein chemical image of the amide I band (1655 cm(-1)) of a 2 × 2.4 cm(2) breast tissue microarray (TMA) containing over 200 cores can be measured in 9 min. This result indicates that applications requiring chemical images from a few key wavelengths would be ideally served by laser-based microscopes.

  3. Resonances in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleuch, Hichem; Rotter, Ingrid

    2017-02-01

    The Hamilton operator of an open quantum system is non-Hermitian. Its eigenvalues are generally complex and provide not only the energies but also the lifetimes of the states of the system. The states may couple via the common environment of scattering wave functions into which the system is embedded. This causes an external mixing (EM) of the states. Mathematically, EM is related to the existence of singular (the so-called exceptional) points. The eigenfunctions of a non-Hermitian operator are biorthogonal, in contrast to the orthogonal eigenfunctions of a Hermitian operator. A quantitative measure for the ratio between biorthogonality and orthogonality is the phase rigidity of the wave functions. At and near an exceptional point (EP), the phase rigidity takes its minimum value. The lifetimes of two nearby eigenstates of a quantum system bifurcate under the influence of an EP. At the parameter value of maximum width bifurcation, the phase rigidity approaches the value one, meaning that the two eigenfunctions become orthogonal. However, the eigenfunctions are externally mixed at this parameter value. The S matrix and therewith the cross section do contain, in the one-channel case, almost no information on the EM of the states. The situation is completely different in the case with two (or more) channels where the resonance structure is strongly influenced by the EM of the states and interesting features of non-Hermitian quantum physics are revealed. We provide numerical results for two and three nearby eigenstates of a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator that are embedded in one common continuum and are influenced by two adjoining EPs. The results are discussed. They are of interest for an experimental test of the non-Hermitian quantum physics as well as for applications.

  4. Large-scale atomistic and quantum-mechanical simulations of a Nafion membrane: Morphology, proton solvation and charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Komarov, Pavel V; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Atomistic and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the structure formation in a hydrated Nafion membrane and the solvation and transport of protons in the water channel of the membrane. For the water/Nafion systems containing more than 4 million atoms, it is found that the observed microphase-segregated morphology can be classified as bicontinuous: both majority (hydrophobic) and minority (hydrophilic) subphases are 3D continuous and organized in an irregular ordered pattern, which is largely similar to that known for a bicontinuous double-diamond structure. The characteristic size of the connected hydrophilic channels is about 25–50 Å, depending on the water content. A thermodynamic decomposition of the potential of mean force and the calculated spectral densities of the hindered translational motions of cations reveal that ion association observed with decreasing temperature is largely an entropic effect related to the loss of low-frequency modes. Based on the results from the atomistic simulation of the morphology of Nafion, we developed a realistic model of ion-conducting hydrophilic channel within the Nafion membrane and studied it with quantum molecular dynamics. The extensive 120 ps-long density functional theory (DFT)-based simulations of charge migration in the 1200-atom model of the nanochannel consisting of Nafion chains and water molecules allowed us to observe the bimodality of the van Hove autocorrelation function, which provides the direct evidence of the Grotthuss bond-exchange (hopping) mechanism as a significant contributor to the proton conductivity. PMID:24205452

  5. Quantum Mechanical Calculation of Noncovalent Interactions: A Large-Scale Evaluation of PMx, DFT, and SAPT Approaches

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of noncovalent interactions are uniquely useful as tools to test and improve molecular mechanics force fields and to model the forces involved in biomolecular binding and folding. Because the more computationally tractable QM methods necessarily include approximations, which risk degrading accuracy, it is essential to evaluate such methods by comparison with high-level reference calculations. Here, we use the extensive Benchmark Energy and Geometry Database (BEGDB) of CCSD(T)/CBS reference results to evaluate the accuracy and speed of widely used QM methods for over 1200 chemically varied gas-phase dimers. In particular, we study the semiempirical PM6 and PM7 methods; density functional theory (DFT) approaches B3LYP, B97-D, M062X, and ωB97X-D; and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) approach. For the PM6 and DFT methods, we also examine the effects of post hoc corrections for hydrogen bonding (PM6-DH+, PM6-DH2), halogen atoms (PM6-DH2X), and dispersion (DFT-D3 with zero and Becke–Johnson damping). Several orders of the SAPT expansion are also compared, ranging from SAPT0 up to SAPT2+3, where computationally feasible. We find that all DFT methods with dispersion corrections, as well as SAPT at orders above SAPT2, consistently provide dimer interaction energies within 1.0 kcal/mol RMSE across all systems. We also show that a linear scaling of the perturbative energy terms provided by the fast SAPT0 method yields similar high accuracy, at particularly low computational cost. The energies of all the dimer systems from the various QM approaches are included in the Supporting Information, as are the full SAPT2+(3) energy decomposition for a subset of over 1000 systems. The latter can be used to guide the parametrization of molecular mechanics force fields on a term-by-term basis. PMID:24803867

  6. Perturbative approach to Markovian open quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Andy C. Y.; Petruccione, F.; Koch, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The exact treatment of Markovian open quantum systems, when based on numerical diagonalization of the Liouville super-operator or averaging over quantum trajectories, is severely limited by Hilbert space size. Perturbation theory, standard in the investigation of closed quantum systems, has remained much less developed for open quantum systems where a direct application to the Lindblad master equation is desirable. We present such a perturbative treatment which will be useful for an analytical understanding of open quantum systems and for numerical calculation of system observables which would otherwise be impractical. PMID:24811607

  7. Perturbative approach to Markovian open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Andy C Y; Petruccione, F; Koch, Jens

    2014-05-08

    The exact treatment of Markovian open quantum systems, when based on numerical diagonalization of the Liouville super-operator or averaging over quantum trajectories, is severely limited by Hilbert space size. Perturbation theory, standard in the investigation of closed quantum systems, has remained much less developed for open quantum systems where a direct application to the Lindblad master equation is desirable. We present such a perturbative treatment which will be useful for an analytical understanding of open quantum systems and for numerical calculation of system observables which would otherwise be impractical.

  8. Duality quantum algorithm efficiently simulates open quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Ruan, Dong; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Because of inevitable coupling with the environment, nearly all practical quantum systems are open system, where the evolution is not necessarily unitary. In this paper, we propose a duality quantum algorithm for simulating Hamiltonian evolution of an open quantum system. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality quantum algorithm, the time evolution of the open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally implemented in duality quantum computer. This duality quantum algorithm has two distinct advantages compared to existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations. Firstly, the query complexity of the algorithm is O(d3) in contrast to O(d4) in existing unitary simulation algorithm, where d is the dimension of the open quantum system. Secondly, By using a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, this duality quantum algorithm provides an exponential improvement in precision compared with previous unitary simulation algorithm. PMID:27464855

  9. Duality quantum algorithm efficiently simulates open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Ruan, Dong; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-07-01

    Because of inevitable coupling with the environment, nearly all practical quantum systems are open system, where the evolution is not necessarily unitary. In this paper, we propose a duality quantum algorithm for simulating Hamiltonian evolution of an open quantum system. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality quantum algorithm, the time evolution of the open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally implemented in duality quantum computer. This duality quantum algorithm has two distinct advantages compared to existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations. Firstly, the query complexity of the algorithm is O(d3) in contrast to O(d4) in existing unitary simulation algorithm, where d is the dimension of the open quantum system. Secondly, By using a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, this duality quantum algorithm provides an exponential improvement in precision compared with previous unitary simulation algorithm.

  10. Duality quantum algorithm efficiently simulates open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Ruan, Dong; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-07-28

    Because of inevitable coupling with the environment, nearly all practical quantum systems are open system, where the evolution is not necessarily unitary. In this paper, we propose a duality quantum algorithm for simulating Hamiltonian evolution of an open quantum system. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality quantum algorithm, the time evolution of the open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally implemented in duality quantum computer. This duality quantum algorithm has two distinct advantages compared to existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations. Firstly, the query complexity of the algorithm is O(d(3)) in contrast to O(d(4)) in existing unitary simulation algorithm, where d is the dimension of the open quantum system. Secondly, By using a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, this duality quantum algorithm provides an exponential improvement in precision compared with previous unitary simulation algorithm.

  11. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  12. Mechanism for quantum speedup in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Bin; Yang, W. L.; An, Jun-Hong; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2016-02-01

    The quantum speed limit (QSL) time for open system characterizes the most efficient response of the system to the environmental influences. Previous results showed that the non-Markovianity governs the quantum speedup. Via studying the dynamics of a dissipative two-level system, we reveal that the non-Markovian effect is only the dynamical way of the quantum speedup, while the formation of the system-environment bound states is the essential reason for the quantum speedup. Our attribution of the quantum speedup to the energy-spectrum character can supply another vital path for experiments when the quantum speedup shows up without any dynamical calculations. The potential experimental observation of our quantum speedup mechanism in the circuit QED system is discussed. Our results may be of both theoretical and experimental interest in exploring the ultimate QSL in realistic environments, and may open new perspectives for devising active quantum speedup devices.

  13. State estimation in large-scale open channel networks using sequential Monte Carlo methods: Optimal sampling importance resampling and implicit particle filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Mohammad; Barrau, Axel; Bayen, Alexandre M.

    2013-06-01

    This article investigates the performance of Monte Carlo-based estimation methods for estimation of flow state in large-scale open channel networks. After constructing a state space model of the flow based on the Saint-Venant equations, we implement the optimal sampling importance resampling filter to perform state estimation in a case in which measurements are available at every time step. Considering a case in which measurements become available intermittently, a random-map implementation of the implicit particle filter is applied to estimate the state trajectory in the interval between the measurements. Finally, some heuristics are proposed, which are shown to improve the estimation results and lower the computational cost. In the first heuristics, considering the case in which measurements are available at every time step, we apply the implicit particle filter over time intervals of a desired size while incorporating all the available measurements over the corresponding time interval. As a second heuristic method, we introduce a maximum a posteriori (MAP) method, which does not require sampling. It will be seen, through implementation, that the MAP method provides more accurate results in the case of our application while having a smaller computational cost. All estimation methods are tested on a network of 19 tidally forced subchannels and 1 reservoir, Clifton Court Forebay, in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California, and numerical results are presented.

  14. Large-scale adverse effects related to treatment evidence standardization (LAERTES): an open scalable system for linking pharmacovigilance evidence sources with clinical data.

    PubMed

    2017-03-07

    Integrating multiple sources of pharmacovigilance evidence has the potential to advance the science of safety signal detection and evaluation. In this regard, there is a need for more research on how to integrate multiple disparate evidence sources while making the evidence computable from a knowledge representation perspective (i.e., semantic enrichment). Existing frameworks suggest well-promising outcomes for such integration but employ a rather limited number of sources. In particular, none have been specifically designed to support both regulatory and clinical use cases, nor have any been designed to add new resources and use cases through an open architecture. This paper discusses the architecture and functionality of a system called Large-scale Adverse Effects Related to Treatment Evidence Standardization (LAERTES) that aims to address these shortcomings. LAERTES provides a standardized, open, and scalable architecture for linking evidence sources relevant to the association of drugs with health outcomes of interest (HOIs). Standard terminologies are used to represent different entities. For example, drugs and HOIs are represented in RxNorm and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine -- Clinical Terms respectively. At the time of this writing, six evidence sources have been loaded into the LAERTES evidence base and are accessible through prototype evidence exploration user interface and a set of Web application programming interface services. This system operates within a larger software stack provided by the Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics clinical research framework, including the relational Common Data Model for observational patient data created by the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership. Elements of the Linked Data paradigm facilitate the systematic and scalable integration of relevant evidence sources. The prototype LAERTES system provides useful functionality while creating opportunities for further research. Future work will

  15. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  16. Large-Scale Quantum Many-Body Perturbation on Spin and Charge Separation in the Excited States of the Synthesized Donor-Acceptor Hybrid PBI-Macrocycle Complex.

    PubMed

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2017-03-17

    The reliable calculation of the excited states of charge-transfer (CT) compounds poses a major challenge to the ab initio community because the frequently employed method, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), massively relies on the underlying density functional, resulting in heavily Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange-dependent excited-state energies. By applying the highly sophisticated many-body perturbation approach, we address the encountered unreliabilities and inconsistencies of not optimally tuned (standard) TD-DFT regarding photo-excited CT phenomena, and present results concerning accurate vertical transition energies and the correct energetic ordering of the CT and the first visible singlet state of a recently synthesized thermodynamically stable large hybrid perylene bisimide-macrocycle complex. This is a large-scale application of the quantum many-body perturbation approach to a chemically relevant CT system, demonstrating the system-size independence of the quality of the many-body-based excitation energies. Furthermore, an optimal tuning of the ωB97X hybrid functional can well reproduce the many-body results, making TD-DFT a suitable choice but at the expense of introducing a range-separation parameter, which needs to be optimally tuned. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Successive and large-scale synthesis of InP/ZnS quantum dots in a hybrid reactor and their application to white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungnam; Jeong, Sohee; Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Chang-Soo

    2012-02-01

    We report successive and large-scale synthesis of InP/ZnS core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) using a customized hybrid flow reactor, which is based on serial combination of a batch-type mixer and a flow-type furnace. InP cores and InP/ZnS core/shell QDs were successively synthesized in the hybrid reactor in a simple one-step process. In this reactor, the flow rate of the solutions was typically 1 ml min-1, 100 times larger than that of conventional microfluidic reactors. In order to synthesize high-quality InP/ZnS QDs, we controlled both the flow rate and the crystal growth temperature. Finally, we obtained high-quality InP/ZnS QDs in colors from bluish green to red, and we demonstrated that these core/shell QDs could be incorporated into white-light-emitting diode (LED) devices to improve color rendering performance.

  18. Large scale scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Deuflhard, P. ); Engquist, B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on large scale scientific computing. It includes: Initial value problems of ODE's and parabolic PDE's; Boundary value problems of ODE's and elliptic PDE's; Hyperbolic PDE's; Inverse problems; Optimization and optimal control problems; and Algorithm adaptation on supercomputers.

  19. Dynamics of the large-scale open solar magnetic field and its specific features in the zone of the main active longitudes in 2006-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of the absolute global values (Φ) of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) fluxes at an interval of one solar rotation in 2006-2012 has been studied based on the Wilcox Solar Observatory data and using the ISOPAK original package for modeling the solar magnetic field. The reference points and the duration of the final quasi-biennial interval in cycle 23 (January 2006-May 2007; 17 months) and the phases of the cycle 24 minimum (May 2007-November 2009; 30 months), growth (November 2009-May 2012; 30 months), and the beginning of the maximum (May 2012-January 2013) have been determined. It has been indicated that the absolute values (Φ) decreased sharply at the beginning of the minimum, growth, and the maximum phases to ˜(2, 1.25, 0.75) × 1022 Mx, respectively. During the entire minimum phase, LOSMF corotated super-quasi-rigidly westward in the direction of solar rotation; at the beginning of the growth phase, this field started corotating mostly eastward. The LOSMF polarity reversal in the current cycle 24 started in May-June 2012 (CR 2123-2124), when fields of southern polarity rushed from the Sun's southern hemisphere toward the north. The statement that the solar cycle is a continuous series of quasi-biennial LOSMF intervals is confirmed. In particular, the minimum and growth phases are characterized by opposite LOSMF rotation directions, i.e., super-quasi-rigid corotation (twisting) and detwisting, with identical duration at least in cycle 24.

  20. Quantum dynamics in open quantum-classical systems.

    PubMed

    Kapral, Raymond

    2015-02-25

    Often quantum systems are not isolated and interactions with their environments must be taken into account. In such open quantum systems these environmental interactions can lead to decoherence and dissipation, which have a marked influence on the properties of the quantum system. In many instances the environment is well-approximated by classical mechanics, so that one is led to consider the dynamics of open quantum-classical systems. Since a full quantum dynamical description of large many-body systems is not currently feasible, mixed quantum-classical methods can provide accurate and computationally tractable ways to follow the dynamics of both the system and its environment. This review focuses on quantum-classical Liouville dynamics, one of several quantum-classical descriptions, and discusses the problems that arise when one attempts to combine quantum and classical mechanics, coherence and decoherence in quantum-classical systems, nonadiabatic dynamics, surface-hopping and mean-field theories and their relation to quantum-classical Liouville dynamics, as well as methods for simulating the dynamics.

  1. Quantum computing Hyper Terahertz Facility opens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Chadha, Kulvinder

    2016-01-01

    A new facility has opened at the University of Surrey to use terahertz radiation for quantum computing. The Hyper Terahertz Facility (HTF) is a joint collaboration between the University of Surrey and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL).

  2. Generalized Open Quantum Walks on Apollonian Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Łukasz; Gawron, Piotr; Miszczak, Jarosław Adam; Sadowski, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the model of generalized open quantum walks on networks using the Transition Operation Matrices formalism. We focus our analysis on the mean first passage time and the average return time in Apollonian networks. These results differ significantly from a classical walk on these networks. We show a comparison of the classical and quantum behaviour of walks on these networks. PMID:26177452

  3. Quantum speed limits in open system dynamics.

    PubMed

    del Campo, A; Egusquiza, I L; Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2013-02-01

    Bounds to the speed of evolution of a quantum system are of fundamental interest in quantum metrology, quantum chemical dynamics, and quantum computation. We derive a time-energy uncertainty relation for open quantum systems undergoing a general, completely positive, and trace preserving evolution which provides a bound to the quantum speed limit. When the evolution is of the Lindblad form, the bound is analogous to the Mandelstam-Tamm relation which applies in the unitary case, with the role of the Hamiltonian being played by the adjoint of the generator of the dynamical semigroup. The utility of the new bound is exemplified in different scenarios, ranging from the estimation of the passage time to the determination of precision limits for quantum metrology in the presence of dephasing noise.

  4. Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Ran; Fan, Heng

    2015-06-23

    Quantum Zeno effect shows that frequent observations can slow down or even stop the unitary time evolution of an unstable quantum system. This effect can also be regarded as a physical consequence of the statistical indistinguishability of neighboring quantum states. The accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics under unitary time evolution can be quantitatively estimated by quantum Zeno time in terms of Fisher information. In this work, we investigate the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems by calculating noisy Fisher information when a trace preserving and completely positive map is assumed. We firstly study the consequences of non-Markovian noise on quantum Zeno effect and give the exact forms of the dissipative Fisher information and the quantum Zeno time. Then, for the operator-sum representation, an achievable upper bound of the quantum Zeno time is given with the help of the results in noisy quantum metrology. It is of significance that the noise reducing the accuracy in the entanglement-enhanced parameter estimation can conversely be favorable for the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics of entangled states.

  5. Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Ran; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Zeno effect shows that frequent observations can slow down or even stop the unitary time evolution of an unstable quantum system. This effect can also be regarded as a physical consequence of the statistical indistinguishability of neighboring quantum states. The accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics under unitary time evolution can be quantitatively estimated by quantum Zeno time in terms of Fisher information. In this work, we investigate the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems by calculating noisy Fisher information when a trace preserving and completely positive map is assumed. We firstly study the consequences of non-Markovian noise on quantum Zeno effect and give the exact forms of the dissipative Fisher information and the quantum Zeno time. Then, for the operator-sum representation, an achievable upper bound of the quantum Zeno time is given with the help of the results in noisy quantum metrology. It is of significance that the noise reducing the accuracy in the entanglement-enhanced parameter estimation can conversely be favorable for the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics of entangled states. PMID:26099840

  6. Quantum Entanglement and Quantum Discord in Gaussian Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, Aurelian

    2011-10-03

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we give a description of the continuous-variable quantum entanglement and quantum discord for a system consisting of two noninteracting modes embedded in a thermal environment. Entanglement and discord are used to quantify the quantum correlations of the system. For all values of the temperature of the thermal reservoir, an initial separable Gaussian state remains separable for all times. In the case of an entangled initial Gaussian state, entanglement suppression (entanglement sudden death) takes place for non-zero temperatures of the environment. Only for a zero temperature of the thermal bath the initial entangled state remains entangled for finite times. We analyze the time evolution of the Gaussian quantum discord, which is a measure of all quantum correlations in the bipartite state, including entanglement, and show that quantum discord decays asymptotically in time under the effect of the thermal bath.

  7. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  8. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems.

    PubMed

    Wild, Dominik S; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-10-07

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  10. Large Scale Nonlinear Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-15

    KEY WORDS (Conhinu. as, t.n.t.. aid. if nic••iary aid ld.ntify by block n,a,b.r) L. In,~~~ IP!CIE LARGE SCALE OPTIMIZATION APPLICATIONS OF NONLINEAR ... NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING by Garth P. McCormick 1. Introduction The general mathematical programming ( optimization ) problem can be stated in the following form...because the difficulty in solving a general nonlinear optimization problem has a~ much to do with the nature of the functions involved as it does with the

  11. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  12. Localization in Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusipov, I.; Laptyeva, T.; Denisov, S.; Ivanchenko, M.

    2017-02-01

    In an isolated single-particle quantum system, a spatial disorder can induce Anderson localization. Being a result of interference, this phenomenon is expected to be fragile in the face of dissipation. Here we show that a proper dissipation can drive a disordered system into a steady state with tunable localization properties. This can be achieved with a set of identical dissipative operators, each one acting nontrivially on a pair of sites. Operators are parametrized by a uniform phase, which controls the selection of Anderson modes contributing to the state. On the microscopic level, quantum trajectories of a system in the asymptotic regime exhibit intermittent dynamics consisting of long-time sticking events near selected modes interrupted by intermode jumps.

  13. Open-System Quantum Annealing in Mean-Field Models with Exponential Degeneracy*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechedzhi, Kostyantyn; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.

    2016-04-01

    Real-life quantum computers are inevitably affected by intrinsic noise resulting in dissipative nonunitary dynamics realized by these devices. We consider an open-system quantum annealing algorithm optimized for such a realistic analog quantum device which takes advantage of noise-induced thermalization and relies on incoherent quantum tunneling at finite temperature. We theoretically analyze the performance of this algorithm considering a p -spin model that allows for a mean-field quasiclassical solution and, at the same time, demonstrates the first-order phase transition and exponential degeneracy of states, typical characteristics of spin glasses. We demonstrate that finite-temperature effects introduced by the noise are particularly important for the dynamics in the presence of the exponential degeneracy of metastable states. We determine the optimal regime of the open-system quantum annealing algorithm for this model and find that it can outperform simulated annealing in a range of parameters. Large-scale multiqubit quantum tunneling is instrumental for the quantum speedup in this model, which is possible because of the unusual nonmonotonous temperature dependence of the quantum-tunneling action in this model, where the most efficient transition rate corresponds to zero temperature. This model calculation is the first analytically tractable example where open-system quantum annealing algorithm outperforms simulated annealing, which can, in principle, be realized using an analog quantum computer.

  14. Quantum correlation of an optically controlled open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Sham, L. J.

    2012-02-01

    A precise time-dependent optical control of an open quantum system relies on an accurate account of the quantum interference among the system, the photon control and the dissipative environment. In the spirit of the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function approach, we develop a diagrammatic technique to precisely calculate this quantum correlation for a fast multimode coherent photon control against slow relaxation, valid for both Markovian and non-Markovian systems. We demonstrate how this novel formalism can lead to a better accuracy than existing approximations of the master equation. We also describe extensions to cases with controls by photon state other than the coherent Glauber state.

  15. Challenges for Large Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    With computational approaches becoming ubiquitous the growing impact of large scale computing on research influences both theoretical and experimental work. I will review a few examples in condensed matter physics and quantum optics, including the impact of computer simulations in the search for supersolidity, thermometry in ultracold quantum gases, and the challenging search for novel phases in strongly correlated electron systems. While only a decade ago such simulations needed the fastest supercomputers, many simulations can now be performed on small workstation clusters or even a laptop: what was previously restricted to a few experts can now potentially be used by many. Only part of the gain in computational capabilities is due to Moore's law and improvement in hardware. Equally impressive is the performance gain due to new algorithms - as I will illustrate using some recently developed algorithms. At the same time modern peta-scale supercomputers offer unprecedented computational power and allow us to tackle new problems and address questions that were impossible to solve numerically only a few years ago. While there is a roadmap for future hardware developments to exascale and beyond, the main challenges are on the algorithmic and software infrastructure side. Among the problems that face the computational physicist are: the development of new algorithms that scale to thousands of cores and beyond, a software infrastructure that lifts code development to a higher level and speeds up the development of new simulation programs for large scale computing machines, tools to analyze the large volume of data obtained from such simulations, and as an emerging field provenance-aware software that aims for reproducibility of the complete computational workflow from model parameters to the final figures. Interdisciplinary collaborations and collective efforts will be required, in contrast to the cottage-industry culture currently present in many areas of computational

  16. Microscopic derivation of open quantum Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco; Sinayskiy, Ilya; UKZN Team

    2015-03-01

    Recently a model of open quantum Brownian motion (OQBM) [M. Bauer, D. Bernard, A. Tilloy, Phys. Rev. A 88 (2013) 062340] was introduced as a scaling limit of Open Quantum Walks (OQWs) [S. Attal, F. Petruccione, C. Sabot, I. Sinayskiy, J. Stat. Phys. 147 (20120 832]. OQBM is a new type of quantum Brownian motion where the dynamics of the Brownian particle not only depends on the interactions with a thermal environment, but also depends on the state of the internal degrees of freedom of the Brownian particle. Here, we present the microscopic derivation of the OQBM for a Brownian particle with two internal degrees of freedom. Examples of the dynamics for initial Gaussian and non-Gaussian distributions are presented. This work is based upon research supported by the South African Research Chair Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and National Research Foundation.

  17. Large scale tracking algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  18. Large Scale IR Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlu, Virgil

    2008-01-01

    Today, search engines are embedded into all aspects of digital world: in addition to Internet search, all operating systems have integrated search engines that respond even as you type, even over the network, even on cell phones; therefore the importance of their efficacy and efficiency cannot be overstated. There are many open possibilities for…

  19. Large Scale IR Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlu, Virgil

    2008-01-01

    Today, search engines are embedded into all aspects of digital world: in addition to Internet search, all operating systems have integrated search engines that respond even as you type, even over the network, even on cell phones; therefore the importance of their efficacy and efficiency cannot be overstated. There are many open possibilities for…

  20. Relativistic quantum metrology in open system dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Fan, Heng; Jing, Jiliang

    2015-01-22

    Quantum metrology studies the ultimate limit of precision in estimating a physical quantity if quantum strategies are exploited. Here we investigate the evolution of a two-level atom as a detector which interacts with a massless scalar field using the master equation approach for open quantum system. We employ local quantum estimation theory to estimate the Unruh temperature when probed by a uniformly accelerated detector in the Minkowski vacuum. In particular, we evaluate the Fisher information (FI) for population measurement, maximize its value over all possible detector preparations and evolution times, and compare its behavior with that of the quantum Fisher information (QFI). We find that the optimal precision of estimation is achieved when the detector evolves for a long enough time. Furthermore, we find that in this case the FI for population measurement is independent of initial preparations of the detector and is exactly equal to the QFI, which means that population measurement is optimal. This result demonstrates that the achievement of the ultimate bound of precision imposed by quantum mechanics is possible. Finally, we note that the same configuration is also available to the maximum of the QFI itself.

  1. Relativistic Quantum Metrology in Open System Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Fan, Heng; Jing, Jiliang

    2015-01-01

    Quantum metrology studies the ultimate limit of precision in estimating a physical quantity if quantum strategies are exploited. Here we investigate the evolution of a two-level atom as a detector which interacts with a massless scalar field using the master equation approach for open quantum system. We employ local quantum estimation theory to estimate the Unruh temperature when probed by a uniformly accelerated detector in the Minkowski vacuum. In particular, we evaluate the Fisher information (FI) for population measurement, maximize its value over all possible detector preparations and evolution times, and compare its behavior with that of the quantum Fisher information (QFI). We find that the optimal precision of estimation is achieved when the detector evolves for a long enough time. Furthermore, we find that in this case the FI for population measurement is independent of initial preparations of the detector and is exactly equal to the QFI, which means that population measurement is optimal. This result demonstrates that the achievement of the ultimate bound of precision imposed by quantum mechanics is possible. Finally, we note that the same configuration is also available to the maximum of the QFI itself. PMID:25609187

  2. Patterns of Metabolite Changes Identified from Large-Scale Gene Perturbations in Arabidopsis Using a Genome-Scale Metabolic Network1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taehyong; Dreher, Kate; Nilo-Poyanco, Ricardo; Lee, Insuk; Fiehn, Oliver; Lange, Bernd Markus; Nikolau, Basil J.; Sumner, Lloyd; Welti, Ruth; Wurtele, Eve S.; Rhee, Seung Y.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics enables quantitative evaluation of metabolic changes caused by genetic or environmental perturbations. However, little is known about how perturbing a single gene changes the metabolic system as a whole and which network and functional properties are involved in this response. To answer this question, we investigated the metabolite profiles from 136 mutants with single gene perturbations of functionally diverse Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes. Fewer than 10 metabolites were changed significantly relative to the wild type in most of the mutants, indicating that the metabolic network was robust to perturbations of single metabolic genes. These changed metabolites were closer to each other in a genome-scale metabolic network than expected by chance, supporting the notion that the genetic perturbations changed the network more locally than globally. Surprisingly, the changed metabolites were close to the perturbed reactions in only 30% of the mutants of the well-characterized genes. To determine the factors that contributed to the distance between the observed metabolic changes and the perturbation site in the network, we examined nine network and functional properties of the perturbed genes. Only the isozyme number affected the distance between the perturbed reactions and changed metabolites. This study revealed patterns of metabolic changes from large-scale gene perturbations and relationships between characteristics of the perturbed genes and metabolic changes. PMID:25670818

  3. Eigenstate tracking in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Jun; Sarandy, Marcelo S.; Lidar, Daniel A.; Luo, Da-Wei; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2016-10-01

    Keeping a quantum system in a given instantaneous eigenstate is a control problem with numerous applications, e.g., in quantum information processing. The problem is even more challenging in the setting of open quantum systems, where environment-mediated transitions introduce additional decoherence channels. Adiabatic passage is a well-established solution but requires a sufficiently slow evolution time that is dictated by the adiabatic theorem. Here we develop a systematic projection theory formulation for the transitionless evolution of general open quantum systems described by time-local master equations. We derive a time-convolutionless dynamical equation for the target instantaneous eigenstate of a given time-dependent Hamiltonian. A transitionless dynamics then arises in terms of a competition between the average Hamiltonian gap and the decoherence rate, which implies optimal adiabaticity timescales. We show how eigenstate tracking can be accomplished via control pulses, without explicitly incorporating counter-diabatic driving, thus offering an alternative route to accelerate adiabaticity. We examine rectangular pulses, chaotic signals, and white noise, and find that, remarkably, the effectiveness of eigenstate tracking hardly depends on the details of the control functions. In all cases the control protocol keeps the system in the desired instantaneous eigenstate throughout the entire evolution, along an accelerated adiabatic path.

  4. Open quantum systems and random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulhall, Declan

    2014-10-01

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with RMT. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the level spacing, width distribution and Δ3(L) statistic are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. The usual super-radiant state is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and Δ3(L) statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

  5. Open quantum systems and random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhall, Declan

    2014-10-15

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with RMT. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the level spacing, width distribution and Δ{sub 3}(L) statistic are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. The usual super-radiant state is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and Δ{sub 3}(L) statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

  6. Open quantum systems and random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulhall, Declan

    2015-01-01

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with random matrix theory. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper the effect on the level statistics of opening the system is seen. In particular the Δ3(L ) statistic, the width distribution and the level spacing are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. The emergence of a super-radiant transition is observed. The level spacing and Δ3(L ) statistics exhibit the signatures of missed levels or intruder levels as the super-radiant state is formed.

  7. Revealing Open Quantum Systems with Subsystem DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    The traditional quantum chemical methods, wave function or density based, are designed to solve for a closed system, where the Hamiltonian contains all relevant interactions. The closed system is, however, not realistic, as in real life the system is embedded in an environment with which it interacts to some degree. Including the description of the environment at the full quantum mechanical level leads to the Open Quantum Systems (OQS) theory: the only theory which can describe non-Markovian dynamics between the system and the environment. By allowing the flow of information in both directions phenomena such as quantum entanglement, relevant for the design of quantum computers, become available. While most OQS theories rely on the density matrix to describe the system-bath interaction, time-dependent subsystem DFT allows to approach the problem using the electron density. Through Dyson-like equations connecting the density-density response kernels of the OQS and its environment, the extent to which non-Markovian dynamics is present can be revealed. We illustrate this for the process of excitation energy transfer in coupled chromophores embedded in explicit solvent.

  8. Metastability in an open quantum Ising model.

    PubMed

    Rose, Dominic C; Macieszczak, Katarzyna; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P

    2016-11-01

    We apply a recently developed theory for metastability in open quantum systems to a one-dimensional dissipative quantum Ising model. Earlier results suggest this model features either a nonequilibrium phase transition or a smooth but sharp crossover, where the stationary state changes from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic, accompanied by strongly intermittent emission dynamics characteristic of first-order coexistence between dynamical phases. We show that for a range of parameters close to this transition or crossover point the dynamics of the finite system displays pronounced metastability, i.e., the system relaxes first to long-lived metastable states before eventual relaxation to the true stationary state. From the spectral properties of the quantum master operator we characterize the low-dimensional manifold of metastable states, which are shown to be probability mixtures of two, paramagnetic and ferromagnetic, metastable phases. We also show that for long times the dynamics can be approximated by a classical stochastic dynamics between the metastable phases that is directly related to the intermittent dynamics observed in quantum trajectories and thus the dynamical phases.

  9. Metastability in an open quantum Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Dominic C.; Macieszczak, Katarzyna; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2016-11-01

    We apply a recently developed theory for metastability in open quantum systems to a one-dimensional dissipative quantum Ising model. Earlier results suggest this model features either a nonequilibrium phase transition or a smooth but sharp crossover, where the stationary state changes from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic, accompanied by strongly intermittent emission dynamics characteristic of first-order coexistence between dynamical phases. We show that for a range of parameters close to this transition or crossover point the dynamics of the finite system displays pronounced metastability, i.e., the system relaxes first to long-lived metastable states before eventual relaxation to the true stationary state. From the spectral properties of the quantum master operator we characterize the low-dimensional manifold of metastable states, which are shown to be probability mixtures of two, paramagnetic and ferromagnetic, metastable phases. We also show that for long times the dynamics can be approximated by a classical stochastic dynamics between the metastable phases that is directly related to the intermittent dynamics observed in quantum trajectories and thus the dynamical phases.

  10. Metazoan meiofauna in deep-sea canyons and adjacent open slopes: A large-scale comparison with focus on the rare taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchelli, S.; Gambi, C.; Zeppilli, D.; Danovaro, R.

    2010-03-01

    Metazoan meiofaunal abundance, total biomass, nematode size and the richness of taxa were investigated along bathymetric gradients (from the shelf break down to ca. 5000-m depth) in six submarine canyons and on five adjacent open slopes of three deep-sea regions. The investigated areas were distributed along >2500 km, on the Portuguese to the Catalan and South Adriatic margins. The Portuguese and Catalan margins displayed the highest abundances, biomass and richness of taxa, while the lowest values were observed in the Central Mediterranean Sea. The comparison between canyons and the nearby open slopes showed the lack of significant differences in terms of meiofaunal abundance and biomass at any sampling depth. In most canyons and on most slopes, meiofaunal variables did not display consistent bathymetric patterns. Conversely, we found that the different topographic features were apparently responsible for significant differences in the abundance and distribution of the rare meiofaunal taxa (i.e. taxa accounting for <1% of total meiofaunal abundance). Several taxa belonging to the temporary meiofauna, such as larvae/juveniles of Priapulida, Holothuroidea, Ascidiacea and Cnidaria, were encountered exclusively on open slopes, while others (including the Tanaidacea and Echinodea larvae) were found exclusively in canyons sediments. Results reported here indicate that, at large spatial scales, differences in deep-sea meiofaunal abundance and biomass are not only controlled by the available food sources, but also by the region or habitat specific topographic features, which apparently play a key role in the distribution of rare benthic taxa.

  11. Large-scale fibre-array multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Cheremiskin, I V; Chekhlova, T K

    2001-05-31

    The possibility of creating a fibre multiplexer/demultiplexer with large-scale multiplexing without any basic restrictions on the number of channels and the spectral spacing between them is shown. The operating capacity of a fibre multiplexer based on a four-fibre array ensuring a spectral spacing of 0.7 pm ({approx} 10 GHz) between channels is demonstrated. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Large-scale stress factors affecting coral reefs: open ocean sea surface temperature and surface seawater aragonite saturation over the next 400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, K. J.; Lippmann, T.; Sen Gupta, A.

    2012-06-01

    One-third of the world's coral reefs have disappeared over the last 30 years, and a further third is under threat today from various stress factors. The main global stress factors on coral reefs have been identified as changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation (Ωarag). Here, we use a climate model of intermediate complexity, which includes an ocean general circulation model and a fully coupled carbon cycle, in conjunction with present-day observations of inter-annual SST variability to investigate three IPCC representative concentration pathways (RCP 3PD, RCP 4.5, and RCP 8.5), and their impact on the environmental stressors of coral reefs related to open ocean SST and open ocean Ωarag over the next 400 years. Our simulations show that for the RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios, the threshold of 3.3 for zonal and annual mean Ωarag would be crossed in the first half of this century. By year 2030, 66-85% of the reef locations considered in this study would experience severe bleaching events at least once every 10 years. Regardless of the concentration pathway, virtually every reef considered in this study (>97%) would experience severe thermal stress by year 2050. In all our simulations, changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation lead changes in temperatures.

  13. Evolution of Quantum Entanglement in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, A.

    2010-08-04

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we give a description of the continuous-variable entanglement for a system consisting of two uncoupled harmonic oscillators interacting with a thermal environment. Using Peres-Simon necessary sufficient criterion for separability of two-mode Gaussian states, we show that for some values of diffusion coefficient, dissipation constant and temperature of the environment, the state keeps for all times its initial type: separable or entangled. In other cases, entanglement generation, entanglement sudden death or a periodic collapse revival of entanglement take place.

  14. Large scale synthesis of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) from waste biomass and their use as an efficient and selective photoluminescence on-off-on probe for Ag(+) ions.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Anil; Biswal, Mandakini; Mhamane, Dattakumar; Gokhale, Rohan; Patil, Shankar; Guin, Debanjan; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-10-21

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are synthesized from bio-waste and are further modified to produce amine-terminated GQDs (Am-GQDs) which have higher dispersibility and photoluminescence intensity than those of GQDs. A strong fluorescence quenching of Am-GQDs (switch-off) is observed for a number of metal ions, but only for the Ag(+) ions is the original fluorescence regenerated (switch-on) upon addition of L-cysteine.

  15. Large-scale biodiesel production using flue gas from coal-fired power plants with Nannochloropsis microalgal biomass in open raceway ponds.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Baohua; Sun, Faqiang; Yang, Miao; Lu, Lin; Yang, Guanpin; Pan, Kehou

    2014-12-01

    The potential use of microalgal biomass as a biofuel source has raised broad interest. Highly effective and economically feasible biomass generating techniques are essential to realize such potential. Flue gas from coal-fired power plants may serve as an inexpensive carbon source for microalgal culture, and it may also facilitate improvement of the environment once the gas is fixed in biomass. In this study, three strains of the genus Nannochloropsis (4-38, KA2 and 75B1) survived this type of culture and bloomed using flue gas from coal-fired power plants in 8000-L open raceway ponds. Lower temperatures and solar irradiation reduced the biomass yield and lipid productivities of these strains. Strain 4-38 performed better than the other two as it contained higher amounts of triacylglycerols and fatty acids, which are used for biodiesel production. Further optimization of the application of flue gas to microalgal culture should be undertaken. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A study on large scale cultivation of Microcystis aeruginosa under open raceway pond at semi-continuous mode for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Veeramuthu; Agila, Elango; Salam, Zainal; Ponraj, Mohanadoss; Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2014-11-01

    The study explores on upstream and downstream process in Microcystis aeruginosa for biodiesel production. The alga was isolated from temple tank, acclimatized and successfully mass cultivated in open raceway pond at semi-continuous mode. A two step combined process was designed and harvested 99.3% of biomass, the daily dry biomass productivity was recorded up to 28gm(-2)day(-1). The lipid extraction was optimized and achieved 21.3%; physicochemical properties were characterized and found 11.7% of FFA, iodine value 72% and 99.2% of ester content. The lipid was transesterified by a two step simultaneous process and produced 90.1% of biodiesel; the calorific value of the biodiesel was 38.8MJ/kg. Further, the physicochemical properties of biodiesel was characterized and found to be within the limits of American ASTM D6751. Based on the areal and volumetric biomass productivity estimation, M. aeruginosa can yield 84.1 tons of dry biomass ha(-1)year(-1).

  17. Colloquium: Non-Markovian dynamics in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry, and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markovian stochastic process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modeled phenomenologically by means of a dynamical semigroup with a corresponding time-independent generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics of the open system typically leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence, correlations, and entanglement. Here recent theoretical results on the rich non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems are discussed, paying particular attention to the rigorous mathematical definition, to the physical interpretation and classification, as well as to the quantification of quantum memory effects. The general theory is illustrated by a series of physical examples. The analysis reveals that memory effects of the open system dynamics reflect characteristic features of the environment which opens a new perspective for applications, namely, to exploit a small open system as a quantum probe signifying nontrivial features of the environment it is interacting with. This Colloquium further explores the various physical sources of non-Markovian quantum dynamics, such as structured environmental spectral densities, nonlocal correlations between environmental degrees of freedom, and correlations in the initial system-environment state, in addition to developing schemes for their local detection. Recent experiments addressing the detection, quantification, and control of

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: a green route for large-scale production of porous graphene and graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paola; Hu, Anming; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Duley, Walter W.; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2014-01-01

    Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the solution. The sheets consist of one to six stacked layers of spongy graphene, which form an irregular 3D porous structure that displays pores with an average size of 15-20 nm. Several characterization techniques have confirmed the porous nature of the collected layers. The analyses of the aqueous solution confirmed the presence of GQDs with dimensions of about 2-5 nm. It is found that the formation of both PG and GQDs depends on the fs-laser ablation energy. At laser fluences less than 12 J cm-2, no evidence of either PG or GQDs is detected. However, polyynes with six and eight carbon atoms per chain are found in the solution. For laser energies in the 20-30 J cm-2 range, these polyynes disappeared, while PG and GQDs were found at the water-air interface and in the solution, respectively. The origin of these materials can be explained based on the mechanisms for water breakdown and coal gasification. The absence of PG and GQDs, after the laser ablation of HOPG in liquid nitrogen, confirms the proposed mechanisms.Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the

  19. Quantum-chemistry based calibration of the alkali metal cation series (Li(+)-Cs(+)) for large-scale polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus; Lim, Carmay; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad

    2015-02-15

    The alkali metal cations in the series Li(+)-Cs(+) act as major partners in a diversity of biological processes and in bioinorganic chemistry. In this article, we present the results of their calibration in the context of the SIBFA polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics procedure. It relies on quantum-chemistry (QC) energy-decomposition analyses of their monoligated complexes with representative O-, N-, S-, and Se- ligands, performed with the aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) basis set at the Hartree-Fock level. Close agreement with QC is obtained for each individual contribution, even though the calibration involves only a limited set of cation-specific parameters. This agreement is preserved in tests on polyligated complexes with four and six O- ligands, water and formamide, indicating the transferability of the procedure. Preliminary extensions to density functional theory calculations are reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: a green route for large-scale production of porous graphene and graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Russo, Paola; Hu, Anming; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Duley, Walter W; Zhou, Norman Y

    2014-02-21

    Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the solution. The sheets consist of one to six stacked layers of spongy graphene, which form an irregular 3D porous structure that displays pores with an average size of 15-20 nm. Several characterization techniques have confirmed the porous nature of the collected layers. The analyses of the aqueous solution confirmed the presence of GQDs with dimensions of about 2-5 nm. It is found that the formation of both PG and GQDs depends on the fs-laser ablation energy. At laser fluences less than 12 J cm(-2), no evidence of either PG or GQDs is detected. However, polyynes with six and eight carbon atoms per chain are found in the solution. For laser energies in the 20-30 J cm(-2) range, these polyynes disappeared, while PG and GQDs were found at the water-air interface and in the solution, respectively. The origin of these materials can be explained based on the mechanisms for water breakdown and coal gasification. The absence of PG and GQDs, after the laser ablation of HOPG in liquid nitrogen, confirms the proposed mechanisms.

  1. Quantum game theory and open access publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Bernius, Steffen; Dugall, Berndt

    2007-08-01

    The digital revolution of the information age and in particular the sweeping changes of scientific communication brought about by computing and novel communication technology, potentiate global, high grade scientific information for free. The arXiv, for example, is the leading scientific communication platform, mainly for mathematics and physics, where everyone in the world has free access on. While in some scientific disciplines the open access way is successfully realized, other disciplines (e.g. humanities and social sciences) dwell on the traditional path, even though many scientists belonging to these communities approve the open access principle. In this paper we try to explain these different publication patterns by using a game theoretical approach. Based on the assumption, that the main goal of scientists is the maximization of their reputation, we model different possible game settings, namely a zero sum game, the prisoners’ dilemma case and a version of the stag hunt game, that show the dilemma of scientists belonging to “non-open access communities”. From an individual perspective, they have no incentive to deviate from the Nash equilibrium of traditional publishing. By extending the model using the quantum game theory approach it can be shown, that if the strength of entanglement exceeds a certain value, the scientists will overcome the dilemma and terminate to publish only traditionally in all three settings.

  2. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  3. Inverse engineering control in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Jun; Wu, Lian-Ao; Sarandy, Marcelo S.; Muga, J. Gonzalo

    2013-11-01

    We propose a scheme for inverse engineering control in open quantum systems. Starting from an undetermined time evolution operator, a time-dependent Hamiltonian is derived in order to guide the system to attain an arbitrary target state at a predefined time. We calculate the fidelity of our inverse engineering control protocol in the presence of the noise with respect to the stochastic fluctuation of the linear parameters of the Hamiltonian during the time evolution. For a special family of Hamiltonians for two-level systems, we show that the control evolution of the system under noise can be categorized into two standard decohering processes: dephasing and depolarization, for both Markovian and non-Markovian conditions. In particular, we illustrate our formalism by analyzing the robustness of the engineered target state against errors. Moreover, we discuss the generalization of the inverse protocol for higher-dimensional systems.

  4. Variational functions in driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Matthias; Stenholm, Stig

    2003-03-01

    We consider the Lindblad-type master equation of an open system. We address the question how to construct a functional of the quantum state which displays a monotonic behavior in time. This thus defines uniquely the direction of time in the system. As the generator of time evolution is not a Hermitian operator, the theory requires the considerations of right and left eigenstates. In this paper we assume them to form two complete bases, which allows us to construct the desired quantity. This can be interpreted as a generalized entropy functional. We show how the construction is carried out in the general case, and we illustrate the theory by solving the case of an externally driven and damped two-level system. The treatment is related to earlier work in the field, and its possible relation to time inversion is discussed.

  5. Large-scale structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1983-01-01

    Problems encountered by aerospace designers in attempting to optimize whole aircraft are discussed, along with possible solutions. Large scale optimization, as opposed to component-by-component optimization, is hindered by computational costs, software inflexibility, concentration on a single, rather than trade-off, design methodology and the incompatibility of large-scale optimization with single program, single computer methods. The software problem can be approached by placing the full analysis outside of the optimization loop. Full analysis is then performed only periodically. Problem-dependent software can be removed from the generic code using a systems programming technique, and then embody the definitions of design variables, objective function and design constraints. Trade-off algorithms can be used at the design points to obtain quantitative answers. Finally, decomposing the large-scale problem into independent subproblems allows systematic optimization of the problems by an organization of people and machines.

  6. Large-scale circuit simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. P.

    1982-12-01

    The simulation of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) circuits falls beyond the capabilities of conventional circuit simulators like SPICE. On the other hand, conventional logic simulators can only give the results of logic levels 1 and 0 with the attendent loss of detail in the waveforms. The aim of developing large-scale circuit simulation is to bridge the gap between conventional circuit simulation and logic simulation. This research is to investigate new approaches for fast and relatively accurate time-domain simulation of MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductors), LSI (Large Scale Integration) and VLSI circuits. New techniques and new algorithms are studied in the following areas: (1) analysis sequencing (2) nonlinear iteration (3) modified Gauss-Seidel method (4) latency criteria and timestep control scheme. The developed methods have been implemented into a simulation program PREMOS which could be used as a design verification tool for MOS circuits.

  7. Large Scale Dynamos in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2015-01-01

    We show that a differentially rotating conducting fluid automatically creates a magnetic helicity flux with components along the rotation axis and in the direction of the local vorticity. This drives a rapid growth in the local density of current helicity, which in turn drives a large scale dynamo. The dynamo growth rate derived from this process is not constant, but depends inversely on the large scale magnetic field strength. This dynamo saturates when buoyant losses of magnetic flux compete with the large scale dynamo, providing a simple prediction for magnetic field strength as a function of Rossby number in stars. Increasing anisotropy in the turbulence produces a decreasing magnetic helicity flux, which explains the flattening of the B/Rossby number relation at low Rossby numbers. We also show that the kinetic helicity is always a subdominant effect. There is no kinematic dynamo in real stars.

  8. Quantum and statistical mechanics in open systems: theory and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueco, David

    2009-08-01

    Using the system-bath model Hamiltonian this thesis covers the equilibrium and out of equilibrium properties of quantum open systems. Topics included are the calculation of thermodynamical quantities of open systems, derivation of quantum master equations, phase space and numerical methods and Linear and non Linear Response Theory. Applications are the transport in periodic potentials and the dynamics of spins.

  9. OpenFlow Extensions for Programmable Quantum Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-19

    ARL-TR-8043 JUN 2017 US Army Research Laboratory OpenFlow Extensions for Programmable Quantum Networks by Venkat Dasari...Extensions for Programmable Quantum Networks by Venkat Dasari, Nikolai Snow, and Billy Geerhart Computational and Information Sciences Directorate...DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2015–March 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE OpenFlow Extensions for Programmable Quantum Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  10. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-27

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In our paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. Furthermore, the method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters.

  11. Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI), the state-of-the-art production techniques for computer chips, promises such powerful, inexpensive computing that, in the future, people will be able to communicate with computer devices in natural language or even speech. However, before full-scale VLSI implementation can occur, certain salient factors must be…

  12. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-01-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  13. Displacement of large-scale open solar magnetic fields from the zone of active longitudes and the heliospheric storm of November 3-10, 2004: 2. "Explosion" of singularity and dynamics of sunspot formation and energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.

    2010-12-01

    A more detailed scenario of one stage (August-November 2004) of the quasibiennial MHD process "Origination ... and dissipation of the four-sector structure of the solar magnetic field" during the decline phase of cycle 23 has been constructed. It has been indicated that the following working hypothesis on the propagation of an MHD disturbance westward (in the direction of solar rotation) and eastward (toward the zone of active longitudes) with the displacement of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) from this zone can be constructed based on LOSMF model representations and data on sunspot formation, flares, active filaments, and coronal ejections as well as on the estimated contribution of sporadic energy release to the flare luminosity and kinetic energy of ejections: (1) The "explosion" of the LOSMF singularity and the formation in the explosion zone of an anemone active region (AR), which produced the satellite sunspot formation that continued west and east of the "anemone," represented a powerful and energy-intensive source of MHD processes at this stage. (2) This resulted in the origination of two "governing" large-scale MHD processes, which regulated various usual manifestations of solar activity: the fast LOSMF along the neutral line in the solar atmosphere, strongly affecting the zone of active longitudes, and the slow LOSMF in the outer layers of the convection zone. The fronts of these processes were identified by powerful (about 1031 erg) coronal ejections. (3) The collision of a wave reflected from the zone of active longitudes with the eastern front of the hydromagnetic impulse of the convection zone resulted in an increase in LOSMF magnetic fluxes, origination of an active sector boundary in the zone of active longitudes, shear-convergent motions, and generation and destabilization of the flare-productive AR 10696 responsible for the heliospheric storm of November 3-10, 2004.

  14. Gain and loss in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleuch, Hichem; Rotter, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    Photosynthesis is the basic process used by plants to convert light energy in reaction centers into chemical energy. The high efficiency of this process is not yet understood today. Using the formalism for the description of open quantum systems by means of a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator, we consider initially the interplay of gain (acceptor) and loss (donor). Near singular points it causes fluctuations of the cross section which appear without any excitation of internal degrees of freedom of the system. This process occurs therefore very quickly and with high efficiency. We then consider the excitation of resonance states of the system by means of these fluctuations. This second step of the whole process takes place much slower than the first one, because it involves the excitation of internal degrees of freedom of the system. The two-step process as a whole is highly efficient, and the decay is biexponential. We provide, if possible, the results of analytical studies, otherwise characteristic numerical results. The similarities of the obtained results to light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms are discussed.

  15. Direct Imaging of Electron States in Open Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, N.; Brunner, R.; Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Meisels, R.; Ferry, D. K.; Ochiai, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We use scanning gate microscopy to probe the ballistic motion of electrons within an open GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot. Conductance maps are recorded by scanning a biased tip over the open quantum dot while a magnetic field is applied. We show that, for specific magnetic fields, the measured conductance images resemble the classical transmitted and backscattered trajectories and their quantum mechanical analogue. In addition, we prove experimentally, with this direct measurement technique, the existence of pointer states. The demonstrated direct imaging technique is essential for the fundamental understanding of wave function scarring and quantum decoherence theory.

  16. Linear response theory for open systems: Quantum master equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Masashi; Kitajima, Sachiko; Arimitsu, Toshihico; Shibata, Fumiaki

    2017-02-01

    A linear response theory for open quantum systems is formulated by means of the time-local and time-nonlocal quantum master equations, where a relevant quantum system interacts with a thermal reservoir as well as with an external classical field. A linear response function that characterizes how a relaxation process deviates from its intrinsic process by a weak external field is obtained by extracting the linear terms with respect to the external field from the quantum master equation. It consists of four parts. One represents the linear response of a quantum system when system-reservoir correlation at an initial time and correlation between reservoir states at different times are neglected. The others are correction terms due to these effects. The linear response function is compared with the Kubo formula in the usual linear response theory. To investigate the properties of the linear response of an open quantum system, an exactly solvable model for a stochastic dephasing of a two-level system is examined. Furthermore, the method for deriving the linear response function is applied for calculating two-time correlation functions of open quantum systems. It is shown that the quantum regression theorem is not valid for open quantum systems unless their reduced time evolution is Markovian.

  17. Optimization Via Open System Quantum Annealing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-07

    related, well studied classical and quantum problems. We have explored and elucidated the significance of tunneling in QA with Path Integral Monte Carlo...elucidated the significance of tunneling in QA with Path Integral Monte Carlo. We have also provided signatures of quantum behavior of QA against closely...theoretical mapping between the Ising spin glass partition function and circuit model decision problems, discovered in a previous ARO Quantum

  18. Geometric phases and quantum phase transitions in open systems.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Ovchinnikov, S G

    2008-07-01

    The relationship is established between quantum phase transitions and complex geometric phases for open quantum systems governed by a non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian with accidental crossing of the eigenvalues. In particular, the geometric phase associated with the ground state of the one-dimensional dissipative Ising model in a transverse magnetic field is evaluated, and it is demonstrated that the related quantum phase transition is of the first order.

  19. Dynamics of open bosonic quantum systems in coherent state representation

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, D. A. R.; Berman, G. P.; Vishik, M.

    2006-01-15

    We consider the problem of decoherence and relaxation of open bosonic quantum systems from a perspective alternative to the standard master equation or quantum trajectories approaches. Our method is based on the dynamics of expectation values of observables evaluated in a coherent state representation. We examine a model of a quantum nonlinear oscillator with a density-density interaction with a collection of environmental oscillators at finite temperature. We derive the exact solution for dynamics of observables and demonstrate a consistent perturbation approach.

  20. An open-system quantum simulator with trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Julio T; Müller, Markus; Schindler, Philipp; Nigg, Daniel; Monz, Thomas; Chwalla, Michael; Hennrich, Markus; Roos, Christian F; Zoller, Peter; Blatt, Rainer

    2011-02-24

    The control of quantum systems is of fundamental scientific interest and promises powerful applications and technologies. Impressive progress has been achieved in isolating quantum systems from the environment and coherently controlling their dynamics, as demonstrated by the creation and manipulation of entanglement in various physical systems. However, for open quantum systems, engineering the dynamics of many particles by a controlled coupling to an environment remains largely unexplored. Here we realize an experimental toolbox for simulating an open quantum system with up to five quantum bits (qubits). Using a quantum computing architecture with trapped ions, we combine multi-qubit gates with optical pumping to implement coherent operations and dissipative processes. We illustrate our ability to engineer the open-system dynamics through the dissipative preparation of entangled states, the simulation of coherent many-body spin interactions, and the quantum non-demolition measurement of multi-qubit observables. By adding controlled dissipation to coherent operations, this work offers novel prospects for open-system quantum simulation and computation.

  1. Emulation of complex open quantum systems using superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostame, Sarah; Huh, Joonsuk; Kreisbeck, Christoph; Kerman, Andrew J.; Fujita, Takatoshi; Eisfeld, Alexander; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2017-02-01

    With quantum computers being out of reach for now, quantum simulators are alternative devices for efficient and accurate simulation of problems that are challenging to tackle using conventional computers. Quantum simulators are classified into analog and digital, with the possibility of constructing "hybrid" simulators by combining both techniques. Here we focus on analog quantum simulators of open quantum systems and address the limit that they can beat classical computers. In particular, as an example, we discuss simulation of the chlorosome light-harvesting antenna from green sulfur bacteria with over 250 phonon modes coupled to each electronic state. Furthermore, we propose physical setups that can be used to reproduce the quantum dynamics of a standard and multiple-mode Holstein model. The proposed scheme is based on currently available technology of superconducting circuits consist of flux qubits and quantum oscillators.

  2. Investigating non-Markovian dynamics of quantum open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yusui

    Quantum open system coupled to a non-Markovian environment has recently attracted widespread interest for its important applications in quantum information processing and quantum dissipative systems. New phenomena induced by the non-Markovian environment have been discovered in variety of research areas ranging from quantum optics, quantum decoherence to condensed matter physics. However, the study of the non-Markovian quantum open system is known a difficult problem due to its technical complexity in deriving the fundamental equation of motion and elusive conceptual issues involving non-equilibrium dynamics for a strong coupled environment. The main purpose of this thesis is to introduce several new techniques of solving the quantum open systems including a systematic approach to dealing with non-Markovian master equations from a generic quantum-state diffusion (QSD) equation. In the first part of this thesis, we briefly introduce the non-Markovian quantum-state diffusion approach, and illustrate some pronounced non-Markovian quantum effects through numerical investigation on a cavity-QED model. Then we extend the non-Markovian QSD theory to an interesting model where the environment has a hierarchical structure, and find out the exact non-Markovian QSD equation of this model system. We observe the generation of quantum entanglement due to the interplay between the non-Markovian environment and the cavity. In the second part, we show an innovative method to obtain the exact non-Markovian master equations for a set of generic quantum open systems based on the corresponding non-Markovian QSD equations. Multiple-qubit systems and multilevel systems are discussed in details as two typical examples. Particularly, we derive the exact master equation for a model consisting of a three-level atom coupled to an optical cavity and controlled by an external laser field. Additionally, we discuss in more general context the mathematical similarity between the multiple

  3. Detecting quantum speedup in closed and open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2016-07-01

    We construct a general measure for detecting the quantum speedup in both closed and open systems. The speed measure is based on the changing rate of the position of quantum states on a manifold with appropriate monotone Riemannian metrics. Any increase in speed is a clear signature of dynamical speedup. To clarify the mechanisms for quantum speedup, we first introduce the concept of longitudinal and transverse types of speedup: the former stems from the time evolution process itself with fixed initial conditions, while the latter is a result of adjusting initial conditions. We then apply the proposed measure to several typical closed and open quantum systems, illustrating that quantum coherence (or entanglement) and the memory effect of the environment together can become resources for longitudinally or transversely accelerating dynamical evolution under specific conditions and assumptions.

  4. Cosmology with Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, A.; Ross, A.; Seo, H.; DePutter, R.; Padmanabhan, N.; White, M.; Myers, A.; Bovy, J.; Blanton, M.; Hernandez, C.; Mena, O.; Percival, W.; Prada, F.; Ross, N. P.; Saito, S.; Schneider, D.; Skibba, R.; Smith, K.; Slosar, A.; Strauss, M.; Verde, L.; Weinberg, D.; Bachall, N.; Brinkmann, J.; da Costa, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey I-III surveyed 14,000 square degrees, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. I present cosmological results from this unprecedented data set which contains over a million galaxies distributed between redshift of 0.45 to 0.70. With such a large volume of data set, high precision cosmological constraints can be obtained given a careful control and understanding of observational systematics. I present a novel treatment of observational systematics and its application to the clustering signals from the data set. I will present cosmological constraints on dark components of the Universe and tightest constraints of the non-gaussianity of early Universe to date utilizing Large Scale Structure.

  5. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jesper S; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg; Groth, Jesper S; Vissing, Thomas; Larsen, Marianne S; Geschke, Oliver; Emneús, Jenny; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus H

    2009-10-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO(2) laser micro-structured 8 x 8 aperture partition arrays with average aperture diameters of 301 +/- 5 microm. We addressed the electro-physical properties of the lipid bilayers established across the micro-structured scaffold arrays by controllable reconstitution of biotechnological and physiological relevant membrane peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays, and furthermore demonstrate that the design can conveniently be scaled up to support planar lipid bilayers in large square-centimeter partition arrays.

  6. Driven harmonic oscillator as a quantum simulator for open systems

    SciTech Connect

    Piilo, Jyrki; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2006-09-15

    We show theoretically how a driven harmonic oscillator can be used as a quantum simulator for the non-Markovian damped harmonic oscillator. In the general framework, our results demonstrate the possibility to use a closed system as a simulator for open quantum systems. The quantum simulator is based on sets of controlled drives of the closed harmonic oscillator with appropriately tailored electric field pulses. The non-Markovian dynamics of the damped harmonic oscillator is obtained by using the information about the spectral density of the open system when averaging over the drives of the closed oscillator. We consider single trapped ions as a specific physical implementation of the simulator, and we show how the simulator approach reveals physical insight into the open system dynamics, e.g., the characteristic quantum mechanical non-Markovian oscillatory behavior of the energy of the damped oscillator, usually obtained by the non-Lindblad-type master equation, can have a simple semiclassical interpretation.

  7. Quantum Information Biology: From Theory of Open Quantum Systems to Adaptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    This chapter reviews quantum(-like) information biology (QIB). Here biology is treated widely as even covering cognition and its derivatives: psychology and decision making, sociology, and behavioral economics and finances. QIB provides an integrative description of information processing by bio-systems at all scales of life: from proteins and cells to cognition, ecological and social systems. Mathematically QIB is based on the theory of adaptive quantum systems (which covers also open quantum systems). Ideologically QIB is based on the quantum-like (QL) paradigm: complex bio-systems process information in accordance with the laws of quantum information and probability. This paradigm is supported by plenty of statistical bio-data collected at all bio-scales. QIB re ects the two fundamental principles: a) adaptivity; and, b) openness (bio-systems are fundamentally open). In addition, quantum adaptive dynamics provides the most generally possible mathematical representation of these principles.

  8. Open quantum dots in graphene: Scaling relativistic pointer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Huang, L.; Yang, R.; Lai, Y.-C.; Akis, R.

    2010-04-01

    Open quantum dots provide a window into the connection between quantum and classical physics, particularly through the decoherence theory, in which an important set of quantum states are not "washed out" through interaction with the environment-the pointer states provide connection to trapped classical orbits which remain stable in the dots. Graphene is a recently discovered material with highly unusual properties. This single layer, one atom thick, sheet of carbon has a unique bandstructure, governed by the Dirac equation, in which charge carriers imitate relativistic particles with zero rest mass. Here, an atomic orbital-based recursive Green's function method is used for studying the quantum transport. We study quantum fluctuations in graphene and bilayer graphene quantum dots with this recursive Green's function method. Finally, we examine the scaling of the domiant fluctuation frequency with dot size.

  9. Open quantum dots—probing the quantum to classical transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Brunner, R.; Day, T. E.; Meisels, R.; Kuchar, F.; Bird, J. P.; Bennett, B. R.

    2011-04-01

    Quantum dots provide a natural system in which to study both quantum and classical features of transport. As a closed testbed, they provide a natural system with a very rich set of eigenstates. When coupled to the environment through a pair of quantum point contacts, each of which passes several modes, the original quantum environment evolves into a set of decoherent and coherent states, which classically would compose a mixed phase space. The manner of this breakup is governed strongly by Zurek's decoherence theory, and the remaining coherent states possess all the properties of his pointer states. These states are naturally studied via traditional magnetotransport at low temperatures. More recently, we have used scanning gate (conductance) microscopy to probe the nature of the coherent states, and have shown that families of states exist through the spectrum in a manner consistent with quantum Darwinism. In this review, we discuss the nature of the various states, how they are formed, and the signatures that appear in magnetotransport and general conductance studies.

  10. Open quantum systems approach to atomtronics

    SciTech Connect

    Pepino, R. A.; Cooper, J.; Meiser, D.; Anderson, D. Z.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-07-15

    We derive a quantum master equation to treat quantum systems interacting with multiple reservoirs. The formalism is used to investigate the atomic transport of bosons across a variety of lattice configurations. We demonstrate how the behavior of an electronic diode, a field-effect transistor, and a bipolar junction transistor can be realized with neutral, ultracold atoms trapped in optical lattices. An analysis of the current fluctuations is provided for the case of the atomtronic diode. Finally, we show that it is possible to demonstrate and logic gate behavior in an optical lattice.

  11. Large-scale PACS implementation.

    PubMed

    Carrino, J A; Unkel, P J; Miller, I D; Bowser, C L; Freckleton, M W; Johnson, T G

    1998-08-01

    The transition to filmless radiology is a much more formidable task than making the request for proposal to purchase a (Picture Archiving and Communications System) PACS. The Department of Defense and the Veterans Administration have been pioneers in the transformation of medical diagnostic imaging to the electronic environment. Many civilian sites are expected to implement large-scale PACS in the next five to ten years. This presentation will related the empirical insights gleaned at our institution from a large-scale PACS implementation. Our PACS integration was introduced into a fully operational department (not a new hospital) in which work flow had to continue with minimal impact. Impediments to user acceptance will be addressed. The critical components of this enormous task will be discussed. The topics covered during this session will include issues such as phased implementation, DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) standard-based interaction of devices, hospital information system (HIS)/radiology information system (RIS) interface, user approval, networking, workstation deployment and backup procedures. The presentation will make specific suggestions regarding the implementation team, operating instructions, quality control (QC), training and education. The concept of identifying key functional areas is relevant to transitioning the facility to be entirely on line. Special attention must be paid to specific functional areas such as the operating rooms and trauma rooms where the clinical requirements may not match the PACS capabilities. The printing of films may be necessary for certain circumstances. The integration of teleradiology and remote clinics into a PACS is a salient topic with respect to the overall role of the radiologists providing rapid consultation. A Web-based server allows a clinician to review images and reports on a desk-top (personal) computer and thus reduce the number of dedicated PACS review workstations. This session

  12. Quantum interference between independent reservoirs in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2014-04-01

    When a quantum system interacts with multiple reservoirs, the environmental effects are usually treated in an additive manner. We show that this assumption breaks down for non-Markovian environments that have finite memory times. Specifically, we demonstrate that quantum interferences between independent environments can qualitatively modify the dynamics of the physical system. We illustrate this effect with a two-level system coupled to two structured photonic reservoirs, discuss its origin using a nonequilibrium diagrammatic technique, and show an example when the application of this interference can result in an improved dark state preparation in a Λ system.

  13. Quantum Interference between independent environments in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne; Lukin, Mikhail

    2014-03-01

    When a general quantum system interacts with multiple environments, the environmental effects are usually treated in an additive manner in the master equation. This assumption becomes questionable for non-Markovian environments that have finite memory times. Here, we show that quantum interferences between independent environments exist and can qualitatively modify the dynamics of the reduced physical system. We illustrate this effect with examples of atomic systems coupled to structured reservoirs, and discuss its origin in general using a non-equilibrium diagrammatic technique. The consequential decoherence dynamics cannot be captured by an additive master equation.

  14. Periodic thermodynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics of quantum systems coupled to periodically modulated heat baths and work reservoirs is developed. By identifying affinities and fluxes, the first and the second law are formulated consistently. In the linear response regime, entropy production becomes a quadratic form in the affinities. Specializing to Lindblad dynamics, we identify the corresponding kinetic coefficients in terms of correlation functions of the unperturbed dynamics. Reciprocity relations follow from symmetries with respect to time reversal. The kinetic coefficients can be split into a classical and a quantum contribution subject to an additional constraint, which follows from a natural detailed balance condition. This constraint implies universal bounds on efficiency and power of quantum heat engines. In particular, we show that Carnot efficiency cannot be reached whenever quantum coherence effects are present, i.e., when the Hamiltonian used for work extraction does not commute with the bare system Hamiltonian. For illustration, we specialize our universal results to a driven two-level system in contact with a heat bath of sinusoidally modulated temperature.

  15. Periodic thermodynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics of quantum systems coupled to periodically modulated heat baths and work reservoirs is developed. By identifying affinities and fluxes, the first and the second law are formulated consistently. In the linear response regime, entropy production becomes a quadratic form in the affinities. Specializing to Lindblad dynamics, we identify the corresponding kinetic coefficients in terms of correlation functions of the unperturbed dynamics. Reciprocity relations follow from symmetries with respect to time reversal. The kinetic coefficients can be split into a classical and a quantum contribution subject to an additional constraint, which follows from a natural detailed balance condition. This constraint implies universal bounds on efficiency and power of quantum heat engines. In particular, we show that Carnot efficiency cannot be reached whenever quantum coherence effects are present, i.e., when the Hamiltonian used for work extraction does not commute with the bare system Hamiltonian. For illustration, we specialize our universal results to a driven two-level system in contact with a heat bath of sinusoidally modulated temperature.

  16. Large scale cluster computing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dane Skow; Alan Silverman

    2002-12-23

    Recent revolutions in computer hardware and software technologies have paved the way for the large-scale deployment of clusters of commodity computers to address problems heretofore the domain of tightly coupled SMP processors. Near term projects within High Energy Physics and other computing communities will deploy clusters of scale 1000s of processors and be used by 100s to 1000s of independent users. This will expand the reach in both dimensions by an order of magnitude from the current successful production facilities. The goals of this workshop were: (1) to determine what tools exist which can scale up to the cluster sizes foreseen for the next generation of HENP experiments (several thousand nodes) and by implication to identify areas where some investment of money or effort is likely to be needed. (2) To compare and record experimences gained with such tools. (3) To produce a practical guide to all stages of planning, installing, building and operating a large computing cluster in HENP. (4) To identify and connect groups with similar interest within HENP and the larger clustering community.

  17. Large-Scale Sequence Comparison.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi

    2017-01-01

    There are millions of sequences deposited in genomic databases, and it is an important task to categorize them according to their structural and functional roles. Sequence comparison is a prerequisite for proper categorization of both DNA and protein sequences, and helps in assigning a putative or hypothetical structure and function to a given sequence. There are various methods available for comparing sequences, alignment being first and foremost for sequences with a small number of base pairs as well as for large-scale genome comparison. Various tools are available for performing pairwise large sequence comparison. The best known tools either perform global alignment or generate local alignments between the two sequences. In this chapter we first provide basic information regarding sequence comparison. This is followed by the description of the PAM and BLOSUM matrices that form the basis of sequence comparison. We also give a practical overview of currently available methods such as BLAST and FASTA, followed by a description and overview of tools available for genome comparison including LAGAN, MumMER, BLASTZ, and AVID.

  18. Large Scale Homing in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Mario; Zhu, Hong; Tautz, Jürgen; Zhang, Shaowu

    2011-01-01

    Honeybee foragers frequently fly several kilometres to and from vital resources, and communicate those locations to their nest mates by a symbolic dance language. Research has shown that they achieve this feat by memorizing landmarks and the skyline panorama, using the sun and polarized skylight as compasses and by integrating their outbound flight paths. In order to investigate the capacity of the honeybees' homing abilities, we artificially displaced foragers to novel release spots at various distances up to 13 km in the four cardinal directions. Returning bees were individually registered by a radio frequency identification (RFID) system at the hive entrance. We found that homing rate, homing speed and the maximum homing distance depend on the release direction. Bees released in the east were more likely to find their way back home, and returned faster than bees released in any other direction, due to the familiarity of global landmarks seen from the hive. Our findings suggest that such large scale homing is facilitated by global landmarks acting as beacons, and possibly the entire skyline panorama. PMID:21602920

  19. Large Scale Magnetostrictive Valve Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.; Holleman, Elizabeth; Eddleman, David

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Valves, Actuators and Ducts Design and Development Branch developed a large scale magnetostrictive valve actuator. The potential advantages of this technology are faster, more efficient valve actuators that consume less power and provide precise position control and deliver higher flow rates than conventional solenoid valves. Magnetostrictive materials change dimensions when a magnetic field is applied; this property is referred to as magnetostriction. Magnetostriction is caused by the alignment of the magnetic domains in the material s crystalline structure and the applied magnetic field lines. Typically, the material changes shape by elongating in the axial direction and constricting in the radial direction, resulting in no net change in volume. All hardware and testing is complete. This paper will discuss: the potential applications of the technology; overview of the as built actuator design; discuss problems that were uncovered during the development testing; review test data and evaluate weaknesses of the design; and discuss areas for improvement for future work. This actuator holds promises of a low power, high load, proportionally controlled actuator for valves requiring 440 to 1500 newtons load.

  20. Measure of the Quantum Speedup in Closed and Open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen-Yu

    We construct a general measure for detecting the quantum speedup in both closed and open systems. This speed measure is based on the changing rate of the position of quantum states on a manifold with appropriate monotone Riemannian metrics. Any increase in speed is a clear signature of real dynamical speedup. To clarify the mechanisms of quantum speedup, we first introduce the concept of longitudinal and transverse types of speedup, and then apply the proposed measure to several typical closed and open quantum systems, illustrating that entanglement and the memory effect of the environment together can become resources for longitudinally or transversely accelerating dynamical evolution under certain conditions. Remarkably, a direct measurement of such speedup is feasible without the need for a tomographic reconstruction of the density matrix, which greatly enhances the feasibility of practical experimental tests. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11204196).

  1. Controlling open quantum systems: tools, achievements, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-06-01

    The advent of quantum devices, which exploit the two essential elements of quantum physics, coherence and entanglement, has sparked renewed interest in the control of open quantum systems. Successful implementations face the challenge of preserving relevant nonclassical features at the level of device operation. A major obstacle is decoherence, which is caused by interaction with the environment. Optimal control theory is a tool that can be used to identify control strategies in the presence of decoherence. Here we review recent advances in optimal control methodology that allow typical tasks in device operation for open quantum systems to be tackled and discuss examples of relaxation-optimized dynamics. Optimal control theory is also a useful tool to exploit the environment for control. We discuss examples and point out possible future extensions.

  2. Controlling open quantum systems: tools, achievements, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christiane P

    2016-06-02

    The advent of quantum devices, which exploit the two essential elements of quantum physics, coherence and entanglement, has sparked renewed interest in the control of open quantum systems. Successful implementations face the challenge of preserving relevant nonclassical features at the level of device operation. A major obstacle is decoherence, which is caused by interaction with the environment. Optimal control theory is a tool that can be used to identify control strategies in the presence of decoherence. Here we review recent advances in optimal control methodology that allow typical tasks in device operation for open quantum systems to be tackled and discuss examples of relaxation-optimized dynamics. Optimal control theory is also a useful tool to exploit the environment for control. We discuss examples and point out possible future extensions.

  3. Statistical entropy of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durão, L. M. M.; Caldeira, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    Dissipative quantum systems are frequently described within the framework of the so-called "system-plus-reservoir" approach. In this work we assign their description to the Maximum Entropy Formalism and compare the resulting thermodynamic properties with those of the well-established approaches. Due to the non-negligible coupling to the heat reservoir, these systems are nonextensive by nature, and the former task may require the use of nonextensive parameter dependent informational entropies. In doing so, we address the problem of choosing appropriate forms of those entropies in order to describe a consistent thermodynamics for dissipative quantum systems. Nevertheless, even having chosen the most successful and popular forms of those entropies, we have proven our model to be a counterexample where this sort of approach leads us to wrong results.

  4. Geometric phase for open quantum systems and stochastic unravelings

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Angelo; Ippoliti, Emiliano

    2006-06-15

    We analyze the geometric phase for an open quantum system when computed by resorting to a stochastic unraveling of the reduced density matrix (quantum jump approach or stochastic Schroedinger equations). We show that the resulting phase strongly depends on the type of unraveling used for the calculations: as such, this phase is not a geometric object since it depends on nonphysical parameters, which are not related to the path followed by the density matrix during the evolution of the system.

  5. Approximation of reachable sets for coherently controlled open quantum systems: Application to quantum state engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Lu, Dawei; Luo, Zhihuang; Laflamme, Raymond; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Precisely characterizing and controlling realistic quantum systems under noises is a challenging frontier in quantum sciences and technologies. In developing reliable controls for open quantum systems, one is often confronted with the problem of the lack of knowledge on the system controllability. The purpose of this paper is to give a numerical approach to this problem, that is, to approximately compute the reachable set of states for coherently controlled quantum Markovian systems. The approximation consists of setting both upper and lower bounds for system's reachable region of states. Furthermore, we apply our reachability analysis to the control of the relaxation dynamics of a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance spin system. We implement some experimental tasks of quantum state engineering in this open system at a near optimal performance in view of purity: e.g., increasing polarization and preparing pseudopure states. These results demonstrate the usefulness of our theory and show interesting and promising applications of environment-assisted quantum dynamics.

  6. Methane emissions on large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beswick, K. M.; Simpson, T. W.; Fowler, D.; Choularton, T. W.; Gallagher, M. W.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Sutton, M. A.; Kaye, A.

    with previous results from the area, indicating that this method of data analysis provided good estimates of large scale methane emissions.

  7. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  8. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  9. Methods for molecular interactions and large-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Byoungseon

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) is one of the powerful methods for studying the complexity of large ensembles of particles in various states of matter. This thesis describes work in advancing selective applications of computational molecular dynamics. First, the detailed interaction between methyl-thiol molecules and a Au(111) surface is investigated through extensive state-of-the-art first principles calculations. The quantum simulation results are used to fit a classical many-body surface potential, which can be conveniently implemented into MD simulations of alkane-thiol ensembles on a Au(111) surface. Also a coarse-grained MD code is developed, and the effect of thiol densities and alkane-chain lengths on self-assembled monolayers is examined. Second, ultracold neutral plasmas with open boundary are investigated with all pair-wise calculations, parallel TREE, and a mean field potential. Using two-component plasma (TCP) analysis and large-scale parallel processing, simulations of realistically large configurations are conducted. In addition to TCP, the mean field theory facilitates the simple description of background electrons, and full scale simulations of ultracold plasma evolution are presented. Finally, two-temperature systems of two-component plasmas with extremely high density and temperatures are examined for thermal mixing and equilibration between the components. Electrostatic interactions are evaluated with periodic boundary conditions, and bare/reduced ion mass simulations are conducted for the balance between numerical efficiency and reliability of simulations. These examples of development and applications of MD methods, such as first-principles calculations, force-field development, efficient algorithm implementation, and large-scale molecular simulations, have provided many valuable experiences in the dynamics and energetics of molecular systems. They have also provided specific new studies and results that are valuable to the communities of surface self

  10. Quantum Computing in Solid State, and Coherent Behavior of Open Quantum Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    2 � Final Report for the ARO Grant DAAD-19-99-1-0342 Quantum Computing in Solid State, and Coherent Behavior of Open Quantum Systems...Our work to apply this method to qubits in quantum- computing architectures, is ongoing, continuing under the new ARO grant. In various collaborations...at http://arxiv.org/ftp/quant-ph/papers/0103/0103116.pdf). Technical reports submitted to ARO Annual Report for 1999 (covering September

  11. Periodic Scarred States in Open Quantum Dots as Evidence of Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Day, T. E.; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, D. K.; Bennett, B. R.

    2010-04-01

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is used to image scar structures in an open quantum dot, which is created in an InAs quantum well by electron-beam lithography and wet etching. The scanned images demonstrate periodicities in magnetic field that correlate to those found in the conductance fluctuations. Simulations have shown that these magnetic transform images bear a strong resemblance to actual scars found in the dot that replicate through the modes in direct agreement with quantum Darwinism.

  12. Periodic scarred States in open quantum dots as evidence of quantum Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Burke, A M; Akis, R; Day, T E; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, D K; Bennett, B R

    2010-04-30

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is used to image scar structures in an open quantum dot, which is created in an InAs quantum well by electron-beam lithography and wet etching. The scanned images demonstrate periodicities in magnetic field that correlate to those found in the conductance fluctuations. Simulations have shown that these magnetic transform images bear a strong resemblance to actual scars found in the dot that replicate through the modes in direct agreement with quantum Darwinism.

  13. Time-continuous open quantum walks (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Radhakrishnan; Liu, Chaobin

    2017-05-01

    Continuous-time open quantum walks (CTOQW) are introduced as the formulation of quantum dynamical semigroups of trace-preserving and completely positive linear maps (or quantum Markov semigroups) on graphs. We show that a CTOQW always converges to a steady state regardless of the initial state when a graph is connected. When the graph is both connected and regular, it is shown that the steady state is the maximally mixed state. The difference of long-time behaviors between CTOQW and other two continuous-time processes on graphs is exemplified. The examples demonstrate that the structure of a graph can affect a quantum coherence effect on CTOQW through a long time run. Precisely, a quantum coherence effect persists throughout the evolution of the CTOQW when the underlying topology is certain irregular graphs (such as a path or a star as shown in the examples). In contrast, a quantum coherence effect will eventually vanish from the open quantum system when the underlying topology is a regular graph (such as a cycle).

  14. Steady states of continuous-time open quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaobin; Balu, Radhakrishnan

    2017-07-01

    Continuous-time open quantum walks (CTOQW) are introduced as the formulation of quantum dynamical semigroups of trace-preserving and completely positive linear maps (or quantum Markov semigroups) on graphs. We show that a CTOQW always converges to a steady state regardless of the initial state when a graph is connected. When the graph is both connected and regular, it is shown that the steady state is the maximally mixed state. As shown by the examples in this article, the steady states of CTOQW can be very unusual and complicated even though the underlying graphs are simple. The examples demonstrate that the structure of a graph can affect quantum coherence in CTOQW through a long-time run. Precisely, the quantum coherence persists throughout the evolution of the CTOQW when the underlying topology is certain irregular graphs (such as a path or a star as shown in the examples). In contrast, the quantum coherence will eventually vanish from the open quantum system when the underlying topology is a regular graph (such as a cycle).

  15. Large-Scale Sakharov Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Bremner, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Recent far-reaching theoretical results have used the quantum vacuum noise as a fundamental electromagnetic radiation field to derive a frequency (w) -dependent version of Newton's gravitational coupling term, G(w). This paper reconciles the cutoff frequency with the observed cosmological constant, then briefly puts forward a realizable laboratory test case in the 10-100 Mhz frequency range. One analogy is drawn between the classical vacuum energy experiments with attraction between two closely spaced plates (Casimir cavity) and the arbitrarily dense material boundaries possible in Bose condensates, such as irradiation at Mhz frequencies of superfluid helium or superconductors.

  16. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-08-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  17. Control of decoherence in open quantum systems using feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Narayan

    Decoherence, which is caused due to the interaction of a quantum system with its environment plagues all quantum systems and leads to the loss of quantum properties that are vital for quantum computation and quantum information processing. In this work we propose a novel strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done so. A novel construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Almost all the earlier work on decoherence control employ density matrix and stochastic master equations to analyze the problem. Our approach to decoherence control involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with non-trivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and Decoherence Free Subspaces (DFS). Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. The two concepts are contrasted and an improved theory of disturbance decoupling for general input affine systems is developed. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system has to be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. Finally the results are also shown to be superior to the ones obtained via master equations. In order to apply feedback a reliable information extraction scheme is presented that employs continuous indirect measurements with the help of a quantum probe. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform

  18. Eigenvalue problem of the Liouvillian of open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Naomichi; Petrosky, Tomio

    2015-03-10

    It is argued that the Liouvillian that appears in the Liouville-von Neumann equation for open quantum systems can have complex eigenvalues. Attention is paid to the question whether the Liouvillian has an eigenvalue that are not given by the difference of the two Hamiltonian eigenvalues.

  19. c -number quantum generalized Langevin equation for an open system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantorovich, L.; Ness, H.; Stella, L.; Lorenz, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    We derive a c -number generalized Langevin equation (GLE) describing the evolution of the expectation values xixit of the atomic position operators xi of an open system. The latter is coupled linearly to a harmonic bath kept at a fixed temperature. The equations of motion contain a non-Markovian friction term with the classical kernel [L. Kantorovich, Phys. Rev. B 78, 094304 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevB.78.094304] and a zero mean non-Gaussian random force with correlation functions that depend on the initial preparation of the open system. We used a density operator formalism without assuming that initially the combined system was decoupled. The only approximation made in deriving quantum GLE consists of assuming that the Hamiltonian of the open system at time t can be expanded up to the second order with respect to operators of atomic displacements ui=xi-t (the "harmonization" approximation). The noise is introduced to ensure that sampling many quantum GLE trajectories yields exactly the average one. An explicit expression for the pair correlation function of the noise, consistent with the classical limit, is also proposed. Unlike the usually considered quantum operator GLE, the proposed c -number quantum GLE can be used in direct molecular dynamic simulations of open systems under general equilibrium or nonequilibrium conditions.

  20. Experiences from Participants in Large-Scale Group Practice of the Maharishi Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Programs and Parallel Principles of Quantum Theory, Astrophysics, Quantum Cosmology, and String Theory: Interdisciplinary Qualitative Correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Eric Johan

    Participants on the Invincible America Assembly in Fairfield, Iowa, and neighboring Maharishi Vedic City, Iowa, practicing Maharishi Transcendental Meditation(TM) (TM) and the TM-Sidhi(TM) programs in large groups, submitted written experiences that they had had during, and in some cases shortly after, their daily practice of the TM and TM-Sidhi programs. Participants were instructed to include in their written experiences only what they observed and to leave out interpretation and analysis. These experiences were then read by the author and compared with principles and phenomena of modern physics, particularly with quantum theory, astrophysics, quantum cosmology, and string theory as well as defining characteristics of higher states of consciousness as described by Maharishi Vedic Science. In all cases, particular principles or phenomena of physics and qualities of higher states of consciousness appeared qualitatively quite similar to the content of the given experience. These experiences are presented in an Appendix, in which the corresponding principles and phenomena of physics are also presented. These physics "commentaries" on the experiences were written largely in layman's terms, without equations, and, in nearly every case, with clear reference to the corresponding sections of the experiences to which a given principle appears to relate. An abundance of similarities were apparent between the subjective experiences during meditation and principles of modern physics. A theoretic framework for understanding these rich similarities may begin with Maharishi's theory of higher states of consciousness provided herein. We conclude that the consistency and richness of detail found in these abundant similarities warrants the further pursuit and development of such a framework.

  1. Symmetry and the thermodynamics of currents in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Daniel; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2014-09-01

    Symmetry is a powerful concept in physics, and its recent application to understand nonequilibrium behavior is providing deep insights and groundbreaking exact results. Here we show how to harness symmetry to control transport and statistics in open quantum systems. Such control is enabled by a first-order-type dynamic phase transition in current statistics and the associated coexistence of different transport channels (or nonequilibrium steady states) classified by symmetry. Microreversibility then ensues, via the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, a twin dynamic phase transition for rare current fluctuations. Interestingly, the symmetry present in the initial state is spontaneously broken at the fluctuating level, where the quantum system selects the symmetry sector that maximally facilitates a given fluctuation. We illustrate these results in a qubit network model motivated by the problem of coherent energy harvesting in photosynthetic complexes, and introduce the concept of a symmetry-controlled quantum thermal switch, suggesting symmetry-based design strategies for quantum devices with controllable transport properties.

  2. Quantum Control of Open Systems and Dense Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiLoreto, Christopher

    Controlling the dynamics of open quantum systems; i.e. quantum systems that decohere because of interactions with the environment, is an active area of research with many applications in quantum optics and quantum computation. My thesis expands the scope of this inquiry by seeking to control open systems in proximity to an additional system. The latter could be a classical system such as metal nanoparticles, or a quantum system such as a cluster of similar atoms. By modelling the interactions between the systems, we are able to expand the accessible state space of the quantum system in question. For a single, three-level quantum system, I examine isolated systems that have only normal spontaneous emission. I then show that intensity-intensity correlation spectra, which depend directly on the density matrix of the system, can be used detect whether transitions share a common energy level. This detection is possible due to the presence of quantum interference effects between two transitions if they are connected. This effect allows one to asses energy level structure diagrams in complex atoms/molecules. By placing an open quantum system near a nanoparticle dimer, I show that the spontaneous emission rate of the system can be changed "on demand" by changing the polarization of an incident, driving field. In a three-level, Lambda system, this allows a qubit to both retain high qubit fidelity when it is operating, and to be rapidly initialized to a pure state once it is rendered unusable by decoherence. This type of behaviour is not possible in a single open quantum system; therefore adding a classical system nearby extends the overall control space of the quantum system. An open quantum system near identical neighbours in a dense ensemble is another example of how the accessible state space can be expanded. I show that a dense ensemble of atoms rapidly becomes disordered with states that are not directly excited by an incident field becoming significantly populated

  3. Large-scale simulations of complex physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belić, A.

    2007-04-01

    Scientific computing has become a tool as vital as experimentation and theory for dealing with scientific challenges of the twenty-first century. Large scale simulations and modelling serve as heuristic tools in a broad problem-solving process. High-performance computing facilities make possible the first step in this process - a view of new and previously inaccessible domains in science and the building up of intuition regarding the new phenomenology. The final goal of this process is to translate this newly found intuition into better algorithms and new analytical results. In this presentation we give an outline of the research themes pursued at the Scientific Computing Laboratory of the Institute of Physics in Belgrade regarding large-scale simulations of complex classical and quantum physical systems, and present recent results obtained in the large-scale simulations of granular materials and path integrals.

  4. Large-scale simulations of complex physical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Belic, A.

    2007-04-23

    Scientific computing has become a tool as vital as experimentation and theory for dealing with scientific challenges of the twenty-first century. Large scale simulations and modelling serve as heuristic tools in a broad problem-solving process. High-performance computing facilities make possible the first step in this process - a view of new and previously inaccessible domains in science and the building up of intuition regarding the new phenomenology. The final goal of this process is to translate this newly found intuition into better algorithms and new analytical results.In this presentation we give an outline of the research themes pursued at the Scientific Computing Laboratory of the Institute of Physics in Belgrade regarding large-scale simulations of complex classical and quantum physical systems, and present recent results obtained in the large-scale simulations of granular materials and path integrals.

  5. Keldysh field theory for driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Sieberer, L M; Buchhold, M; Diehl, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent experimental developments in diverse areas-ranging from cold atomic gases to light-driven semiconductors to microcavity arrays-move systems into the focus which are located on the interface of quantum optics, many-body physics and statistical mechanics. They share in common that coherent and driven-dissipative quantum dynamics occur on an equal footing, creating genuine non-equilibrium scenarios without immediate counterpart in equilibrium condensed matter physics. This concerns both their non-thermal stationary states and their many-body time evolution. It is a challenge to theory to identify novel instances of universal emergent macroscopic phenomena, which are tied unambiguously and in an observable way to the microscopic drive conditions. In this review, we discuss some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we provide a systematic introduction to the open system Keldysh functional integral approach, which is the proper technical tool to accomplish a merger of quantum optics and many-body physics, and leverages the power of modern quantum field theory to driven open quantum systems.

  6. Keldysh field theory for driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieberer, L. M.; Buchhold, M.; Diehl, S.

    2016-09-01

    Recent experimental developments in diverse areas—ranging from cold atomic gases to light-driven semiconductors to microcavity arrays—move systems into the focus which are located on the interface of quantum optics, many-body physics and statistical mechanics. They share in common that coherent and driven-dissipative quantum dynamics occur on an equal footing, creating genuine non-equilibrium scenarios without immediate counterpart in equilibrium condensed matter physics. This concerns both their non-thermal stationary states and their many-body time evolution. It is a challenge to theory to identify novel instances of universal emergent macroscopic phenomena, which are tied unambiguously and in an observable way to the microscopic drive conditions. In this review, we discuss some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we provide a systematic introduction to the open system Keldysh functional integral approach, which is the proper technical tool to accomplish a merger of quantum optics and many-body physics, and leverages the power of modern quantum field theory to driven open quantum systems.

  7. Parametric representation of open quantum systems and cross-over from quantum to classical environment.

    PubMed

    Calvani, Dario; Cuccoli, Alessandro; Gidopoulos, Nikitas I; Verrucchi, Paola

    2013-04-23

    The behavior of most physical systems is affected by their natural surroundings. A quantum system with an environment is referred to as open, and its study varies according to the classical or quantum description adopted for the environment. We propose an approach to open quantum systems that allows us to follow the cross-over from quantum to classical environments; to achieve this, we devise an exact parametric representation of the principal system, based on generalized coherent states for the environment. The method is applied to the s = 1/2 Heisenberg star with frustration, where the quantum character of the environment varies with the couplings entering the Hamiltonian H. We find that when the star is in an eigenstate of H, the central spin behaves as if it were in an effective magnetic field, pointing in the direction set by the environmental coherent-state angle variables (θ, ϕ), and broadened according to their quantum probability distribution. Such distribution is independent of ϕ, whereas as a function of θ is seen to get narrower as the quantum character of the environment is reduced, collapsing into a Dirac-δ function in the classical limit. In such limit, because ϕ is left undetermined, the Von Neumann entropy of the central spin remains finite; in fact, it is equal to the entanglement of the original fully quantum model, a result that establishes a relation between this latter quantity and the Berry phase characterizing the dynamics of the central spin in the effective magnetic field.

  8. Equilibration properties of a disordered interacting open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nieuwenburg, Evert; Huber, Sebastian

    The central question in the field of many body localization is if a closed interacting quantum system effectively thermalizes in the presence of disorder. However, any experimental test necessarily involves the opening of the ideally closed quantum system. Both from a fundamental point of view as well as for concrete experimental investigations of many body localization phenomena, a solid understanding of the effect of an attached bath is of significant importance. We study the equilibration properties of disordered interacting open quantum systems. On the one hand we consider the equilibration of such a many body localized system by coupling baths to the ends of a 1D spin chain. We find non-monotonous behaviour of the slowest relaxation time towards equilibrium. On the other hand, we take the bath itself to be a disordered interacting open quantum system and investigate the dephasing of a single qubit coupled to it. The model for the bath has a many body localization transition, affecting the dephasing of the single qubit.

  9. Dynamical and thermodynamical control of Open Quantum Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco; Sinayskiy, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    Over the last few years dynamical properties and limit distributions of Open Quantum Walks (OQWs), quantum walks driven by dissipation, have been intensely studied [S. Attal et. al. J. Stat. Phys. 147, Issue 4, 832 (2012)]. For some particular cases of OQWs central limit theorems have been proven [S. Attal, N. Guillotin, C. Sabot, ``Central Limit Theorems for Open Quantum Random Walks,'' to appear in Annales Henri Poincaré]. However, only recently the connection between the rich dynamical behavior of OQWs and the corresponding microscopic system-environment models has been established. The microscopic derivation of an OQW as a reduced system dynamics on a 2-nodes graph [I. Sinayskiy, F. Petruccione, Open Syst. Inf. Dyn. 20, 1340007 (2013)] and its generalization to arbitrary graphs allow to explain the dependance of the dynamical behavior of the OQW on the temperature and coupling to the environment. For thermal environments we observe Gaussian behaviour, whereas at zero temperature population trapping and ``soliton''-like behaviour are possible. Physical realizations of OQWs in quantum optical setups will be also presented. This work is based on research supported by the South African Research Chair Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and National Research Foundation.

  10. Atomic vs. quantum dot open shell spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, Jacob; Montgomery, H. E.

    2017-02-01

    Hund's rules apply to pairs of atomic states which, in the limit of weak interelectronic repulsion, belong to a common configuration. We examine the asymptotic behavior of the energy difference between states belonging to such pairs (Δ E ) as a function of the nuclear charge (Z) at both Z →∞ (ignoring relativistic effects) and at Z →Zc , where Zc is the critical charge below which the outermost electron is not bound. We find that the ratio Δ/E Z2 is non-monotonic, having a maximum at some intermediate value of Z. This non-monotonicity is shown to account for the sign reversal in the difference between the corresponding interelectronic repulsion energies. For analogous open shell systems with confining potentials (such as Hooke's atom or the infinite spherical well), the corresponding function of the energy difference, in terms of which the interelectronic repulsion energy is given as a first derivative with respect to the parameter that characterizes the strength of the one-body potential (such as the harmonic force constant or the well radius, respectively), is monotonic in this parameter. This implies that the relative magnitude of the interelectronic repulsion energies that characterizes the strong one-body limit (usually, the ordering naively expected on the basis of Hund's rule) remains valid along the whole isoelectronic sequence.

  11. Homogeneous Open Quantum Random Walks on a Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Raffaella; Pautrat, Yan

    2015-09-01

    We study open quantum random walks (OQRWs) for which the underlying graph is a lattice, and the generators of the walk are homogeneous in space. Using the results recently obtained in Carbone and Pautrat (Ann Henri Poincaré, 2015), we study the quantum trajectory associated with the OQRW, which is described by a position process and a state process. We obtain a central limit theorem and a large deviation principle for the position process. We study in detail the case of homogeneous OQRWs on the lattice , with internal space.

  12. Hierarchy of Stochastic Pure States for Open Quantum System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, D.; Eisfeld, A.; Strunz, W. T.

    2014-10-01

    We derive a hierarchy of stochastic evolution equations for pure states (quantum trajectories) for open quantum system dynamics with non-Markovian structured environments. This hierarchy of pure states (HOPS) is generally applicable and provides the exact reduced density operator as an ensemble average over normalized states. The corresponding nonlinear equations are presented. We demonstrate that HOPS provides an efficient theoretical tool and apply it to the spin-boson model, the calculation of absorption spectra of molecular aggregates, and energy transfer in a photosynthetic pigment-protein complex.

  13. Tunneling phenomena in the open elliptic quantum billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gracia, Hipolito; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C.

    2012-07-01

    The study of open quantum billiards has gained popularity in the last decades, including different common and uncommon geometries such as the circular and stadium billiards. We present an extensive analysis of the elliptic quantum billiard with hyperbolic channels. We concentrate on the tunneling through an elliptic resonator-like structure. We analyze three different variations of the system: the first configuration has horizontal channels, then we study the system with vertical leads, and finally we displace both channels by the same angle to gain a more general perspective. We observed a very unusual phase distribution in the resonator cavity when there is no tunneling through the system.

  14. Electromagnetic scattering in the open elliptic quantum billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gracia, Hipolito; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C.

    2012-10-01

    The study of open quantum billiards has gained popularity in the last decades, including different common and uncommon geometries such as the circular and stadium billiards. We study the electromagnetic scattering of a linearly polarized electric field in the elliptic quantum billiard with hyperbolic channels. We analyze the effect of different parameters on the scattering in a billiard configuration obtained by displacing both channels by the same angle. We observed that for the configuration proposed in this work the polarization of the electric field is conserved.

  15. Decoherence control in open quantum systems via classical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Narayan; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2007-03-01

    In this work we propose a strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done. A construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Our approach to decoherence control in contrast to other approaches in the literature involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with nontrivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and decoherence free subspaces. Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system must be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. In the subsequent section we discuss a general information extraction scheme to gain knowledge of the state and the amount of decoherence based on indirect continuous measurement. The analysis of continuous measurement on a decohering quantum system has not been extensively studied before. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform decoherence free quantum computing. The results obtained are qualitatively different and superior to the ones obtained via master equations.

  16. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R. These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R=0) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits.

  17. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Gabriel G.; Benito, R. M.; Borondo, F.

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R . These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R =0 ) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits.

  18. Large-Scale Reform Comes of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the history of large-scale education reform and makes the case that large-scale or whole system reform policies and strategies are becoming increasingly evident. The review briefly addresses the pre 1997 period concluding that while the pressure for reform was mounting that there were very few examples of deliberate or…

  19. Automating large-scale reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper conveys a philosophy for developing automated large-scale control systems that behave in an integrated, intelligent, flexible manner. Methods for operating large-scale systems under varying degrees of equipment degradation are discussed, and a design approach that separates the effort into phases is suggested. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Limit Theorem and Applications of the Pauli Open Quantum Random Walk on Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampadu, Clement

    2013-04-01

    Following the recent talk in the ``Workshop of Quantum Dynamics and Quantum Walks'' held at Okazaki Conference Center, Okazaki, Japan. This talk clarifies the relationship between the convergent behavior of the Pauli quantum walk on the line, and the open quantum random walk obtained from the Pauli quantum walk.

  1. An information theory model for dissipation in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, David M.

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a general model for open quantum systems using an information game along the lines of Jaynes’ original work. It is shown how an energy based reweighting of propagators provides a novel moment generating function at each time point in the process. Derivatives of the generating function give moments of the time derivatives of observables. Aside from the mathematically helpful properties, the ansatz reproduces key physics of stochastic quantum processes. At high temperature, the average density matrix follows the Caldeira-Leggett equation. Its associated Langevin equation clearly demonstrates the emergence of dissipation and decoherence time scales, as well as an additional diffusion due to quantum confinement. A consistent interpretation of these results is that decoherence and wavefunction collapse during measurement are directly related to the degree of environmental noise, and thus occur because of subjective uncertainty of an observer.

  2. Linear Response Theory for Thermally Driven Quantum Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, V.; Ogata, Y.; Pillet, C.-A.

    2006-05-01

    This note is a continuation of our recent paper [V. Jakšić Y. Ogata, and C.-A. Pillet, The Green-Kubo formula and Onsager reciprocity relations in quantum statistical mechanics. Commun. Math. Phys. in press.] where we have proven the Green-Kubo formula and the Onsager reciprocity relations for heat fluxes in thermally driven quantum open systems. In this note we extend the derivation of the Green-Kubo formula to heat and charge fluxes and discuss some other generalizations of the model and results of [V. Jakšić Y. Ogata and C.-A. Pillet, The Green-Kubo formula and Onsager reciprocity relations in quantum statistical mechanics. Commun. Math. Phys. in press.].

  3. Fluctuations of work in nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Suomela, S; Salmilehto, J; Savenko, I G; Ala-Nissila, T; Möttönen, M

    2015-02-01

    We extend the quantum jump method to nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems in a way that allows for an accurate account of the external driving in the system-environment interaction. Using this framework, we construct the corresponding trajectory-dependent work performed on the system and derive the integral fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality for nearly adiabatic driving. We show that such identities hold as long as the stochastic dynamics and work variable are consistently defined. We numerically study the emerging work statistics for a two-level quantum system and find that the conventional diabatic approximation is unable to capture some prominent features arising from driving, such as the continuity of the probability density of work. Our results reveal the necessity of using accurate expressions for the drive-dressed heat exchange in future experiments probing jump time distributions.

  4. Understanding Hawking radiation in the framework of open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hongwei; Zhang Jialin

    2008-01-15

    We study the Hawking radiation in the framework of open quantum systems by examining the time evolution of a detector (modeled by a two-level atom) interacting with vacuum massless scalar fields. The dynamics of the detector is governed by a master equation obtained by tracing over the field degrees of freedom from the complete system. The nonunitary effects are studied by analyzing the time behavior of a particular observable of the detector, i.e., its admissible state, in the Unruh, Hartle-Hawking, as well as Boulware vacua outside a Schwarzschild black hole. We find that the detector in both the Unruh and Hartle-Hawking vacua would spontaneously excite with a nonvanishing probability the same as what one would obtain if there is thermal radiation at the Hawking temperature from the black hole, thus reproducing the basic results concerning the Hawking effect in the framework of open quantum systems.

  5. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  6. Statistical Measures of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogeley, Michael; Geller, Margaret; Huchra, John; Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard

    1993-12-01

    \\inv Mpc} To quantify clustering in the large-scale distribution of galaxies and to test theories for the formation of structure in the universe, we apply statistical measures to the CfA Redshift Survey. This survey is complete to m_{B(0)}=15.5 over two contiguous regions which cover one-quarter of the sky and include ~ 11,000 galaxies. The salient features of these data are voids with diameter 30-50\\hmpc and coherent dense structures with a scale ~ 100\\hmpc. Comparison with N-body simulations rules out the ``standard" CDM model (Omega =1, b=1.5, sigma_8 =1) at the 99% confidence level because this model has insufficient power on scales lambda >30\\hmpc. An unbiased open universe CDM model (Omega h =0.2) and a biased CDM model with non-zero cosmological constant (Omega h =0.24, lambda_0 =0.6) match the observed power spectrum. The amplitude of the power spectrum depends on the luminosity of galaxies in the sample; bright (L>L(*) ) galaxies are more strongly clustered than faint galaxies. The paucity of bright galaxies in low-density regions may explain this dependence. To measure the topology of large-scale structure, we compute the genus of isodensity surfaces of the smoothed density field. On scales in the ``non-linear" regime, <= 10\\hmpc, the high- and low-density regions are multiply-connected over a broad range of density threshold, as in a filamentary net. On smoothing scales >10\\hmpc, the topology is consistent with statistics of a Gaussian random field. Simulations of CDM models fail to produce the observed coherence of structure on non-linear scales (>95% confidence level). The underdensity probability (the frequency of regions with density contrast delta rho //lineρ=-0.8) depends strongly on the luminosity of galaxies; underdense regions are significantly more common (>2sigma ) in bright (L>L(*) ) galaxy samples than in samples which include fainter galaxies.

  7. A relativistic signature in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Verde, Licia; Wands, David

    2016-09-01

    In General Relativity, the constraint equation relating metric and density perturbations is inherently nonlinear, leading to an effective non-Gaussianity in the dark matter density field on large scales-even if the primordial metric perturbation is Gaussian. Intrinsic non-Gaussianity in the large-scale dark matter overdensity in GR is real and physical. However, the variance smoothed on a local physical scale is not correlated with the large-scale curvature perturbation, so that there is no relativistic signature in the galaxy bias when using the simplest model of bias. It is an open question whether the observable mass proxies such as luminosity or weak lensing correspond directly to the physical mass in the simple halo bias model. If not, there may be observables that encode this relativistic signature.

  8. Open Quantum Systems with Applications to Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieri, David

    A spectrally pure coherent light source is an important component in precision measurement applications, such as an atomic clock. The more spectrally pure the coherent light source, or the narrower the linewidth of its power spectrum, the better for atomic clock experiments. A coherent light light source, such as a laser, is intrinsically an open quantum system, meaning that it gains and loses energy from an external environment. The aim of this thesis is to study various open quantum systems in an attempt to discover a scheme in which an extremely spectrally pure coherent light source might be realized. Therefore, this thesis begins by introducing the two main approaches to treating open quantum systems, the quantum master equation approach, and the quantum Langevin equation approach. In addition to deriving these from first principles, many of the solution methods to these approaches are given and then demonstrated using computer simulations. These include the quantum jump algorithm, the quantum state diffusion algorithm, the cumulant expansion method, and the method of c-number Langevin equations. Using these methods, the theory of the crossover between lasing and steady state superradiance is presented. It is shown that lasing and steady state superradiance might be demonstrated in the same physical system, but in different parameter regimes. The parameter space between these two extreme limits is explored, and the benefits and drawbacks of operating a system at a given set of parameters, i.e. to achieve the most spectrally pure light source, are discussed. We also consider the phase stability of a laser that is locked to a cavity QED system comprised of atoms with an ultra-narrow optical transition. Although the atomic motion introduces Doppler broadening, the standing wave nature of the cavity causes saturated absorption, which can be used to achieve an extremely high degree of phase stabilization. The inhomogeneity introduced by finite atomic velocities can

  9. Large Scale Metal Additive Techniques Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nycz, Andrzej; Adediran, Adeola I; Noakes, Mark W; Love, Lonnie J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years additive manufacturing made long strides toward becoming a main stream production technology. Particularly strong progress has been made in large-scale polymer deposition. However, large scale metal additive has not yet reached parity with large scale polymer. This paper is a review study of the metal additive techniques in the context of building large structures. Current commercial devices are capable of printing metal parts on the order of several cubic feet compared to hundreds of cubic feet for the polymer side. In order to follow the polymer progress path several factors are considered: potential to scale, economy, environment friendliness, material properties, feedstock availability, robustness of the process, quality and accuracy, potential for defects, and post processing as well as potential applications. This paper focuses on current state of art of large scale metal additive technology with a focus on expanding the geometric limits.

  10. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  11. The ALPS Project: Open Source Software for Quantum Lattice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebst, Simon

    2004-03-01

    Algorithms for the simulation of strongly correlated quantum lattice models have matured and there is increasing demand for reliable simulation results both from theoreticians to test ideas and from experimental researchers as means of data analysis. Unlike in other fields there have been no "community codes" available, with the computational experts writing individual codes, adjusting them for specific needs of new projects and thereby investing weeks to months in software development for each project. We will present experiences with the ALPS collaboration, an open source effort aiming at simplifying the development of simulation codes for strongly correlated classical and quantum lattice models. It provides powerful but generic libraries and open-source application programs (such as classical and quantum Monte Carlo, exact diagonalization, DMRG, and others), intended also for non-experts. We will especially address three topics that are of relevance also to other similar efforts: license issues have been extensively discussed, especially concerning the scientific return of making source codes available to the community. The ALPS license is a compromise ensuring scientific return by requesting citations to the original authors of the codes while making sources openly available for future developments. The coordination of an international collaboration with researchers contributing from Austria, France, Germany, Japan and Switzerland by intense developer workshops on a semi-annual basis and annual user workshops is discussed. The situation for funding needed for such a joint open source development effort, which is often classified more as an infrastructure project and less as a research project, is also addressed. Work done with the ALPS collaboration initiated by M. Troyer (ETH) and S. Todo (Tokyo). For details and a list of members see http://alps.comp-phys.org/

  12. The Large -scale Distribution of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flin, Piotr

    A review of the Large-scale structure of the Universe is given. A connection is made with the titanic work by Johannes Kepler in many areas of astronomy and cosmology. A special concern is made to spatial distribution of Galaxies, voids and walls (cellular structure of the Universe). Finaly, the author is concluding that the large scale structure of the Universe can be observed in much greater scale that it was thought twenty years ago.

  13. Stochastic theory of non-Markovian open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu

    In this thesis, a stochastic approach to solving non-Markovian open quantum system called "non-Markovian quantum state diffusion" (NMQSD) approach is discussed in details. The NMQSD approach can serve as an analytical and numerical tool to study the dynamics of the open quantum systems. We explore three main topics of the NMQSD approach. First, we extend the NMQSD approach to many-body open systems such as two-qubit system and coupled N-cavity system. Based on the exact NMQSD equations and the corresponding master equations, we investigate several interesting non-Markovian features due to the memory effect of the environment such as the entanglement generation in two-qubit system and the coherence and entanglement transfer between cavities. Second, we extend the original NMQSD approach to the case that system is coupled to a fermionic bath or a spin bath. By introducing the anti-commutative Grassmann noise and the fermionic coherent state, we derive a fermionic NMQSD equation and the corresponding master equation. The fermionic NMQSD is illustrated by several examples. In a single qubit dissipative example, we have explicitly demonstrated that the NMQSD approach and the ordinary quantum mechanics give rise to the exactly same results. We also show the difference between fermionic bath and bosonic bath. Third, we combine the bosonic and fermionic NMQSD approach to develop a unified NMQSD approach to study the case that an open system is coupled to a bosonic bath and a fermionic bath simultaneously. For all practical purposes, we develop a set of useful computer programs (NMQSD Toolbox) to implement the NMQSD equation in realistic computations. In particular, we develop an algorithm to calculate the exact O operator involved in the NMQSD equation. The NMQSD toolbox is designed to be user friendly, so it will be especially valuable for a non-expert who has interest to employ the NMQSD equation to solve a practical problem. Apart from the central topics on the NMQSD

  14. Boundary driven open quantum many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prosen, Tomaž

    2014-01-08

    In this lecture course I outline a simple paradigm of non-eqjuilibrium quantum statistical physics, namely we shall study quantum lattice systems with local, Hamiltonian (conservative) interactions which are coupled to the environment via incoherent processes only at the system's boundaries. This is arguably the simplest nontrivial context where one can study far from equilibrium steady states and their transport properties. We shall formulate the problem in terms of a many-body Markovian master equation (the so-called Lindblad equation, and some of its extensions, e.g. the Redfield eqaution). The lecture course consists of two main parts: Firstly, and most extensively we shall present canonical Liouville-space many-body formalism, the so-called 'third quantization' and show how it can be implemented to solve bi-linear open many-particle problems, the key peradigmatic examples being the XY spin 1/2 chains or quasi-free bosonic (or harmonic) chains. Secondly, we shall outline several recent approaches on how to approach exactly solvable open quantum interacting many-body problems, such as anisotropic Heisenberg ((XXZ) spin chain or fermionic Hubbard chain.

  15. Landau-Zener transitions in an open multilevel quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashhab, S.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the Landau-Zener problem for a multilevel quantum system that is coupled to an external environment. In particular, we consider a number of cases of three-level systems coupled to a harmonic oscillator that represents the external environment. We find that, similar to the case of the Landau-Zener problem with a two-level system, when the quantum system and the environment are both initially in their ground states the probability that the system remains in the same quantum state is not affected by the coupling to the environment. The final occupation probabilities of the other states are well described by a common general principle: the coupling to the environment turns each Landau-Zener transition process in the closed system into a sequence of smaller transitions in the combined Hilbert space of the system and environment, and this sequence of transitions lasts a total duration that increases with increasing system-environment coupling strength. These results provide an intuitive understanding of Landau-Zener transitions in open multilevel quantum systems.

  16. Speed limits in Liouville space for open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdin, Raam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2016-08-01

    One of the defining properties of an open quantum system is the variation of its purity in time. We derive speed limits on the rate of purity change for systems coupled to a Markovian environment. Our speed limits are based on Liouville space where density matrices are represented as vectors. This approach leads to speed limits that are always tighter compared to their parallel speed limits in Hilbert space. These bounds depend solely on the generators of the nonunitary dynamics and are independent of the particular state of the systems. Thus, they are perfectly suited to investigate dephasing, thermalization, and decorrelation processes of arbitrary states. We show that our speed limits can be attained and are therefore tight. As an application of our results we study dephasing of interacting spins, and the speed of classical and quantum correlation erasure in multi-particle system.

  17. Time-correlated blip dynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Michael; Stockburger, Jürgen T.; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    The non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems is still a challenging task, particularly in the nonperturbative regime at low temperatures. While the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation (SLN) provides a formally exact tool to tackle this problem for both discrete and continuous degrees of freedom, its performance deteriorates for long times due to an inherently nonunitary propagator. Here we present a scheme that combines the SLN with projector operator techniques based on finite dephasing times, gaining substantial improvements in terms of memory storage and statistics. The approach allows for systematic convergence and is applicable in regions of parameter space where perturbative methods fail, up to the long-time domain. Findings are applied to the coherent and incoherent quantum dynamics of two- and three-level systems. In the long-time domain sequential and superexchange transfer rates are extracted and compared to perturbative predictions.

  18. Excitation transfer through open quantum networks: Three basic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2011-10-01

    A variety of open quantum networks are currently under intense examination to model energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Here, we study the coherent transfer of a quantum excitation over a network incoherently coupled with a structured and small environment that effectively models the photosynthetic reaction center. Our goal is to distill a few basic, possibly universal, mechanisms or effects that are featured in simple energy-transfer models. In particular, we identify three different phenomena: the congestion effect, the asymptotic unitarity, and the staircase effects. We begin with few-site models, in which these effects can be fully understood, and then proceed to study more complex networks similar to those employed to model energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes.

  19. Dynamical gauge effects in an open quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    We describe new experimental techniques for simulation of high-energy field theories based on an analogy between open thermodynamic systems and effective dynamical gauge-fields following SU(2) × U(1) Yang-Mills models. By coupling near-resonant laser-modes to atoms moving in a disordered optical environment, we create an open system which exhibits a non-equilibrium phase transition between two steady-state behaviors, exhibiting scale-invariant behavior near the transition. By measuring transport of atoms through the disordered network, we observe two distinct scaling behaviors, corresponding to the classical and quantum limits for the dynamical gauge field. This behavior is loosely analogous to dynamical gauge effects in quantum chromodynamics, and can mapped onto generalized open problems in theoretical understanding of quantized non-Abelian gauge theories. Additional, the scaling behavior can be understood from the geometric structure of the gauge potential and linked to the measure of information in the local disordered potential, reflecting an underlying holographic principle. We acknowledge support from NSF Award No.1068570, and the Charles E. Kaufman Foundation.

  20. Classical transients and the support of open quantum maps.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Wisniacki, D A; Ermann, Leonardo; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2013-01-01

    The basic ingredients in a semiclassical theory are the classical invariant objects serving as a support for quantization. Recent studies, mainly obtained on quantum maps, have led to the commonly accepted belief that the classical repeller-the set of nonescaping orbits in the future and past evolution-is the object that suitably plays this role in open scattering systems. In this paper we present numerical evidence warning that this may not always be the case. For this purpose we study recently introduced families of tribaker maps [L. Ermann, G. G. Carlo, J. M. Pedrosa, and M. Saraceno, Phys. Rev. E 85, 066204 (2012)], which share the same asymptotic properties but differ in their short-time behavior. We have found that although the eigenvalue distribution of the evolution operator of these maps follows the fractal Weyl law prediction, the theory of short periodic orbits for open maps fails to describe the resonance eigenfunctions of some of them. This is a strong indication that new elements must be included in the semiclassical description of open quantum systems. We provide an interpretation of the results in order to have hints about them.

  1. Classical transients and the support of open quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Gabriel G.; Wisniacki, D. A.; Ermann, Leonardo; Benito, R. M.; Borondo, F.

    2013-01-01

    The basic ingredients in a semiclassical theory are the classical invariant objects serving as a support for quantization. Recent studies, mainly obtained on quantum maps, have led to the commonly accepted belief that the classical repeller—the set of nonescaping orbits in the future and past evolution—is the object that suitably plays this role in open scattering systems. In this paper we present numerical evidence warning that this may not always be the case. For this purpose we study recently introduced families of tribaker maps [L. Ermann, G. G. Carlo, J. M. Pedrosa, and M. Saraceno, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.066204 85, 066204 (2012)], which share the same asymptotic properties but differ in their short-time behavior. We have found that although the eigenvalue distribution of the evolution operator of these maps follows the fractal Weyl law prediction, the theory of short periodic orbits for open maps fails to describe the resonance eigenfunctions of some of them. This is a strong indication that new elements must be included in the semiclassical description of open quantum systems. We provide an interpretation of the results in order to have hints about them.

  2. Resonances for Open Quantum Maps and a Fractal Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatlov, Semyon; Jin, Long

    2017-08-01

    We study eigenvalues of quantum open baker's maps with trapped sets given by linear arithmetic Cantor sets of dimensions {δ\\in (0,1)}. We show that the size of the spectral gap is strictly greater than the standard bound {max(0,{1\\over 2}-δ)} for all values of {δ}, which is the first result of this kind. The size of the improvement is determined from a fractal uncertainty principle and can be computed for any given Cantor set. We next show a fractal Weyl upper bound for the number of eigenvalues in annuli, with exponent which depends on the inner radius of the annulus.

  3. Spin degeneracy and conductance fluctuations in open quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Folk, J A; Patel, S R; Birnbaum, K M; Marcus, C M; Duruöz, C I; Harris, J S

    2001-03-05

    The dependence of conductance fluctuations on parallel magnetic field is used as a probe of spin degeneracy in open GaAs quantum dots. The variance of fluctuations at high parallel field is reduced from the low-field variance (with broken time-reversal symmetry) by factors ranging from roughly 2 in a 1 microm (2) dot to greater than 4 in 8 microm (2) dots. The factor of 2 is expected for Zeeman splitting of spin-degenerate channels. A possible explanation for the larger suppression based on field-dependent spin-orbit scattering is proposed.

  4. Large-scale cortical networks and cognition.

    PubMed

    Bressler, S L

    1995-03-01

    The well-known parcellation of the mammalian cerebral cortex into a large number of functionally distinct cytoarchitectonic areas presents a problem for understanding the complex cortical integrative functions that underlie cognition. How do cortical areas having unique individual functional properties cooperate to accomplish these complex operations? Do neurons distributed throughout the cerebral cortex act together in large-scale functional assemblages? This review examines the substantial body of evidence supporting the view that complex integrative functions are carried out by large-scale networks of cortical areas. Pathway tracing studies in non-human primates have revealed widely distributed networks of interconnected cortical areas, providing an anatomical substrate for large-scale parallel processing of information in the cerebral cortex. Functional coactivation of multiple cortical areas has been demonstrated by neurophysiological studies in non-human primates and several different cognitive functions have been shown to depend on multiple distributed areas by human neuropsychological studies. Electrophysiological studies on interareal synchronization have provided evidence that active neurons in different cortical areas may become not only coactive, but also functionally interdependent. The computational advantages of synchronization between cortical areas in large-scale networks have been elucidated by studies using artificial neural network models. Recent observations of time-varying multi-areal cortical synchronization suggest that the functional topology of a large-scale cortical network is dynamically reorganized during visuomotor behavior.

  5. A Cloud Computing Platform for Large-Scale Forensic Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussev, Vassil; Wang, Liqiang; Richard, Golden; Marziale, Lodovico

    The timely processing of massive digital forensic collections demands the use of large-scale distributed computing resources and the flexibility to customize the processing performed on the collections. This paper describes MPI MapReduce (MMR), an open implementation of the MapReduce processing model that outperforms traditional forensic computing techniques. MMR provides linear scaling for CPU-intensive processing and super-linear scaling for indexing-related workloads.

  6. Survey on large scale system control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    The problem inherent to large scale systems such as power network, communication network and economic or ecological systems were studied. The increase in size and flexibility of future spacecraft has put those dynamical systems into the category of large scale systems, and tools specific to the class of large systems are being sought to design control systems that can guarantee more stability and better performance. Among several survey papers, reference was found to a thorough investigation on decentralized control methods. Especially helpful was the classification made of the different existing approaches to deal with large scale systems. A very similar classification is used, even though the papers surveyed are somehow different from the ones reviewed in other papers. Special attention is brought to the applicability of the existing methods to controlling large mechanical systems like large space structures. Some recent developments are added to this survey.

  7. Dissipation equation of motion approach to open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, YiJing; Jin, Jinshuang; Xu, Rui-Xue; Zheng, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive account of the dissipaton-equation-of-motion (DEOM) theory for open quantum systems. This newly developed theory treats not only the quantum dissipative systems of primary interest, but also the hybrid environment dynamics that are also experimentally measurable. Despite the fact that DEOM recovers the celebrated hierarchical-equations-of-motion (HEOM) formalism, these two approaches have some fundamental differences. To show these differences, we also scrutinize the HEOM construction via its root at the influence functional path integral formalism. We conclude that many unique features of DEOM are beyond the reach of the HEOM framework. The new DEOM approach renders a statistical quasi-particle picture to account for the environment, which can be either bosonic or fermionic. The review covers the DEOM construction, the physical meanings of dynamical variables, the underlying theorems and dissipaton algebra, and recent numerical advancements for efficient DEOM evaluations of various problems. We also address the issue of high-order many-dissipaton truncations with respect to the invariance principle of quantum mechanics of Schrödinger versus Heisenberg prescriptions. DEOM serves as a universal tool for characterizing of stationary and dynamic properties of system-and-bath interferences, as highlighted with its real-time evaluation of both linear and nonlinear current noise spectra of nonequilibrium electronic transport.

  8. Quantum speed-up dynamical crossover in open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.-J.; Yan, K.; Xie, Y.-Q.; Wu, Yinzhong; Hao, Xiang

    We put forward a measure for evaluating quantum speed limit for arbitrary mixed states of open systems by means of trace distance. Compared with some present measures, it can provide an optimal bound to the speed of the evolution. The dynamical crossover from no speedup region to speedup region happens during the spontaneous decay of an atom. The evolution is characteristic of the alternating behavior between quantum acceleration and deceleration in the strong coupling case. Under the condition of detuning, the evolution can be initially accelerated and then decelerated to a normal process either in the weak or strong coupling regime. In accordance with the uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that the potential capacity for quantum speedup evolution is closely related to the energy feedback from the reservoir to the system. The negative decay rate for the evolution results in the speedup process where the photons previously emitted by the atom are reabsorbed at a later time. The values of the spontaneous decay rate become positive after a long enough time, which results in the evolution with no speedup potential.

  9. The large-scale distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies in the universe is characterized on the basis of the six completed strips of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics redshift-survey extension. The design of the survey is briefly reviewed, and the results are presented graphically. Vast low-density voids similar to the void in Bootes are found, almost completely surrounded by thin sheets of galaxies. Also discussed are the implications of the results for the survey sampling problem, the two-point correlation function of the galaxy distribution, the possibility of detecting large-scale coherent flows, theoretical models of large-scale structure, and the identification of groups and clusters of galaxies.

  10. Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zixian; Lü, Zhiguo; Zheng, Hang; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    The traditional approach to the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) and quantum anti-Zeno effect (QAZE) in open quantum systems (implicitly) assumes that the bath (environment) state returns to its original state after each instantaneous projective measurement on the system and thus ignores the cross-correlations of the bath operators between different Zeno intervals. However, this assumption is not generally true, especially for a bath with a considerably nonnegligible memory effect and for a system repeatedly projected into an initial general superposition state. We find that, in stark contrast to the result of a constant value found in the traditional approach, the scaled average decay rate in unit Zeno interval of the survival probability is generally time dependent or shows an oscillatory behavior. In the case of a strong bath correlation, the transition between the QZE and the QAZE depends sensitively on the number of measurements N . For a fixed N , a QZE region predicted by the traditional approach may in fact already be in the QAZE region. We illustrate our findings using an exactly solvable open qubit system model with a Lorentzian bath spectral density, which is directly related to realistic circuit cavity quantum electrodynamics systems. Thus the results and dynamics presented here can be verified with current superconducting circuit technology.

  11. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; hide

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  12. Continuous Time Open Quantum Random Walks and Non-Markovian Lindblad Master Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Clément

    2014-02-01

    A new type of quantum random walks, called Open Quantum Random Walks, has been developed and studied in Attal et al. (Open quantum random walks, preprint) and (Central limit theorems for open quantum random walks, preprint). In this article we present a natural continuous time extension of these Open Quantum Random Walks. This continuous time version is obtained by taking a continuous time limit of the discrete time Open Quantum Random Walks. This approximation procedure is based on some adaptation of Repeated Quantum Interactions Theory (Attal and Pautrat in Annales Henri Poincaré Physique Théorique 7:59-104, 2006) coupled with the use of correlated projectors (Breuer in Phys Rev A 75:022103, 2007). The limit evolutions obtained this way give rise to a particular type of quantum master equations. These equations appeared originally in the non-Markovian generalization of the Lindblad theory (Breuer in Phys Rev A 75:022103, 2007). We also investigate the continuous time limits of the quantum trajectories associated with Open Quantum Random Walks. We show that the limit evolutions in this context are described by jump stochastic differential equations. Finally we present a physical example which can be described in terms of Open Quantum Random Walks and their associated continuous time limits.

  13. Management of large-scale technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two major themes are addressed in this assessment of the management of large-scale NASA programs: (1) how a high technology agency was a decade marked by a rapid expansion of funds and manpower in the first half and almost as rapid contraction in the second; and (2) how NASA combined central planning and control with decentralized project execution.

  14. Large-scale multimedia modeling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Castleton, K.J.; Gelston, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies have faced increasing scrutiny for a wide range of environmental issues related to past and current practices. A number of large-scale applications have been undertaken that required analysis of large numbers of potential environmental issues over a wide range of environmental conditions and contaminants. Several of these applications, referred to here as large-scale applications, have addressed long-term public health risks using a holistic approach for assessing impacts from potential waterborne and airborne transport pathways. Multimedia models such as the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were designed for use in such applications. MEPAS integrates radioactive and hazardous contaminants impact computations for major exposure routes via air, surface water, ground water, and overland flow transport. A number of large-scale applications of MEPAS have been conducted to assess various endpoints for environmental and human health impacts. These applications are described in terms of lessons learned in the development of an effective approach for large-scale applications.

  15. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  16. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  17. Large-scale quantization from local correlations in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George; McComas, David J.

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the large-scale quantization that can characterize the phase space of certain physical systems. Plasmas are such systems where large-scale quantization, ħ*, is caused by Debye shielding that structures correlations between particles. The value of ħ* is constant—some 12 orders of magnitude larger than the Planck constant—across a wide range of space plasmas, from the solar wind in the inner heliosphere to the distant plasma in the inner heliosheath and the local interstellar medium. This paper develops the foundation and advances the understanding of the concept of plasma quantization; in particular, we (i) show the analogy of plasma to Planck quantization, (ii) show the key points of plasma quantization, (iii) construct some basic quantum mechanical concepts for the large-scale plasma quantization, (iv) investigate the correlation between plasma parameters that implies plasma quantization, when it is approximated by a relation between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency, (v) analyze typical space plasmas throughout the heliosphere and show the constancy of plasma quantization over many orders of magnitude in plasma parameters, (vi) analyze Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) solar wind measurements to develop another measurement of the value of ħ*, and (vii) apply plasma quantization to derive unknown plasma parameters when some key observable is missing.

  18. From open to large-scale randomized cell transplantation trials in Huntington's disease: Lessons from the multicentric intracerebral grafting in Huntington's disease trial (MIG-HD) and previous pilot studies.

    PubMed

    Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Fifty-one patients from open-label pilot trials have been transplanted in Huntington's disease (HD) using human fetal cells; clinical data and follow-up are available in 30 of them. These open-label studies were mostly designed for safety and feasibility. However, signs of long-term efficacy have been reported in 4 out of 30 patients, differences in tissue preparation, surgical procedure, patients characteristics, immunosuppression regimens, clinical, and imaging assessments, makes it difficult to define the optimal procedure for future trials. Forty-five patients have now been grafted in the multicentric intracerebral grafting trial in Huntington's in France (MIG-HD) and Belgium, and 22 in Germany in a randomized delayed start design. Whereas the 10 patients published from the German cohort showed no improvement, the results from the MIG-HD trial are still under analysis. However, the MIG-HD trial has already changed cell transplantation for HD by showing alloimmunization with graft rejection in one patient and HLA antibodies against the transplant in others. Moreover, MIG-HD has established a new surgical procedure to avoid subdural hematoma, the most frequent adverse effect in transplant in HD, and a surgical strategy to eradicate eventual choroid cysts. By reviewing all the published results, new avenues are provided for optimization for cell preparation, delivery methods, standardization of clinical assessment, and surgical procedure with blind video scoring, imaging, and electrophysiology. Future trials should capitalize on a new CAPIT-HD2 battery to determine efficacy with sufficiently long pre and postgraft follow-up, using patient stratification and randomization, control of alloimmunization, HLA monitoring, and standardization of the consent procedure. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Global food insecurity. Treatment of major food crops with elevated carbon dioxide or ozone under large-scale fully open-air conditions suggests recent models may have overestimated future yields

    PubMed Central

    Long, Stephen P; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Leakey, Andrew D.B; Morgan, Patrick B

    2005-01-01

    Predictions of yield for the globe's major grain and legume arable crops suggest that, with a moderate temperature increase, production may increase in the temperate zone, but decline in the tropics. In total, global food supply may show little change. This security comes from inclusion of the direct effect of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, [CO2], which significantly stimulates yield by decreasing photorespiration in C3 crops and transpiration in all crops. Evidence for a large response to [CO2] is largely based on studies made within chambers at small scales, which would be considered unacceptable for standard agronomic trials of new cultivars or agrochemicals. Yet, predictions of the globe's future food security are based on such inadequate information. Free-Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) technology now allows investigation of the effects of rising [CO2] and ozone on field crops under fully open-air conditions at an agronomic scale. Experiments with rice, wheat, maize and soybean show smaller increases in yield than anticipated from studies in chambers. Experiments with increased ozone show large yield losses (20%), which are not accounted for in projections of global food security. These findings suggest that current projections of global food security are overoptimistic. The fertilization effect of CO2 is less than that used in many models, while rising ozone will cause large yield losses in the Northern Hemisphere. Unfortunately, FACE studies have been limited in geographical extent and interactive effects of CO2, ozone and temperature have yet to be studied. Without more extensive study of the effects of these changes at an agronomic scale in the open air, our ever-more sophisticated models will continue to have feet of clay. PMID:16433090

  20. Towards a Theory of Metastability in Open Quantum Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Macieszczak, Katarzyna; Guţă, Mădălin; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P

    2016-06-17

    By generalizing concepts from classical stochastic dynamics, we establish the basis for a theory of metastability in Markovian open quantum systems. Partial relaxation into long-lived metastable states-distinct from the asymptotic stationary state-is a manifestation of a separation of time scales due to a splitting in the spectrum of the generator of the dynamics. We show here how to exploit this spectral structure to obtain a low dimensional approximation to the dynamics in terms of motion in a manifold of metastable states constructed from the low-lying eigenmatrices of the generator. We argue that the metastable manifold is in general composed of disjoint states, noiseless subsystems, and decoherence-free subspaces.

  1. Dynamics of non-Markovian open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vega, Inés; Alonso, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Open quantum systems (OQSs) cannot always be described with the Markov approximation, which requires a large separation of system and environment time scales. An overview is given of some of the most important techniques available to tackle the dynamics of an OQS beyond the Markov approximation. Some of these techniques, such as master equations, Heisenberg equations, and stochastic methods, are based on solving the reduced OQS dynamics, while others, such as path integral Monte Carlo or chain mapping approaches, are based on solving the dynamics of the full system. The physical interpretation and derivation of the various approaches are emphasized, how they are connected is explored, and how different methods may be suitable for solving different problems is examined.

  2. Time-dependent density functional theory for open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, David; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-02-01

    We present the extension of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to the realm of open quantum systems (OQS). OQS-TDDFT allows a first principles description of electronic systems undergoing non-unitary dynamics due to coupling with a bath, such as that arising from molecular vibrations, solvent degrees of freedom or photon modes of the electromagnetic field. We first prove extensions of the Runge-Gross and van Leeuwen theorems to OQS-TDDFT, which rigorously establish it as a formally exact theory. We then discuss development of approximate OQS-TDDFT functionals, exact conditions on these functionals, as well as future challenges. Finally, we will discuss the application of OQS-TDDFT in obtaining broadened absorption spectra.

  3. Thermodynamics of trajectories of open quantum systems, step by step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeon, Simon; Xuereb, André

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamics of trajectories promises to make possible the thorough analysis of the dynamical properties of an open quantum system, a sought-after goal in modern physics. Unfortunately, calculation of the relevant quantities presents severe challenges. Determining the large-deviation function that gives access to the full counting statistics associated with a dynamical order parameter is challenging, if not impossible, even for systems evolving in a restricted Liouville space. Acting on the realisation that the salient features of most dynamical systems are encoded in the first few moments of the counting statistics, in this article we present a method that gives sequential access to these moments. Our method allows for obtaining analytical result in several cases, as we illustrate, and allows using large deviation theory to reinterpret certain well-known results.

  4. Nonlinear Quantum Metrology of Many-Body Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beau, M.; del Campo, A.

    2017-07-01

    We introduce general bounds for the parameter estimation error in nonlinear quantum metrology of many-body open systems in the Markovian limit. Given a k -body Hamiltonian and p -body Lindblad operators, the estimation error of a Hamiltonian parameter using a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state as a probe is shown to scale as N-[k -(p /2 )], surpassing the shot-noise limit for 2 k >p +1 . Metrology equivalence between initial product states and maximally entangled states is established for p ≥1 . We further show that one can estimate the system-environment coupling parameter with precision N-(p /2 ), while many-body decoherence enhances the precision to N-k in the noise-amplitude estimation of a fluctuating k -body Hamiltonian. For the long-range Ising model, we show that the precision of this parameter beats the shot-noise limit when the range of interactions is below a threshold value.

  5. QUANTUM ESPRESSO: a modular and open-source software project for quantum simulations of materials.

    PubMed

    Giannozzi, Paolo; Baroni, Stefano; Bonini, Nicola; Calandra, Matteo; Car, Roberto; Cavazzoni, Carlo; Ceresoli, Davide; Chiarotti, Guido L; Cococcioni, Matteo; Dabo, Ismaila; Dal Corso, Andrea; de Gironcoli, Stefano; Fabris, Stefano; Fratesi, Guido; Gebauer, Ralph; Gerstmann, Uwe; Gougoussis, Christos; Kokalj, Anton; Lazzeri, Michele; Martin-Samos, Layla; Marzari, Nicola; Mauri, Francesco; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Paolini, Stefano; Pasquarello, Alfredo; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Sbraccia, Carlo; Scandolo, Sandro; Sclauzero, Gabriele; Seitsonen, Ari P; Smogunov, Alexander; Umari, Paolo; Wentzcovitch, Renata M

    2009-09-30

    QUANTUM ESPRESSO is an integrated suite of computer codes for electronic-structure calculations and materials modeling, based on density-functional theory, plane waves, and pseudopotentials (norm-conserving, ultrasoft, and projector-augmented wave). The acronym ESPRESSO stands for opEn Source Package for Research in Electronic Structure, Simulation, and Optimization. It is freely available to researchers around the world under the terms of the GNU General Public License. QUANTUM ESPRESSO builds upon newly-restructured electronic-structure codes that have been developed and tested by some of the original authors of novel electronic-structure algorithms and applied in the last twenty years by some of the leading materials modeling groups worldwide. Innovation and efficiency are still its main focus, with special attention paid to massively parallel architectures, and a great effort being devoted to user friendliness. QUANTUM ESPRESSO is evolving towards a distribution of independent and interoperable codes in the spirit of an open-source project, where researchers active in the field of electronic-structure calculations are encouraged to participate in the project by contributing their own codes or by implementing their own ideas into existing codes.

  6. Evolution of quantum correlations in the open quantum systems consisting of two coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasnezhad, Farkhondeh; Mehrabankar, Somayeh; Afshar, Davood; Jafarpour, Mojtaba

    2017-04-01

    The open quantum systems consisting of coupled and uncoupled asymmetric oscillators are considered with an initial quantum-dot trapped-ion coherent state. The quantum correlations between spatial modes of this trapped ion are examined to find their dependence on the temperature, asymmetric parameter, dissipation coefficient and the magnetic field. It is observed that the discord of the initial state is an increasing function of the asymmetric parameter and the magnetic field. Moreover, in the case of two uncoupled modes, entanglement and discord are decreasing functions of temperature and the dissipation coefficient. However, as the temperature and dissipation coefficient increase, the discord fades out faster. In the case of two coupled modes, as the temperature and dissipation coefficient increase, the sudden death of the entanglement and fade out of the discord happen sooner; moreover, as the magnetic field increases, the entanglement sudden death and the discord fade out time occur sooner. Also, with the increase in the asymmetric parameter, the entanglement sudden death is postponed. In addition, in the asymmetric system, appreciable discord can be created in the temperature range 0-10 K, while appreciable entanglement can be created in the temperature range 0-5 mK. Finally, it is observed that non-monotonic evolution of quantum correlations is due to coupling of modes.

  7. Condition Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted for the NASA Ames Research Center under grant NAG2-1182 (Condition-Based Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities). The information includes copies of view graphs presented at NASA Ames in the final Workshop (held during December of 1998), as well as a copy of a technical report provided to the COTR (Dr. Anne Patterson-Hine) subsequent to the workshop. The material describes the experimental design, collection of data, and analysis results associated with monitoring the health of large-scale facilities. In addition to this material, a copy of the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory data fusion visual programming tool kit was also provided to NASA Ames researchers.

  8. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Ludemann, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The propfan is an advanced propeller concept which maintains the high efficiencies traditionally associated with conventional propellers at the higher aircraft cruise speeds associated with jet transports. The large-scale advanced propfan (LAP) program extends the research done on 2 ft diameter propfan models to a 9 ft diameter article. The program includes design, fabrication, and testing of both an eight bladed, 9 ft diameter propfan, designated SR-7L, and a 2 ft diameter aeroelastically scaled model, SR-7A. The LAP program is complemented by the propfan test assessment (PTA) program, which takes the large-scale propfan and mates it with a gas generator and gearbox to form a propfan propulsion system and then flight tests this system on the wing of a Gulfstream 2 testbed aircraft.

  9. Multi-point observations of large scale perturbations on the open-closed field line boundary during a geomagnetic storm, as observed by the Van Allen Probes and geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, Manuel; MacDonald, Elizabeth; Dixon, Patrick

    We discuss a series of lobe entry events observed by the twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft between 0200 and 0515 UTC during the November 14th 2012 geomagnetic storm. During the events Dst was below -100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = -15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). The events occurred in the southern hemisphere flank between 0400 and 0635 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE , and were characterized by significantly diminished electron and ion fluxes and a corresponding strong, highly stretched magnetic field. Both spacecraft crossed into the lobe five times with durations from 3-10 minutes. Four of the events were seen by both Van Allen Probes nearly simultaneously despite separations of up to 45 minutes of local time. In all cases the more tailward satellite sees the boundary crossing first. The lobe was also encountered at the same time by the LANL geosynchronous satellites, both at dawn in the northern hemisphere and dusk in the southern hemisphere. These multi-spacecraft observations are used to constrain the spatial and temporal extent of the open/closed field line boundary and to compare this topology to that predicted by a range of magnetic field models. Significant accelerated field aligned oxygen signatures were measured by the HOPE low energy plasma instrument aboard the probes. Using the multi-point measurements we will examine the source of this acceleration and its role in inner magnetosphere ion dynamics.

  10. Multi-point observations of large scale perturbations on the open/closed field line boundary during a geomagnetic storm, as observed by the Van Allen Probes and geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Patrick

    We discuss a series of lobe entry events observed by the twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft between 0200 and 0515 UTC during the November 14th 2012 geomagnetic storm. During the events Dst was below -100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = -15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). The events occurred in the southern hemisphere flank between 0400 and 0635 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE , and were characterized by significantly diminished electron and ion fluxes and a corresponding strong, highly stretched magnetic field. Both spacecraft crossed into the lobe five times with durations from 3-10 minutes. Four of the events were seen by both Van Allen Probes nearly simultaneously despite separations of up to 45 minutes of local time. In all cases the more tailward satellite sees the boundary crossing first. The lobe was also encountered at the same time by the LANL geosynchronous satellites, both at dawn in the northern hemisphere and dusk in the southern hemisphere. These multi-spacecraft observations are used to constrain the spatial and temporal extent of the open/closed field line boundary and to compare this topology to that predicted by a range of magnetic field models. Significant accelerated field aligned oxygen signatures were measured by the HOPE low energy plasma instrument aboard the probes. Using the multi-point measurements we will examine the source of this acceleration and its role in inner magnetosphere ion dynamics.

  11. Multi-point observations of large scale perturbations on the open/closed field line boundary during a geomagnetic storm, as observed by the Van Allen Probes and geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Paddy; Grande, Manuel; MacDonald, Elizabeth; Skoug, Ruth; Reeves, Geoff; Thomsen, Michelle; Funsten, Herbert; Zou, Shasha; Glocer, Alex; Jia, Xianzhe

    2014-05-01

    We discuss a series of lobe entry events observed by the twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft between 0200 and 0515 UTC during the November 14th 2012 geomagnetic storm. During the events Dst was below -100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = -15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). The events occurred in the southern hemisphere flank between 0400 and 0635 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE , and were characterized by significantly diminished electron and ion fluxes and a corresponding strong, highly stretched magnetic field. Both spacecraft crossed into the lobe five times with durations from 3-10 minutes. Four of the events were seen by both Van Allen Probes nearly simultaneously despite separations of up to 45 minutes of local time. In all cases the more tailward satellite sees the boundary crossing first. The lobe was also encountered at the same time by the LANL geosynchronous satellites, both at dawn in the northern hemisphere and dusk in the southern hemisphere. These multi-spacecraft observations are used to constrain the spatial and temporal extent of the open/closed field line boundary and to compare this topology to that predicted by a range of magnetic field models. Significant accelerated field aligned oxygen signatures were measured by the HOPE low energy plasma instrument aboard the probes. Using the multi-point measurements we will examine the source of this acceleration and its role in inner magnetosphere ion dynamics.

  12. Modeling Human Behavior at a Large Scale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Discerning intentions in dynamic human action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences , 5(4):171 – 178, 2001. Shirli Bar-David, Israel Bar-David, Paul C. Cross, Sadie...Limits of predictability in human mobility. Science , 327(5968):1018, 2010. S.A. Stouffer. Intervening opportunities: a theory relating mobility and...Modeling Human Behavior at a Large Scale by Adam Sadilek Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy

  13. Large-Scale Aerosol Modeling and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    aerosol species up to six days in advance anywhere on the globe. NAAPS and COAMPS are particularly useful for forecasts of dust storms in areas...impact cloud processes globally. With increasing dust storms due to climate change and land use changes in desert regions, the impact of the...bacteria in large-scale dust storms is expected to significantly impact warm ice cloud formation, human health, and ecosystems globally. In Niemi et al

  14. Large-scale instabilities of helical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Alexandre; Alexakis, Alexandros; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities of periodic helical flows of a given wave number K are investigated using three-dimensional Floquet numerical computations. In the Floquet formalism the unstable field is expanded in modes of different spacial periodicity. This allows us (i) to clearly distinguish large from small scale instabilities and (ii) to study modes of wave number q of arbitrarily large-scale separation q ≪K . Different flows are examined including flows that exhibit small-scale turbulence. The growth rate σ of the most unstable mode is measured as a function of the scale separation q /K ≪1 and the Reynolds number Re. It is shown that the growth rate follows the scaling σ ∝q if an AKA effect [Frisch et al., Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena 28, 382 (1987), 10.1016/0167-2789(87)90026-1] is present or a negative eddy viscosity scaling σ ∝q2 in its absence. This holds both for the Re≪1 regime where previously derived asymptotic results are verified but also for Re=O (1 ) that is beyond their range of validity. Furthermore, for values of Re above a critical value ReSc beyond which small-scale instabilities are present, the growth rate becomes independent of q and the energy of the perturbation at large scales decreases with scale separation. The nonlinear behavior of these large-scale instabilities is also examined in the nonlinear regime where the largest scales of the system are found to be the most dominant energetically. These results are interpreted by low-order models.

  15. Economically viable large-scale hydrogen liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, U.; Decker, L.; Klein, H.

    2017-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen demand, particularly driven by clean energy applications, will rise in the near future. As industrial large scale liquefiers will play a major role within the hydrogen supply chain, production capacity will have to increase by a multiple of today’s typical sizes. The main goal is to reduce the total cost of ownership for these plants by increasing energy efficiency with innovative and simple process designs, optimized in capital expenditure. New concepts must ensure a manageable plant complexity and flexible operability. In the phase of process development and selection, a dimensioning of key equipment for large scale liquefiers, such as turbines and compressors as well as heat exchangers, must be performed iteratively to ensure technological feasibility and maturity. Further critical aspects related to hydrogen liquefaction, e.g. fluid properties, ortho-para hydrogen conversion, and coldbox configuration, must be analysed in detail. This paper provides an overview on the approach, challenges and preliminary results in the development of efficient as well as economically viable concepts for large-scale hydrogen liquefaction.

  16. Large-Scale Visual Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Modern high performance computers have speeds measured in petaflops and handle data set sizes measured in terabytes and petabytes. Although these machines offer enormous potential for solving very large-scale realistic computational problems, their effectiveness will hinge upon the ability of human experts to interact with their simulation results and extract useful information. One of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century is to effectively understand and make use of the vast amount of information being produced. Visual data analysis will be among our most most important tools in helping to understand such large-scale information. Our research at the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute at the University of Utah has focused on innovative, scalable techniques for large-scale 3D visual data analysis. In this talk, I will present state- of-the-art visualization techniques, including scalable visualization algorithms and software, cluster-based visualization methods and innovate visualization techniques applied to problems in computational science, engineering, and medicine. I will conclude with an outline for a future high performance visualization research challenges and opportunities.

  17. Large-scale neuromorphic computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furber, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Neuromorphic computing covers a diverse range of approaches to information processing all of which demonstrate some degree of neurobiological inspiration that differentiates them from mainstream conventional computing systems. The philosophy behind neuromorphic computing has its origins in the seminal work carried out by Carver Mead at Caltech in the late 1980s. This early work influenced others to carry developments forward, and advances in VLSI technology supported steady growth in the scale and capability of neuromorphic devices. Recently, a number of large-scale neuromorphic projects have emerged, taking the approach to unprecedented scales and capabilities. These large-scale projects are associated with major new funding initiatives for brain-related research, creating a sense that the time and circumstances are right for progress in our understanding of information processing in the brain. In this review we present a brief history of neuromorphic engineering then focus on some of the principal current large-scale projects, their main features, how their approaches are complementary and distinct, their advantages and drawbacks, and highlight the sorts of capabilities that each can deliver to neural modellers.

  18. Minimal evolution time and quantum speed limit of non-Markovian open systems

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangyi; Wu, Chengjun; Guo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We derive a sharp bound as the quantum speed limit (QSL) for the minimal evolution time of quantum open systems in the non-Markovian strong-coupling regime with initial mixed states by considering the effects of both renormalized Hamiltonian and dissipator. For a non-Markovian quantum open system, the possible evolution time between two arbitrary states is not unique, among the set of which we find that the minimal one and its QSL can decrease more steeply by adjusting the coupling strength of the dissipator, which thus provides potential improvements of efficiency in many quantum physics and quantum information areas. PMID:26565062

  19. Critical relaxation with overdamped quasiparticles in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Johannes; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    We study the late-time relaxation following a quench in an open quantum many-body system. We consider the open Dicke model, describing the infinite-range interactions between N atoms and a single, lossy electromagnetic mode. We show that the dynamical phase transition at a critical atom-light coupling is characterized by the interplay between reservoir-driven and intrinsic relaxation processes in the absence of number conservation. Above the critical coupling, small fluctuations in the occupation of the dominant quasiparticle mode start to grow in time, while the quasiparticle lifetime remains finite due to losses. Near the critical interaction strength, we observe a crossover between exponential and power-law 1 /τ relaxation, the latter driven by collisions between quasiparticles. For a quench exactly to the critical coupling, the power-law relaxation extends to infinite times, but the finite lifetime of quasiparticles prevents aging from appearing in two-times response and correlation functions. We predict our results to be accessible to quench experiments with ultracold bosons in optical resonators.

  20. Modified quantum-speed-limit bounds for open quantum dynamics in quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wu, Wei; Wang, Chao

    2017-05-01

    The minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states is of fundamental interest in quantum physics. Very recently Mirkin et al. [Phys. Rev. A 94, 052125 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.052125] argued that some of the most common quantum-speed-limit (QSL) bounds which depend on the actual evolution time do not cleave to the essence of the QSL theory as they grow indefinitely but the final state is reached at a finite time in a damped Jaynes-Cummings model. In this paper, we thoroughly study this puzzling phenomenon. We find the inconsistent estimates will happen if and only if the limit of resolution of a calculation program is achieved, through which we propose that the nature of the inconsistency is not a violation of the essence of the QSL theory but an illusion caused by the finite precision in numerical simulations. We also present a generic method to overcome the inconsistent estimates and confirm its effectiveness in both amplitude-damping and phase-damping channels. Additionally, we show special cases which may restrict the QSL bound defined by "quantumness".

  1. Large-scale flow experiments for managing river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.; Olden, Julian D.; Lytle, David A.; Melis, Theodore S.; Schmidt, John C.; Bray, Erin N.; Freeman, Mary C.; Gido, Keith B.; Hemphill, Nina P.; Kennard, Mark J.; McMullen, Laura E.; Mims, Meryl C.; Pyron, Mark; Robinson, Christopher T.; Williams, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental manipulations of streamflow have been used globally in recent decades to mitigate the impacts of dam operations on river systems. Rivers are challenging subjects for experimentation, because they are open systems that cannot be isolated from their social context. We identify principles to address the challenges of conducting effective large-scale flow experiments. Flow experiments have both scientific and social value when they help to resolve specific questions about the ecological action of flow with a clear nexus to water policies and decisions. Water managers must integrate new information into operating policies for large-scale experiments to be effective. Modeling and monitoring can be integrated with experiments to analyze long-term ecological responses. Experimental design should include spatially extensive observations and well-defined, repeated treatments. Large-scale flow manipulations are only a part of dam operations that affect river systems. Scientists can ensure that experimental manipulations continue to be a valuable approach for the scientifically based management of river systems.

  2. Experimental Simulations of Large-Scale Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the effects of target porosity on the mechanics of impact cratering. Impact experiments conducted on a centrifuge provide direct simulations of large-scale cratering on porous asteroids. The experiments show that large craters in porous materials form mostly by compaction, with essentially no deposition of material into the ejecta blanket that is a signature of cratering in less-porous materials. The ratio of ejecta mass to crater mass is shown to decrease with increasing crater size or target porosity. These results are consistent with the observation that large closely-packed craters on asteroid Mathilde appear to have formed without degradation to earlier craters.

  3. What is a large-scale dynamo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, G.; Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in a sheared helical flow at moderate to high values of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). We find exponentially growing solutions which, for large enough shear, take the form of a coherent part embedded in incoherent fluctuations. We argue that at large Rm large-scale dynamo action should be identified by the presence of structures coherent in time, rather than those at large spatial scales. We further argue that although the growth rate is determined by small-scale processes, the period of the coherent structures is set by mean-field considerations.

  4. Large-scale brightenings associated with flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that large-scale brightenings (LSBs) associated with solar flares, similar to the 'giant arches' discovered by Svestka et al. (1982) in images obtained by the SSM HXIS hours after the onset of two-ribbon flares, can also occur in association with confined flares in complex active regions. For these events, a clear link between the LSB and the underlying flare is clearly evident from the active-region magnetic field topology. The implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of the interacting loops of flares and the giant arch phenomenology.

  5. Large scale phononic metamaterials for seismic isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, N.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we numerically examine structures that could be characterized as large scale phononic metamaterials. These novel structures could have band gaps in the frequency spectrum of seismic waves when their dimensions are chosen appropriately, thus raising the belief that they could be serious candidates for seismic isolation structures. Different and easy to fabricate structures were examined made from construction materials such as concrete and steel. The well-known finite difference time domain method is used in our calculations in order to calculate the band structures of the proposed metamaterials.

  6. Large-scale planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidnyk, Serge; Zhang, Hua; Pearson, Matt; Balakrishnan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging advanced wafer processing and flip-chip bonding techniques, we have succeeded in hybrid integrating a myriad of active optical components, including photodetectors and laser diodes, with our planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. We have combined hybrid integration of active components with monolithic integration of other critical functions, such as diffraction gratings, on-chip mirrors, mode-converters, and thermo-optic elements. Further process development has led to the integration of polarization controlling functionality. Most recently, all these technological advancements have been combined to create large-scale planar lightwave circuits that comprise hundreds of optical elements integrated on chips less than a square inch in size.

  7. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  8. Colloquium: Large scale simulations on GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Bisson, Mauro; Fatica, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    Graphics processing units (GPU) are currently used as a cost-effective platform for computer simulations and big-data processing. Large scale applications require that multiple GPUs work together but the efficiency obtained with cluster of GPUs is, at times, sub-optimal because the GPU features are not exploited at their best. We describe how it is possible to achieve an excellent efficiency for applications in statistical mechanics, particle dynamics and networks analysis by using suitable memory access patterns and mechanisms like CUDA streams, profiling tools, etc. Similar concepts and techniques may be applied also to other problems like the solution of Partial Differential Equations.

  9. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  10. Large-scale Heterogeneous Network Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-31

    Data for Multi-Player Influence Maximization on Social Networks.” KDD 2012 (Demo).  Po-Tzu Chang , Yen-Chieh Huang, Cheng-Lun Yang, Shou-De Lin, Pu...Jen Cheng. “Learning-Based Time-Sensitive Re-Ranking for Web Search.” SIGIR 2012 (poster)  Hung -Che Lai, Cheng-Te Li, Yi-Chen Lo, and Shou-De Lin...Exploiting and Evaluating MapReduce for Large-Scale Graph Mining.” ASONAM 2012 (Full, 16% acceptance ratio).  Hsun-Ping Hsieh , Cheng-Te Li, and Shou

  11. Internationalization Measures in Large Scale Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soeding, Emanuel; Smith, Nancy

    2017-04-01

    Internationalization measures in Large Scale Research Projects Large scale research projects (LSRP) often serve as flagships used by universities or research institutions to demonstrate their performance and capability to stakeholders and other interested parties. As the global competition among universities for the recruitment of the brightest brains has increased, effective internationalization measures have become hot topics for universities and LSRP alike. Nevertheless, most projects and universities are challenged with little experience on how to conduct these measures and make internationalization an cost efficient and useful activity. Furthermore, those undertakings permanently have to be justified with the Project PIs as important, valuable tools to improve the capacity of the project and the research location. There are a variety of measures, suited to support universities in international recruitment. These include e.g. institutional partnerships, research marketing, a welcome culture, support for science mobility and an effective alumni strategy. These activities, although often conducted by different university entities, are interlocked and can be very powerful measures if interfaced in an effective way. On this poster we display a number of internationalization measures for various target groups, identify interfaces between project management, university administration, researchers and international partners to work together, exchange information and improve processes in order to be able to recruit, support and keep the brightest heads to your project.

  12. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  13. Large-scale Intelligent Transporation Systems simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Canfield, T.; Hannebutte, U.; Levine, D.; Tentner, A.

    1995-06-01

    A prototype computer system has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) capable of running on massively parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems. The prototype includes the modelling of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of our design is that vehicles will be represented by autonomus computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  14. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  15. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves.

    PubMed

    Warmuth, Alexander

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  16. Positive Tensor Network Approach for Simulating Open Quantum Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, A. H.; Jaschke, D.; Silvi, P.; Kliesch, M.; Calarco, T.; Eisert, J.; Montangero, S.

    2016-06-01

    Open quantum many-body systems play an important role in quantum optics and condensed matter physics, and capture phenomena like transport, the interplay between Hamiltonian and incoherent dynamics, and topological order generated by dissipation. We introduce a versatile and practical method to numerically simulate one-dimensional open quantum many-body dynamics using tensor networks. It is based on representing mixed quantum states in a locally purified form, which guarantees that positivity is preserved at all times. Moreover, the approximation error is controlled with respect to the trace norm. Hence, this scheme overcomes various obstacles of the known numerical open-system evolution schemes. To exemplify the functioning of the approach, we study both stationary states and transient dissipative behavior, for various open quantum systems ranging from few to many bodies.

  17. Positive Tensor Network Approach for Simulating Open Quantum Many-Body Systems.

    PubMed

    Werner, A H; Jaschke, D; Silvi, P; Kliesch, M; Calarco, T; Eisert, J; Montangero, S

    2016-06-10

    Open quantum many-body systems play an important role in quantum optics and condensed matter physics, and capture phenomena like transport, the interplay between Hamiltonian and incoherent dynamics, and topological order generated by dissipation. We introduce a versatile and practical method to numerically simulate one-dimensional open quantum many-body dynamics using tensor networks. It is based on representing mixed quantum states in a locally purified form, which guarantees that positivity is preserved at all times. Moreover, the approximation error is controlled with respect to the trace norm. Hence, this scheme overcomes various obstacles of the known numerical open-system evolution schemes. To exemplify the functioning of the approach, we study both stationary states and transient dissipative behavior, for various open quantum systems ranging from few to many bodies.

  18. Revealing electronic open quantum systems with subsystem TDDFT.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    2016-03-28

    Open quantum systems (OQSs) are perhaps the most realistic systems one can approach through simulations. In recent years, describing OQSs with Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a prominent avenue of research with most approaches based on a density matrix partitioning in conjunction with an ad-hoc description of system-bath interactions. We propose a different theoretical approach to OQSs based on partitioning of the electron density. Employing the machinery of subsystem DFT (and its time-dependent extension), we provide a novel way of isolating and analyzing the various terms contributing to the coupling between the system and the surrounding bath. To illustrate the theory, we provide numerical simulations on a toy system (a molecular dimer) and on a condensed phase system (solvated excimer). The simulations show that non-Markovian dynamics in the electronic system-bath interactions are important in chemical applications. For instance, we show that the superexchange mechanism of transport in donor-bridge-acceptor systems is a non-Markovian interaction between the donor-acceptor (OQS) with the bridge (bath) which is fully characterized by real-time subsystem time-dependent DFT.

  19. Survival of coherence for open quantum systems in thermal baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo; Petruccione, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    The loss of coherence in a general open quantum system interacting with a bosonic environment is analyzed. The reservoir is initially in a thermal state. The reduced dynamics is described by a non-Markovian time-local master equation. We consider spectral densities that are sub- or super-Ohmic at low frequencies and arbitrarily shaped at high frequencies. In the super-Ohmic regime, for noninteger frequency powers larger than 2, long time survival of coherence appears. In the latter regime, at vanishing temperature, the asymptotic amount of surviving coherence is stabilized to its initial value, up to a phase factor, by properly increasing the bandwidth and decreasing the low-frequency profile of the spectral density. For noninteger positive frequency powers less than 2, stretched exponential-like decoherence is found over long times. The relaxations to the asymptotic configurations become arbitrarily slow by approaching the frequency power 2 of the super-Ohmic regime. The same dependence on temperature, spectral density, and scale frequency appears for purity and concurrence of two qubits and coherence of a qubit.

  20. Towards laser control of open quantum systems: memory effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthumpally-Joseph, R.; Atabek, O.; Mangaud, E.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.; Sugny, D.

    2017-08-01

    Laser control of Open Quantum Systems (OQS) is a challenging issue as compared to its counterpart in isolated small size molecules, basically due to very large numbers of degrees of freedom to be accounted for. Such a control aims at appropriately optimizing decoherence processes of a central two-level system (a given vibrational mode, for instance) towards its environmental bath (including, for instance, all other normal modes). A variety of applications could potentially be envisioned, either to preserve the central system from decaying (long duration molecular alignment or orientation, qubit decoherence protection) or, to speed up the information flow towards the bath (efficient charge or proton transfers in long chain organic compounds). Achieving such controls require some quantitative measures of decoherence in relation with memory effects in the bath response, actually given by the degree of non-Markovianity. Characteristic decoherence rates of a Spin-Boson model are calculated using a Nakajima-Zwanzig type master equation with converged HEOM expansion for the memory kernel. It is shown that, by adequately tuning the two-level transition frequency through a controlled Stark shift produced by an external laser field, non-Markovianity can be enhanced in a continuous way leading to a first attempt towards the control of OQS.

  1. Systematic renormalization of the effective theory of Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Pajer, Enrico

    2016-05-31

    A perturbative description of Large Scale Structure is a cornerstone of our understanding of the observed distribution of matter in the universe. Renormalization is an essential and defining step to make this description physical and predictive. Here we introduce a systematic renormalization procedure, which neatly associates counterterms to the UV-sensitive diagrams order by order, as it is commonly done in quantum field theory. As a concrete example, we renormalize the one-loop power spectrum and bispectrum of both density and velocity. In addition, we present a series of results that are valid to all orders in perturbation theory. First, we show that while systematic renormalization requires temporally non-local counterterms, in practice one can use an equivalent basis made of local operators. We give an explicit prescription to generate all counterterms allowed by the symmetries. Second, we present a formal proof of the well-known general argument that the contribution of short distance perturbations to large scale density contrast δ and momentum density π(k) scale as k{sup 2} and k, respectively. Third, we demonstrate that the common practice of introducing counterterms only in the Euler equation when one is interested in correlators of δ is indeed valid to all orders.

  2. Efficient, large scale separation of coal macerals

    SciTech Connect

    Dyrkacz, G.R.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors believe that the separation of macerals by continuous flow centrifugation offers a simple technique for the large scale separation of macerals. With relatively little cost (/approximately/ $10K), it provides an opportunity for obtaining quite pure maceral fractions. Although they have not completely worked out all the nuances of this separation system, they believe that the problems they have indicated can be minimized to pose only minor inconvenience. It cannot be said that this system completely bypasses the disagreeable tedium or time involved in separating macerals, nor will it by itself overcome the mental inertia required to make maceral separation an accepted necessary fact in fundamental coal science. However, they find their particular brand of continuous flow centrifugation is considerably faster than sink/float separation, can provide a good quality product with even one separation cycle, and permits the handling of more material than a conventional sink/float centrifuge separation.

  3. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-01-01

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects. PMID:9611248

  4. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  5. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  6. Large-scale optimization of neuron arbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Christopher; Changizi, Mark; Won Kang, Du

    1999-05-01

    At the global as well as local scales, some of the geometry of types of neuron arbors-both dendrites and axons-appears to be self-organizing: Their morphogenesis behaves like flowing water, that is, fluid dynamically; waterflow in branching networks in turn acts like a tree composed of cords under tension, that is, vector mechanically. Branch diameters and angles and junction sites conform significantly to this model. The result is that such neuron tree samples globally minimize their total volume-rather than, for example, surface area or branch length. In addition, the arbors perform well at generating the cheapest topology interconnecting their terminals: their large-scale layouts are among the best of all such possible connecting patterns, approaching 5% of optimum. This model also applies comparably to arterial and river networks.

  7. Engineering management of large scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Serita; Gill, Tepper L.; Paul, Arthur S.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of high technology and engineering problem solving, has given rise to an emerging concept. Reasoning principles for integrating traditional engineering problem solving with system theory, management sciences, behavioral decision theory, and planning and design approaches can be incorporated into a methodological approach to solving problems with a long range perspective. Long range planning has a great potential to improve productivity by using a systematic and organized approach. Thus, efficiency and cost effectiveness are the driving forces in promoting the organization of engineering problems. Aspects of systems engineering that provide an understanding of management of large scale systems are broadly covered here. Due to the focus and application of research, other significant factors (e.g., human behavior, decision making, etc.) are not emphasized but are considered.

  8. Large scale cryogenic fluid systems testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Cryogenic Fluid Systems Branch (CFSB) within the Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) has the ultimate goal of enabling the long term storage and in-space fueling/resupply operations for spacecraft and reusable vehicles in support of space exploration. Using analytical modeling, ground based testing, and on-orbit experimentation, the CFSB is studying three primary categories of fluid technology: storage, supply, and transfer. The CFSB is also investigating fluid handling, advanced instrumentation, and tank structures and materials. Ground based testing of large-scale systems is done using liquid hydrogen as a test fluid at the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Facility (K-site) at Lewis' Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. A general overview of tests involving liquid transfer, thermal control, pressure control, and pressurization is given.

  9. Large scale preparation of pure phycobiliproteins.

    PubMed

    Padgett, M P; Krogmann, D W

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes simple procedures for the purification of large amounts of phycocyanin and allophycocyanin from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. A homogeneous natural bloom of this organism provided hundreds of kilograms of cells. Large samples of cells were broken by freezing and thawing. Repeated extraction of the broken cells with distilled water released phycocyanin first, then allophycocyanin, and provides supporting evidence for the current models of phycobilisome structure. The very low ionic strength of the aqueous extracts allowed allophycocyanin release in a particulate form so that this protein could be easily concentrated by centrifugation. Other proteins in the extract were enriched and concentrated by large scale membrane filtration. The biliproteins were purified to homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE cellulose. Purity was established by HPLC and by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The proteins were examined for stability at various pHs and exposures to visible light.

  10. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-06-15

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects.

  11. Large-scale synthesis of peptides.

    PubMed

    Andersson, L; Blomberg, L; Flegel, M; Lepsa, L; Nilsson, B; Verlander, M

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in the areas of formulation and delivery have rekindled the interest of the pharmaceutical community in peptides as drug candidates, which, in turn, has provided a challenge to the peptide industry to develop efficient methods for the manufacture of relatively complex peptides on scales of up to metric tons per year. This article focuses on chemical synthesis approaches for peptides, and presents an overview of the methods available and in use currently, together with a discussion of scale-up strategies. Examples of the different methods are discussed, together with solutions to some specific problems encountered during scale-up development. Finally, an overview is presented of issues common to all manufacturing methods, i.e., methods used for the large-scale purification and isolation of final bulk products and regulatory considerations to be addressed during scale-up of processes to commercial levels. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 55: 227-250, 2000

  12. Jovian large-scale stratospheric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.; Friedson, A. J.; Appleby, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to diagnose the annual-average mean meridional residual Jovian large-scale stratospheric circulation from observations of the temperature and reflected sunlight that reveal the morphology of the aerosol heating. The annual mean solar heating, total radiative flux divergence, mass stream function, and Eliassen-Palm flux divergence are shown. The stratospheric radiative flux divergence is dominated the high latitudes by aerosol absorption. Between the 270 and 100 mbar pressure levels, where there is no aerosol heating in the model, the structure of the circulation at low- to midlatitudes is governed by the meridional variation of infrared cooling in association with the variation of zonal mean temperatures observed by IRIS. The principal features of the vertical velocity profile found by Gierasch et al. (1986) are recovered in the present calculation.

  13. Large-scale parametric survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sushil; Madigan, David; Cheng, Jerry Q; Burd, Randall S

    2013-10-15

    Survival analysis has been a topic of active statistical research in the past few decades with applications spread across several areas. Traditional applications usually consider data with only a small numbers of predictors with a few hundreds or thousands of observations. Recent advances in data acquisition techniques and computation power have led to considerable interest in analyzing very-high-dimensional data where the number of predictor variables and the number of observations range between 10(4) and 10(6). In this paper, we present a tool for performing large-scale regularized parametric survival analysis using a variant of the cyclic coordinate descent method. Through our experiments on two real data sets, we show that application of regularized models to high-dimensional data avoids overfitting and can provide improved predictive performance and calibration over corresponding low-dimensional models.

  14. Large-Scale Parametric Survival Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sushil; Madigan, David; Cheng, Jerry; Burd, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Survival analysis has been a topic of active statistical research in the past few decades with applications spread across several areas. Traditional applications usually consider data with only small numbers of predictors with a few hundreds or thousands of observations. Recent advances in data acquisition techniques and computation power has led to considerable interest in analyzing very high-dimensional data where the number of predictor variables and the number of observations range between 104 – 106. In this paper, we present a tool for performing large-scale regularized parametric survival analysis using a variant of cyclic coordinate descent method. Through our experiments on two real data sets, we show that application of regularized models to high-dimensional data avoids overfitting and can provide improved predictive performance and calibration over corresponding low-dimensional models. PMID:23625862

  15. Large scale study of tooth enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Martin, M.Th.

    1981-04-01

    Human tooth enamel contains traces of foreign elements. The presence of these elements is related to the history and the environment of the human body and can be considered as the signature of perturbations which occur during the growth of a tooth. A map of the distribution of these traces on a large scale sample of the population will constitute a reference for further investigations of environmental effects. One hundred eighty samples of teeth were first analysed using PIXE, backscattering and nuclear reaction techniques. The results were analysed using statistical methods. Correlations between O, F, Na, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sr were observed and cluster analysis was in progress. The techniques described in the present work have been developed in order to establish a method for the exploration of very large samples of the Belgian population.

  16. The challenge of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The tasks that I have assumed for myself in this presentation include three separate parts. The first, appropriate to the particular setting of this meeting, is to review the basic work of the founding of this field; the appropriateness comes from the fact that W. G. Tifft made immense contributions that are not often realized by the astronomical community. The second task is to outline the general tone of the observational evidence for large scale structures. (Here, in particular, I cannot claim to be complete. I beg forgiveness from any workers who are left out by my oversight for lack of space and time.) The third task is to point out some of the major aspects of the field that may represent the clues by which some brilliant sleuth will ultimately figure out how galaxies formed.

  17. Modeling the Internet's large-scale topology

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Soon-Hyung; Jeong, Hawoong; Barabási, Albert-László

    2002-01-01

    Network generators that capture the Internet's large-scale topology are crucial for the development of efficient routing protocols and modeling Internet traffic. Our ability to design realistic generators is limited by the incomplete understanding of the fundamental driving forces that affect the Internet's evolution. By combining several independent databases capturing the time evolution, topology, and physical layout of the Internet, we identify the universal mechanisms that shape the Internet's router and autonomous system level topology. We find that the physical layout of nodes form a fractal set, determined by population density patterns around the globe. The placement of links is driven by competition between preferential attachment and linear distance dependence, a marked departure from the currently used exponential laws. The universal parameters that we extract significantly restrict the class of potentially correct Internet models and indicate that the networks created by all available topology generators are fundamentally different from the current Internet. PMID:12368484

  18. Passage Times, Exit Times and Dirichlet Problems for Open Quantum Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardet, Ivan; Bernard, Denis; Pautrat, Yan

    2017-03-01

    We consider an open quantum walk on a graph, and the random variables defined as the passage time and number of visits at a given point of the graph. We study in particular the probability that the passage time is finite, the expectation of that passage time, the expectation of the number of visits, and discuss the notion of recurrence for open quantum walks. We also study exit times and exit probabilities from a finite domain, and use them to solve Dirichlet problems and to determine harmonic measures. We consider in particular the case of irreducible open quantum walks. The results we obtain extend those for classical Markov chains.

  19. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  20. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R., LLNL

    1998-02-19

    Business needs have driven the development of commercial database systems since their inception. As a result, there has been a strong focus on supporting many users, minimizing the potential corruption or loss of data, and maximizing performance metrics like transactions per second, or TPC-C and TPC-D results. It turns out that these optimizations have little to do with the needs of the scientific community, and in particular have little impact on improving the management and use of large-scale high-dimensional data. At the same time, there is an unanswered need in the scientific community for many of the benefits offered by a robust DBMS. For example, tying an ad-hoc query language such as SQL together with a visualization toolkit would be a powerful enhancement to current capabilities. Unfortunately, there has been little emphasis or discussion in the VLDB community on this mismatch over the last decade. The goal of the paper is to identify the specific issues that need to be resolved before large-scale scientific applications can make use of DBMS products. This topic is addressed in the context of an evaluation of commercial DBMS technology applied to the exploration of data generated by the Department of Energy`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The paper describes the data being generated for ASCI as well as current capabilities for interacting with and exploring this data. The attraction of applying standard DBMS technology to this domain is discussed, as well as the technical and business issues that currently make this an infeasible solution.

  1. Improving Recent Large-Scale Pulsar Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rogerio Fernando; Ransom, S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsars are unique in that they act as celestial laboratories for precise tests of gravity and other extreme physics (Kramer 2004). There are approximately 2000 known pulsars today, which is less than ten percent of pulsars in the Milky Way according to theoretical models (Lorimer 2004). Out of these 2000 known pulsars, approximately ten percent are known millisecond pulsars, objects used for their period stability for detailed physics tests and searches for gravitational radiation (Lorimer 2008). As the field and instrumentation progress, pulsar astronomers attempt to overcome observational biases and detect new pulsars, consequently discovering new millisecond pulsars. We attempt to improve large scale pulsar surveys by examining three recent pulsar surveys. The first, the Green Bank Telescope 350MHz Drift Scan, a low frequency isotropic survey of the northern sky, has yielded a large number of candidates that were visually inspected and identified, resulting in over 34.000 thousands candidates viewed, dozens of detections of known pulsars, and the discovery of a new low-flux pulsar, PSRJ1911+22. The second, the PALFA survey, is a high frequency survey of the galactic plane with the Arecibo telescope. We created a processing pipeline for the PALFA survey at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville- VA, in addition to making needed modifications upon advice from the PALFA consortium. The third survey examined is a new GBT 820MHz survey devoted to find new millisecond pulsars by observing the target-rich environment of unidentified sources in the FERMI LAT catalogue. By approaching these three pulsar surveys at different stages, we seek to improve the success rates of large scale surveys, and hence the possibility for ground-breaking work in both basic physics and astrophysics.

  2. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  3. Voids in the Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ad, Hagai; Piran, Tsvi

    1997-12-01

    Voids are the most prominent feature of the large-scale structure of the universe. Still, their incorporation into quantitative analysis of it has been relatively recent, owing essentially to the lack of an objective tool to identify the voids and to quantify them. To overcome this, we present here the VOID FINDER algorithm, a novel tool for objectively quantifying voids in the galaxy distribution. The algorithm first classifies galaxies as either wall galaxies or field galaxies. Then, it identifies voids in the wall-galaxy distribution. Voids are defined as continuous volumes that do not contain any wall galaxies. The voids must be thicker than an adjustable limit, which is refined in successive iterations. In this way, we identify the same regions that would be recognized as voids by the eye. Small breaches in the walls are ignored, avoiding artificial connections between neighboring voids. We test the algorithm using Voronoi tesselations. By appropriate scaling of the parameters with the selection function, we apply it to two redshift surveys, the dense SSRS2 and the full-sky IRAS 1.2 Jy. Both surveys show similar properties: ~50% of the volume is filled by voids. The voids have a scale of at least 40 h-1 Mpc and an average -0.9 underdensity. Faint galaxies do not fill the voids, but they do populate them more than bright ones. These results suggest that both optically and IRAS-selected galaxies delineate the same large-scale structure. Comparison with the recovered mass distribution further suggests that the observed voids in the galaxy distribution correspond well to underdense regions in the mass distribution. This confirms the gravitational origin of the voids.

  4. Phase Correlations and Topological Measures of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, P.

    The process of gravitational instability initiated by small primordial density perturbations is a vital ingredient of cosmological models that attempt to explain how galaxies and large-scale structure formed in the Universe. In the standard picture (the "concordance" model), a period of accelerated expansion ("inflation") generated density fluctuations with simple statistical properties through quantum processes (Starobinsky [82], [83], [84]; Guth [39]; Guth & Pi [40]; Albrecht & Steinhardt [2]; Linde [55]). In this scenario the primordial density field is assumed to form a statistically homogeneous and isotropic Gaussian random field (GRF). Over years of observational scrutiny this paradigm has strengthened its hold in the minds of cosmologists and has survived many tests, culminating in those furnished by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP; Bennett et al. [7]; Hinshaw et al. [45].

  5. OpenFlow arbitrated programmable network channels for managing quantum metadata

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Venkat R.; Humble, Travis S.

    2016-10-10

    Quantum networks must classically exchange complex metadata between devices in order to carry out information for protocols such as teleportation, super-dense coding, and quantum key distribution. Demonstrating the integration of these new communication methods with existing network protocols, channels, and data forwarding mechanisms remains an open challenge. Software-defined networking (SDN) offers robust and flexible strategies for managing diverse network devices and uses. We adapt the principles of SDN to the deployment of quantum networks, which are composed from unique devices that operate according to the laws of quantum mechanics. We show how quantum metadata can be managed within a software-defined network using the OpenFlow protocol, and we describe how OpenFlow management of classical optical channels is compatible with emerging quantum communication protocols. We next give an example specification of the metadata needed to manage and control quantum physical layer (QPHY) behavior and we extend the OpenFlow interface to accommodate this quantum metadata. Here, we conclude by discussing near-term experimental efforts that can realize SDN’s principles for quantum communication.

  6. OpenFlow arbitrated programmable network channels for managing quantum metadata

    DOE PAGES

    Dasari, Venkat R.; Humble, Travis S.

    2016-10-10

    Quantum networks must classically exchange complex metadata between devices in order to carry out information for protocols such as teleportation, super-dense coding, and quantum key distribution. Demonstrating the integration of these new communication methods with existing network protocols, channels, and data forwarding mechanisms remains an open challenge. Software-defined networking (SDN) offers robust and flexible strategies for managing diverse network devices and uses. We adapt the principles of SDN to the deployment of quantum networks, which are composed from unique devices that operate according to the laws of quantum mechanics. We show how quantum metadata can be managed within a software-definedmore » network using the OpenFlow protocol, and we describe how OpenFlow management of classical optical channels is compatible with emerging quantum communication protocols. We next give an example specification of the metadata needed to manage and control quantum physical layer (QPHY) behavior and we extend the OpenFlow interface to accommodate this quantum metadata. Here, we conclude by discussing near-term experimental efforts that can realize SDN’s principles for quantum communication.« less

  7. Large-scale calculations of gas phase thermochemistry: Enthalpy of formation, standard entropy, and heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremanpour, Mohammad M.; van Maaren, Paul J.; Ditz, Jonas C.; Lindh, Roland; van der Spoel, David

    2016-09-01

    Large scale quantum calculations for molar enthalpy of formation (ΔfH0), standard entropy (S0), and heat capacity (CV) are presented. A large data set may help to evaluate quantum thermochemistry tools in order to uncover possible hidden shortcomings and also to find experimental data that might need to be reinvestigated, indeed we list and annotate approximately 200 problematic thermochemistry measurements. Quantum methods systematically underestimate S0 for flexible molecules in the gas phase if only a single (minimum energy) conformation is taken into account. This problem can be tackled in principle by performing thermochemistry calculations for all stable conformations [Zheng et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 10885-10907 (2011)], but this is not practical for large molecules. We observe that the deviation of composite quantum thermochemistry recipes from experimental S0 corresponds roughly to the Boltzmann equation (S = RlnΩ), where R is the gas constant and Ω the number of possible conformations. This allows an empirical correction of the calculated entropy for molecules with multiple conformations. With the correction we find an RMSD from experiment of ≈13 J/mol K for 1273 compounds. This paper also provides predictions of ΔfH0, S0, and CV for well over 700 compounds for which no experimental data could be found in the literature. Finally, in order to facilitate the analysis of thermodynamics properties by others we have implemented a new tool obthermo in the OpenBabel program suite [O'Boyle et al., J. Cheminf. 3, 33 (2011)] including a table of reference atomization energy values for popular thermochemistry methods.

  8. Quantum simulator of an open quantum system using superconducting qubits: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostame, Sarah; Rebentrost, Patrick; Eisfeld, Alexander; Kerman, Andrew J.; Tsomokos, Dimitris I.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-02-01

    In the initial stage of photosynthesis, light-harvested energy is transferred with remarkably high efficiency to a reaction center, with the vibrational environment assisting the transport mechanism. It is of great interest to mimic this process with present-day technologies. Here we propose an analog quantum simulator of open system dynamics, where noise engineering of the environment has a central role. In particular, we propose the use of superconducting qubits for the simulation of exciton transport in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson protein, a prototypical photosynthetic complex. Our method allows for a single-molecule implementation and the investigation of energy transfer pathways as well as non-Markovian and spatiotemporal noise-correlation effects.

  9. Universality in spectral statistics of open quantum graphs.

    PubMed

    Gutkin, B; Osipov, V Al

    2015-06-01

    The quantum evolution maps of closed chaotic quantum graphs are unitary and known to have universal spectral correlations matching predictions of random matrix theory. In chaotic graphs with absorption the quantum maps become nonunitary. We show that their spectral statistics exhibit universality at the soft edges of the spectrum. The same spectral behavior is observed in many classical nonunitary ensembles of random matrices with rotationally invariant measures.

  10. Universality in spectral statistics of open quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutkin, B.; Osipov, V. Al.

    2015-06-01

    The quantum evolution maps of closed chaotic quantum graphs are unitary and known to have universal spectral correlations matching predictions of random matrix theory. In chaotic graphs with absorption the quantum maps become nonunitary. We show that their spectral statistics exhibit universality at the soft edges of the spectrum. The same spectral behavior is observed in many classical nonunitary ensembles of random matrices with rotationally invariant measures.

  11. Rapid Swept-Wavelength External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Open Path Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-07-01

    A rapidly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system is used for open path sensing. The system permits acquisition of transient absorption spectra over a 125 cm-1 tuning range in less than 0.01 s.

  12. Open-loop quantum control as a resource for secure communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Properties of unitary time evolution of quantum systems can be applied to define quantum cryptographic protocols. Dynamics of a qubit can be exploited as a data encryption/decryption procedure by means of timed measurements, implementation of an open-loop control scheme over a qubit increases robustness of a protocol employing this principle.

  13. ORNL Demonstrates Large-Scale Technique to Produce Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, David; Moon, Ji-Won

    2016-05-19

    A method to produce significant amounts of semiconducting nanoparticles for light-emitting displays, sensors, solar panels and biomedical applications has gained momentum with a demonstration by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. ORNL Demonstrates Large-Scale Technique to Produce Quantum Dots

    ScienceCinema

    Graham, David; Moon, Ji-Won

    2016-07-12

    A method to produce significant amounts of semiconducting nanoparticles for light-emitting displays, sensors, solar panels and biomedical applications has gained momentum with a demonstration by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. Management of large-scale multimedia conferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cidon, Israel; Nachum, Youval

    1998-12-01

    The goal of this work is to explore management strategies and algorithms for large-scale multimedia conferencing over a communication network. Since the use of multimedia conferencing is still limited, the management of such systems has not yet been studied in depth. A well organized and human friendly multimedia conference management should utilize efficiently and fairly its limited resources as well as take into account the requirements of the conference participants. The ability of the management to enforce fair policies and to quickly take into account the participants preferences may even lead to a conference environment that is more pleasant and more effective than a similar face to face meeting. We suggest several principles for defining and solving resource sharing problems in this context. The conference resources which are addressed in this paper are the bandwidth (conference network capacity), time (participants' scheduling) and limitations of audio and visual equipment. The participants' requirements for these resources are defined and translated in terms of Quality of Service requirements and the fairness criteria.

  16. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  17. Large-scale tides in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Hiu Yan; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-02-01

    Density perturbations in cosmology, i.e. spherically symmetric adiabatic perturbations of a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime, are locally exactly equivalent to a different FLRW solution, as long as their wavelength is much larger than the sound horizon of all fluid components. This fact is known as the "separate universe" paradigm. However, no such relation is known for anisotropic adiabatic perturbations, which correspond to an FLRW spacetime with large-scale tidal fields. Here, we provide a closed, fully relativistic set of evolutionary equations for the nonlinear evolution of such modes, based on the conformal Fermi (CFC) frame. We show explicitly that the tidal effects are encoded by the Weyl tensor, and are hence entirely different from an anisotropic Bianchi I spacetime, where the anisotropy is sourced by the Ricci tensor. In order to close the system, certain higher derivative terms have to be dropped. We show that this approximation is equivalent to the local tidal approximation of Hui and Bertschinger [1]. We also show that this very simple set of equations matches the exact evolution of the density field at second order, but fails at third and higher order. This provides a useful, easy-to-use framework for computing the fully relativistic growth of structure at second order.

  18. Food appropriation through large scale land acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand for agricultural products and the uncertainty of international food markets has recently drawn the attention of governments and agribusiness firms toward investments in productive agricultural land, mostly in the developing world. The targeted countries are typically located in regions that have remained only marginally utilized because of lack of modern technology. It is expected that in the long run large scale land acquisitions (LSLAs) for commercial farming will bring the technology required to close the existing crops yield gaps. While the extent of the acquired land and the associated appropriation of freshwater resources have been investigated in detail, the amount of food this land can produce and the number of people it could feed still need to be quantified. Here we use a unique dataset of land deals to provide a global quantitative assessment of the rates of crop and food appropriation potentially associated with LSLAs. We show how up to 300-550 million people could be fed by crops grown in the acquired land, should these investments in agriculture improve crop production and close the yield gap. In contrast, about 190-370 million people could be supported by this land without closing of the yield gap. These numbers raise some concern because the food produced in the acquired land is typically exported to other regions, while the target countries exhibit high levels of malnourishment. Conversely, if used for domestic consumption, the crops harvested in the acquired land could ensure food security to the local populations.

  19. Large scale structure of the sun's corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Mukul R.

    Results concerning the large-scale structure of the solar corona obtained by observations at meter-decameter wavelengths are reviewed. Coronal holes observed on the disk at multiple frequencies show the radial and azimuthal geometry of the hole. At the base of the hole there is good correspondence to the chromospheric signature in He I 10,830 A, but at greater heights the hole may show departures from symmetry. Two-dimensional imaging of weak-type III bursts simultaneously with the HAO SMM coronagraph/polarimeter measurements indicate that these bursts occur along elongated features emanating from the quiet sun, corresponding in position angle to the bright coronal streamers. It is shown that the densest regions of streamers and the regions of maximum intensity of type II bursts coincide closely. Non-flare-associated type II/type IV bursts associated with coronal streamer disruption events are studied along with correlated type II burst emissions originating from distant centers on the sun.

  20. Large-scale carbon fiber tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A realistic release of carbon fibers was established by burning a minimum of 45 kg of carbon fiber composite aircraft structural components in each of five large scale, outdoor aviation jet fuel fire tests. This release was quantified by several independent assessments with various instruments developed specifically for these tests. The most likely values for the mass of single carbon fibers released ranged from 0.2 percent of the initial mass of carbon fiber for the source tests (zero wind velocity) to a maximum of 0.6 percent of the initial carbon fiber mass for dissemination tests (5 to 6 m/s wind velocity). Mean fiber lengths for fibers greater than 1 mm in length ranged from 2.5 to 3.5 mm. Mean diameters ranged from 3.6 to 5.3 micrometers which was indicative of significant oxidation. Footprints of downwind dissemination of the fire released fibers were measured to 19.1 km from the fire.

  1. Large-scale clustering of cosmic voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwan Chuen; Hamaus, Nico; Desjacques, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    We study the clustering of voids using N -body simulations and simple theoretical models. The excursion-set formalism describes fairly well the abundance of voids identified with the watershed algorithm, although the void formation threshold required is quite different from the spherical collapse value. The void cross bias bc is measured and its large-scale value is found to be consistent with the peak background split results. A simple fitting formula for bc is found. We model the void auto-power spectrum taking into account the void biasing and exclusion effect. A good fit to the simulation data is obtained for voids with radii ≳30 Mpc h-1 , especially when the void biasing model is extended to 1-loop order. However, the best-fit bias parameters do not agree well with the peak-background results. Being able to fit the void auto-power spectrum is particularly important not only because it is the direct observable in galaxy surveys, but also our method enables us to treat the bias parameters as nuisance parameters, which are sensitive to the techniques used to identify voids.

  2. Large-scale autostereoscopic outdoor display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitterer, Jörg; Fidler, Franz; Saint Julien-Wallsee, Ferdinand; Schmid, Gerhard; Gartner, Wolfgang; Leeb, Walter; Schmid, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    State-of-the-art autostereoscopic displays are often limited in size, effective brightness, number of 3D viewing zones, and maximum 3D viewing distances, all of which are mandatory requirements for large-scale outdoor displays. Conventional autostereoscopic indoor concepts like lenticular lenses or parallax barriers cannot simply be adapted for these screens due to the inherent loss of effective resolution and brightness, which would reduce both image quality and sunlight readability. We have developed a modular autostereoscopic multi-view laser display concept with sunlight readable effective brightness, theoretically up to several thousand 3D viewing zones, and maximum 3D viewing distances of up to 60 meters. For proof-of-concept purposes a prototype display with two pixels was realized. Due to various manufacturing tolerances each individual pixel has slightly different optical properties, and hence the 3D image quality of the display has to be calculated stochastically. In this paper we present the corresponding stochastic model, we evaluate the simulation and measurement results of the prototype display, and we calculate the achievable autostereoscopic image quality to be expected for our concept.

  3. Large Scale EOF Analysis of Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhat, M.; Gittens, A.; Kashinath, K.; Cavanaugh, N. R.; Mahoney, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a distributed approach towards extracting EOFs from 3D climate data. We implement the method in Apache Spark, and process multi-TB sized datasets on O(1000-10,000) cores. We apply this method to latitude-weighted ocean temperature data from CSFR, a 2.2 terabyte-sized data set comprising ocean and subsurface reanalysis measurements collected at 41 levels in the ocean, at 6 hour intervals over 31 years. We extract the first 100 EOFs of this full data set and compare to the EOFs computed simply on the surface temperature field. Our analyses provide evidence of Kelvin and Rossy waves and components of large-scale modes of oscillation including the ENSO and PDO that are not visible in the usual SST EOFs. Further, they provide information on the the most influential parts of the ocean, such as the thermocline, that exist below the surface. Work is ongoing to understand the factors determining the depth-varying spatial patterns observed in the EOFs. We will experiment with weighting schemes to appropriately account for the differing depths of the observations. We also plan to apply the same distributed approach to analysis of analysis of 3D atmospheric climatic data sets, including multiple variables. Because the atmosphere changes on a quicker time-scale than the ocean, we expect that the results will demonstrate an even greater advantage to computing 3D EOFs in lieu of 2D EOFs.

  4. Numerical Modeling for Large Scale Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Malvoisin, Benjamin; Mazzini, Adriano; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    Moderate-to-high enthalpy systems are driven by multiphase and multicomponent processes, fluid and rock mechanics, and heat transport processes, all of which present challenges in developing realistic numerical models of the underlying physics. The objective of this work is to present an approach, and some initial results, for modeling and understanding dynamics of the birth of large scale hydrothermal systems. Numerical modeling of such complex systems must take into account a variety of coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes, which is numerically challenging. To provide first estimates of the behavior of this deep complex systems, geological structures must be constrained, and the fluid dynamics, mechanics and the heat transport need to be investigated in three dimensions. Modeling these processes numerically at adequate resolution and reasonable computation times requires a suite of tools that we are developing and/or utilizing to investigate such systems. Our long-term goal is to develop 3D numerical models, based on a geological models, which couples mechanics with the hydraulics and thermal processes driving hydrothermal system. Our first results from the Lusi hydrothermal system in East Java, Indonesia provide a basis for more sophisticated studies, eventually in 3D, and we introduce a workflow necessary to achieve these objectives. Future work focuses with the aim and parallelization suitable for High Performance Computing (HPC). Such developments are necessary to achieve high-resolution simulations to more fully understand the complex dynamics of hydrothermal systems.

  5. Large scale digital atlases in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawrylycz, M.; Feng, D.; Lau, C.; Kuan, C.; Miller, J.; Dang, C.; Ng, L.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging in neuroscience has revolutionized our current understanding of brain structure, architecture and increasingly its function. Many characteristics of morphology, cell type, and neuronal circuitry have been elucidated through methods of neuroimaging. Combining this data in a meaningful, standardized, and accessible manner is the scope and goal of the digital brain atlas. Digital brain atlases are used today in neuroscience to characterize the spatial organization of neuronal structures, for planning and guidance during neurosurgery, and as a reference for interpreting other data modalities such as gene expression and connectivity data. The field of digital atlases is extensive and in addition to atlases of the human includes high quality brain atlases of the mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and other model organisms. Using techniques based on histology, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as gene expression data, modern digital atlases use probabilistic and multimodal techniques, as well as sophisticated visualization software to form an integrated product. Toward this goal, brain atlases form a common coordinate framework for summarizing, accessing, and organizing this knowledge and will undoubtedly remain a key technology in neuroscience in the future. Since the development of its flagship project of a genome wide image-based atlas of the mouse brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has used imaging as a primary data modality for many of its large scale atlas projects. We present an overview of Allen Institute digital atlases in neuroscience, with a focus on the challenges and opportunities for image processing and computation.

  6. Large Scale Land Acquisition as a driver of slope instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilo Chiarelli, Davide; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Davis, Kyle F.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Forests play a key role in preventing shallow landslides and deforestation has been analyzed as one of the main causes of increased mass wasting in hillsplopes undergoing land cover change. In the last few years vast tracts of lands have been acquired by foreign investors to satisfy an increasing demand for agricultural products. Large Scale Land Acquisitions (LSLA) often entail the conversion of forested landscapes into agricultural fields. Mozambique has been a major target of LSLAs and there is evidence that many of the acquired land have recently undergone forest clearing. The Zambezia Province in Mozambique has lost more than 500000ha of forest from 2000 to 2014; 25.4% of them were in areas acquired by large scale land investors. According to Land Matrix, an open-source database of reported land deals, there are currently 123 intended and confirmed deals in Mozambique; collectively, they account for 2.34million ha, the majority of which are located in forested areas. This study analyses the relationship between deforestation taking place inside LSLA areas(usually for agricultural purpose) and the likelihood of landslides occurrence in the Zambezia province in Mozambique. To this aim we use a spatially distributed and physically based model that couples slope stability analysis with a hillslope scale hydrological model and we compare the change in slope stability associated the forest loss documented by satellite imagery.

  7. Large scale calculations for hadron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbi, C.

    1985-01-01

    The talk reviews some recent Monte Carlo calculations for Quantum Chromodynamics, performed on Euclidean lattices of rather large extent. Purpose of the calculations is to provide accurate determinations of quantities, such as interquark potentials or mass eigenvalues, which are relevant for hadronic spectroscopy. Results obtained in quenched QCD on 16/sup 3/ x 32 lattices are illustrated, and a discussion of computational resources and techniques required for the calculations is presented. 18 refs.,3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Large-scale structure in the universe. Proceedings. Conference, London (UK), 25 - 26 Mar 1998.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Universe: large-scale structure, early Universe: quantum fluctuations, microwave background radiation studies, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, galaxy clustering evolution, the CNOC2 Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, quasar clustering.

  9. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Wilcox, Lucas C.; Hill, Judith C.; Ghattas, Omar; Berggren, Martin Olof; Akcelik, Volkan; Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  10. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  11. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  12. The School Principal's Role in Large-Scale Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Paul; Tunison, Scott; Viczko, Melody

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an interpretive study in which 25 elementary principals were asked about their assessment knowledge, the use of large-scale assessments in their schools, and principals' perceptions on their roles with respect to large-scale assessments. Principals in this study suggested that the current context of large-scale assessment and…

  13. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  14. Quantum metrology in open systems: dissipative Cramér-Rao bound.

    PubMed

    Alipour, S; Mehboudi, M; Rezakhani, A T

    2014-03-28

    Estimation of parameters is a pivotal task throughout science and technology. The quantum Cramér-Rao bound provides a fundamental limit of precision allowed to be achieved under quantum theory. For closed quantum systems, it has been shown how the estimation precision depends on the underlying dynamics. Here, we propose a general formulation for metrology scenarios in open quantum systems, aiming to relate the precision more directly to properties of the underlying dynamics. This feature may be employed to enhance an estimation precision, e.g., by quantum control techniques. Specifically, we derive a Cramér-Rao bound for a fairly large class of open system dynamics, which is governed by a (time-dependent) dynamical semigroup map. We illustrate the utility of this scenario through three examples.

  15. A mini review: photobioreactors for large scale algal cultivation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prabuddha L; Lee, Seung-Mok; Choi, Hee-Jeong

    2015-09-01

    Microalgae cultivation has gained much interest in terms of the production of foods, biofuels, and bioactive compounds and offers a great potential option for cleaning the environment through CO2 sequestration and wastewater treatment. Although open pond cultivation is most affordable option, there tends to be insufficient control on growth conditions and the risk of contamination. In contrast, while providing minimal risk of contamination, closed photobioreactors offer better control on culture conditions, such as: CO2 supply, water supply, optimal temperatures, efficient exposure to light, culture density, pH levels, and mixing rates. For a large scale production of biomass, efficient photobioreactors are required. This review paper describes general design considerations pertaining to photobioreactor systems, in order to cultivate microalgae for biomass production. It also discusses the current challenges in designing of photobioreactors for the production of low-cost biomass.

  16. Large-scale coherent structures as drivers of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Gutmark, E.; Parr, T.P.; Parr, D.M.; Wilson, K.J.

    1987-06-01

    The role of flow coherent structures as drivers of combustion instabilities in a dump combustor was studied. Results of nonreacting tests in air and water flows as well as combustion experiments in a diffusion flame and dump combustor are discussed to provide insight into the generation process of large-scale structures in the combustor flow and their interaction with the combustion process. It is shown that the flow structures, or vortices, are formed by interaction between the flow instabilities and the chamber acoustic resonance. When these vortices dominate the reacting flow, the combustion is confined to their cores, leading to periodic heat release, which may result in the driving of high amplitude pressure oscillations. These oscillations are typical to the occurrence of combustion instabilities for certain operating conditions. The basic understanding of the interaction between flow dynamics and the combustion process opens up the possibility for rational control of combustion-induced pressure oscillations. 42 references.

  17. Lindbladian operators, von Neumann entropy and energy conservation in time-dependent quantum open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Congjie; Chamberlin, Ralph V.; Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The Lindblad equation is widely employed in studies of Markovian quantum open systems. Here, the following question is posed: in a quantum open system with a time-dependent Hamiltonian such as a subsystem in contact with the heat bath, what is the corresponding Lindblad equation for the quantum state that keeps the internal energy of the subsystem constant in time? This issue is of importance in realizing quasi-stationary states of open systems such as quantum circuits and batteries. As an illustrative example, the time-dependent harmonic oscillator is analyzed. It is shown that the Lindbladian operator is uniquely determined with the help of a Lie-algebraic structure, and the time derivative of the von Neumann entropy is shown to be nonnegative if the curvature of the harmonic potential monotonically decreases in time.

  18. Large-Scale Graphene Film Deposition for Monolithic Device Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-shurman, Khaled

    Since 1958, the concept of integrated circuit (IC) has achieved great technological developments and helped in shrinking electronic devices. Nowadays, an IC consists of more than a million of compacted transistors. The majority of current ICs use silicon as a semiconductor material. According to Moore's law, the number of transistors built-in on a microchip can be double every two years. However, silicon device manufacturing reaches its physical limits. To explain, there is a new trend to shrinking circuitry to seven nanometers where a lot of unknown quantum effects such as tunneling effect can not be controlled. Hence, there is an urgent need for a new platform material to replace Si. Graphene is considered a promising material with enormous potential applications in many electronic and optoelectronics devices due to its superior properties. There are several techniques to produce graphene films. Among these techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) offers a very convenient method to fabricate films for large-scale graphene films. Though CVD method is suitable for large area growth of graphene, the need for transferring a graphene film to silicon-based substrates is required. Furthermore, the graphene films thus achieved are, in fact, not single crystalline. Also, graphene fabrication utilizing Cu and Ni at high growth temperature contaminates the substrate that holds Si CMOS circuitry and CVD chamber as well. So, lowering the deposition temperature is another technological milestone for the successful adoption of graphene in integrated circuits fabrication. In this research, direct large-scale graphene film fabrication on silicon based platform (i.e. SiO2 and Si3N4) at low temperature was achieved. With a focus on low-temperature graphene growth, hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was utilized to synthesize graphene film using 200 nm thick nickel film. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to examine graphene formation on the bottom side of the Ni film

  19. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school…

  20. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school…

  1. Large scale dynamics of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William

    2017-08-01

    Planets form in the gaseous and dusty disks orbiting young stars. These protoplanetary disks are dispersed in a few million years, being accreted onto the central star or evaporated into the interstellar medium. To explain the observed accretion rates, it is commonly assumed that matter is transported through the disk by turbulence, although the mechanism sustaining turbulence is uncertain. On the other side, irradiation by the central star could heat up the disk surface and trigger a photoevaporative wind, but thermal effects cannot account for the observed acceleration and collimation of the wind into a narrow jet perpendicular to the disk plane. Both issues can be solved if the disk is sensitive to magnetic fields. Weak fields lead to the magnetorotational instability, whose outcome is a state of sustained turbulence. Strong fields can slow down the disk, causing it to accrete while launching a collimated wind. However, the coupling between the disk and the neutral gas is done via electric charges, each of which is outnumbered by several billion neutral molecules. The imperfect coupling between the magnetic field and the neutral gas is described in terms of "non-ideal" effects, introducing new dynamical behaviors. This thesis is devoted to the transport processes happening inside weakly ionized and weakly magnetized accretion disks; the role of microphysical effects on the large-scale dynamics of the disk is of primary importance. As a first step, I exclude the wind and examine the impact of non-ideal effects on the turbulent properties near the disk midplane. I show that the flow can spontaneously organize itself if the ionization fraction is low enough; in this case, accretion is halted and the disk exhibits axisymmetric structures, with possible consequences on planetary formation. As a second step, I study the launching of disk winds via a global model of stratified disk embedded in a warm atmosphere. This model is the first to compute non-ideal effects from

  2. Large scale simulations of Brownian suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viera, Marc Nathaniel

    Particle suspensions occur in a wide variety of natural and engineering materials. Some examples are colloids, polymers, paints, and slurries. These materials exhibit complex behavior owing to the forces which act among the particles and are transmitted through the fluid medium. Depending on the application, particle sizes range from large macroscopic molecules of 100mum to smaller colloidal particles in the range of 10nm to 1mum. Particles of this size interact though interparticle forces such as electrostatic and van der Waals, as well as hydrodynamic forces transmitted through the fluid medium. Additionally, the particles are subjected to random thermal fluctuations in the fluid giving rise to Brownian motion. The central objective of our research is to develop efficient numerical algorithms for the large scale dynamic simulation of particle suspensions. While previous methods have incurred a computational cost of O(N3), where N is the number of particles, we have developed a novel algorithm capable of solving this problem in O(N ln N) operations. This has allowed us to perform dynamic simulations with up to 64,000 particles and Monte Carlo realizations of up to 1 million particles. Our algorithm follows a Stokesian dynamics formulation by evaluating many-body hydrodynamic interactions using a far-field multipole expansion combined with a near-field lubrication correction. The breakthrough O(N ln N) scaling is obtained by employing a Particle-Mesh-Ewald (PME) approach whereby near-field interactions are evaluated directly and far-field interactions are evaluated using a grid based velocity computed with FFT's. This approach is readily extended to include the effects of Brownian motion. For interacting particles, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem requires that the individual Brownian forces satisfy a correlation based on the N body resistance tensor R. The accurate modeling of these forces requires the computation of a matrix square root R 1/2 for matrices up

  3. Dynamics and thermodynamics of linear quantum open systems.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Esteban A; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2013-03-29

    We analyze the evolution of the quantum state of networks of quantum oscillators coupled with arbitrary external environments. We show that the reduced density matrix of the network always obeys a local master equation with a simple analytical solution. We use this to study the emergence of thermodynamical laws in the long time regime demonstrating two main results: First, we show that it is impossible to build a quantum absorption refrigerator using linear networks (thus, nonlinearity is an essential resource for such refrigerators recently studied by Levy and Kosloff [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 070604 (2012)] and Levy et al. [Phys. Rev. B 85, 061126 (2012)]). Then, we show that the third law imposes constraints on the low frequency behavior of the environmental spectral densities.

  4. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Linear Quantum Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Esteban A.; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the evolution of the quantum state of networks of quantum oscillators coupled with arbitrary external environments. We show that the reduced density matrix of the network always obeys a local master equation with a simple analytical solution. We use this to study the emergence of thermodynamical laws in the long time regime demonstrating two main results: First, we show that it is impossible to build a quantum absorption refrigerator using linear networks (thus, nonlinearity is an essential resource for such refrigerators recently studied by Levy and Kosloff [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 070604 (2012)] and Levy et al. [Phys. Rev. B 85, 061126 (2012)]). Then, we show that the third law imposes constraints on the low frequency behavior of the environmental spectral densities.

  5. Simulation of single-qubit open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweke, Ryan; Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for the simulation of arbitrary Markovian dynamics of a qubit, described by a semigroup of single-qubit quantum channels {Tt} specified by a generator L. This algorithm requires only single-qubit and controlled-not gates and approximates the channel Tt=etL up to the chosen accuracy ɛ, with a slightly superlinear cost O((∥L∥(1→1)t)1+1/2k/ɛ1/2k) for any integer k. Inspired by developments in Hamiltonian simulation, a decomposition and recombination technique is utilized which allows for the exploitation of recently developed methods for the approximation of arbitrary single-qubit channels. In particular, as a result of these methods the algorithm requires only a single ancilla qubit, the minimal possible dilation for a nonunitary single-qubit quantum channel.

  6. Large-Scale Simulation Network Design Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    involved in a single excercise ._Ultimately, the system will be able to be used byhundreds of individua , players’Finally, it attempts to portray a realistic...main gun at a maximum of twelve rounds per minute, a minimum of five seconds must elapse between successive depressions of the rounds switches. As the...arming the main gun This includes ensuring that the "safe" light is lit, depressing the knee switch that opens the bustle door, pretending to load the

  7. Population generation for large-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Andrew C.; King, Gary; Morrison, Clayton; Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Computer simulation is used to research phenomena ranging from the structure of the space-time continuum to population genetics and future combat.1-3 Multi-agent simulations in particular are now commonplace in many fields.4, 5 By modeling populations whose complex behavior emerges from individual interactions, these simulations help to answer questions about effects where closed form solutions are difficult to solve or impossible to derive.6 To be useful, simulations must accurately model the relevant aspects of the underlying domain. In multi-agent simulation, this means that the modeling must include both the agents and their relationships. Typically, each agent can be modeled as a set of attributes drawn from various distributions (e.g., height, morale, intelligence and so forth). Though these can interact - for example, agent height is related to agent weight - they are usually independent. Modeling relations between agents, on the other hand, adds a new layer of complexity, and tools from graph theory and social network analysis are finding increasing application.7, 8 Recognizing the role and proper use of these techniques, however, remains the subject of ongoing research. We recently encountered these complexities while building large scale social simulations.9-11 One of these, the Hats Simulator, is designed to be a lightweight proxy for intelligence analysis problems. Hats models a "society in a box" consisting of many simple agents, called hats. Hats gets its name from the classic spaghetti western, in which the heroes and villains are known by the color of the hats they wear. The Hats society also has its heroes and villains, but the challenge is to identify which color hat they should be wearing based on how they behave. There are three types of hats: benign hats, known terrorists, and covert terrorists. Covert terrorists look just like benign hats but act like terrorists. Population structure can make covert hat identification significantly more

  8. Large-scale Fractal Motion of Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    waters surrounding the island.) The “swallowed” gulps of clear island air get carried along within the vortices, but these are soon mixed into the surrounding clouds. Landsat is unique in its ability to image both the small-scale eddies that mix clear and cloudy air, down to the 30 meter pixel size of Landsat, but also having a wide enough field-of-view, 180 km, to reveal the connection of the turbulence to large-scale flows such as the subtropical oceanic gyres. Landsat 7, with its new onboard digital recorder, has extended this capability away from the few Landsat ground stations to remote areas such as Alejandro Island, and thus is gradually providing a global dynamic picture of evolving human-scale phenomena. For more details on von Karman vortices, refer to climate.gsfc.nasa.gov/~cahalan. Image and caption courtesy Bob Cahalan, NASA GSFC Instrument: Landsat 7 - ETM+ Credit: NASA/GSFC/Landsat NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  9. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  10. Completely Positive Approximate Solutions of Driven Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadfarshi, Farhang; Cui, Jian; Mintert, Florian

    2015-04-01

    We define a perturbative approximation for the solution of Lindblad master equations with time-dependent generators that satisfies the fundamental property of complete positivity, as essential for quantum simulations and optimal control. With explicit examples we show that ensuring this property substantially improves the accuracy of the perturbative approximation.

  11. Quantum Chemistry on Quantum Computers: A Polynomial-Time Quantum Algorithm for Constructing the Wave Functions of Open-Shell Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Toyota, Kazuo; Sato, Kazunobu; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2016-08-18

    Quantum computers are capable to efficiently perform full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations of atoms and molecules by using the quantum phase estimation (QPE) algorithm. Because the success probability of the QPE depends on the overlap between approximate and exact wave functions, efficient methods to prepare accurate initial guess wave functions enough to have sufficiently large overlap with the exact ones are highly desired. Here, we propose a quantum algorithm to construct the wave function consisting of one configuration state function, which is suitable for the initial guess wave function in QPE-based FCI calculations of open-shell molecules, based on the addition theorem of angular momentum. The proposed quantum algorithm enables us to prepare the wave function consisting of an exponential number of Slater determinants only by a polynomial number of quantum operations.

  12. Fast algorithm for transient current through open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, King Tai; Fu, Bin; Yu, Zhizhou; Wang, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Transient current calculation is essential to study the response time and capture the peak transient current for preventing meltdown of nanochips in nanoelectronics. Its calculation is known to be extremely time consuming with the best scaling T N3 where N is the dimension of the device and T is the number of time steps. The dynamical response of the system is usually probed by sending a steplike pulse and monitoring its transient behavior. Here, we provide a fast algorithm to study the transient behavior due to the steplike pulse. This algorithm consists of two parts: algorithm I reduces the computational complexity to T0N3 for large systems as long as T large scale transient problems including magnetic tunneling junctions and ferroelectric tunneling junctions.

  13. Multitree Algorithms for Large-Scale Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, William B.; Ozakin, Arkadas; Lee, Dongryeol; Riegel, Ryan; Gray, Alexander G.

    2012-03-01

    this number every week, resulting in billions of objects. At such scales, even linear-time analysis operations present challenges, particularly since statistical analyses are inherently interactive processes, requiring that computations complete within some reasonable human attention span. The quadratic (or worse) runtimes of straightforward implementations become quickly unbearable. Examples of applications. These analysis subroutines occur ubiquitously in astrostatistical work. We list just a few examples. The need to cross-match objects across different catalogs has led to various algorithms, which at some point perform an AllNN computation. 2-point and higher-order spatial correlations for the basis of spatial statistics, and are utilized in astronomy to compare the spatial structures of two datasets, such as an observed sample and a theoretical sample, for example, forming the basis for two-sample hypothesis testing. Friends-of-friends clustering is often used to identify halos in data from astrophysical simulations. Minimum spanning tree properties have also been proposed as statistics of large-scale structure. Comparison of the distributions of different kinds of objects requires accurate density estimation, for which KDE is the overall statistical method of choice. The prediction of redshifts from optical data requires accurate regression, for which kernel regression is a powerful method. The identification of objects of various types in astronomy, such as stars versus galaxies, requires accurate classification, for which KDA is a powerful method. Overview. In this chapter, we will briefly sketch the main ideas behind recent fast algorithms which achieve, for example, linear runtimes for pairwise-distance problems, or similarly dramatic reductions in computational growth. In some cases, the runtime orders for these algorithms are mathematically provable statements, while in others we have only conjectures backed by experimental observations for the time being

  14. Energy Exchange in Driven Open Quantum Systems at Strong Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrega, Matteo; Solinas, Paolo; Sassetti, Maura; Weiss, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    The time-dependent energy transfer in a driven quantum system strongly coupled to a heat bath is studied within an influence functional approach. Exact formal expressions for the statistics of energy dissipation into the different channels are derived. The general method is applied to the driven dissipative two-state system. It is shown that the energy flows obey a balance relation, and that, for strong coupling, the interaction may constitute the major dissipative channel. Results in analytic form are presented for the particular value K =1/2 of strong Ohmic dissipation. The energy flows show interesting behaviors including driving-induced coherences and quantum stochastic resonances. It is found that the general characteristics persists for K near 1/2 .

  15. Charge transport through weakly open one-dimensional quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnin, N. B.; Galperin, Y. M.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2009-01-01

    We consider resonant transmission through a gated finite-length quantum wire connected to leads via finite-transparency junctions, such that the escape time is much smaller than the energy relaxation time in the wire. The coherent electron transport is strongly modified by the Coulomb interaction. The low-temperature current-voltage (IV) curves show steplike dependence on the bias voltage determined by the distance between the quantum levels inside the conductor, the pattern being dependent on the ratio between the charging energy and level spacing. If the system is tuned close to the resonance condition by the gate voltage, the low-voltage IV curve is ohmic. At large Coulomb energy and low temperatures, the conductance is temperature independent for any relationship between temperature, level spacing, and coupling between the wire and the leads.

  16. Python for large-scale electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Spacek, Martin; Blanche, Tim; Swindale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiology is increasingly moving towards highly parallel recording techniques which generate large data sets. We record extracellularly in vivo in cat and rat visual cortex with 54-channel silicon polytrodes, under time-locked visual stimulation, from localized neuronal populations within a cortical column. To help deal with the complexity of generating and analysing these data, we used the Python programming language to develop three software projects: one for temporally precise visual stimulus generation ("dimstim"); one for electrophysiological waveform visualization and spike sorting ("spyke"); and one for spike train and stimulus analysis ("neuropy"). All three are open source and available for download (http://swindale.ecc.ubc.ca/code). The requirements and solutions for these projects differed greatly, yet we found Python to be well suited for all three. Here we present our software as a showcase of the extensive capabilities of Python in neuroscience.

  17. Python for Large-Scale Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Spacek, Martin; Blanche, Tim; Swindale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiology is increasingly moving towards highly parallel recording techniques which generate large data sets. We record extracellularly in vivo in cat and rat visual cortex with 54-channel silicon polytrodes, under time-locked visual stimulation, from localized neuronal populations within a cortical column. To help deal with the complexity of generating and analysing these data, we used the Python programming language to develop three software projects: one for temporally precise visual stimulus generation (“dimstim”); one for electrophysiological waveform visualization and spike sorting (“spyke”); and one for spike train and stimulus analysis (“neuropy”). All three are open source and available for download (http://swindale.ecc.ubc.ca/code). The requirements and solutions for these projects differed greatly, yet we found Python to be well suited for all three. Here we present our software as a showcase of the extensive capabilities of Python in neuroscience. PMID:19198646

  18. Adaptive Texture Synthesis for Large Scale City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despine, G.; Colleu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Large scale city models textured with aerial images are well suited for bird-eye navigation but generally the image resolution does not allow pedestrian navigation. One solution to face this problem is to use high resolution terrestrial photos but it requires huge amount of manual work to remove occlusions. Another solution is to synthesize generic textures with a set of procedural rules and elementary patterns like bricks, roof tiles, doors and windows. This solution may give realistic textures but with no correlation to the ground truth. Instead of using pure procedural modelling we present a method to extract information from aerial images and adapt the texture synthesis to each building. We describe a workflow allowing the user to drive the information extraction and to select the appropriate texture patterns. We also emphasize the importance to organize the knowledge about elementary pattern in a texture catalogue allowing attaching physical information, semantic attributes and to execute selection requests. Roofs are processed according to the detected building material. Façades are first described in terms of principal colours, then opening positions are detected and some window features are computed. These features allow selecting the most appropriate patterns from the texture catalogue. We experimented this workflow on two samples with 20 cm and 5 cm resolution images. The roof texture synthesis and opening detection were successfully conducted on hundreds of buildings. The window characterization is still sensitive to the distortions inherent to the projection of aerial images onto the facades.

  19. Large scale remote sensing for environmental monitoring of infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Matthew J; Fuchs, Michael P; Janoyan, Kerop D

    2008-07-01

    Recent developments in wireless sensor technology afford the opportunity to rapidly and easily deploy large-scale, low-cost, and low-power sensor networks across relatively sizeable environmental regions. Furthermore, the advancement of increasingly smaller and less expensive wireless hardware is further complemented by the rapid development of open-source software components. These software protocols allow for interfacing with the hardware to program and configure the onboard processing and communication settings. In general, a wireless sensor network topology consists of an array of microprocessor boards, referred to as motes, which can engage in two-way communication among each other as well as with a base station that relays the mote data to a host computer. The information can then be either logged and displayed on the local host or directed to an http server for network monitoring remote from the site. A number of wireless sensor products are available that offer off-the-shelf network hardware as well as sensor solutions for environmental monitoring that are compatible with the TinyOS open-source software platform. This paper presents an introduction to wireless sensing and to the use of external antennas for increasing the antenna radiation intensity and shaping signal directivity for monitoring applications requiring larger mote-to-mote communication distances.

  20. Ectopically tethered CP190 induces large-scale chromatin decondensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahanger, Sajad H.; Günther, Katharina; Weth, Oliver; Bartkuhn, Marek; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Insulator mediated alteration in higher-order chromatin and/or nucleosome organization is an important aspect of epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have suggested a key role for CP190 in such processes. In this study, we analysed the effects of ectopically tethered insulator factors on chromatin structure and found that CP190 induces large-scale decondensation when targeted to a condensed lacO array in mammalian and Drosophila cells. In contrast, dCTCF alone, is unable to cause such a decondensation, however, when CP190 is present, dCTCF recruits it to the lacO array and mediates chromatin unfolding. The CP190 induced opening of chromatin may not be correlated with transcriptional activation, as binding of CP190 does not enhance luciferase activity in reporter assays. We propose that CP190 may mediate histone modification and chromatin remodelling activity to induce an open chromatin state by its direct recruitment or targeting by a DNA binding factor such as dCTCF.

  1. Simulation of fatigue crack growth under large scale yielding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Christoph; Seifert, Thomas; Riedel, Hermann

    2010-07-01

    A simple mechanism based model for fatigue crack growth assumes a linear correlation between the cyclic crack-tip opening displacement (ΔCTOD) and the crack growth increment (da/dN). The objective of this work is to compare analytical estimates of ΔCTOD with results of numerical calculations under large scale yielding conditions and to verify the physical basis of the model by comparing the predicted and the measured evolution of the crack length in a 10%-chromium-steel. The material is described by a rate independent cyclic plasticity model with power-law hardening and Masing behavior. During the tension-going part of the cycle, nodes at the crack-tip are released such that the crack growth increment corresponds approximately to the crack-tip opening. The finite element analysis performed in ABAQUS is continued for so many cycles until a stabilized value of ΔCTOD is reached. The analytical model contains an interpolation formula for the J-integral, which is generalized to account for cyclic loading and crack closure. Both simulated and estimated ΔCTOD are reasonably consistent. The predicted crack length evolution is found to be in good agreement with the behavior of microcracks observed in a 10%-chromium steel.

  2. Towards modeling of epigenetic evolution with the aid of theory of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    2012-12-01

    We apply theory of open quantum systems to modeling of epigenetic evolution. This is an attempt to unify Darwinian and Lamarckian viewpoints on evolution on the basis of a quantum-like model. The state of uncertainty of cell's epigenome is resolved to a stable and inherited epigenetic configuration. This process of evolution and stabilization is described by the quantum master equation (the Gorini-Kossakowski-Sudarshan-Lindblad equation). The initial state of epigenome starting interaction with a new environment is represented as a pure quantum state. It evolves to a steady state solution of the quantum master equation given by a diagonal density matrix. The latter represents the state resulting from a series of epimutations induced by the environment. We use the information interpretation of the wave function which was elaborated by C. Fuchs and A. Zeilinger.

  3. Rise and fall of quantum and classical correlations in open-system dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Khasin, Michael; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2007-07-15

    Interacting quantum systems evolving from an uncorrelated composite initial state generically develop quantum correlations--entanglement. As a consequence, a local description of interacting quantum systems is impossible as a rule. A unitarily evolving (isolated) quantum system generically develops extensive entanglement: the magnitude of the generated entanglement will increase without bounds with the effective Hilbert space dimension of the system. It is conceivable that coupling of the interacting subsystems to local dephasing environments will restrict the generation of entanglement to such extent that the evolving composite system may be considered as approximately disentangled. This conjecture is addressed in the context of some common models of a bipartite system with linear and nonlinear interactions and local coupling to dephasing environments. Analytical and numerical results obtained imply that the conjecture is generally false. Open dynamics of the quantum correlations is compared to the corresponding evolution of the classical correlations and a qualitative difference is found.

  4. Tomograms for open quantum systems: In(finite) dimensional optical and spin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pathak, Anirban

    2016-03-15

    Tomograms are obtained as probability distributions and are used to reconstruct a quantum state from experimentally measured values. We study the evolution of tomograms for different quantum systems, both finite and infinite dimensional. In realistic experimental conditions, quantum states are exposed to the ambient environment and hence subject to effects like decoherence and dissipation, which are dealt with here, consistently, using the formalism of open quantum systems. This is extremely relevant from the perspective of experimental implementation and issues related to state reconstruction in quantum computation and communication. These considerations are also expected to affect the quasiprobability distribution obtained from experimentally generated tomograms and nonclassicality observed from them. -- Highlights: •Tomograms are constructed for open quantum systems. •Finite and infinite dimensional quantum systems are studied. •Finite dimensional systems (phase states, single & two qubit spin states) are studied. •A dissipative harmonic oscillator is considered as an infinite dimensional system. •Both pure dephasing as well as dissipation effects are studied.

  5. Consecutive pedestrian tracking in large scale space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jinpeng; Xu, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Pedestrian tracking is an important and meaningful part of the computer vision topic. Given the position of pedestrian in the first frame, our goal is to automatically determine the accurate position of the target pedestrian in every frame that follows. Current tracking methods show good performance in short-term tracking. However, there are still some open problems in real scenes, e.g. pedestrian re-identification under multi-camera surveillance and pedestrian tracking under occlusions. In our paper, we proposed an efficient method for consecutive tracking, which can deal with the challenging view changes and occlusions. Proposed tracker consists of short-time tracking mechanism and consecutive tracking mechanism. The consecutive tracking mechanism will be activated while the target pedestrian is under occlusion or changes dramatically in appearance. In consecutive tracking mechanism, proposed algorithm will detect the target pedestrian using a coarse but fast feature as first level classifier and a fine feature as the last level classifier. After regaining the accurate position of target pedestrian, the appearance model of the target pedestrian will be updated as historical information and the short-time tracking mechanism will be activated again to continue tracking the target pedestrian. Experimental results show that the proposed method can handle hard cases and achieve higher success rate than the current existing methods.

  6. Large-scale GW software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjung; Mandal, Subhasish; Mikida, Eric; Jindal, Prateek; Bohm, Eric; Jain, Nikhil; Kale, Laxmikant; Martyna, Glenn; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    Electronic excitations are important in understanding and designing many functional materials. In terms of ab initio methods, the GW and Bethe-Saltpeter Equation (GW-BSE) beyond DFT methods have proved successful in describing excited states in many materials. However, the heavy computational loads and large memory requirements have hindered their routine applicability by the materials physics community. We summarize some of our collaborative efforts to develop a new software framework designed for GW calculations on massively parallel supercomputers. Our GW code is interfaced with the plane-wave pseudopotential ab initio molecular dynamics software ``OpenAtom'' which is based on the Charm++ parallel library. The computation of the electronic polarizability is one of the most expensive parts of any GW calculation. We describe our strategy that uses a real-space representation to avoid the large number of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) common to most GW methods. We also describe an eigendecomposition of the plasmon modes from the resulting dielectric matrix that enhances efficiency. This work is supported by NSF through Grant ACI-1339804.

  7. A Large Scale Virtual Gas Sensor Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Fernández-Diaz, Eduard; Chaudry, A.; Marco, Santiago; Persaud, Krishna; Perera, Alexandre

    2011-09-01

    This paper depicts a virtual sensor array that allows the user to generate gas sensor synthetic data while controlling a wide variety of the characteristics of the sensor array response: arbitrary number of sensors, support for multi-component gas mixtures and full control of the noise in the system such as sensor drift or sensor aging. The artificial sensor array response is inspired on the response of 17 polymeric sensors for three analytes during 7 month. The main trends in the synthetic gas sensor array, such as sensitivity, diversity, drift and sensor noise, are user controlled. Sensor sensitivity is modeled by an optionally linear or nonlinear method (spline based). The toolbox on data generation is implemented in open source R language for statistical computing and can be freely accessed as an educational resource or benchmarking reference. The software package permits the design of scenarios with a very large number of sensors (over 10000 sensels), which are employed in the test and benchmarking of neuromorphic models in the Bio-ICT European project NEUROCHEM.

  8. Open quantum system approach to the Gibbons-Hawking effect of de Sitter space-time.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwei

    2011-02-11

    We analyze, in the paradigm of open quantum systems, the reduced dynamics of a freely falling two-level detector in de Sitter space-time in weak interaction with a reservoir of fluctuating quantized conformal scalar fields in the de Sitter-invariant vacuum. We find that the detector is asymptotically driven to a thermal state at the Gibbons-Hawking temperature, regardless of its initial state. Our discussion, therefore, shows that the Gibbons-Hawking effect of de Sitter space-time can be understood as a manifestation of thermalization phenomena that involves decoherence and dissipation in open quantum systems.

  9. Optimal Wind Energy Integration in Large-Scale Electric Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaijat, Mohammad H.

    The major concern in electric grid operation is operating under the most economical and reliable fashion to ensure affordability and continuity of electricity supply. This dissertation investigates the effects of such challenges, which affect electric grid reliability and economic operations. These challenges are: 1. Congestion of transmission lines, 2. Transmission lines expansion, 3. Large-scale wind energy integration, and 4. Phaser Measurement Units (PMUs) optimal placement for highest electric grid observability. Performing congestion analysis aids in evaluating the required increase of transmission line capacity in electric grids. However, it is necessary to evaluate expansion of transmission line capacity on methods to ensure optimal electric grid operation. Therefore, the expansion of transmission line capacity must enable grid operators to provide low-cost electricity while maintaining reliable operation of the electric grid. Because congestion affects the reliability of delivering power and increases its cost, the congestion analysis in electric grid networks is an important subject. Consequently, next-generation electric grids require novel methodologies for studying and managing congestion in electric grids. We suggest a novel method of long-term congestion management in large-scale electric grids. Owing to the complication and size of transmission line systems and the competitive nature of current grid operation, it is important for electric grid operators to determine how many transmission lines capacity to add. Traditional questions requiring answers are "Where" to add, "How much of transmission line capacity" to add, and "Which voltage level". Because of electric grid deregulation, transmission lines expansion is more complicated as it is now open to investors, whose main interest is to generate revenue, to build new transmission lines. Adding a new transmission capacity will help the system to relieve the transmission system congestion, create

  10. Large scale scientific computing - future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G. S.

    1982-06-01

    Every new generation of scientific computers has opened up new areas of science for exploration through the use of more realistic numerical models or the ability to process ever larger amounts of data. Concomitantly, scientists, because of the success of past models and the wide range of physical phenomena left unexplored, have pressed computer designers to strive for the maximum performance that current technology will permit. This encompasses not only increased processor speed, but also substantial improvements in processor memory, I/O bandwidth, secondary storage and facilities to augment the scientist's ability both to program and to understand the results of a computation. Over the past decade, performance improvements for scientific calculations have come from algoeithm development and a major change in the underlying architecture of the hardware, not from significantly faster circuitry. It appears that this trend will continue for another decade. A future archetectural change for improved performance will most likely be multiple processors coupled together in some fashion. Because the demand for a significantly more powerful computer system comes from users with single large applications, it is essential that an application be efficiently partitionable over a set of processors; otherwise, a multiprocessor system will not be effective. This paper explores some of the constraints on multiple processor architecture posed by these large applications. In particular, the trade-offs between large numbers of slow processors and small numbers of fast processors is examined. Strategies for partitioning range from partitioning at the language statement level (in-the-small) and at the program module level (in-the-large). Some examples of partitioning in-the-large are given and a strategy for efficiently executing a partitioned program is explored.

  11. A novel computational approach towards the certification of large-scale boson sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Joonsuk

    Recent proposals of boson sampling and the corresponding experiments exhibit the possible disproof of extended Church-Turning Thesis. Furthermore, the application of boson sampling to molecular computation has been suggested theoretically. Till now, however, only small-scale experiments with a few photons have been successfully performed. The boson sampling experiments of 20-30 photons are expected to reveal the computational superiority of the quantum device. A novel theoretical proposal for the large-scale boson sampling using microwave photons is highly promising due to the deterministic photon sources and the scalability. Therefore, the certification protocol of large-scale boson sampling experiments should be presented to complete the exciting story. We propose, in this presentation, a computational protocol towards the certification of large-scale boson sampling. The correlations of paired photon modes and the time-dependent characteristic functional with its Fourier component can show the fingerprint of large-scale boson sampling. This work was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology(NRF-2015R1A6A3A04059773), the ICT R&D program of MSIP/IITP [2015-019, Fundamental Research Toward Secure Quantum Communication] and Mueunjae Institute for Chemistry (MIC) postdoctoral fellowship.

  12. Agile in Large-Scale Development Workshop: Coaching, Transitioning and Practicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Thomas; Larsson, Andreas

    Agile in large-scale and complex development presents its own set of problems, both how to practice, transition and coaching. This workshop aims at bringing persons interested in this topic together to share tools, techniques and insights. The workshop will follow the increasingly popular “lightning talk + open space” format.

  13. Correspondence Between Small- and Large-Scale Determinations of Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Barns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dairy barns are known to be major emitters of ammonia. However, quantifying ammonia emissions from dairy barns is difficult due to their large volume, open ventilation, and other factors. Correspondence between ammonia emissions derived from small-scale and large-scale operational studies could faci...

  14. Explorative Function in Williams Syndrome Analyzed through a Large-Scale Task with Multiple Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foti, F.; Petrosini, L.; Cutuli, D.; Menghini, D.; Chiarotti, F.; Vicari, S.; Mandolesi, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate spatial function in subjects with Williams syndrome (WS) by using a large-scale task with multiple rewards and comparing the spatial abilities of WS subjects with those of mental age-matched control children. In the present spatial task, WS participants had to explore an open space to search nine rewards placed in…

  15. Explorative Function in Williams Syndrome Analyzed through a Large-Scale Task with Multiple Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foti, F.; Petrosini, L.; Cutuli, D.; Menghini, D.; Chiarotti, F.; Vicari, S.; Mandolesi, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate spatial function in subjects with Williams syndrome (WS) by using a large-scale task with multiple rewards and comparing the spatial abilities of WS subjects with those of mental age-matched control children. In the present spatial task, WS participants had to explore an open space to search nine rewards placed in…

  16. Large-Scale Events: New Ways of Working Across the Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Steven E.

    1996-01-01

    Eight approaches to organizational change and problem solving that use large-scale events and involve a broad range of stakeholders are described, and their applications to college administration are discussed. They include future searches; open space technology; interactive design method; home-grown events such as retreats; great teaching…

  17. Using Large-Scale Databases in Evaluation: Advances, Opportunities, and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Means, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Major advances in the number, capabilities, and quality of state, national, and transnational databases have opened up new opportunities for evaluators. Both large-scale data sets collected for administrative purposes and those collected by other researchers can provide data for a variety of evaluation-related activities. These include (a)…

  18. Quantum internet using code division multiple access.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-xi; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

  19. Quantum internet using code division multiple access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Xi; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-07-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

  20. Quantum internet using code division multiple access

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-xi; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels. PMID:23860488

  1. Using Web-Based Testing for Large-Scale Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Laura S.; Klein, Stephen P.; Lorie, William

    This paper describes an approach to large-scale assessment that uses tests that are delivered to students over the Internet and that are tailored (adapted) to each student's own level of proficiency. A brief background on large-scale assessment is followed by a description of this new technology and an example. Issues that need to be investigated…

  2. Slow Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Open Quantum Systems.

    PubMed

    Cavina, Vasco; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2017-08-04

    We develop a perturbation theory of quantum (and classical) master equations with slowly varying parameters, applicable to systems which are externally controlled on a time scale much longer than their characteristic relaxation time. We apply this technique to the analysis of finite-time isothermal processes in which, differently from quasistatic transformations, the state of the system is not able to continuously relax to the equilibrium ensemble. Our approach allows one to formally evaluate perturbations up to arbitrary order to the work and heat exchange associated with an arbitrary process. Within first order in the perturbation expansion, we identify a general formula for the efficiency at maximum power of a finite-time Carnot engine. We also clarify under which assumptions and in which limit one can recover previous phenomenological results as, for example, the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency.

  3. Slow Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavina, Vasco; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2017-08-01

    We develop a perturbation theory of quantum (and classical) master equations with slowly varying parameters, applicable to systems which are externally controlled on a time scale much longer than their characteristic relaxation time. We apply this technique to the analysis of finite-time isothermal processes in which, differently from quasistatic transformations, the state of the system is not able to continuously relax to the equilibrium ensemble. Our approach allows one to formally evaluate perturbations up to arbitrary order to the work and heat exchange associated with an arbitrary process. Within first order in the perturbation expansion, we identify a general formula for the efficiency at maximum power of a finite-time Carnot engine. We also clarify under which assumptions and in which limit one can recover previous phenomenological results as, for example, the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency.

  4. Challenges and advances in large-scale DFT calculations on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, Heather

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in reformulating electronic structure algorithms for stream processors such as graphical processing units have made DFT calculations on systems comprising up to O(103) atoms feasible. Simulations on such systems that previously required half a week on traditional processors can now be completed in only half an hour. Here, we leverage these GPU-accelerated quantum chemistry methods to investigate large-scale quantum mechanical features in protein structure, mechanochemical depolymerization, and the nucleation and growth of heterogeneous nanoparticle structures. In each case, large-scale and rapid evaluation of electronic structure properties is critical for unearthing previously poorly understood properties and mechanistic features of these systems. We will also discuss outstanding challenges in the use of Gaussian localized-basis-set codes on GPUs pertaining to limitations in basis set size and how we circumvent such challenges to computational efficiency with systematic, physics-based error corrections to basis set incompleteness.

  5. General non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Min; Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Tu, Matisse Wei-Yuan; Nori, Franco

    2012-10-26

    We present a general theory of non-Markovian dynamics for open systems of noninteracting fermions (bosons) linearly coupled to thermal environments of noninteracting fermions (bosons). We explore the non-Markovian dynamics by connecting the exact master equations with the nonequilibirum Green's functions. Environmental backactions are fully taken into account. The non-Markovian dynamics consists of nonexponential decays and dissipationless oscillations. Nonexponential decays are induced by the discontinuity in the imaginary part of the self-energy corrections. Dissipationless oscillations arise from band gaps or the finite band structure of spectral densities. The exact analytic solutions for various non-Markovian thermal environments show that non-Markovian dynamics can be largely understood from the environmental-modified spectra of open systems.

  6. Quantum and classical fluctuation theorems from a decoherent histories, open-system analysis.

    PubMed

    Subaşı, Y; Hu, B L

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a first-principles analysis of the nonequilibrium work distribution and the free energy difference of a quantum system interacting with a general environment (with arbitrary spectral density and for all temperatures) based on a well-understood microphysics (quantum Brownian motion) model under the conditions stipulated by the Jarzynski equality [Jarzynski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 2690 (1997)] and Crooks' fluctuation theorem [Crooks, Phys. Rev. E 60, 2721 (1999)] (in short, fluctuation theorems, FTs). We use the decoherent histories conceptual framework to explain how the notion of trajectories in a quantum system can be made viable and use the environment-induced decoherence scheme to assess the strength of noise that could provide sufficient decoherence to warrant the use of trajectories to define work in open quantum systems. From the solutions to the Langevin equation governing the stochastic dynamics of such systems we were able to produce formal expressions for these quantities entering in the FTs and from them prove explicitly the validity of the FTs at the high temperature limit. At low temperatures our general results would enable one to identify the range of parameters where FTs may not hold or need be expressed differently. We explain the relation between classical and quantum FTs and the advantage of this microphysics open-system approach over the phenomenological modeling and energy-level calculations for substitute closed quantum systems.

  7. Quantum and classical resources for unitary design of open-system evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticozzi, Francesco; Viola, Lorenza

    2017-09-01

    A variety of tasks in quantum control, ranging from purification and cooling to quantum stabilisation and open-system simulation, rely on the ability to implement a target quantum channel over a specified time interval within prescribed accuracy. This can be achieved by engineering a suitable unitary dynamics of the system of interest along with its environment, which, depending on the available level of control, is fully or partly exploited as a coherent quantum controller. After formalising a controllability framework for completely positive trace-preserving quantum dynamics, we provide sufficient conditions on the environment state and dimension that allow for the realisation of relevant classes of quantum channels, including extreme channels, stochastic unitaries or simply any channel. The results hinge on generalisations of Stinespring’s dilation via a subsystem principle. In the process, we show that a conjecture by Lloyd on the minimal dimension of the environment required for arbitrary open-system simulation, albeit formally disproved, can in fact be salvaged, provided that classical randomisation is included among the available resources. Existing measurement-based feedback protocols for universal simulation, dynamical decoupling and dissipative state preparation are recast within the proposed coherent framework as concrete applications, and the resources they employ discussed in the light of the general results.

  8. Testing loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Loop quantum cosmology predicts that quantum gravity effects resolve the big-bang singularity and replace it by a cosmic bounce. Furthermore, loop quantum cosmology can also modify the form of primordial cosmological perturbations, for example by reducing power at large scales in inflationary models or by suppressing the tensor-to-scalar ratio in the matter bounce scenario; these two effects are potential observational tests for loop quantum cosmology. In this article, I review these predictions and others, and also briefly discuss three open problems in loop quantum cosmology: its relation to loop quantum gravity, the trans-Planckian problem, and a possible transition from a Lorentzian to a Euclidean space-time around the bounce point.

  9. The spectrum and properties of the scattering cross section of electrons in open spherical quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju.

    2009-03-15

    In the effective mass approximation in the model of rectangular potentials, the scattering cross section of electrons in an open spherical quantum dot is calculated for the first time. It is shown that, for such a nanosystem with a barrier of several monolayers, the experimental measurements of the scattering cross section allow adequate identification of the resonance energies and the widths of resonance states in the low-energy region of the quasi-stationary electron spectrum. It is also shown that, for an open spherical quantum dot with a low-strength potential barrier, the adequate spectral parameters of the quasi-stationary spectrum are the generalized resonance energies and widths determined via the probability of an electron being inside the quantum dot.

  10. Site recurrence of open and unitary quantum walks on the line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Silas L.; Guidi, Leonardo F.; Lardizabal, Carlos F.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of site recurrence of discrete-time nearest-neighbor open quantum random walks (OQWs) on the integer line, proving basic properties and some of its relations with the corresponding problem for unitary (coined) quantum walks (UQWs). For both kinds of walks, our discussion concerns two notions of recurrence, one given by a monitoring procedure (Grünbaum et al. in Commun Math Phys 320:543-569, 2013; Lardizabal and Souza in J Stat Phys 159:772-796, 2015), and we study their similarities and differences. In particular, by considering UQWs and OQWs induced by the same pair of matrices, we discuss the fact that recurrence of these walks is related by an additive interference term in a simple way. Based on a previous result of positive recurrence, we describe an open quantum version of Kac's lemma for the expected return time to a site.

  11. Fast resonator reset in circuit QED using open quantum system optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Samuel; Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Venkatraman, Jayameenakshi; Blais, Alexandre

    Practical implementations of quantum information processing requires repetitive qubit readout. In circuit QED, where readout is performed using a resonator dispersively coupled to the qubits, the measurement repetition rate is limited by the resonator reset time. This reset is usually performed passively by waiting several resonator decay times. Alternatively, it was recently shown that a simple pulse sequence allows to decrease the reset time to twice the resonator decay time. In this work, we show how to further optimize the ring-down pulse sequence by using optimal control theory for open quantum systems. Using a new implementation of the open GRAPE algorithm that is well suited to large Hilbert spaces, we find active resonator reset procedures that are faster than a single resonator decay time. Simple quantum speed limits for this kind of active reset processes will be discussed

  12. Solving non-Markovian open quantum systems with multi-channel reservoir coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Curtis J.; Jing, Jun; Yu, Ting; Eberly, Joseph H.

    2012-08-01

    We extend the non-Markovian quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to open quantum systems which exhibit multi-channel coupling to a harmonic oscillator reservoir. Open quantum systems which have multi-channel reservoir coupling are those in which canonical transformation of reservoir modes cannot reduce the number of reservoir operators appearing in the interaction Hamiltonian to one. We show that the non-Markovian QSD equation for multi-channel reservoir coupling can, in some cases, lead to an exact master equation which we derive. We then derive the exact master equation for the three-level system in a vee-type configuration which has multi-channel reservoir coupling and give the analytical solution. Finally, we examine the evolution of the three-level vee-type system with generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck reservoir correlations numerically.

  13. Large Scale Integrated Photonics for Twenty-First Century Information Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beausoleil, Raymond G.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we will review research done by the Large-Scale Integrated Photonics group at HP Laboratories, and in particular we will discuss applications of optical resonances in dielectric microstructures and nanostructures to future classical and quantum information technologies. Our goal is to scale photonic technologies over the next decade in much the same way as electronics over the past five, thereby establishing a Moore's Law for optics.

  14. Arts Students and Quantum Theory in an Open University History of Science Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Clive

    1982-01-01

    In an open university History of Science course a unit was written to provide basic information on quantum theory for students with arts and social science background in order to enable these students to handle the Bohr-Einstein debate. An evaluation of the unit showed that it achieved its purpose. (Author/MLW)

  15. Arts Students and Quantum Theory in an Open University History of Science Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Clive

    1982-01-01

    In an open university History of Science course a unit was written to provide basic information on quantum theory for students with arts and social science background in order to enable these students to handle the Bohr-Einstein debate. An evaluation of the unit showed that it achieved its purpose. (Author/MLW)

  16. Process control of large-scale finite element simulation software

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, P.A.; Weingarten, L.I.; Schroder, K.; Tung, D.M.; Sheaffer, D.A.

    1996-02-01

    We have developed a methodology for coupling large-scale numerical codes with process control algorithms. Closed-loop simulations were demonstrated using the Sandia-developed finite element thermal code TACO and the commercially available finite element thermal-mechanical code ABAQUS. This new capability enables us to use computational simulations for designing and prototyping advanced process-control systems. By testing control algorithms on simulators before building and testing hardware, enormous time and cost savings can be realized. The need for a closed-loop simulation capability was demonstrated in a detailed design study of a rapid-thermal-processing reactor under development by CVC Products Inc. Using a thermal model of the RTP system as a surrogate for the actual hardware, we were able to generate response data needed for controller design. We then evaluated the performance of both the controller design and the hardware design by using the controller to drive the finite element model. The controlled simulations provided data on wafer temperature uniformity as a function of ramp rate, temperature sensor locations, and controller gain. This information, which is critical to reactor design, cannot be obtained from typical open-loop simulations.

  17. Determining Environmental Impacts of Large Scale Irrigation in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, K.; Douglas, E. M.; Limbrunner, J. F.; Ozertan, G.

    2010-12-01

    In 1989, the Turkish government launched their most comprehensive regional development plan in history entitled the Southeastern Anatolia Project (SAP) which focuses on improving the quality of life and income level within the most underdeveloped region in Turkey. This project aims to integrate sustainable human development through agriculture, industry, transportation, education, health and rural and urban infrastructure building. In May 2008, a new action plan was announced for the region which includes the designation of almost 800,000 hectares of previously unirrigated land to be open for irrigation within the next five years. If not done in a sustainable manner, such a large-scale irrigation project could cause severe environmental impacts. The first objective of our research is to use computer simulations to reproduce the observed environmental impacts of irrigated agriculture in this arid region, primarily by simulating the effects of soil salinization. The second objective of our research is to estimate soil salinization that could result from expanded irrigation and suggest sustainable strategies for the newly irrigated land in Turkey in order to minimize these environmental impacts.

  18. Judgments of exocentric direction in large-scale space.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jonathan W; Loomis, Jack M; Beall, Andrew C

    2004-01-01

    Judgments of exocentric direction are quite common, especially when judging where others are looking or pointing. To investigate these judgments in large-scale space, observers were shown two targets in a large open field and were asked to judge the exocentric direction specified by the targets. The targets ranged in egocentric distance from 5 to 20 m with target-to-target angular separations of 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 135 degrees. Observers judged exocentric direction using two methods: (i) by judging which point on a distant fence appeared collinear with the two targets, and (ii) by orienting their body in a direction parallel with the perceived line segment. In the collinearity task, observers had to imagine the line connecting the targets and then extrapolate this imagined line out to the fence. Observers indicated the perceived point of collinearity on a handheld 360 degrees panoramic cylinder representing their vista. The two judgment methods gave similar results except for a constant bias associated with the body-pointing response. Aside from this bias, the results of these two methods agree with other existing research indicating an effect of relative egocentric distance to the targets on judgment error--line segments are perceived as being rotated in depth. Additionally, verbal estimates of egocentric and exocentric distance suggest that perceived distance is not the cause for the systematic errors in judging exocentric direction.

  19. Terminology of Large-Scale Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, Bojan

    2005-03-01

    This is the fourth in a series of essays on terms used in solar-terrestrial physics that are thought to be in need of clarification. Terms are identified and essays are commissioned by a committee chartered by Division II (Sun and Heliosphere) of the International Astronomical Union. Terminology Committee members include Ed Cliver (chair), Jean-Louis Bougeret, Hilary Cane, Takeo Kosugi, Sara Martin, Rainer Schwenn, and Lidia van Driel-Gestelyi. Authors are asked to review the origins of terms and their current usage/misusage. The goals are to inform the community and to open a discussion. The following article by Bojan Vršnak focuses on terms used to describe large-scale waves in the solar atmosphere, an area of research that has been given great impetus by the images of waves from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The committee welcomes suggestions for other terms to address in this forum.

  20. Vestiges of quantum oscillations in the open evolution of semiclassical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozorio de Almeida, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    A single wave component of a quantum particle can in principle be detected by the way that it interferes with itself, that is, through the local wave function correlation. The interpretation as the expectation of a local translation operator allows this measure of quantum wavyness to be followed through the process of decoherence in open quantum systems. This is here assumed to be Markovian, determined by Lindblad operators that are linear in position and momentum. The limitation of small averaging windows and even smaller correlation lengths simplifies the semiclassical theory for the evolving local correlation. Its spectrum has a peak for each classical momentum, subjected to Gaussian broadening with decoherence. These spectral lines can be clearly resolved even after the Wigner function has become positive: the correlations located far from caustics seem to be the last vestige of quantum oscilations.

  1. Large scale stochastic spatio-temporal modelling with PCRaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karssenberg, Derek; Drost, Niels; Schmitz, Oliver; de Jong, Kor; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2013-04-01

    software from the eScience Technology Platform (eSTeP), developed at the Netherlands eScience Center. This will allow us to scale up to hundreds of machines, with thousands of compute cores. A key requirement is not to change the user experience of the software. PCRaster operations and the use of the Python framework classes should work in a similar manner on machines ranging from a laptop to a supercomputer. This enables a seamless transfer of models from small machines, where model development is done, to large machines used for large-scale model runs. Domain specialists from a large range of disciplines, including hydrology, ecology, sedimentology, and land use change studies, currently use the PCRaster Python software within research projects. Applications include global scale hydrological modelling and error propagation in large-scale land use change models. The software runs on MS Windows, Linux operating systems, and OS X.

  2. Cloud-based large-scale air traffic flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    The ever-increasing traffic demand makes the efficient use of airspace an imperative mission, and this paper presents an effort in response to this call. Firstly, a new aggregate model, called Link Transmission Model (LTM), is proposed, which models the nationwide traffic as a network of flight routes identified by origin-destination pairs. The traversal time of a flight route is assumed to be the mode of distribution of historical flight records, and the mode is estimated by using Kernel Density Estimation. As this simplification abstracts away physical trajectory details, the complexity of modeling is drastically decreased, resulting in efficient traffic forecasting. The predicative capability of LTM is validated against recorded traffic data. Secondly, a nationwide traffic flow optimization problem with airport and en route capacity constraints is formulated based on LTM. The optimization problem aims at alleviating traffic congestions with minimal global delays. This problem is intractable due to millions of variables. A dual decomposition method is applied to decompose the large-scale problem such that the subproblems are solvable. However, the whole problem is still computational expensive to solve since each subproblem is an smaller integer programming problem that pursues integer solutions. Solving an integer programing problem is known to be far more time-consuming than solving its linear relaxation. In addition, sequential execution on a standalone computer leads to linear runtime increase when the problem size increases. To address the computational efficiency problem, a parallel computing framework is designed which accommodates concurrent executions via multithreading programming. The multithreaded version is compared with its monolithic version to show decreased runtime. Finally, an open-source cloud computing framework, Hadoop MapReduce, is employed for better scalability and reliability. This framework is an "off-the-shelf" parallel computing model

  3. Canonical versus noncanonical equilibration dynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Jie; An, Jun-Hong; Luo, Hong-Gang; Li, Yading; Oh, C H

    2014-08-01

    In statistical mechanics, any quantum system in equilibrium with its weakly coupled reservoir is described by a canonical state at the same temperature as the reservoir. Here, by studying the equilibration dynamics of a harmonic oscillator interacting with a reservoir, we evaluate microscopically the condition under which the equilibration to a canonical state is valid. It is revealed that the non-Markovian effect and the availability of a stationary state of the total system play a profound role in the equilibration. In the Markovian limit, the conventional canonical state can be recovered. In the non-Markovian regime, when the stationary state is absent, the system equilibrates to a generalized canonical state at an effective temperature; whenever the stationary state is present, the equilibrium state of the system cannot be described by any canonical state anymore. Our finding of the physical condition on such noncanonical equilibration might have significant impact on statistical physics. A physical scheme based on circuit QED is proposed to test our results.

  4. Open quantum system stochastic dynamics with and without the RWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Y. B.

    2015-02-01

    We study the dynamics of a two-level quantum system interacting with a single frequency electromagnetic field and a stochastic magnetic field, with and without making the rotating wave approximation (RWA). The transformation to the rotating frame does not commute with the stochastic Hamiltonian if the stochastic field has nonvanishing components in the transverse direction, hence, applying the RWA requires transformation of the stochastic terms in the Hamiltonian. For Gaussian white noise, the master equation is derived from the stochastic Schrödinger-Langevin equations, with and without the RWA. With the RWA, the master equation for the density matrix has Lindblad terms with coefficients that are time-dependent (i.e., the master equation is time-local). An approximate analytic expression for the density matrix is obtained with the RWA. For Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise, as well as other types of colored noise, in contradistinction to the Gaussian white noise case, the non-commutation of the RWA transformation and the noise Hamiltonian can significantly affect the RWA dynamics when ω {{τ }corr} 1, where ω is the electromagnetic field frequency and {{τ }corr} is the stochastic magnetic field correlation time.

  5. Thermodynamic meaning of local temperature of nonequilibrium open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, LvZhou; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2016-12-01

    Measuring the local temperature of nanoscale systems out of equilibrium has emerged as a new tool to study local heating effects and other local thermal properties of systems driven by external fields. Although various experimental protocols and theoretical definitions have been proposed to determine the local temperature, the thermodynamic meaning of the measured or defined quantities remains unclear. By performing analytical and numerical analysis of bias-driven quantum dot systems both in the noninteracting and strongly-correlated regimes, we elucidate the underlying physical meaning of local temperature as determined by two definitions: the zero-current condition that is widely used but not measurable and the minimal-perturbation condition that is experimentally realizable. We show that, unlike the zero-current condition, the local temperature determined by the minimal-perturbation protocol establishes a quantitative correspondence between the nonequilibrium system of interest and a reference equilibrium system, provided the probed system observable and the related electronic excitations are fully local. The quantitative correspondence thus allows the well-established thermodynamic concept to be extended to nonequilibrium situations.

  6. Optimal Control of Open Quantum Systems: Cooperative Effects of Driving and Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R.; Negretti, A.; Ankerhold, J.; Calarco, T.; Stockburger, J. T.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the optimal control of open quantum systems, in particular, the mutual influence of driving and dissipation. A stochastic approach to open-system control is developed, using a generalized version of Krotov’s iterative algorithm, with no need for Markovian or rotating-wave approximations. The application to a harmonic degree of freedom reveals cooperative effects of driving and dissipation that a standard Markovian treatment cannot capture. Remarkably, control can modify the open-system dynamics to the point where the entropy change turns negative, thus achieving cooling of translational motion without any reliance on internal degrees of freedom.

  7. Distribution probability of large-scale landslides in central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timilsina, Manita; Bhandary, Netra P.; Dahal, Ranjan Kumar; Yatabe, Ryuichi

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale landslides in the Himalaya are defined as huge, deep-seated landslide masses that occurred in the geological past. They are widely distributed in the Nepal Himalaya. The steep topography and high local relief provide high potential for such failures, whereas the dynamic geology and adverse climatic conditions play a key role in the occurrence and reactivation of such landslides. The major geoscientific problems related with such large-scale landslides are 1) difficulties in their identification and delineation, 2) sources of small-scale failures, and 3) reactivation. Only a few scientific publications have been published concerning large-scale landslides in Nepal. In this context, the identification and quantification of large-scale landslides and their potential distribution are crucial. Therefore, this study explores the distribution of large-scale landslides in the Lesser Himalaya. It provides simple guidelines to identify large-scale landslides based on their typical characteristics and using a 3D schematic diagram. Based on the spatial distribution of landslides, geomorphological/geological parameters and logistic regression, an equation of large-scale landslide distribution is also derived. The equation is validated by applying it to another area. For the new area, the area under the receiver operating curve of the landslide distribution probability in the new area is 0.699, and a distribution probability value could explain > 65% of existing landslides. Therefore, the regression equation can be applied to areas of the Lesser Himalaya of central Nepal with similar geological and geomorphological conditions.

  8. Organised convection embedded in a large-scale flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Ann Kristin; Stevens, Bjorn; Hohenegger, Cathy

    2017-04-01

    In idealised simulations of radiative convective equilibrium, convection aggregates spontaneously from randomly distributed convective cells into organized mesoscale convection despite homogeneous boundary conditions. Although these simulations apply very idealised setups, the process of self-aggregation is thought to be relevant for the development of tropical convective systems. One feature that idealised simulations usually neglect is the occurrence of a large-scale background flow. In the tropics, organised convection is embedded in a large-scale circulation system, which advects convection in along-wind direction and alters near surface convergence in the convective areas. A large-scale flow also modifies the surface fluxes, which are expected to be enhanced upwind of the convective area if a large-scale flow is applied. Convective clusters that are embedded in a large-scale flow therefore experience an asymmetric component of the surface fluxes, which influences the development and the pathway of a convective cluster. In this study, we use numerical simulations with explicit convection and add a large-scale flow to the established setup of radiative convective equilibrium. We then analyse how aggregated convection evolves when being exposed to wind forcing. The simulations suggest that convective line structures are more prevalent if a large-scale flow is present and that convective clusters move considerably slower than advection by the large-scale flow would suggest. We also study the asymmetric component of convective aggregation due to enhanced surface fluxes, and discuss the pathway and speed of convective clusters as a function of the large-scale wind speed.

  9. Statistical analysis of mesoscale rainfall: Dependence of a random cascade generator on large-scale forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Over, Thomas, M.; Gupta, Vijay K.

    1994-01-01

    Under the theory of independent and identically distributed random cascades, the probability distribution of the cascade generator determines the spatial and the ensemble properties of spatial rainfall. Three sets of radar-derived rainfall data in space and time are analyzed to estimate the probability distribution of the generator. A detailed comparison between instantaneous scans of spatial rainfall and simulated cascades using the scaling properties of the marginal moments is carried out. This comparison highlights important similarities and differences between the data and the random cascade theory. Differences are quantified and measured for the three datasets. Evidence is presented to show that the scaling properties of the rainfall can be captured to the first order by a random cascade with a single parameter. The dependence of this parameter on forcing by the large-scale meteorological conditions, as measured by the large-scale spatial average rain rate, is investigated for these three datasets. The data show that this dependence can be captured by a one-to-one function. Since the large-scale average rain rate can be diagnosed from the large-scale dynamics, this relationship demonstrates an important linkage between the large-scale atmospheric dynamics and the statistical cascade theory of mesoscale rainfall. Potential application of this research to parameterization of runoff from the land surface and regional flood frequency analysis is briefly discussed, and open problems for further research are presented.

  10. A general transfer-function approach to noise filtering in open-loop quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Lorenza

    2015-03-01

    Hamiltonian engineering via unitary open-loop quantum control provides a versatile and experimentally validated framework for manipulating a broad class of non-Markovian open quantum systems of interest, with applications ranging from dynamical decoupling and dynamically corrected quantum gates, to noise spectroscopy and quantum simulation. In this context, transfer-function techniques directly motivated by control engineering have proved invaluable for obtaining a transparent picture of the controlled dynamics in the frequency domain and for quantitatively analyzing performance. In this talk, I will show how to identify a computationally tractable set of ``fundamental filter functions,'' out of which arbitrary filter functions may be assembled up to arbitrary high order in principle. Besides avoiding the infinite recursive hierarchy of filter functions that arises in general control scenarios, this fundamental set suffices to characterize the error suppression capabilities of the control protocol in both the time and frequency domain. I will show, in particular, how the resulting notion of ``filtering order'' reveals conceptually distinct, albeit complementary, features of the controlled dynamics as compared to the ``cancellation order,'' traditionally defined in the Magnus sense. Implications for current quantum control experiments will be discussed. Work supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under Contract No. W911NF-14-1-0682.

  11. Absorption and injection models for open time-dependent quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Traversa, F L; Zhan, Z; Oriols, X

    2014-08-01

    In the time-dependent simulation of pure states dealing with transport in open quantum systems, the initial state is located outside of the active region of interest. Using the superposition principle and the analytical knowledge of the free time evolution of such a state outside the active region, together with absorbing layers and remapping, a model for a very significant reduction of the computational burden associated with the numerical simulation of open time-dependent quantum systems is presented. The model is specially suited to study (many-particle and high-frequency effects) quantum transport, but it can also be applied to any other research field where the initial time-dependent pure state is located outside of the active region. From numerical simulations of open quantum systems described by the (effective mass) Schrödinger and (atomistic) tight-binding equations, a reduction of the computational burden of about two orders of magnitude for each spatial dimension of the domain with a negligible error is presented.

  12. General response formula and application to topological insulator in quantum open system.

    PubMed

    Shen, H Z; Qin, M; Shao, X Q; Yi, X X

    2015-11-01

    It is well-known that the quantum linear response theory is based on the first-order perturbation theory for a system in thermal equilibrium. Hence, this theory breaks down when the system is in a steady state far from thermal equilibrium and the response up to higher order in perturbation is not negligible. In this paper, we develop a nonlinear response theory for such quantum open system. We first formulate this theory in terms of general susceptibility, after which we apply it to the derivation of Hall conductance for open system at finite temperature. As an example, the Hall conductance of the two-band model is derived. Then we calculate the Hall conductance for a two-dimensional ferromagnetic electron gas and a two-dimensional lattice model. The calculations show that the transition points of topological phase are robust against the environment. Our results provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation of the nonlinear response in quantum open system, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and statistical physics.

  13. Absorption and injection models for open time-dependent quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversa, F. L.; Zhan, Z.; Oriols, X.

    2014-08-01

    In the time-dependent simulation of pure states dealing with transport in open quantum systems, the initial state is located outside of the active region of interest. Using the superposition principle and the analytical knowledge of the free time evolution of such a state outside the active region, together with absorbing layers and remapping, a model for a very significant reduction of the computational burden associated with the numerical simulation of open time-dependent quantum systems is presented. The model is specially suited to study (many-particle and high-frequency effects) quantum transport, but it can also be applied to any other research field where the initial time-dependent pure state is located outside of the active region. From numerical simulations of open quantum systems described by the (effective mass) Schrödinger and (atomistic) tight-binding equations, a reduction of the computational burden of about two orders of magnitude for each spatial dimension of the domain with a negligible error is presented.

  14. Chain representations of Open Quantum Systems and Lieb-Robinson like bounds for the dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Mischa

    2013-03-01

    This talk is concerned with the mapping of the Hamiltonian of open quantum systems onto chain representations, which forms the basis for a rigorous theory of the interaction of a system with its environment. This mapping progresses as an interaction which gives rise to a sequence of residual spectral densities of the system. The rigorous mathematical properties of this mapping have been unknown so far. Here we develop the theory of secondary measures to derive an analytic, expression for the sequence solely in terms of the initial measure and its associated orthogonal polynomials of the first and second kind. These mappings can be thought of as taking a highly nonlocal Hamiltonian to a local Hamiltonian. In the latter, a Lieb-Robinson like bound for the dynamics of the open quantum system makes sense. We develop analytical bounds on the error to observables of the system as a function of time when the semi-infinite chain in truncated at some finite length. The fact that this is possible shows that there is a finite ``Speed of sound'' in these chain representations. This has many implications of the simulatability of open quantum systems of this type and demonstrates that a truncated chain can faithfully reproduce the dynamics at shorter times. These results make a significant and mathematically rigorous contribution to the understanding of the theory of open quantum systems; and pave the way towards the efficient simulation of these systems, which within the standard methods, is often an intractable problem. EPSRC CDT in Controlled Quantum Dynamics, EU STREP project and Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

  15. Evidencing `Tight Bound States' in the Hydrogen Atom:. Empirical Manipulation of Large-Scale XD in Violation of QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.; Vigier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-09-01

    In this work we extend Vigier's recent theory of `tight bound state' (TBS) physics and propose empirical protocols to test not only for their putative existence, but also that their existence if demonstrated provides the 1st empirical evidence of string theory because it occurs in the context of large-scale extra dimensionality (LSXD) cast in a unique M-Theoretic vacuum corresponding to the new Holographic Anthropic Multiverse (HAM) cosmological paradigm. Physicists generally consider spacetime as a stochastic foam containing a zero-point field (ZPF) from which virtual particles restricted by the quantum uncertainty principle (to the Planck time) wink in and out of existence. According to the extended de Broglie-Bohm-Vigier causal stochastic interpretation of quantum theory spacetime and the matter embedded within it is created annihilated and recreated as a virtual locus of reality with a continuous quantum evolution (de Broglie matter waves) governed by a pilot wave - a `super quantum potential' extended in HAM cosmology to be synonymous with the a `force of coherence' inherent in the Unified Field, UF. We consider this backcloth to be a covariant polarized vacuum of the (generally ignored by contemporary physicists) Dirac type. We discuss open questions of the physics of point particles (fermionic nilpotent singularities). We propose a new set of experiments to test for TBS in a Dirac covariant polarized vacuum LSXD hyperspace suggestive of a recently tested special case of the Lorentz Transformation put forth by Kowalski and Vigier. These protocols reach far beyond the recent battery of atomic spectral violations of QED performed through NIST.

  16. Needs, opportunities, and options for large scale systems research

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.L.

    1984-10-01

    The Office of Energy Research was recently asked to perform a study of Large Scale Systems in order to facilitate the development of a true large systems theory. It was decided to ask experts in the fields of electrical engineering, chemical engineering and manufacturing/operations research for their ideas concerning large scale systems research. The author was asked to distribute a questionnaire among these experts to find out their opinions concerning recent accomplishments and future research directions in large scale systems research. He was also requested to convene a conference which included three experts in each area as panel members to discuss the general area of large scale systems research. The conference was held on March 26--27, 1984 in Pittsburgh with nine panel members, and 15 other attendees. The present report is a summary of the ideas presented and the recommendations proposed by the attendees.

  17. Modified gravity and large scale flows, a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    Large scale flows have been a challenging feature of cosmography ever since galaxy scaling relations came on the scene 40 years ago. The next generation of surveys will offer a serious test of the standard cosmology.

  18. Learning networks for sustainable, large-scale improvement.

    PubMed

    McCannon, C Joseph; Perla, Rocco J

    2009-05-01

    Large-scale improvement efforts known as improvement networks offer structured opportunities for exchange of information and insights into the adaptation of clinical protocols to a variety of settings.

  19. Amplification of large-scale magnetic field in nonhelical magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohit; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2017-09-01

    It is typically assumed that the kinetic and magnetic helicities play a crucial role in the growth of large-scale dynamo. In this paper, we demonstrate that helicity is not essential for the amplification of large-scale magnetic field. For this purpose, we perform nonhelical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation, and show that the large-scale magnetic field can grow in nonhelical MHD when random external forcing is employed at scale 1/10 the box size. The energy fluxes and shell-to-shell transfer rates computed using the numerical data show that the large-scale magnetic energy grows due to the energy transfers from the velocity field at the forcing scales.

  20. An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    the method . Using the above definitions , the weak statement of the non-linear local problem at the kth 4 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0305 An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations Carlos Duarte UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHAMPAIGN...14-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Adaptive Multiscale Generalized Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  1. Large-scale studies of marked birds in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tautin, J.; Metras, L.; Smith, G.

    1999-01-01

    The first large-scale, co-operative, studies of marked birds in North America were attempted in the 1950s. Operation Recovery, which linked numerous ringing stations along the east coast in a study of autumn migration of passerines, and the Preseason Duck Ringing Programme in prairie states and provinces, conclusively demonstrated the feasibility of large-scale projects. The subsequent development of powerful analytical models and computing capabilities expanded the quantitative potential for further large-scale projects. Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship, and Adaptive Harvest Management are current examples of truly large-scale programmes. Their exemplary success and the availability of versatile analytical tools are driving changes in the North American bird ringing programme. Both the US and Canadian ringing offices are modifying operations to collect more and better data to facilitate large-scale studies and promote a more project-oriented ringing programme. New large-scale programmes such as the Cornell Nest Box Network are on the horizon.

  2. A study of MLFMA for large-scale scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastriter, Michael Larkin

    This research is centered in computational electromagnetics with a focus on solving large-scale problems accurately in a timely fashion using first principle physics. Error control of the translation operator in 3-D is shown. A parallel implementation of the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) was studied as far as parallel efficiency and scaling. The large-scale scattering program (LSSP), based on the ScaleME library, was used to solve ultra-large-scale problems including a 200lambda sphere with 20 million unknowns. As these large-scale problems were solved, techniques were developed to accurately estimate the memory requirements. Careful memory management is needed in order to solve these massive problems. The study of MLFMA in large-scale problems revealed significant errors that stemmed from inconsistencies in constants used by different parts of the algorithm. These were fixed to produce the most accurate data possible for large-scale surface scattering problems. Data was calculated on a missile-like target using both high frequency methods and MLFMA. This data was compared and analyzed to determine possible strategies to increase data acquisition speed and accuracy through multiple computation method hybridization.

  3. Dynamics of open quantum spin systems: An assessment of the quantum master equation approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, P; De Raedt, H; Miyashita, S; Jin, F; Michielsen, K

    2016-08-01

    Data of the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of a system containing one spin-1/2 particle interacting with a bath of up to 32 spin-1/2 particles is used to construct a Markovian quantum master equation describing the dynamics of the system spin. The procedure of obtaining this quantum master equation, which takes the form of a Bloch equation with time-independent coefficients, accounts for all non-Markovian effects inasmuch the general structure of the quantum master equation allows. Our simulation results show that, with a few rather exotic exceptions, the Bloch-type equation with time-independent coefficients provides a simple and accurate description of the dynamics of a spin-1/2 particle in contact with a thermal bath. A calculation of the coefficients that appear in the Redfield master equation in the Markovian limit shows that this perturbatively derived equation quantitatively differs from the numerically estimated Markovian master equation, the results of which agree very well with the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  4. Developments in large-scale coastal flood hazard mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vousdoukas, Michalis I.; Voukouvalas, Evangelos; Mentaschi, Lorenzo; Dottori, Francesco; Giardino, Alessio; Bouziotas, Dimitrios; Bianchi, Alessandra; Salamon, Peter; Feyen, Luc

    2016-08-01

    Coastal flooding related to marine extreme events has severe socioeconomic impacts, and even though the latter are projected to increase under the changing climate, there is a clear deficit of information and predictive capacity related to coastal flood mapping. The present contribution reports on efforts towards a new methodology for mapping coastal flood hazard at European scale, combining (i) the contribution of waves to the total water level; (ii) improved inundation modeling; and (iii) an open, physics-based framework which can be constantly upgraded, whenever new and more accurate data become available. Four inundation approaches of gradually increasing complexity and computational costs were evaluated in terms of their applicability to large-scale coastal flooding mapping: static inundation (SM); a semi-dynamic method, considering the water volume discharge over the dykes (VD); the flood intensity index approach (Iw); and the model LISFLOOD-FP (LFP). A validation test performed against observed flood extents during the Xynthia storm event showed that SM and VD can lead to an overestimation of flood extents by 232 and 209 %, while Iw and LFP showed satisfactory predictive skill. Application at pan-European scale for the present-day 100-year event confirmed that static approaches can overestimate flood extents by 56 % compared to LFP; however, Iw can deliver results of reasonable accuracy in cases when reduced computational costs are a priority. Moreover, omitting the wave contribution in the extreme total water level (TWL) can result in a ˜ 60 % underestimation of the flooded area. The present findings have implications for impact assessment studies, since combination of the estimated inundation maps with population exposure maps revealed differences in the estimated number of people affected within the 20-70 % range.

  5. Statistical mechanical expression of entropy production for an open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroki; Suzuki, Akira

    2013-02-01

    A quantum statistical expression for the entropy of a nonequilibrium system is defined so as to be consistent with Gibbs' relation, and is shown to corresponds to dynamical variable by introducing analogous to the Heisenberg picture in quantum mechanics. The general relation between system-reservoir interactions and an entropy change operator in an open quantum system, relying just on the framework of statistical mechanics and the definition of von Neumann entropy. By using this formula, we can obtain the correct entropy production in the linear response framework. The present derivation of entropy production is directly based on the first principle of microscopic time-evolution, while the previous standard argument is due to the thermodynamic energy balance.

  6. Exact propagation of open quantum systems in a system-reservoir context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockburger, Jürgen T.

    2016-08-01

    A stochastic representation of the dynamics of open quantum systems, suitable for non-perturbative system-reservoir interaction, non-Markovian effects and arbitrarily driven systems is presented. It includes the case of driving on timescales comparable to or shorter than the reservoir correlation time, a notoriously difficult but relevant case in the context of quantum information processing and quantum thermodynamics. A previous stochastic approach is re-formulated for the case of finite reservoir correlation and response times, resulting in a numerical simulation strategy exceeding previous ones by orders of magnitude in efficiency. Although the approach is based on a memory formalism, the dynamical equations propagated in the simulations are time-local. This leaves a wide range of choices in selecting the system to be studied and the numerical method used for propagation. For a series of tests, the dynamics of the spin-boson system is computed in various settings including strong external driving and Landau-Zener transitions.

  7. Probability-current analysis of energy transport in open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Roden, Jan J J; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a probability-current analysis of excitation energy transfer between states of an open quantum system. Expressing the energy transfer through currents of excitation probability between the states in a site representation enables us to gain key insights into the energy transfer dynamics. In particular, the analysis yields direct identification of the pathways of energy transport in large networks of sites and quantifies their relative weights, as well as the respective contributions of unitary dynamics, coherence, dephasing, and relaxation and dissipation processes to the energy transfer. It thus provides much more information than studying only excitation probabilities of the states as a function of time. Our analysis is general and can be readily applied to a broad range of dynamical descriptions of open quantum system dynamics with coupling to non-Markovian or Markovian environments.

  8. Probability-current analysis of energy transport in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Jan J. J.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a probability-current analysis of excitation energy transfer between states of an open quantum system. Expressing the energy transfer through currents of excitation probability between the states in a site representation enables us to gain key insights into the energy transfer dynamics. In particular, the analysis yields direct identification of the pathways of energy transport in large networks of sites and quantifies their relative weights, as well as the respective contributions of unitary dynamics, coherence, dephasing, and relaxation and dissipation processes to the energy transfer. It thus provides much more information than studying only excitation probabilities of the states as a function of time. Our analysis is general and can be readily applied to a broad range of dynamical descriptions of open quantum system dynamics with coupling to non-Markovian or Markovian environments.

  9. Application of the theory of open quantum systems to nuclear physics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum diffusion equations with transport coefficients explicitly depending on time are derived from the generalized non-Markovian Langevin equations. The asymptotic behavior of the friction and diffusion coefficients is investigated in the case of the FC and RWA couplings between the collective and internal subsystems. An asymptotic expression is obtained for the propagator of the density matrix of the open quantum system with the general quadratic Hamiltonian, linearly coupled (in coordinate and momentum) to internal degrees of freedom. The effect of different sets of transport coefficients on the decoherence and decay rate of the metastable state is investigated using the master equation for the reduced density matrix of open quantum systems. The developed approach is used to study the capture of the projectile nucleus by the target nucleus at energies near the Coulomb barrier. Capture cross sections in asymmetric reactions are well described with allowance for the calculated capture probabilities. Particular cases where dissipation favors penetration through the potential barrier are found. The generalized Kramers formula for the quasi-stationary decay rate of the quantum metastable systems is analytically derived.

  10. Nonequilibrium effective field theory for absorbing state phase transitions in driven open quantum spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhold, Michael; Everest, Benjamin; Marcuzzi, Matteo; Lesanovsky, Igor; Diehl, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Phase transitions to absorbing states are among the simplest examples of critical phenomena out of equilibrium. The characteristic feature of these models is the presence of a fluctuationless configuration which the dynamics cannot leave, which has proved a rather stringent requirement in experiments. Recently, a proposal to seek such transitions in highly tunable systems of cold-atomic gases offers to probe this physics and, at the same time, to investigate the robustness of these transitions to quantum coherent effects. Here, we specifically focus on the interplay between classical and quantum fluctuations in a simple driven open quantum model which, in the classical limit, reproduces a contact process, which is known to undergo a continuous transition in the "directed percolation" universality class. We derive an effective long-wavelength field theory for the present class of open spin systems and show that, due to quantum fluctuations, the nature of the transition changes from second to first order, passing through a bicritical point which appears to belong instead to the "tricritical directed percolation" class.

  11. Influence of external magnetic field on dynamics of open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2007-03-15

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the non-Markovian dynamics of an open two-dimensional quantum system is investigated. The fluctuations of collective coordinate and momentum and transport coefficients are studied for a charged harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a neutral bosonic heat bath. It is shown that the dissipation of collective energy slows down with increasing strength of the external magnetic field. The role of magnetic field in the diffusion processes is illustrated by several examples.

  12. Influence of external magnetic field on dynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Kalandarov, Sh A; Kanokov, Z; Adamian, G G; Antonenko, N V

    2007-03-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the non-Markovian dynamics of an open two-dimensional quantum system is investigated. The fluctuations of collective coordinate and momentum and transport coefficients are studied for a charged harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a neutral bosonic heat bath. It is shown that the dissipation of collective energy slows down with increasing strength of the external magnetic field. The role of magnetic field in the diffusion processes is illustrated by several examples.

  13. Time-dependent density functional theory of open quantum systems in the linear-response regime.

    PubMed

    Tempel, David G; Watson, Mark A; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-02-21

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has recently been extended to describe many-body open quantum systems evolving under nonunitary dynamics according to a quantum master equation. In the master equation approach, electronic excitation spectra are broadened and shifted due to relaxation and dephasing of the electronic degrees of freedom by the surrounding environment. In this paper, we develop a formulation of TDDFT linear-response theory (LR-TDDFT) for many-body electronic systems evolving under a master equation, yielding broadened excitation spectra. This is done by mapping an interacting open quantum system onto a noninteracting open Kohn-Sham system yielding the correct nonequilibrium density evolution. A pseudoeigenvalue equation analogous to the Casida equations of the usual LR-TDDFT is derived for the Redfield master equation, yielding complex energies and Lamb shifts. As a simple demonstration, we calculate the spectrum of a C(2 +) atom including natural linewidths, by treating the electromagnetic field vacuum as a photon bath. The performance of an adiabatic exchange-correlation kernel is analyzed and a first-order frequency-dependent correction to the bare Kohn-Sham linewidth based on the Görling-Levy perturbation theory is calculated.

  14. Magneto-transport in InAs/AlGaSb open quantum dot structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maemoto, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuji; Kitamura, Yoji; Karasaki, Moritomo; Kita, Toshihiro; Sasa, Shigehiko; Inoue, Masataka; Ishibashi, Koji; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu

    2001-03-01

    We report on the magneto-transport properties in InAs/AlGaSb open quantum dot structures, in which electron interference should be an important process. The open dot structures such as the square or circle cavities with sub-micron scale have been fabricated by electron beam lithography. Since the device size is small enough to be less than the elastic mean free path, the electron transport is expected to be predominantly ballistic in nature. Oscillations or fluctuations of magnetoresistance have been observed from low magnetic fields below 1 T, which were not seen in the conventional devices. The periodic fluctuations indicate the important effect of electric wave interference in the quantum dot structures. The large and simple structures of magnetoresistance fluctuations can be analyzed from the semi-classical scattering trajectory depending on the geometrical feature of the devices. In addition to these large-period magneto-oscillations, the short-period magnetoresistance fluctuations have been also observed even at 4.2K [1]. These fluctuations may result from the complex modes of the interference electron waves possibly characterized by highly characteristic wave function scattering [2]. From the analyses of correlation functions of these oscillations, interference of electron waves in the InAs/AlGaSb open quantum dot structures will be discussed. [1] T. Maemoto, M. Ichiu, A. Ohya, S. Sasa, M. Inoue, K. Ishibashi, Y. Aoyagi, Physica B 272, 110 (1999). [2] R. Akis, D. K. Ferry, and J. P. Bird, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 123 (1997).

  15. Synthesis of strongly fluorescent graphene quantum dots by cage-opening buckminsterfullerene.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Jankovský, Ondřej; Klímová, Kateřina; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Hrdličková Kučková, Štěpánka; Pumera, Martin

    2015-03-24

    Graphene quantum dots is a class of graphene nanomaterials with exceptional luminescence properties. Precise dimension control of graphene quantum dots produced by chemical synthesis methods is currently difficult to achieve and usually provides a range of sizes from 3 to 25 nm. In this work, fullerene C60 is used as starting material, due to its well-defined dimension, to produce very small graphene quantum dots (∼2-3 nm). Treatment of fullerene C60 with a mixture of strong acid and chemical oxidant induced the oxidation, cage-opening, and fragmentation processes of fullerene C60. The synthesized quantum dots were characterized and supported by LDI-TOF MS, TEM, XRD, XPS, AFM, STM, FTIR, DLS, Raman spectroscopy, and luminescence analyses. The quantum dots remained fully dispersed in aqueous suspension and exhibited strong luminescence properties, with the highest intensity at 460 nm under a 340 nm excitation wavelength. Further chemical treatments with hydrazine hydrate and hydroxylamine resulted in red- and blue-shift of the luminescence, respectively.

  16. EINSTEIN'S SIGNATURE IN COSMOLOGICAL LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Bruni, Marco; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Wands, David

    2014-10-10

    We show how the nonlinearity of general relativity generates a characteristic nonGaussian signal in cosmological large-scale structure that we calculate at all perturbative orders in a large-scale limit. Newtonian gravity and general relativity provide complementary theoretical frameworks for modeling large-scale structure in ΛCDM cosmology; a relativistic approach is essential to determine initial conditions, which can then be used in Newtonian simulations studying the nonlinear evolution of the matter density. Most inflationary models in the very early universe predict an almost Gaussian distribution for the primordial metric perturbation, ζ. However, we argue that it is the Ricci curvature of comoving-orthogonal spatial hypersurfaces, R, that drives structure formation at large scales. We show how the nonlinear relation between the spatial curvature, R, and the metric perturbation, ζ, translates into a specific nonGaussian contribution to the initial comoving matter density that we calculate for the simple case of an initially Gaussian ζ. Our analysis shows the nonlinear signature of Einstein's gravity in large-scale structure.

  17. Recursive architecture for large-scale adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanahara, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Yoshihiko

    1994-09-01

    'Large scale' is one of major trends in the research and development of recent engineering, especially in the field of aerospace structural system. This term expresses the large scale of an artifact in general, however, it also implies the large number of the components which make up the artifact in usual. Considering a large scale system which is especially used in remote space or deep-sea, such a system should be adaptive as well as robust by itself, because its control as well as maintenance by human operators are not easy due to the remoteness. An approach to realizing this large scale, adaptive and robust system is to build the system as an assemblage of components which are respectively adaptive by themselves. In this case, the robustness of the system can be achieved by using a large number of such components and suitable adaptation as well as maintenance strategies. Such a system gathers many research's interest and their studies such as decentralized motion control, configurating algorithm and characteristics of structural elements are reported. In this article, a recursive architecture concept is developed and discussed towards the realization of large scale system which consists of a number of uniform adaptive components. We propose an adaptation strategy based on the architecture and its implementation by means of hierarchically connected processing units. The robustness and the restoration from degeneration of the processing unit are also discussed. Two- and three-dimensional adaptive truss structures are conceptually designed based on the recursive architecture.

  18. The Influence of Large-scale Environments on Galaxy Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu-qing; Wang, Lei; Dai, Cai-ping

    2017-07-01

    The star formation properties of galaxies and their dependence on environments play an important role for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. Using the galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), different research groups have studied the physical properties of galaxies and their large-scale environments. Here, using the filament catalog from Tempel et al. and the galaxy catalog of large-scale structure classification from Wang et al., and taking the influence of the galaxy morphology, high/low local density environment, and central (satellite) galaxy into consideration, we have found that the properties of galaxies are correlated with their residential large-scale environments: the SSFR (specific star formation rate) and SFR (star formation rate) strongly depend on the large-scale environment for spiral galaxies and satellite galaxies, but this dependence is very weak for elliptical galaxies and central galaxies, and the influence of large-scale environments on galaxies in low density region is more sensitive than that in high density region. The above conclusions remain valid even for the galaxies with the same mass. In addition, the SSFR distributions derived from the catalogs of Tempel et al. and Wang et al. are not entirely consistent.

  19. PubChemQC Project: A Large-Scale First-Principles Electronic Structure Database for Data-Driven Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Maho; Shimazaki, Tomomi

    2017-06-26

    Large-scale molecular databases play an essential role in the investigation of various subjects such as the development of organic materials, in silico drug design, and data-driven studies with machine learning. We have developed a large-scale quantum chemistry database based on first-principles methods. Our database currently contains the ground-state electronic structures of 3 million molecules based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, and we successively calculated 10 low-lying excited states of over 2 million molecules via time-dependent DFT with the B3LYP functional and the 6-31+G* basis set. To select the molecules calculated in our project, we referred to the PubChem Project, which was used as the source of the molecular structures in short strings using the InChI and SMILES representations. Accordingly, we have named our quantum chemistry database project "PubChemQC" ( http://pubchemqc.riken.jp/ ) and placed it in the public domain. In this paper, we show the fundamental features of the PubChemQC database and discuss the techniques used to construct the data set for large-scale quantum chemistry calculations. We also present a machine learning approach to predict the electronic structure of molecules as an example to demonstrate the suitability of the large-scale quantum chemistry database.

  20. Generic features of the dynamics of complex open quantum systems: statistical approach based on averages over the unitary group.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Manuel; Breuer, Heinz-Peter

    2013-04-01

    We obtain exact analytic expressions for a class of functions expressed as integrals over the Haar measure of the unitary group in d dimensions. Based on these general mathematical results, we investigate generic dynamical properties of complex open quantum systems, employing arguments from ensemble theory. We further generalize these results to arbitrary eigenvalue distributions, allowing a detailed comparison of typical regular and chaotic systems with the help of concepts from random matrix theory. To illustrate the physical relevance and the general applicability of our results we present a series of examples related to the fields of open quantum systems and nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamics. These include the effect of initial correlations, the average quantum dynamical maps, the generic dynamics of system-environment pure state entanglement and, finally, the equilibration of generic open and closed quantum systems.

  1. Nonequilibrium steady state in open quantum systems: Influence action, stochastic equation and power balance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, J.-T.; Hu, B.L.

    2015-11-15

    The existence and uniqueness of a steady state for nonequilibrium systems (NESS) is a fundamental subject and a main theme of research in statistical mechanics for decades. For Gaussian systems, such as a chain of classical harmonic oscillators connected at each end to a heat bath, and for classical anharmonic oscillators under specified conditions, definitive answers exist in the form of proven theorems. Answering this question for quantum many-body systems poses a challenge for the present. In this work we address this issue by deriving the stochastic equations for the reduced system with self-consistent backaction from the two baths, calculating the energy flow from one bath to the chain to the other bath, and exhibiting a power balance relation in the total (chain + baths) system which testifies to the existence of a NESS in this system at late times. Its insensitivity to the initial conditions of the chain corroborates to its uniqueness. The functional method we adopt here entails the use of the influence functional, the coarse-grained and stochastic effective actions, from which one can derive the stochastic equations and calculate the average values of physical variables in open quantum systems. This involves both taking the expectation values of quantum operators of the system and the distributional averages of stochastic variables stemming from the coarse-grained environment. This method though formal in appearance is compact and complete. It can also easily accommodate perturbative techniques and diagrammatic methods from field theory. Taken all together it provides a solid platform for carrying out systematic investigations into the nonequilibrium dynamics of open quantum systems and quantum thermodynamics. -- Highlights: •Nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) for interacting quantum many-body systems. •Derivation of stochastic equations for quantum oscillator chain with two heat baths. •Explicit calculation of the energy flow from one bath to the

  2. Toward Improved Support for Loosely Coupled Large Scale Simulation Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Swen; Elwasif, Wael R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R

    2014-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) workloads are increasingly leveraging loosely coupled large scale simula- tions. Unfortunately, most large-scale HPC platforms, including Cray/ALPS environments, are designed for the execution of long-running jobs based on coarse-grained launch capabilities (e.g., one MPI rank per core on all allocated compute nodes). This assumption limits capability-class workload campaigns that require large numbers of discrete or loosely coupled simulations, and where time-to-solution is an untenable pacing issue. This paper describes the challenges related to the support of fine-grained launch capabilities that are necessary for the execution of loosely coupled large scale simulations on Cray/ALPS platforms. More precisely, we present the details of an enhanced runtime system to support this use case, and report on initial results from early testing on systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. Seismic safety in conducting large-scale blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashukov, I. V.; Chaplygin, V. V.; Domanov, V. P.; Semin, A. A.; Klimkin, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    In mining enterprises to prepare hard rocks for excavation a drilling and blasting method is used. With the approach of mining operations to settlements the negative effect of large-scale blasts increases. To assess the level of seismic impact of large-scale blasts the scientific staff of Siberian State Industrial University carried out expertise for coal mines and iron ore enterprises. Determination of the magnitude of surface seismic vibrations caused by mass explosions was performed using seismic receivers, an analog-digital converter with recording on a laptop. The registration results of surface seismic vibrations during production of more than 280 large-scale blasts at 17 mining enterprises in 22 settlements are presented. The maximum velocity values of the Earth’s surface vibrations are determined. The safety evaluation of seismic effect was carried out according to the permissible value of vibration velocity. For cases with exceedance of permissible values recommendations were developed to reduce the level of seismic impact.

  4. PKI security in large-scale healthcare networks.

    PubMed

    Mantas, Georgios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios; Komninos, Nikos

    2012-06-01

    During the past few years a lot of PKI (Public Key Infrastructures) infrastructures have been proposed for healthcare networks in order to ensure secure communication services and exchange of data among healthcare professionals. However, there is a plethora of challenges in these healthcare PKI infrastructures. Especially, there are a lot of challenges for PKI infrastructures deployed over large-scale healthcare networks. In this paper, we propose a PKI infrastructure to ensure security in a large-scale Internet-based healthcare network connecting a wide spectrum of healthcare units geographically distributed within a wide region. Furthermore, the proposed PKI infrastructure facilitates the trust issues that arise in a large-scale healthcare network including multi-domain PKI infrastructures.

  5. Acoustic Studies of the Large Scale Ocean Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menemenlis, Dimitris

    1999-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of ocean circulation and its transport properties is prerequisite to an understanding of the earth's climate and of important biological and chemical cycles. Results from two recent experiments, THETIS-2 in the Western Mediterranean and ATOC in the North Pacific, illustrate the use of ocean acoustic tomography for studies of the large scale circulation. The attraction of acoustic tomography is its ability to sample and average the large-scale oceanic thermal structure, synoptically, along several sections, and at regular intervals. In both studies, the acoustic data are compared to, and then combined with, general circulation models, meteorological analyses, satellite altimetry, and direct measurements from ships. Both studies provide complete regional descriptions of the time-evolving, three-dimensional, large scale circulation, albeit with large uncertainties. The studies raise serious issues about existing ocean observing capability and provide guidelines for future efforts.

  6. Large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, X L; Tong, P

    2001-09-01

    A systematic study of large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection is carried out in three different aspect-ratio cells filled with water. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the velocity profiles and statistics over varying Rayleigh numbers Ra and at various spatial positions across the whole convection cell. Large velocity fluctuations are found both in the central region and near the cell boundary. Despite the large velocity fluctuations, the flow field still maintains a large-scale quasi-two-dimensional structure, which rotates in a coherent manner. This coherent single-roll structure scales with Ra and can be divided into three regions in the rotation plane: (1) a thin viscous boundary layer, (2) a fully mixed central core region with a constant mean velocity gradient, and (3) an intermediate plume-dominated buffer region. The experiment reveals a unique driving mechanism for the large-scale coherent rotation in turbulent convection.

  7. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  8. Large Scale Processes and Extreme Floods in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro Lima, C. H.; AghaKouchak, A.; Lall, U.

    2016-12-01

    Persistent large scale anomalies in the atmospheric circulation and ocean state have been associated with heavy rainfall and extreme floods in water basins of different sizes across the world. Such studies have emerged in the last years as a new tool to improve the traditional, stationary based approach in flood frequency analysis and flood prediction. Here we seek to advance previous studies by evaluating the dominance of large scale processes (e.g. atmospheric rivers/moisture transport) over local processes (e.g. local convection) in producing floods. We consider flood-prone regions in Brazil as case studies and the role of large scale climate processes in generating extreme floods in such regions is explored by means of observed streamflow, reanalysis data and machine learning methods. The dynamics of the large scale atmospheric circulation in the days prior to the flood events are evaluated based on the vertically integrated moisture flux and its divergence field, which are interpreted in a low-dimensional space as obtained by machine learning techniques, particularly supervised kernel principal component analysis. In such reduced dimensional space, clusters are obtained in order to better understand the role of regional moisture recycling or teleconnected moisture in producing floods of a given magnitude. The convective available potential energy (CAPE) is also used as a measure of local convection activities. We investigate for individual sites the exceedance probability in which large scale atmospheric fluxes dominate the flood process. Finally, we analyze regional patterns of floods and how the scaling law of floods with drainage area responds to changes in the climate forcing mechanisms (e.g. local vs large scale).

  9. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A. ); Gaztanaga, E. )

    1993-06-19

    The authors analyze the consequences of models of structure formation for higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly non-linear regime. Several variations of the standard [Omega] = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations have recently been introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R[sub p] [approximately]20 h[sup [minus]1] Mpc, e.g., low-matter-density (non-zero cosmological constant) models, [open quote]tilted[close quote] primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower, et al. The authors show that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale-dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the hierarchical amplitudes Q[sub J] at large scales, r [approx gt] R[sub p]. Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q[sub 3] and S[sub 3] can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  10. [Issues of large scale tissue culture of medicinal plant].

    PubMed

    Lv, Dong-Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Zhan, Zhi-Lai

    2014-09-01

    In order to increase the yield and quality of the medicinal plant and enhance the competitive power of industry of medicinal plant in our country, this paper analyzed the status, problem and countermeasure of the tissue culture of medicinal plant on large scale. Although the biotechnology is one of the most efficient and promising means in production of medicinal plant, it still has problems such as stability of the material, safety of the transgenic medicinal plant and optimization of cultured condition. Establishing perfect evaluation system according to the characteristic of the medicinal plant is the key measures to assure the sustainable development of the tissue culture of medicinal plant on large scale.

  11. The CLASSgal code for relativistic cosmological large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea; Montanari, Francesco; Lesgourgues, Julien; Durrer, Ruth

    2013-11-01

    We present accurate and efficient computations of large scale structure observables, obtained with a modified version of the CLASS code which is made publicly available. This code includes all relativistic corrections and computes both the power spectrum Cl(z1,z2) and the corresponding correlation function ξ(θ,z1,z2) of the matter density and the galaxy number fluctuations in linear perturbation theory. For Gaussian initial perturbations, these quantities contain the full information encoded in the large scale matter distribution at the level of linear perturbation theory. We illustrate the usefulness of our code for cosmological parameter estimation through a few simple examples.

  12. Corridors Increase Plant Species Richness at Large Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Damschen, Ellen I.; Haddad, Nick M.; Orrock,John L.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2006-09-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the largest threats to biodiversity. Landscape corridors, which are hypothesized to reduce the negative consequences of fragmentation, have become common features of ecological management plans worldwide. Despite their popularity, there is little evidence documenting the effectiveness of corridors in preserving biodiversity at large scales. Using a large-scale replicated experiment, we showed that habitat patches connected by corridors retain more native plant species than do isolated patches, that this difference increases over time, and that corridors do not promote invasion by exotic species. Our results support the use of corridors in biodiversity conservation.

  13. Large-Scale Graph Processing Analysis using Supercomputer Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vildario, Alfrido; Fitriyani; Nugraha Nurkahfi, Galih

    2017-01-01

    Graph implementation is widely use in various sector such as automotive, traffic, image processing and many more. They produce graph in large-scale dimension, cause the processing need long computational time and high specification resources. This research addressed the analysis of implementation large-scale graph using supercomputer cluster. We impelemented graph processing by using Breadth-First Search (BFS) algorithm with single destination shortest path problem. Parallel BFS implementation with Message Passing Interface (MPI) used supercomputer cluster at High Performance Computing Laboratory Computational Science Telkom University and Stanford Large Network Dataset Collection. The result showed that the implementation give the speed up averages more than 30 times and eficiency almost 90%.

  14. Survey of decentralized control methods. [for large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the types of problems that are being considered by control theorists in the area of dynamic large scale systems with emphasis on decentralized control strategies. Approaches that deal directly with decentralized decision making for large scale systems are discussed. It is shown that future advances in decentralized system theory are intimately connected with advances in the stochastic control problem with nonclassical information pattern. The basic assumptions and mathematical tools associated with the latter are summarized, and recommendations concerning future research are presented.

  15. Clearing and Labeling Techniques for Large-Scale Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jinyoung; Choe, Minjin; Kim, Sung-Yon

    2016-01-01

    Clearing and labeling techniques for large-scale biological tissues enable simultaneous extraction of molecular and structural information with minimal disassembly of the sample, facilitating the integration of molecular, cellular and systems biology across different scales. Recent years have witnessed an explosive increase in the number of such methods and their applications, reflecting heightened interest in organ-wide clearing and labeling across many fields of biology and medicine. In this review, we provide an overview and comparison of existing clearing and labeling techniques and discuss challenges and opportunities in the investigations of large-scale biological systems. PMID:27239813

  16. The Evolution of Baryons in Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Arielle Phillips, Lara; Mathews, Grant James; Coughlin, Jared; Suh, In-Saeng; Bhattacharya, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The environments of galaxies play a critical role in their formation and evolution. We study these environments using cosmological simulations with star formation and supernova feedback included. From these simulations, we parse the large scale structure into clusters, filaments and voids using a segmentation algorithm adapted from medical imaging. We trace the star formation history, gas phase and metal evolution of the baryons in the intergalactic medium as function of structure. We find that our algorithm reproduces the baryon fraction in the intracluster medium and that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, dense filaments. We present the consequences this large scale environment has for galactic halos and galaxy evolution.

  17. Large scale purification of RNA nanoparticles by preparative ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Jasinski, Daniel L; Schwartz, Chad T; Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Purification of large quantities of supramolecular RNA complexes is of paramount importance due to the large quantities of RNA needed and the purity requirements for in vitro and in vivo assays. Purification is generally carried out by liquid chromatography (HPLC), polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), or agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE). Here, we describe an efficient method for the large-scale purification of RNA prepared by in vitro transcription using T7 RNA polymerase by cesium chloride (CsCl) equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation and the large-scale purification of RNA nanoparticles by sucrose gradient rate-zonal ultracentrifugation or cushioned sucrose gradient rate-zonal ultracentrifugation.

  18. Partition-free approach to open quantum systems in harmonic environments: An exact stochastic Liouville equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaul, G. M. G.; Lorenz, C. D.; Kantorovich, L.

    2017-03-01

    We present a partition-free approach to the evolution of density matrices for open quantum systems coupled to a harmonic environment. The influence functional formalism combined with a two-time Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation allows us to derive a set of exact differential equations for the reduced density matrix of an open system, termed the extended stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation. Our approach generalizes previous work based on Caldeira-Leggett models and a partitioned initial density matrix. This provides a simple, yet exact, closed-form description for the evolution of open systems from equilibriated initial conditions. The applicability of this model and the potential for numerical implementations are also discussed.

  19. Developmental changes in large-scale network connectivity in autism.

    PubMed

    Nomi, Jason S; Uddin, Lucina Q

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted cortical connectivity is thought to underlie the complex cognitive and behavior profile observed in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previous neuroimaging research has identified patterns of both functional hypo- and hyper-connectivity in individuals with ASD. A recent theory attempting to reconcile conflicting results in the literature proposes that hyper-connectivity of brain networks may be more characteristic of young children with ASD, while hypo-connectivity may be more prevalent in adolescents and adults with the disorder when compared to typical development (TD) (Uddin etal., 2013). Previous work has examined only young children, mixed groups of children and adolescents, or adult cohorts in separate studies, leaving open the question of developmental influences on functional brain connectivity in ASD. The current study tests this developmental hypothesis by examining within- and between-network resting state functional connectivity in a large sample of 26 children, 28 adolescents, and 18 adults with ASD and age- and IQ-matchedTD individuals for the first time using an entirely data-driven approach. Independent component analyses (ICA) and dual regression was applied to data from three age cohorts to examine the effects of participant age on patterns of within-networkwhole-brain functional connectivity in individuals with ASD compared with TD individuals. Between-network connectivity differences were examined for each age cohort by comparing correlations between ICA components across groups. We find that in the youngest cohort (age 11 and under), children with ASD exhibit hyper-connectivity within large-scale brain networks as well as decreased between-network connectivity compared with age-matchedTD children. In contrast, adolescents with ASD (age 11-18) do not differ from TD adolescents in within-network connectivity, yet show decreased between-network connectivity compared with TD adolescents. Adults with ASD show no within- or

  20. Entanglement transfer from electrons to photons in quantum dots: an open quantum system approach.

    PubMed

    Budich, Jan C; Trauzettel, Björn

    2010-07-09

    We investigate entanglement transfer from a system of two spin-entangled electron-hole pairs, each placed in a separate single mode cavity, to the photons emitted due to cavity leakage. Dipole selection rules and a splitting between the light hole and the heavy hole subbands are the crucial ingredients establishing a one-to-one correspondence between electron spins and circular photon polarizations. To account for the measurement of the photons as well as dephasing effects, we choose a stochastic Schrödinger equation and a conditional master equation approach, respectively. The influence of interactions with the environment as well as asymmetries in the coherent couplings on the photon entanglement is analysed for two concrete measurement schemes. The first one is designed to violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, while the second one employs the visibility of interference fringes to prove the entanglement of the photons. Because of the spatial separation of the entangled electronic system over two quantum dots, a successful verification of entangled photons emitted by this system would imply the detection of nonlocal spin entanglement of massive particles in a solid state structure.