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Sample records for large-scale structure constraints

  1. Large scale structure forecast constraints on particle production during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chantavat, Teeraparb; Gordon, Christopher; Silk, Joseph

    2011-05-15

    Bursts of particle production during inflation provide a well-motivated mechanism for creating bumplike features in the primordial power spectrum. Current data constrain these features to be less than about 5% the size of the featureless primordial power spectrum at wave numbers of about 0.1h Mpc{sup -1}. We forecast that the Planck cosmic microwave background experiment will be able to strengthen this constraint to the 0.5% level. We also predict that adding data from a square kilometer array galaxy redshift survey would improve the constraint to about the 0.1% level. For features at larger wave numbers, Planck will be limited by Silk damping and foregrounds, while the square kilometer array will be limited by nonlinear effects. We forecast, for a cosmic inflation probe galaxy redshift survey, that similar constraints can be achieved up to about a wave number of 1.0h Mpc{sup -1}.

  2. Stability constraints on large-scale structural brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard T.; Robinson, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Stability is an important dynamical property of complex systems and underpins a broad range of coherent self-organized behavior. Based on evidence that some neurological disorders correspond to linear instabilities, we hypothesize that stability constrains the brain's electrical activity and influences its structure and physiology. Using a physiologically-based model of brain electrical activity, we investigated the stability and dispersion solutions of networks of neuronal populations with propagation time delays and dendritic time constants. We find that stability is determined by the spectrum of the network's matrix of connection strengths and is independent of the temporal damping rate of axonal propagation with stability restricting the spectrum to a region in the complex plane. Time delays and dendritic time constants modify the shape of this region but it always contains the unit disk. Instabilities resulting from changes in connection strength initially have frequencies less than a critical frequency. For physiologically plausible parameter values based on the corticothalamic system, this critical frequency is approximately 10 Hz. For excitatory networks and networks with randomly distributed excitatory and inhibitory connections, time delays and non-zero dendritic time constants have no impact on network stability but do effect dispersion frequencies. Random networks with both excitatory and inhibitory connections can have multiple marginally stable modes at low delta frequencies. PMID:23630490

  3. Constraints on the dark energy dipole from large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurier, G.

    2016-11-01

    The high-significance measurement of large-scale structure signals enables testing the isotropy of the Universe. The measurement of cosmological parameters through the large-scale distribution of matter is now a mature domain. This approach is mainly limited by our knowledge of astrophysical processes that are used to observe the large-scale structure. However, when we assume that these astrophysical processes are the same across the Universe, then it is possible to tightly constrain the isotropy of cosmological parameters across the sky. Particularly the X-SZ cross-correlation has been shown to be a probe of the large scale structures that has a high signal-to-noise ratio and low bias. For this analysis, we used a localized measurement of the X-SZ cross-correlation as a test of the cosmological parameter isotropy. Using the scatter of the X-SZ cross-correlation across the sky, we derive cosmological constraints σ8(Ωm/ 0.28)0.34 = 0.78 ± 0.02 and tight isotropy constraints on the dark energy dipole ΔΩΛ < 0.07 at 95% confidence level.

  4. Testing LTB void models without the cosmic microwave background or large scale structure: new constraints from galaxy ages

    SciTech Connect

    Putter, Roland de; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu

    2013-02-01

    We present new observational constraints on inhomogeneous models based on observables independent of the CMB and large-scale structure. Using Bayesian evidence we find very strong evidence for the homogeneous LCDM model, thus disfavouring inhomogeneous models. Our new constraints are based on quantities independent of the growth of perturbations and rely on cosmic clocks based on atomic physics and on the local density of matter.

  5. Constraints on neutrino masses from the study of the nearby large-scale structure and galaxy cluster counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung

    2016-07-01

    The high precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background by the Planck survey yielded tight constraints on cosmological parameters and the statistics of the density fluctuations at the time of recombination. This provides the means for a critical study of structure formation in the Universe by comparing the microwave background results with present epoch measurements of the cosmic large-scale structure. It can reveal subtle effects such as how different forms of Dark Matter may modify structure growth. Currently most interesting is the damping effect of structure growth by massive neutrinos. Different observations of low redshift matter density fluctuations provided evidence for a signature of massive neutrinos. Here we discuss the study of the cosmic large-scale structure with a complete sample of nearby, X-ray luminous clusters from our REFLEX cluster survey. From the observed X-ray luminosity function and its reproduction for different cosmological models, we obtain tight constraints on the cosmological parameters describing the matter density, Ωm, and the density fluctuation amplitude, σ8. A comparison of these constraints with the Planck results shows a discrepancy in the framework of a pure ΛCDM model, but the results can be reconciled, if we allow for a neutrino mass in the range of 0.17 eV to 0.7 eV. Also some others, but not all of the observations of the nearby large-scale structure provide evidence or trends for signatures of massive neutrinos. With further improvement in the systematics and future survey projects, these indications will develop into a definitive measurement of neutrino masses.

  6. Making Structured Graphics and Constraints Practical for Large-Scale Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    The one major technical obstacle to virtual aggregates lies in simulating first-class behavior in the virtual components. While this requires a... trigonometry ), so the drawing time is only 41.1 milliseconds (35% faster). This technique cannot be used when external objects have constraints to internal parts

  7. Large-scale structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1983-01-01

    Problems encountered by aerospace designers in attempting to optimize whole aircraft are discussed, along with possible solutions. Large scale optimization, as opposed to component-by-component optimization, is hindered by computational costs, software inflexibility, concentration on a single, rather than trade-off, design methodology and the incompatibility of large-scale optimization with single program, single computer methods. The software problem can be approached by placing the full analysis outside of the optimization loop. Full analysis is then performed only periodically. Problem-dependent software can be removed from the generic code using a systems programming technique, and then embody the definitions of design variables, objective function and design constraints. Trade-off algorithms can be used at the design points to obtain quantitative answers. Finally, decomposing the large-scale problem into independent subproblems allows systematic optimization of the problems by an organization of people and machines.

  8. Natural inflation: Particle physics models, power-law spectra for large-scale structure, and constraints from the Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Bond, J. Richard; Freese, Katherine; Frieman, Joshua A.; Olinto, Angela V.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the particle physics basis for models of natural inflation with pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons and study the consequences for large-scale structure of the nonscale-invariant density fluctuation spectra that arise in natural inflation and other models. A pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson, with a potential of the form V(φ)=Λ4[1+/-cos(φ/f)], can naturally give rise to an epoch of inflation in the early Universe, if f~MPl and Λ~MGUT. Such mass scales arise in particle physics models with a gauge group that becomes strongly interacting at the grand unified theory scale. We work out a specific particle physics example based on the multiple gaugino condensation scenario in superstring theory. We then study the cosmological evolution of and constraints upon these inflation models numerically and analytically. To obtain sufficient inflation with a probability of order 1 and a high enough post-inflation reheat temperature for baryogenesis, we require f>~0.3MPl. The primordial density fluctuation spectrum generated by quantum fluctuations in φ is a non-scale-invariant power law P(k)~kns, with ns~=1-(M2Pl/8πf2) leading to more power on large length scales than the ns=1 Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum. (For the reader primarily interested in large-scale structure, the discussion of this topic is presented in Sec. IV and is intended to be nearly self-contained.) We pay special attention to the prospects of using the enhanced power to explain the otherwise puzzling large-scale clustering of galaxies and clusters and their flows. We find that the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model with 0<~ns<~0.6 could in principle explain these data. However, the microwave background anisotropies recently detected by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) imply such low primordial amplitudes for these CDM models (that is, bias factors b8>~2 for ns<~0.6) that galaxy formation would occur too late to be viable and the large-scale galaxy velocities would be too small. In fact, combining the

  9. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  10. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  11. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  12. Voids in the Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ad, Hagai; Piran, Tsvi

    1997-12-01

    Voids are the most prominent feature of the large-scale structure of the universe. Still, their incorporation into quantitative analysis of it has been relatively recent, owing essentially to the lack of an objective tool to identify the voids and to quantify them. To overcome this, we present here the VOID FINDER algorithm, a novel tool for objectively quantifying voids in the galaxy distribution. The algorithm first classifies galaxies as either wall galaxies or field galaxies. Then, it identifies voids in the wall-galaxy distribution. Voids are defined as continuous volumes that do not contain any wall galaxies. The voids must be thicker than an adjustable limit, which is refined in successive iterations. In this way, we identify the same regions that would be recognized as voids by the eye. Small breaches in the walls are ignored, avoiding artificial connections between neighboring voids. We test the algorithm using Voronoi tesselations. By appropriate scaling of the parameters with the selection function, we apply it to two redshift surveys, the dense SSRS2 and the full-sky IRAS 1.2 Jy. Both surveys show similar properties: ~50% of the volume is filled by voids. The voids have a scale of at least 40 h-1 Mpc and an average -0.9 underdensity. Faint galaxies do not fill the voids, but they do populate them more than bright ones. These results suggest that both optically and IRAS-selected galaxies delineate the same large-scale structure. Comparison with the recovered mass distribution further suggests that the observed voids in the galaxy distribution correspond well to underdense regions in the mass distribution. This confirms the gravitational origin of the voids.

  13. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  14. Large-Scale Constraint-Based Pattern Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Feida

    2009-01-01

    We studied the problem of constraint-based pattern mining for three different data formats, item-set, sequence and graph, and focused on mining patterns of large sizes. Colossal patterns in each data formats are studied to discover pruning properties that are useful for direct mining of these patterns. For item-set data, we observed robustness of…

  15. Large-Scale Structure of Magnetospheric Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Delcourt, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigations of magnetospheric plasma structure are summarized under the broad categories of empirical models, transport across boundaries, formation, and dynamics of the plasma sheet. This report reviews work in these areas during the period 1991 to 1993. Fully three-dimensional empirical models and simulations have become important contributors to our understanding of the magnetospheric system. Some new structural concepts have appeared in the literature: the 'entry boundary' and 'geo-pause', the plasma sheet 'region 1 vortices', the 'low-energy layer', the 'adia-baticity boundary' or 'wall region', and a region in the tail to which we refer as the 'injection port'. Traditional structural concepts have also been the subject of recent study, notably the plasmapause, the magnetopause, and the plasma sheet. Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of plasma sheet formation and dynamics, but the acceleration of electrons to high energy remains somewhat mysterious.

  16. Real or virtual large-scale structure?

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, August E.

    1999-01-01

    Modeling the development of structure in the universe on galactic and larger scales is the challenge that drives the field of computational cosmology. Here, photorealism is used as a simple, yet expert, means of assessing the degree to which virtual worlds succeed in replicating our own. PMID:10200243

  17. Management Structures and Large-Scale Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welty, Gordon; Lundin, Edward

    The structure of an organization plays a vital role in the evaluation of the organization. Social science researchers often assume that controls inherent in the physical sciences are as applicable to human subjects. Evaluation of Head Start is an example of the social relation of investigator to subject matter and of the variables introduced by…

  18. Large-scale structural monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Ian; Cunnane, James; Stevenson, Paul

    2000-06-01

    Extensive structural health instrumentation systems have been installed on three long-span cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong. The quantities measured include environment and applied loads (such as wind, temperature, seismic and traffic loads) and the bridge response to these loadings (accelerations, displacements, and strains). Measurements from over 1000 individual sensors are transmitted to central computing facilities via local data acquisition stations and a fault- tolerant fiber-optic network, and are acquired and processed continuously. The data from the systems is used to provide information on structural load and response characteristics, comparison with design, optimization of inspection, and assurance of continued bridge health. Automated data processing and analysis provides information on important structural and operational parameters. Abnormal events are noted and logged automatically. Information of interest is automatically archived for post-processing. Novel aspects of the instrumentation system include a fluid-based high-accuracy long-span Level Sensing System to measure bridge deck profile and tower settlement. This paper provides an outline of the design and implementation of the instrumentation system. A description of the design and implementation of the data acquisition and processing procedures is also given. Examples of the use of similar systems in monitoring other large structures are discussed.

  19. Large-Scale Structures of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2015-12-01

    A class of solar system analogs has yet to be identified among the large crop of planetary systems now observed. However, since most observed worlds are more easily detectable than direct analogs of the Sun's planets, the frequency of systems with structures similar to our own remains unknown. Identifying the range of possible planetary system architectures is complicated by the large number of physical processes that affect the formation and dynamical evolution of planets. I will present two ways of organizing planetary system structures. First, I will suggest that relatively few physical parameters are likely to differentiate the qualitative architectures of different systems. Solid mass in a protoplanetary disk is perhaps the most obvious possible controlling parameter, and I will give predictions for correlations between planetary system properties that we would expect to be present if this is the case. In particular, I will suggest that the solar system's structure is representative of low-metallicity systems that nevertheless host giant planets. Second, the disk structures produced as young stars are fed by their host clouds may play a crucial role. Using the observed distribution of RV giant planets as a function of stellar mass, I will demonstrate that invoking ice lines to determine where gas giants can form requires fine tuning. I will suggest that instead, disk structures built during early accretion have lasting impacts on giant planet distributions, and disk clean-up differentially affects the orbital distributions of giant and lower-mass planets. These two organizational hypotheses have different implications for the solar system's context, and I will suggest observational tests that may allow them to be validated or falsified.

  20. Large Scale Turbulent Structures in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    Jet noise is a major concern in the design of commercial aircraft. Studies by various researchers suggest that aerodynamic noise is a major contributor to jet noise. Some of these studies indicate that most of the aerodynamic jet noise due to turbulent mixing occurs when there is a rapid variation in turbulent structure, i.e. rapidly growing or decaying vortices. The objective of this research was to simulate a compressible round jet to study the non-linear evolution of vortices and the resulting acoustic radiations. In particular, to understand the effect of turbulence structure on the noise. An ideal technique to study this problem is Direct Numerical Simulations(DNS), because it provides precise control on the initial and boundary conditions that lead to the turbulent structures studied. It also provides complete 3-dimensional time dependent data. Since the dynamics of a temporally evolving jet are not greatly different from those, of a spatially evolving jet, a temporal jet problem was solved, using periodicity ill the direction of the jet axis. This enables the application of Fourier spectral methods in the streamwise direction. Physically this means that turbulent structures in the jet are repeated in successive downstream cells instead of being gradually modified downstream into a jet plume. The DNS jet simulation helps us understand the various turbulent scales and mechanisms of turbulence generation in the evolution of a compressible round jet. These accurate flow solutions will be used in future research to estimate near-field acoustic radiation by computing the total outward flux across a surface and determine how it is related to the evolution of the turbulent solutions. Furthermore, these simulations allow us to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic radiations to inlet/boundary conditions, with possible application to active noise suppression. In addition, the data generated can be used to compute various turbulence quantities such as mean velocities

  1. Large Scale Turbulent Structures in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    Jet noise is a major concern in the design of commercial aircraft. Studies by various researchers suggest that aerodynamic noise is a major contributor to jet noise. Some of these studies indicate that most of the aerodynamic jet noise due to turbulent mixing occurs when there is a rapid variation in turbulent structure, i.e. rapidly growing or decaying vortices. The objective of this research was to simulate a compressible round jet to study the non-linear evolution of vortices and the resulting acoustic radiations. In particular, to understand the effect of turbulence structure on the noise. An ideal technique to study this problem is Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), because it provides precise control on the initial and boundary conditions that lead to the turbulent structures studied. It also provides complete 3-dimensional time dependent data. Since the dynamics of a temporally evolving jet are not greatly different from those of a spatially evolving jet, a temporal jet problem was solved, using periodicity in the direction of the jet axis. This enables the application of Fourier spectral methods in the streamwise direction. Physically this means that turbulent structures in the jet are repeated in successive downstream cells instead of being gradually modified downstream into a jet plume. The DNS jet simulation helps us understand the various turbulent scales and mechanisms of turbulence generation in the evolution of a compressible round jet. These accurate flow solutions will be used in future research to estimate near-field acoustic radiation by computing the total outward flux across a surface and determine how it is related to the evolution of the turbulent solutions. Furthermore, these simulations allow us to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic radiations to inlet/boundary conditions, with possible appli(,a- tion to active noise suppression. In addition, the data generated can be used to compute, various turbulence quantities such as mean

  2. A relativistic signature in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Verde, Licia; Wands, David

    2016-09-01

    In General Relativity, the constraint equation relating metric and density perturbations is inherently nonlinear, leading to an effective non-Gaussianity in the dark matter density field on large scales-even if the primordial metric perturbation is Gaussian. Intrinsic non-Gaussianity in the large-scale dark matter overdensity in GR is real and physical. However, the variance smoothed on a local physical scale is not correlated with the large-scale curvature perturbation, so that there is no relativistic signature in the galaxy bias when using the simplest model of bias. It is an open question whether the observable mass proxies such as luminosity or weak lensing correspond directly to the physical mass in the simple halo bias model. If not, there may be observables that encode this relativistic signature.

  3. Large Scale Structure in the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekemoer, Anton; Mould, Jeremy; Cooke, Jeffrey; Wyithe, Stuart; Lidman, Christopher; Trenti, Michele; Abbott, Tim; Kunder, Andrea; Barone-Nugent, Robert; Tescari, Edoardo; Katsianis, Antonios

    2014-02-01

    We propose to capitalize on the high red sensitivity and large field of view of DECam to detect the brightest and rarest galaxies at z=6-7. Our 2012 results show the signature of large scale structure with wavenumber of order 0.1 inverse Mpc in line with expectations of primordial non-gaussianity. But the signal to noise in one deep field from two nights' data is insufficient for a robust conclusion. Ten nights' data will do the job. These data will also constrain the galaxy contribution to reionization by enabling a tighter constraint on the full galaxy luminosity function, including the faint end. The observations will be executed with a cadence and depth that will enable the detection of super-luminous supernovae at z=6-7. Super-luminous supernovae are a recently observed class of supernovae that are 10-100x more luminous than typical supernovae. This class includes pair- instability supernovae that are a rare, third type of supernova explosion in which only 3 events are known. The proposed observations will greatly extend the current reach of supernovae research, examining their occurrence rate and properties near the epoch of reionization.

  4. Testing LSST Dither Strategies for Large-scale Structure Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awan, Humna; Gawiser, Eric J.; Kurczynski, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will start a ten-year survey of the southern sky in 2022. Since the telescope observing strategy can lead to artifacts in the observed data, we undertake an investigation of implementing large telescope-pointing offsets (called dithers) as a means to minimize the induced artifacts. We implement various types of dithers, varying in both implementation timescale and the dither geometry, and examine their effects on the r-band coadded depth after the 10-year survey. Then we propagate the depth fluctuations to galaxy counts fluctuations, which are a systematic for large-scale structure studies. We show that the observing strategies induce window function uncertainties which set a constraint on the level of information we can extract from an optimized survey to precisely measure Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations at high redshifts. We find that the best dither strategies lead to window function uncertainties well below the minimum statistical uncertainty after the 10 years of survey, hence not requiring any systematics correction methods. While the systematics level is considerably higher after the first year of the survey, dithering can play a critical role in reducing it. We also explore different cadences, and demonstrate that the best dither strategies minimize the window function uncertainties for various cadences.

  5. EINSTEIN'S SIGNATURE IN COSMOLOGICAL LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Bruni, Marco; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Wands, David

    2014-10-10

    We show how the nonlinearity of general relativity generates a characteristic nonGaussian signal in cosmological large-scale structure that we calculate at all perturbative orders in a large-scale limit. Newtonian gravity and general relativity provide complementary theoretical frameworks for modeling large-scale structure in ΛCDM cosmology; a relativistic approach is essential to determine initial conditions, which can then be used in Newtonian simulations studying the nonlinear evolution of the matter density. Most inflationary models in the very early universe predict an almost Gaussian distribution for the primordial metric perturbation, ζ. However, we argue that it is the Ricci curvature of comoving-orthogonal spatial hypersurfaces, R, that drives structure formation at large scales. We show how the nonlinear relation between the spatial curvature, R, and the metric perturbation, ζ, translates into a specific nonGaussian contribution to the initial comoving matter density that we calculate for the simple case of an initially Gaussian ζ. Our analysis shows the nonlinear signature of Einstein's gravity in large-scale structure.

  6. Large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, X L; Tong, P

    2001-09-01

    A systematic study of large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection is carried out in three different aspect-ratio cells filled with water. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the velocity profiles and statistics over varying Rayleigh numbers Ra and at various spatial positions across the whole convection cell. Large velocity fluctuations are found both in the central region and near the cell boundary. Despite the large velocity fluctuations, the flow field still maintains a large-scale quasi-two-dimensional structure, which rotates in a coherent manner. This coherent single-roll structure scales with Ra and can be divided into three regions in the rotation plane: (1) a thin viscous boundary layer, (2) a fully mixed central core region with a constant mean velocity gradient, and (3) an intermediate plume-dominated buffer region. The experiment reveals a unique driving mechanism for the large-scale coherent rotation in turbulent convection.

  7. The Evolution of Baryons in Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Arielle Phillips, Lara; Mathews, Grant James; Coughlin, Jared; Suh, In-Saeng; Bhattacharya, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The environments of galaxies play a critical role in their formation and evolution. We study these environments using cosmological simulations with star formation and supernova feedback included. From these simulations, we parse the large scale structure into clusters, filaments and voids using a segmentation algorithm adapted from medical imaging. We trace the star formation history, gas phase and metal evolution of the baryons in the intergalactic medium as function of structure. We find that our algorithm reproduces the baryon fraction in the intracluster medium and that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, dense filaments. We present the consequences this large scale environment has for galactic halos and galaxy evolution.

  8. The Large-Scale Structure of Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosso, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The standard textbook description of the nature of science describes the proposal, testing, and acceptance of a theoretical idea almost entirely in isolation from other theories. The resulting model of science is a kind of piecemeal empiricism that misses the important network structure of scientific knowledge. Only the large-scale description of…

  9. Large scale structure of the sun's radio corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Results of studies of large scale structures of the corona at long radio wavelengths are presented, using data obtained with the multifrequency radioheliograph of the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. It is shown that features corresponding to coronal streamers and coronal holes are readily apparent in the Clark Lake maps.

  10. Lagrangian space consistency relation for large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao E-mail: lh399@columbia.edu

    2015-09-01

    Consistency relations, which relate the squeezed limit of an (N+1)-point correlation function to an N-point function, are non-perturbative symmetry statements that hold even if the associated high momentum modes are deep in the nonlinear regime and astrophysically complex. Recently, Kehagias and Riotto and Peloso and Pietroni discovered a consistency relation applicable to large scale structure. We show that this can be recast into a simple physical statement in Lagrangian space: that the squeezed correlation function (suitably normalized) vanishes. This holds regardless of whether the correlation observables are at the same time or not, and regardless of whether multiple-streaming is present. The simplicity of this statement suggests that an analytic understanding of large scale structure in the nonlinear regime may be particularly promising in Lagrangian space.

  11. Alteration of Large-Scale Chromatin Structure by Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Anne C.; Rajendran, Ramji R.; Stenoien, David L.; Mancini, Michael A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2002-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily important in human physiology and disease, recruits coactivators which modify local chromatin structure. Here we describe effects of ER on large-scale chromatin structure as visualized in live cells. We targeted ER to gene-amplified chromosome arms containing large numbers of lac operator sites either directly, through a lac repressor-ER fusion protein (lac rep-ER), or indirectly, by fusing lac repressor with the ER interaction domain of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator 1. Significant decondensation of large-scale chromatin structure, comparable to that produced by the ∼150-fold-stronger viral protein 16 (VP16) transcriptional activator, was produced by ER in the absence of estradiol using both approaches. Addition of estradiol induced a partial reversal of this unfolding by green fluorescent protein-lac rep-ER but not by wild-type ER recruited by a lac repressor-SRC570-780 fusion protein. The chromatin decondensation activity did not require transcriptional activation by ER nor did it require ligand-induced coactivator interactions, and unfolding did not correlate with histone hyperacetylation. Ligand-induced coactivator interactions with helix 12 of ER were necessary for the partial refolding of chromatin in response to estradiol using the lac rep-ER tethering system. This work demonstrates that when tethered or recruited to DNA, ER possesses a novel large-scale chromatin unfolding activity. PMID:11971975

  12. The CLASSgal code for relativistic cosmological large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dio, Enea Di; Montanari, Francesco; Durrer, Ruth; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: Francesco.Montanari@unige.ch E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch

    2013-11-01

    We present accurate and efficient computations of large scale structure observables, obtained with a modified version of the CLASS code which is made publicly available. This code includes all relativistic corrections and computes both the power spectrum C{sub ℓ}(z{sub 1},z{sub 2}) and the corresponding correlation function ξ(θ,z{sub 1},z{sub 2}) of the matter density and the galaxy number fluctuations in linear perturbation theory. For Gaussian initial perturbations, these quantities contain the full information encoded in the large scale matter distribution at the level of linear perturbation theory. We illustrate the usefulness of our code for cosmological parameter estimation through a few simple examples.

  13. Decoupling local mechanics from large-scale structure in modular metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Silverberg, Jesse L

    2017-04-04

    A defining feature of mechanical metamaterials is that their properties are determined by the organization of internal structure instead of the raw fabrication materials. This shift of attention to engineering internal degrees of freedom has coaxed relatively simple materials into exhibiting a wide range of remarkable mechanical properties. For practical applications to be realized, however, this nascent understanding of metamaterial design must be translated into a capacity for engineering large-scale structures with prescribed mechanical functionality. Thus, the challenge is to systematically map desired functionality of large-scale structures backward into a design scheme while using finite parameter domains. Such "inverse design" is often complicated by the deep coupling between large-scale structure and local mechanical function, which limits the available design space. Here, we introduce a design strategy for constructing 1D, 2D, and 3D mechanical metamaterials inspired by modular origami and kirigami. Our approach is to assemble a number of modules into a voxelized large-scale structure, where the module's design has a greater number of mechanical design parameters than the number of constraints imposed by bulk assembly. This inequality allows each voxel in the bulk structure to be uniquely assigned mechanical properties independent from its ability to connect and deform with its neighbors. In studying specific examples of large-scale metamaterial structures we show that a decoupling of global structure from local mechanical function allows for a variety of mechanically and topologically complex designs.

  14. Large-scale structure in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-05-15

    In this work we study the cosmology of the general f(T) gravity theory. We express the modified Einstein equations using covariant quantities, and derive the gauge-invariant perturbation equations in covariant form. We consider a specific choice of f(T), designed to explain the observed late-time accelerating cosmic expansion without including an exotic dark energy component. Our numerical solution shows that the extra degree of freedom of such f(T) gravity models generally decays as one goes to smaller scales, and consequently its effects on scales such as galaxies and galaxies clusters are small. But on large scales, this degree of freedom can produce large deviations from the standard {Lambda}CDM scenario, leading to severe constraints on the f(T) gravity models as an explanation to the cosmic acceleration.

  15. Simplified DGS procedure for large-scale genome structural study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Chul; Xu, Jia; Chen, Jun; Kim, Yeong; Winchester, David; Wang, San Ming

    2009-11-01

    Ditag genome scanning (DGS) uses next-generation DNA sequencing to sequence the ends of ditag fragments produced by restriction enzymes. These sequences are compared to known genome sequences to determine their structure. In order to use DGS for large-scale genome structural studies, we have substantially revised the original protocol by replacing the in vivo genomic DNA cloning with in vitro adaptor ligation, eliminating the ditag concatemerization steps, and replacing the 454 sequencer with Solexa or SOLiD sequencers for ditag sequence collection. This revised protocol further increases genome coverage and resolution and allows DGS to be used to analyze multiple genomes simultaneously.

  16. Large-scale structure from wiggly cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Vilenkin, Alexander

    1991-08-01

    Recent simulations of the evolution of cosmic strings indicate the presence of small-scale structure on the strings. It is shown that wakes produced by such 'wiggly' cosmic strings can result in the efficient formation of large-scale structure and large streaming velocities in the universe without significantly affecting the microwave-background isotropy. It is also argued that the motion of strings will lead to the generation of a primordial magnetic field. The most promising version of this scenario appears to be the one in which the universe is dominated by light neutrinos.

  17. Integrated High Accuracy Portable Metrology for Large Scale Structural Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaas, Andrej; Richardson, Paul; Burguete, Richard; Harris, Linden

    2014-06-01

    As the performance and accuracy of analysis tools increases bespoke solutions are more regularly being requested to perform high-accuracy measurement on structural tests to validate these methods. These can include optical methods and full-field techniques in place of the more traditional point measurements. As each test is unique it presents its own individual challenges.In this paper two recent, large scale tests performed by Airbus, will be presented and the metrology solutions that were identified for them will be discussed.

  18. Clusters as cornerstones of large-scale structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1997-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are one of the best tracers of large-scale structure in the Universe on scales well above 100 Mpc. The authors investigate here the clustering properties of a redshift sample of Abell/ACO clusters and compare the observational sample with mock samples constructed from N-body simulations on the basis of four different cosmological models. The authors discuss the power spectrum, the Minkowski functionals and the void statistics of these samples and conclude, that the SCDM and TCDM models are ruled out whereas the ACDM and BSI models are in agreement with the observational data.

  19. Structure and function of large-scale brain systems.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the functional neuroanatomy of large-scale brain systems. Both the structure and functions of these brain networks are presented. All human behavior is the result of interactions within and between these brain systems. This system of brain function completely changes our understanding of how cognition and behavior are organized within the brain, replacing the traditional lesion model. Understanding behavior within the context of brain network interactions has profound implications for modifying abstract constructs such as attention, learning, and memory. These constructs also must be understood within the framework of a paradigm shift, which emphasizes ongoing interactions within a dynamically changing environment.

  20. Evolution of baryons in cosmic large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali

    We introduce a new self-consistent structure finding algorithm that parses large scale cosmological structure into clusters, filaments and voids. This algorithm probes the structure at multiple scales and classifies the appropriate regions with the most probable structure type and size. We use this structure finding algorithm to parse and follow the evolution of poor clusters, filaments and voids in large scale simulations. We trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find the majority of star formation occurs in cold condensed gas in filaments at all redshifts and that it peaks at intermediate redshifts (z ~ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to high contrast regions or the inner parts of filaments. Since filaments bridge between void and cluster regions, this suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion onto poor clusters. We find that at the present epoch, the gas phase distribution is 43.1%, 30.0%, 24.7% and 2.2% in the diffuse, WHIM, hot halo and condensed phases, respectively. Most of the WHIM is found to be in filamentary structures. Moreover 8.77%, 79.1%, 2.11% and 9.98% of the gas is located in poor clusters, filaments, voids and unassigned regions respectively. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments at redshift z = 0.

  1. U-shaped Vortex Structures in Large Scale Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yantao; Peng, Xiaoxing; Xu, Lianghao; Hong, Fangwen

    2015-12-01

    The control of cloud cavitation, especially large scale cloud cavitation(LSCC), is always a hot issue in the field of cavitation research. However, there has been little knowledge on the evolution of cloud cavitation since it is associated with turbulence and vortex flow. In this article, the structure of cloud cavitation shed by sheet cavitation around different hydrofoils and a wedge were observed in detail with high speed camera (HSC). It was found that the U-shaped vortex structures always existed in the development process of LSCC. The results indicated that LSCC evolution was related to this kind of vortex structures, and it may be a universal character for LSCC. Then vortex strength of U-shaped vortex structures in a cycle was analyzed with numerical results.

  2. Solving large scale structure in ten easy steps with COLA

    SciTech Connect

    Tassev, Svetlin; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Eisenstein, Daniel J. E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method: an N-body method for solving for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). Unlike standard N-body methods, the COLA method can straightforwardly trade accuracy at small-scales in order to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing, as those catalogs are essential for performing detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS. As an illustration, we ran a COLA-based N-body code on a box of size 100 Mpc/h with particles of mass ≈ 5 × 10{sup 9}M{sub s}un/h. Running the code with only 10 timesteps was sufficient to obtain an accurate description of halo statistics down to halo masses of at least 10{sup 11}M{sub s}un/h. This is only at a modest speed penalty when compared to mocks obtained with LPT. A standard detailed N-body run is orders of magnitude slower than our COLA-based code. The speed-up we obtain with COLA is due to the fact that we calculate the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT, while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos. Achieving a similar level of accuracy in halo statistics without the COLA method requires at least 3 times more timesteps than when COLA is employed.

  3. Solving large scale structure in ten easy steps with COLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassev, Svetlin; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2013-06-01

    We present the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method: an N-body method for solving for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). Unlike standard N-body methods, the COLA method can straightforwardly trade accuracy at small-scales in order to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing, as those catalogs are essential for performing detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS. As an illustration, we ran a COLA-based N-body code on a box of size 100 Mpc/h with particles of mass ≈ 5 × 109Msolar/h. Running the code with only 10 timesteps was sufficient to obtain an accurate description of halo statistics down to halo masses of at least 1011Msolar/h. This is only at a modest speed penalty when compared to mocks obtained with LPT. A standard detailed N-body run is orders of magnitude slower than our COLA-based code. The speed-up we obtain with COLA is due to the fact that we calculate the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT, while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos. Achieving a similar level of accuracy in halo statistics without the COLA method requires at least 3 times more timesteps than when COLA is employed.

  4. Large-scale coherent structures as drivers of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Gutmark, E.; Parr, T.P.; Parr, D.M.; Wilson, K.J.

    1987-06-01

    The role of flow coherent structures as drivers of combustion instabilities in a dump combustor was studied. Results of nonreacting tests in air and water flows as well as combustion experiments in a diffusion flame and dump combustor are discussed to provide insight into the generation process of large-scale structures in the combustor flow and their interaction with the combustion process. It is shown that the flow structures, or vortices, are formed by interaction between the flow instabilities and the chamber acoustic resonance. When these vortices dominate the reacting flow, the combustion is confined to their cores, leading to periodic heat release, which may result in the driving of high amplitude pressure oscillations. These oscillations are typical to the occurrence of combustion instabilities for certain operating conditions. The basic understanding of the interaction between flow dynamics and the combustion process opens up the possibility for rational control of combustion-induced pressure oscillations. 42 references.

  5. Probing for Dark Energy Perturbations using the CMB and Large Scale Structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Rachel; Doré, Olivier

    2004-12-01

    We review the implications of having a non-trivial matter component in the universe and the potential for detecting such a component through the matter power spectrum and ISW effect. We adopt a phenomenological approach and consider the mysterious dark energy to be a cosmic fluid. It is thus fully characterized, up to linear order, by its equation of state and its speed of sound. Whereas the equation of state has been widely studied in the literature, less interest has been devoted to the speed of sound. Its observational consequences come predominantly from very large scale modes of dark matter perturbations (k < 0.01hMpc-1). Since these modes have hardly been probed so far by large scale galaxy surveys, we investigate whether joint constraints that can be placed on those two quantities using the recent CMB fluctuations measurements by WMAP as well as the recently measured CMB large scale structure cross-correlation.

  6. Non-Gaussianity and large-scale structure in a two-field inflationary model

    SciTech Connect

    Tseliakhovich, Dmitriy; Hirata, Christopher

    2010-08-15

    Single-field inflationary models predict nearly Gaussian initial conditions, and hence a detection of non-Gaussianity would be a signature of the more complex inflationary scenarios. In this paper we study the effect on the cosmic microwave background and on large-scale structure from primordial non-Gaussianity in a two-field inflationary model in which both the inflaton and curvaton contribute to the density perturbations. We show that in addition to the previously described enhancement of the galaxy bias on large scales, this setup results in large-scale stochasticity. We provide joint constraints on the local non-Gaussianity parameter f-tilde{sub NL} and the ratio {xi} of the amplitude of primordial perturbations due to the inflaton and curvaton using WMAP and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data.

  7. Non-Gaussianity and Large Scale Structure in a two-field Inflationary model

    SciTech Connect

    Tseliakhovich, D.; Slosar, A.; Hirata, C.

    2010-08-30

    Single-field inflationary models predict nearly Gaussian initial conditions, and hence a detection of non-Gaussianity would be a signature of the more complex inflationary scenarios. In this paper we study the effect on the cosmic microwave background and on large-scale structure from primordial non-Gaussianity in a two-field inflationary model in which both the inflaton and curvaton contribute to the density perturbations. We show that in addition to the previously described enhancement of the galaxy bias on large scales, this setup results in large-scale stochasticity. We provide joint constraints on the local non-Gaussianity parameter f*{sub NL} and the ratio {zeta} of the amplitude of primordial perturbations due to the inflaton and curvaton using WMAP and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data.

  8. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  9. Systematic renormalization of the effective theory of Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Pajer, Enrico

    2016-05-31

    A perturbative description of Large Scale Structure is a cornerstone of our understanding of the observed distribution of matter in the universe. Renormalization is an essential and defining step to make this description physical and predictive. Here we introduce a systematic renormalization procedure, which neatly associates counterterms to the UV-sensitive diagrams order by order, as it is commonly done in quantum field theory. As a concrete example, we renormalize the one-loop power spectrum and bispectrum of both density and velocity. In addition, we present a series of results that are valid to all orders in perturbation theory. First, we show that while systematic renormalization requires temporally non-local counterterms, in practice one can use an equivalent basis made of local operators. We give an explicit prescription to generate all counterterms allowed by the symmetries. Second, we present a formal proof of the well-known general argument that the contribution of short distance perturbations to large scale density contrast δ and momentum density π(k) scale as k{sup 2} and k, respectively. Third, we demonstrate that the common practice of introducing counterterms only in the Euler equation when one is interested in correlators of δ is indeed valid to all orders.

  10. Large-scale structure non-Gaussianities with modal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Relying on a separable modal expansion of the bispectrum, the implementation of a fast estimator for the full bispectrum of a 3d particle distribution is presented. The computational cost of accurate bispectrum estimation is negligible relative to simulation evolution, so the bispectrum can be used as a standard diagnostic whenever the power spectrum is evaluated. As an application, the time evolution of gravitational and primordial dark matter bispectra was measured in a large suite of N-body simulations. The bispectrum shape changes characteristically when the cosmic web becomes dominated by filaments and halos, therefore providing a quantitative probe of 3d structure formation. Our measured bispectra are determined by ~ 50 coefficients, which can be used as fitting formulae in the nonlinear regime and for non-Gaussian initial conditions. We also compare the measured bispectra with predictions from the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS).

  11. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  12. Testing the Big Bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, a detailed discussion is presented regarding: (1) nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances, and neutrino counting; (2) the dark matter problems; and (3) the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments are made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it.

  13. Probing large-scale structure with radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shea D.

    This thesis focuses on detecting magnetized relativistic plasma in the intergalactic medium (IGM) of filamentary large-scale structure (LSS) by observing synchrotron emission emitted by structure formation shocks. Little is known about the IGM beyond the largest clusters of galaxies, and synchrotron emission holds enormous promise as a means of probing magnetic fields and relativistic particle populations in these low density regions. I'll first report on observations taken at the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of the diffuse radio source 0809+39. I use these observations to demonstrate that 0809+39 is likely the first "radio relic" discovered that is not associated with a rich |"X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. I then demonstrate that an unconventional reprocessing of the NVSS polarization survey can reveal structures on scales from 15' to hundreds of degrees, far larger than the nominal shortest-baseline scale. This yields hundreds of new diffuse sources as well as the identification of a new nearby galactic loop . These observations also highlight the major obstacle that diffuse galactic foreground emission poses for any search for large-scale, low surface- brightness extragalactic emission. I therefore explore the cross-correlation of diffuse radio emission with optical tracers of LSS as a means of statistically detecting the presence of magnetic fields in the low-density regions of the cosmic web. This initial study with the Bonn 1.4 GHz radio survey yields an upper limit of 0.2 mG for large-scale filament magnetic fields. Finally, I report on new Green Bank Telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations of the famous Coma cluster of galaxies. Major findings include an extension to the Coma cluster radio relic source 1253+275 which makes its total extent ~2 Mpc, as well as a sharp edge, or "front", on the Western side of the radio halo which shows a strong correlation with merger activity associated with an

  14. Large scale structure of the globular cluster population in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, Alexander T.; O'Neill, Conor; Madrid, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    A search for globular cluster candidates in the Coma Cluster was carried out using Hubble Space Telescope data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We combine different observing programs including the Coma Treasury Survey in order to obtain the large scale distribution of globular clusters in Coma. Globular cluster candidates were selected through careful morphological inspection and a detailed analysis of their magnitude and colors in the two available wavebands, F475W (Sloan g) and F814W (I). Color Magnitude Diagrams, radial density plots and density maps were then created to characterize the globular cluster population in Coma. Preliminary results show the structure of the intergalactic globular cluster system throughout Coma, among the largest globular clusters catalogues to date. The spatial distribution of globular clusters shows clear overdensities, or bridges, between Coma galaxies. It also becomes evident that galaxies of similar luminosity have vastly different numbers of associated globular clusters.

  15. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  16. Phase Correlations and Topological Measures of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, P.

    The process of gravitational instability initiated by small primordial density perturbations is a vital ingredient of cosmological models that attempt to explain how galaxies and large-scale structure formed in the Universe. In the standard picture (the "concordance" model), a period of accelerated expansion ("inflation") generated density fluctuations with simple statistical properties through quantum processes (Starobinsky [82], [83], [84]; Guth [39]; Guth & Pi [40]; Albrecht & Steinhardt [2]; Linde [55]). In this scenario the primordial density field is assumed to form a statistically homogeneous and isotropic Gaussian random field (GRF). Over years of observational scrutiny this paradigm has strengthened its hold in the minds of cosmologists and has survived many tests, culminating in those furnished by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP; Bennett et al. [7]; Hinshaw et al. [45].

  17. Large-scale testing of structural clay tile infilled frames

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.D.; Bennett, R.M.

    1993-03-18

    A summary of large-scale cyclic static tests of structural clay tile infilled frames is given. In-plane racking tests examined the effects of varying frame stiffness, varying infill size, infill offset from frame centerline, and single and double wythe infill construction. Out-of-plane tests examined infilled frame response to inertial loadings and inter-story drift loadings. Sequential in-plane and out-of-plane loadings were performed to determine the effects of orthogonal damage and degradation on both strength and stiffness. A combined out-of-plane inertial and in-plane racking test was conducted to investigate the interaction of multi-directional loading. To determine constitutive properties of the infills, prism compression, mortar compression and various unit tile tests were performed.

  18. Simulating the large-scale structure of HI intensity maps

    SciTech Connect

    Seehars, Sebastian; Paranjape, Aseem; Witzemann, Amadeus; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel E-mail: aseem@iucaa.in E-mail: alexandre.refregier@phys.ethz.ch E-mail: joel.akeret@phys.ethz.ch

    2016-03-01

    Intensity mapping of neutral hydrogen (HI) is a promising observational probe of cosmology and large-scale structure. We present wide field simulations of HI intensity maps based on N-body simulations of a 2.6 Gpc / h box with 2048{sup 3} particles (particle mass 1.6 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙} / h). Using a conditional mass function to populate the simulated dark matter density field with halos below the mass resolution of the simulation (10{sup 8} M{sub ⊙} / h < M{sub halo} < 10{sup 13} M{sub ⊙} / h), we assign HI to those halos according to a phenomenological halo to HI mass relation. The simulations span a redshift range of 0.35 ∼< z ∼< 0.9 in redshift bins of width Δ z ≈ 0.05 and cover a quarter of the sky at an angular resolution of about 7'. We use the simulated intensity maps to study the impact of non-linear effects and redshift space distortions on the angular clustering of HI. Focusing on the autocorrelations of the maps, we apply and compare several estimators for the angular power spectrum and its covariance. We verify that these estimators agree with analytic predictions on large scales and study the validity of approximations based on Gaussian random fields, particularly in the context of the covariance. We discuss how our results and the simulated maps can be useful for planning and interpreting future HI intensity mapping surveys.

  19. Cosmic structure formation: From first stars to large-scale filamentary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zheng

    Theory of cosmic structure formation outlines how stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and large-scale structures formed out of primordial density fluctuations. It presents us a picture of cosmic mass assembly, and places strong constraints on cosmological model. Both observations and theories suggest that structures formation follows a "bottom up" process, in which small, low-mass component form first, and gradually develop into larger, more massive systems. This dissertation focuses on three crucial stages of cosmic structure formation: first generation stars, quasar host galaxies and the large-scale galaxy overdensities. In Chapter 1, I present an overview of structure formation, acquainting readers with a general picture from first object in the Universe to large-scale structures at later epochs. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3, I derive strong constraints to the star formation rates (SFRs) of very massive Population III (Pop III) stars in two high redshift galaxies at z = 7. By probing the He II emission lines for both galaxies, I conclude that the contributions of very massive Pop III stars to total the SFRs are less than 3%. In Chapter 4, I move to more massive systems, quasar host galaxies at z ˜ 3. Using damped Lyman alpha absorption systems as natural coronagraphs, I report that rest-frame far-UV emission of quasar host galaxy correlates strongly with quasar luminosity. This result suggests a co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. In Chapter 5, I develop a novel method for searching the most massive protoclusters at z = 2--3, by utilizing intergalactic Lyman alpha absorption. My investigations suggest that large intergalactic Lyman alpha absorption systems effectively trace the most overdense regions at large scale of ˜15 h -1 Mpc. In Chapter 6, I present our imaging observations of an extreme galaxy overdensity (protocluster) BOSS1441+4000, which is discovered using the techniques developed in Chapter 5. Furthermore, I report an

  20. Large-scale structure formation with global topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Zhou, Zhi-Hong

    1996-05-01

    We investigate cosmological structure formation seeded by topological defects which may form during a phase transition in the early Universe. First, we derive a partially new, local, and gauge-invariant system of perturbation equations to treat microwave background and dark matter fluctuations induced by topological defects or any other type of seeds. We then show that this system is well suited for numerical analysis of structure formation by applying it to seeds induced by fluctuations of a global scalar field. Our numerical results cover a larger dynamical range than those covered by previous investigations and are complementary to them since we use substantially different methods. The resulting microwave background fluctuations are compatible with older simulations. We also obtain a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations although with somewhat higher amplitude. On the other hand, our dark matter results yield a smaller bias parameter compatible with b~2 on scales of 20h-1 Mpc in contrast with previous work which yielded larger bias factors. Our conclusions are thus more positive. According to the aspects analyzed in this work, global topological defect-induced fluctuations yield viable scenarios of structure formation and do better than standard CDM on large scales.

  1. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  2. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    DOE PAGES

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local inmore » space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.« less

  3. Origin of the large scale structures of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Oaknin, David H.

    2004-11-15

    We revise the statistical properties of the primordial cosmological density anisotropies that, at the time of matter-radiation equality, seeded the gravitational development of large scale structures in the otherwise homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker flat universe. Our analysis shows that random fluctuations of the density field at the same instant of equality and with comoving wavelength shorter than the causal horizon at that time can naturally account, when globally constrained to conserve the total mass (energy) of the system, for the observed scale invariance of the anisotropies over cosmologically large comoving volumes. Statistical systems with similar features are generically known as glasslike or latticelike. Obviously, these conclusions conflict with the widely accepted understanding of the primordial structures reported in the literature, which requires an epoch of inflationary cosmology to precede the standard expansion of the universe. The origin of the conflict must be found in the widespread, but unjustified, claim that scale invariant mass (energy) anisotropies at the instant of equality over comoving volumes of cosmological size, larger than the causal horizon at the time, must be generated by fluctuations in the density field with comparably large comoving wavelength.

  4. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. We describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/k{sub NL} and k/k{sub M}, where k is the wavenumber of interest, k{sub NL} is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and k{sub M} is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  5. Reconstructing Information in Large-Scale Structure via Logarithmic Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, Istvan

    We propose to develop a new method to extract information from large-scale structure data combining two-point statistics and non-linear transformations; before, this information was available only with substantially more complex higher-order statistical methods. Initially, most of the cosmological information in large-scale structure lies in two-point statistics. With non- linear evolution, some of that useful information leaks into higher-order statistics. The PI and group has shown in a series of theoretical investigations how that leakage occurs, and explained the Fisher information plateau at smaller scales. This plateau means that even as more modes are added to the measurement of the power spectrum, the total cumulative information (loosely speaking the inverse errorbar) is not increasing. Recently we have shown in Neyrinck et al. (2009, 2010) that a logarithmic (and a related Gaussianization or Box-Cox) transformation on the non-linear Dark Matter or galaxy field reconstructs a surprisingly large fraction of this missing Fisher information of the initial conditions. This was predicted by the earlier wave mechanical formulation of gravitational dynamics by Szapudi & Kaiser (2003). The present proposal is focused on working out the theoretical underpinning of the method to a point that it can be used in practice to analyze data. In particular, one needs to deal with the usual real-life issues of galaxy surveys, such as complex geometry, discrete sam- pling (Poisson or sub-Poisson noise), bias (linear, or non-linear, deterministic, or stochastic), redshift distortions, pro jection effects for 2D samples, and the effects of photometric redshift errors. We will develop methods for weak lensing and Sunyaev-Zeldovich power spectra as well, the latter specifically targetting Planck. In addition, we plan to investigate the question of residual higher- order information after the non-linear mapping, and possible applications for cosmology. Our aim will be to work out

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON IONIZING PHOTON PRODUCTION FROM THE LARGE-SCALE Lyα FOREST

    SciTech Connect

    Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya; Bird, Simeon; Verde, Licia

    2014-09-10

    Recent work has shown that the z ≅ 2.5 Lyα forest on large scales encodes information about the galaxy and quasar populations that keep the intergalactic medium photoionized. We present the first forecasts for constraining the populations with data from current and next-generation surveys. At a minimum, the forest should tell us whether galaxies or, conversely, quasars dominate the photon production. The number density and clustering strength of the ionizing sources might be estimated to sub-10% precision with a DESI-like survey if degeneracies (e.g., with the photon mean-free-path, small-scale clustering power normalization, and potentially other astrophysical effects) can be broken by prior information. We demonstrate that when inhomogeneous ionization is correctly handled, constraints on dark energy do not degrade.

  7. White-Light Polarization and Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalyan, O. G.; Livshits, M. A.; Sýkora, J.

    1997-06-01

    The results of the white-light polarization measurements performed during three solar eclipses (1973, 1980, 1991) are presented. The eclipse images were processed and analysed by the same technique and method and, consequently, the distributions of the polarization and coronal intensity around the Sun were obtained in unified form for all three solar eclipses. The mutual comparisons of our results, and their comparison with the distributions found by other authors, allowed the real accuracy of the current measurements of the white-light corona polarization, which is not worse than +/-5%, to be estimated. We have investigated the behaviour of the polarization in dependence on heliocentric distance in helmet streamers and coronal holes. Simultaneous interpretation of the data on polarization and intensity in white-light helmet streamers is only possible if a considerable concentration of coronal matter (plasma) towards the plane of the sky is assumed. The values obtained for the coronal hole regions can be understood within the framework of a spherically symmetrical model of the low density solar atmosphere. A tendency towards increasing polarization in coronal holes, connected with the decrease of the hole's size and with the transition from the minimum to the maximum of the solar cycle, was noticed. The problem of how the peculiarities of the large-scale coronal structures are related to the orientation of the global (dipole) solar magnetic field and to the degree of the goffer character of the coronal and interplanetary current sheet is discussed briefly.

  8. Generating intrinsic dipole anisotropy in the large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shamik

    2014-03-01

    There have been recent reports of unexpectedly large velocity dipole in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) data. We investigate whether the excess in the NVSS dipole reported can be of cosmological origin. We assume a long wavelength inhomogeneous scalar perturbation of the form αsin(κz) and study its effects on the matter density contrasts. Assuming an ideal fluid model, we calculate, in the linear regime, the contribution of the inhomogeneous mode to the density contrast. We calculate the expected dipole in the large scale structure (LSS) for two cases, first assuming that the mode is still superhorizon everywhere, and second assuming the mode is subhorizon but has crossed the horizon deep in matter domination and is subhorizon everywhere in the region of the survey (NVSS). In both cases, we find that such an inhomogeneous scalar perturbation is sufficient to generate the reported values of dipole anisotropy in LSS. For the superhorizon modes, we find values which are consistent with both cosmic microwave background and NVSS results. We also predict signatures for the model which can be tested by future observations.

  9. Investigation of Coronal Large Scale Structures Utilizing Spartan 201 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    1998-01-01

    Two telescopes aboard Spartan 201, a small satellite has been launched from the Space Shuttles, on April 8th, 1993, September 8th, 1994, September 7th, 1995 and November 20th, 1997. The main objective of the mission was to answer some of the most fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics-What accelerates the solar wind and what heats the corona? The two telescopes are 1) Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory which uses ultraviolet emissions from neutral hydrogen and ions in the corona to determine velocities of the coronal plasma within the solar wind source region, and the temperature and density distributions of protons and 2) White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center which measures visible light to determine the density distribution of coronal electrons within the same region. The PI has had the primary responsibility in the development and application of computer codes necessary for scientific data analysis activities, end instrument calibration for the white-light coronagraph for the entire Spartan mission. The PI was responsible for the science output from the WLC instrument. PI has also been involved in the investigation of coronal density distributions in large-scale structures by use of numerical models which are (mathematically) sufficient to reproduce the details of the observed brightness and polarized brightness distributions found in SPARTAN 201 data.

  10. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.; Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2016-10-01

    Cosmology and neutrino physics have converged into a recent discovery era. The success of the standard model of cosmology in explaining the cosmic microwave background and cosmological large-scale structure data allows for the possibility of measuring the absolute neutrino mass and providing exquisite constraints on the number of light degrees of freedom, including neutrinos. This sensitivity to neutrino physics requires the validity of some of the assumptions, including general relativity, inflationary cosmology, and standard thermal history, many of which can be tested with cosmological data. This sensitivity is also predicated on the robust handling of systematic uncertainties associated with different cosmological observables. We review several past, current, and future measurements of the cosmic microwave background and cosmological large-scale structure that allow us to do fundamental neutrino physics with cosmology.

  11. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of models of structure formation for higher order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly nonlinear regime. Several variations of the standard Omega = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations have recently been introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R(sub p) is approximately 20/h Mpc, e.g., low matter-density (nonzero cosmological constant) models, 'tilted' primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower et al. We show that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the the hierarchical amplitudes Q(sub J) at large scales, r is greater than or approximately R(sub p). Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q(sub 3) and S(sub 3) can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  12. Inflation physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D. L.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crill, B. P.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Doré, O.; Dunkley, J.; Feng, J. L.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Giddings, S. B.; Green, D.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hanson, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Horowitz, G.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jackson, M.; Jones, W. C.; Kallosh, R.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Kinney, W.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Kuo, C. -L.; Kusaka, A.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linde, A.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; Maldacena, J.; Martinec, E.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Senatore, L.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Slosar, A.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.; Zaldarriaga, M.

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments—the theory of cosmic inflation—and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1% of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5σ measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B -mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  13. Inflation physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D. L.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crill, B. P.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Doré, O.; Dunkley, J.; Feng, J. L.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Giddings, S. B.; Green, D.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hanson, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Horowitz, G.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jackson, M.; Jones, W. C.; Kallosh, R.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Kinney, W.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Kuo, C.-L.; Kusaka, A.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linde, A.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; Maldacena, J.; Martinec, E.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Senatore, L.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Slosar, A.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.; Zaldarriaga, M.

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments-the theory of cosmic inflation-and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1% of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5 σ measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B-mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  14. Inflation Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abazajian, K.N.; Arnold,K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B.A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D.L.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Carvalho, C.S.; Chang, C.L.; Chiang, H.C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T.M.; Crill, B.P.; Dawson, K.S.; Das, S.; Devline, M.J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S; Wollack, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments---the theory of cosmic inflation---and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1 of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5-sigma measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B-mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  15. Maximum-entropy large-scale structures of Boolean networks optimized for criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Marco; Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2015-04-01

    We construct statistical ensembles of modular Boolean networks that are constrained to lie at the critical line between frozen and chaotic dynamic regimes. The ensembles are maximally random given the imposed constraints, and thus represent null models of critical networks. By varying the network density and the entropic cost associated with biased Boolean functions, the ensembles undergo several phase transitions. The observed structures range from fully random to several ordered ones, including a prominent core-periphery-like structure, and an 'attenuated' two-group structure, where the network is divided in two groups of nodes, and one of them has Boolean functions with very low sensitivity. This shows that such simple large-scale structures are the most likely to occur when optimizing for criticality, in the absence of any other constraint or competing optimization criteria.

  16. Inflationary tensor fossils in large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Fasiello, Matteo; Jeong, Donghui; Kamionkowski, Marc E-mail: mrf65@case.edu E-mail: kamion@jhu.edu

    2014-12-01

    Inflation models make specific predictions for a tensor-scalar-scalar three-point correlation, or bispectrum, between one gravitational-wave (tensor) mode and two density-perturbation (scalar) modes. This tensor-scalar-scalar correlation leads to a local power quadrupole, an apparent departure from statistical isotropy in our Universe, as well as characteristic four-point correlations in the current mass distribution in the Universe. So far, the predictions for these observables have been worked out only for single-clock models in which certain consistency conditions between the tensor-scalar-scalar correlation and tensor and scalar power spectra are satisfied. Here we review the requirements on inflation models for these consistency conditions to be satisfied. We then consider several examples of inflation models, such as non-attractor and solid-inflation models, in which these conditions are put to the test. In solid inflation the simplest consistency conditions are already violated whilst in the non-attractor model we find that, contrary to the standard scenario, the tensor-scalar-scalar correlator probes directly relevant model-dependent information. We work out the predictions for observables in these models. For non-attractor inflation we find an apparent local quadrupolar departure from statistical isotropy in large-scale structure but that this power quadrupole decreases very rapidly at smaller scales. The consistency of the CMB quadrupole with statistical isotropy then constrains the distance scale that corresponds to the transition from the non-attractor to attractor phase of inflation to be larger than the currently observable horizon. Solid inflation predicts clustering fossils signatures in the current galaxy distribution that may be large enough to be detectable with forthcoming, and possibly even current, galaxy surveys.

  17. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  18. Soft-Pion theorems for large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-09-01

    Consistency relations — which relate an N-point function to a squeezed (N+1)-point function — are useful in large scale structure (LSS) because of their non-perturbative nature: they hold even if the N-point function is deep in the nonlinear regime, and even if they involve astrophysically messy galaxy observables. The non-perturbative nature of the consistency relations is guaranteed by the fact that they are symmetry statements, in which the velocity plays the role of the soft pion. In this paper, we address two issues: (1) how to derive the relations systematically using the residual coordinate freedom in the Newtonian gauge, and relate them to known results in ζ-gauge (often used in studies of inflation); (2) under what conditions the consistency relations are violated. In the non-relativistic limit, our derivation reproduces the Newtonian consistency relation discovered by Kehagias & Riotto and Peloso & Pietroni. More generally, there is an infinite set of consistency relations, as is known in ζ-gauge. There is a one-to-one correspondence between symmetries in the two gauges; in particular, the Newtonian consistency relation follows from the dilation and special conformal symmetries in ζ-gauge. We probe the robustness of the consistency relations by studying models of galaxy dynamics and biasing. We give a systematic list of conditions under which the consistency relations are violated; violations occur if the galaxy bias is non-local in an infrared divergent way. We emphasize the relevance of the adiabatic mode condition, as distinct from symmetry considerations. As a by-product of our investigation, we discuss a simple fluid Lagrangian for LSS.

  19. Cosmological parameters from large scale structure - geometric versus shape information

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Lesgourgues, Julien; Rampf, Cornelius; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk E-mail: rampf@physik.rwth-aachen.de

    2010-07-01

    The matter power spectrum as derived from large scale structure (LSS) surveys contains two important and distinct pieces of information: an overall smooth shape and the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We investigate the separate impact of these two types of information on cosmological parameter estimation for current data, and show that for the simplest cosmological models, the broad-band shape information currently contained in the SDSS DR7 halo power spectrum (HPS) is by far superseded by geometric information derived from the baryonic features. An immediate corollary is that contrary to popular beliefs, the upper limit on the neutrino mass m{sub ν} presently derived from LSS combined with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data does not in fact arise from the possible small-scale power suppression due to neutrino free-streaming, if we limit the model framework to minimal ΛCDM+m{sub ν}. However, in more complicated models, such as those extended with extra light degrees of freedom and a dark energy equation of state parameter w differing from -1, shape information becomes crucial for the resolution of parameter degeneracies. This conclusion will remain true even when data from the Planck spacecraft are combined with SDSS DR7 data. In the course of our analysis, we update both the BAO likelihood function by including an exact numerical calculation of the time of decoupling, as well as the HPS likelihood, by introducing a new dewiggling procedure that generalises the previous approach to models with an arbitrary sound horizon at decoupling. These changes allow a consistent application of the BAO and HPS data sets to a much wider class of models, including the ones considered in this work. All the cases considered here are compatible with the conservative 95%-bounds Σm{sub ν} < 1.16eV, N{sub eff} = 4.8±2.0.

  20. Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations using Quantum Chemistry Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-03-01

    This talk will address our recent efforts in developing fast, linear scaling electronic structure methods for large scale applications. Of special importance is our fast multipole method( M. C. Strain, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Science 271), 51 (1996). (FMM) for achieving linear scaling for the quantum Coulomb problem (GvFMM), the traditional bottleneck in quantum chemistry calculations based on Gaussian orbitals. Fast quadratures(R. E. Stratmann, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 257), 213 (1996). combined with methods that avoid the Hamiltonian diagonalization( J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 106), 5569 (1997) have resulted in density functional theory (DFT) programs that can be applied to systems containing many hundreds of atoms and ---depending on computational resources or level of theory-- to many thousands of atoms.( A. D. Daniels, J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 107), 425 (1997). Three solutions for the diagonalization bottleneck will be analyzed and compared: a conjugate gradient density matrix search (CGDMS), a Hamiltonian polynomial expansion of the density matrix, and a pseudo-diagonalization method. Besides DFT, our near-field exchange method( J. C. Burant, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 105), 8969 (1996). for linear scaling Hartree-Fock calculations will be discussed. Based on these improved capabilities, we have also developed programs to obtain vibrational frequencies (via analytic energy second derivatives) and excitation energies (through time-dependent DFT) of large molecules like porphyn or C_70. Our GvFMM has been extended to periodic systems( K. N. Kudin and G. E. Scuseria, Chem. Phys. Lett., in press.) and progress towards a Gaussian-based DFT and HF program for polymers and solids will be reported. Last, we will discuss our progress on a Laplace-transformed \\cal O(N^2) second-order pertubation theory (MP2) method.

  1. Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity and the large scale structure of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Banados, M.; Ferreira, P. G.; Skordis, C.

    2009-03-15

    It has been argued that a Universe governed by Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity can be compatible with current cosmological constraints. The extra fields introduced in this theory can behave as both dark matter and dark energy, unifying the dark sector in one coherent framework. We show the various roles the extra fields can play in the expansion of the Universe and study the evolution of linear perturbations in the various regimes. We find that, as a unified theory of the dark sector, Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity will lead to excessive fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background on large scales. In the presence of a cosmological constant, however, the extra fields can behave as a form of nonparticulate dark matter and can lead to a cosmology which is entirely compatible with current observations of large scale structure. We discuss the interpretation of this form of dark matter and how it can differ from standard, particulate dark matter.

  2. Testing the big bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1991-06-01

    In this series of lectures, several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, detailed discussion is presented regarding nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances and neutrino counting; the dark matter problems; and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments will also be made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing'' and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it. 126 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Long gradient mode and large-scale structure observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyari, Alireza; Firouzjaee, Javad T.

    2017-03-01

    We extend the study of long-mode perturbations to other large-scale observables such as cosmic rulers, galaxy-number counts, and halo bias. The long mode is a pure gradient mode that is still outside an observer's horizon. We insist that gradient-mode effects on observables vanish. It is also crucial that the expressions for observables are relativistic. This allows us to show that the effects of a gradient mode on the large-scale observables vanish identically in a relativistic framework. To study the potential modulation effect of the gradient mode on halo bias, we derive a consistency condition to the first order in gradient expansion. We find that the matter variance at a fixed physical scale is not modulated by the long gradient mode perturbations when the consistency condition holds. This shows that the contribution of long gradient modes to bias vanishes in this framework.

  4. The Large-scale Structure of the Universe: Probes of Cosmology and Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Yookyung

    The usefulness of large-scale structure as a probe of cosmology and structure formation is increasing as large deep surveys in multi-wavelength bands are becoming possible. The observational analysis of large-scale structure guided by large volume numerical simulations are beginning to offer us complementary information and crosschecks of cosmological parameters estimated from the anisotropies in Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. Understanding structure formation and evolution and even galaxy formation history is also being aided by observations of different redshift snapshots of the Universe, using various tracers of large-scale structure. This dissertation work covers aspects of large-scale structure from the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, to that of large scale filaments and galaxy clusters. First, I discuss a large- scale structure use for high precision cosmology. I investigate the reconstruction of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak within the context of Lagrangian perturbation theory, testing its validity in a large suite of cosmological volume N-body simulations. Then I consider galaxy clusters and the large scale filaments surrounding them in a high resolution N-body simulation. I investigate the geometrical properties of galaxy cluster neighborhoods, focusing on the filaments connected to clusters. Using mock observations of galaxy clusters, I explore the correlations of scatter in galaxy cluster mass estimates from multi-wavelength observations and different measurement techniques. I also examine the sources of the correlated scatter by considering the intrinsic and environmental properties of clusters.

  5. Inclusive constraints on unified dark matter models from future large-scale surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Camera, Stefano; Carbone, Carmelita; Moscardini, Lauro E-mail: carmelita.carbone@unibo.it

    2012-03-01

    In the very last years, cosmological models where the properties of the dark components of the Universe — dark matter and dark energy — are accounted for by a single ''dark fluid'' have drawn increasing attention and interest. Amongst many proposals, Unified Dark Matter (UDM) cosmologies are promising candidates as effective theories. In these models, a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term in its Lagrangian mimics both the accelerated expansion of the Universe at late times and the clustering properties of the large-scale structure of the cosmos. However, UDM models also present peculiar behaviours, the most interesting one being the fact that the perturbations in the dark-matter component of the scalar field do have a non-negligible speed of sound. This gives rise to an effective Jeans scale for the Newtonian potential, below which the dark fluid does not cluster any more. This implies a growth of structures fairly different from that of the concordance ΛCDM model. In this paper, we demonstrate that forthcoming large-scale surveys will be able to discriminate between viable UDM models and ΛCDM to a good degree of accuracy. To this purpose, the planned Euclid satellite will be a powerful tool, since it will provide very accurate data on galaxy clustering and the weak lensing effect of cosmic shear. Finally, we also exploit the constraining power of the ongoing CMB Planck experiment. Although our approach is the most conservative, with the inclusion of only well-understood, linear dynamics, in the end we also show what could be done if some amount of non-linear information were included.

  6. Galilean invariance and the consistency relation for the nonlinear squeezed bispectrum of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: pietroni@pd.infn.it

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the constraints imposed on the nonlinear evolution of the Large Scale Structure (LSS) of the universe by galilean invariance, the symmetry relevant on subhorizon scales. Using Ward identities associated to the invariance, we derive fully nonlinear consistency relations between statistical correlators of the density and velocity perturbations, such as the power spectrum and the bispectrum. These relations are valid up to O(f{sub NL}{sup 2}) corrections. We then show that most of the semi-analytic methods proposed so far to resum the perturbative expansion of the LSS dynamics fail to fulfill the constraints imposed by galilean invariance, and are therefore susceptible to non-physical infrared effects. Finally, we identify and discuss a nonperturbative semi-analytical scheme which is manifestly galilean invariant at any order of its expansion.

  7. Local Large-Scale Structure and the Assumption of Homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Ryan C.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-10-01

    Our recent estimates of galaxy counts and the luminosity density in the near-infrared (Keenan et al. 2010, 2012) indicated that the local universe may be under-dense on radial scales of several hundred megaparsecs. Such a large-scale local under-density could introduce significant biases in the measurement and interpretation of cosmological observables, such as the inferred effects of dark energy on the rate of expansion. In Keenan et al. (2013), we measured the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance from us to test for such a local under-density. We made this measurement over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.2 (radial distances D ~ 50 - 800 h 70 -1 Mpc). We found that the shape of the K-band luminosity function is relatively constant as a function of distance and environment. We derive a local (z < 0.07, D < 300 h 70 -1 Mpc) K-band luminosity density that agrees well with previously published studies. At z > 0.07, we measure an increasing luminosity density that by z ~ 0.1 rises to a value of ~ 1.5 times higher than that measured locally. This implies that the stellar mass density follows a similar trend. Assuming that the underlying dark matter distribution is traced by this luminous matter, this suggests that the local mass density may be lower than the global mass density of the universe at an amplitude and on a scale that is sufficient to introduce significant biases into the measurement of basic cosmological observables. At least one study has shown that an under-density of roughly this amplitude and scale could resolve the apparent tension between direct local measurements of the Hubble constant and those inferred by Planck team. Other theoretical studies have concluded that such an under-density could account for what looks like an accelerating expansion, even when no dark energy is present.

  8. Cosmological implications of the CMB large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Melia, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck may have uncovered several anomalies in the full cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky that could indicate possible new physics driving the growth of density fluctuations in the early universe. These include an unusually low power at the largest scales and an apparent alignment of the quadrupole and octopole moments. In a ΛCDM model where the CMB is described by a Gaussian Random Field, the quadrupole and octopole moments should be statistically independent. The emergence of these low probability features may simply be due to posterior selections from many such possible effects, whose occurrence would therefore not be as unlikely as one might naively infer. If this is not the case, however, and if these features are not due to effects such as foreground contamination, their combined statistical significance would be equal to the product of their individual significances. In the absence of such extraneous factors, and ignoring the biasing due to posterior selection, the missing large-angle correlations would have a probability as low as ∼0.1% and the low-l multipole alignment would be unlikely at the ∼4.9% level; under the least favorable conditions, their simultaneous observation in the context of the standard model could then be likely at only the ∼0.005% level. In this paper, we explore the possibility that these features are indeed anomalous, and show that the corresponding probability of CMB multipole alignment in the R{sub h}=ct universe would then be ∼7–10%, depending on the number of large-scale Sachs–Wolfe induced fluctuations. Since the low power at the largest spatial scales is reproduced in this cosmology without the need to invoke cosmic variance, the overall likelihood of observing both of these features in the CMB is ⩾7%, much more likely than in ΛCDM, if the anomalies are real. The key physical ingredient responsible for this difference is the existence in the former of a

  9. Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2010-08-01

    A primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large scale structure(LSS). In this article, we demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales as follows, We also report the newest constraints on the PMF amplitude Bλ and the power spectral index nB which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework and the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In particular we find that |Bλ|<2.10(68%CL) nG and < 2.98(95%CL) nG and nB<-1.19(68%CL) and <-0.25(95%CL) at a present scale of 1 Mpc.

  10. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part III: test of the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Hui, Lam; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: msimonov@sissa.it

    2014-06-01

    The recently derived consistency relations for Large Scale Structure do not hold if the Equivalence Principle (EP) is violated. We show it explicitly in a toy model with two fluids, one of which is coupled to a fifth force. We explore the constraints that galaxy surveys can set on EP violation looking at the squeezed limit of the 3-point function involving two populations of objects. We find that one can explore EP violations of order 10{sup −3}÷10{sup −4} on cosmological scales. Chameleon models are already very constrained by the requirement of screening within the Solar System and only a very tiny region of the parameter space can be explored with this method. We show that no violation of the consistency relations is expected in Galileon models.

  11. CSM Testbed Development and Large-Scale Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, R. E.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Lotts, C. G.; Poole, E. L.; Overman, A. L.; Macy, S. C.

    1989-01-01

    A research activity called Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center is described. This activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM Testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM Testbed methods development environment is presented and some new numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  12. Large-scale structures in turbulent Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of fully developed turbulent Couette flow is performed with a large computational domain in the streamwise and spanwise directions (40 πh and 6 πh) to investigate streamwise-scale growth mechanism of the streamwise velocity fluctuating structures in the core region, where h is the channel half height. It is shown that long streamwise-scale structures (> 3 h) are highly energetic and they contribute to more than 80% of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress, compared to previous studies in canonical Poiseuille flows. Instantaneous and statistical analysis show that negative-u' structures on the bottom wall in the Couette flow continuously grow in the streamwise direction due to mean shear, and they penetrate to the opposite moving wall. The geometric center of the log layer is observed in the centerline with a dominant outer peak in streamwise spectrum, and the maximum streamwise extent for structure is found in the centerline, similar to previous observation in turbulent Poiseuille flows at high Reynolds number. Further inspection of time-evolving instantaneous fields clearly exhibits that adjacent long structures combine to form a longer structure in the centerline. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2014R1A1A2057031).

  13. The large-scale organized structure in free turbulent shear flow and its radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. T. C.; Alper, A.; Mankbadi, R.

    1978-01-01

    Modeling of the large-scale coherent structures in a turbulent free shear flow is described. The objective is to gain insight into the interaction between the large-scale structure and the fine-grained turbulence. Some aerodynamic sound radiation properties of the large-scale structure are examined. It is found that the dominant contributions to the radiation come from shear noise rather than self-noise. The fact that a pure tone excitation leads to broadband amplification is most probably due to the enhancement of the fine-grained turbulence by the coherent structure. Numerical modeling of the coherent structure is also discussed.

  14. The large-scale structure of software-intensive systems

    PubMed Central

    Booch, Grady

    2012-01-01

    The computer metaphor is dominant in most discussions of neuroscience, but the semantics attached to that metaphor are often quite naive. Herein, we examine the ontology of software-intensive systems, the nature of their structure and the application of the computer metaphor to the metaphysical questions of self and causation. PMID:23386964

  15. Large-scale Filamentary Structures around the Virgo Cluster Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Bureau, Martin; Yoon, Hyein; Chung, Aeree; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Lee, Woong; Chung, Jiwon

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the filamentary structures of galaxies around the Virgo cluster, exploiting a larger data set, based on the HyperLeda database, than previous studies. In particular, this includes a large number of low-luminosity galaxies, resulting in better sampled individual structures. We confirm seven known structures in the distance range 4 h -1 Mpc < SGY < 16 h -1 Mpc, now identified as filaments, where SGY is the axis of the supergalactic coordinate system roughly along the line of sight. The Hubble diagram of the filament galaxies suggests they are infalling toward the main body of the Virgo cluster. We propose that the collinear distribution of giant elliptical galaxies along the fundamental axis of the Virgo cluster is smoothly connected to two of these filaments (Leo II A and B). Behind the Virgo cluster (16 h -1 Mpc < SGY < 27 h -1 Mpc), we also identify a new filament elongated toward the NGC 5353/4 group (“NGC 5353/4 filament”) and confirm a sheet that includes galaxies from the W and M clouds of the Virgo cluster (“W-M sheet”). In the Hubble diagram, the NGC 5353/4 filament galaxies show infall toward the NGC 5353/4 group, whereas the W-M sheet galaxies do not show hints of gravitational influence from the Virgo cluster. The filamentary structures identified can now be used to better understand the generic role of filaments in the build-up of galaxy clusters at z ≈ 0.

  16. The large-scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springel, Volker; Frenk, Carlos S.; White, Simon D. M.

    2006-04-01

    Research over the past 25 years has led to the view that the rich tapestry of present-day cosmic structure arose during the first instants of creation, where weak ripples were imposed on the otherwise uniform and rapidly expanding primordial soup. Over 14 billion years of evolution, these ripples have been amplified to enormous proportions by gravitational forces, producing ever-growing concentrations of dark matter in which ordinary gases cool, condense and fragment to make galaxies. This process can be faithfully mimicked in large computer simulations, and tested by observations that probe the history of the Universe starting from just 400,000 years after the Big Bang.

  17. The large-scale structure of the Universe.

    PubMed

    Springel, Volker; Frenk, Carlos S; White, Simon D M

    2006-04-27

    Research over the past 25 years has led to the view that the rich tapestry of present-day cosmic structure arose during the first instants of creation, where weak ripples were imposed on the otherwise uniform and rapidly expanding primordial soup. Over 14 billion years of evolution, these ripples have been amplified to enormous proportions by gravitational forces, producing ever-growing concentrations of dark matter in which ordinary gases cool, condense and fragment to make galaxies. This process can be faithfully mimicked in large computer simulations, and tested by observations that probe the history of the Universe starting from just 400,000 years after the Big Bang.

  18. Large-scale shielding structures in low earth orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, D. V.; Silnikov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.; Rubzov, I. S.; Nosikov, V. B.; Minenko, E. Yu.; Murtazin, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The problems involved in the design-engineering digital simulation of large-size transformable-screen constructions for protecting spacecraft and equipment from space debris and meteoroids were considered. The engineering principles used to improve the design and efficiency of protective screens are presented. The use of embedded matrix transducers located all over the composite material used for armor tiles is proposed for the construction of protective clad screens; this approach enables efficient detection of damaged areas of the protective screen, the assessment of the level of damage, and the prediction of damage to spacecraft and equipment structures.

  19. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A. B.; Littlewood, R.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-10-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work and from field observations: (1) Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; (2) when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides (`calving'); and (3) when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first-order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  20. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A.; Littlewood, R. C.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work, and from field observations: Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides ('calving'); and when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  1. An Open-Source Galaxy Redshift Survey Simulator for next-generation Large Scale Structure Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijak, Uros

    Galaxy redshift surveys produce three-dimensional maps of the galaxy distribution. On large scales these maps trace the underlying matter fluctuations in a relatively simple manner, so that the properties of the primordial fluctuations along with the overall expansion history and growth of perturbations can be extracted. The BAO standard ruler method to measure the expansion history of the universe using galaxy redshift surveys is thought to be robust to observational artifacts and understood theoretically with high precision. These same surveys can offer a host of additional information, including a measurement of the growth rate of large scale structure through redshift space distortions, the possibility of measuring the sum of neutrino masses, tighter constraints on the expansion history through the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and constraints on the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations. Extracting this broadband clustering information hinges on both our ability to minimize and subtract observational systematics to the observed galaxy power spectrum, and our ability to model the broadband behavior of the observed galaxy power spectrum with exquisite precision. Rapid development on both fronts is required to capitalize on WFIRST's data set. We propose to develop an open-source computational toolbox that will propel development in both areas by connecting large scale structure modeling and instrument and survey modeling with the statistical inference process. We will use the proposed simulator to both tailor perturbation theory and fully non-linear models of the broadband clustering of WFIRST galaxies and discover novel observables in the non-linear regime that are robust to observational systematics and able to distinguish between a wide range of spatial and dynamic biasing models for the WFIRST galaxy redshift survey sources. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach in a pilot study of the SDSS-III BOSS galaxies, in which we

  2. Large-Scale Structure of the Carina Nebula.

    PubMed

    Smith; Egan; Carey; Price; Morse; Price

    2000-04-01

    Observations obtained with the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite reveal for the first time the complex mid-infrared morphology of the entire Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). On the largest size scale of approximately 100 pc, the thermal infrared emission from the giant H ii region delineates one coherent structure: a (somewhat distorted) bipolar nebula with the major axis perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The Carina Nebula is usually described as an evolved H ii region that is no longer actively forming stars, clearing away the last vestiges of its natal molecular cloud. However, the MSX observations presented here reveal numerous embedded infrared sources that are good candidates for sites of current star formation. Several compact infrared sources are located at the heads of dust pillars or in dark globules behind ionization fronts. Because their morphology suggests a strong interaction with the peculiar collection of massive stars in the nebula, we speculate that these new infrared sources may be sites of triggered star formation in NGC 3372.

  3. Auxiliary basis expansions for large-scale electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yousung; Sodt, Alex; Gill, Peter M W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2005-05-10

    One way to reduce the computational cost of electronic structure calculations is to use auxiliary basis expansions to approximate four-center integrals in terms of two- and three-center integrals, usually by using the variationally optimum Coulomb metric to determine the expansion coefficients. However, the long-range decay behavior of the auxiliary basis expansion coefficients has not been characterized. We find that this decay can be surprisingly slow. Numerical experiments on linear alkanes and a toy model both show that the decay can be as slow as 1/r in the distance between the auxiliary function and the fitted charge distribution. The Coulomb metric fitting equations also involve divergent matrix elements for extended systems treated with periodic boundary conditions. An attenuated Coulomb metric that is short-range can eliminate these oddities without substantially degrading calculated relative energies. The sparsity of the fit coefficients is assessed on simple hydrocarbon molecules and shows quite early onset of linear growth in the number of significant coefficients with system size using the attenuated Coulomb metric. Hence it is possible to design linear scaling auxiliary basis methods without additional approximations to treat large systems.

  4. Large-Scale Structure of the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Egan, Michael P.; Carey, Sean; Price, Stephan D.; Morse, Jon A.; Price, Paul A.

    2000-04-01

    Observations obtained with the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite reveal for the first time the complex mid-infrared morphology of the entire Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). On the largest size scale of ~100 pc, the thermal infrared emission from the giant H II region delineates one coherent structure: a (somewhat distorted) bipolar nebula with the major axis perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The Carina Nebula is usually described as an evolved H II region that is no longer actively forming stars, clearing away the last vestiges of its natal molecular cloud. However, the MSX observations presented here reveal numerous embedded infrared sources that are good candidates for sites of current star formation. Several compact infrared sources are located at the heads of dust pillars or in dark globules behind ionization fronts. Because their morphology suggests a strong interaction with the peculiar collection of massive stars in the nebula, we speculate that these new infrared sources may be sites of triggered star formation in NGC 3372.

  5. Renormalizing a viscous fluid model for large scale structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Führer, Florian; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos E-mail: gerasimos.rigopoulos@ncl.ac.uk

    2016-02-01

    Using the Stochastic Adhesion Model (SAM) as a simple toy model for cosmic structure formation, we study renormalization and the removal of the cutoff dependence from loop integrals in perturbative calculations. SAM shares the same symmetry with the full system of continuity+Euler equations and includes a viscosity term and a stochastic noise term, similar to the effective theories recently put forward to model CDM clustering. We show in this context that if the viscosity and noise terms are treated as perturbative corrections to the standard eulerian perturbation theory, they are necessarily non-local in time. To ensure Galilean Invariance higher order vertices related to the viscosity and the noise must then be added and we explicitly show at one-loop that these terms act as counter terms for vertex diagrams. The Ward Identities ensure that the non-local-in-time theory can be renormalized consistently. Another possibility is to include the viscosity in the linear propagator, resulting in exponential damping at high wavenumber. The resulting local-in-time theory is then renormalizable to one loop, requiring less free parameters for its renormalization.

  6. The future of primordial features with large-scale structure surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingang; Dvorkin, Cora; Huang, Zhiqi; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Verde, Licia

    2016-11-01

    Primordial features are one of the most important extensions of the Standard Model of cosmology, providing a wealth of information on the primordial Universe, ranging from discrimination between inflation and alternative scenarios, new particle detection, to fine structures in the inflationary potential. We study the prospects of future large-scale structure (LSS) surveys on the detection and constraints of these features. We classify primordial feature models into several classes, and for each class we present a simple template of power spectrum that encodes the essential physics. We study how well the most ambitious LSS surveys proposed to date, including both spectroscopic and photometric surveys, will be able to improve the constraints with respect to the current Planck data. We find that these LSS surveys will significantly improve the experimental sensitivity on features signals that are oscillatory in scales, due to the 3D information. For a broad range of models, these surveys will be able to reduce the errors of the amplitudes of the features by a factor of 5 or more, including several interesting candidates identified in the recent Planck data. Therefore, LSS surveys offer an impressive opportunity for primordial feature discovery in the next decade or two. We also compare the advantages of both types of surveys.

  7. Dark and luminous matter in galaxies and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guangfei

    of ≲ 0.035 on the average external shear. The total mass has an average ellipticity = 0.78 +/- 0.03 (rms of 0.12), which correlates extremely well with the stellar ellipticity, q*, resulting in = 0.99 +/- 0.03 (rms of 0.11) for sigma ≳ 225 kms-1. (iii) The average projected dark-matter mass fraction is inferred to be = 0.25 +/- 0.06 (rms of 0.22) inside , using the stellar mass-to-light ratios derived from the Fundamental Plane as priors. (iv) Combined with results from the Lenses Structure & Dynamics (LSD) Survey at z ≳ 0.3, we find no significant evolution of the total density slope inside one effective radius for galaxies with sigmaap ≥ 200 kms -1: a linear fit gives alphagamma' ≡ d/dz = 0.23 +/- 0.16 (1sigma) for the range z=0.08--1.01. We conclude that massive early-type galaxies at z=0.06--0.33 on average have an isothermal logarithmic density slope inside half an effective radius, with an intrinsic spread of at most 6% (1 sigma). Based on the galaxies hosted by halos more massive than 1013.5 M⊙ from the Millennium Run Simulation (MRS), the relations between the halo mass and cluster optical observables are investigated, at redshifts z = 0, z = 0.3, and z = 0.5 are investigated. Two simulated galaxy catalogs are used, with one from the Durham university group, and the other from Max Planck Institution for Astrophysics (MPA) group. The relations between halo mass and cluster luminosity, or halo mass and galaxy richness (galaxy number) can be well fit by power-law mean relations with lognormal scatter. The scatter is around 0.12 dex (Durham) and 0.15 dex (MPA) at cluster luminosity Ltot 101.4L*. The scatter in the Durham simulation decreases with increasing cluster luminosity, while no obvious trend appears in the MPA simulation. The central galaxy luminosity is also correlated with halo mass, but with larger scatter. At fixed halo mass, there is little or no correlation of average galaxy luminosity or

  8. Insights into interphase large-scale chromatin structure from analysis of engineered chromosome regions.

    PubMed

    Belmont, A S; Hu, Y; Sinclair, P B; Wu, W; Bian, Q; Kireev, I

    2010-01-01

    How chromatin folds into mitotic and interphase chromosomes has remained a difficult question for many years. We have used three generations of engineered chromosome regions as a means of visualizing specific chromosome regions in live cells and cells fixed under conditions that preserve large-scale chromatin structure. Our results confirm the existence of large-scale chromatin domains and fibers formed by the folding of 10-nm and 30-nm chromatin fibers into larger, spatially distinct domains. Transcription at levels within severalfold of the levels measured for endogenous loci occur within these large-scale chromatin structures on a condensed template linearly compacted several hundred fold to 1000-fold relative to B-form DNA. However, transcriptional induction is accompanied by a severalfold decondensation of this large-scale chromatin structure that propagates hundreds of kilobases beyond the induced gene. Examination of engineered chromosome regions in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and differentiated cells suggests a surprising degree of plasticity in this large-scale chromatin structure, allowing long-range DNA interactions within the context of large-scale chromatin fibers. Recapitulation of gene-specific differences in large-scale chromatin conformation and nuclear positioning using these engineered chromosome regions will facilitate identification of cis and trans determinants of interphase chromosome architecture.

  9. Insights into interphase large-scale chromatin structure from analysis of engineered chromosome regions

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, Andrew S.; Hu, Yan; Sinclair, Paul; Wu, Wei; Bian, Qian; Kireev, Igor

    2012-01-01

    How chromatin folds into mitotic and interphase chromosomes has remained a difficult question for many years. We have used three generations of engineered chromosome regions as a means of visualizing specific chromosome regions in live cells and cells fixed under conditions which preserve large-scale chromatin structure. Our results confirm the existence of large-scale chromatin domains and fibers formed by the folding of 10 and 30 nm chromatin fibers into larger, spatially distinct domains. Transcription at levels within several fold of the levels measured for endogenous loci occur within these large-scale chromatin structures on a condensed template linearly compacted several hundred fold to one thousand fold relative to B-form DNA. However, transcriptional induction is accompanied by a several fold decondensation of this large-scale chromatin structure that propagates hundreds of kb beyond the induced gene. Examination of engineered chromosome regions in mouse ES and differentiated cells suggests a surprising degree of plasticity in this large-scale chromatin structure, allowing long-range DNA interactions within the context of large-scale chromatin fibers. Recapitulation of gene specific differences in large-scale chromatin conformation and nuclear positioning using these engineered chromosome regions will facilitate identification of cis and trans determinants of interphase chromosome architecture. PMID:21467143

  10. Fault-Tolerant Tracker for Interconnected Large-Scale Nonlinear Systems with Input Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, Y. C.; Tsai, J. S. H.; Guo, S. M.; Shieh, L. S.; Han, Z.

    This paper presents the decentralized fault-tolerant tracker based on the model predictive control (MPC) for a class of unknown interconnected large-scale sampled-data nonlinear systems. Due to the computational requirements of MPC and the system information is unknown, the observer/Kalman filter identification (OKID) method is utilized to determine decentralized appropriate (low-) order discrete-time linear models. Then, to overcome the effect of modeling error on the identified linear model of each subsystem, the improved observers with the high-gain property based on the digital redesign approach will be presented. Once fault is detected in each decentralized controller, one of the backup control configurations in each decentralized subsystem is switched to using the soft switching approach. Thus, the decentralized fault-tolerant control with the closed-loop decoupling property can be achieved through the above approach with high-gain property decentralized observer/tracker.

  11. Large-scale magnetic structure formation in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Müller, Wolf-Christian

    2013-11-20

    The inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D-MHD) turbulence is believed to be one of the processes responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in astrophysical systems. In this work, we present an exhaustive set of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of both forced and decaying 3D-MHD turbulence, to understand this structure formation process. It is first shown that an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in small-scale driven turbulence does not necessarily generate coherent large-scale magnetic structures. The observed large-scale magnetic field, in this case, is severely perturbed by magnetic fluctuations generated by the small-scale forcing. In the decaying case, coherent large-scale structures form similarly to those observed astronomically. Based on the numerical results, the formation of large-scale magnetic structures in some astrophysical systems is suggested to be the consequence of an initial forcing that imparts the necessary turbulent energy into the system, which, after the forcing shuts off, decays to form the large-scale structures. This idea is supported by representative examples, e.g., clusters of galaxies.

  12. Large-scale structural transitions in supercoiled DNA revealed by coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajina, Brad; Spakowitz, Andrew

    Topological constraints, such as DNA supercoiling, play an integral role in genomic regulation and organization in living systems. However, physical understanding of the principles that underlie DNA structure and organization at biologically-relevant length-scales remains a formidable challenge. We develop a coarse-grained simulation approach for predicting equilibrium conformations of supercoiled DNA. With this approach, we study the conformational transitions that arise due to supercoiling across the full range of supercoiling densities that are commonly explored by living systems. Simulations of ring DNA molecules with lengths up to the scale of topological domains in the E. coli chromosome (~10 kilobases) reveal large-scale structural transitions elicited by supercoiling, resulting in 3 supercoiling conformational regimes: chiral coils, extended plectonemes, and branched hyper-supercoils. These results capture the non-monotonic relationship of size versus degree of supercoiling observed in experimental sedimentation studies of supercoiled DNA, and our results provide a physical explanation of the structural transitions underlying this behavior.

  13. Neural encoding of large-scale three-dimensional space—properties and constraints

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Kate J.; Wilson, Jonathan J.; Casali, Giulio; Hayman, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    How the brain represents represent large-scale, navigable space has been the topic of intensive investigation for several decades, resulting in the discovery that neurons in a complex network of cortical and subcortical brain regions co-operatively encode distance, direction, place, movement etc. using a variety of different sensory inputs. However, such studies have mainly been conducted in simple laboratory settings in which animals explore small, two-dimensional (i.e., flat) arenas. The real world, by contrast, is complex and three dimensional with hills, valleys, tunnels, branches, and—for species that can swim or fly—large volumetric spaces. Adding an additional dimension to space adds coding challenges, a primary reason for which is that several basic geometric properties are different in three dimensions. This article will explore the consequences of these challenges for the establishment of a functional three-dimensional metric map of space, one of which is that the brains of some species might have evolved to reduce the dimensionality of the representational space and thus sidestep some of these problems. PMID:26236246

  14. A fast nonrigid image registration with constraints on the Jacobian using large scale constrained optimization.

    PubMed

    Sdika, Michaël

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a new nonrigid monomodality image registration algorithm based on B-splines. The deformation is described by a cubic B-spline field and found by minimizing the energy between a reference image and a deformed version of a floating image. To penalize noninvertible transformation, we propose two different constraints on the Jacobian of the transformation and its derivatives. The problem is modeled by an inequality constrained optimization problem which is efficiently solved by a combination of the multipliers method and the L-BFGS algorithm to handle the large number of variables and constraints of the registration of 3-D images. Numerical experiments are presented on magnetic resonance images using synthetic deformations and atlas based segmentation.

  15. The galaxy distribution and the large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M. J.; Kurtz, M. J.; De Lapparent, V.

    1986-01-01

    Data related to the large-scale galaxy distribution are discussed. The galaxy counts of Shane-Wirtanen (1967) are analyzed; the effects of residual systematic errors on the galaxy distribution measurements are considered. The analysis reveals that the Shane-Wirtanen data are not applicable to the study of large-scale structure. A model which is capable of measuring galaxy correlation functions on scales greater than about 10 Mpc is evaluated.

  16. The new discussion of a neutrino mass and issues in the formation of large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.

    1991-01-01

    It is argued that the discrepancy between the large-scale structure predicted by cosmological models with neutrino mass (hot dark matter) do not differ drastically from the observed structure. Evidence from the correlation amplitude, nonlinearity and the onset of galaxy formation, large-scale streaming velocities, and the topology of large-scale structure is considered. Hot dark matter models seem to be as accurate predictors of the large-scale structure as are cold dark matter models.

  17. Comparison of CMB lensing efficiency of gravitational waves and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2013-09-01

    We provide a detailed treatment and comparison of the weak lensing effects due to large scale structure (LSS), or scalar density perturbations and those due to gravitational waves (GWs) or tensor perturbations, on the temperature and polarization power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We carry out the analysis both in real space by using the correlation function method, as well as in the spherical harmonic space. We find an intriguing similarity between the lensing kernels associated with LSS lensing and GW lensing. It is found that the lensing kernels only differ in relative negative signs and their form is very reminiscent of even and odd parity bipolar spherical harmonic coefficients. Through a numerical study of these lensing kernels, we establish that lensing due to GW is more efficient at distorting the CMB spectra as compared to LSS lensing, particularly for the polarization power spectra. Finally we argue that the CMB B-mode power spectra measurements can be used to place interesting constraints on GW energy densities.

  18. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; ...

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  19. LUMINOUS RED GALAXY HALO DENSITY FIELD RECONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION TO LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Spergel, David N.; Bode, Paul E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    The nontrivial relationship between observations of galaxy positions in redshift space and the underlying matter field complicates our ability to determine the linear theory power spectrum and extract cosmological information from galaxy surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalog has the potential to place powerful constraints on cosmological parameters. LRGs are bright, highly biased tracers of large-scale structure. However, because they are highly biased, the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies to the galaxy power spectrum is large and fingers-of-God (FOGs) are significant. The combination of these effects leads to a {approx}10% correction in the underlying power spectrum at k = 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {approx}40% correction at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} in the LRG P(k) analysis of Tegmark et al., thereby compromising the cosmological constraints when this potentially large correction is left as a free parameter. We propose an alternative approach to recovering the matter field from galaxy observations. Our approach is to use halos rather than galaxies to trace the underlying mass distribution. We identify FOGs and replace each FOG with a single halo object. This removes the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies, the one-halo term. We test our method on a large set of high-fidelity mock SDSS LRG catalogs and find that the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field deviates from the underlying matter power spectrum at the {<=}1% level for k {<=} 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {<=}4% at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}. The reconstructed halo density field also removes the bias in the measurement of the redshift space distortion parameter {beta} induced by the FOG smearing of the linear redshift space distortions.

  20. Modification in drag of turbulent boundary layers resulting from manipulation of large-scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, T. C.; Guezennec, Y.; Nagib, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of placing a parallel-plate turbulence manipulator in a boundary layer are documented through flow visualization and hot wire measurements. The boundary layer manipulator was designed to manage the large scale structures of turbulence leading to a reduction in surface drag. The differences in the turbulent structure of the boundary layer are summarized to demonstrate differences in various flow properties. The manipulator inhibited the intermittent large scale structure of the turbulent boundary layer for at least 70 boundary layer thicknesses downstream. With the removal of the large scale, the streamwise turbulence intensity levels near the wall were reduced. The downstream distribution of the skin friction was also altered by the introduction of the manipulator.

  1. The Large-Scale Structure of Semantic Networks: Statistical Analyses and a Model of Semantic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyvers, Mark; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2005-01-01

    We present statistical analyses of the large-scale structure of 3 types of semantic networks: word associations, WordNet, and Roget's Thesaurus. We show that they have a small-world structure, characterized by sparse connectivity, short average path lengths between words, and strong local clustering. In addition, the distributions of the number of…

  2. Pulsar Rotation Measures and the Large-Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.; Manchester, R. N.; Lyne, A. G.; Qiao, G. J.; van Straten, W.

    2006-05-01

    The large-scale magnetic field of our Galaxy can be probed in three dimensions using Faraday rotation of pulsar signals. We report on the determination of 223 rotation measures from polarization observations of relatively distant southern pulsars made using the Parkes radio telescope. Combined with previously published observations, these data give clear evidence for large-scale counterclockwise fields (viewed from the north Galactic pole) in the spiral arms interior to the Sun and weaker evidence for a counterclockwise field in the Perseus arm. However, in interarm regions, including the solar neighborhood, we present evidence that suggests that large-scale fields are clockwise. We propose that the large-scale Galactic magnetic field has a bisymmetric structure with reversals on the boundaries of the spiral arms. Streaming motions associated with spiral density waves can directly generate such a structure from an initial, inwardly directed radial field. Large-scale fields increase toward the Galactic center, with a mean value of about 2 μG in the solar neighborhood and 4 μG at a galactocentric radius of 3 kpc.

  3. On the large-scale structures formed by wakes of open cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, Tetsuya; Morioka, Shoji; Miyoshi, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    Large-scale structures of the universe have been variously described as sheetlike, filamentary, cellular, bubbles or spongelike. Recently cosmic strings became one of viable candidates for a galaxy formation scenario, and some of the large-scale structures seem to be simply explained by the open cosmic strings. According to this scenario, sheets are wakes which are traces of moving open cosmic strings where dark matter and baryonic matter have accumulated. Filaments are intersections of such wakes and high density regions are places where three wakes intersect almost orthogonally. The wakes formed at t sub eq become the largest surface density among all wakes, where t sub eq is the epoch when matter density equals to radiation density. If we assume that there is one open cosmic string per each horizon, then it can be explained that the typical distances among wakes, filaments and clusters are also approx. 10(exp 2) Mpc. This model does not exclude a much more large scale structure. Open cosmic string may move even now and accumulate cold dark matter after its traces. However, the surface density is much smaller than the ones formed at t sub eq. From this model, it is expected that the typical high density region will have extended features such as six filaments and three sheets and be surrounded by eight empty regions (voids). Here, the authors are mainly concerned with such structures and have made numerical simulations for the formation of such large scale structures.

  4. DNS study of large-scale structures in a separated turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Mizobuchi, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Yuichi

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a separated flat-plate turbulent boundary layer have been carried out. The inlet data are prescribed by DNSs of a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with the rescaling-recycling method; blowing and suction are imposed at the upper boundary for producing a separation bubble. The Reynolds numbers at the inlet are set to be Reθ =300, 600 and 900, where Reθ is the Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity and the momentum thickness. Particular attention is given to large- scale structures existing in a separated region. Results indicate that large-scale organized structures of the streamwise velocity fluctuation appear in a detached shear layer when a large separated region is formed. The latter structures consist of positive and negative regions alternating in the spanwise direction with a spacing of about 2 ~ 3δ99 (δ99 denotes the 99% boundary layer thickness at the inlet), which become more apparent with increasing Reynolds number. They are most likely associated with large-scale spanwise meandering of the separation line. There is also close relationship between the large-scale structures and vortical structures, the latter tending to form vortex clusters where hairpin-like vortices are also observed.

  5. The small-world organization of large-scale brain systems and relationships with subcortical structures.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    Brain structure and function is characterized by large-scale brain systems. However, each system has its own "small-world" organization, with sub-regions, or "hubs," that have varying degrees of specialization for certain cognitive and behavioral processes. This article describes this small-world organization, and the concepts of functional specialization and functional integration are defined and explained through practical examples. We also describe the development of large-scale brain systems and this small-world organization as a sensitive, protracted process, vulnerable to a variety of influences that generate neurodevelopmental disorders.

  6. Phase transitions as the origin of large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    A review of the formation of large scale structure through gravitational growth of primordial perturbations is given. This is followed by a discussion of how symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe might have produced the required perturbations, in particular through the formation and evolution of a network of cosmic strings.

  7. Large-scale structure in the universe. Proceedings. Conference, London (UK), 25 - 26 Mar 1998.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Universe: large-scale structure, early Universe: quantum fluctuations, microwave background radiation studies, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, galaxy clustering evolution, the CNOC2 Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, quasar clustering.

  8. Structure of isolated large-scale inhomogeneities in the outer ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Iu. K.; Romanchuk, A. A.

    1991-03-01

    The structure of large-scale inhomogeneities in the outer ionosphere is examined with reference to Thomson scattering data. The dependence of delta Ne/Ne and delta Ne on the local coordinates is established. The shape function is also examined.

  9. How CMB and large-scale structure constrain chameleon interacting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Boriero, Daniel; Das, Subinoy; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: subinoy@iiap.res.in

    2015-07-01

    We explore a chameleon type of interacting dark matter-dark energy scenario in which a scalar field adiabatically traces the minimum of an effective potential sourced by the dark matter density. We discuss extensively the effect of this coupling on cosmological observables, especially the parameter degeneracies expected to arise between the model parameters and other cosmological parameters, and then test the model against observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and other cosmological probes. We find that the chameleon parameters α and β, which determine respectively the slope of the scalar field potential and the dark matter-dark energy coupling strength, can be constrained to α < 0.17 and β < 0.19 using CMB data and measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. The latter parameter in particular is constrained only by the late Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Adding measurements of the local Hubble expansion rate H{sub 0} tightens the bound on α by a factor of two, although this apparent improvement is arguably an artefact of the tension between the local measurement and the H{sub 0} value inferred from Planck data in the minimal ΛCDM model. The same argument also precludes chameleon models from mimicking a dark radiation component, despite a passing similarity between the two scenarios in that they both delay the epoch of matter-radiation equality. Based on the derived parameter constraints, we discuss possible signatures of the model for ongoing and future large-scale structure surveys.

  10. Large-Scale Computations Leading to a First-Principles Approach to Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W E; Navratil, P

    2003-08-18

    We report on large-scale applications of the ab initio, no-core shell model with the primary goal of achieving an accurate description of nuclear structure from the fundamental inter-nucleon interactions. In particular, we show that realistic two-nucleon interactions are inadequate to describe the low-lying structure of {sup 10}B, and that realistic three-nucleon interactions are essential.

  11. Weak lensing of large scale structure in the presence of screening

    SciTech Connect

    Tessore, Nicolas; Metcalf, R. Benton; Giocoli, Carlo E-mail: hans.winther@astro.ox.ac.uk E-mail: pedro.ferreira@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-10-01

    A number of alternatives to general relativity exhibit gravitational screening in the non-linear regime of structure formation. We describe a set of algorithms that can produce weak lensing maps of large scale structure in such theories and can be used to generate mock surveys for cosmological analysis. By analysing a few basic statistics we indicate how these alternatives can be distinguished from general relativity with future weak lensing surveys.

  12. Automated tracing of open-field coronal structures for an optimized large-scale magnetic field reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter will provide detailed measurements in the inner heliosphere magnetically connected with the topologically complex and eruptive solar corona. Interpretation of these measurements will require accurate reconstruction of the large-scale coronal magnetic field. In a related presentation by S. Jones et al., we argue that such reconstruction can be performed using photospheric extrapolation methods constrained by white-light coronagraph images. Here, we present the image-processing component of this project dealing with an automated segmentation of fan-like coronal loop structures. In contrast to the existing segmentation codes designed for detecting small-scale closed loops in the vicinity of active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal features observed at significant radial distances from the solar surface. The coronagraph images used for the loop segmentation are transformed into a polar coordinate system and undergo radial detrending and initial noise reduction. The preprocessed images are subject to an adaptive second order differentiation combining radial and azimuthal directions. An adjustable thresholding technique is applied to identify candidate coronagraph features associated with the large-scale coronal field. A blob detection algorithm is used to extract valid features and discard noisy data pixels. The obtained features are interpolated using higher-order polynomials which are used to derive empirical directional constraints for magnetic field extrapolation procedures based on photospheric magnetograms.

  13. Emergence of coherent structures and large-scale flows in motile suspensions.

    PubMed

    Saintillan, David; Shelley, Michael J

    2012-03-07

    The emergence of coherent structures, large-scale flows and correlated dynamics in suspensions of motile particles such as swimming micro-organisms or artificial microswimmers is studied using direct particle simulations. A detailed model is proposed for a slender rod-like particle that propels itself in a viscous fluid by exerting a prescribed tangential stress on its surface, and a method is devised for the efficient calculation of hydrodynamic interactions in large-scale suspensions of such particles using slender-body theory and a smooth particle-mesh Ewald algorithm. Simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions for various system sizes and suspension volume fractions, and demonstrate a transition to large-scale correlated motions in suspensions of rear-actuated swimmers, or Pushers, above a critical volume fraction or system size. This transition, which is not observed in suspensions of head-actuated swimmers, or Pullers, is seen most clearly in particle velocity and passive tracer statistics. These observations are consistent with predictions from our previous mean-field kinetic theory, one of which states that instabilities will arise in uniform isotropic suspensions of Pushers when the product of the linear system size with the suspension volume fraction exceeds a given threshold. We also find that the collective dynamics of Pushers result in giant number fluctuations, local alignment of swimmers and strongly mixing flows. Suspensions of Pullers, which evince no large-scale dynamics, nonetheless display interesting deviations from the random isotropic state.

  14. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to resum the effect of large scale motions in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because the linear power spectrum in ΛCDM is not scale free the effects of the large scale flows are enhanced. Although previous EFT calculations of the equal-time density power spectrum at one and two loops showed a remarkable agreement with numerical results, they also showed a 2% residual which appeared related to the BAO oscillations. We show that this was indeed the case, explain the physical origin and show how a Lagrangian based calculation removes this differences. We propose a simple method to upgrade existing Eulerian calculations to effectively make them Lagrangian and compare the new results with existing fits to numerical simulations. Our new two-loop results agrees with numerical results up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} to within 1% with no oscillatory residuals. We also compute power spectra involving momentum which is significantly more affected by the large scale flows. We show how keeping track of these velocities significantly enhances the UV reach of the momentum power spectrum in addition to removing the BAO related residuals. We compute predictions for the real space correlation function around the BAO scale and investigate its sensitivity to the EFT parameters and the details of the resummation technique.

  15. Mechanism design and dynamic analysis of a large-scale spatial deployable structure for space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanling; Lin, Qiuhong; Wang, Xingze; Li, Lin; Cong, Qiang; Pan, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The deployable structure is critical to the overall success of the space mission. This paper introduces a large-scale spatial deployable structure (SDS), which is developed to deploy and support the payload panels in a precise configuration once on the track. And segmental researching in the design, kinematics and dynamics analysis of SDS's prototyping system are presented. Geometric construction method and Bar-groups method are adopted to analysis the dimensions and coordinates of the SDS, which finally construct an well-determined mathematical model to raise the productivity and efficiency during optimization and analysis work. Be reasoned with the large-scale of the truss structures, flexible multibody dynamic simulations are developed, which present much more authentic stress transfer and kinematics behaviors. According to the deployment experiments of SDS's prototyping system, the correctness and validity of the flexible multibody simulation work are well proved.

  16. TOPOLOGY OF A LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE AS A TEST OF MODIFIED GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Chen Xuelei; Park, Changbom

    2012-03-01

    The genus of the isodensity contours is a robust measure of the topology of a large-scale structure, and it is relatively insensitive to nonlinear gravitational evolution, galaxy bias, and redshift-space distortion. We show that the growth of density fluctuations is scale dependent even in the linear regime in some modified gravity theories, which opens a new possibility of testing the theories observationally. We propose to use the genus of the isodensity contours, an intrinsic measure of the topology of the large-scale structure, as a statistic to be used in such tests. In Einstein's general theory of relativity, density fluctuations grow at the same rate on all scales in the linear regime, and the genus per comoving volume is almost conserved as structures grow homologously, so we expect that the genus-smoothing-scale relation is basically time independent. However, in some modified gravity models where structures grow with different rates on different scales, the genus-smoothing-scale relation should change over time. This can be used to test the gravity models with large-scale structure observations. We study the cases of the f(R) theory, DGP braneworld theory as well as the parameterized post-Friedmann models. We also forecast how the modified gravity models can be constrained with optical/IR or redshifted 21 cm radio surveys in the near future.

  17. Computation of Large-Scale Structure Jet Noise Sources With Weak Nonlinear Effects Using Linear Euler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Hixon, Ray; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    2003-01-01

    An approximate technique is presented for the prediction of the large-scale turbulent structure sound source in a supersonic jet. A linearized Euler equations code is used to solve for the flow disturbances within and near a jet with a given mean flow. Assuming a normal mode composition for the wave-like disturbances, the linear radial profiles are used in an integration of the Navier-Stokes equations. This results in a set of ordinary differential equations representing the weakly nonlinear self-interactions of the modes along with their interaction with the mean flow. Solutions are then used to correct the amplitude of the disturbances that represent the source of large-scale turbulent structure sound in the jet.

  18. Multiscaling and nonextensivity of large-scale structures in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, F. M.; Wuensche, C. A.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Rosa, R. R.

    2002-08-01

    There has been a trend in the past decade to describe the large-scale structures in the Universe as a (multi)fractal set. However, one of the main objections raised by the opponents of this approach deals with the transition to homogeneity. Moreover, they claim there is not enough sampling space to determine a scaling index which characterizes a (multi)fractal set. In this work we propose an alternative solution to this problem, using the generalized thermostatistics formalism. We show that applying the idea of nonextensivity, intrinsic to this approach, it is possible to derive an expression for the correlation function, describing the scaling properties of large-scale structures in the Universe and the transition to homogeneity, which is in good agreement with observational data.

  19. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops and cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Some results from a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops are presented. It is found that even though G x mu is required to be lower than 2 x 10 to the -6th (where mu is the mass per unit length of the string) to give a low enough autocorrelation amplitude, there is excessive power on smaller scales, so that galaxies would be more dense than observed. The large-scale structure does not include a filamentary or connected appearance and shares with more conventional models based on Gaussian perturbations the lack of cluster-cluster correlation at the mean cluster separation scale as well as excessively small bulk velocities at these scales.

  20. Turbulence and magnetic fields in the large-scale structure of the universe.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung; Cho, Jungyeon; Das, Santabrata

    2008-05-16

    The nature and origin of turbulence and magnetic fields in the intergalactic space are important problems that are yet to be understood. We propose a scenario in which turbulent-flow motions are induced via the cascade of the vorticity generated at cosmological shocks during the formation of the large-scale structure. The turbulence in turn amplifies weak seed magnetic fields of any origin. Supercomputer simulations show that the turbulence is subsonic inside clusters and groups of galaxies, whereas it is transonic or mildly supersonic in filaments. Based on a turbulence dynamo model, we then estimated that the average magnetic field strength would be a few microgauss (microG) inside clusters and groups, approximately 0.1 muG around clusters and groups, and approximately 10 nanogauss in filaments. Our model presents a physical mechanism that transfers the gravitational energy to the turbulence and magnetic field energies in the large-scale structure of the universe.

  1. Scalar-fluid theories: cosmological perturbations and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, Tomi S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Tamanini, Nicola E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu

    2015-09-01

    Recently a new Lagrangian framework was introduced to describe interactions between scalar fields and relativistic perfect fluids. This allows two consistent generalizations of coupled quintessence models: non-vanishing pressures and a new type of derivative interaction. The implications of these to the formation of cosmological large-scale structure are uncovered here at the linear order. The full perturbation equations in the two cases are derived in a unified formalism and their Newtonian, quasi-static limit is studied analytically. Requiring the absence of an effective sound speed term in the coupled dark matter fluid restricts the Lagrangian to be a linear function of the matter number density. This leaves new potentially viable classes of both algebraically and derivatively interacting models wherein the coupling may impact the background expansion dynamics and imprint new signatures into the large-scale structure.

  2. Spatio-Temporal Complexity and Large-Scale Structures in Problems of Continuum Mechanic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-15

    TEMPORAL COMPLEXITY & LARGE SCALE STRUCTURES IN PROBLEMS OF CONTINUUM MECHANICS" (U) 61103D 3484/D7 (URI) 6. AUTHOR(S) Drs. Basil Nicolaenko, Dieter...orbits on-the attractor. We have applied our method to two experimental data sets from Taylor-Couette flows . 14. SUBJECT TERMS -WS.-UMBER OF PAGES’ 14 S...8217 .. . .,16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 1. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19., SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION OFA. OF REPORT OF THIS

  3. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Melott, Adrian L.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of large-scale structure formation from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos are described. The linear power spectrum in this model resembles the cold-dark-matter power spectrum. Galaxy formation begins early, and the final distribution consists of isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, leading to a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. The distribution of clustered matter has a filamentary appearance with large voids.

  4. Implications of a class of grand unified theories for large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    A class of grand unified theories in which cosmologicaly significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is discussed. To obtain large scale structure three scenarios are considered: (1) an inflationary scenario; (2) inflation followed by string production; and (3) a non-inflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. Inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that mega 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  5. Mapping 3D Large-Scale Structure at z ˜2 with Lyman-α Forest Tomographic Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, J. F.; White, M.; Croft, R. A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Schlegel, D. J.; Suzuki, N.; Kneib, J.; Bailey, S. J.; Spergel, D. N.; Rix, H.; Strauss, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-α (Lyα) forest absorption at z>2 traces the underlying dark-matter distribution, and with a sufficient density of background sightlines can be used to create 3D tomographic maps of large-scale structure. Since the useful Lyα forest in each sightline spans ˜400-500 h-1Mpc, Lyα forest tomography can efficiently map out large-scale structure at z˜2. The Cosmic Lyman-Alpha Program for the Tomographic Reconstruction of Absorption Probes (CLAPTRAP) will be the first survey to attempt this technique. We aim to obtain spectra for a background grid of faint quasars and bright LBGs at 2large-scale structure at z>1. In conjunction with the rich multi-wavelength data from the COSMOS survey, these maps will facilitate the study of galaxies in the context of the large-scale environment, reveal the topology of large-scale structure at high-redshifts, and allow the direct detection of galaxy protoclusters at the intersections of the cosmic web. The

  6. Large-scale structure effects on the gravitational lens image positions and time delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seljak, Uros

    1994-01-01

    We compute the fluctuations in gravitational lens image positions and time delay caused by large-scale structure correlations. We show that these fluctuations can be expressed as a simple integral over the density power spectrum. Using the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization we find that positions of objects at cosmological distances are expected to deviate from their true positions by few arcminutes. These deflections are not directly observable. The positions of the images relative to one another fluctuate by a few percent of the relative separation, implying that one does not expect multiple images to be produced by large-scale structure. Nevertheless, the fluctuations are larger than the observational errors on the positions and affect reconstructions of the lens potential. The time delay fluctuations have a geometrical and a gravitational contribution. Both are much larger than the expected time delay from the primary lens, but partially cancel each other. We find that large-scale structure weakly affects the time delay and time delay measurements can be used as a probe of the distance scale in the universe.

  7. Simultaneous effect of modified gravity and primordial non-Gaussianity in large scale structure observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzatuny, Nareg; Khosravi, Shahram; Baghram, Shant; Moshafi, Hossein E-mail: khosravi@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: hosseinmoshafi@iasbs.ac.ir

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the simultaneous effect of primordial non-Gaussianity and the modification of the gravity in f(R) framework on large scale structure observations. We show that non-Gaussianity and modified gravity introduce a scale dependent bias and growth rate functions. The deviation from ΛCDM in the case of primordial non-Gaussian models is in large scales, while the growth rate deviates from ΛCDM in small scales for modified gravity theories. We show that the redshift space distortion can be used to distinguish positive and negative f{sub NL} in standard background, while in f(R) theories they are not easily distinguishable. The galaxy power spectrum is generally enhanced in presence of non-Gaussianity and modified gravity. We also obtain the scale dependence of this enhancement. Finally we define galaxy growth rate and galaxy growth rate bias as new observational parameters to constrain cosmology.

  8. Energetics and Structural Characterization of the large-scale Functional Motion of Adenylate Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formoso, Elena; Limongelli, Vittorio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Adenylate Kinase (AK) is a signal transducing protein that regulates cellular energy homeostasis balancing between different conformations. An alteration of its activity can lead to severe pathologies such as heart failure, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A comprehensive elucidation of the large-scale conformational motions that rule the functional mechanism of this enzyme is of great value to guide rationally the development of new medications. Here using a metadynamics-based computational protocol we elucidate the thermodynamics and structural properties underlying the AK functional transitions. The free energy estimation of the conformational motions of the enzyme allows characterizing the sequence of events that regulate its action. We reveal the atomistic details of the most relevant enzyme states, identifying residues such as Arg119 and Lys13, which play a key role during the conformational transitions and represent druggable spots to design enzyme inhibitors. Our study offers tools that open new areas of investigation on large-scale motion in proteins.

  9. Narrow-line Seyfert Galaxies. Connection between abundance and the large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermash, A. A.; Komberg, B. V.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing methods, developed by the author the correlations between spatial concentrations of active nuclei (NLS and BLS) and concentration of galaxies of full uniform sample were obtained. Galaxies of this uniform sample trace the large-scale structure. We used SDSS DR 7 data. The correlations obtained are linear and the NLS/BLS ratio is constant. That leads to conclusion that amounts NLS and BLS are some fixed portion of all galaxies independent on the density of large-scale environment. In order to check validity of our results we also confirmed the well known result that fraction of red galaxies increases with density of environment. Also it was confirmed that this trend is more prominent for less massive galaxies.

  10. Resurrecting hot dark matter - Large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    These are the results of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a universe dominated by massive neutrinos (hot dark matter). This model has several desirable features. The final matter distribution contains isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, producing a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. Because baryons can accrete onto the cosmic strings before the neutrinos, the galaxies will have baryon cores and dark neutrino halos. Galaxy formation in this model begins much earlier than in random-phase models. On large scales the distribution of clustered matter visually resembles the CfA survey, with large voids and filaments.

  11. Large-scale chromatin structure of inducible genes: transcription on a condensed, linear template

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Kireev, Igor; Plutz, Matt; Ashourian, Nazanin

    2009-01-01

    The structure of interphase chromosomes, and in particular the changes in large-scale chromatin structure accompanying transcriptional activation, remain poorly characterized. Here we use light microscopy and in vivo immunogold labeling to directly visualize the interphase chromosome conformation of 1–2 Mbp chromatin domains formed by multi-copy BAC transgenes containing 130–220 kb of genomic DNA surrounding the DHFR, Hsp70, or MT gene loci. We demonstrate near-endogenous transcription levels in the context of large-scale chromatin fibers compacted nonuniformly well above the 30-nm chromatin fiber. An approximately 1.5–3-fold extension of these large-scale chromatin fibers accompanies transcriptional induction and active genes remain mobile. Heat shock–induced Hsp70 transgenes associate with the exterior of nuclear speckles, with Hsp70 transcripts accumulating within the speckle. Live-cell imaging reveals distinct dynamic events, with Hsp70 transgenes associating with adjacent speckles, nucleating new speckles, or moving to preexisting speckles. Our results call for reexamination of classical models of interphase chromosome organization. PMID:19349581

  12. Weak gravitational lensing due to large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroszynski, Michal; Park, Changbom; Paczynski, Bohdan; Gott, J. Richard, III

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the large-scale structure of the universe on the propagation of light rays is studied. The development of the large-scale density fluctuations in the omega = 1 universe is calculated within the cold dark matter scenario using a smooth particle approximation. The propagation of about 10 to the 6th random light rays between the redshift z = 5 and the observer was followed. It is found that the effect of shear is negligible, and the amplification of single images is dominated by the matter in the beam. The spread of amplifications is very small. Therefore, the filled-beam approximation is very good for studies of strong lensing by galaxies or clusters of galaxies. In the simulation, the column density was averaged over a comoving area of approximately (1/h Mpc)-squared. No case of a strong gravitational lensing was found, i.e., no 'over-focused' image that would suggest that a few images might be present. Therefore, the large-scale structure of the universe as it is presently known does not produce multiple images with gravitational lensing on a scale larger than clusters of galaxies.

  13. The BAHAMAS project: calibrated hydrodynamical simulations for large-scale structure cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop; Bird, Simeon; Le Brun, Amandine M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of the large-scale distribution of matter is sensitive to a variety of fundamental parameters that characterize the dark matter, dark energy, and other aspects of our cosmological framework. Since the majority of the mass density is in the form of dark matter that cannot be directly observed, to do cosmology with large-scale structure, one must use observable (baryonic) quantities that trace the underlying matter distribution in a (hopefully) predictable way. However, recent numerical studies have demonstrated that the mapping between observable and total mass, as well as the total mass itself, are sensitive to unresolved feedback processes associated with galaxy formation, motivating explicit calibration of the feedback efficiencies. Here, we construct a new suite of large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulations (called BAHAMAS, for BAryons and HAloes of MAssive Systems), where subgrid models of stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback have been calibrated to reproduce the present-day galaxy stellar mass function and the hot gas mass fractions of groups and clusters in order to ensure the effects of feedback on the overall matter distribution are broadly correct. We show that the calibrated simulations reproduce an unprecedentedly wide range of properties of massive systems, including the various observed mappings between galaxies, hot gas, total mass, and black holes, and represent a significant advance in our ability to mitigate the primary systematic uncertainty in most present large-scale structure tests.

  14. Thick strings, the liquid crystal blue phase, and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model based on the liquid crystal blue phase is proposed as a model for a late-time cosmological phase transition. Topological defects, in particular thick strings and/or domain walls, are presented as seeds for structure formation. It is shown that the observed large-scale structure, including quasi-periodic wall structure, can be well fitted in the model without violating the microwave background isotropy bound or the limits from induced gravitational waves and the millisecond pulsar timing. Furthermore, such late-time transitions can produce objects such as quasars at high redshifts. The model appears to work with either cold or hot dark matter.

  15. On the large-scale structure of the turbulent wake of a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovic, S.; Ramaprian, B. R.

    1989-01-01

    A simple heat-tagging technique was used to isolate and analyze the large-scale coherent structures present in the two-dimensional wake of a flat plate. The results indicate the presence of these coherent structures even at 250 momentum thicknesses downstream of the trailing edge. These structures have a vortexlike topology and carry a significant amount of the total shear stress. The present results for the flat-plate wake seem to be in general agreement with those that have been obtained in cylinder wakes by other comtemporary investigators using more complex techniques of eduction and signal enhancement.

  16. Dark matter, long-range forces, and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradwohl, Ben-Ami; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1992-01-01

    If the dark matter in galaxies and clusters is nonbaryonic, it can interact with additional long-range fields that are invisible to experimental tests of the equivalence principle. We discuss the astrophysical and cosmological implications of a long-range force coupled only to the dark matter and find rather tight constraints on its strength. If the force is repulsive (attractive), the masses of galaxy groups and clusters (and the mean density of the universe inferred from them) have been systematically underestimated (overestimated). We explore the consequent effects on the two-point correlation function, large-scale velocity flows, and microwave background anisotropies, for models with initial scale-invariant adiabatic perturbations and cold dark matter.

  17. On the renormalization of the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pajer, Enrico; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2013-08-01

    Standard perturbation theory (SPT) for large-scale matter inhomogeneities is unsatisfactory for at least three reasons: there is no clear expansion parameter since the density contrast is not small on all scales; it does not fully account for deviations at large scales from a perfect pressureless fluid induced by short-scale non-linearities; for generic initial conditions, loop corrections are UV-divergent, making predictions cutoff dependent and hence unphysical. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures successfully addresses all three issues. Here we focus on the third one and show explicitly that the terms induced by integrating out short scales, neglected in SPT, have exactly the right scale dependence to cancel all UV-divergences at one loop, and this should hold at all loops. A particularly clear example is an Einstein deSitter universe with no-scale initial conditions P{sub in} ∼ k{sup n}. After renormalizing the theory, we use self-similarity to derive a very simple result for the final power spectrum for any n, excluding two-loop corrections and higher. We show how the relative importance of different corrections depends on n. For n ∼ −1.5, relevant for our universe, pressure and dissipative corrections are more important than the two-loop corrections.

  18. The origin of large scale structure in mantle convection: Effects of plate motions and viscosity stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunge, Hans-Peter; Richards, Mark A.

    Convection in Earth's mantle is dominated by long-wavelength structure, as evidenced by the very “red” spectra of both seismic velocity heterogeneity in the deep mantle and the non-hydrostatic gravity field, or geoid. Here we show that this large-scale structure may be a consequence of two factors that influence the scale of mantle convection. First, the existence of surface plates, which tend to organize the flow. Second, a substantial increase in lower mantle viscosity for which there is considerable independent geophysical evidence. Combining these two factors in 3-D spherical mantle convection models explains rather well the observed seismic spectrum of mantle heterogeneity.

  19. Bayesian inference of the initial conditions from large-scale structure surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of three-dimensional cosmological surveys has the potential to answer outstanding questions on the initial conditions from which structure appeared, and therefore on the very high energy physics at play in the early Universe. We report on recently proposed statistical data analysis methods designed to study the primordial large-scale structure via physical inference of the initial conditions in a fully Bayesian framework, and applications to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7. We illustrate how this approach led to a detailed characterization of the dynamic cosmic web underlying the observed galaxy distribution, based on the tidal environment.

  20. Large-scale Structure around a z=2.1 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Casey, Caitlin M.; Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Capak, Peter L.; Cowley, Michael J.; Darvish, Behnam; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Kovač, K.; Lilly, Simon J.; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Spitler, Lee R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Yuan, Tiantian

    2016-08-01

    The most prodigious starburst galaxies are absent in massive galaxy clusters today, but their connection with large-scale environments is less clear at z≳ 2. We present a search of large-scale structure around a galaxy cluster core at z = 2.095 using a set of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies. We find that both color-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) show significant overdensities around the z = 2.095 cluster. A total of eight DSFGs (including three X-ray luminous active galactic nuclei, AGNs) and 34 SFGs are found within a 10‧ radius (corresponds to ˜15 cMpc at z˜ 2.1) from the cluster center and within a redshift range of {{Δ }}z=0.02, which leads to galaxy overdensities of {δ }{{DSFG}}˜ 12.3 and {δ }{{SFG}}˜ 2.8. The cluster core and the extended DSFG- and SFG-rich structures together demonstrate an active cluster formation phase, in which the cluster is accreting a significant amount of material from large-scale structure while the more mature core may begin to virialize. Our finding of this DSFG-rich structure, along with a number of other protoclusters with excess DSFGs and AGNs found to date, suggest that the overdensities of these rare sources indeed trace significant mass overdensities. However, it remains puzzling how these intense star formers are triggered concurrently. Although an increased probability of galaxy interactions and/or enhanced gas supply can trigger the excess of DSFGs, our stacking analysis based on 850 μm images and morphological analysis based on rest-frame optical imaging do not show such enhancements of merger fraction and gas content in this structure.

  1. Giant radio galaxies as effective probes of X-ray gas in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Malarecki, Jurek; Jones, Heath; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2015-08-01

    Giant radio galaxies are AGNs with relativistic jets that dynamically evolve into Mpc scale synchrotron lobes around the host elliptical. The thermal gas environment influences the jet advance and lobe formation. Since the host ellipticals are in filamentary low-density galaxy environments, the ambient gas for the Mpc-scale radio structures is likely the warm-hot X-ray gas inhabiting the intergalactic medium. We have, therefore, used large radio galaxies as probes of the distribution of hot and tenuous gas on mega-parsec scales in these relatively low density large-scale structures.For a sample of 19 giant radio galaxies we obtained radio continuum images of the synchrotron structures, and redshifts of a total of nearly 9000 galaxies in their vicinity. The 2-degree field redshift data traces the large-scale galaxy structure around the radio sources. The radio-optical data allows an estimation of the pressure, temperature and distribution of hot thermal gas associated with the large-scale structure in the vicinity of the radio AGN (Malarecki, Staveley-Smith, Saripalli, Subrahmanyan, Jones, Duffy, Rioja 2013, MNRAS 432, 200).Strong correspondence between radio galaxy lobes and galaxy distribution is observed. The data suggests that galaxies trace gas, and that radio jets and lobes of giant radio galaxies are sensitive tracers of gas on mega-parsec scales and may be used as effective probes of the difficult-to-detect IGM (Malarecki, Jones, Saripalli, Stavele-Smith, Subrahmanyan, 2015, MNRAS in press; arXiv150203954).

  2. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  3. Multi-thread parallel algorithm for reconstructing 3D large-scale porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Yang; Huang, Yaohui; Zheng, Jiangtao; Qian, Xu; Xie, Heping; Zhao, Xi

    2017-04-01

    Geomaterials inherently contain many discontinuous, multi-scale, geometrically irregular pores, forming a complex porous structure that governs their mechanical and transport properties. The development of an efficient reconstruction method for representing porous structures can significantly contribute toward providing a better understanding of the governing effects of porous structures on the properties of porous materials. In order to improve the efficiency of reconstructing large-scale porous structures, a multi-thread parallel scheme was incorporated into the simulated annealing reconstruction method. In the method, four correlation functions, which include the two-point probability function, the linear-path functions for the pore phase and the solid phase, and the fractal system function for the solid phase, were employed for better reproduction of the complex well-connected porous structures. In addition, a random sphere packing method and a self-developed pre-conditioning method were incorporated to cast the initial reconstructed model and select independent interchanging pairs for parallel multi-thread calculation, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by examining the similarity between the reconstructed structure and a prototype in terms of their geometrical, topological, and mechanical properties. Comparisons of the reconstruction efficiency of porous models with various scales indicated that the parallel multi-thread scheme significantly shortened the execution time for reconstruction of a large-scale well-connected porous model compared to a sequential single-thread procedure.

  4. Spatial properties of large-scale structure in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinyul; Lee, Jin; Jung, Seo Yoon; Zaki, Tamer A.; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) database of a zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer was scrutinized to investigate the spatial distribution of vortices around a streamwise-elongated low-speed structure. The turbulent flow field has been numerically produced by preceding the bypass transition simulation using the isotropic free-stream turbulence, in which the Reynolds number reaches up to Reθ = 3280 . In the present study, the low-speed structures and vortices have been identified and tracked in order to obtain spatial properties of the large-scale structures. The information about the inclination angle, distance and population of individual vortices on the long streamwise structure has been investigated. Finally, the present study provides statistical evidence on the formation of large-scale packet-like structure and its variation along the downstream. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2013-003364) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and partially supported by KISTI under the Strategic Supercomputing Support Program.

  5. Coherent large-scale structures in high Reynolds number supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Burrin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The flow structure of a 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter jet operated at a full expanded Mach number of 1.37, with Reynolds numbers in the range 1.7 to 2.35 million, was examined for the first 20 jet diameters. To facilitate the study of the large scale structure, and determine any coherence, a discrete tone acoustic excitation method was used. Phase locked flow visualization as well as laser velocimeter quantitative measurements were made. The main conclusions derived from this study are: (1) large scale coherent like turbulence structures do exist in large Reynolds number supersonic jets, and they prevail even beyond the potential core; (2) the most preferential Strouhal number for these structures is in the vicinity of 0.4; and (3) quantitatively, the peak amplitudes of these structures are rather low, and are about 1% of the jet exit velocity. Finally, since a number of unique problems related to LV measurements in supersonic jets were encountered, a summary of these problems and lessons learned therefrom are also reported.

  6. Diffusion on complex networks: a way to probe their large-scale topological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Ingve; Astrup Eriksen, Kasper; Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2004-05-01

    A diffusion process on complex networks is introduced in order to uncover their large-scale topological structures. This is achieved by focusing on the slowest decaying diffusive modes of the network. The proposed procedure is applied to real-world networks like a friendship network of known modular structure, and an Internet routing network. For the friendship network, its known structure is well reproduced. In case of the Internet, where the structure is far less well known, one indeed finds a modular structure, and modules can roughly be associated with individual countries. Quantitatively, the modular structure of the Internet manifests itself in an approximately 10 times larger participation ratio of its slowest decaying modes as compared to the null model-a random scale-free network. The extreme edges of the Internet are found to correspond to Russian and US military sites.

  7. Computational Speed-Up of Complex Durability Analysis of Large-Scale Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O; Abdi, Frank; Dutton, Renly; Cochran, Ernest J

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of modern structures for aerospace, infrastructure, and automotive engineering applications necessitates the use of larger and larger computational models for accurate prediction of structural response. The ever-increasing size of computational structural mechanics simulations imposes a pressing need for commensurate increases in computational speed to keep costs and computation times in check. Innovative methods are needed to expedite the numerical analysis of complex structures while minimizing computational costs. The need for these methodologies is even more critical when performing durability and damage tolerance evaluation as the computation is repeated a number of times for various loading conditions. This paper describes a breakthrough for efficient and accurate predictive methodologies that are amenable to the analysis of progressive failure, reliability, and optimization of large-scale composite structures or structural components.

  8. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at two loops

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k{sub NL}, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields. We find that the EFTofLSS prediction at two loops matches to percent accuracy the non-linear matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1}, requiring just one unknown coefficient that needs to be fit to observations. Given that Standard Perturbation Theory stops converging at redshift zero at k∼ 0.1 h Mpc{sup −1}, our results demonstrate the possibility of accessing a factor of order 200 more dark matter quasi-linear modes than naively expected. If the remaining observational challenges to accessing these modes can be addressed with similar success, our results show that there is tremendous potential for large scale structure surveys to explore the primordial universe.

  9. Bias to CMB lensing measurements from the bispectrum of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Vanessa; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sherwin, Blake D.

    2016-08-01

    The rapidly improving precision of measurements of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) also requires a corresponding increase in the precision of theoretical modeling. A commonly made approximation is to model the CMB deflection angle or lensing potential as a Gaussian random field. In this paper, however, we analytically quantify the influence of the non-Gaussianity of large-scale structure (LSS) lenses, arising from nonlinear structure formation, on CMB lensing measurements. In particular, evaluating the impact of the nonzero bispectrum of large-scale structure on the relevant CMB four-point correlation functions, we find that there is a bias to estimates of the CMB lensing power spectrum. For temperature-based lensing reconstruction with CMB stage III and stage IV experiments, we find that this lensing power spectrum bias is negative and is of order 1% of the signal. This corresponds to a shift of multiple standard deviations for these upcoming experiments. We caution, however, that our numerical calculation only evaluates two of the largest bias terms and, thus, only provides an approximate estimate of the full bias. We conclude that further investigation into lensing biases from nonlinear structure formation is required and that these biases should be accounted for in future lensing analyses.

  10. Role of magnetic shear in dynamics of large-scale structures in electron temperature gradient turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.; Miyato, N.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate how the magnetic shear governs the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as zonal flows and streamers, in electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence. Based on the well-known 2D Hasegawa-Mima turbulence modeling, which is the inviscid version of fluid (or gyrofluid) ETG turbulence [1], we derive a general dispersion relation of secondary fluctuations through modulation instability analysis. The results show that the formation of different large-scale structures including zonal flow, streamer and so-called generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (GKH) mode in ETG turbulence depends on the spectral anisotropy of turbulent fluctuation. In a slab geometry, the magnetic shear closely relates to the ETG mode structures so that it may determine the pattern selection in the quasi-steady ETG turbulence. 3D gyrofluid slab ETG simulations show that turbulent ETG fluctuation energy condenses to the zonal flows in the weak shear plasmas and to the streamer component for the high shears. 2D ETG simulations with rather high resolution not only exhibits the global spectral distribution of zonal flows, but also further confirm a mechanism: enhanced zonal flow in weak shear ETG turbulence is limited by exciting a KH mode [1]. Furthermore, in toroidal ETG simulations, streamer structures are observed at around good curvature region along the flux tube in the quasisteady state in some medium shear regime. Related streamer dynamics are also investigated. [1] Jiquan Li and Y. Kishimoto, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1493(2004)

  11. Networks of silicon nanowires: A large-scale atomistic electronic structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keleş, Ümit; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Liedke, Bartosz; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2013-11-11

    Networks of silicon nanowires possess intriguing electronic properties surpassing the predictions based on quantum confinement of individual nanowires. Employing large-scale atomistic pseudopotential computations, as yet unexplored branched nanostructures are investigated in the subsystem level as well as in full assembly. The end product is a simple but versatile expression for the bandgap and band edge alignments of multiply-crossing Si nanowires for various diameters, number of crossings, and wire orientations. Further progress along this line can potentially topple the bottom-up approach for Si nanowire networks to a top-down design by starting with functionality and leading to an enabling structure.

  12. Topology of large-scale structure. IV - Topology in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Cohen, Alexander P.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Weinberg, David H.

    1989-01-01

    In a recent series of papers, an algorithm was developed for quantitatively measuring the topology of the large-scale structure of the universe and this algorithm was applied to numerical models and to three-dimensional observational data sets. In this paper, it is shown that topological information can be derived from a two-dimensional cross section of a density field, and analytic expressions are given for a Gaussian random field. The application of a two-dimensional numerical algorithm for measuring topology to cross sections of three-dimensional models is demonstrated.

  13. Dusty Starbursts within a z=3 Large Scale Structure revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehata, Hideki

    The role of the large-scale structure is one of the most important theme in studying galaxy formation and evolution. However, it has been still mystery especially at z>2. On the basis of our ALMA 1.1 mm observations in a z ~ 3 protocluster field, it is suggested that submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) preferentially reside in the densest environment at z ~ 3. Furthermore we find a rich cluster of AGN-host SMGs at the core of the protocluster, combining with Chandra X-ray data. Our results indicate the vigorous star-formation and accelerated super massive black hole (SMBH) growth in the node of the cosmic web.

  14. Light domain walls, massive neutrinos and the large scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1991-01-01

    Domain walls generated through a cosmological phase transition are considered, which interact nongravitationally with light neutrinos. At a redshift z greater than or equal to 10(exp 4), the network grows rapidly and is virtually decoupled from the matter. As the friction with the matter becomes dominant, a comoving network scale close to that of the comoving horizon scale at z of approximately 10(exp 4) gets frozen. During the later phases, the walls produce matter wakes of a thickness d of approximately 10h(exp -1)Mpc, that may become seeds for the formation of the large scale structure observed in the Universe.

  15. Phase transitions as the origin of large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turok, Neil

    1988-01-01

    A review of the formation of large scale structure through gravitational growth of primordial perturbations is given. This is followed by a discussion of how symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe might have produced the required perturbations, in particular through the formation and evolution of a network of cosmic strings. Finally, the statistical mechanics of string networks, for both cosmic and fundamental strings is discussed, leading to some more speculative ideas on the possible role of fundamental strings (superstrings or heterotic strings) in the very early universe.

  16. Could the electroweak scale be linked to the large scale structure of the Universe?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravorty, Alak; Massarotti, Alessandro

    1991-01-01

    We study a model where the domain walls are generated through a cosmological phase transition involving a scalar field. We assume the existence of a coupling between the scalar field and dark matter and show that the interaction between domain walls and dark matter leads to an energy dependent reflection mechanism. For a simple Yakawa coupling, we find that the vacuum expectation value of the scalar field is theta approx. equals 30GeV - 1TeV, in order for the model to be successful in the formation of large scale 'pancake' structures.

  17. Contributions to the understanding of large-scale coherent structures in developing free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. T. C.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in the mechanics of boundary layer flow are reported. The physical problems of large scale coherent structures in real, developing free turbulent shear flows, from the nonlinear aspects of hydrodynamic stability are addressed. The presence of fine grained turbulence in the problem, and its absence, lacks a small parameter. The problem is presented on the basis of conservation principles, which are the dynamics of the problem directed towards extracting the most physical information, however, it is emphasized that it must also involve approximations.

  18. Characterising large-scale structure with the REFLEX II cluster survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    We study the large-scale structure with superclusters from the REFLEX X-ray cluster survey together with cosmological N-body simulations. It is important to construct superclusters with criteria such that they are homogeneous in their properties. We lay out our theoretical concept considering future evolution of superclusters in their definition, and show that the X-ray luminosity and halo mass functions of clusters in superclusters are found to be top-heavy, different from those of clusters in the field. We also show a promising aspect of using superclusters to study the local cluster bias and mass scaling relation with simulations.

  19. Chaotic dynamics of large-scale structures in a turbulent wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varon, Eliott; Eulalie, Yoann; Edwige, Stephie; Gilotte, Philippe; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of a three-dimensional (3D) bimodal turbulent wake downstream of a square-back Ahmed body are experimentally studied in a wind tunnel through high-frequency wall-pressure probes mapping the rear of the model and a horizontal two-dimensional (2D) velocity field. The barycenters of the pressure distribution over the rear part of the model and the intensity recirculation are found highly correlated. Both described the most energetic large-scale structures dynamics, confirming the relation between the large-scale recirculation bubble and its wall-pressure footprint. Focusing on the pressure, its barycenter trajectory has a stochastic behavior but its low-frequency dynamics exhibit the same characteristics as a weak strange chaotic attractor system, with two well-defined attractors. The low-frequency dynamics associated to the large-scale structures are then analyzed. The largest Lyapunov exponent is first estimated, leading to a low positive value characteristic of strange attractors and weak chaotic systems. Afterwards, analyzing the autocorrelation function of the timeseries, we compute the correlation dimension, larger than two. The signal is finally transformed and analyzed as a telegraph signal, showing that its dynamics correspond to a quasirandom telegraph signal. This is the first demonstration that the low-frequency dynamics of a turbulent 3D wake are not a purely stochastic process but rather a weak chaotic process exhibiting strange attractors. From the flow control point of view, it also opens the path to more simple closed-loop flow-control strategies aiming at the stabilization of the wake and the control of the dynamics of the wake barycenter.

  20. Evolution of the Busbar Structure in Large-Scale Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Liang, Jinding; Li, Jie; Sun, Kena; Xiao, Jin

    2017-02-01

    Studies of magnetic field and magneto-hydro-dynamics are regarded as the foundation for the development of large-scale aluminum reduction cells, while due to the direct relationship between the busbar configuration and magnetic compensation, the actual key content is the configuration of the busbar. As the line current has been increased from 160 kA to 600 kA, the configuration of the busbar was becoming more complex. To summarize and explore the evolution of busbar configuration in aluminum reduction cells, this paper has reviewed various representative large-scale pre-baked aluminum reduction cell busbar structures, such as end-to-end potlines, side-by-side potlines and external compensation current. The advantages and disadvantages in the magnetic distribution or technical specifications have also been introduced separately, especially for the configurations of the mainstream 400-kA potlines. In the end, the development trends of the bus structure configuration were prospected, based on the recent successful applications of super-scale cell busbar structures in China (500-600 kA).

  1. The Signature of Large Scale Structures on the Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoco, A.; Hannestad, S.; Haugbolle, T.; Miele, G.; Serpico, P.D.; Tu, H.; /Aarhus U. /UC, Irvine

    2006-12-01

    If the diffuse extragalactic gamma ray emission traces the large scale structures of the universe, peculiar anisotropy patterns are expected in the gamma ray sky. In particular, because of the cutoff distance introduced by the absorption of 0.1-10 TeV photons on the infrared/optical background, prominent correlations with the local structures within a range of few hundreds Mpc should be present. We provide detailed predictions of the signal based on the PSCz map of the local universe. We also use mock N-body catalogues complemented with the halo model of structures to study some statistical features of the expected signatures. The results are largely independent from cosmological details, and depend mostly on the index of correlation (or bias) of the sources with respect to the large scale distribution of galaxies. For instance, the predicted signal in the case of a quadratic correlation (as it may happen for a dark matter annihilation contribution to the diffuse gamma flux) differs substantially from a linear correlation case, providing a complementary tool to unveil the nature of the sources of the diffuse gamma ray emission. The chances of the present and future space and ground based observatories to measure these features are discussed.

  2. A correlation between the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Boughn, Stephen; Crittenden, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Observations of distant supernovae and the fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) indicate that the expansion of the Universe may be accelerating under the action of a 'cosmological constant' or some other form of 'dark energy'. This dark energy now appears to dominate the Universe and not only alters its expansion rate, but also affects the evolution of fluctuations in the density of matter, slowing down the gravitational collapse of material (into, for example, clusters of galaxies) in recent times. Additional fluctuations in the temperature of CMB photons are induced as they pass through large-scale structures and these fluctuations are necessarily correlated with the distribution of relatively nearby matter. Here we report the detection of correlations between recent CMB data and two probes of large-scale structure: the X-ray background and the distribution of radio galaxies. These correlations are consistent with those predicted by dark energy, indicating that we are seeing the imprint of dark energy on the growth of structure in the Universe.

  3. Evolution of the Busbar Structure in Large-Scale Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Liang, Jinding; Li, Jie; Sun, Kena; Xiao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Studies of magnetic field and magneto-hydro-dynamics are regarded as the foundation for the development of large-scale aluminum reduction cells, while due to the direct relationship between the busbar configuration and magnetic compensation, the actual key content is the configuration of the busbar. As the line current has been increased from 160 kA to 600 kA, the configuration of the busbar was becoming more complex. To summarize and explore the evolution of busbar configuration in aluminum reduction cells, this paper has reviewed various representative large-scale pre-baked aluminum reduction cell busbar structures, such as end-to-end potlines, side-by-side potlines and external compensation current. The advantages and disadvantages in the magnetic distribution or technical specifications have also been introduced separately, especially for the configurations of the mainstream 400-kA potlines. In the end, the development trends of the bus structure configuration were prospected, based on the recent successful applications of super-scale cell busbar structures in China (500-600 kA).

  4. On the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mercolli, Lorenzo; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    We compute the renormalized two-point functions of density, divergence and vorticity of the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because of momentum and mass conservation, the corrections from short scales to the large-scale power spectra of density, divergence and vorticity must start at order k{sup 4}. For the vorticity this constitutes one of the two leading terms. Exact (approximated) self-similarity of an Einstein-de Sitter (ΛCDM) background fixes the time dependence so that the vorticity power spectrum at leading order is determined by the symmetries of the problem and the power spectrum around the non-linear scale. We show that to cancel all divergences in the velocity correlators one needs new counterterms. These fix the definition of velocity and do not represent new properties of the system. For an Einstein-de Sitter universe, we show that all three renormalized cross- and auto-correlation functions have the same structure but different numerical coefficients, which we compute. We elucidate the differences between using momentum and velocity.

  5. A quantitative approach to the topology of large-scale structure. [for galactic clustering computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Weinberg, David H.; Melott, Adrian L.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative measure of the topology of large-scale structure: the genus of density contours in a smoothed density distribution, is described and applied. For random phase (Gaussian) density fields, the mean genus per unit volume exhibits a universal dependence on threshold density, with a normalizing factor that can be calculated from the power spectrum. If large-scale structure formed from the gravitational instability of small-amplitude density fluctuations, the topology observed today on suitable scales should follow the topology in the initial conditions. The technique is illustrated by applying it to simulations of galaxy clustering in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter. The technique is also applied to a volume-limited sample of the CfA redshift survey and to a model in which galaxies reside on the surfaces of polyhedral 'bubbles'. The topology of the evolved mass distribution and 'biased' galaxy distribution in the cold dark matter models closely matches the topology of the density fluctuations in the initial conditions. The topology of the observational sample is consistent with the random phase, cold dark matter model.

  6. Large-scale structure in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Spergel, David N.; Turok, Nail

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the formation of large-scale structure by global texture in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter. A code for evolution of the texture fields was combined with an N-body code for evolving the dark matter. The results indicate some promising aspects: with only one free parameter, the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function is reproduced, clusters of galaxies are found to be significantly clustered on a scale of 20-50/h Mpc, and coherent structures of over 50/h Mpc in the galaxy distribution were found. The large-scale streaming motions observed are in good agreement with the observations: the average magnitude of the velocity field smoothed over 30/h Mpc is 430 km/sec. Global texture produces a cosmic Mach number that is compatible with observation. Also, significant evolution of clusters at low redshift was seen. Possible problems for the theory include too high velocity dispersions in clusters, and voids which are not as empty as those observed.

  7. Time-sliced perturbation theory for large scale structure I: general formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    We present a new analytic approach to describe large scale structure formation in the mildly non-linear regime. The central object of the method is the time-dependent probability distribution function generating correlators of the cosmological observables at a given moment of time. Expanding the distribution function around the Gaussian weight we formulate a perturbative technique to calculate non-linear corrections to cosmological correlators, similar to the diagrammatic expansion in a three-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory, with time playing the role of an external parameter. For the physically relevant case of cold dark matter in an Einstein-de Sitter universe, the time evolution of the distribution function can be found exactly and is encapsulated by a time-dependent coupling constant controlling the perturbative expansion. We show that all building blocks of the expansion are free from spurious infrared enhanced contributions that plague the standard cosmological perturbation theory. This paves the way towards the systematic resummation of infrared effects in large scale structure formation. We also argue that the approach proposed here provides a natural framework to account for the influence of short-scale dynamics on larger scales along the lines of effective field theory.

  8. Correlation of CMB with large-scale structure. II. Weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Christopher M.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Seljak, Uros

    2008-08-15

    We investigate the correlation of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with several tracers of large-scale structure, including luminous red galaxies (LRGs), quasars, and radio sources. The lensing field is reconstructed based on the CMB maps from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite; the LRGs and quasars are observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); and the radio sources are observed in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). Combining all three large-scale structure samples, we find evidence for a positive cross correlation at the 2.5{sigma} level (1.8{sigma} for the SDSS samples and 2.1{sigma} for NVSS); the cross correlation amplitude is 1.06{+-}0.42 times that expected for the WMAP cosmological parameters. Our analysis extends other recent analyses in that we carefully determine bias-weighted redshift distribution of the sources, which is needed for a meaningful cosmological interpretation of the detected signal. We investigate contamination of the signal by galactic emission, extragalactic radio and infrared sources, thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and the Rees-Sciama effect, and find all of them to be negligible.

  9. On the soft limit of the large scale structure power spectrum: UV dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Konstandin, Thomas; Sagunski, Laura; Porto, Rafael A. E-mail: thomas.konstandin@desy.de E-mail: laura.sagunski@desy.de

    2015-11-01

    We derive a non-perturbative equation for the large scale structure power spectrum of long-wavelength modes. Thereby, we use an operator product expansion together with relations between the three-point function and power spectrum in the soft limit. The resulting equation encodes the coupling to ultraviolet (UV) modes in two time-dependent coefficients, which may be obtained from response functions to (anisotropic) parameters, such as spatial curvature, in a modified cosmology. We argue that both depend weakly on fluctuations deep in the UV. As a byproduct, this implies that the renormalized leading order coefficient(s) in the effective field theory (EFT) of large scale structures receive most of their contribution from modes close to the non-linear scale. Consequently, the UV dependence found in explicit computations within standard perturbation theory stems mostly from counter-term(s). We confront a simplified version of our non-perturbative equation against existent numerical simulations, and find good agreement within the expected uncertainties. Our approach can in principle be used to precisely infer the relevance of the leading order EFT coefficient(s) using small volume simulations in an 'anisotropic separate universe' framework. Our results suggest that the importance of these coefficient(s) is a ∼ 10% effect, and plausibly smaller.

  10. Analytic prediction of baryonic effects from the EFT of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Matthew; Perko, Ashley; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-05-01

    The large scale structures of the universe will likely be the next leading source of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to understand their behavior. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures provides a consistent way to perturbatively predict the clustering of dark matter at large distances. The fact that baryons move distances comparable to dark matter allows us to infer that baryons at large distances can be described in a similar formalism: the backreaction of short-distance non-linearities and of star-formation physics at long distances can be encapsulated in an effective stress tensor, characterized by a few parameters. The functional form of baryonic effects can therefore be predicted. In the power spectrum the leading contribution goes as propto k2 P(k), with P(k) being the linear power spectrum and with the numerical prefactor depending on the details of the star-formation physics. We also perform the resummation of the contribution of the long-wavelength displacements, allowing us to consistently predict the effect of the relative motion of baryons and dark matter. We compare our predictions with simulations that contain several implementations of baryonic physics, finding percent agreement up to relatively high wavenumbers such as k simeq 0.3 hMpc-1 or k simeq 0.6 hMpc-1, depending on the order of the calculation. Our results open a novel way to understand baryonic effects analytically, as well as to interface with simulations.

  11. Investigation of the large scale coherent structure in a jet and its relevance to jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, R. E. A.; George, W. K.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the causes of aircraft noise in large jet aircraft. It was determined that jet noise varies strongly with velocity and that significant pure tones are generated by rotor-stator interaction in the jet engines. An objective method for deducing the large eddy structure in a large jet is described. The provisions of lighthill's theory are analyzed and applied to investigating the nature of jet noise. There is considerable evidence that a large scale coherent structure exists in a jet and that this structure can play a major role in sound radiation. Mathematical models are developed to define the parameters of orthogonal decomposition, finite extent velocity field, homogeneous fields, and periodic velocity fields.

  12. Large-Scale Numerical Simulation of Fluid Structure Interactions in Low Reynolds Number Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eken, Ali; Sahin, Mehmet

    2011-11-01

    A fully coupled numerical algorithm has been developed for the numerical simulation of large-scale fluid structure interaction problems. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation based on the side-centered unstructured finite volume method. A special attention is given to satisfy the discrete continuity equation within each element at discrete level as well as the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL). The linear elasticity equations are discretized within the structure domain using the Galerkin finite element method. The resulting algebraic linear equations are solved in a fully coupled form using a monolitic multigrid method. The implementation of the fully coupled iterative solvers is based on the PETSc library for improving the efficiency of the parallel code. The present numerical algorithm is initially validated for a beam in cross flow and then it is used to simulate the fluid structure interaction of a membrane-wing micro aerial vehicle (MAV).

  13. Formation of large-scale structures in ablative Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Don, Wai-Sun; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, Y. J.; He, X. T.

    2010-12-01

    In this research, we studied numerically nonlinear evolutions of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) with and without thermal conduction, aka, the ablative KHI (AKHI) and the classical KHI (CKHI). The second order thermal conduction term with a variable thermal conductivity coefficient is added to the energy equation in the Euler equations in the AKHI to investigate the effect of thermal conduction on the evolution of large and small scale structures within the shear layer which separate the fluids with different velocities. The inviscid hyperbolic flux of Euler equation is computed via the classical fifth order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite difference scheme and the temperature is solved by an implicit fourth order finite difference scheme with variable coefficients in the second order parabolic term to avoid severe time step restriction imposed by the stability of the numerical scheme. As opposed to the CKHI, fine scale structures such as the vortical structures are suppressed from forming in the AKHI due to the dissipative nature of the second order thermal conduction term. With a single-mode sinusoidal interface perturbation, the results of simulations show that the growth of higher harmonics is effectively suppressed and the flow is stabilized by the thermal conduction. With a two-mode sinusoidal interface perturbation, the vortex pairing is strengthened by the thermal conduction which would allow the formation of large-scale structures and enhance the mixing of materials. In summary, our numerical studies show that thermal conduction can have strong influence on the nonlinear evolutions of the KHI. Thus, it should be included in applications where thermal conduction plays an important role, such as the formation of large-scale structures in the high energy density physics and astrophysics.

  14. Formation of large-scale structures in ablative Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; He, X. T.; Don, Wai-Sun; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-12-15

    In this research, we studied numerically nonlinear evolutions of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) with and without thermal conduction, aka, the ablative KHI (AKHI) and the classical KHI (CKHI). The second order thermal conduction term with a variable thermal conductivity coefficient is added to the energy equation in the Euler equations in the AKHI to investigate the effect of thermal conduction on the evolution of large and small scale structures within the shear layer which separate the fluids with different velocities. The inviscid hyperbolic flux of Euler equation is computed via the classical fifth order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite difference scheme and the temperature is solved by an implicit fourth order finite difference scheme with variable coefficients in the second order parabolic term to avoid severe time step restriction imposed by the stability of the numerical scheme. As opposed to the CKHI, fine scale structures such as the vortical structures are suppressed from forming in the AKHI due to the dissipative nature of the second order thermal conduction term. With a single-mode sinusoidal interface perturbation, the results of simulations show that the growth of higher harmonics is effectively suppressed and the flow is stabilized by the thermal conduction. With a two-mode sinusoidal interface perturbation, the vortex pairing is strengthened by the thermal conduction which would allow the formation of large-scale structures and enhance the mixing of materials. In summary, our numerical studies show that thermal conduction can have strong influence on the nonlinear evolutions of the KHI. Thus, it should be included in applications where thermal conduction plays an important role, such as the formation of large-scale structures in the high energy density physics and astrophysics.

  15. The dark mark of large-scale structure on the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granett, Benjamin R.

    2010-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) offers a screen to study the Universe in projection. Large-scale structures leave gravitational imprints on the background radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. In an accelerating universe, photons following trajectories across large clusters or voids are heated or cooled as the gravitational potential decays. The hot and cold marks left on the radiation field are a direct signature of dark energy in a spatially flat universe. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to trace large-scale structures and confirm their effect on the cosmic microwave background. We construct a map of the anisotropy over the survey area and find that the pattern is present on the microwave sky. This detection demonstrates that the positive statistical correlation between the galaxy density and the CMB temperature reported in the literature is consistent with the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect under dark energy. The imprints of individual voids and clusters can be isolated on the cosmic microwave background. By summing the signal from voids and clusters, we overcome the noise of primary fluctuations and produce an image of the average imprint left by the gravitational potential of the structures. Intriguingly, the detection level surpasses the all-sky integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurement. We suggest that the technique may be used as a new probe of dark energy. Supervoid and supercluster structures could be responsible for anomalous regions on the microwave background. We introduce the method of constrained realization to identify statistically anomalous regions on the sky. Of particular interest is the Cold Spot which could arise from a supervoid structure at low redshift. To test this idea, we conduct a photometric redshift survey of the region to moderate redshift. However, we find no strong evidence that a large void is responsible.

  16. Ward identities and consistency relations for the large scale structure with multiple species

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: pietroni@pd.infn.it

    2014-04-01

    We present fully nonlinear consistency relations for the squeezed bispectrum of Large Scale Structure. These relations hold when the matter component of the Universe is composed of one or more species, and generalize those obtained in [1,2] in the single species case. The multi-species relations apply to the standard dark matter + baryons scenario, as well as to the case in which some of the fields are auxiliary quantities describing a particular population, such as dark matter halos or a specific galaxy class. If a large scale velocity bias exists between the different populations new terms appear in the consistency relations with respect to the single species case. As an illustration, we discuss two physical cases in which such a velocity bias can exist: (1) a new long range scalar force in the dark matter sector (resulting in a violation of the equivalence principle in the dark matter-baryon system), and (2) the distribution of dark matter halos relative to that of the underlying dark matter field.

  17. Large-scale structure evolution in axisymmetric, compressible free-shear layers

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    This paper is a description of work-in-progress. It describes Sandia`s program to study the basic fluid mechanics of large-scale mixing in unbounded, compressible, turbulent flows, specifically, the turbulent mixing of an axisymmetric compressible helium jet in a parallel, coflowing compressible air freestream. Both jet and freestream velocities are variable over a broad range, providing a wide range mixing layer Reynolds number. Although the convective Mach number, M{sub c}, range is currently limited by the present nozzle design to values of 0.6 and below, straightforward nozzle design changes would permit a wide range of convective Mach number, to well in excess of 1.0. The use of helium allows simulation of a hot jet due to the large density difference, and also aids in obtaining optical flow visualization via schlieren due to the large density gradient in the mixing layer. The work comprises a blend of analysis, experiment, and direct numerical simulation (DNS). There the authors discuss only the analytical and experimental efforts to observe and describe the evolution of the large-scale structures. The DNS work, used to compute local two-point velocity correlation data, will be discussed elsewhere.

  18. Large-scale coherent structures in fractal-generated, axisymmetric wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Jovan; Supponen, Outi; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2013-11-01

    The coherence and energy of large-scale structures in turbulent axisymmetric wakes are known to play a role on the drag coefficient of the body. Specifically, there is an expectation that drag can be reduced by reducing the energy of the vortex shedding. We use fractal plates which have been shown to have higher drag coefficients than square plates and disks with the same frontal area (Nedic, Ganapathisubramani & Vassilicos FDR 2013), yet show that the energy of the large-scale vortices shed from these plates is reduced by 15% to 60% compared to non-fractal plates. Fractal plates can reduce wake size and alter dissipation scalings [see DFD13-2013-000126] and the relation CD =CVCɛ between the drag coefficient and coefficients of wake volume and average turbulent dissipation rate can be used to explore consequences on drag. Furthermore, the azimuthal mode associated with the vortex shedding (m = 1) is still found to be dominant for all plates, however its coherence is slightly altered by the fractals, whilst mode m = 2 has been dramatically altered.

  19. Partially acoustic dark matter, interacting dark radiation, and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi; Tsai, Yuhsinz

    2016-12-01

    The standard paradigm of collisionless cold dark matter is in tension with measurements on large scales. In particular, the best fit values of the Hubble rate H 0 and the matter density perturbation σ 8 inferred from the cosmic microwave background seem inconsistent with the results from direct measurements. We show that both problems can be solved in a framework in which dark matter consists of two distinct components, a dominant component and a subdominant component. The primary component is cold and collisionless. The secondary component is also cold, but interacts strongly with dark radiation, which itself forms a tightly coupled fluid. The growth of density perturbations in the subdominant component is inhibited by dark acoustic oscillations due to its coupling to the dark radiation, solving the σ 8 problem, while the presence of tightly coupled dark radiation ameliorates the H 0 problem. The subdominant component of dark matter and dark radiation continue to remain in thermal equilibrium until late times, inhibiting the formation of a dark disk. We present an example of a simple model that naturally realizes this scenario in which both constituents of dark matter are thermal WIMPs. Our scenario can be tested by future stage-IV experiments designed to probe the CMB and large scale structure.

  20. Efficient Large-Scale Structure From Motion by Fusing Auxiliary Imaging Information.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hainan; Shen, Shuhan; Gao, Wei; Hu, Zhanyi

    2015-11-01

    One of the potentially effective means for large-scale 3D scene reconstruction is to reconstruct the scene in a global manner, rather than incrementally, by fully exploiting available auxiliary information on the imaging condition, such as camera location by Global Positioning System (GPS), orientation by inertial measurement unit (or compass), focal length from EXIF, and so on. However, such auxiliary information, though informative and valuable, is usually too noisy to be directly usable. In this paper, we present an approach by taking advantage of such noisy auxiliary information to improve structure from motion solving. More specifically, we introduce two effective iterative global optimization algorithms initiated with such noisy auxiliary information. One is a robust rotation averaging algorithm to deal with contaminated epipolar graph, the other is a robust scene reconstruction algorithm to deal with noisy GPS data for camera centers initialization. We found that by exclusively focusing on the estimated inliers at the current iteration, the optimization process initialized by such noisy auxiliary information could converge well and efficiently. Our proposed method is evaluated on real images captured by unmanned aerial vehicle, StreetView car, and conventional digital cameras. Extensive experimental results show that our method performs similarly or better than many of the state-of-art reconstruction approaches, in terms of reconstruction accuracy and completeness, but is more efficient and scalable for large-scale image data sets.

  1. Non-linear shrinkage estimation of large-scale structure covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    In many astrophysical settings, covariance matrices of large data sets have to be determined empirically from a finite number of mock realizations. The resulting noise degrades inference and precludes it completely if there are fewer realizations than data points. This work applies a recently proposed non-linear shrinkage estimator of covariance to a realistic example from large-scale structure cosmology. After optimizing its performance for the usage in likelihood expressions, the shrinkage estimator yields subdominant bias and variance comparable to that of the standard estimator with a factor of ∼50 less realizations. This is achieved without any prior information on the properties of the data or the structure of the covariance matrix, at a negligible computational cost.

  2. Production of large-scale, freestanding vanadium pentoxide nanobelt porous structures.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Byung Hoon; Hong, Won G; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Yark Yeon; Jeong, Eun-ju; Jang, Won Ick; Yu, Han Young

    2012-03-07

    Large-scale, freestanding, porous structures of vanadium pentoxide nanobelts (VPNs) were successfully prepared using the template-free freeze-drying method. The porous and multi-layered VPN macrostructures are composed of randomly oriented long nanobelts (over 100 μm) and their side length can be controlled up to a few tens of centimetres. Also, the bulk density and surface area of these macrostructures are 3-5 mg cm(-3) and 40-80 m(2) g(-1), respectively, which are similar to those of the excellent adsorbents. In addition, the removal efficiency measurements of ammonia molecules revealed that the VPN porous structures can adsorb the ammonia molecules with the combinations of van der Waals forces and strong chemical bonding by functional groups on the VPN surface.

  3. Production of large-scale, freestanding vanadium pentoxide nanobelt porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Byung Hoon; Hong, Won G.; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Yark Yeon; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Jang, Won Ick; Yu, Han Young

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale, freestanding, porous structures of vanadium pentoxide nanobelts (VPNs) were successfully prepared using the template-free freeze-drying method. The porous and multi-layered VPN macrostructures are composed of randomly oriented long nanobelts (over 100 μm) and their side length can be controlled up to a few tens of centimetres. Also, the bulk density and surface area of these macrostructures are 3-5 mg cm-3 and 40-80 m2 g-1, respectively, which are similar to those of the excellent adsorbents. In addition, the removal efficiency measurements of ammonia molecules revealed that the VPN porous structures can adsorb the ammonia molecules with the combinations of van der Waals forces and strong chemical bonding by functional groups on the VPN surface.

  4. Planck measurements of the isotropy and statistics of the large scale structure of the universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    2015-08-01

    Planck was originally proposed to deliver definitive measurements of the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background on angular scales larger than ~5 arcmin. This goal has been met with the 2015 release of the legacy data set comprising full sky maps of the microwave sky at multiple frequencies. One of the fundamental aspects of cosmology is the precision with which we understand the universe itself, and in particular the nature of the structure-seeding primordial perturbations. More specifically, what do their statistical properties and consistency or otherwise with isotropy reveal about early universe physics?I will discuss the phenomenological determination of the isotropy and statistics of the large scale structure of the universe from Planck data. This is likely to remain unsurpassed in the foreseeable future.

  5. Detection of the Effect of Cosmological Large-Scale Structure on the Orientation of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Carretero, Conrado; Patiri, Santiago G.

    2006-04-01

    Galaxies are not distributed randomly throughout space but are instead arranged in an intricate ``cosmic web'' of filaments and walls surrounding bubble-like voids. There is still no compelling observational evidence of a link between the structure of the cosmic web and how galaxies form within it. However, such a connection is expected on the basis of our understanding of the origin of galaxy angular momentum: disk galaxies should be highly inclined relative to the plane defined by the large-scale structure surrounding them. Using the two largest galaxy redshift surveys currently in existence (2dFGRS and SDSS), we show at the 99.7% confidence level that these alignments do indeed exist: spiral galaxies located on the shells of the largest cosmic voids have rotation axes that lie preferentially on the void surface.

  6. Large-scale structure from quantum fluctuations in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Turner

    2000-05-25

    A better understanding of the formation of large-scale structure in the Universe is arguably the most pressing question in cosmology. The most compelling and promising theoretical paradigm, Inflation + Cold Dark Matter, holds that the density inhomogeneities that seeded the formation of structure in the Universe originated from quantum fluctuations arising during inflation and that the bulk of the dark matter exists as slowing moving elementary particles (cold dark matter) left over from the earliest, fiery moments. Large redshift surveys (such as the SDSS and 2dF) and high-resolution measurements of CBR anisotropy (to be made by the MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites) have the potential to decisively test Inflation + Cold Dark Matter and to open a window to the very early Universe and fundamental physics.

  7. Joint Hierarchical Category Structure Learning and Large-Scale Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanyun; Lin, Li; Shen, Fumin; Lu, Chang; Wu, Yang; Xie, Yuan; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-10-05

    We investigate the scalable image classification problem with a large number of categories. Hierarchical visual data structures are helpful for improving the efficiency and performance of large-scale multi-class classification. We propose a novel image classification method based on learning hierarchical interclass structures. Specifically, we first design a fast algorithm to compute the similarity metric between categories, based on which a visual tree is constructed by hierarchical spectral clustering. Using the learned visual tree, a test sample label is efficiently predicted by searching for the best path over the entire tree. The proposed method is extensively evaluated on the ILSVRC2010 and Caltech 256 benchmark datasets. Experimental results show that our method obtains significantly better category hierarchies than other state-of-the-art visual tree-based methods and, therefore, much more accurate classification.

  8. Seismic imaging of structural heterogeneity in Earth's mantle: evidence for large-scale mantle flow.

    PubMed

    Ritsema, J; Van Heijst, H J

    2000-01-01

    Systematic analyses of earthquake-generated seismic waves have resulted in models of three-dimensional elastic wavespeed structure in Earth's mantle. This paper describes the development and the dominant characteristics of one of the most recently developed models. This model is based on seismic wave travel times and wave shapes from over 100,000 ground motion recordings of earthquakes that occurred between 1980 and 1998. It shows signatures of plate tectonic processes to a depth of about 1,200 km in the mantle, and it demonstrates the presence of large-scale structure throughout the lower 2,000 km of the mantle. Seismological analyses make it increasingly more convincing that geologic processes shaping Earth's surface are intimately linked to physical processes in the deep mantle.

  9. Theory of large-scale HF heating processes in the unstructured and structured ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Keskinen, M.J.; Chaturvedi, P.K.; Ossakow, S.L.

    1990-10-01

    Theoretical aspects of large-scale HF heating processes in the unstructured and structured ionosphere have been studied. For the unstructured case, we present an analytical model for the generation, convection, and steepening of HF-induced density cavities. We discuss the nonlinear propagation of high power HF in steepened cavities. Properties of thermal self-focusing instabilities in the presence of a convecting and steepened cavity is studied. For the structured ionosphere, we discuss parametric coupling processes of a large amplitude HF pump wave with both F-region, i.e., interchange, current-convective, and ion cyclotron and E-region, i.e., two-stream and gradient-drift ionospheric instabilities which instabilities have been proposed to account, in part, for naturally occurring ionospheric irregularities. We show that these instabilities may be stabilized or destabilized using high power HF heaters.

  10. The Price of Precision: Large-Scale Mapping of Forest Structure and Biomass Using Airborne Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubayah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing provides one of the best means for acquiring detailed information on forest structure. However, its application over large areas has been limited largely because of its expense. Nonetheless, extant data exist over many states in the U.S., funded largely by state and federal consortia and mainly for infrastructure, emergency response, flood plain and coastal mapping. These lidar data are almost always acquired in leaf-off seasons, and until recently, usually with low point count densities. Even with these limitations, they provide unprecedented wall-to-wall mappings that enable development of appropriate methodologies for large-scale deployment of lidar. In this talk we summarize our research and lessons learned in deriving forest structure over regional areas as part of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). We focus on two areas: the entire state of Maryland and Sonoma County, California. The Maryland effort used low density, leaf-off data acquired by each county in varying epochs, while the on-going Sonoma work employs state-of-the-art, high density, wall-to-wall, leaf-on lidar data. In each area we combine these lidar coverages with high-resolution multispectral imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) and in situ plot data to produce maps of canopy height, tree cover and biomass, and compare our results against FIA plot data and national biomass maps. Our work demonstrates that large-scale mapping of forest structure at high spatial resolution is achievable but products may be complex to produce and validate over large areas. Furthermore, fundamental issues involving statistical approaches, plot types and sizes, geolocation, modeling scales, allometry, and even the definitions of "forest" and "non-forest" must be approached carefully. Ultimately, determining the "price of precision", that is, does the value of wall-to-wall forest structure data justify their expense, should consider not only carbon market applications

  11. Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Hume, Timothy; Jakob, Christian; Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Zhang, Minghua

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the characteristics of the large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles observed during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which was conducted in January–February 2006 in Darwin during the northern Australian monsoon season. The examined profiles exhibit significant variations between four distinct synoptic regimes that were observed during the experiment. The active monsoon period is characterized by strong upward motion and large advective cooling and moistening throughout the entire troposphere, while the suppressed and clear periods are dominated by moderate midlevel subsidence and significant low- to midlevel drying through horizontal advection. The midlevel subsidence and horizontal dry advection are largely responsible for the dry midtroposphere observed during the suppressed period and limit the growth of clouds to low levels. During the break period, upward motion and advective cooling and moistening located primarily at midlevels dominate together with weak advective warming and drying (mainly from horizontal advection) at low levels. The variations of the diabatic heating and drying profiles with the different regimes are closely associated with differences in the large-scale structures, cloud types, and rainfall rates between the regimes. Strong diabatic heating and drying are seen throughout the troposphere during the active monsoon period while they are moderate and only occur above 700 hPa during the break period. The diabatic heating and drying tend to have their maxima at low levels during the suppressed periods. Furthermore, the diurnal variations of these structures between monsoon systems, continental/coastal, and tropical inland-initiated convective systems are also examined.

  12. Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shaocheng; Hume, Timothy; Jakob, Christian; ...

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the characteristics of the large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles observed during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which was conducted in January–February 2006 in Darwin during the northern Australian monsoon season. The examined profiles exhibit significant variations between four distinct synoptic regimes that were observed during the experiment. The active monsoon period is characterized by strong upward motion and large advective cooling and moistening throughout the entire troposphere, while the suppressed and clear periods are dominated by moderate midlevel subsidence and significant low- to midlevel drying through horizontal advection. The midlevel subsidence andmore » horizontal dry advection are largely responsible for the dry midtroposphere observed during the suppressed period and limit the growth of clouds to low levels. During the break period, upward motion and advective cooling and moistening located primarily at midlevels dominate together with weak advective warming and drying (mainly from horizontal advection) at low levels. The variations of the diabatic heating and drying profiles with the different regimes are closely associated with differences in the large-scale structures, cloud types, and rainfall rates between the regimes. Strong diabatic heating and drying are seen throughout the troposphere during the active monsoon period while they are moderate and only occur above 700 hPa during the break period. The diabatic heating and drying tend to have their maxima at low levels during the suppressed periods. Furthermore, the diurnal variations of these structures between monsoon systems, continental/coastal, and tropical inland-initiated convective systems are also examined.« less

  13. Large-scale internal structure in volcanogenic breakout flood deposits: Extensive GPR survey on volcaniclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, K.; Gomez, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale outburst floods from volcanic lakes such as caldera lakes or volcanically dammed river-valleys tend to be voluminous with total discharge of > 1-10s km3 and peak discharge of >10000s to 100000s m3 s-1. Such a large flood can travel long distance and leave sediments and bedforms/landforms extensively with large-scale internal structures, which are difficult to assess from single local sites. Moreover, the sediments and bedforms/landforms are sometimes untraceable, and outcrop information obtained by classical geological and geomorphological field surveys is limited to the dissected/terraced parts of fan body, road cuts and/or large quarries. Therefore, GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar), using the properties of electromagnetic waves' propagation through media, seems best adapted for the appraisal of large-scale subsurface structures. Recently, studies on GPR applications to volcanic deposits have successfully captured images of lava flows and volcaniclastic deposits and proved the usefulness of this method even onto the volcanic areas which often encompass complicated stratigraphy and structures with variable material, grainsize, and ferromagnetic content. Using GPR, the present study aims to understand the large-scale internal structures of volcanogenic flood deposits. The survey was carried out over two volcanogenic flood fan (or apron) sediments in northeast Japan, at Numazawa and Towada volcanoes. The 5 ka Numazawa flood deposits in the Tadami river catchment that has been emplaced by a breakout flood from ignimbrite-dammed valley leaving pumiceous gravelly sediments with meter-sized boulders in the flow path. At Towada volcano, a comparable flood event originating from a breach in the caldera rim emplaced the 13-15 ka Sanbongi fan deposits in the Oirase river valley, which is characterized by a bouldery fan deposits. The GPR data was collected following 200 to 500 m long lateral and longitudinal transects, which were captured using a GPR Pulse

  14. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghram, Shant; Akbar Abolhasani, Ali; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling knA-1 for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound nA < 0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale Mc in which for M Mc) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  15. Large-scale screening of zeolite structures for CO2 membrane separations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihan; Abouelnasr, Mahmoud; Lin, Li-Chiang; Smit, Berend

    2013-05-22

    We have conducted large-scale screening of zeolite materials for CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 membrane separation applications using the free energy landscape of the guest molecules inside these porous materials. We show how advanced molecular simulations can be integrated with the design of a simple separation process to arrive at a metric to rank performance of over 87,000 different zeolite structures, including the known IZA zeolite structures. Our novel, efficient algorithm using graphics processing units can accurately characterize both the adsorption and diffusion properties of a given structure in just a few seconds and accordingly find a set of optimal structures for different desired purity of separated gases from a large database of porous materials in reasonable wall time. Our analysis reveals that the optimal structures for separations usually consist of channels with adsorption sites spread relatively uniformly across the entire channel such that they feature well-balanced CO2 adsorption and diffusion properties. Our screening also shows that the top structures in the predicted zeolite database outperform the best known zeolite by a factor of 4-7. Finally, we have identified a completely different optimal set of zeolite structures that are suitable for an inverse process, in which the CO2 is retained while CH4 or N2 is passed through a membrane.

  16. Large-Scale Screening of Zeolite Structures for CO2 Membrane Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, JH; Abouelnasr, M; Lin, LC; Smit, B

    2013-05-22

    We have conducted large-scale screening of zeolite materials for CO2/CH4 and CO2/N-2 membrane separation applications using the free energy landscape of the guest molecules inside these porous materials. We show how advanced molecular simulations can be integrated with the design of a simple separation process to arrive at a metric to rank performance of over 87 000 different zeolite structures, including the known IZA zeolite structures. Our novel, efficient algorithm using graphics processing units can accurately characterize both the adsorption and diffusion properties of a given structure in just a few seconds and accordingly find a set of optimal structures for different desired purity of separated gases from a large database of porous materials in reasonable wall time. Our analysis reveals that the optimal structures for separations usually consist of channels with adsorption sites spread relatively uniformly across the entire channel such that they feature well-balanced CO2 adsorption and diffusion properties. Our screening also shows that the top structures in the predicted zeolite database outperform the best known zeolite by a factor of 4-7. Finally, we have identified a completely different optimal set of zeolite structures that are suitable for an inverse process, in which the CO2 is retained while CH4 or N-2 is passed through a membrane.

  17. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Baghram, Shant; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: MohammadHossein.Namjoo@utdallas.edu

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling k{sup n{sub A}-1} for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound n{sub A} < 0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale M{sub c} in which for M M{sub c}) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  18. Herschel view of the large-scale structure in the Chamaeleon dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Oliveira, C.; Schneider, N.; Merín, B.; Prusti, T.; Ribas, Á.; Cox, N. L. J.; Vavrek, R.; Könyves, V.; Arzoumanian, D.; Puga, E.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Kóspál, Á.; André, Ph.; Didelon, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Royer, P.; Waelkens, C.; Bontemps, S.; Winston, E.; Spezzi, L.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest star-forming sites and encompasses three molecular clouds (Cha I, II, and III) that have a different star-formation history, from quiescent (Cha III) to actively forming stars (Cha II), and one that reaches the end of star-formation (Cha I). Aims: We aim at characterising the large-scale structure of the three sub-regions of the Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex by analysing new far-infrared images taken with the Herschel Space Observatory. Methods: We derived column density and temperature maps using PACS and SPIRE observations from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey and applied several tools, such as filament tracing, power-spectra, Δ-variance, and probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the column density, to derive the physical properties. Results: The column density maps reveal a different morphological appearance for each of the three clouds, with a ridge-like structure for Cha I, a clump-dominated regime for Cha II, and an intricate filamentary network for Cha III. The filament width is measured to be about 0.12 ± 0.04 pc in the three clouds, and the filaments are found to be gravitationally unstable in Cha I and II, but mostly subcritical in Cha III. Faint filaments (striations) are prominent in Cha I and are mostly aligned with the large-scale magnetic field. The PDFs of all regions show a lognormal distribution at low column densities. For higher densities, the PDF of Cha I shows a turnover indicative of an extended higher density component and culminates in a power-law tail. Cha II shows a power-law tail with a slope characteristic of gravity. The PDF of Cha III can be best fit by a single lognormal. Conclusions: The turbulence properties of the three regions are found to be similar, pointing towards a scenario where the clouds are impacted by large-scale processes. The magnetic field might possibly play an important role for the star formation efficiency in the Chamaeleon clouds

  19. Altered functional-structural coupling of large-scale brain networks in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Liao, Wei; Chen, Huafu; Mantini, Dante; Ding, Ju-Rong; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Zhengge; Yuan, Cuiping; Chen, Guanghui; Jiao, Qing; Lu, Guangming

    2011-10-01

    The human brain is a large-scale integrated network in the functional and structural domain. Graph theoretical analysis provides a novel framework for analysing such complex networks. While previous neuroimaging studies have uncovered abnormalities in several specific brain networks in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by tonic-clonic seizures, little is known about changes in whole-brain functional and structural connectivity networks. Regarding functional and structural connectivity, networks are intimately related and share common small-world topological features. We predict that patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy would exhibit a decoupling between functional and structural networks. In this study, 26 patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by tonic-clonic seizures and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal correlations and diffusion tensor image tractography were used to generate functional and structural connectivity networks. Graph theoretical analysis revealed that the patients lost optimal topological organization in both functional and structural connectivity networks. Moreover, the patients showed significant increases in nodal topological characteristics in several cortical and subcortical regions, including mesial frontal cortex, putamen, thalamus and amygdala relative to controls, supporting the hypothesis that regions playing important roles in the pathogenesis of epilepsy may display abnormal hub properties in network analysis. Relative to controls, patients showed further decreases in nodal topological characteristics in areas of the default mode network, such as the posterior cingulate gyrus and inferior temporal gyrus. Most importantly, the degree of coupling between functional and structural connectivity networks was decreased, and exhibited a negative correlation with epilepsy duration in patients. Our findings

  20. Large-scale structure after COBE: Peculiar velocities and correlations of cold dark matter halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Quinn, Peter J.; Salmon, John K.; Warren, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Large N-body simulations on parallel supercomputers allow one to simultaneously investigate large-scale structure and the formation of galactic halos with unprecedented resolution. Our study shows that the masses as well as the spatial distribution of halos on scales of tens of megaparsecs in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe with the spectrum normalized to the anisotropies detected by Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is compatible with the observations. We also show that the average value of the relative pairwise velocity dispersion sigma(sub v) - used as a principal argument against COBE-normalized CDM models-is significantly lower for halos than for individual particles. When the observational methods of extracting sigma(sub v) are applied to the redshift catalogs obtained from the numerical experiments, estimates differ significantly between different observation-sized samples and overlap observational estimates obtained following the same procedure.

  1. The trispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the connected four point correlation function (the trispectrum in Fourier space) of cosmological density perturbations at one-loop order in Standard Perturbation Theory (SPT) and the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure (EFT of LSS). This paper is a companion to our earlier work on the non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum, which corresponds to a particular wavenumber configuration of the trispectrum. In the present calculation, we highlight and clarify some of the subtle aspects of the EFT framework that arise at third order in perturbation theory for general wavenumber configurations of the trispectrum. We consistently incorporate vorticity and non-locality in time into the EFT counterterms and lay out a complete basis of building blocks for the stress tensor. We show predictions for the one-loop SPT trispectrum and the EFT contributions, focusing on configurations which have particular relevance for using LSS to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity.

  2. Computing global structural balance in large-scale signed social networks.

    PubMed

    Facchetti, Giuseppe; Iacono, Giovanni; Altafini, Claudio

    2011-12-27

    Structural balance theory affirms that signed social networks (i.e., graphs whose signed edges represent friendly/hostile interactions among individuals) tend to be organized so as to avoid conflictual situations, corresponding to cycles of negative parity. Using an algorithm for ground-state calculation in large-scale Ising spin glasses, in this paper we compute the global level of balance of very large online social networks and verify that currently available networks are indeed extremely balanced. This property is explainable in terms of the high degree of skewness of the sign distributions on the nodes of the graph. In particular, individuals linked by a large majority of negative edges create mostly "apparent disorder," rather than true "frustration."

  3. Evidence for the interaction of large scale magnetic structures in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Demoulin, P.; Henoux, J. C.; Machado, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    By modeling the observed vertical magnetic field of an active region AR 2372 by the potential field of an ensemble of magnetic dipoles, the likely location of the separatrices, surfaces that separates cells of different field line connectivities, and of the separator which is the intersection of the separatrices, is derived. Four of the five off-band H-alpha kernels of a flare that occurred less than 20 minutes before obtaining the magnetogram are shown to have taken place near or at the separatrices. These H-alpha kernels are connected by field lines that pass near the separator. This indicates that the flare may have resulted from the interaction in the separator region of large scale magnetic structures.

  4. Computing global structural balance in large-scale signed social networks

    PubMed Central

    Facchetti, Giuseppe; Iacono, Giovanni; Altafini, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Structural balance theory affirms that signed social networks (i.e., graphs whose signed edges represent friendly/hostile interactions among individuals) tend to be organized so as to avoid conflictual situations, corresponding to cycles of negative parity. Using an algorithm for ground-state calculation in large-scale Ising spin glasses, in this paper we compute the global level of balance of very large online social networks and verify that currently available networks are indeed extremely balanced. This property is explainable in terms of the high degree of skewness of the sign distributions on the nodes of the graph. In particular, individuals linked by a large majority of negative edges create mostly “apparent disorder,” rather than true “frustration.” PMID:22167802

  5. Efficient preconditioning of the electronic structure problem in large scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-06-28

    We present an improved preconditioning scheme for electronic structure calculations based on the orbital transformation method. First, a preconditioner is developed which includes information from the full Kohn-Sham matrix but avoids computationally demanding diagonalisation steps in its construction. This reduces the computational cost of its construction, eliminating a bottleneck in large scale simulations, while maintaining rapid convergence. In addition, a modified form of Hotelling’s iterative inversion is introduced to replace the exact inversion of the preconditioner matrix. This method is highly effective during molecular dynamics (MD), as the solution obtained in earlier MD steps is a suitable initial guess. Filtering small elements during sparse matrix multiplication leads to linear scaling inversion, while retaining robustness, already for relatively small systems. For system sizes ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand atoms, which are typical for many practical applications, the improvements to the algorithm lead to a 2-5 fold speedup per MD step.

  6. Effective theory of large-scale structure with primordial non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Pajer, Enrico; Woude, Drian van der; Welling, Yvette E-mail: d.baumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: yvettewelling@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    We develop the effective theory of large-scale structure for non-Gaussian initial conditions. The effective stress tensor in the dark matter equations of motion contains new operators, which originate from the squeezed limit of the primordial bispectrum. Parameterizing the squeezed limit by a scaling and an angular dependence, captures large classes of primordial non-Gaussianity. Within this parameterization, we classify the possible contributions to the effective theory. We show explicitly how all terms consistent with the symmetries arise from coarse graining the dark matter equations of motion and its initial conditions. We also demonstrate that the system is closed under renormalization and that the basis of correction terms is therefore complete. The relevant corrections to the matter power spectrum and bispectrum are computed numerically and their relative importance is discussed.

  7. The topology of large-scale structure. VI - Slices of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III; Melott, Adrian L.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the topology of large-scale structure in two observed slices of the universe are presented. Both slices pass through the Coma cluster and their depths are 100 and 230/h Mpc. The present topology study shows that the largest void in the CfA slice is divided into two smaller voids by a statistically significant line of galaxies. The topology of toy models like the white noise and bubble models is shown to be inconsistent with that of the observed slices. A large N-body simulation was made of the biased cloud dark matter model and the slices are simulated by matching them in selection functions and boundary conditions. The genus curves for these simulated slices are spongelike and have a small shift in the direction of a meatball topology like those of observed slices.

  8. Large-Scale Predictive Drug Safety: From Structural Alerts to Biological Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Serna, Ricard; Vidal, David; Remez, Nikita; Mestres, Jordi

    2015-10-19

    The recent explosion of data linking drugs, proteins, and pathways with safety events has promoted the development of integrative systems approaches to large-scale predictive drug safety. The added value of such approaches is that, beyond the traditional identification of potentially labile chemical fragments for selected toxicity end points, they have the potential to provide mechanistic insights for a much larger and diverse set of safety events in a statistically sound nonsupervised manner, based on the similarity to drug classes, the interaction with secondary targets, and the interference with biological pathways. The combined identification of chemical and biological hazards enhances our ability to assess the safety risk of bioactive small molecules with higher confidence than that using structural alerts only. We are still a very long way from reliably predicting drug safety, but advances toward gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to adverse outcomes represent a step forward in this direction.

  9. Efficient preconditioning of the electronic structure problem in large scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-06-01

    We present an improved preconditioning scheme for electronic structure calculations based on the orbital transformation method. First, a preconditioner is developed which includes information from the full Kohn-Sham matrix but avoids computationally demanding diagonalisation steps in its construction. This reduces the computational cost of its construction, eliminating a bottleneck in large scale simulations, while maintaining rapid convergence. In addition, a modified form of Hotelling's iterative inversion is introduced to replace the exact inversion of the preconditioner matrix. This method is highly effective during molecular dynamics (MD), as the solution obtained in earlier MD steps is a suitable initial guess. Filtering small elements during sparse matrix multiplication leads to linear scaling inversion, while retaining robustness, already for relatively small systems. For system sizes ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand atoms, which are typical for many practical applications, the improvements to the algorithm lead to a 2-5 fold speedup per MD step.

  10. Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure:Connecting Hopes with Reality

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Marcello; Baldauf, T.; Bond, J. Richard; Dalal, N.; Putter, R. D.; Dore, O.; Green, Daniel; Hirata, Chris; Huang, Zhiqi; Huterer, Dragan; Jeong, Donghui; Johnson, Matthew C.; Krause, Elisabeth; Loverde, Marilena; Meyers, Joel; Meeburg, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo; Shandera, Sarah; Silverstein, Eva; Slosar, Anze; Smith, Kendrick; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Assassi, Valentin; Braden, Jonathan; Hajian, Amir; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Stein, George; Engelen, Alexander van

    2014-12-15

    The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large-scale structure is, however, from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude f$loc\\atop{NL}$ (f$eq\\atop{NL}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are Δf$loc, eq\\atop{NL}$ ≃ 1. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.

  11. Consistency relations for large-scale structures with primordial non-Gaussianities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valageas, Patrick; Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    We investigate how the consistency relations of large-scale structures are modified when the initial density field is not Gaussian. We consider both scenarios where the primordial density field can be written as a nonlinear functional of a Gaussian field and more general scenarios where the probability distribution of the primordial density field can be expanded around the Gaussian distribution, up to all orders over δL 0. Working at linear order over the non-Gaussianity parameters fNL(n ) or Sn, we find that the consistency relations for the matter density fields are modified as they include additional contributions that involve all-order mixed linear-nonlinear correlations ⟨∏δL∏δ ⟩. We derive the conditions needed to recover the simple Gaussian form of the consistency relations. This corresponds to scenarios that become Gaussian in the squeezed limit. Our results also apply to biased tracers and velocity or momentum cross-correlations.

  12. Large Scale Chromosome Folding Is Stable against Local Changes in Chromatin Structure

    PubMed Central

    Therizols, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the link between small-scale chromatin structure and large-scale chromosome folding during interphase is a prerequisite for understanding transcription. Yet, this link remains poorly investigated. Here, we introduce a simple biophysical model where interphase chromosomes are described in terms of the folding of chromatin sequences composed of alternating blocks of fibers with different thicknesses and flexibilities, and we use it to study the influence of sequence disorder on chromosome behaviors in space and time. By employing extensive computer simulations, we thus demonstrate that chromosomes undergo noticeable conformational changes only on length-scales smaller than 105 basepairs and time-scales shorter than a few seconds, and we suggest there might exist effective upper bounds to the detection of chromosome reorganization in eukaryotes. We prove the relevance of our framework by modeling recent experimental FISH data on murine chromosomes. PMID:27295501

  13. A case study of large-scale structure in a 'hot' model universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.; Gallagher, John S., III; Melott, Adrian L.; Bushouse, Howard A.

    1988-01-01

    Large-scale structure is studied in an Omega(0) = 1 model universe filled with 'hot' dark matter. A particle mesh computer code is used to calculate the development of gravitational instabilities in 64-cubed mass clouds on a 64-cubed three-dimensional grid over an expansion factor of about 1000. The present epoch is identified by matching the slope of the model particle-particle two-point correlation function with that obtained from observations of galaxies, and the model then corresponds to a cubical sample of the universe of about 105/h Mpc on a side. Properties of the simulated universe are investigated by casting the model quantities into observer's coordinates and comparing the results with observations of the spatial and velocity distributions of luminous matter. It is concluded based on simple arguments that current limits on the time of galaxy formation do not rule out 'hot' dark matter.

  14. Modeling of the dielectrophoretic conveyer-belt assembling microparticles into large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusid, Boris; Jacqmin, David; Kumar, Anil; Acrivos, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    A dielectrophoretic conveyor-belt method for assembling negatively polarized microparticles into large-scale structures was recently developed (APL 90, 154104, 2007). To do this, first, an array of microelectrodes is energized to generate a spatially periodic AC electric field that causes the particles to aggregate into boluses in positions of the field intensity- minima, which are located mid-way along the height of the channel. The minima and their associated boluses are then moved by periodically grounding and energizing the electrode array so as to generate an electrical field moving along the electrode array. We simulate this experiment numerically via a two- dimensional electro-hydrodynamic model (PRE 69, 021402, 2004). The numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experiments in that they show similar particle aggregation rates, bolus sizes and bolus transport speeds.

  15. Automatic three-dimensional measurement of large-scale structure based on vision metrology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Guan, Banglei; Zhang, Xiaohu; Li, Daokui; Yu, Qifeng

    2014-01-01

    All relevant key techniques involved in photogrammetric vision metrology for fully automatic 3D measurement of large-scale structure are studied. A new kind of coded target consisting of circular retroreflective discs is designed, and corresponding detection and recognition algorithms based on blob detection and clustering are presented. Then a three-stage strategy starting with view clustering is proposed to achieve automatic network orientation. As for matching of noncoded targets, the concept of matching path is proposed, and matches for each noncoded target are found by determination of the optimal matching path, based on a novel voting strategy, among all possible ones. Experiments on a fixed keel of airship have been conducted to verify the effectiveness and measuring accuracy of the proposed methods.

  16. Automatic Three-Dimensional Measurement of Large-Scale Structure Based on Vision Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Guan, Banglei; Zhang, Xiaohu; Li, Daokui; Yu, Qifeng

    2014-01-01

    All relevant key techniques involved in photogrammetric vision metrology for fully automatic 3D measurement of large-scale structure are studied. A new kind of coded target consisting of circular retroreflective discs is designed, and corresponding detection and recognition algorithms based on blob detection and clustering are presented. Then a three-stage strategy starting with view clustering is proposed to achieve automatic network orientation. As for matching of noncoded targets, the concept of matching path is proposed, and matches for each noncoded target are found by determination of the optimal matching path, based on a novel voting strategy, among all possible ones. Experiments on a fixed keel of airship have been conducted to verify the effectiveness and measuring accuracy of the proposed methods. PMID:24701143

  17. Measuring the topology of large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm for quantitatively measuring the topology of large-scale structure has now been applied to a large number of observational data sets. The present paper summarizes and provides an overview of some of these observational results. On scales significantly larger than the correlation length, larger than about 1200 km/s, the cluster and galaxy data are fully consistent with a sponge-like random phase topology. At a smoothing length of about 600 km/s, however, the observed genus curves show a small shift in the direction of a meatball topology. Cold dark matter (CDM) models show similar shifts at these scales but not generally as large as those seen in the data. Bubble models, with voids completely surrounded on all sides by wall of galaxies, show shifts in the opposite direction. The CDM model is overall the most successful in explaining the data.

  18. Mantle convection and the large scale structures of the Earth's gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    The connection between the observed large scale structure of the Earths' gravitational field, as represented by the GEM10 model, and the surface kinematic manifestations of plate tectonics, as represented by the absolute plate motion model of Minster and Jordan, is explored using a somewhat novel method of analysis. Two scalar derivatives of the field of surface plate velocities, namely the horizontal divergence and the radial vorticity, are computed from the plate motion data. These two scalars are respectively determined by the poloidal and toroidal scalars in terms of which any essentially solenoidal vector field may be completely represented. They provide a compact summary of the observed plate boundary types in nature, with oceanic ridges and trenches being essentially boundaries of divergence, and transform faults being essentially boundaries of vorticity.

  19. Computational Cosmology: from the Early Universe to the Large Scale Structure.

    PubMed

    Anninos, Peter

    1998-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  20. Computational Cosmology: From the Early Universe to the Large Scale Structure.

    PubMed

    Anninos, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations (and numerical methods applied to specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  1. Automatic Generation of Connectivity for Large-Scale Neuronal Network Models through Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Pier, Sandra; Naveau, Mikaël; Butz-Ostendorf, Markus; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of new high performance computation technology in the last decade, the simulation of large scale neural networks which are able to reproduce the behavior and structure of the brain has finally become an achievable target of neuroscience. Due to the number of synaptic connections between neurons and the complexity of biological networks, most contemporary models have manually defined or static connectivity. However, it is expected that modeling the dynamic generation and deletion of the links among neurons, locally and between different regions of the brain, is crucial to unravel important mechanisms associated with learning, memory and healing. Moreover, for many neural circuits that could potentially be modeled, activity data is more readily and reliably available than connectivity data. Thus, a framework that enables networks to wire themselves on the basis of specified activity targets can be of great value in specifying network models where connectivity data is incomplete or has large error margins. To address these issues, in the present work we present an implementation of a model of structural plasticity in the neural network simulator NEST. In this model, synapses consist of two parts, a pre- and a post-synaptic element. Synapses are created and deleted during the execution of the simulation following local homeostatic rules until a mean level of electrical activity is reached in the network. We assess the scalability of the implementation in order to evaluate its potential usage in the self generation of connectivity of large scale networks. We show and discuss the results of simulations on simple two population networks and more complex models of the cortical microcircuit involving 8 populations and 4 layers using the new framework. PMID:27303272

  2. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; ...

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 hmore » Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.« less

  3. Analytic prediction of baryonic effects from the EFT of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, Matthew; Perko, Ashley; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: perko@stanford.edu

    2015-05-01

    The large scale structures of the universe will likely be the next leading source of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to understand their behavior. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures provides a consistent way to perturbatively predict the clustering of dark matter at large distances. The fact that baryons move distances comparable to dark matter allows us to infer that baryons at large distances can be described in a similar formalism: the backreaction of short-distance non-linearities and of star-formation physics at long distances can be encapsulated in an effective stress tensor, characterized by a few parameters. The functional form of baryonic effects can therefore be predicted. In the power spectrum the leading contribution goes as ∝ k{sup 2} P(k), with P(k) being the linear power spectrum and with the numerical prefactor depending on the details of the star-formation physics. We also perform the resummation of the contribution of the long-wavelength displacements, allowing us to consistently predict the effect of the relative motion of baryons and dark matter. We compare our predictions with simulations that contain several implementations of baryonic physics, finding percent agreement up to relatively high wavenumbers such as k ≅ 0.3 hMpc{sup −1} or k ≅ 0.6 hMpc{sup −1}, depending on the order of the calculation. Our results open a novel way to understand baryonic effects analytically, as well as to interface with simulations.

  4. Complex networks, community structure, and catchment classification in a large-scale river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Koren; Sivakumar, Bellie; Woldemeskel, Fitsum M.

    2017-02-01

    This study introduces the concepts of complex networks, especially community structure, to classify catchments in large-scale river basins. The Mississippi River basin (MRB) is considered as a representative large-scale basin, and daily streamflow from a network of 1663 stations are analyzed. Six community structure methods are employed: edge betweenness, greedy algorithm, multilevel modularity optimization, leading eigenvector, label propagation, and walktrap. The influence of correlation threshold (i.e. spatial correlation in flow between stations) on classification (i.e. community formation) is examined. The consistency among the methods in classifying catchments is assessed, using a normalized mutual information (NMI) index. An attempt is also made to explain the community formation in terms of river network/branching and some important catchment/flow properties. The results indicate that the correlation threshold has a notable influence on the number and size of communities identified and that there is a high level of consistency in the performance among the methods (except for the leading eigenvector method at lower thresholds). The results also reveal that only a few communities combine to represent a majority of the catchments, with the 10 largest communities (roughly 4% of the total number of communities) representing almost two-thirds of the catchments. Community formation is found to be influenced not only by geographic proximity but also, more importantly, by the organization of the river network (i.e. main stem and subsequent branching). Some communities are found to exhibit a greater variability in catchment/flow properties within themselves when compared to that of the whole network, thus indicating that such characteristics are unlikely to be a significant influence on community grouping.

  5. Formation and dynamics of large-scale magnetic structures in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutier, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The formation and dynamics of large-scale magnetic structures in the ionosphere of Venus are examined. It is shown that such structures must be the result of steady state convection of interplanetary field lines into the ionosphere by the small amount of solar wind plasma (less than or approximately equal to 1-5 percent) absorbed by the planetary atmosphere below the ionopause, rather than isolated remnants of large fields persisting for long periods without connection to the solar wind induced current and convection pattern. In particular, it is demonstrated that the magnetic diffusion of such structures would result in their dissipation with time scales of 1-10 min, if they were not steady state structures in convective and diffusive equilibriuim. It is shown that the equations governing the diffusion of these magnetic structures are similar to those governing diffusion of a gas out of an enclosed chamber with a porous wall, and a simple analog is illustrated. The application of these results to magnetic fields of astrophysical plasmas is discussed.

  6. Traveling wave solutions of large-scale structures in turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yongyun; Willis, Ashley; Cossu, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    Recently, a set of stationary invariant solutions for the large-scale structures in turbulent Couette flow was computed at Reτ = 128 using an over-damped LES with the Smagorinsky model which accounts the effect of the surrounding small-scale motions. In this talk, we show that this approach can be extended to Reτ = 1000 in turbulent channel flow, towards the regime where the large-scale structures in the form of very-large-scale motions (long streaky motions) and large-scale motions (short vortical structures) energetically emerge. We demonstrate that a set of invariant solutions in the form of a traveling wave can be computed from simulations of the self-sustaining large-scale structures in the minimal unit with midplane reflection symmetry. By approximating the surrounding small scales with an artificially elevated Smagorinsky constant, a set of equilibrium states are found, labelled upper- and lower-branch according to their related wall shear stress. In particular, we will show that the upper-branch equilibrium state is a reasonable proxy for the spatial structure and the turbulent statistics of the self-sustaining large-scale structures. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, UK (EP/N019342/1).

  7. Determining large-scale heliospheric structure using ultraviolet resonance line observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Doyle T.

    1995-01-01

    Currently the Pioneer 10 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are beyond the orbit of Pluto, traveling outward from the Sun. Each is capable of detecting ultraviolet radiation resonantly scattered from hydrogen and helium atoms in the heliosphere and local interstellar medium. These observations are particularly well suited for the investigation of the large-scale heliospheric H and He distributions because the Voyager spacecraft are heading upstream, into the direction of local interstellar flow, whereas Pioneer 10 is heading downstream. Observations of the brightest resonance line, H Lyman-alpha, reveals that beyond about 20 AU from the Sun, upstream intensities decrease less quickly as a function of solar distance than downstream intensities. This implies that the heliospheric H distributions in the upstream and downstream directions are significantly different. Heliospheric H atoms originate in the local interstellar flow, and must penetrate through the heliospheric interface, where they are subject to charge exchange collisions with solar wind and interstellar protons. Models indicate that this process is probably responsible for the upstream/downstream difference in H Lyman-alpha. In addition, a recent spectroscopic determination of the H atom velocity distribution in the inner heliosphere implies a significant deceleration in the bulk flow speed of the heliospheric hydrogen gas relative to the helium flow, an effect that is also likely due to H-p charge exchange occurring in the upstream heliospheric interface region. In this presentation, recent heliospheric resonance line observations and their interpretations will be reviewed, focusing on their sensitivity to large-scale heliospheric structure.

  8. A Bayesian Estimate of the CMB-Large-scale Structure Cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura-Santos, E.; Carvalho, F. C.; Penna-Lima, M.; Novaes, C. P.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    Evidences for late-time acceleration of the universe are provided by multiple probes, such as Type Ia supernovae, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large-scale structure (LSS). In this work, we focus on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary CMB fluctuations generated by evolving gravitational potentials due to the transition between, e.g., the matter and dark energy (DE) dominated phases. Therefore, assuming a flat universe, DE properties can be inferred from ISW detections. We present a Bayesian approach to compute the CMB-LSS cross-correlation signal. The method is based on the estimate of the likelihood for measuring a combined set consisting of a CMB temperature and galaxy contrast maps, provided that we have some information on the statistical properties of the fluctuations affecting these maps. The likelihood is estimated by a sampling algorithm, therefore avoiding the computationally demanding techniques of direct evaluation in either pixel or harmonic space. As local tracers of the matter distribution at large scales, we used the Two Micron All Sky Survey galaxy catalog and, for the CMB temperature fluctuations, the ninth-year data release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9). The results show a dominance of cosmic variance over the weak recovered signal, due mainly to the shallowness of the catalog used, with systematics associated with the sampling algorithm playing a secondary role as sources of uncertainty. When combined with other complementary probes, the method presented in this paper is expected to be a useful tool to late-time acceleration studies in cosmology.

  9. Using large scale structure to measure fNL , gNL and τNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Simone; Smith, Kendrick M.

    2015-02-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity of local type is known to produce a scale-dependent contribution to the galaxy bias. Several classes of multifield inflationary models predict non-Gaussian bias which is stochastic, in the sense that dark matter and halos do not trace each other perfectly on large scales. In this work, we forecast the ability of next-generation large-scale structure surveys to constrain common types of primordial non-Gaussianity like fNL, gNL and τNL using halo bias, including stochastic contributions. We provide fitting functions for statistical errors on these parameters which can be used for rapid forecasting or survey optimization. A next-generation survey with volume V =25 h-3 Gpc3 , median redshift z =0.7 and mean bias bg=2.5 can achieve σ (fNL)=6 , σ (gNL)=105 and σ (τNL)=103 if no mass information is available. If halo masses are available, we show that optimally weighting the halo field in order to reduce sample variance can achieve σ (fNL)=1.5 , σ (gNL)=104 and σ (τNL)=100 if halos with mass down to Mmin=1011h-1M⊙ are resolved, outperforming Planck by a factor of 4 on fNL and nearly an order of magnitude on gNL and τNL. Finally, we study the effect of photometric redshift errors and discuss degeneracies between different non-Gaussian parameters, as well as the impact of marginalizing Gaussian bias and shot noise.

  10. Dynamics of the large-scale ULF electromagnetic wave structures in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburjania, G. D.; Chargazia, Z. Kh.

    2007-12-01

    The present article displays the results of theoretical investigation of the planetary ultra-low-frequency (ULF) electromagnetic wave structure, generation and propagation dynamics in the dissipative ionosphere. These waves are stipulated by a spatial inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The waves propagate in different ionospheric layers along the parallels to the east as well as to the west and their frequencies vary in the range of (10 10-6) s-1 with a wavelength of order 103 km. The fast disturbances are associated with oscillations of the ionospheric electrons frozen in the geomagnetic field. The large-scale waves are weakly damped. They generate the geomagnetic field adding up to several tens of nanotesla (nT) near the Earth's surface. It is prescribed that the planetary ULF electromagnetic waves preceding their nonlinear interaction with the local shear winds can self-localize in the form of nonlinear long-living solitary vortices, moving along the latitude circles westward as well as eastward with a velocity different from the phase velocity of the corresponding linear waves. The vortex structures transfer the trapped particles of medium, as well as energy and heat. That is why such nonlinear vortex structures can be the structural elements of the ionospheric strong macro-turbulences.

  11. Large-Scale Genetic Structuring of a Widely Distributed Carnivore - The Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx)

    PubMed Central

    Rueness, Eli K.; Naidenko, Sergei; Trosvik, Pål; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the phylogeography and genetic structure of a multitude of species inhabiting Europe and North America have been described. The flora and fauna of the vast landmasses of north-eastern Eurasia are still largely unexplored in this respect. The Eurasian lynx is a large felid that is relatively abundant over much of the Russian sub-continent and the adjoining countries. Analyzing 148 museum specimens collected throughout its range over the last 150 years we have described the large-scale genetic structuring in this highly mobile species. We have investigated the spatial genetic patterns using mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and cytochrome b) and 11 microsatellite loci, and describe three phylogenetic clades and a clear structuring along an east-west gradient. The most likely scenario is that the contemporary Eurasian lynx populations originated in central Asia and that parts of Europe were inhabited by lynx during the Pleistocene. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) range expansions lead to colonization of north-western Siberia and Scandinavia from the Caucasus and north-eastern Siberia from a refugium further east. No evidence of a Berinigan refugium could be detected in our data. We observed restricted gene flow and suggest that future studies of the Eurasian lynx explore to what extent the contemporary population structure may be explained by ecological variables. PMID:24695745

  12. Large-scale genetic structuring of a widely distributed carnivore--the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Rueness, Eli K; Naidenko, Sergei; Trosvik, Pål; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the phylogeography and genetic structure of a multitude of species inhabiting Europe and North America have been described. The flora and fauna of the vast landmasses of north-eastern Eurasia are still largely unexplored in this respect. The Eurasian lynx is a large felid that is relatively abundant over much of the Russian sub-continent and the adjoining countries. Analyzing 148 museum specimens collected throughout its range over the last 150 years we have described the large-scale genetic structuring in this highly mobile species. We have investigated the spatial genetic patterns using mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and cytochrome b) and 11 microsatellite loci, and describe three phylogenetic clades and a clear structuring along an east-west gradient. The most likely scenario is that the contemporary Eurasian lynx populations originated in central Asia and that parts of Europe were inhabited by lynx during the Pleistocene. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) range expansions lead to colonization of north-western Siberia and Scandinavia from the Caucasus and north-eastern Siberia from a refugium further east. No evidence of a Berinigan refugium could be detected in our data. We observed restricted gene flow and suggest that future studies of the Eurasian lynx explore to what extent the contemporary population structure may be explained by ecological variables.

  13. Kinematic morphology of large-scale structure: evolution from potential to rotational flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Eyink, Gregory L.

    2014-09-20

    As an alternative way to describe the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of the characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, is very useful for understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with the cosmic web structure because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between the cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of the phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariant space.

  14. Seismic Modelling of the Earth's Large-Scale Three-Dimensional Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, J. H.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    1989-07-01

    Several different kinds of seismological data, spanning more than three orders of magnitude in frequency, have been employed in the study of the Earth's large-scale three-dimensional structure. These yield different but overlapping information, which is leading to a coherent picture of the Earth's internal heterogeneity. In this article we describe several methods of seismic inversion and intercompare the resulting models. Models of upper-mantle shear velocity based upon mantle waveforms (Woodhouse & Dziewonski (J. geophys. Res. 89, 5953-5986 (1984))) (f lesssim 7 mHz) and long-period body waveforms (f lesssim 20 mHz; Woodhouse & Dziewonski (Eos, Wash. 67, 307 (1986))) show the mid-oceanic ridges to be the major low-velocity anomalies in the uppermost mantle, together with regions in the western Pacific, characterized by back-arc volcanism. High velocities are associated with the continents, and in particular with the continental shields, extending to depths in excess of 300 km. By assuming a given ratio between density and wave velocity variations, and a given mantle viscosity structure, such models have been successful in explaining some aspects of observed plate motion in terms of thermal convection in the mantle (Forte & Peltier (J. geophys. Res. 92, 3645-3679 (1987))). An important qualitative conclusion from such analysis is that the magnitude of the observed seismic anomalies is of the order expected in a convecting system having the viscosity, temperature derivatives and flow rates which characterize the mantle. Models of the lower mantle based upon P-wave arrival times (f ≈ 1 Hz; Dziewonski (J. geophys. Res. 89, 5929-5952 (1984)); Morelli & Dziewonski (Eos, Wash. 67, 311 (1986))) SH waveforms (f ≈ 20 mHz; Woodhouse & Dziewonski (1986)) and free oscillations (Giardini et al. (Nature, Lond. 325, 405-411 (1987); J. geophys. Res. 93, 13716-13742 (1988))) (f ≈ 0.5-5 mHz) show a very long wavelength pattern, largely contained in spherical harmonics of

  15. Error analysis and system implementation for structured light stereo vision 3D geometric detection in large scale condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Zhu, Fan

    2012-11-01

    Stereo vision based 3D metrology technique is an effective approach for relatively large scale object's 3D geometric detection. In this paper, we present a specified image capture system, which implements LVDS interface embedded CMOS sensor and CAN bus to ensure synchronous trigger and exposure. We made an error analysis for structured light vision measurement in large scale condition, based on which we built and tested the system prototype both indoor and outfield. The result shows that the system is very suitable for large scale metrology applications.

  16. Implementing DICOM Structured Reporting in a Large-Scale Telemedicine Network

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos, Cloves Langendorf; Andrade, Rafael; de Carlos Back Giuliano, Isabela; Borgatto, Adriano Ferreti; de Andrade, Dalton Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Large-scale asynchronous telemedicine networks can offer a unique opportunity for the acquisition of detailed epidemiological information if the data are acquired and handled in an appropriate way. In this work, an approach is presented for the integration of medical reports in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Structured Reporting standard in telemedicine networks using structured vocabularies. Materials and Methods: The use of these structured vocabularies is extended beyond radiology, and a case study in telecardiology is presented. The approach was applied in the context of a real-world statewide public telemedicine network; nowadays on average 470 written electrocardiographic structured reports daily are being performed. Cardiologists provided more than 220,000 written structured reports, and these reports are stored into a central database. Results: This study was performed during a 12-month period, and it was possible to examine possible associations between a list of co-morbidities and cardiac risk factors with a diagnosis that indicates the presence of cardiac ischemia, cardiac injury, or possible necrosis by using DICOM Structured Reporting. Our application is responsible for coordinating the process of issuance of reports through various technologies and devices. The system works as a library in an HTTP server, which accesses information from studies in DICOM format from the database and from structured vocabularies. Conclusions: Results indicate that traceability of morbidity, diagnoses, and patient clinical information can be achieved, resulting in an efficient data mining–friendly framework. A multidevice application for Web-based and smartphone-based platforms showed that it is a viable solution for applying the DICOM Structured Reporting standard in telemedicine networks. PMID:23837517

  17. Symbolic and graphical representation scheme for sensors deployed in large-scale structures.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Seon; Shin, Yunah; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-07-31

    As wireless sensor network (WSN)-based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are increasingly being employed in civil infrastructures and building structures, the management of large numbers of sensing devices and the large amount of data acquired from WSNs will become increasingly difficult unless systematic expressions of the sensor network are provided. This study introduces a practical WSN for SHM that consists of sensors, wireless sensor nodes, repeater nodes, master nodes, and monitoring servers. This study also proposes a symbolic and graphical representation scheme (SGRS) for this system, in which the communication relationships and respective location information of the distributed sensing components are expressed in a concise manner. The SGRS was applied to the proposed WSN, which is employed in an actual large-scale irregular structure in which three types of sensors (75 vibrating wire strain gauges, 10 inclinometers, and three laser displacement sensors) and customized wireless sensor nodes are installed. The application results demonstrate that prompt identification of sensing units and effective management of the distributed sensor network can be realized from the SGRS. The results also demonstrate the superiority of the SGRS over conventional expression methods in which a box diagram or tree diagram representing the ID of sensors and data loggers is used.

  18. Symbolic and Graphical Representation Scheme for Sensors Deployed in Large-Scale Structures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Seon; Shin, Yunah; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-01-01

    As wireless sensor network (WSN)-based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are increasingly being employed in civil infrastructures and building structures, the management of large numbers of sensing devices and the large amount of data acquired from WSNs will become increasingly difficult unless systematic expressions of the sensor network are provided. This study introduces a practical WSN for SHM that consists of sensors, wireless sensor nodes, repeater nodes, master nodes, and monitoring servers. This study also proposes a symbolic and graphical representation scheme (SGRS) for this system, in which the communication relationships and respective location information of the distributed sensing components are expressed in a concise manner. The SGRS was applied to the proposed WSN, which is employed in an actual large-scale irregular structure in which three types of sensors (75 vibrating wire strain gauges, 10 inclinometers, and three laser displacement sensors) and customized wireless sensor nodes are installed. The application results demonstrate that prompt identification of sensing units and effective management of the distributed sensor network can be realized from the SGRS. The results also demonstrate the superiority of the SGRS over conventional expression methods in which a box diagram or tree diagram representing the ID of sensors and data loggers is used. PMID:23912426

  19. Structure-preserving model reduction of large-scale logistics networks. Applications for supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz-Reiter, B.; Wirth, F.; Dashkovskiy, S.; Makuschewitz, T.; Schönlein, M.; Kosmykov, M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the problem of model reduction with a view to large-scale logistics networks, specifically supply chains. Such networks are modeled by means of graphs, which describe the structure of material flow. An aim of the proposed model reduction procedure is to preserve important features within the network. As a new methodology we introduce the LogRank as a measure for the importance of locations, which is based on the structure of the flows within the network. We argue that these properties reflect relative importance of locations. Based on the LogRank we identify subgraphs of the network that can be neglected or aggregated. The effect of this is discussed for a few motifs. Using this approach we present a meta algorithm for structure-preserving model reduction that can be adapted to different mathematical modeling frameworks. The capabilities of the approach are demonstrated with a test case, where a logistics network is modeled as a Jackson network, i.e., a particular type of queueing network.

  20. Investigation of Strain/Vorticity and Large-Scale Flow Structure in Turbulent Nonpremixed Jet Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    Our study will use the microgravity environment to investigate the underlying flow structure of turbulent nonpremixed round jet flames. In particular, we aim to investigate the large-scale turbulent structure using planar laser Mie scattering (PLMS), and the strain rate and vorticity fields using particle image velocimetry (PIV). This work is motivated by recent studies in our laboratory that have led to several interesting observations of nominally momentum-driven turbulent nonpremixed planar flames. First of all, the organized large-scale turbulent structures that are observed in nonreacting planar jets may be substantially modified or suppressed in nonpremixed planar jet flames. Furthermore, a recent study using PIV and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH has shown that in transitional and turbulent nonpremixed planar jet flames the presence of the flame seems to greatly influence the underlying vorticity and strain fields, as compared to nonreacting jets. For example, the reaction zones in the jet flames are strongly correlated with regions of high vorticity. A related study has demonstrated that vorticity is not correlated in the same way with either iso-scalar surfaces or scalar dissipation layers in nonreacting planar jets. Furthermore, the relationship between strain and the reaction zone appears to be modified by the presence of high levels of heat release. In particular, the strain rate field in planar jet flames exhibits a preferred direction of principal compressive strain that apparently is related to strong shear across the reaction zone. This preferred direction of strain was not observed in nonreacting jets. One of the major problems encountered when conducting these types of studies is that it is difficult to know to what extent buoyancy influences the results. Therefore, the microgravity environment provides us with an excellent opportunity to explore these issues without the complicating effects of buoyancy. This is particularly the case when

  1. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, N.; White, B.R.; Lei, T.

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T`) were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T` large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T` structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T` structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T` structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T` structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. 11 refs.

  2. Large-scale gas kinematics and structure: An analysis of the Milky Way and NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Evan Scott

    2007-12-01

    This thesis quantitatively investigates the large-scale distribution and kinematics of gas in the Milky Way and other galaxies. Using the Leiden/ Argentine/Bonn (LAB) survey, I map the vertical structure of the Milky Way in atomic hydrogen. I reduce the complex structure of the warp to three simple Fourier spatial frequencies, and I show that the vertical oscillations known as "scalloping" are local rather than global. I then use unsharp masking to produce perturbed surface density and thickness maps of the outer Milky Way disk. These maps show the presence of spiral arms out to at least 25 kpc from the Galactic center, and demonstrate that overdensities in the surface density are coincident with regions of reduced gas thickness. Using interferometric observations from the VLA Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS) and the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS), I constrain the rotation curve of the inner Galaxy and its first two vertical derivatives. I use global and local models to find the falloff in the rotation curve from the plane is -22 ± 6 km s -1 kpc - 1 . This result is consistent with the falloff measured in the halos of other galaxies, but is too large to be explained by gravitational physics alone. I also present new observations of dense gas tracers in the central kiloparsec of NGC 6946 made with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). These observations spatially resolve the emission from HCN and HCO+ . I discuss two plausible hypotheses for the distribution of the dense gas.

  3. Neural Schematics as a unified formal graphical representation of large-scale Neural Network Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Matthias; Schüffny, René

    2013-01-01

    One of the major outcomes of neuroscientific research are models of Neural Network Structures (NNSs). Descriptions of these models usually consist of a non-standardized mixture of text, figures, and other means of visual information communication in print media. However, as neuroscience is an interdisciplinary domain by nature, a standardized way of consistently representing models of NNSs is required. While generic descriptions of such models in textual form have recently been developed, a formalized way of schematically expressing them does not exist to date. Hence, in this paper we present Neural Schematics as a concept inspired by similar approaches from other disciplines for a generic two dimensional representation of said structures. After introducing NNSs in general, a set of current visualizations of models of NNSs is reviewed and analyzed for what information they convey and how their elements are rendered. This analysis then allows for the definition of general items and symbols to consistently represent these models as Neural Schematics on a two dimensional plane. We will illustrate the possibilities an agreed upon standard can yield on sampled diagrams transformed into Neural Schematics and an example application for the design and modeling of large-scale NNSs. PMID:24167490

  4. Spectra and Large-Scale Structures in a Turbulent Boundary Layer Interacting with Wind Turbine Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, Yulia; Chatterjee, Tanmoy

    2016-11-01

    Wind Turbine Array Boundary Layer is a relatively simple, yet useful theoretical conceptualization to study very large wind farms in an atmospheric boundary layer. In this talk, we investigate the length scales of eddies involved in the power generation in these very large, "infinite" wind farms by analyzing the spectra of the turbulent flux of the mean kinetic energy from Large Eddy Simulations (LES). A goal is to provide a fundamental understanding of the dynamic behavior, the size, the scaling laws and the anisotropic structure of the energy containing eddies responsible for power generation from the wind turbines. Large-scale structures with an order of magnitude bigger than the turbine rotor diameter are shown to have substantial contribution to wind power. The study is performed with a Spectral Element LES code with the recently implemented near-wall model and the actuator line model to represent the effect of rotating wind turbine blades. In this presentation, we also explore an idea of a "multiscale" wind farm, where larger and smaller turbines are arranged in a symbiotic way, with smaller turbines helping to harvest additional power from the wakes of the larger turbines, inspired by the findings of the spectral analysis in uniform wind farms. NSF CBET 13358568 award.

  5. Large scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer and their imprint on wall shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a turbulent boundary layer developing on a flat plate model under zero pressure gradient flow. A MEMS differential capacitive shear stress sensor with a 1 mm × 1 mm floating element was used to capture the fluctuating wall shear stress simultaneously with streamwise velocity measurements from a hot-wire anemometer traversed in the wall normal direction. Near the wall, the peak in the cross correlation corresponds to an organized motion inclined 45° from the wall. In the outer region, the peak diminishes in value, but is still significant at a distance greater than half the boundary layer thickness, and corresponds to a structure inclined 14° from the wall. High coherence between the two signals was found for the low-frequency content, reinforcing the belief that large scale structures have a vital impact on wall shear stress. Thus, estimation of the wall shear stress from the low-frequency velocity signal will be performed, and is expected to be statistically significant in the outer boundary layer. Additionally, conditionally averaged mean velocity profiles will be presented to assess the effects of high and low shear stress. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  6. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Lima, Nelson A.

    2017-02-01

    With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar-tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar-tensor modification of gravity.

  7. Large-Scale Structures in Earth Foreshock Waves during Radial IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganse, Urs; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian; Palmroth, Minna; Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    Wave instabilities in the foreshock region of Earth's bow shock lead to formation of magnetic field and density fluctuations, commonly observed by spacecraft as 30-second waves. These waves are oblique to the interplanetary magnetic field, with the mechanism leading to oblique propagation still under discussion. Using the VLASIATOR (http://vlasiator.fmi.fi) global hybrid-Vlasov simulation code, we performed runs of radial and near-radial IMF conditions and were able to reproduce the development of these oblique foreshock wave instabilities, revealing a peculiar global structure, in which waves with different wave-vector directions are arranged around central spines, which are spatially offset from the bow shock's nose. We present analysis of the waves' growth behaviour and combine them with artificial observations, comparing to in-situ spacecraft data. Furthermore, we employed a test particle approach to investigate the formation mechanism of the instabilities' large-scale structure, and found that a coupling between the microphysics of wave-particle interaction and global-scale shock and foreshock geometry is essential to explain them.

  8. Large-Scale Recombinant Expression and Purification of Human Tyrosinase Suitable for Structural Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xuelei; Soler-Lopez, Montserrat; Wichers, Harry J.

    2016-01-01

    Human tyrosinase (TYR) is a glycoprotein that initiates the first two reactions in the melanin biosynthesis pathway. Mutations in its encoding gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism type I (OCA1), the most severe form of albinism, which is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by reduced or absent production of melanin in skin, hair and eyes. Despite extensive structural and characterization studies of its homologues in lower eukaryotic organisms, the catalytic mechanism of human TYR and the molecular basis of OCA1 are largely unknown. In this work, we have carried out a large-scale recombinant expression of TYR that has enabled us to obtain high yields of pure and active protein, required for crystallization trials and screening of skin whitening agents, which is highly demanded in the cosmetic industry. Addition of an N-terminal honeybee melittin signal peptide for secretion of the produced protein into the (protein-free) medium, as well as a cleavable His-tag at the C-terminus, was crucial for increasing the yield of pure protein. We have successfully crystallized two TYR variants, in both glycosylated and deglycosylated forms, showing preliminary X-ray diffraction patterns at 3.5 Å resolution. Hence, we have established an expression and purification protocol suitable for the crystal structure determination of human TYR, which will give unique atomic insight into the nature and conformation of the residues that shape the substrate binding pocket that will ultimately lead to efficient compound design. PMID:27551823

  9. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Senatore, Leonardo; Schmittfull, Marcel E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2015-10-01

    Given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/k{sub NL}, where k is the wavenumber of interest and k{sub NL} is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k≅ 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} and k≅ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which k{sub NL} is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ{sub 8}=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k≅ 0.25 h Mpc{sup −1}, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k≅ 0.25 h Mpc{sup −1}, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  10. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  11. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-01-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  12. Development and Applications of a Modular Parallel Process for Large Scale Fluid/Structures Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A modular process that can efficiently solve large scale multidisciplinary problems using massively parallel supercomputers is presented. The process integrates disciplines with diverse physical characteristics by retaining the efficiency of individual disciplines. Computational domain independence of individual disciplines is maintained using a meta programming approach. The process integrates disciplines without affecting the combined performance. Results are demonstrated for large scale aerospace problems on several supercomputers. The super scalability and portability of the approach is demonstrated on several parallel computers.

  13. Development and Applications of a Modular Parallel Process for Large Scale Fluid/Structures Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A modular process that can efficiently solve large scale multidisciplinary problems using massively parallel super computers is presented. The process integrates disciplines with diverse physical characteristics by retaining the efficiency of individual disciplines. Computational domain independence of individual disciplines is maintained using a meta programming approach. The process integrates disciplines without affecting the combined performance. Results are demonstrated for large scale aerospace problems on several supercomputers. The super scalability and portability of the approach is demonstrated on several parallel computers.

  14. A Structural Evaluation of a Large-Scale Quasi-Experimental Microfinance Initiative.

    PubMed

    Kaboski, Joseph P; Townsend, Robert M

    2011-09-01

    This paper uses a structural model to understand, predict, and evaluate the impact of an exogenous microcredit intervention program, the Thai Million Baht Village Fund program. We model household decisions in the face of borrowing constraints, income uncertainty, and high-yield indivisible investment opportunities. After estimation of parameters using pre-program data, we evaluate the model's ability to predict and interpret the impact of the village fund intervention. Simulations from the model mirror the data in yielding a greater increase in consumption than credit, which is interpreted as evidence of credit constraints. A cost-benefit analysis using the model indicates that some households value the program much more than its per household cost, but overall the program costs 20 percent more than the sum of these benefits.

  15. A Structural Evaluation of a Large-Scale Quasi-Experimental Microfinance Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kaboski, Joseph P.; Townsend, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a structural model to understand, predict, and evaluate the impact of an exogenous microcredit intervention program, the Thai Million Baht Village Fund program. We model household decisions in the face of borrowing constraints, income uncertainty, and high-yield indivisible investment opportunities. After estimation of parameters using pre-program data, we evaluate the model’s ability to predict and interpret the impact of the village fund intervention. Simulations from the model mirror the data in yielding a greater increase in consumption than credit, which is interpreted as evidence of credit constraints. A cost-benefit analysis using the model indicates that some households value the program much more than its per household cost, but overall the program costs 20 percent more than the sum of these benefits. PMID:22162594

  16. Deep Imaging of large scale extensional structures in the SW South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yao; Delescluse, Matthias; Wang, Jun; Pubellier, Manuel; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Qiu, Yan; Savva, Dimitri; Meresse, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest marginal basin in SE Asia and exhibits hundreds of kilometres of extended continental crust on both conjugate margins. The structures and processes leading to the formation of the SCS are still debated at various levels (timing, mechanisms). A joint collaboration between French and Chinese scientists led to the acquisition of coincident refraction and reflection seismic data over the SW sub-basin. In 2011, a 1000-km-long refraction line was first shot using R/V Tan Bao and 50 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS). Among the results was the homogeneous thickness (~12 km) of the thinned continental crust over hundreds of kilometres and the possible large scale normal faults rooting in a ductile lower crust which could explain the relatively flat Moho. The coincident multichannel seismic (MCS) profile is now available to us. The 1000-km-long MCS line was acquired using a ~7000 cu.in. tuned airgun array and 6 to 8 km long streamers. Here we focus on a 230-km-long section of the profile to the south of the V-shaped SW oceanic basin across Spratley Islands. Multiples attenuation and high density velocity analysis are performed to obtain a detailed imaging of the sediments and crust at depth. We apply pre-stack Kirchhoff time migration and superimpose the obtained reflectivity on the refraction velocity model. The processed section includes a basin bound by a large crustal normal fault already imaged in the refraction velocity model, although no information on the basement was used to model the refraction velocities. The results validate the interpretation of the refraction velocity lateral variations and emphasize the significant vertical offsets of the large scale normal faults. Deep crustal reflectivity may give additional hints at a lower crustal ductile flow. Future work will consist in using the geometry of the MCS profiles in the refraction velocity modelling and an attempt to use more advanced migration methods with the help of

  17. THREE-POINT PHASE CORRELATIONS: A NEW MEASURE OF NONLINEAR LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Wolstenhulme, Richard; Bonvin, Camille; Obreschkow, Danail

    2015-05-10

    We derive an analytical expression for a novel large-scale structure observable: the line correlation function. The line correlation function, which is constructed from the three-point correlation function of the phase of the density field, is a robust statistical measure allowing the extraction of information in the nonlinear and non-Gaussian regime. We show that, in perturbation theory, the line correlation is sensitive to the coupling kernel F{sub 2}, which governs the nonlinear gravitational evolution of the density field. We compare our analytical expression with results from numerical simulations and find a 1σ agreement for separations r ≳ 30 h{sup −1} Mpc. Fitting formulae for the power spectrum and the nonlinear coupling kernel at small scales allow us to extend our prediction into the strongly nonlinear regime, where we find a 1σ agreement with the simulations for r ≳ 2 h{sup −1} Mpc. We discuss the advantages of the line correlation relative to standard statistical measures like the bispectrum. Unlike the latter, the line correlation is independent of the bias, in the regime where the bias is local and linear. Furthermore, the variance of the line correlation is independent of the Gaussian variance on the modulus of the density field. This suggests that the line correlation can probe more precisely the nonlinear regime of gravity, with less contamination from the power spectrum variance.

  18. Large scale structure and galaxy disks as Lyman-alpha clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salpeter, Edwin E.

    1993-10-01

    Large-scale structure in the universe is enriched by two morphological categories, expanding 'clouds' of bound 'local groups' of galaxies and superclusters. Part of the complexity is due to a 'category overlap' in length scales, e.g., some galaxy pairs have a larger separation than the size of some rich compact groups. This essay includes conjectures on (presently unseen) galaxies, located in the Voids between superclusters, with highly extended gas disks (out to about 250 kpc) providing most of the Ly-alpha 'forest' absorption systems. The main postulate is a small central peak value N(max) of the mass surface density for the protodisks of these galaxies, which delays not only the recombination of hydrogen but also the phase transition from warm to cold neutral hydrogen. On this model, star formation starts only when the cold phase is reached, but then results in a violent starburst. If conditions are favorable, this burst results in a mild galactic wind (or a galactic fountain) which removes much of the inner gas disk, but leaves most of the outer disk intact; the ratio of the number of 'damped wing' to the number of forest lines is predicted to be much smaller at low redshifts than for z above 2.

  19. Interplanetary Scintillation Observations of the Large-Scale Structure of the Solar Wind Using EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Breen, A. R.; Habbal, S. R.; Fallows, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) taken with the European Incoherent SCATter radar (EISCAT) in northern Scandinavia can be used to study the evolution of the solar wind as it expands through interplanetary space. IPS arises from changes in the apparent brightness of distant, compact radio sources due to scattering by density irregularities in the solar wind and can be used to obtain estimates of the solar wind speed. In this paper we present the results of a study of the large-scale structure of the fast solar wind under near solar minimum conditions, using data taken with the EISCAT system, and the extremely long baseline observations which combine the EISCAT and MERLIN systems. The latter are the best measurements to date of meridional components of velocity in the inner solar wind. In particular, the existence of a gradient in solar wind velocity of the fast wind over the polar crown, at latitudes corresponding to the x-ray and ultra-violet coronal hole boundary, as reported by Habbal and Woo (2001), is also explored.

  20. Hierarchical system for autonomous sensing-healing of delamination in large-scale composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Sun, Denghao; Takeda, Nobuo

    2014-10-01

    This study combines our hierarchical fiber-optic-based delamination detection system with a microvascular self-healing material to develop the first autonomous sensing-healing system applicable to large-scale composite structures. In this combined system, embedded vascular modules are connected through check valves to a surface-mounted supply tube of a pressurized healing agent while fiber-optic-based sensors monitor the internal pressure of these vascular modules. When delamination occurs, the healing agent flows into the vascular modules breached by the delamination and infiltrates the damage for healing. At the same time, the pressure sensors identify the damaged modules by detecting internal pressure changes. This paper begins by describing the basic concept of the combined system and by discussing the advantages that arise from its hierarchical nature. The feasibility of the system is then confirmed through delamination infiltration tests. Finally, the hierarchical system is validated in a plate specimen by focusing on the detection and infiltration of the damage. Its self-diagnostic function is also demonstrated.

  1. Correlated primordial perturbations in light of CMB and large scale structure data

    SciTech Connect

    Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Muhonen, Vesa; Vaeliviita, Jussi

    2005-03-15

    We use cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large scale structure data to constrain cosmological models where the primordial perturbations have both an adiabatic and a cold dark matter (CDM) isocurvature component. We allow for a possible correlation between the adiabatic and isocurvature modes, and for different spectral indices for the power in each mode and for their correlation. We do a likelihood analysis with 11 independent parameters and discuss the effect of choosing the pivot scale for the definition of amplitude parameters. The upper limit to the isocurvature fraction is 18% around a pivot scale k=0.01 Mpc{sup -1}. For smaller pivot wavenumbers the limit stays about the same. For larger pivot wavenumbers, very large values of the isocurvature spectral index are favored, which makes the analysis problematic, but larger isocurvature fractions seem to be allowed. For large isocurvature spectral indices n{sub iso}>2 a positive correlation between the adiabatic and isocurvature mode is favored, and for n{sub iso}<2 a negative correlation is favored. The upper limit to the nonadiabatic contribution to the CMB temperature variance is 7.5%. Of the standard cosmological parameters, determination of the CDM density {omega}{sub c} and the sound horizon angle {theta} (or the Hubble constant H{sub 0}) are affected most by a possible presence of a correlated isocurvature contribution. The baryon density {omega}{sub b} nearly retains its 'adiabatic value'.

  2. Large scale dynamical structure measured over the South Pole, 2001-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, S. E.; Iimura, H.; South Pole Team

    In January 2001 the University of Colorado in conjunction with the Institute for Experimental Meteorology in Obninsk Russia installed a new 46.3MHz all-sky meteor radar system at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. This system utilizes a single transmitter and receiver with multiple data acquisitions systems. These data acquisition systems are adapted from the Colorado Obninsk Radar system (COBRA) and the Meteor Echo Detection and Collection system (MEDAC). Because of its unique location at the rotational pole of the Earth this system has the ability to measure the meridional winds at four distinct longitudes around the pole. Utilizing these measurements the spatial structure including zonal wavenumber and direction of propagation can be determined for disturbances in the vicinity of the pole. Results for the large-scale dynamical features observed over the pole including the migrating diurnal and nonmigrating semidiurnal tides will be presented. With observations spanning multiple years it is now possible to investigate the interannual variability of these features over the pole. These results will be compared with previous meteor radar measurements made at the South Pole in 1996 and 1997.

  3. Cosmological Shock Waves in the Large Scale Structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renyi; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung

    2013-01-01

    Based on the cosmological hydrodynamic simulation, we study the properties of shock waves formed during the formation of the large scale structure (LSS) of the universe, and investigate their contribution to the cosmic ray (CR) fraction in the intergalactic medium (IGM). It is found that while strong accretion shocks prevail at high redshift, weak internal shocks become dominant in the intracluster medium (ICM) as galaxy clusters form and virialize at low redshift, z < 1. The accumulated CR proton energy is likely to be less than 10 % of the thermal energy in the ICM, since weak shocks of M ≲ 3 are most abundant. This is consistent with the upper limit constrained by radio and gamma-ray observations of galaxy clusters. In the warm-hot medium (WHIM) inside filaments, CRs and gas could be almost in energy equipartition, since relatively stronger shocks of 5 ≲ M ≲ 10 are dominant there. We suggest that the non-thermal emissions from the CR electrons and protons accelerated by cosmological shock waves could provide a new way to detect the WHIM of the universe.

  4. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-28

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  5. The Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-06-26

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  6. Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David H.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method for large scale ab initio electronic structure calculations. LS3DF is based on a divide-and-conquer approach, which incorporates a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects due to the subdivision of the system. As a consequence, the LS3DF program yields essentially the same results as direct density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The fragments of the LS3DF algorithm can be calculated separately with different groups of processors. This leads to almost perfect parallelization on tens of thousands of processors. After code optimization, we were able to achieve 35.1 Tflop/s, which is 39percent of the theoretical speed on 17,280 Cray XT4 processor cores. Our 13,824-atom ZnTeO alloy calculation runs 400 times faster than a direct DFTcalculation, even presuming that the direct DFT calculation can scale well up to 17,280 processor cores. These results demonstrate the applicability of the LS3DF method to material simulations, the advantage of using linearly scaling algorithms over conventional O(N3) methods, and the potential for petascale computation using the LS3DF method.

  7. Non-detection of a statistically anisotropic power spectrum in large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Hirata, Christopher M. E-mail: chirata@tapir.caltech.edu

    2010-05-01

    We search a sample of photometric luminous red galaxies (LRGs) measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for a quadrupolar anisotropy in the primordial power spectrum, in which P( k-vector ) is an isotropic power spectrum P-bar (k) multiplied by a quadrupolar modulation pattern. We first place limits on the 5 coefficients of a general quadrupole anisotropy. We also consider axisymmetric quadrupoles of the form P( k-vector ) = P-bar (k)(1+g{sub *}[( k-circumflex ⋅ n-circumflex ){sup 2}−(1/3)]) where n-circumflex is the axis of the anisotropy. When we force the symmetry axis n-circumflex to be in the direction (l,b) = (94°,26°) identified in the recent Groeneboom et al. analysis of the cosmic microwave background, we find g{sub *} = 0.006±0.036 (1σ). With uniform priors on n-circumflex and g{sub *} we find that −0.41 < g{sub *} < +0.38 with 95% probability, with the wide range due mainly to the large uncertainty of asymmetries aligned with the Galactic Plane. In none of these three analyses do we detect evidence for quadrupolar power anisotropy in large scale structure.

  8. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-01

    The linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  9. Renormalization-group flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2017-01-01

    Following an approach of Matarrese and Pietroni, we derive the functional renormalization group (RG) flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures. Perturbative solutions of this RG flow equation are shown to be consistent with standard cosmological perturbation theory. Non-perturbative approximate solutions can be obtained by truncating the a priori infinite set of possible effective actions to a finite subspace. Using for the truncated effective action a form dictated by dissipative fluid dynamics, we derive RG flow equations for the scale dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity of non-interacting dark matter, and we solve them numerically. Physically, the effective viscosity and sound velocity account for the interactions of long-wavelength fluctuations with the spectrum of smaller-scale perturbations. We find that the RG flow exhibits an attractor behaviour in the IR that significantly reduces the dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity on the input values at the UV scale. This allows for a self-contained computation of matter and velocity power spectra for which the sensitivity to UV modes is under control.

  10. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part II: resummation and redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2014-02-01

    We generalize the recently derived single-field consistency relations of Large Scale Structure in two directions. First, we treat the effect of the long modes (with momentum q) on the short ones (with momentum k) non-perturbatively, by writing resummed consistency relations which do not require k/q⋅δ{sub q} << 1. These relations do not make any assumptions on the short-scales physics and are extended to include (an arbitrary number of) multiple long modes, internal lines with soft momenta and soft loops. We do several checks of these relations in perturbation theory and we verify that the effect of soft modes always cancels out in equal-time correlators. Second, we write the relations directly in redshift space, without assuming the single-stream approximation: not only the long mode affects the short scales as a homogeneous gravitational field, but it also displaces them by its velocity along the line-of-sight. Redshift space consistency relations still vanish when short modes are taken at equal time: an observation of a signal in the squeezed limit would point towards multifield inflation or a violation of the equivalence principle.

  11. Measuring Large-Scale Structure at z ~ 1 with the VIPERS galaxy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is the largest redshift survey ever conducted with the ESO telescopes. It has used the Very Large Telescope to collect nearly 100,000 redshifts from the general galaxy population at 0.5 < z < 1.2. With a combination of volume and high sampling density that is unique for these redshifts, it allows statistical measurements of galaxy clustering and related cosmological quantities to be obtained on an equal footing with classic results from local redshift surveys. At the same time, the simple magnitude-limited selection and the wealth of ancillary photometric data provide a general view of the galaxy population, its physical properties and the relation of the latter to large-scale structure. This paper presents an overview of the galaxy clustering results obtained so far, together with their cosmological implications. Most of these are based on the ~ 55,000 galaxies forming the first public data release (PDR-1). As of January 2015, observations and data reduction are complete and the final data set of more than 90,000 redshifts is being validated and made ready for the final investigations.

  12. THE COSMIC HISTORY OF THE SPIN OF DARK MATTER HALOS WITHIN THE LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Trowland, Holly E.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-01-10

    We use N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the orientation and magnitude of dark matter halo angular momentum within the large-scale structure since z = 3. We look at the evolution of the alignment of halo spins with filaments and with each other, as well as the spin parameter, which is a measure of the magnitude of angular momentum. It was found that the angular momentum vectors of dark matter halos at high redshift have a weak tendency to be orthogonal to filaments and high-mass halos have a stronger orthogonal alignment than low-mass halos. Since z = 1, the spins of low-mass halos have become weakly aligned parallel to filaments, whereas high-mass halos kept their orthogonal alignment. This recent parallel alignment of low-mass halos casts doubt on tidal torque theory as the sole mechanism for the buildup of angular momentum. We see evidence for bulk flows and the broadening of filaments over time in the alignments of halo spin and velocities. We find a significant alignment of the spin of neighboring dark matter halos only at very small separations, r < 0.3 Mpc h {sup -1}, which is driven by substructure. A correlation of the spin parameter with halo mass is confirmed at high redshift.

  13. The Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Porto, Rafael A.; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory (LEFT) formalism for the study of cosmological large scale structures. Unlike the previous Eulerian-space construction, it is naturally formulated as an effective field theory of extended objects in Lagrangian space. In LEFT the resulting finite size effects are described using a multipole expansion parameterized by a set of time dependent coefficients and organized in powers of the ratio of the wavenumber of interest k over the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. The multipoles encode the effects of the short distance modes on the long-wavelength universe and absorb UV divergences when present. There are no IR divergences in LEFT. Some of the parameters that control the perturbative approach are not assumed to be small and can be automatically resummed. We present an illustrative one-loop calculation for a power law universe. We describe the dynamics both at the level of the equations of motion and through an action formalism.

  14. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengaly, C. A. P., Jr.; Bernui, A.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Xavier, H. S.; Novaes, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is A = 0.0507 ± 0.0014 towards the (l, b) = (323°, -5°) direction, whose result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues. Furthermore, this dipole amplitude is statistically consistent (p-value = 0.061) with mock catalogues simulated according to the expected Λ cold dark matter density fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage and anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy in the LSS, given the limitations and systematics of current data, in the concordance model scenario.

  15. Principal shapes and squeezed limits in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Solon, Mikhail P.

    2016-11-01

    We apply an orthogonalization procedure on the effective field theory of large scale structure (EFT of LSS) shapes, relevant for the angle-averaged bispectrum and non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum at one loop. Assuming natural-sized EFT parameters, this identifies a linear combination of EFT shapes—referred to as the principal shape—that gives the dominant contribution for the whole kinematic plane, with subdominant combinations suppressed by a few orders of magnitude. For the covariance, our orthogonal transformation is in excellent agreement with a principal component analysis applied to available data. Additionally we find that, for both observables, the coefficients of the principal shapes are well approximated by the EFT coefficients appearing in the squeezed limit, and are thus measurable from power spectrum response functions. Employing data from N-body simulations for the growth-only response, we measure the single EFT coefficient describing the angle-averaged bispectrum with 𝒪(10%) precision. These methods of shape orthogonalization and measurement of coefficients from response functions are valuable tools for developing the EFT of LSS framework, and can be applied to more general observables.

  16. The structure and large-scale organization of extreme cold waves over the conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zuowei; Black, Robert X.; Deng, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Extreme cold waves (ECWs) occurring over the conterminous United States (US) are studied through a systematic identification and documentation of their local synoptic structures, associated large-scale meteorological patterns (LMPs), and forcing mechanisms external to the US. Focusing on the boreal cool season (November-March) for 1950‒2005, a hierarchical cluster analysis identifies three ECW patterns, respectively characterized by cold surface air temperature anomalies over the upper midwest (UM), northwestern (NW), and southeastern (SE) US. Locally, ECWs are synoptically organized by anomalous high pressure and northerly flow. At larger scales, the UM LMP features a zonal dipole in the mid-tropospheric height field over North America, while the NW and SE LMPs each include a zonal wave train extending from the North Pacific across North America into the North Atlantic. The Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) in general simulates the three ECW patterns quite well and successfully reproduces the observed enhancements in the frequency of their associated LMPs. La Niña and the cool phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) favor the occurrence of NW ECWs, while the warm PDO phase, low Arctic sea ice extent and high Eurasian snow cover extent (SCE) are associated with elevated SE-ECW frequency. Additionally, high Eurasian SCE is linked to increases in the occurrence likelihood of UM ECWs.

  17. MIC-Large Scale Magnetically Inflated Cable Structures for Space Power, Propulsion, Communications and Observational Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Rather, John

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for the erection of rigid large scale structures in space-MIC (Magnetically Inflated Cable)-is described. MIC structures are launched as a compact payload of superconducting cables and attached tethers. After reaching orbit, the superconducting cables are energized with electrical current. The magnet force interactions between the cables cause them to expand outwards into the final large structure. Various structural shapes and applications are described. The MIC structure can be a simple flat disc with a superconducting outer ring that supports a tether network holding a solar cell array, or it can form a curved mirror surface that concentrates light and focuses it on a smaller region-for example, a high flux solar array that generates electric power, a high temperature receiver that heats H2 propellant for high Isp propulsion, and a giant primary reflector for a telescope for astronomy and Earth surveillance. Linear dipole and quadrupole MIC structures are also possible. The linear quadrupole structure can be used for magnetic shielding against cosmic radiation for astronauts, for example. MIC could use lightweight YBCO superconducting HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) cables, that can operate with liquid N2 coolant at engineering current densities of ~105 amp/cm2. A 1 kilometer length of MIC cable would weigh only 3 metric tons, including superconductor, thermal insulations, coolant circuits, and refrigerator, and fit within a 3 cubic meter compact package for launch. Four potential MIC applications are described: Solar-thermal propulsion using H2 propellant, space based solar power generation for beaming power to Earth, a large space telescope, and solar electric generation for a manned lunar base. The first 3 applications use large MIC solar concentrating mirrors, while the 4th application uses a surface based array of solar cells on a magnetically levitated MIC structure to follow the sun. MIC space based mirrors can be very large and light

  18. Constraints on the Origin of Cosmic Rays above 1018 eV from Large-scale Anisotropy Searches in Data of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antiči'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Messina, S.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2013-01-01

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 1018 eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is reported. For the first time, these large-scale anisotropy searches are performed as a function of both the right ascension and the declination and expressed in terms of dipole and quadrupole moments. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Upper limits on dipole and quadrupole amplitudes are derived under the hypothesis that any cosmic ray anisotropy is dominated by such moments in this energy range. These upper limits provide constraints on the production of cosmic rays above 1018 eV, since they allow us to challenge an origin from stationary galactic sources densely distributed in the galactic disk and emitting predominantly light particles in all directions.

  19. CONSTRAINTS ON THE ORIGIN OF COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV FROM LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY SEARCHES IN DATA OF THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Antici'c, T.; Arganda, E.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2013-01-01

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is reported. For the first time, these large-scale anisotropy searches are performed as a function of both the right ascension and the declination and expressed in terms of dipole and quadrupole moments. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Upper limits on dipole and quadrupole amplitudes are derived under the hypothesis that any cosmic ray anisotropy is dominated by such moments in this energy range. These upper limits provide constraints on the production of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV, since they allow us to challenge an origin from stationary galactic sources densely distributed in the galactic disk and emitting predominantly light particles in all directions.

  20. Bayesian reconstruction of the cosmological large-scale structure: methodology, inverse algorithms and numerical optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, F. S.; Enßlin, T. A.

    2008-09-01

    We address the inverse problem of cosmic large-scale structure reconstruction from a Bayesian perspective. For a linear data model, a number of known and novel reconstruction schemes, which differ in terms of the underlying signal prior, data likelihood and numerical inverse extraregularization schemes are derived and classified. The Bayesian methodology presented in this paper tries to unify and extend the following methods: Wiener filtering, Tikhonov regularization, ridge regression, maximum entropy and inverse regularization techniques. The inverse techniques considered here are the asymptotic regularization, the Jacobi, Steepest Descent, Newton-Raphson, Landweber-Fridman and both linear and non-linear Krylov methods based on Fletcher-Reeves, Polak-Ribière and Hestenes-Stiefel conjugate gradients. The structures of the up-to-date highest performing algorithms are presented, based on an operator scheme, which permits one to exploit the power of fast Fourier transforms. Using such an implementation of the generalized Wiener filter in the novel ARGO software package, the different numerical schemes are benchmarked with one-, two- and three-dimensional problems including structured white and Poissonian noise, data windowing and blurring effects. A novel numerical Krylov scheme is shown to be superior in terms of performance and fidelity. These fast inverse methods ultimately will enable the application of sampling techniques to explore complex joint posterior distributions. We outline how the space of the dark matter density field, the peculiar velocity field and the power spectrum can jointly be investigated by a Gibbs-sampling process. Such a method can be applied for the redshift distortions correction of the observed galaxies and for time-reversal reconstructions of the initial density field.

  1. Electronic structure and aromaticity of large-scale hexagonal graphene nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wei E-mail: linlin@lbl.gov E-mail: jlyang@ustc.edu.cn; Yang, Chao E-mail: linlin@lbl.gov E-mail: jlyang@ustc.edu.cn; Lin, Lin E-mail: linlin@lbl.gov E-mail: jlyang@ustc.edu.cn; Yang, Jinlong E-mail: linlin@lbl.gov E-mail: jlyang@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-12-07

    With the help of the recently developed SIESTA-pole (Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms) - PEXSI (pole expansion and selected inversion) method [L. Lin, A. García, G. Huhs, and C. Yang, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 26, 305503 (2014)], we perform Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations to study the stability and electronic structure of hydrogen passivated hexagonal graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) with up to 11 700 atoms. We find the electronic properties of GNFs, including their cohesive energy, edge formation energy, highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gap, edge states, and aromaticity, depend sensitively on the type of edges (armchair graphene nanoflakes (ACGNFs) and zigzag graphene nanoflakes (ZZGNFs)), size and the number of electrons. We observe that, due to the edge-induced strain effect in ACGNFs, large-scale ACGNFs’ edge formation energy decreases as their size increases. This trend does not hold for ZZGNFs due to the presence of many edge states in ZZGNFs. We find that the energy gaps E{sub g} of GNFs all decay with respect to 1/L, where L is the size of the GNF, in a linear fashion. But as their size increases, ZZGNFs exhibit more localized edge states. We believe the presence of these states makes their gap decrease more rapidly. In particular, when L is larger than 6.40 nm, we find that ZZGNFs exhibit metallic characteristics. Furthermore, we find that the aromatic structures of GNFs appear to depend only on whether the system has 4N or 4N + 2 electrons, where N is an integer.

  2. A transient FETI methodology for large-scale parallel implicit computations in structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Crivelli, Luis; Roux, Francois-Xavier

    1992-01-01

    Explicit codes are often used to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of large-scale structural systems, even for low frequency response, because the storage and CPU requirements entailed by the repeated factorizations traditionally found in implicit codes rapidly overwhelm the available computing resources. With the advent of parallel processing, this trend is accelerating because explicit schemes are also easier to parallelize than implicit ones. However, the time step restriction imposed by the Courant stability condition on all explicit schemes cannot yet -- and perhaps will never -- be offset by the speed of parallel hardware. Therefore, it is essential to develop efficient and robust alternatives to direct methods that are also amenable to massively parallel processing because implicit codes using unconditionally stable time-integration algorithms are computationally more efficient when simulating low-frequency dynamics. Here we present a domain decomposition method for implicit schemes that requires significantly less storage than factorization algorithms, that is several times faster than other popular direct and iterative methods, that can be easily implemented on both shared and local memory parallel processors, and that is both computationally and communication-wise efficient. The proposed transient domain decomposition method is an extension of the method of Finite Element Tearing and Interconnecting (FETI) developed by Farhat and Roux for the solution of static problems. Serial and parallel performance results on the CRAY Y-MP/8 and the iPSC-860/128 systems are reported and analyzed for realistic structural dynamics problems. These results establish the superiority of the FETI method over both the serial/parallel conjugate gradient algorithm with diagonal scaling and the serial/parallel direct method, and contrast the computational power of the iPSC-860/128 parallel processor with that of the CRAY Y-MP/8 system.

  3. A transient FETI methodology for large-scale parallel implicit computations in structural mechanics, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Crivelli, Luis

    1993-01-01

    Explicit codes are often used to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of large-scale structural systems, even for low frequency response, because the storage and CPU requirements entailed by the repeated factorizations traditionally found in implicit codes rapidly overwhelm the available computing resources. With the advent of parallel processing, this trend is accelerating because explicit schemes are also easier to parallellize than implicit ones. However, the time step restriction imposed by the Courant stability condition on all explicit schemes cannot yet and perhaps will never be offset by the speed of parallel hardware. Therefore, it is essential to develop efficient and robust alternatives to direct methods that are also amenable to massively parallel processing because implicit codes using unconditionally stable time-integration algorithms are computationally more efficient than explicit codes when simulating low-frequency dynamics. Here we present a domain decomposition method for implicit schemes that requires significantly less storage than factorization algorithms, that is several times faster than other popular direct and iterative methods, that can be easily implemented on both shared and local memory parallel processors, and that is both computationally and communication-wise efficient. The proposed transient domain decomposition method is an extension of the method of Finite Element Tearing and Interconnecting (FETI) developed by Farhat and Roux for the solution of static problems. Serial and parallel performance results on the CRAY Y-MP/8 and the iPSC-860/128 systems are reported and analyzed for realistic structural dynamics problems. These results establish the superiority of the FETI method over both the serial/parallel conjugate gradient algorithm with diagonal scaling and the serial/parallel direct method, and contrast the computational power of the iPSC-860/128 parallel processor with that of the CRAY Y-MP/8 system.

  4. Higher-order massive neutrino perturbations in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Führer, Florian; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2015-03-01

    We develop a higher-order perturbation theory for large-scale structure formation involving a free-streaming hot or warm dark matter species. We focus on the case of mixed cold dark matter and massive neutrinos, although our approach is applicable also to a single warm dark matter species. In order to capture the suppressed growth of neutrino density perturbations on small scales, we account for the full momentum dependence of the phase space distribution using the Vlasov equation, and derive from it a formal closed-form nonlinear equation for the neutrino density. Using a systematic perturbative expansion of this equation we compute high-order corrections to the neutrino density contrast without the explicit need to track the perturbed neutrino momentum distribution. We calculate the leading-order total matter bispectrum for several neutrino masses. Using our result as a benchmark, we test the accuracy of the fluid approximation and a linear approximation used in perturbative and N-body analyses, as well as a new hybrid approach that combines the exact linear evolution with the nonlinear structure of the fluid equations. Aiming at lesssim 1% accuracy, we find that the total matter bispectrum with a low neutrino mass m = 0.046 eV can be reproduced by all but the fluid approximation, while for larger neutrino masses m=0.46 → 0.93 eV only the hybrid approach has the desired accuracy on a large range of scales. This result serves as a cautionary note that approximate nonlinear models of neutrino clustering that reproduce the gross features of some observables may not suffice for precision calculations, nor are they guaranteed to apply to other observables. All of the approximation schemes fail to reproduce the bispectrum of the neutrino density perturbations at better than 20% accuracy across all scales, indicating that an exact treatment of nonlinear neutrino perturbations is necessary.

  5. Large-scale turbulent structures in jets and in flows over cavities and their relationship to entrainment and mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Massier, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    Large scale structures in jets and in flows over cavities were investigated experimentally to determine their role in entrainment, mixing, and noise production. The presence of these structures resulted in growth of the shear layer and entrainment. Merging of adjacent large scale structures caused the near field pressure signal in excited flows. It is believed that both the entrained fluid as well as its eventual mixing with the jet flow can be controlled by introducing pulsation in the jet flow at a frequency for which the flow is most unstable.

  6. Model and controller reduction of large-scale structures based on projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildin, Eduardo

    The design of low-order controllers for high-order plants is a challenging problem theoretically as well as from a computational point of view. Frequently, robust controller design techniques result in high-order controllers. It is then interesting to achieve reduced-order models and controllers while maintaining robustness properties. Controller designed for large structures based on models obtained by finite element techniques yield large state-space dimensions. In this case, problems related to storage, accuracy and computational speed may arise. Thus, model reduction methods capable of addressing controller reduction problems are of primary importance to allow the practical applicability of advanced controller design methods for high-order systems. A challenging large-scale control problem that has emerged recently is the protection of civil structures, such as high-rise buildings and long-span bridges, from dynamic loadings such as earthquakes, high wind, heavy traffic, and deliberate attacks. Even though significant effort has been spent in the application of control theory to the design of civil structures in order increase their safety and reliability, several challenging issues are open problems for real-time implementation. This dissertation addresses with the development of methodologies for controller reduction for real-time implementation in seismic protection of civil structures using projection methods. Three classes of schemes are analyzed for model and controller reduction: nodal truncation, singular value decomposition methods and Krylov-based methods. A family of benchmark problems for structural control are used as a framework for a comparative study of model and controller reduction techniques. It is shown that classical model and controller reduction techniques, such as balanced truncation, modal truncation and moment matching by Krylov techniques, yield reduced-order controllers that do not guarantee stability of the closed-loop system, that

  7. Cross-correlation of diffuse synchrotron and large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shea; Farnsworth, Damon; Rudnick, Lawrence

    2010-02-01

    We explore for the first time the method of cross-correlation of radio synchrotron emission and tracers of large-scale structure in order to detect the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). We performed a cross-correlation of a 34° × 34° area of Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) galaxies for two redshift slices (0.03 < z < 0.04 and 0.06 < z < 0.07) with the corresponding region of the 1.4 GHz Bonn survey. For this analysis, we assumed that the synchrotron surface brightness is linearly proportional to surface density of galaxies. We also sampled the cross-correlation function (CCF) using 24 distant fields of the same size from the Bonn survey, to better assess the noise properties. Though we obtained a null result, we found that by adding a signal weighted by the 2MASS image with a filament (peak) surface brightness of 1 (7) and 7 (49) mK would produce a 3σ positive correlation for the 0.03 < z < 0.04 and 0.06 < z < 0.07 redshift slices, respectively. These detection thresholds correspond to minimum energy magnetic fields as low as 0.2 μG, close to some theoretical expectations for filament field values. This injected signal is also below the rms noise of the Bonn survey, and demonstrates the power of this technique and its utility for upcoming sensitive continuum surveys such as those planned with the Murchison Widefield Array.

  8. Large Scale Structure in Absorption up to z~0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejos, Nicolas

    2012-10-01

    We propose to observe and characterize IGM absorption systems associated with Large Scale Structure {LSS} in a statistical manner up to redshift 0.4. For this purpose, we have used a recently published cluster catalog {GMBCG; Hao et al., 2010} to identify massive nodes in the 'cosmic web'. Then, we used cluster pairs with small separations {<20 Mpc} at similar redshifts to identify zones where filaments should reside with high probabilities. Combining the GMBCG cluster catalog with the SDSS DR7 QSO catalog, we selected a single QSO whose sightline passes through a total of 6 predicted filaments {3 of which are independent} and 3 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts at impact parameters <1.5 Mpc. This will considerably increase the sample of known LSS {especially filaments} at low redshift. We propose to observe the QSO with HST/COS using the G130M and G160M gratings to cover the full FUV spectral range at high resolution {R 20000}. We require observations at S/N 10 to ensure a full characterization of HI and OVI lines at small column densities {N 10^13 cm^-2}. These low column densities will allow us to detect broad and shallow HI lines with OVI, believed to be associated with portions of the warm-hot intergalactic medium {WHIM}. Our results will also be suitable for testing an alternative hypothesis which states that the majority of OVI absorbers at low-z are confined within <300 kpc from galaxies and are not directly related to the WHIM {Prochaska et al., 2011; Tumlinson et al., 2011}. Our findings will test our understanding of galaxy formation and the importance of AGN/supernova feedbacks by comparing them with state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations.

  9. The Origin of the Large-Scale Structure in the Universe: Theoretical and Statistical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Yeinzon

    2005-07-01

    We review some theoretical and statistical aspects of the origin of the large-scale structure in the Universe, in view of the two most widely known and accepted scenarios: the inflaton and the curvaton scenarios. Among the theoretical aspects, we point out the impossibility of having a low inflationary energy scale in the simplest curvaton model. A couple of modifications to the simplest setup are explored, corresponding to the implementation of a second (thermal) inflationary period whose end makes the curvaton field `heavy', triggering either its oscillations or immediate decay. Low scale inflation is then possible to attain with H_ast being as low as 1 TeV. Among the statistical aspects, we study the bispectrum B_zeta(k_1,k_2,k_3) of the primordial curvature perturbation zeta whose normalisation fnl gives information about the level of non-gaussianity in zeta. In connection with fnl, several conserved and/or gauge invariant quantities described as the second-order curvature perturbation have been given in the literature. We review each of these quantities showing how to interpret one in terms of the others, and analyze the respective expected fnl in both the inflaton and the curvaton scenarios as well as in other less known models for the generation of primordial perturbations and/or non-gaussianities. The delta N formalism turns out to be a powerful technique to compute fnl in multi-component slow-roll inflation, as the knowledge of the evolution of some family of unperturbed universes is the only requirement. We present for the first time this formalism and apply it to selected examples.

  10. Horizon Run 4 Simulation: Coupled Evolution of Galaxies and Large-Scale Structures of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Hong, Sungwook E.

    2015-08-01

    The Horizon Run 4 is a cosmological N-body simulation designed for the study of coupled evolution between galaxies and large-scale structures of the Universe, and for the test of galaxy formation models. Using 6300^3 gravitating particles in a cubic box of L_{box} = 3150 h^{-1} Mpc, we build a dense forest of halo merger trees to trace the halo merger history with a halo mass resolution scale down to M_s = 2.7 × 10^{11} h^{-1} M_⊙. We build a set of particle and halo data, which can serve as testbeds for comparison of cosmological models and gravitational theories with observations. We find that the FoF halo mass function shows a substantial deviation from the universal form with tangible redshift evolution of amplitude and shape. At higher redshifts, the amplitude of the mass function is lower, and the functional form is shifted toward larger values of ln (1/σ). We also find that the baryonic acoustic oscillation feature in the two-point correlation funct-ion of mock galaxies becomes broader with a peak position moving to smaller scales and the peak amplitude decreasing for increasing directional cosine mu compared to the linear predictions. From the halo merger trees built from halo data at 75 redshifts, we measure the half-mass epoch of halos and find that less massive halos tend to reach half of their current mass at higher redshifts. Simulation outputs including snapshot data, past lightcone space data, and halo merger data are available at http://sdss.kias.re.kr/astro/Horizon-Run4

  11. Photometric Redshifts for the Dark Energy Survey and VISTA and Implications for Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, Manda; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the photometric redshift requirements for the proposed Dark Energy Survey (DES) using two sets of mock galaxy simulations and an artificial neural network code-ANNz. In particular, we examine how optical photometry in the DES grizY bands can be complemented with near infra-red photometry from the planned VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) in the JHK{sub s} bands in order to improve the photometric redshift estimate by a factor of two at z > 1. We draw attention to the effects of galaxy formation scenarios such as reddening on the photo-z estimate and using our neural network code, calculate A{sub v} for these reddened galaxies. We also look at the impact of using different training sets when calculating photometric redshifts. In particular, we find that using the ongoing DEEP2 and VVDS-Deep spectroscopic surveys to calibrate photometric redshifts for DES, will prove effective. However we need to be aware of uncertainties in the photometric redshift bias that arise when using different training sets as these will translate into errors in the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. Furthermore, we show that the neural network error estimate on the photometric redshift may be used to remove outliers from our samples before any kind of cosmological analysis, in particular for large-scale structure experiments. By removing all galaxies with a 1{sigma} photo-z scatter greater than 0.1 from our DES+VHS sample, we can constrain the galaxy power spectrum out to a redshift of 2 and reduce the fractional error on this power spectrum by {approx}15-20% compared to using the entire catalogue.

  12. A Strong-Lens Survey in AEGIS: the Influence of Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Marshall, Phil J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hopkins, Andrew; Koekemoer, Anton; Konidaris, Nicholas P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Willmer, Christopher N.A.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-07-14

    We report on the results of a visual search for galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses over 650 arcmin2 of HST/ACS imaging in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). These deep F606W- and F814W-band observations are in the DEEP2-EGS field. In addition to a previously-known Einstein Cross also found by our search (the ''Cross'', HSTJ141735+52264, with z{sub lens} = 0.8106 and a published z{sub source} = 3.40), we identify two new strong galaxy-galaxy lenses with multiple extended arcs. The first, HSTJ141820+52361 (the ''Dewdrop''; z{sub lens} = 0.5798), lenses two distinct extended sources into two pairs of arcs (z{sub source} = 0.9818 by nebular [O{sub II}] emission), while the second, HSTJ141833+52435 (the ''Anchor''; z{sub lens} = 0.4625), produces a single pair of arcs (source redshift not yet known). Four less convincing arc/counter-arc and two-image lens candidates are also found and presented for completeness. All three definite lenses are fit reasonably well by simple singular isothermal ellipsoid models including external shear, giving {chi}{sub {nu}}{sup 2}values close to unity. Using the three-dimensional line-of-sight (LOS) information on galaxies from the DEEP2 data, we calculate the convergence and shear contributions {kappa}{sub los} and {gamma}{sub los} to each lens, assuming singular isothermal sphere halos truncated at 200 h{sup -1} kpc. These are compared against a robust measure of local environment, {delta}{sub 3}, a normalized density that uses the distance to the third nearest neighbor. We find that even strong lenses in demonstrably underdense local environments may be considerably affected by LOS contributions, which in turn, under the adopted assumptions, may be underestimates of the effect of large scale structure.

  13. The EFT of Large Scale Structures at all redshifts: analytical predictions for lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Simon; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    We study the prediction of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) for the matter power spectrum at different redshifts. In previous work, we found that the two-loop prediction can match the nonlinear power spectrum measured from N-body simulations at redshift zero within approximately 2% up to k~ 0.6 h Mpc-1 after fixing a single free parameter, the so-called "speed of sound". We determine the time evolution of this parameter by matching the EFTofLSS prediction to simulation output at different redshifts, and find that it is well-described by a fitting function that only includes one additional parameter. After the two free parameters are fixed, the prediction agrees with nonlinear data within approximately 2% up to at least k~ 1 h Mpc-1 at z>= 1, and also within approximately 5% up to k~ 1.2 h Mpc-1 at z=1 and k~ 2.3 h Mpc-1 at z=3, a major improvement with respect to other perturbative techniques. We also develop an accurate way to estimate where the EFTofLSS predictions at different loop orders should fail, based on the sizes of the next-order terms that are neglected, and find agreement with the actual comparisons to data. Finally, we use our matter power spectrum results to perform analytical calculations of lensing potential power spectra corresponding to both CMB and galaxy lensing. This opens the door to future direct applications of the EFTofLSS to observations of gravitational clustering on cosmic scales.

  14. High-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas in galaxy halos and large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Limin

    This dissertation presents spectroscopic studies of gas in galaxy halos and large-scale structures through high-resolution quasar absorption lines. The broad goal of this effort is to learn how galaxies acquire their gas and how they return it to the intergalactic medium, or more generally, how galaxies interact with their environment. The study of the absorption lines due to the extraplanar 21cm "Outer Arm" (OA) of the Milky Way toward two quasars, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907, provides valuable insight into the gas accretion processes. It yields the following results. (1) The OA is a multiphase cloud and high ions show small but significant offsets in velocity and are unlikely to be cospatial with the low ions. (2) The overall metallicity of the OA is Z=0.3-0.5 Z⊙, but nitrogen is underabundant. (3) The abundance of N, O, and S derived are roughly consistent with outer-galaxy emission-line abundances and the metallicity gradient derived from H II regions. The similarity of the OA kinematics to several nearby high velocity clouds (HVCs, e.g. Complexes C, G, and H) suggests that these clouds could be detritus from a merging satellite galaxy. To test this hypothesis, we build up a simple model including tidal tripping, ram-pressure stripping, and dynamical friction to consider whether the OA could be debris affiliated with the Monoceros Ring. Our model can roughly reproduce the spatial and velocity characteristics of the OA. Moreover, the metallicity of the OA is similar to the higher metallicities measured in the younger stellar components of the Monoceros Ring and the progenitor candidate, the CMa overdensity. However, both our model and the Galactic warp scenario can not explain other HVCs that are likely to be related to the OA. Instead of acquiring gas, some galaxies have their gas removed through various physical processes. Ram-pressure stripping and tidal interaction are important mechanisms for galaxies to loose their gas. The high-resolution spectrum of Mrk

  15. A Confirmatory Approach to Examining the Factor Structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ): A Large Scale Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niclasen, Janni; Skovgaard, Anne Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Somhovd, Mikael Julius; Obel, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) using a Structural Confirmatory Factor Analytic approach. The Danish translation of the SDQ was distributed to 71,840 parents and teachers of 5-7 and 10-12-year-old boys and girls from four large scale cohorts. Three theoretical models…

  16. Disassembly Sequence Optimization for Large-Scale Products With Multiresource Constraints Using Scatter Search and Petri Nets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiwang; Liu, Shixin; Zhou, MengChu; Tian, Guangdong

    2016-11-01

    Disassembly modeling and planning are meaningful and important to the reuse, recovery, and recycling of obsolete and discarded products. However, the existing methods pay little or no attention to resources constraints, e.g., disassembly operators and tools. Thus a resulting plan when being executed may be ineffective in actual product disassembly. This paper proposes to model and optimize selective disassembly sequences subject to multiresource constraints to maximize disassembly profit. Moreover, two scatter search algorithms with different combination operators, namely one with precedence preserved crossover combination operator and another with path-relink combination operator, are designed to solve the proposed model. Their validity is shown by comparing them with the optimization results from well-known optimization software CPLEX for different cases. The experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Large-scale structural analysis: The structural analyst, the CSM Testbed and the NAS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Macy, Steven C.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM testbed methods development environment is presented and some numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  18. Large-Scale Structures in the Zone of Avoidance: The Galactic Anticenter Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Nanyao Y.; Freudling, Wolfram

    1995-01-01

    We have selected a sample of 876 galaxy candidates from the IRAS Point Source Catalog in the region of 2(exp h) < alpha < 10(exp h) and 0 deg < delta < 36 deg, which crosses the Galactic anticenter part of the Zone of Avoidance (ZOA) and includes most of the highly obscured Orion-Taurus complex region. We have identified galaxies among the candidate sources by attempting to detect the 21 cm H I line of those sources which were not known to be galaxies at the beginning of the survey. In this manner, we constructed a galaxy sample which is largely free from Galactic reddening. Of the 272 observed candidates, 89 were detected in the H I line up to a heliocentric velocity of v(sub h) approximately 16,000 km/s. The resulting galaxy sample of 717 galaxies is fairly complete (within about 10%) and uniform (within about 4%) in the part of the survey area 10 deg away from the Galactic plane and for velocities up to at least 9000 km/s. This provides, for the first time, a largely unbiased view on the large-scale structures in much of the survey area. Our main results are the following: (1) Several large voids are identified. In particular, a void between alpha approximately equals 3(sup h) and 4(sup h), up to v(sub h) approximately 6000 km/s, separates the Pisces-Perseus supercluster at alpha < 3(sup h) from structures at alpha > 4(sup h); and a "nearby void" occupies most of our survey area and reaches out to a redshift of nearly 3000 km/s. (2) We found no nearby galaxy concentration that could significantly contribute to the "Local Velocity Anomoly" (LVA), but a general excess of galaxies around v(sub h) approximately 5000 km/s in the survey area. (3) The contrast between the "Great Wall" at v(sub h) approximately 8500 km/s and the void in front of it appears to gradually diffuse out after it enters the Zone of Avoidance from the northern Galactic hemisphere. (4) Our data combined with other galaxy surveys in or near the Galactic anticenter part of the ZOA suggest that the

  19. Spatial Structure of Large-Scale Plasma Density Perturbations HF-Induced in the Ionospheric F 2 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Komrakov, G. P.; Glukhov, Ya. V.; Andreeva, E. S.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Kurbatov, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the experimental results obtained by studying the large-scale structure of the HF-disturbed ionospheric region. The experiments were performed using the SURA heating facility. The disturbed ionospheric region was sounded by signals radiated by GPS navigation satellite beacons as well as by signals of low-orbit satellites (radio tomography). The results of the experiments show that large-scale plasma density perturbations induced at altitudes higher than the F2 layer maximum can contribute significantly to the measured variations of the total electron density and can, with a certain arrangement of the reception points, be measured by the GPS sounding method.

  20. Study of Large-Scale Wave Structure and Development of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles Using the C/NOFS Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-31

    include Kwajalein and Guam. The scientific value of the Pacific cluster is enhanced by ionograms being collected with three ionosondes (Kwajalein, Pohnpei...R.T., Multi-reflected echoes: Another ionogram signature of large-scale wave structure, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L01102, doi:10.1029/2008GL036221...Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L20102, doi:10.1029/2011GL049173, 2011. Thampi, S.V., R. Tsunoda, L. Jose, and T.K. Pant, Ionogram signatures of large-scale

  1. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir E-mail: matteorf@stanford.edu E-mail: zvlah@stanford.edu

    2015-09-01

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describe the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ{sub 8} = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k≅ 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k≅ 0.15 h Mpc{sup −1} for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. This is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.

  2. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describe the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.

  3. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; ...

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describemore » the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.« less

  4. DEMNUni: the clustering of large-scale structures in the presence of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Castorina, Emanuele; Carbone, Carmelita; Bel, Julien; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Dolag, Klaus E-mail: carmelita.carbone@brera.inaf.it E-mail: emiliano.sefusatti@brera.inaf.it

    2015-07-01

    We analyse the clustering features of Large Scale Structures (LSS) in the presence of massive neutrinos, employing a set of large-volume, high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations, where neutrinos are treated as separate collisionless particles. The volume of 8 h{sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}, combined with a resolution of about 8×10{sup 10}h{sup -1}M{sub ⊚} for the cold dark matter (CDM) component, represents a significant improvement over previous N-body simulations in massive neutrino cosmologies. In this work we focus, in the first place, on the analysis of nonlinear effects in CDM and neutrinos perturbations contributing to the total matter power spectrum. We show that most of the nonlinear evolution is generated exclusively by the CDM component. We therefore compare mildly nonlinear predictions from Eulerian Perturbation Theory (PT), and fully nonlinear prescriptions (HALOFIT) with the measurements obtained from the simulations. We find that accounting only for the nonlinear evolution of the CDM power spectrum allows to recover the total matter power spectrum with the same accuracy as the massless case. Indeed, we show that, the most recent version of the (HALOFIT) formula calibrated on ΛCDM simulations can be applied directly to the linear CDM power spectrum without requiring additional fitting parameters in the massive case. As a second step, we study the abundance and clustering properties of CDM halos, confirming that, in massive neutrino cosmologies, the proper definition of the halo bias should be made with respect to the cold rather than the total matter distribution, as recently shown in the literature. Here we extend these results to the redshift space, finding that, when accounting for massive neutrinos, an improper definition of the linear bias can lead to a systematic error of about 1-2 % in the determination of the linear growth rate from anisotropic clustering. This result is quite important if we consider that future spectroscopic galaxy

  5. Tectonic evolution of high-grade metamorphic terranes in central Vietnam: Constraints from large-scale monazite geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Nobuhiko; Osanai, Yasuhito; Owada, Masaaki; Nam, Tran Ngoc; Charusiri, Punya; Khamphavong, Keo

    2013-09-01

    Several metamorphic complexes in Southeast Asia have been interpreted as Precambrian basement, characterized by amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism. In this paper, we re-evaluate the timing of this thermal event based on the large-scale geochronology and compositional variation of monazites from amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphic terranes in central Vietnam. Most of the samples in this study are from metamorphic rocks (n = 38) and granitoids (n = 11) in the Kontum Massif. Gneisses (n = 6) and granitoids (n = 5) from the Hai Van Migmatite Complex and the Truong Son Belt, located to the north of the massif, were also studied. Two distinct thermal episodes (245-230 Ma and 460-430 Ma) affected Kontum Massif gneisses, while a single dominant event at 240-220 Ma is recorded in the gneisses from the Hai Van Complex and the Truong Son Belt. Monazites from granitoids commonly yield an age of 240-220 Ma. Mesoproterozoic ages (1530-1340 Ma) were obtained only from monazite cores that are surrounded by c. 440 Ma overgrowths. Thermobarometric results, combined with concentrations of Y2O3, Ce2O3, and heavy rare earth elements in monazite, and recently reported pressure-temperature paths suggest that Triassic ages correspond to retrograde metamorphism following decompression from high- to medium-pressure/temperature conditions. Ordovician-Silurian ages reflect low-pressure/temperature metamorphism accompanied by isobaric heating during prograde metamorphism. Some samples were affected by both metamorphic events. We conclude that high-grade metamorphism observed in so-called Precambrian basement terranes in central Vietnam occurred during both the Permian-Triassic and the Ordovician-Silurian, while peraluminous granitoid magmatism is Triassic. Additionally, our preliminary analyses for U-Pb zircon age and whole-rock chemistry of granitic gneisses from the Truong Song Belt suggests the presence of the Ordovician-Silurian volcanic arc magmatism in the region. Based

  6. Creating High Quality DEMs of Large Scale Fluvial Environments Using Structure-from-Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javernick, L. A.; Brasington, J.; Caruso, B. S.; Hicks, M.; Davies, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    -linear transformation to convert the point clouds to the absolute NZTM coordinate system, with average errors of 0.06 m in the horizontal and 0.11 m in the vertical dimensions. The final point clouds extracted had typical point spacings of 0.25 m, well above the metric resolution of airborne LiDAR. To improve data handling, the final point cloud was decimated to point spacings of 0.5 m using a recently developed gridding procedure (Rychkov, Brasington, & Vericat, 2012), and finally converted into a DEM using a Delaunay constrained TIN in ArcGIS. Results reveal SfM's ability to produce high quality terrain products of large scale fluvial environments that can outperform LiDAR, and can potentially compare with TLS. PhotoScan offers a straightforward method to generate, transform, and export DEMs that requires little user knowledge of photogrammetric processes. Further, the affordability and reduced field work offer low budget researchers the ability to produce repeat surveys for in-depth temporal studies. Funding supported by the New Zealand Department of Conservation.

  7. The SRG/eROSITA All-Sky Survey: A new era of large-scale structure studies with AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2015-08-01

    The four-year X-ray All-Sky Survey (eRASS) of the eROSITA telescope aboard the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) satellite will detect about 3 million active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of z~1 and typical luminosity of L0.5-2.0keV ~ 1044 erg/s. We demonstrate that this unprecedented AGN sample, complemented with redshift information, will supply us with outstanding opportunities for large-scale structure (LSS) studies.We show that with this sample of X-ray selected AGN, it will become possible for the first time to perform detailed redshift- and luminosity-resolved studies of the AGN clustering. This enable us to put strong constraints on different AGN triggering/fueling models as a function of AGN environment, which will dramatically improve our understanding of super-massive black hole growth and its correlation with the co-evolving LSS.Further, the eRASS AGN sample will become a powerful cosmological probe. We demonstrate for the first time that, given the breadth and depth of eRASS, it will become possible to convincingly detect baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) with ~8σ confidence in the 0.8 < z < 2.0 range, currently uncovered by any existing BAO survey.Finally, we discuss the requirements for follow-up missions and demonstrate that in order to fully exploit the potential of the eRASS AGN sample, photometric and spectroscopic surveys of large areas and a sufficient depth will be needed.

  8. Fluid-structure interaction simulation of floating wind turbines interacting with complex, large-scale ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderer, Antoni; Guo, Xin; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    We develop a numerical method for simulating coupled interactions of complex floating structures with large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulence. The Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) solver integrates the curvilinear immersed boundary method of Borazjani et al. (JCP 2008) with the level-set method of Kang et al. (Adv. in Water Res. 2012) and is capable of simulating the coupled dynamic interaction of arbitrarily complex bodies with airflow and waves. The large-scale wave model is based on the two-fluid coupled approach of Yang et al. (JCP 2011), which employs a high-order spectral method for simulating the water motion and a viscous solver with undulatory boundaries for the air motion. The large-scale wave field solver is coupled with the near-field FSI solver by feeding into the latter large-scale waves via the pressure-forcing method of Guo et al. (JCP 2009), appropriately adapted herein for the level set method. We validate the model under both simple wave trains and three-dimensional directional waves and compare the results with experimental and theoretical solutions. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of the new solver by carrying out large eddy simulation of a floating offshore wind turbine platform interacting with realistic ocean waves. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy (DE-EE0005482), the National Science Foundation (CBET-1341062), the University of Minnesota Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment, and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  9. MIC - a self deploying magnetically inflated cable system for large scale space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Paniagua, John

    2001-03-01

    A new approach, termed MIC (Magnetically Inflated Cable) that enables large, lightweight very strong and rigid space structures is described. MIC would be launched as a compact package of coiled superconducting (SC) cables. After reaching orbit, the cables would be cryogenically cooled and electrically energized by a small power source. The resultant repulsion magnetic forces between the DC currents in the SC cables automatically cause the coiled launch package to self deploy into the final large space structure. The SC cables are held in place by a distributed network of high tensile strength tethers (e.g., Spectra material), creating a very stiff, rigid truss structure that strongly resists bending and torsional, etc. movements, without the need for gravity gradient stabilization. A linear quadrupole (LQ) MIC configuration is described that is suitable for large solar power satellites, space stations, space hotels, propellant tanks, manned Mars spacecraft, etc. The LQ has 2 long SC dipole loops, of horizontal width W, length L, and opposite magnetic polarity, which are vertically separated by distance W, producing a long truss structure of square cross-section (width W) with the 4 SC cables at the corners of the square. The SC currents are opposite in adjacent cables, yielding an outwardly directed net radial force on each cable. The ends of each SC loop experience outwards longitudinal forces. The magnetic forces are very strong, even for modest supercurrents. For example, a 4 meter square truss with I = 250 kiloamp has an outwards radial force of 220 kg per meter of cable. and 5250 kg outwards longitudinal force at the ends of each SC loop. The network of restraining tensile lines can support lightweight structures, including solar panels, propellant tankage, habitat modules, power transmission lines, etc. The design of a 1 kilometer long, 4 meter square cross section MIC truss for solar power satellites is described. The MIC launch package fits within the

  10. Constraints on the power spectrum of the primordial density field from large-scale data - Microwave background and predictions of inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown here that, by using galaxy catalog correlation data as input, measurements of microwave background radiation (MBR) anisotropies should soon be able to test two of the inflationary scenario's most basic predictions: (1) that the primordial density fluctuations produced were scale-invariant and (2) that the universe is flat. They should also be able to detect anisotropies of large-scale structure formed by gravitational evolution of density fluctuations present at the last scattering epoch. Computations of MBR anisotropies corresponding to the minimum of the large-scale variance of the MBR anisotropy are presented which favor an open universe with P(k) significantly different from the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum predicted by most inflationary models.

  11. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    SciTech Connect

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  12. Generation of large-scale structures and vortex systems in numerical experiments for rotating annular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledzer, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Methods for solving shallow-water equations that describe flows in rotating annular channels are considered and the results of numerical calculations are analyzed for the possible generation of global large-scale flows, narrow jets, and numerous small-scale vortices in laboratory experiments. External effects in fluids are induced using a mass source-sink and the MHD-method of interaction of radial electric current with the magnetic field generated by the field of permanent magnets. A central-upwind scheme modified to suit the specific aspects of geophysical hydrodynamics. Initially, this method was used to solve shallow-water equations only in hydraulic problems, such as for flows in dam breaks, channels, rivers, and lakes. Geophysical hydrodynamics (in addition to free surface and topography) requires a rotation of the system as a whole, which is accompanied by the appearance of a complex system of vortices, jets, and turbulence (these should be taken into account in the formulation of the problem). Accordingly, the basic features of the central-upwind method should be changed. The modifications should ensure that the scheme is well-balanced and choose interpolation methods for desired variables. The main result of this modification is the control over numerical viscosity affecting the fluid motion variety. The active dynamics of a large number of vortices transformed into jets or generating large-scale streams is the general result of modifications suitable for geophysical hydrodynamics. Because there are technical difficulties in the creation of an appropriate laboratory setup for modeling of geophysical flows with the help of numerous source-sinks, it will be appropriate to use numerical experiments for studying the motions generated by this method. Unlike this method, the MHD-method can be rather easily used in laboratory conditions to generate a large variety of flows and vortex currents in the channel by a relatively small number of permanent magnets

  13. Introduction of a test measurement for a monitoring technology inside a large-scale civil engineering structure using muon radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannomiya, A.; Tanaka, H.

    2012-04-01

    Akira Sannomiya1*, Koichiro Tada1*, Hiroyuki K.M. Tanaka2* Chigasaki Research Institute, Technology Development Center, Electric Power Development Co., Ltd.1, Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Japan2 Introduction The technology that enables us to observe the internal structure of a volcano and the city foundation is being developed by utilizing the muon's significant penetration power. From the possibility to use this technology for the surveillance inside a large-scale civil engineering structure, we are planning an experimental measurement. General Instruction A final target is safety judgment of the condition of a large-scale civil engineering structure. It is important for safety judgment to grasp the internal density contract, such as the crack and slack levels of a base rock or the structure, and degradation and groundwater levels. However, feasibility of application of muon radiography to monitoring inside the large-scale civil engineering structure has not confirmed yet. Therefore, as a test experiment, we attempt to measure the fluctuation of the groundwater level in order to evaluate and examine the method. Measurement will be carried out from the inside of a scupper tunnel in the base rock. The result will be compared with the independent groundwater level measurement in order to perform quantitative evaluation of muon radiography. In addition, this test measurement will start the near future. About a detailed plan, it is under examination now.

  14. Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Ohmori, Kenji; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-07-13

    A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

  15. Structure of the Large-Scale Vortex Motions in the Ionosphere E Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalimov, S. L.

    2003-11-01

    It is shown that the dissipative-centrifugal instability (DCI) revealed earlier for large-scale two-dimension vortex motions of the neutral gas in a fast-rotating atmosphere is also possible for similar motions of a weakly ionized gas in the magnetic field when one takes into account electrodynamics forces (the induction deceleration and gyroscopic force caused by the Hall current) in the absence of dissipation. In the case of a conductive atmosphere, strictly anticyclone motion at a DCI of the neutral atmosphere could be impossible or (depending on the Hall conductivity value) it could even change to a cyclone motion. Experimental results that can be considered as a confirmation of the theoretical conclusions are presented.

  16. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I - IRAS pointed observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1989-04-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution.

  17. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I - IRAS pointed observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1989-01-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution.

  18. Large scale structure in Bekenstein's theory of relativistic modified Newtonian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Skordis, C; Mota, D F; Ferreira, P G; Boehm, C

    2006-01-13

    A relativistic theory of modified gravity has been recently proposed by Bekenstein. The tensor field in Einstein's theory of gravity is replaced by a scalar, a vector, and a tensor field which interact in such a way to give modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) in the weak-field nonrelativistic limit. We study the evolution of the Universe in such a theory, identifying its key properties and comparing it with the standard cosmology obtained in Einstein gravity. The evolution of the scalar field is akin to that of tracker quintessence fields. We expand the theory to linear order to find the evolution of perturbations on large scales. The impact on galaxy distributions and the cosmic microwave background is calculated in detail. We show that it may be possible to reproduce observations of the cosmic microwave background and galaxy distributions with Bekenstein's theory of MOND.

  19. Support Vector Machines Trained with Evolutionary Algorithms Employing Kernel Adatron for Large Scale Classification of Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Arana-Daniel, Nancy; Gallegos, Alberto A.; López-Franco, Carlos; Alanís, Alma Y.; Morales, Jacob; López-Franco, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing power of computers, the amount of data that can be processed in small periods of time has grown exponentially, as has the importance of classifying large-scale data efficiently. Support vector machines have shown good results classifying large amounts of high-dimensional data, such as data generated by protein structure prediction, spam recognition, medical diagnosis, optical character recognition and text classification, etc. Most state of the art approaches for large-scale learning use traditional optimization methods, such as quadratic programming or gradient descent, which makes the use of evolutionary algorithms for training support vector machines an area to be explored. The present paper proposes an approach that is simple to implement based on evolutionary algorithms and Kernel-Adatron for solving large-scale classification problems, focusing on protein structure prediction. The functional properties of proteins depend upon their three-dimensional structures. Knowing the structures of proteins is crucial for biology and can lead to improvements in areas such as medicine, agriculture and biofuels. PMID:27980384

  20. Support Vector Machines Trained with Evolutionary Algorithms Employing Kernel Adatron for Large Scale Classification of Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Arana-Daniel, Nancy; Gallegos, Alberto A; López-Franco, Carlos; Alanís, Alma Y; Morales, Jacob; López-Franco, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing power of computers, the amount of data that can be processed in small periods of time has grown exponentially, as has the importance of classifying large-scale data efficiently. Support vector machines have shown good results classifying large amounts of high-dimensional data, such as data generated by protein structure prediction, spam recognition, medical diagnosis, optical character recognition and text classification, etc. Most state of the art approaches for large-scale learning use traditional optimization methods, such as quadratic programming or gradient descent, which makes the use of evolutionary algorithms for training support vector machines an area to be explored. The present paper proposes an approach that is simple to implement based on evolutionary algorithms and Kernel-Adatron for solving large-scale classification problems, focusing on protein structure prediction. The functional properties of proteins depend upon their three-dimensional structures. Knowing the structures of proteins is crucial for biology and can lead to improvements in areas such as medicine, agriculture and biofuels.

  1. Implications of a class of grand-unified theories for large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    A class of grand-unified theories in which cosmologically significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is considered. To obtain large-scale structure, attention is given to (1) an inflationary scenario, (2) inflation followed by string production, and (3) a noninflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. It is shown that inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that Omega less than 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  2. Large-scale shear velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath Europe and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, C. P.; Meier, T. M.; Lebedev, S.; Friederich, W.

    2009-12-01

    The automated multimode waveform inversion technique developed by Lebedev et al. (2005) was applied to available data of broadband stations in Europe and surrounding regions. It performs a fitting of the complete waveform starting from the S-wave onset to the surface wave. Assuming the location and focal mechanism of a considered earthquake as known, the first basic step is to consider each available seismogram separately and to find the 1D-model that can explain the filtered seismogram best. In a second step, each 1D-model serves as a linear constraint in an inversion for a 3D S-wave velocity model of the upper mantle. We collected data for the years from 1990 to 2006 from all permanent stations for which data were available via the data centers of ORFEUS, GEOFON amd IRIS, and from others that build the Virtual European Seismological Network (VEBSN). In addition, we incorporated data from temporary experiments like SVEKALAPKO, TOR and the Eifel plume project as well as permanent stations in France. Just recently we were also able to add the data recorded by the temporary broadband EGELADOS network in the southern Aegean. In this way, a huge data set of about 500000 seismograms came about from which about 60000 1D-models could be constructed. The resulting models exhibit an overwhelming structural detail in relation to the size of the region considered in the inversion. They are to our knowledge the most detailed models of shear wave velocity currently available for the European upper mantle and surroundings. Most prominent features are an extremely sharp demarcation of the East European platform from Western Europe. Narrow high velocity regions follow the Hellenic arc and the Ionian trench toward the north. Whereas high velocities are found beneath the western Alps between about 100 km to 200 km depth, the eastern Alps show a low velocity anomaly at these depths. Low velocity zones are found at depths around 150 km in the Pannonian basin, the back-arc of the

  3. Geographic distribution, large-scale spatial structure and diversity of parasitoids of the seed-feeding beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus.

    PubMed

    Wood, A; Haga, E B; Costa, V A; Rossi, M N

    2016-10-21

    Bruchine beetles are highly host-specific seed feeders during the larval stage. Although some specific parasitoid families have been recorded attacking bruchine beetles, most studies have been done at small spatial scales. Therefore, the current knowledge about the diversity and the geographic distribution of parasitoid species parasitizing bruchines is scarce, especially at a wide geographic area that extends over large distances through a latitudinal cline (i.e. large-scale spatial structure). The present study determined the species richness and evenness of parasitoids attacking the bruchine beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus feeding on Leucaena leucocephala seeds, examined their geographic distribution, and characterized the large-scale spatial structure in parasitoid species composition. A total of 1420 parasitoids (all Hymenoptera) belonging to four families, five subfamilies and eight species were collected (genera: Horismenus, Paracrias, Urosigalphus, Stenocorse, Chryseida, Eupelmus). Most parasitoid species showed wide spatial distribution, high evenness in species abundance and the species richness estimators were close to stabilization (approximately eight species). Overall, greater similarity was observed in the species composition of plant populations near to each other than those farther apart, revealing a large-scale spatial structure in parasitoid species composition.

  4. LARGE-SCALE AZIMUTHAL STRUCTURES OF TURBULENCE IN ACCRETION DISKS: DYNAMO TRIGGERED VARIABILITY OF ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Flock, M.; Dzyurkevich, N.; Klahr, H.; Turner, N.; Henning, Th.

    2012-01-10

    We investigate the significance of large-scale azimuthal, magnetic, and velocity modes for the magnetorotational instability (MRI) turbulence in accretion disks. We perform three-dimensional global ideal MHD simulations of global stratified protoplanetary disk models. Our domains span azimuthal angles of {pi}/4, {pi}/2, {pi}, and 2{pi}. We observe up to 100% stronger magnetic fields and stronger turbulence for the restricted azimuthal domain models {pi}/2 and {pi}/4 compared to the full 2{pi} model. We show that for those models the Maxwell stress is larger due to strong axisymmetric magnetic fields generated by the {alpha}{Omega} dynamo. Large radial extended axisymmetric toroidal fields trigger temporal magnification of accretion stress. All models display a positive dynamo-{alpha} in the northern hemisphere (upper disk). The parity is distinct in each model and changes on timescales of 40 local orbits. In model 2{pi}, the toroidal field is mostly antisymmetric with respect to the midplane. The eddies of the MRI turbulence are highly anisotropic. The major wavelengths of the turbulent velocity and magnetic fields are between one and two disk scale heights. At the midplane, we find magnetic tilt angles around 8 Degree-Sign -9 Degree-Sign increasing up to 12 Degree-Sign -13 Degree-Sign in the corona. We conclude that an azimuthal extent of {pi} is sufficient to reproduce most turbulent properties in three-dimensional global stratified simulations of magnetized accretion disks.

  5. Analyzing Large-Scale Structural Change in Proteins: Comparison of Principal Component Projection and Sammon Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2006-04-01

    Effective analysis of large-scale conformational transitions in macromolecules requires transforming them into a lower dimensional representation that captures the dominant motions. Herein, we apply and compare two different dimensionality reduction techniques, namely, principal component analysis (PCA), a linear method, and Sammon mapping, which is nonlinear. The two methods are used to analyze four different protein transition pathways of varying complexity, obtained by using either the conjugate peak refinement method or constrained molecular dynamics. For the return-stroke in myosin, both Sammon mapping and PCA show that the conformational change is dominated by a simple rotation of a rigid body. Also, in the case of the T{yields}R transition in hemoglobin, both methods are able to identify the two main quaternary transition events. In contrast, in the cases of the unfolding transition of staphylococcal nuclease or the signaling switch of Ras p21, which are both more complex conformational transitions, only Sammon mapping is able to identify the distinct phases of motion.

  6. Fast large scale structure perturbation theory using one-dimensional fast Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Vlah, Zvonimir; McDonald, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    The usual fluid equations describing the large-scale evolution of mass density in the universe can be written as local in the density, velocity divergence, and velocity potential fields. As a result, the perturbative expansion in small density fluctuations, usually written in terms of convolutions in Fourier space, can be written as a series of products of these fields evaluated at the same location in configuration space. Based on this, we establish a new method to numerically evaluate the 1-loop power spectrum (i.e., Fourier transform of the 2-point correlation function) with one-dimensional fast Fourier transforms. This is exact and a few orders of magnitude faster than previously used numerical approaches. Numerical results of the new method are in excellent agreement with the standard quadrature integration method. This fast model evaluation can in principle be extended to higher loop order where existing codes become painfully slow. Our approach follows by writing higher order corrections to the 2-point correlation function as, e.g., the correlation between two second-order fields or the correlation between a linear and a third-order field. These are then decomposed into products of correlations of linear fields and derivatives of linear fields. The method can also be viewed as evaluating three-dimensional Fourier space convolutions using products in configuration space, which may also be useful in other contexts where similar integrals appear.

  7. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I. IRAS pointed observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.

    1989-04-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution. 81 refs.

  8. Features of liquid mixtures separation in large-scale distillation columns with structured packing. New ideas and approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A. N.; Zhukov, V. E.; Pecherkin, N. I.; Li, X.; Sui, H.

    2016-10-01

    Negative vapor stratification along the height of distillation column caused by different density of vapor mixture components and higher temperature at the column bottom, leads to formation of large-scale maldistribution of temperature and mixture composition over the column cross-section even at uniform irrigation of the structured packing. Experimental results concerning the dynamic effect of packing irrigation on separation efficiency of the two-component mixture of R-21 and R-114 are presented in this paper. The structured packing Zulser 350Y was installed in the distillation column with the diameter of 0.9 m. Experiments were carried out on the 10- and 19-layer packing with an overall height of 2.1 and 4 m, respectively. The liquid distributor with independently controlled 126 valves for each irrigation point, developed by the authors, was used for packing irrigation. The experiments showed that the periodic impact of the irrigation system on the large-scale non-uniformity of mixture composition, formed in the packing, could significantly affect the distribution of flow parameters over the cross-section and height of the mass transfer unit. Essentially nonuniform periodic irrigation of the packing can improve the separation efficiency of the column within 20%, if the switching periods are comparable with the times of formation of large-scale non-uniformity.

  9. Evolution of large-scale plasma structures in comets: Kinematics and physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Cometary and solar wind data from December 1985 through April 1986 are presented for the purpose of determining the solar wind conditions associated with comet plasma tail disconnection events (DE's). The cometary data are from The International Halley Watch Atlas of Large-Scale Phenomena (Brandt, Niedner, and Rahe, 1992). In addition, we present the kinematic analysis of 4 DE's, those of Dec. 13.5 and 31.2, 1985, and Feb. 21.7 and 28.7, 1986. The circumstances of these DE's clearly illustrate the need to analyze DE's in groups. In situ solar wind measurements from IMP-8, ICE, and PVO were used to construct the variation of solar wind speed, density, and dynamic pressure during this interval. Data from these same spacecraft plus Vega-1 were used to determine the time of 48 current sheet crossings. These data were fitted to heliospheric current sheet curves extrapolated from the corona into the heliosphere in order to determine the best-fit source surface radius for each Carrington rotation. Comparison of the solar wind conditions and 16 DE's in Halley's comet (the four DE's discussed in this paper and 12 DE's in the literature) leaves little doubt that DE's are associated primarily with crossings of the heliospheric current sheet and apparently not with any other property of the solar wind. If we assume that there is a single or primary physical mechanism and that Halley's DE's are representative, efforts at simulation should concentrate on conditions at current sheet crossings. The mechanisms consistent with this result are sunward magnetic reconnection and tailward magnetic reconnection, if tailward reconnection can be triggered by the sector boundary crossing.

  10. Experimental investigation of coherent structures in turbulent pipe flow using a large-scale pipe flow facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, David

    2012-11-01

    In recent years it has been shown by various researchers, using either experimental techniques or direct numerical simulations, that coherent structures (i.e. features of the flow that persist in space and time) such as hairpin vortices, vortex packets, and very large scale motions (or superstructures) play an important role in wall-bounded turbulent flows (boundary layers, pipes and channel flows). A large-scale recirculating pipe flow facility at the University of Liverpool has been developed to enable the investigation of large and very large scale coherent motions in turbulent pipe flow. The facility includes a 100mm-diameter working section, consisting of individual modules of precision-bore borosilicate glass tubes each 1.027m long, totalling 22 metres in length. Experimental measurements using high-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry at approximately 210 pipe diameters downstream of the inlet are made possible using a unique mechanical arrangement for performing the calibration. Reynolds numbers of up to ReD =105 can be reached when the working fluid is water.

  11. Integrated approach to cosmology: Combining CMB, large-scale structure, and weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Andrina; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam

    2016-10-01

    Recent observational progress has led to the establishment of the standard Λ CDM model for cosmology. This development is based on different cosmological probes that are usually combined through their likelihoods at the latest stage in the analysis. We implement here an integrated scheme for cosmological probes, which are combined in a common framework starting at the map level. This treatment is necessary as the probes are generally derived from overlapping maps and are thus not independent. It also allows for a thorough test of the cosmological model and of systematics through the consistency of different physical tracers. As a first application, we combine current measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the Planck satellite, and galaxy clustering and weak lensing from SDSS. We consider the spherical harmonic power spectra of these probes including all six auto- and cross-correlations along with the associated full Gaussian covariance matrix. This provides an integrated treatment of different analyses usually performed separately including CMB anisotropies, cosmic shear, galaxy clustering, galaxy-galaxy lensing and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect with galaxy and shear tracers. We derive constraints on Λ CDM parameters that are compatible with existing constraints and highlight tensions between data sets, which become apparent in this integrated treatment. We discuss how this approach provides a complete and powerful integrated framework for probe combination and how it can be extended to include other tracers in the context of current and future wide-field cosmological surveys.

  12. Comparison of the large scale structure of the ISM in the 2nd and 3rd Galactic Quadrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, V.; Kiss, Cs.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper we are questing the large scale structure of the interstellar medium (ISM) using IRAS/ISSA 60 and 100 mum maps in the 3rd Galactic Quadrant (GQ). Here we identified 41 loop-like intensity enhancements and analysed their far-infrared (FIR) properties. We found major differences in the distribution and characteristics of these features when comparing the results of the 2nd and the 3rd GQs. This discrepancy can be satisfactorily explained by basic differences of the structure of the ISM in these two Galactic Quadrants.

  13. Large-scale structure formation and cosmic microwave anisotropy in a cold plus hot dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Robert K.; Shafi, Qaisar; Stecker, Floyd W.

    1989-01-01

    Several particle physics models suggest the simultaneous existence of both cold and hot forms of dark matter particles. Assuming a Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of primordial density fluctuations and Omega = 1, the formation of structure in a universe dominated by a combination of cold dark matter and massive neutrinos is explored. It is found that the presence of the hot dark matter component can cause enough power on large scales to explain some recent observations, while there is still sufficient power on small scales to allow galactic structure formation. Spatial anisotropies in the microwave background radiation are computed and found to be compatible with observational limits.

  14. Large-scale structures in tetrahydrofuran-water mixture with a trace amount of antioxidant butylhydroxytoluene (BHT).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyong; Cheng, He; Li, Junyu; Hao, Jinkun; Zhang, Li; Hammouda, Boualem; Han, Charles C

    2011-06-23

    Author: Because of the closed-loop phase diagram of tetrahydrofuran (THF)-water mixture, THF aqueous solution naturally exhibits concentration fluctuations near the phase boundary. Besides the fast mode induced by concentration fluctuations, the 4.5% mole fraction THF aqueous solution is also characterized by a slow mode. The existence of a trace amount of butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) antioxidant in commercial THF strongly influences the slow mode in 4.5% mole fraction THF aqueous solution. A core-shell structure with a BHT core and a shell made from THF-rich THF-D(2)O mixture was identified by the combination of dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). BHT is hydrophobic, stabilized by a THF-rich domain in THF aqueous solution and acts as a tracer to make the large-scale structure (slow mode) "visible" through SANS because of its larger contrast with the solvent. In contrast, this large-scale structure was almost not detectable by SANS when BHT was removed from the THF-D(2)O mixture. Combined UV-vis, DLS, and static light scattering (SLS) indicated that slow-moving objects do exist and that their sizes almost do not change, but their concentration decreases to a small but nonzero value at the infinite dilution limit. The origin of the elusive large-scale structure at zero BHT concentration is still not clear, but it might be associated with some hydrophobic impurities or nanobubbles. However, a polydisperse sphere model of ∼8.5% mole fraction THF-D(2)O mixture can fit the structure with a radius of ∼100 nm, which gives the temperature-dependent low-q SANS profiles of 4.5% mole fraction THF aqueous solution at zero BHT concentration.

  15. The solar wind structure that caused a large-scale disturbance of the plasma tail of comet Austin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozuka, Yukio; Konno, Ichishiro; Saito, Takao; Numazawa, Shigemi

    1992-01-01

    The plasma tail of Comet Austin (1989c1) showed remarkable disturbances because of the solar maximum periods and its orbit. Figure 1 shows photographs of Comet Austin taken in Shibata, Japan, on 29 Apr. 1990 UT, during about 20 minutes with the exposure times of 90 to 120 s. There are two main features in the disturbance; one is many bowed structures, which seem to move tailwards; and the other is a large-scale wavy structure. The bowed structures can be interpreted as arcade structures brushing the surface of both sides of the cometary plasma surrounding the nucleus. We identified thirteen structures of the arcades from each of the five photographs and calculated the relation between the distance of each structure from the cometary nucleus, chi, and the velocity, upsilon. The result is shown. This indicates that the velocity of the structures increases with distance. This is consistent with the result obtained from the observation at the Kiso Observatory.

  16. Does lower Omega allow a resolution of the large-scale structure problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate angular scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background, peculiar velocities, density correlations, and mass fluctuations for both neutrino and baryon-dominated universes with Omega less than one are evaluated. The large coherence length associated with a low-Omega, hot dark matter-dominated universe provides substantial density fluctuations on scales up to 100 Mpc: there is a range of acceptable models that are capable of producing large voids and superclusters of galaxies and the clustering of galaxy clusters, with Omega roughly 0.3, without violating any observational constraint. Low-Omega, cold dark matter-dominated cosmologies are also examined. All of these models may be reconciled with the inflationary requirement of a flat universe by introducing a cosmological constant 1-Omega.

  17. Detected Galaxies and Large Scale Structure in the Arecibo L-band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance Survey (ALFAZOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Patricia A.; Sanchez-Barrantes, Monica; McIntyre, Travis; Minchin, Robert F.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Butcher, Zhon; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Schneider, Stephen E.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; van Driel, Wim; Ramatsoku, Mpati; Koribalski, Baerbel; Spears, Brady

    2017-01-01

    While large, systematic redshift surveys of galaxies have been conducted for decades, lack of information behind the Milky Way (the Zone of Avoidance) contributes uncertainty to our picture of dynamics in the local universe. Controversy persists for the dipole calculated from galaxy and redshift surveys compared to the CMB. Depth in redshift space is an issue, as is incomplete sky mapping, even of supposed all sky redshifts surveys. For instance, the wide-angle 2MASS Redshift Survey retains a gap of 5-8 deg around the Galactic plane. Fortunately, there is no ZOA at 21cm, except for velocities occupied by the Galaxy. This long-wavelength spectral line passes unimpeded through dust, and is unaffected by stellar confusion. With immediate redshift determination, a 21-cm survey produces a 3-dimensional map of the distribution of obscured galaxies which contain HI. It traces large-scale structure right across the Galactic Plane, and identifies obscured mass overdensities relevant to flow-field studies.ALFAZOA is a blind HI survey for galaxies behind the Milky Way covering more than 1000 square degrees of the Arecibo sky. It proceeds in two phases: shallow (completed) and deep (ongoing). The shallow survey (rms ~5-7 mJy) mapped the region within Galactic longitude l = 30 - 75 deg, and latitude b = -10 to +10 deg, detecting several hundred galaxies to about 12,000 km/s, tracing large-scale structure across the plane. The deep survey (rms ~1 mJy), in both the inner (Galactic longitude 30 - 75 deg and latitude plus/minus 2 deg) and outer (longitude 175 - 207 deg and latitude = +1 to -2 deg) Galaxy is ongoing, with detections reaching to 18,000 km/s. Analysis of detections to date, and large-scale structure mapped, will be presented.

  18. PIV measurements of in-cylinder, large-scale structures in a water-analogue Diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalpakli Vester, A.; Nishio, Y.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2016-11-01

    Swirl and tumble are large-scale structures that develop in an engine cylinder during the intake stroke. Their structure and strength depend on the design of the inlet ports and valves, but also on the valve lift history. Engine manufacturers make their design to obtain a specific flow structure that is assumed to give the best engine performance. Despite many efforts, there are still open questions, such as how swirl and tumble depend on the dynamics of the valves/piston as well as how cycle-to-cycle variations should be minimized. In collaboration with Swedish vehicle industry we perform PIV measurements of the flow dynamics during the intake stroke inside a cylinder of a water-analogue engine model having the same geometrical characteristics as a typical truck Diesel engine. Water can be used since during the intake stroke the flow is nearly incompressible. The flow from the valves moves radially outwards, hits the vertical walls of the cylinder, entrains surrounding fluid, moves along the cylinder walls and creates a central backflow, i.e. a tumble motion. Depending on the port and valve design and orientation none, low, or high swirl can be established. For the first time, the effect of the dynamic motion of the piston/valves on the large-scale structures is captured. Supported by the Swedish Energy Agency, Scania CV AB and Volvo GTT, through the FFI program.

  19. N-body simulations of supercluster dynamics to test the viability of large scale structure as a probe of dark energy and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David William

    Many parameters of modern cosmology have been determined to incredible precision at present, including tight constraints on two rather mysterious components of the Universe, dark matter and dark energy. Large Scale structure may be uniquely able to place constraints on both of these components, particularly structures that are loosely gravitationally bound. In such structures, the effects of dark energy's outward push is only slightly less than gravity's inward pull, giving the best chance for detection of dark energy in their dynamics. This work aims to answer whether these structures could potentially serve as a laboratory for studying dark energy, by simulating the dynamics of superclusters both including and excluding its effects. Also, by comparing simulation results with an observational dynamical analysis, dark matter content and possibly the effects of dark energy can be constrained. For this purpose four potentially bound superclusters were identified: the Aquarius, Corona Borealis, Microscopium, and Shapley superclusters. Their dynamics were simulated with N-body software written by the author. It is shown that there is a difference in the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of superclusters depending on whether the effects of dark energy are included or not, but this difference is small enough that it would not be detectable due to observational uncertainties. A new method of supercluster mass estimation, named SCM+FP, is presented, combining knowledge of the dynamics and the spherical collapse model to determine the mass. Also, a new analytical model for the extent of gravitationally bound structure is presented, arising from a simple modification of the spherical collapse model which is supported by simulation results. Further results include the most conclusive evidence to date of extended bound structure in the Corona Borealis supercluster along with evidence that there is extended bound structure in the Shapley supercluster, each with a core of five

  20. The Muenster Red Sky Survey: Large-scale structures in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungruhe, R.; Seitter, W. C.; Duerbeck, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    We present a large-scale galaxy catalogue for the red spectral region which covers an area of 5 000 square degrees. It contains positions, red magnitudes, radii, ellipticities and position angles of about 5.5 million galaxies. Together with the APM catalogue (4,300 square degrees) in the blue spectral region, this catalogue forms at present the largest coherent data base for cosmological investigations in the southern hemisphere. 217 ESO Southern Sky Atlas R Schmidt plates with galactic latitudes -45 degrees were digitized with the two PDS microdensitometers of the Astronomisches Institut Münster, with a step width of 15 microns, corresponding to 1.01 arcseconds per pixel. All data were stored on different storage media and are available for further investigations. Suitable search parameters must be chosen in such a way that all objects are found on the plates, and that the percentage of artificial objects remains as low as possible. Based on two reference areas on different plates, a search threshold of 140 PDS density units and a minimum number of four pixels per object were chosen. The detected objects were stored, according to size, in frames of different size length. Each object was investigated in its frame, and 18 object parameters were determined. The classification of objects into stars, galaxies and perturbed objects was done with an automatic procedure which makes use of combinations of computed object parameters. In the first step, the perturbed objects are removed from the catalogue. Double objects and noise objects can be excluded on the basis of symmetry properties, while for satellite trails, a new classification criterium based on apparent magnitude, effective radius and apparent ellipticity, was developed. For the remaining objects, a star/galaxy separation was carried out. For bright objects, the relation between apparent magnitude and effective radius serves as the discriminating property, for fainter objects, the relation between effective

  1. New Insights about Enzyme Evolution from Large Scale Studies of Sequence and Structure Relationships*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Shoshana D.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. PMID:25210038

  2. New insights about enzyme evolution from large scale studies of sequence and structure relationships.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shoshana D; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-10-31

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes.

  3. Dynamic Arrest in Charged Colloidal Systems Exhibiting Large-Scale Structural Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Perez, C.; Callejas-Fernandez, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.; Rojas-Ochoa, L. F.; Castaneda-Priego, R.; Quesada-Perez, M.; Trappe, V.

    2009-01-09

    Suspensions of charged liposomes are found to exhibit typical features of strongly repulsive fluid systems at short length scales, while exhibiting structural heterogeneities at larger length scales that are characteristic of attractive systems. We model the static structure factor of these systems using effective pair interaction potentials composed of a long-range attraction and a shorter range repulsion. Our modeling of the static structure yields conditions for dynamically arrested states at larger volume fractions, which we find to agree with the experimentally observed dynamics.

  4. Observational requirements for Lyα forest tomographic mapping of large-scale structure at z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; White, Martin; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Ozbek, Melih

    2014-06-10

    The z ≳ 2 Lyα forest traces the underlying dark matter distribution on large scales and, given sufficient sightlines, can be used to create three-dimensional (3D) maps of large-scale structures. We examine the observational requirements to construct such maps and estimate the signal-to-noise as a function of exposure time and sightline density. Sightline densities at z = 2.25 are n {sub los} ≈ [360, 1200, 3300] deg{sup –2} at limiting magnitudes of g = [24.0, 24.5, 25.0], resulting in transverse sightline separations of (d ) ≈ [3.6, 1.9, 1.2] h {sup –1} Mpc, which roughly sets the reconstruction scale. We simulate these reconstructions using mock spectra with realistic noise properties and find that spectra with S/N ≈ 4 per angstrom can be used to generate maps that clearly trace the underlying dark matter at overdensities of ρ/(ρ) ∼ 1. For the VLT/VIMOS spectrograph, exposure times t {sub exp} = [4, 6, 10] hr are sufficient for maps with spatial resolution ε{sub 3D} = [5.0, 3.2, 2.3] h {sup –1} Mpc. Assuming ∼250 h {sup –1} Mpc is probed along the line of sight, 1 deg{sup 2} of survey area would cover a comoving volume of ≈10{sup 6} h {sup –3} Mpc{sup 3} at (z) ∼ 2.3, enabling the efficient mapping of large volumes with 8-10 m telescopes. These maps could be used to study galaxy environments, the topology of large-scale structures at high z, and to detect proto-clusters.

  5. Chebyshev polynomial filtered subspace iteration in the discontinuous Galerkin method for large-scale electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amartya S; Lin, Lin; Hu, Wei; Yang, Chao; Pask, John E

    2016-10-21

    The Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) electronic structure method employs an adaptive local basis (ALB) set to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of density functional theory in a discontinuous Galerkin framework. The adaptive local basis is generated on-the-fly to capture the local material physics and can systematically attain chemical accuracy with only a few tens of degrees of freedom per atom. A central issue for large-scale calculations, however, is the computation of the electron density (and subsequently, ground state properties) from the discretized Hamiltonian in an efficient and scalable manner. We show in this work how Chebyshev polynomial filtered subspace iteration (CheFSI) can be used to address this issue and push the envelope in large-scale materials simulations in a discontinuous Galerkin framework. We describe how the subspace filtering steps can be performed in an efficient and scalable manner using a two-dimensional parallelization scheme, thanks to the orthogonality of the DG basis set and block-sparse structure of the DG Hamiltonian matrix. The on-the-fly nature of the ALB functions requires additional care in carrying out the subspace iterations. We demonstrate the parallel scalability of the DG-CheFSI approach in calculations of large-scale two-dimensional graphene sheets and bulk three-dimensional lithium-ion electrolyte systems. Employing 55 296 computational cores, the time per self-consistent field iteration for a sample of the bulk 3D electrolyte containing 8586 atoms is 90 s, and the time for a graphene sheet containing 11 520 atoms is 75 s.

  6. Chebyshev polynomial filtered subspace iteration in the discontinuous Galerkin method for large-scale electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amartya S.; Lin, Lin; Hu, Wei; Yang, Chao; Pask, John E.

    2016-10-01

    The Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) electronic structure method employs an adaptive local basis (ALB) set to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of density functional theory in a discontinuous Galerkin framework. The adaptive local basis is generated on-the-fly to capture the local material physics and can systematically attain chemical accuracy with only a few tens of degrees of freedom per atom. A central issue for large-scale calculations, however, is the computation of the electron density (and subsequently, ground state properties) from the discretized Hamiltonian in an efficient and scalable manner. We show in this work how Chebyshev polynomial filtered subspace iteration (CheFSI) can be used to address this issue and push the envelope in large-scale materials simulations in a discontinuous Galerkin framework. We describe how the subspace filtering steps can be performed in an efficient and scalable manner using a two-dimensional parallelization scheme, thanks to the orthogonality of the DG basis set and block-sparse structure of the DG Hamiltonian matrix. The on-the-fly nature of the ALB functions requires additional care in carrying out the subspace iterations. We demonstrate the parallel scalability of the DG-CheFSI approach in calculations of large-scale two-dimensional graphene sheets and bulk three-dimensional lithium-ion electrolyte systems. Employing 55 296 computational cores, the time per self-consistent field iteration for a sample of the bulk 3D electrolyte containing 8586 atoms is 90 s, and the time for a graphene sheet containing 11 520 atoms is 75 s.

  7. Dynamic displacement measurement of large-scale structures based on the Lucas-Kanade template tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jie; Zhu, Chang`an

    2016-01-01

    The development of optics and computer technologies enables the application of the vision-based technique that uses digital cameras to the displacement measurement of large-scale structures. Compared with traditional contact measurements, vision-based technique allows for remote measurement, has a non-intrusive characteristic, and does not necessitate mass introduction. In this study, a high-speed camera system is developed to complete the displacement measurement in real time. The system consists of a high-speed camera and a notebook computer. The high-speed camera can capture images at a speed of hundreds of frames per second. To process the captured images in computer, the Lucas-Kanade template tracking algorithm in the field of computer vision is introduced. Additionally, a modified inverse compositional algorithm is proposed to reduce the computing time of the original algorithm and improve the efficiency further. The modified algorithm can rapidly accomplish one displacement extraction within 1 ms without having to install any pre-designed target panel onto the structures in advance. The accuracy and the efficiency of the system in the remote measurement of dynamic displacement are demonstrated in the experiments on motion platform and sound barrier on suspension viaduct. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can extract accurate displacement signal and accomplish the vibration measurement of large-scale structures.

  8. Large-Scale Production and Structural and Biophysical Characterizations of the Human Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Vörös, Judit; Urbanek, Annika; Rautureau, Gilles Jean Philippe; O'Connor, Maggie; Fisher, Henry C.; Ashcroft, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major human pathogen that causes serious liver disease and 600,000 deaths annually. Approved therapies for treating chronic HBV infections usually target the multifunctional viral polymerase (hPOL). Unfortunately, these therapies—broad-spectrum antivirals—are not general cures, have side effects, and cause viral resistance. While hPOL remains an attractive therapeutic target, it is notoriously difficult to express and purify in a soluble form at yields appropriate for structural studies. Thus, no empirical structural data exist for hPOL, and this impedes medicinal chemistry and rational lead discovery efforts targeting HBV. Here, we present an efficient strategy to overexpress recombinant hPOL domains in Escherichia coli, purifying them at high yield and solving their known aggregation tendencies. This allowed us to perform the first structural and biophysical characterizations of hPOL domains. Apo-hPOL domains adopt mainly α-helical structures with small amounts of β-sheet structures. Our recombinant material exhibited metal-dependent, reverse transcriptase activity in vitro, with metal binding modulating the hPOL structure. Calcomine orange 2RS, a small molecule that inhibits duck HBV POL activity, also inhibited the in vitro priming activity of recombinant hPOL. Our work paves the way for structural and biophysical characterizations of hPOL and should facilitate high-throughput lead discovery for HBV. IMPORTANCE The viral polymerase from human hepatitis B virus (hPOL) is a well-validated therapeutic target. However, recombinant hPOL has a well-deserved reputation for being extremely difficult to express in a soluble, active form in yields appropriate to the structural studies that usually play an important role in drug discovery programs. This has hindered the development of much-needed new antivirals for HBV. However, we have solved this problem and report here procedures for expressing recombinant hPOL domains in

  9. Developing eThread Pipeline Using SAGA-Pilot Abstraction for Large-Scale Structural Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Ragothaman, Anjani; Feinstein, Wei; Jha, Shantenu; Kim, Joohyun

    2014-01-01

    While most of computational annotation approaches are sequence-based, threading methods are becoming increasingly attractive because of predicted structural information that could uncover the underlying function. However, threading tools are generally compute-intensive and the number of protein sequences from even small genomes such as prokaryotes is large typically containing many thousands, prohibiting their application as a genome-wide structural systems biology tool. To leverage its utility, we have developed a pipeline for eThread—a meta-threading protein structure modeling tool, that can use computational resources efficiently and effectively. We employ a pilot-based approach that supports seamless data and task-level parallelism and manages large variation in workload and computational requirements. Our scalable pipeline is deployed on Amazon EC2 and can efficiently select resources based upon task requirements. We present runtime analysis to characterize computational complexity of eThread and EC2 infrastructure. Based on results, we suggest a pathway to an optimized solution with respect to metrics such as time-to-solution or cost-to-solution. Our eThread pipeline can scale to support a large number of sequences and is expected to be a viable solution for genome-scale structural bioinformatics and structure-based annotation, particularly, amenable for small genomes such as prokaryotes. The developed pipeline is easily extensible to other types of distributed cyberinfrastructure. PMID:24995285

  10. Robust classification of protein variation using structural modelling and large-scale data integration

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, Evan H.; Simmons-Edler, Riley; Müller, Christian L.; Alford, Rebecca F.; Volfovsky, Natalia; Lash, Alex E.; Bonneau, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for interpreting protein variation focus on annotating mutation pathogenicity rather than detailed interpretation of variant deleteriousness and frequently use only sequence-based or structure-based information. We present VIPUR, a computational framework that seamlessly integrates sequence analysis and structural modelling (using the Rosetta protein modelling suite) to identify and interpret deleterious protein variants. To train VIPUR, we collected 9477 protein variants with known effects on protein function from multiple organisms and curated structural models for each variant from crystal structures and homology models. VIPUR can be applied to mutations in any organism's proteome with improved generalized accuracy (AUROC .83) and interpretability (AUPR .87) compared to other methods. We demonstrate that VIPUR's predictions of deleteriousness match the biological phenotypes in ClinVar and provide a clear ranking of prediction confidence. We use VIPUR to interpret known mutations associated with inflammation and diabetes, demonstrating the structural diversity of disrupted functional sites and improved interpretation of mutations associated with human diseases. Lastly, we demonstrate VIPUR's ability to highlight candidate variants associated with human diseases by applying VIPUR to de novo variants associated with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26926108

  11. An algebraic sub-structuring method for large-scale eigenvaluecalculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.; Bai, Z.; Li, X.; Lee, L.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.

    2004-05-26

    We examine sub-structuring methods for solving large-scalegeneralized eigenvalue problems from a purely algebraic point of view. Weuse the term "algebraic sub-structuring" to refer to the process ofapplying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a largesparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectralcomponents are extracted and combined to provide approximate solutions tothe original problem. We are interested in the question of which spectralcomponentsone should extract from each sub-structure in order to producean approximate solution to the original problem with a desired level ofaccuracy. Error estimate for the approximation to the small esteigen pairis developed. The estimate leads to a simple heuristic for choosingspectral components (modes) from each sub-structure. The effectiveness ofsuch a heuristic is demonstrated with numerical examples. We show thatalgebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve a generalizedeigenvalue problem arising from the simulation of an acceleratorstructure. One interesting characteristic of this application is that thestiffness matrix produced by a hierarchical vector finite elements schemecontains a null space of large dimension. We present an efficient schemeto deflate this null space in the algebraic sub-structuringprocess.

  12. Large Scale Structures in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey and in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1999-06-01

    The large supercluster structures obvious in recent galaxy redshift surveys are quantified using an one-dimensional cluster analysis (core sampling) and a three-dimensional cluster analysis based on the minimal spanning tree. The comparison with the LCRS reveals promising stable results. At a mean overdensity of about ten, the supercluster systems form huge wall-like structures comprising about 40% of all galaxies. The overdense clusters have a low mean transverse velocity dispersion of about 400 km/s, i.e. they look quite narrow in redshift space. We performed N-body simulations with large box sizes for six cosmological scenarios. The quantitative analysis shows that the observed structures can be understood best in low density models with Ω_m <= 0.5 with or without a cosmological constant.

  13. Probabilistic Analysis of Large-Scale Composite Structures Using the IPACS Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemonds, Jeffrey; Kumar, Virendra

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was performed to ascertain the feasibility of using IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures) for probabilistic analysis of a composite fan blade, the development of which is being pursued by various industries for the next generation of aircraft engines. A model representative of the class of fan blades used in the GE90 engine has been chosen as the structural component to be analyzed with IPACS. In this study, typical uncertainties are assumed in the level, and structural responses for ply stresses and frequencies are evaluated in the form of cumulative probability density functions. Because of the geometric complexity of the blade, the number of plies varies from several hundred at the root to about a hundred at the tip. This represents a extremely complex composites application for the IPACS code. A sensitivity study with respect to various random variables is also performed.

  14. Large Scale Structural Rearrangement of a Serine Hydrolase from Francisella tularensis Facilitates Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Weston, Leigh A.; Kuhn, Misty L.; Geissler, Brett; Gehring, Alexandra M.; Armoush, Nicola; Adkins, Chinessa T.; Minasov, George; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Winsor, James R.; Lavis, Luke D.; Satchell, Karla J. F.; Becker, Daniel P.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Johnson, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Tularemia is a deadly, febrile disease caused by infection by the Gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis. Members of the ubiquitous serine hydrolase protein family are among current targets to treat diverse bacterial infections. Herein we present a structural and functional study of a novel bacterial carboxylesterase (FTT258) from F. tularensis, a homologue of human acyl protein thioesterase (hAPT1). The structure of FTT258 has been determined in multiple forms, and unexpectedly large conformational changes of a peripheral flexible loop occur in the presence of a mechanistic cyclobutanone ligand. The concomitant changes in this hydrophobic loop and the newly exposed hydrophobic substrate binding pocket suggest that the observed structural changes are essential to the biological function and catalytic activity of FTT258. Using diverse substrate libraries, site-directed mutagenesis, and liposome binding assays, we determined the importance of these structural changes to the catalytic activity and membrane binding activity of FTT258. Residues within the newly exposed hydrophobic binding pocket and within the peripheral flexible loop proved essential to the hydrolytic activity of FTT258, indicating that structural rearrangement is required for catalytic activity. Both FTT258 and hAPT1 also showed significant association with liposomes designed to mimic bacterial or human membranes, respectively, even though similar structural rearrangements for hAPT1 have not been reported. The necessity for acyl protein thioesterases to have maximal catalytic activity near the membrane surface suggests that these conformational changes in the protein may dually regulate catalytic activity and membrane association in bacterial and human homologues. PMID:23430251

  15. Large-scale production and protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Milić, Dalibor; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) gave insights into molecular mechanisms of their action and contributed significantly to molecular pharmacology. This is primarily due to technical advances in protein engineering, production and crystallization of these important receptor targets. On the other hand, NMR spectroscopy of GPCRs, which can provide information about their dynamics, still remains challenging due to difficulties in preparation of isotopically labeled receptors and their low long-term stabilities. In this review, we discuss methods used for expression and purification of GPCRs for crystallographic and NMR studies. We also summarize protein engineering methods that played a crucial role in obtaining GPCR crystal structures. PMID:25873898

  16. Large-scale production and protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Milić, Dalibor; Veprintsev, Dmitry B

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) gave insights into molecular mechanisms of their action and contributed significantly to molecular pharmacology. This is primarily due to technical advances in protein engineering, production and crystallization of these important receptor targets. On the other hand, NMR spectroscopy of GPCRs, which can provide information about their dynamics, still remains challenging due to difficulties in preparation of isotopically labeled receptors and their low long-term stabilities. In this review, we discuss methods used for expression and purification of GPCRs for crystallographic and NMR studies. We also summarize protein engineering methods that played a crucial role in obtaining GPCR crystal structures.

  17. A mixed time integration method for large scale acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.; Wineman, S.J.; Goudreau, G.L.; Foch, J.D.

    1994-07-18

    The transient, coupled, interaction of sound with structures is a process in which an acoustic fluid surrounding an elastic body contributes to the effective inertia and elasticity of the body. Conversely, the presence of an elastic body in an acoustic medium influences the behavior of propagating disturbances. This paper details the application of a mixed explicit-implicit time integration algorithm to the fully coupled acoustic fluidstructure interaction problem. Based upon a dispersion analysis of the semi-discrete wave equation a second-order, explicit scheme for solving the wave equation is developed. The combination of a highly vectorized, explicit, acoustic fluid solver with an implicit structural code for linear elastodynamics has resulted in a simulation tool, PING, for acoustic fluid-structure interaction. PING`s execution rates range from 1{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for rigid scattering to 10{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for fully coupled problems. Several examples of PING`s application to 3-D problems serve in part to validate the code, and also to demonstrate the capability to treat complex geometry, acoustic fluid-structure problems which require high resolution meshes.

  18. Characterizing the nonlinear growth of large-scale structure in the Universe

    PubMed

    Coles; Chiang

    2000-07-27

    The local Universe displays a rich hierarchical pattern of galaxy clusters and superclusters. The early Universe, however, was almost smooth, with only slight 'ripples' as seen in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Models of the evolution of cosmic structure link these observations through the effect of gravity, because the small initially overdense fluctuations are predicted to attract additional mass as the Universe expands. During the early stages of this expansion, the ripples evolve independently, like linear waves on the surface of deep water. As the structures grow in mass, they interact with each other in nonlinear ways, more like waves breaking in shallow water. We have recently shown how cosmic structure can be characterized by phase correlations associated with these nonlinear interactions, but it was not clear how to use that information to obtain quantitative insights into the growth of structures. Here we report a method of revealing phase information, and show quantitatively how this relates to the formation of filaments, sheets and clusters of galaxies by nonlinear collapse. We develop a statistical method based on information entropy to separate linear from nonlinear effects, and thereby are able to disentangle those aspects of galaxy clustering that arise from initial conditions (the ripples) from the subsequent dynamical evolution.

  19. A new method to estimate the Galactic extinction for the analysis of large scale structure in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Malkan, M. A.; Sekiguchi, K.; Menzies, J. W.; Parker, Q. A.; Jugaku, J.; Karoji, H.; Okamura, S.

    In order to study the large scale structure in the region of low Galactic latitude, it is indispensable to discriminate true features in the projected galaxy distribution from spurious ones due to the patchy Galactic extinction. We derive a linear relation between the Galactic extinction and the flux density at 100 microns in IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA) based on the analysis of the number count of faint galaxies. Thus, ISSA 100 microns flux density can be used to estimate the Galactic extinction with a fine resolution of 1.5 arcmin. With the aid of this estimate, we investigate large scale structure in the Galactic center region. We made a galaxy survey in the 175 square degree field centered at the Ophiuchus cluster (l = 0.5circ, b = +9.5circ, cz = 8,500 km s^{-1}) using ESO/SERC Southern Sky Survey films. We detected 4,021 galaxies and compiled redshifts for 219 galaxies including 179 new determinations. Seven clumps were identified in the distribution of luminous galaxies. On the basis of redshifts in these seven clumps, the Ophiuchus cluster, two new clusters of irregular type and four new groups of galaxies are found to form a supercluster. The region of cz = 0 - 5,000 km s^{-1}, this side of the supercluster, is found to be a void.

  20. Large-scale oscillation of structure-related DNA sequence features in human chromosome 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wentian; Miramontes, Pedro

    2006-08-01

    Human chromosome 21 is the only chromosome in the human genome that exhibits oscillation of the (G+C) content of a cycle length of hundreds kilobases (kb) ( 500kb near the right telomere). We aim at establishing the existence of a similar periodicity in structure-related sequence features in order to relate this (G+C)% oscillation to other biological phenomena. The following quantities are shown to oscillate with the same 500kb periodicity in human chromosome 21: binding energy calculated by two sets of dinucleotide-based thermodynamic parameters, AA/TT and AAA/TTT bi- and tri-nucleotide density, 5'-TA-3' dinucleotide density, and signal for 10- or 11-base periodicity of AA/TT or AAA/TTT. These intrinsic quantities are related to structural features of the double helix of DNA molecules, such as base-pair binding, untwisting or unwinding, stiffness, and a putative tendency for nucleosome formation.

  1. Noise produced by the large-scale transition region structure of turbulent jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The 'orderly' structure which has been observed recently by numerous researchers within the transition region of subsonic turbulent jets is analyzed to reveal its noise-producing potential. For the case of a circular jet, this structure is modeled as a train of toroidal vortex rings which are formed near the jet exit and propagate downstream. The noise produced by the model is evaluated from a reformulation of Lighthill's expression for the far-field acoustic density which emphasizes the importance of the vorticity within the turbulent flow field. It is shown that the noise production occurs mainly close to the jet exit and depends primarily upon temporal changes in the toroidal radii. These results suggest a new approach to noise suppression which has been substantiated experimentally.

  2. State-of-the-art eigensolvers for electronic structure calculations of large scale nano-systems

    SciTech Connect

    Voemel, Christof Tomov, Stanimire Z. Marques, Osni A.; Canning, A. Wang, L.-W. Dongarra, Jack J.

    2008-07-20

    The band edge states determine optical and electronic properties of semiconductor nano-structures which can be computed from an interior eigenproblem. We study the reliability and performance of state-of-the-art iterative eigensolvers on large quantum dots and wires, focusing on variants of preconditioned CG, Lanczos, and Davidson methods. One Davidson variant, the GD + k (Olsen) method, is identified to be as reliable as the commonly used preconditioned CG while consistently being between two and three times faster.

  3. Large-scale structure of brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations in England: effects on rodenticide resistance

    PubMed Central

    Haniza, Mohd Z.H.; Adams, Sally; Jones, Eleanor P.; MacNicoll, Alan; Mallon, Eamonn B.; Smith, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    The brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a relatively recent (<300 years) addition to the British fauna, but by association with negative impacts on public health, animal health and agriculture, it is regarded as one of the most important vertebrate pest species. Anticoagulant rodenticides were introduced for brown rat control in the 1950s and are widely used for rat control in the UK, but long-standing resistance has been linked to control failures in some regions. One thus far ignored aspect of resistance biology is the population structure of the brown rat. This paper investigates the role population structure has on the development of anticoagulant resistance. Using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA, we examined 186 individuals (from 15 counties in England and one location in Wales near the Wales–England border) to investigate the population structure of rural brown rat populations. We also examined individual rats for variations of the VKORC1 gene previously associated with resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides. We show that the populations were structured to some degree, but that this was only apparent in the microsatellite data and not the mtDNA data. We discuss various reasons why this is the case. We show that the population as a whole appears not to be at equilibrium. The relative lack of diversity in the mtDNA sequences examined can be explained by founder effects and a subsequent spatial expansion of a species introduced to the UK relatively recently. We found there was a geographical distribution of resistance mutations, and relatively low rate of gene flow between populations, which has implications for the development and management of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:26664802

  4. Large-scale flows and coherent structure phenomena in flute turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Andrushchenko, Zh.N.; Pavlenko, V.P.

    2005-04-15

    The properties of zonal and streamer flows in the flute mode turbulence are investigated. The stability criteria and the frequency of these flows are determined in terms of the spectra of turbulent fluctuations. Furthermore, it is shown that zonal flows can undergo a further nonlinear evolution leading to the formation of long-lived coherent structures which consist of self-bound wave packets supporting stationary shear layers, and thus can be characterized as regions with a reduced level of anomalous transport.

  5. Large scale prop-fan structural design study. Volume 2: Preliminary design of SR-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, L. C.; Gruska, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Leishman, D. K.; Turnberg, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel consumption. Studies have shown that the inherent efficiency advantage that turboprop propulsion systems have demonstrated at lower cruise speeds may now be extended to the higher speeds of today's turbofan and turbojet-powered aircraft. To achieve this goal, new propeller designs will require features such as thin, high speed airfoils and aerodynamic sweep, features currently found only in wing designs for high speed aircraft. This is Volume 2 of a 2 volume study to establish structural concepts for such advanced propeller blades, to define their structural properties, to identify any new design, analysis, or fabrication techniques which were required, and to determine the structural tradeoffs involved with several blade shapes selected primarily on the basis of aero/acoustic design considerations. The feasibility of fabricating and testing dynamically scaled models of these blades for aeroelastic testing was also established. The preliminary design of a blade suitable for flight use in a testbed advanced turboprop was conducted and is described.

  6. Mummy Lake: An unroofed ceremonial structure within a large-scale ritual landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, Larry V.; Griffin, Eleanor R.; Stein, J.R.; Friedman, R. A.; Andrae, S. W.

    2014-01-01

    The structure at Mesa Verde National Park known historically as Mummy Lake and more recently as Far View Reservoir is not part of a water collection, impoundment, or redistribution system. We offer an alternative explanation for the function of Mummy Lake. We suggest that it is an unroofed ceremonial structure, and that it serves as an essential component of a Chacoan ritual landscape. A wide constructed avenue articulates Mummy Lake with Far View House and Pipe Shrine House. The avenue continues southward for approximately 6 km where it apparently divides connecting with Spruce Tree House and Sun Temple/Cliff Palace. The avenue has previously been interpreted as an irrigation ditch fed by water impounded at Mummy Lake; however, it conforms in every respect to alignments described as Chacoan roads. Tree-ring dates indicate that the construction of Spruce Tree House and Cliff Palace began about A.D. 1225, roughly coincident with the abandonment of the Far View community. This pattern of periodically relocating the focus of an Anasazi community by retiring existing ritual structures and linking them to newly constructed facilities by means of broad avenues was first documented by Fowler and Stein (1992) in Manuelito Canyon, New Mexico. Periods of intense drought appear to have contributed to the relocation of prehistoric Native Americans from the Far View group to Cliff Palace/Spruce Tree House in the mid-13th century and eventually to the abandonment of all Anasazi communities in southwestern Colorado in the late-13th century.

  7. Large scale prop-fan structural design study. Volume 1: Initial concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, L. C.; Gruska, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Leishman, D. K.; Turnberg, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel consumption. Studies have shown that the inherent efficiency advantage that turboprop propulsion systems have demonstrated at lower cruise speeds may now be extended to the higher speeds of today's turbofan and turbojet-powered aircraft. To achieve this goal, new propeller designs will require features such as thin, high speed airfoils and aerodynamic sweep, features currently found only in wing designs for high speed aircraft. This is Volume 1 of a 2 volume study to establish structural concepts for such advanced propeller blades, to define their structural properties, to identify any new design, analysis, or fabrication techniques which were required, and to determine the structural tradeoffs involved with several blade shapes selected primarily on the basis of aero/acoustic design considerations. The feasibility of fabricating and testing dynamically scaled models of these blades for aeroelastic testing was also established. The preliminary design of a blade suitable for flight use in a testbed advanced turboprop was conducted and is described in Volume 2.

  8. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2016-12-26

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale.

  9. Compact groups in theory and practice - IV. The connection to large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, J. Trevor; Ellison, Sara L.; Simard, Luc; Patton, David R.; McConnachie, Alan W.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the properties of photometrically selected compact groups (CGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this paper, the fourth in a series, we focus on understanding the characteristics of our observed CG sample with particular attention paid to quantifying and removing contamination from projected foreground or background galaxies. Based on a simple comparison of pairwise redshift likelihoods, we find that approximately half of CGs in the parent sample contain one or more projected (interloping) members; our final clean sample contains 4566 galaxies in 1086 CGs. We show that half of the remaining CGs are associated with rich groups (or clusters), i.e. they are embedded sub-structure. The other half have spatial distributions and number-density profiles consistent with the interpretation that they are either independently distributed structures within the field (i.e. they are isolated) or associated with relatively poor structures. Comparisons of late-type and red-sequence fractions in radial annuli show that galaxies around apparently isolated CGs resemble the field population by 300 to 500 kpc from the group centre. In contrast, the galaxy population surrounding embedded CGs appears to remain distinct from the field out beyond 1 to 2 Mpc, consistent with results for rich groups. We take this as additional evidence that the observed distinction between CGs, i.e. isolated versus embedded, is a separation between different host environments.

  10. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  11. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-24

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~36 × 36 m(2). The spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurements are sufficiently high to quantify the evolution of blade-generated coherent motions, such as the tip and trailing sheet vortices, identify their instability mechanisms and correlate them with turbine operation, control and performance. Our experiment provides an unprecedented in situ characterization of flow structures around utility-scale turbines, and yields significant insights into the Reynolds number similarity issues presented in wind energy applications.

  12. Parallel methods on large-scale structural analysis and physics applications; Symposium, Hampton, VA, Feb. 5, 6, 1991, Selected Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O. (Editor); Carmona, Edward A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in parallel methods and algorithms integrated into large-scale codes are presented. Consideration is given to problem decomposition (substructuring), efficient matrix solution algorithms for shared memory architectures, dynamic and transient analysis algorithms for shared memory architectures, and algorithms for distributed and massively parallel architectures. Particular attention is given to partitioning of unstructured problems for parallel processing, parallel-vector computation for linear-structural analysis and nonlinear unconstraint optimization problems, a parallel-vector equation solver for unsymmetric matrices on supercomputers, parallel nonlinear finite element dynamic response, multigrid algorithms for solving structural mechanics problems on supercomputers, structural analysis on massively parallel computers, explicit finite element methods with contact-impact on SIMD computers, and the impact of mapping and sparsity on parallelized finite element method modules.

  13. Large-scale sequence and structural comparisons of human naive and antigen-experienced antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Brandon J.; Lungu, Oana I.; Park, Daechan; Johnson, Erik L.; Charab, Wissam; Chrysostomou, Constantine; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ellington, Andrew D.; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Georgiou, George

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating how antigen exposure and selection shape the human antibody repertoire is fundamental to our understanding of B-cell immunity. We sequenced the paired heavy- and light-chain variable regions (VH and VL, respectively) from large populations of single B cells combined with computational modeling of antibody structures to evaluate sequence and structural features of human antibody repertoires at unprecedented depth. Analysis of a dataset comprising 55,000 antibody clusters from CD19+CD20+CD27− IgM-naive B cells, >120,000 antibody clusters from CD19+CD20+CD27+ antigen–experienced B cells, and >2,000 RosettaAntibody-predicted structural models across three healthy donors led to a number of key findings: (i) VH and VL gene sequences pair in a combinatorial fashion without detectable pairing restrictions at the population level; (ii) certain VH:VL gene pairs were significantly enriched or depleted in the antigen-experienced repertoire relative to the naive repertoire; (iii) antigen selection increased antibody paratope net charge and solvent-accessible surface area; and (iv) public heavy-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3) antibodies in the antigen-experienced repertoire showed signs of convergent paired light-chain genetic signatures, including shared light-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-L3) amino acid sequences and/or Vκ,λ–Jκ,λ genes. The data reported here address several longstanding questions regarding antibody repertoire selection and development and provide a benchmark for future repertoire-scale analyses of antibody responses to vaccination and disease. PMID:27114511

  14. Hierarchical, decentralized control system for large-scale smart-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algermissen, Stephan; Fröhlich, Tim; Monner, Hans Peter

    2014-08-01

    Active control of sound and vibration has gained much attention in all kinds of industries in the past decade. Future prospects for maximizing airline passenger comfort are especially promising. The objectives of recent research projects in this area are the reduction of noise transmission through thin walled structures such as fuselages, linings or interior elements. Besides different external noise sources, such as the turbulent boundary layer, rotor or jet noise, the actuator and sensor placement as well as different control concepts are addressed. Mostly, the work is focused on a single panel or section of the fuselage, neglecting the fact that for effective noise reduction the entire fuselage has to be taken into account. Nevertheless, extending the scope of an active system from a single panel to the entire fuselage increases the effort for control hardware dramatically. This paper presents a control concept for large structures using distributed control nodes. Each node has the capability to execute a vibration or noise controller for a specific part or section of the fuselage. For maintenance, controller tuning or performance measurement, all nodes are connected to a host computer via Universal Serial Bus (USB). This topology allows a partitioning and distributing of tasks. The nodes execute the low-level control functions. High-level tasks like maintenance, system identification and control synthesis are operated by the host using streamed data from the nodes. By choosing low-price nodes, a very cost effective way of implementing an active system for large structures is realized. Besides the system identification and controller synthesis on the host computer, a detailed view on the hardware and software concept for the nodes is given. Finally, the results of an experimental test of a system running a robust vibration controller at an active panel demonstrator are shown.

  15. Nanolithography. Large-scale nanoshaping of ultrasmooth 3D crystalline metallic structures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huang; Hu, Yaowu; Xuan, Yi; Li, Ji; Yang, Yingling; Martinez, Ramses V; Li, Chunyu; Luo, Jian; Qi, Minghao; Cheng, Gary J

    2014-12-12

    We report a low-cost, high-throughput benchtop method that enables thin layers of metal to be shaped with nanoscale precision by generating ultrahigh-strain-rate deformations. Laser shock imprinting can create three-dimensional crystalline metallic structures as small as 10 nanometers with ultrasmooth surfaces at ambient conditions. This technique enables the successful fabrications of large-area, uniform nanopatterns with aspect ratios as high as 5 for plasmonic and sensing applications, as well as mechanically strengthened nanostructures and metal-graphene hybrid nanodevices.

  16. A Linear Scaling Three Dimensional Fragment Method for Large ScaleElectronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan

    2007-07-26

    We present a novel linear scaling ab initio total energyelectronic structure calculation method, which is simple to implement,easily to parallelize, and produces essentially thesame results as thedirect ab initio method, while it could be thousands of times faster.Using this method, we have studied the dipole moments of CdSe quantumdots, and found both significant bulk and surface contributions. The bulkdipole contribution cannot simply be estimated from the bulk spontaneouspolarization value by a proportional volume factor. Instead it has ageometry dependent screening effect. The dipole moment also produces astrong internal electric field which induces a strong electron holeseparation.

  17. Outdoor thermal monitoring of large scale structures by infrared thermography integrated in an ICT based architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Crinière, Antoine; Averty, Rodolphe

    2015-04-01

    An infrared system has been developed to monitor transport infrastructures in a standalone configuration. Results obtained on bridges open to traffic allows to retrieve the inner structure of the decks. To complete this study, experiments were carried out over several months to monitor two reinforced concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T each. Detection of a damaged area over one of the two beams was made by Pulse Phase Thermography approach. Measurements carried out over several months. Finally, conclusion on the robustness of the system is proposed and perspectives are presented.

  18. Self-Assembly of Large-Scale Shape-Controlled DNA Nano-Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-16

    Boulais, Y. Hakobyan, W. Wang, A. Guan, M. Bathe, and P. Yin. DNA ’Genome’ for Programming 3D Inorganic Shapes. Science, submitted. 2. Y. Ke, L. L. Ong ...of a DNA tetrahedron. Submitted, 2013. 6. Y Ke, L. L. Ong , W. Sun, J. Song, M. Dong, W. M. Shih and P. Yin. Complex crystals with prescribed depth...2013. 13. Y Ke, L. Ong , W. Shih, and P. Yin*, Three-Dimensional Structures Self-Assembled from DNA Bricks. Science, 338:1177-1183, 2012. Note

  19. A Catalog of Proper Motions to Dynamically Measure the Hubble Expansion and the Evolution of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truebenbach, Alexandra; Darling, Jeremiah K.

    2017-01-01

    Objects and structures gravitationally decoupled from the Hubble expansion will appear to shrink in angular size as the universe expands. Observations of extragalactic proper motions can thus directly reveal the cosmic expansion without reliance on canonical cosmological models. Relatively static structures such as galaxies or galaxy clusters will show an apparent fractional angular compression of ~ 15 microarcseconds/yr in the local universe. Pairs of gravitationally bound objects (separations less than ~ 150 Mpc) will also show a deviation from pure cosmic expansion due to the collapse of large-scale structure. We have created a catalog of quasar proper motions to detect and measure these effects through the angular expansion / contraction of quasar pairs rather than with the Doppler method, which relies on cosmological models such as the “distance ladder.” With our catalog, we have confirmed that large separation pairs (600 - 10^4 Mpc comoving) show no net convergence or divergence, 0.18 +/- 0.18 microarcseconds/yr, consistent with Hubble expansion and significantly inconsistent with static structures, as expected. For pairs with comoving separations 150 < r < 300 Mpc, we have detected an unexplained expansion that is faster than the Hubble expansion, 9.7 +/- 1.7 microarcseconds/yr. For pairs with separations < 150 Mpc, we expect a pairwise contraction from the collapse of large-scale structure, but lack enough pairs to significantly detect this effect. We measure an insignificant divergence of 6.3 +/- 2.8 microarcseconds/yr. We are currently expanding our proper motion catalog using the VLBA, Gemini and Gaia in order to dynamically detect the evolution of large-scale structure. This will be the largest extragalactic proper motion catalog to date and will include new and updated proper motions with errors < 1 microarcseconds/yr for many well-known quasars. Finally, this project will provide a dynamical means to confirm the isotropy of the universe, to

  20. Brans-Dicke Theory with Λ>0: Black Holes and Large Scale Structures.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Dialektopoulos, Konstantinos F; Romano, Antonio Enea; Tomaras, Theodore N

    2015-10-30

    A step-by-step approach is followed to study cosmic structures in the context of Brans-Dicke theory with positive cosmological constant Λ and parameter ω. First, it is shown that regular stationary black-hole solutions not only have constant Brans-Dicke field ϕ, but can exist only for ω=∞, which forces the theory to coincide with the general relativity. Generalizations of the theory in order to evade this black-hole no-hair theorem are presented. It is also shown that in the absence of a stationary cosmological event horizon in the asymptotic region, a stationary black-hole horizon can support a nontrivial Brans-Dicke hair. Even more importantly, it is shown next that the presence of a stationary cosmological event horizon rules out any regular stationary solution, appropriate for the description of a star. Thus, to describe a star one has to assume that there is no such stationary horizon in the faraway asymptotic region. Under this implicit assumption generic spherical cosmic structures are studied perturbatively and it is shown that only for ω>0 or ω≲-5 their predicted maximum sizes are consistent with observations. We also point out how, many of the conclusions of this work differ qualitatively from the Λ=0 spacetimes.

  1. Using stochastically-generated subcolumns to represent cloud structure in a large-scale model

    SciTech Connect

    Pincus, R; Hemler, R; Klein, S A

    2005-12-08

    A new method for representing subgrid-scale cloud structure, in which each model column is decomposed into a set of subcolumns, has been introduced into the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's global climate model AM2. Each subcolumn in the decomposition is homogeneous but the ensemble reproduces the initial profiles of cloud properties including cloud fraction, internal variability (if any) in cloud condensate, and arbitrary overlap assumptions that describe vertical correlations. These subcolumns are used in radiation and diagnostic calculations, and have allowed the introduction of more realistic overlap assumptions. This paper describes the impact of these new methods for representing cloud structure in instantaneous calculations and long-term integrations. Shortwave radiation computed using subcolumns and the random overlap assumption differs in the global annual average by more than 4 W/m{sup 2} from the operational radiation scheme in instantaneous calculations; much of this difference is counteracted by a change in the overlap assumption to one in which overlap varies continuously with the separation distance between layers. Internal variability in cloud condensate, diagnosed from the mean condensate amount and cloud fraction, has about the same effect on radiative fluxes as does the ad hoc tuning accounting for this effect in the operational radiation scheme. Long simulations with the new model configuration show little difference from the operational model configuration, while statistical tests indicate that the model does not respond systematically to the sampling noise introduced by the approximate radiative transfer techniques introduced to work with the subcolumns.

  2. Large-scale variation in lithospheric structure along and across the Kenya rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prodehl, C.; Mechie, J.; Kaminski, W.; Fuchs, K.; Grosse, C.; Hoffmann, H.; Stangl, R.; Stellrecht, R.; Khan, M.A.; Maguire, Peter K.H.; Kirk, W.; Keller, Gordon R.; Githui, A.; Baker, M.; Mooney, W.; Criley, E.; Luetgert, J.; Jacob, B.; Thybo, H.; Demartin, M.; Scarascia, S.; Hirn, A.; Bowman, J.R.; Nyambok, I.; Gaciri, S.; Patel, J.; Dindi, E.; Griffiths, D.H.; King, R.F.; Mussett, A.E.; Braile, L.W.; Thompson, G.; Olsen, K.; Harder, S.; Vees, R.; Gajewski, D.; Schulte, A.; Obel, J.; Mwango, F.; Mukinya, J.; Riaroh, D.

    1991-01-01

    The Kenya rift is one of the classic examples of a continental rift zone: models for its evolution range from extension of the lithosphere by pure shear1, through extension by simple shear2, to diapiric upwelling of an asthenolith3. Following a pilot study in 19854, the present work involved the shooting of three seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection profiles along the axis, across the margins, and on the northeastern flank of the rift (Fig. 1). These lines were intended to reconcile the different crustal thickness estimates for the northern and southern parts of the rift4-6 and to reveal the structure across the rift, including that beneath the flanks. The data, presented here, reveal significant lateral variations in structure both along and across the rift. The crust thins along the rift axis from 35 km in the south to 20 km in the north; there are abrupt changes in Mono depth and uppermost-mantle seismic velocity across the rift margins, and crustal thickening across the boundary between the Archaean craton and PanAfrican orogenic belt immediately west of the rift. These results suggest that thickened crust may have controlled the rift's location, that there is a decrease in extension from north to south, and that the upper mantle immediately beneath the rift may contain reservoirs of magma generated at greater depth.

  3. Large-Scale, Exhaustive Lattice-Based Structural Auditing of SNOMED CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    One criterion for the well-formedness of ontologies is that their hierarchical structure form a lattice. Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) has been used as a technique for assessing the quality of ontologies, but is not scalable to large ontologies such as SNOMED CT. We developed a methodology called Lattice-based Structural Auditing (LaSA), for auditing biomedical ontologies, implemented through automated SPARQL queries, in order to exhaustively identify all non-lattice pairs in SNOMED CT. The percentage of non-lattice pairs ranges from 0 to 1.66 among the 19 SNOMED CT hierarchies. Preliminary manual inspection of a limited portion of the 518K non-lattice pairs, among over 34 million candidate pairs, revealed inconsistent use of precoordination in SNOMED CT, but also a number of false positives. Our results are consistent with those based on FCA, with the advantage that the LaSA computational pipeline is scalable and applicable to ontological systems consisting mostly of taxonomic links. This work is based on collaboration with Olivier Bodenreider from the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, USA.

  4. Large-scale structure of a nation-wide production network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Aoyama, H.

    2010-10-01

    Production in an economy is a set of firms’ activities as suppliers and customers; a firm buys goods from other firms, puts value added and sells products to others in a giant network of production. Empirical study is lacking despite the fact that the structure of the production network is important to understand and make models for many aspects of dynamics in economy. We study a nation-wide production network comprising a million firms and millions of supplier-customer links by using recent statistical methods developed in physics. We show in the empirical analysis scale-free degree distribution, disassortativity, correlation of degree to firm-size, and community structure having sectoral and regional modules. Since suppliers usually provide credit to their customers, who supply it to theirs in turn, each link is actually a creditor-debtor relationship. We also study chains of failures or bankruptcies that take place along those links in the network, and corresponding avalanche-size distribution.

  5. Overview of PSB track on gene structure identification in large-scale genomic sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Uberbacher, E.C.; Xu, Y.

    1998-12-31

    The recent funding of more than a dozen major genome centers to begin community-wide high-throughput sequencing of the human genome has created a significant new challenge for the computational analysis of DNA sequence and the prediction of gene structure and function. It has been estimated that on average from 1996 to 2003, approximately 2 million bases of newly finished DNA sequence will be produced every day and be made available on the Internet and in central databases. The finished (fully assembled) sequence generated each day will represent approximately 75 new genes (and their respective proteins), and many times this number will be represented in partially completed sequences. The information contained in these is of immeasurable value to medical research, biotechnology, the pharmaceutical industry and researchers in a host of fields ranging from microorganism metabolism, to structural biology, to bioremediation. Sequencing of microorganisms and other model organisms is also ramping up at a very rapid rate. The genomes for yeast and several microorganisms such as H. influenza have recently been fully sequenced, although the significance of many genes remains to be determined.

  6. Large-scale inhomogeneities in solutions of low molar mass compounds and mixtures of liquids: supramolecular structures or nanobubbles?

    PubMed

    Sedlák, Marián; Rak, Dmytro

    2013-02-28

    In textbooks, undersaturated solutions of low molar mass compounds and mixtures of freely miscible liquids are considered as homogeneous at larger length scales exceeding appreciably dimensions of individual molecules. However, growing experimental evidence reveals that it is not the case. Large-scale structures with sizes on the order of 100 nm are present in solutions and mixtures used in everyday life and research practice, especially in aqueous systems. These mesoscale inhomogeneities are long-lived, and (relatively slow) kinetics of their formation can be monitored upon mixing the components. Nevertheless, the nature of these structures and mechanisms behind their formation are not clear yet. Since it was previously suggested that these can be nanobubbles stabilized by adsorbed solute at the gas/solvent interface, we devote the current study to addressing this question. Static and dynamic light scattering was used to investigate solutions and mixtures prepared at ordinary conditions (equilibrated with air at 1 atm), prepared with degassed solvent, and solutions and mixtures degassed after formation of large structures. The behavior of large structures in strong gravitational centrifugal fields was also investigated. Systems from various categories were chosen for this study: aqueous solutions of an inorganic ionic compound (MgSO4), organic ionic compound (citric acid), uncharged organic compound (urea), and a mixture of water with organic solvent freely miscible with water (tert-butyl alcohol). Obtained results show that these structures are not nanobubbles in all cases. Visualization of large-scale structures via nanoparticle tracking analysis is presented. NTA results confirm conclusions from our previous light scattering work.

  7. Large scale X-ray and radio structures associated with compact extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, P.; Pauliny-Toth, I. I. K.; Witzel, A.; Fricke, K.; Johnston, K. J.; Kuehr, H.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Urbanik, M.

    1982-01-01

    Knots of X-ray emission have been detected within 20 arcmin of five compact sources initially selected from the MPIfR north polar 5 GHz survey. Two of the knots have also been detected at centimeter wavelengths and probably have nonthermal spectra. They appear to be associated with the compact sources since the probability of serendipitous discovery at the observed flux levels is low. While the apparent association may be due to colocation of the sources in a distant supercluster, it is suggested on the basis of overall alignment, and possible correlations with structures in the respective central sources, that the association may be similar to that found in extended radio sources. The observed emission may thus be due to synchrotron or inverse Compton radiation, the energy being supplied by jets from the central source.

  8. The topology of large-scale structure. V - Two-dimensional topology of sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. R., III; Mao, Shude; Park, Changbom; Lahav, Ofer

    1992-01-01

    A 2D algorithm is applied to observed sky maps and numerical simulations. It is found that when topology is studied on smoothing scales larger than the correlation length, the topology is approximately in agreement with the random phase formula for the 2D genus-threshold density relation, G2(nu) varies as nu(e) exp-nu-squared/2. Some samples show small 'meatball shifts' similar to those seen in corresponding 3D observational samples and similar to those produced by biasing in cold dark matter simulations. The observational results are thus consistent with the standard model in which the structure in the universe today has grown from small fluctuations caused by random quantum noise in the early universe.

  9. Searching for filaments and large-scale structure around DAFT/FADA clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Márquez, I.; Acebrón, A.; Adami, C.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Capelato, H.; Martinet, N.; Sarron, F.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Clusters of galaxies are located at the intersection of cosmic filaments and are still accreting galaxies and groups along these preferential directions. However, because of their relatively low contrast on the sky, filaments are difficult to detect (unless a large amount of spectroscopic data are available), and unambiguous detections have been limited until now to relatively low redshifts (z< ~ 0.3). Aims: This project is aimed at searching for extensions and filaments around clusters, traced by galaxies selected to be at the cluster redshift based on the red sequence. In the 0.4 structures detected in this way. Whenever possible, we identified the other structures detected on the density maps with clusters listed in NED. Results: We find clear elongations in twelve clusters out of thirty, with sizes that can reach up to 7.6 Mpc. Eleven other clusters have neighbouring structures, but the zones linking them are not detected in the density maps at a 3σ level. Three clusters show no extended structure and no neighbours, and four clusters are of too low contrast to be clearly visible on our density maps. Conclusions: The simple method we have applied appears to work well to show the existence of filaments and/or extensions around a number of clusters in the redshift range 0.4

  10. An evolutionary theory of large-scale human warfare: Group-structured cultural selection.

    PubMed

    Zefferman, Matthew R; Mathew, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    When humans wage war, it is not unusual for battlefields to be strewn with dead warriors. These warriors typically were men in their reproductive prime who, had they not died in battle, might have gone on to father more children. Typically, they are also genetically unrelated to one another. We know of no other animal species in which reproductively capable, genetically unrelated individuals risk their lives in this manner. Because the immense private costs borne by individual warriors create benefits that are shared widely by others in their group, warfare is a stark evolutionary puzzle that is difficult to explain. Although several scholars have posited models of the evolution of human warfare, these models do not adequately explain how humans solve the problem of collective action in warfare at the evolutionarily novel scale of hundreds of genetically unrelated individuals. We propose that group-structured cultural selection explains this phenomenon.

  11. APOGEE: The New View of the Milky Way -- Large Scale Galactic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2016-06-01

    Observations of the structure and dynamics of different stellar populations in the Milky Way's disk provide a unique perspective on galactic growth, evolution, and dynamics over cosmic time. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has over the past five years collected almost 1 million high-resolution (R~22,500), high quality (S/N > 100) spectra in the near-infrared H-band (1.51-1.68 μm) for about 250,000 stars covering all stellar populations of the Milky Way. I will take the audience on a tour of the exciting results from APOGEE and show how its novel, global view of the Milky Way is reshaping our understanding of how galactic disks form and evolve.

  12. A New Lumped Structure Photochemical Mechanism for Large-Scale Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Peters, Leonard K.

    1999-12-20

    The lumped-structure approach for condensing organic chemical mechanisms is attractive, since it yields fewer species and reactions, and reduces computational costs. This paper leads through the development of a new lumped-structure mechanism, largely based on the widely used Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-IV) developed by Gery et al.[1989]. The new mechanism called CBM-Z, extends the original framework to function properly at larger spatial and longer time scales. The major modifications in the mechanism include: revised inorganic chemistry; explicit treatment of the lesser reactive paraffins - methane and ethane; revised parameterizations of the reactive paraffin, olefin and aromatic reactions; inclusion of alkyl and acyl peroxy radical interactions and their reactions with NO3; inclusion of organic nitrates and hydroperoxides; and refined isoprene chemistry based on the condensed one-product mechanism of Carter[1996a,b]. CBM-Z was successfully evaluated along with the CBM-IV, a partially revised CBM-IV and a revised RADM2 mechanism[Stockwell et al., 1990; Kirchner and Stockwell, 1996] using the low VOC and NOx concentration smog chamber experiments of Simonaitis et al.[1997]. Box-model versions of the four mechanisms were also evaluated under a variety of hypothetical urban and rural scenarios for a period of 30 days. Results from CBM-Z and revised RADM2 were found to be within (+/-) 20% of each other, while CBM-IV and revised CBM-IV results deviated significantly by up to 50-95%. Sensitivity tests were performed to elucidate the effects of some of the new features added in CBM-Z. Relative computational memory and time requirements of these mechanisms are also discussed.

  13. Large-scale hydraulic structure of a seismogenic fault at 10 km depth (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Southern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steve; Mittempergher, Silvia; Garofalo, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The definition of hydraulic properties of fault zones is a major issue in structural geology, seismology, and in several applications (hydrocarbons, hydrogeology, CO2 sequestration, etc.). The permeability of fault rocks can be measured in laboratory experiments, but its upscaling to large-scale structures is not straightforward. For instance, typical permeability of fine-grained fault rock samples is in the 10-18-10-20 m2 range, but, according to seismological estimates, the large-scale permeability of active fault zones can be as high as 10-10 m2. Solving this issue is difficult because in-situ measurements of large-scale permeability have been carried out just at relatively shallow depths - mainly in oil wells and exceptionally in active tectonic settings (e.g. SAFOD at 3 km), whilst deeper experiments have been performed only in the stable continental crust (e.g. KTB at 9 km). In this study, we apply discrete fracture-network (DFN) modelling techniques developed for shallow aquifers (mainly in nuclear waste storage projects like Yucca Mountain) and in the oil industry, in order to model the hydraulic structure of the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ, Italian Southern Alps). This fault, now exposed in world-class glacier-polished outcrops, has been exhumed from ca. 8 km, where it was characterized by a well-documented seismic activity, but also by hydrous fluid flow evidenced by alteration halos and precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in veins and along cataclasites. The GLFZ does not show a classical seal structure that in other fault zones corresponds to a core zone characterized by fine-grained fault rocks. However, permeability is heterogeneous and the permeability tensor is strongly anisotropic due to fracture preferential orientation. We will show with numerical experiments that this hydraulic structure results in a channelized fluid flow (which is consistent with the observed hydrothermal alteration pattern). This results in a counterintuitive situation

  14. An Ag-grid/graphene hybrid structure for large-scale, transparent, flexible heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junmo; Jang, Yonghee; Kim, Youngsoo; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Suhr, Jonghwan; Hong, Byung Hee; Choi, Jae-Boong; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-04-01

    Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non-vacuum, maskless, and low-temperature environment. The hybrid electrode offers an effective and simple route for achieving a sheet resistance as low as ~4 Ω per square with ~78% optical transmittance. Finally, we demonstrate that transparent flexible heaters based on the hybrid conductive films could be used in a vehicle or a smart window system.Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non

  15. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  16. Structurally controlled 'teleconnection' of large-scale mass wasting (Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, Marc; Sanders, Diethard

    2015-04-01

    In the Brenner Pass area (Eastern Alps) , closely ahead of the most northward outlier ('nose') of the Southern-Alpine continental indenter, abundant deep-seated gravitational slope deformations and a cluster of five post-glacial rockslides are present. The indenter of roughly triangular shape formed during Neogene collision of the Southern-Alpine basement with the Eastern-Alpine nappe stack. Compression by the indenter activated a N-S striking, roughly W-E extensional fault northward of the nose of the indenter (Brenner-normal fault; BNF), and lengthened the Eastern-Alpine edifice along a set of major strike-slip faults. These fault zones display high seismicity, and are the preferred locus of catastrophic rapid slope failures (rockslides, rock avalanches) and deep-seated gravitational slope deformations. The seismotectonic stress field, earthquake activity, and structural data all indicate that the South-Alpine indenter still - or again - exerts compression; in consequence, the northward adjacent Eastern Alps are subject mainly to extension and strike-slip. For the rockslides in the Brenner Pass area, and for the deep-seated gravitational slope deformations, the fault zones combined with high seismic activity predispose massive slope failures. Structural data and earthquakes mainly record ~W-E extension within an Eastern Alpine basement block (Oetztal-Stubai basement complex) in the hangingwall of the BNF. In the Northern Calcareous Alps NW of the Oetztal-Stubai basement complex, dextral faults provide defacement scars for large rockfalls and rockslides. Towards the West, these dextral faults merge into a NNW-SSE striking sinistral fault zone that, in turn, displays high seismic activity and is the locus of another rockslide cluster (Fern Pass cluster; Prager et al., 2008). By its kinematics dictated by the South-Alpine indenter, the relatively rigid Oetztal-Stubai basement block relays faulting and associated mass-wasting over a N-S distance of more than 60

  17. Vertical structure of Indonesian throughflow in a large-scale model1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemra, James T.; Hautala, Susan L.; Sprintall, Janet

    2003-07-01

    The vertical structure of the exchange of water between the Pacific and Indian Oceans via the Indonesian throughflow and its temporal variability are examined. Since there are no simultaneous, direct observations of transport variations with depth at the inflow straits (Makassar, Maluku, and Halmahera) and outflow straits (Lombok, Ombai, and Timor), numerical model results are used. Analysis of depth-integrated transport through the model straits indicates differences in the vertical structure of the flow between the inflow and outflow straits. Generally speaking, local winds affect flow in a layer above the thermocline, while remote forcing, e.g., ENSO or coastal Kelvin waves, affect flow in a subsurface layer. On the outflow side, transport occurs primarily in two vertical modes. The dominant mode is characterized by a surface intensification that decays to zero around 400 m. The second mode is characterized by flow in the upper 100 m that is of opposite direction to flow from 100 to 400 m. The vertical decomposition of transport through the model's inflow straits varies between the straits. At Makassar, the western-most inflow passage, the dominant mode is similar to the outflow straits, with a surface intensification of southward transport that decays to zero at 800 m. At Halmahera, the eastern-most inflow strait, the dominant mode is two-layer, with surface to 200 m transport in the opposite direction of transport from 200 to 700 m, similar to the second mode at the outflow straits. At Maluku, the center inflow passage, the dominant vertical mode is three-layer. At this strait, there is a layer from about 100 to 800 m within which flow is in the opposite direction to flow in a surface layer above 100 m and in a deeper layer below 800 m. Phase lags on the annual cycle suggest that during April-October, peaking in May, there is a convergence of mass in the upper 100 m of the Indonesian seas. This convergence is balanced by a mass divergence from 100 to 710 m

  18. LYα FOREST TOMOGRAPHY FROM BACKGROUND GALAXIES: THE FIRST MEGAPARSEC-RESOLUTION LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MAP AT z > 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Eilers, Anna-Christina; Stark, Casey; White, Martin; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Schlegel, David J.; Arinyo-i-Prats, Andreu; Suzuki, Nao; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Caputi, Karina I.; Cassata, Paolo; Ilbert, Olivier; Le Brun, Vincent; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Garilli, Bianca; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maccagni, Dario; Nugent, Peter; and others

    2014-11-01

    We present the first observations of foreground Lyα forest absorption from high-redshift galaxies, targeting 24 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with z ∼ 2.3-2.8 within a 5' × 14' region of the COSMOS field. The transverse sightline separation is ∼2 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving, allowing us to create a tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) Lyα forest absorption field over the redshift range 2.20 ≤ z ≤ 2.45. The resulting map covers 6 h {sup –1} Mpc × 14 h {sup –1} Mpc in the transverse plane and 230 h {sup –1} Mpc along the line of sight with a spatial resolution of ≈3.5 h {sup –1} Mpc, and is the first high-fidelity map of a large-scale structure on ∼Mpc scales at z > 2. Our map reveals significant structures with ≳ 10 h {sup –1} Mpc extent, including several spanning the entire transverse breadth, providing qualitative evidence for the filamentary structures predicted to exist in the high-redshift cosmic web. Simulated reconstructions with the same sightline sampling, spectral resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio recover the salient structures present in the underlying 3D absorption fields. Using data from other surveys, we identified 18 galaxies with known redshifts coeval with our map volume, enabling a direct comparison with our tomographic map. This shows that galaxies preferentially occupy high-density regions, in qualitative agreement with the same comparison applied to simulations. Our results establish the feasibility of the CLAMATO survey, which aims to obtain Lyα forest spectra for ∼1000 SFGs over ∼1 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, in order to map out the intergalactic medium large-scale structure at (z) ∼ 2.3 over a large volume (100 h {sup –1} Mpc){sup 3}.

  19. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; ...

    2014-03-15

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve σ (σmv) = 16 meV and σ (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020.more » Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero σmνσmν, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of Neff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that Neff = 3.046.« less

  20. Quantifying the fingerprint descriptor dependence of structure-activity relationship information on a large scale.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-09-23

    It is well-known that different molecular representations, e.g., graphs, numerical descriptors, fingerprints, or 3D models, change the numerical results of molecular similarity calculations. Because the assessment of structure-activity relationships (SARs) requires similarity and potency comparisons of active compounds, this representation dependence inevitably also affects SAR analysis. But to what extent? How exactly does SAR information change when alternative fingerprints are used as descriptors? What is the proportion of active compounds with substantial changes in SAR information induced by different fingerprints? To provide answers to these questions, we have quantified changes in SAR information across many different compound classes using six different fingerprints. SAR profiling was carried out on 128 target-based data sets comprising more than 60,000 compounds with high-confidence activity annotations. A numerical measure of SAR discontinuity was applied to assess SAR information on a per compound basis. For ~70% of all test compounds, changes in SAR characteristics were detected when different fingerprints were used as molecular representations. Moreover, the SAR phenotype of ~30% of the compounds changed, and distinct fingerprint-dependent local SAR environments were detected. The fingerprints we compared were found to generate SAR models that were essentially not comparable. Atom environment and pharmacophore fingerprints produced the largest differences in compound-associated SAR information. Taken together, the results of our systematic analysis reveal larger fingerprint-dependent changes in compound-associated SAR information than would have been anticipated.

  1. An Ag-grid/graphene hybrid structure for large-scale, transparent, flexible heaters.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junmo; Jang, Yonghee; Kim, Youngsoo; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Suhr, Jonghwan; Hong, Byung Hee; Choi, Jae-Boong; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-04-21

    Recently, carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for fabricating transparent conducting materials. However, obtaining low sheet resistance and high transmittance of these carbon materials has been challenging due to the intrinsic properties of the materials. In this paper, we introduce highly transparent and flexible conductive films based on a hybrid structure of graphene and an Ag-grid. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing was used to produce a micro-scale grid consisting of Ag lines less than 10 μm wide. We were able to directly write the Ag-grid on a large-area graphene/flexible substrate due to the high conductivity of graphene. The hybrid electrode could be fabricated using hot pressing transfer and EHD jet printing in a non-vacuum, maskless, and low-temperature environment. The hybrid electrode offers an effective and simple route for achieving a sheet resistance as low as ∼4 Ω per square with ∼78% optical transmittance. Finally, we demonstrate that transparent flexible heaters based on the hybrid conductive films could be used in a vehicle or a smart window system.

  2. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Dore, O.; Dunkley, J.; Errard, J.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jones, W. C.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Kuo, C. -L.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Slosar, A.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; W. Wu; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.

    2014-03-15

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve σ (σmv) = 16 meV and σ (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero σmνσmν, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of Neff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that Neff = 3.046.

  3. Variations of cosmic large-scale structure covariance matrices across parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, Robert; Kiessling, Alina; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-03-01

    The likelihood function for cosmological parameters, given by e.g. weak lensing shear measurements, depends on contributions to the covariance induced by the non-linear evolution of the cosmic web. As highly non-linear clustering to date has only been described by numerical N-body simulations in a reliable and sufficiently precise way, the necessary computational costs for estimating those covariances at different points in parameter space are tremendous. In this work, we describe the change of the matter covariance and the weak lensing covariance matrix as a function of cosmological parameters by constructing a suitable basis, where we model the contribution to the covariance from non-linear structure formation using Eulerian perturbation theory at third order. We show that our formalism is capable of dealing with large matrices and reproduces expected degeneracies and scaling with cosmological parameters in a reliable way. Comparing our analytical results to numerical simulations, we find that the method describes the variation of the covariance matrix found in the SUNGLASS weak lensing simulation pipeline within the errors at one-loop and tree-level for the spectrum and the trispectrum, respectively, for multipoles up to ℓ ≤ 1300. We show that it is possible to optimize the sampling of parameter space where numerical simulations should be carried out by minimizing interpolation errors and propose a corresponding method to distribute points in parameter space in an economical way.

  4. Large-scale Sedimentary Structures and Contaminant Transport: an Example from Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, A.; Uchupi, E.

    2002-05-01

    A review of 289 borehole logs collected across Cape Cod reveals that two large glacial lakes once covered the peninsula. The older lake, which existed about 19,000 years ago, covered the east-west portion of Cape Cod and deposited clay, silt, and very fine sand across the area. The southern dam of this lake ultimately failed and large drainage channels were carved into the surface of the glaciolacustrine sediments. These eroded lake deposits were subsequently buried by the outwash plains of sand and gravel that make up the surficial geology of today. One of the major drainage channels in the lake deposit surface is located below the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), a 34 square mile facility with >10 known groundwater contaminant plumes. We will present preliminary evidence that the buried paleochannel is exerting a strong control on the transport of several plumes at MMR and thus are critical stratigraphic structures that must be understood and delineated. Although fine-grained sediments are described in borehole logs from the MMR, infering the origin and significance of these deposits is made difficult by local-scale heterogeneities. The existence of the proglacial lake and the extensive, deep drainage channels are only apparent from investigating borehole data across a larger scale. This work illustrates the importance of characterizing the stratigraphic framework beyond the confines of a specific contamination site and further shows the controls that paleochannels filled with high permeability sediments can exert on flow and transport.

  5. Structural adjustment for accurate conditioning in large-scale subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman

    2017-03-01

    Most of the current subsurface simulation approaches consider a priority list for honoring the well and any other auxiliary data, and eventually adopt a middle ground between the quality of the model and conditioning it to hard data. However, as the number of datasets increases, such methods often produce undesirable features in the subsurface model. Due to their high flexibility, subsurface modeling based on training images (TIs) is becoming popular. Providing comprehensive TIs remains, however, an outstanding problem. In addition, identifying a pattern similar to those in the TI that honors the well and other conditioning data is often difficult. Moreover, the current subsurface modeling approaches do not account for small perturbations that may occur in a subsurface system. Such perturbations are active in most of the depositional systems. In this paper, a new methodology is presented that is based on an irregular gridding scheme that accounts for incomplete TIs and minor offsets. Use of the methodology enables one to use a small or incomplete TI and adaptively change the patterns in the simulation grid in order to simultaneously honor the well data and take into account the effect of the local offsets. Furthermore, the proposed method was used on various complex process-based models and their structures are deformed for matching with the conditioning point data. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm are successfully demonstrated by applying it to models of several complex examples.

  6. Large-scale structure of the sun's corona from radio observations using the Clark Lake Radioheliograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Gergely, T. E.; Schmahl, E. J.; Szabo, A.; Loiacono, R.

    1987-01-01

    Meterwave maps of the solar corona made with the Clark Lake Radioheliograph at 30.9, 50, and 73.8 MHz for one solar rotation are presented. They are compared and contrasted with optical data: 10,830 A maps, white-light coronagraph images (SOLWIND and Mauna Loa K coronameter), and forbidden line scans. Most of the sources in the radio maps persist for two days or more, and appear to rotate approximately with the solar rate. A coronal hole seen against the disk at all three frequencies shows interesting similarities and significant differences with the optical signatures of the hole. Elongated features of the 50 MHz corona correspond rather well to the azimuthal position of white light streamers seen in SOLWIND images. Synoptic charts made from the radio maps show overall similarities to synoptic charts constructed from (limb) coronagraph data. Some of the differences may result from the different weightings given by the radio and optical data to density and temperature, or by the different sensitivities to nonradial geometries. It is shown that the combined use of meter wave and optical images provides considerable new insights into the three-dimensional structure of the low to middle corona.

  7. Neutrino physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Brock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.

    2015-03-15

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve σ (σmν)(σmν) = 16 meV and σ (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero σmνσmν, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of NeffNeff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that View the MathML sourceNeff=3.046.

  8. Neutrino physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Doré, O.; Dunkley, J.; Errard, J.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jones, W. C.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Kuo, C. -L.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Slosar, A.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.

    2015-03-01

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve σ (σmν) = 16 meV and σ (Neff) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero σmν , whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of Neff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that Neff=3.046 .

  9. A coarse grained perturbation theory for the Large Scale Structure, with cosmology and time independence in the UV

    SciTech Connect

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Peloso, Marco; Pietroni, Massimo; Viel, Matteo; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it

    2014-09-01

    Standard cosmological perturbation theory (SPT) for the Large Scale Structure (LSS) of the Universe fails at small scales (UV) due to strong nonlinearities and to multistreaming effects. In ref. [1] a new framework was proposed in which the large scales (IR) are treated perturbatively while the information on the UV, mainly small scale velocity dispersion, is obtained by nonlinear methods like N-body simulations. Here we develop this approach, showing that it is possible to reproduce the fully nonlinear power spectrum (PS) by combining a simple (and fast) 1-loop computation for the IR scales and the measurement of a single, dominant, correlator from N-body simulations for the UV ones. We measure this correlator for a suite of seven different cosmologies, and we show that its inclusion in our perturbation scheme reproduces the fully non-linear PS with percent level accuracy, for wave numbers up to k∼ 0.4 h Mpc{sup -1} down to 0z=. We then show that, once this correlator has been measured in a given cosmology, there is no need to run a new simulation for a different cosmology in the suite. Indeed, by rescaling this correlator by a proper function computable in SPT, the reconstruction procedure works also for the other cosmologies and for all redshifts, with comparable accuracy. Finally, we clarify the relation of this approach to the Effective Field Theory methods recently proposed in the LSS context.

  10. Correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure behind an interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    From a survey of observations on ISEE-3, an example of correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure is presented. Bidirectional proton fluxes were observed for a period of 40 hours in the energy range 35-1600 keV approximately 12 hours after the passage of the interplanetary shock of December 11, 1980, and directly after the passage of a discontinuity. For each of the eight logarithmically spaced energy channels, a three-dimensional anisotropy analysis reveals streaming along both directions of the magnetic field. The magnetic field rotated slowly but steadily through approximately 180 deg during this same 40-hour period; this is consistent with the existence of a large-scale loop with extent greater than 0.5 AU. The observations suggest that the particles are being injected into the loop sunward of the spacecraft; they appear as bidirectional fluxes in the outermost regions of the loop arising from a combination of focusing and near scatter-free transport.

  11. The topology of large-scale structure. I - Topology and the random phase hypothesis. [galactic formation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Melott, Adrian L.

    1987-01-01

    Many models for the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure assume a spectrum of random phase (Gaussian), small-amplitude density fluctuations as initial conditions. In such scenarios, the topology of the galaxy distribution on large scales relates directly to the topology of the initial density fluctuations. Here a quantitative measure of topology - the genus of contours in a smoothed density distribution - is described and applied to numerical simulations of galaxy clustering, to a variety of three-dimensional toy models, and to a volume-limited sample of the CfA redshift survey. For random phase distributions the genus of density contours exhibits a universal dependence on threshold density. The clustering simulations show that a smoothing length of 2-3 times the mass correlation length is sufficient to recover the topology of the initial fluctuations from the evolved galaxy distribution. Cold dark matter and white noise models retain a random phase topology at shorter smoothing lengths, but massive neutrino models develop a cellular topology.

  12. Cosmological N-body Simulation of Galaxy and Large-Scale Structure Formation: The Gravity Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly

    2015-04-01

    One of the first N-body simulations done almost 50 years ago had only 200 self-gravitating particles. Even this first baby step made substantial impact on understanding how astronomical objects should form. Now powerful supercomputers and new algorithms allow astronomers produce N-body simulations that employ up to a trillion dark matter particles and produce vital theoretical predictions regarding formation, evolution, structure and statistics of objects ranging from dwarf galaxies to clusters and superclusters of galaxies. With only gravity involved in these theoretical models, one would naively expect that by now we should know everything we need about N-body dynamics of cosmological fluctuations. Not the case. It appears that the Universe was not cooperative and gave us divergencies in the initial conditions generated during the Inflation epoch and subsequent expansion of the Universe - the infinite phase-space density and divergent density fluctuations. Ever increasing observational demands on statistics and accuracy of theoretical predictions is another driving force for more realistic and larger N-body simulations. Large current and new planned observational projects such as BOSS, eBOSS, Euclid, LSST will bring information on spatial distribution, motion, and properties of millions of galaxies at different redshifts. Direct simulations of evolution of gas and formation of stars for millions of forming galaxies will not be available for years leaving astronomers with the only option - to develop methods to combine large N-body simulations with models of galaxy formation to produce accurate theoretical predictions. I will discuss the current status of the field and directions of its development.

  13. Testing LSST Dither Strategies for Survey Uniformity and Large-scale Structure Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awan, Humna; Gawiser, Eric; Kurczynski, Peter; Jones, R. Lynne; Zhan, Hu; Padilla, Nelson D.; Muñoz Arancibia, Alejandra M.; Orsi, Alvaro; Cora, Sofía A.; Yoachim, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will survey the southern sky from 2022-2032 with unprecedented detail. Since the observing strategy can lead to artifacts in the data, we investigate the effects of telescope-pointing offsets (called dithers) on the r-band coadded 5σ depth yielded after the 10-year survey. We analyze this survey depth for several geometric patterns of dithers (e.g., random, hexagonal lattice, spiral) with amplitudes as large as the radius of the LSST field of view, implemented on different timescales (per season, per night, per visit). Our results illustrate that per night and per visit dither assignments are more effective than per season assignments. Also, we find that some dither geometries (e.g., hexagonal lattice) are particularly sensitive to the timescale on which the dithers are implemented, while others like random dithers perform well on all timescales. We then model the propagation of depth variations to artificial fluctuations in galaxy counts, which are a systematic for LSS studies. We calculate the bias in galaxy counts caused by the observing strategy accounting for photometric calibration uncertainties, dust extinction, and magnitude cuts; uncertainties in this bias limit our ability to account for structure induced by the observing strategy. We find that after 10 years of the LSST survey, the best dither strategies lead to uncertainties in this bias that are smaller than the minimum statistical floor for a galaxy catalog as deep as r < 27.5. A few of these strategies bring the uncertainties close to the statistical floor for r < 25.7 after the first year of survey.

  14. GRASP92: a package for large-scale relativistic atomic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parpia, F. A.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2006-12-01

    of CSFs sharing the same quantum numbers is determined using the configuration-interaction (CI) procedure that results upon varying the expansion coefficients to determine the extremum of a variational functional. Radial functions may be determined by numerically solving the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) equations that result upon varying the orbital radial functions or some subset thereof so as to obtain an extremum of the variational functional. Radial wavefunctions may also be determined using a screened hydrogenic or Thomas-Fermi model, although these schemes generally provide initial estimates for MCDF self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations. Transition properties for pairs of ASFs are computed from matrix elements of multipole operators of the electromagnetic field. All matrix elements of CSFs are evaluated using the Racah algebra. Reasons for the new version: During recent studies using the general relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP92), several errors were found, some of which might have been present already in the earlier GRASP92 version (program ABJN_v1_0, Comput. Phys. Comm. 55 (1989) 425). These errors were reported and discussed by Froese Fischer, Gaigalas, and Ralchenko in a separate publication [C. Froese Fischer, G. Gaigalas, Y. Ralchenko, Comput. Phys. Comm. 175 (2006) 738-744. [7

  15. A topological analysis of large-scale structure, studied using the CMASS sample of SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Parihar, Prachi; Gott, J. Richard III; Vogeley, Michael S.; Choi, Yun-Young; Kim, Juhan; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Speare, Robert; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brinkmann, J. E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr

    2014-12-01

    We study the three-dimensional genus topology of large-scale structure using the northern region of the CMASS Data Release 10 (DR10) sample of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We select galaxies with redshift 0.452 < z < 0.625 and with a stellar mass M {sub stellar} > 10{sup 11.56} M {sub ☉}. We study the topology at two smoothing lengths: R {sub G} = 21 h {sup –1} Mpc and R {sub G} = 34 h {sup –1} Mpc. The genus topology studied at the R {sub G} = 21 h {sup –1} Mpc scale results in the highest genus amplitude observed to date. The CMASS sample yields a genus curve that is characteristic of one produced by Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The data thus support the standard model of inflation where random quantum fluctuations in the early universe produced Gaussian random phase initial conditions. Modest deviations in the observed genus from random phase are as expected from shot noise effects and the nonlinear evolution of structure. We suggest the use of a fitting formula motivated by perturbation theory to characterize the shift and asymmetries in the observed genus curve with a single parameter. We construct 54 mock SDSS CMASS surveys along the past light cone from the Horizon Run 3 (HR3) N-body simulations, where gravitationally bound dark matter subhalos are identified as the sites of galaxy formation. We study the genus topology of the HR3 mock surveys with the same geometry and sampling density as the observational sample and find the observed genus topology to be consistent with ΛCDM as simulated by the HR3 mock samples. We conclude that the topology of the large-scale structure in the SDSS CMASS sample is consistent with cosmological models having primordial Gaussian density fluctuations growing in accordance with general relativity to form galaxies in massive dark matter halos.

  16. Radiography with cosmic-ray and compact accelerator muons; Exploring inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic-ray muons (CRM) arriving from the sky on the surface of the earth are now known to be used as radiography purposes to explore the inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms, ranging in thickness from meter to kilometers scale, such as volcanic mountains, blast furnaces, nuclear reactors etc. At the same time, by using muons produced by compact accelerators (CAM), advanced radiography can be realized for objects with a thickness in the sub-millimeter to meter range, with additional exploration capability such as element identification and bio-chemical analysis. In the present report, principles, methods and specific research examples of CRM transmission radiography are summarized after which, principles, methods and perspective views of the future CAM radiography are described.

  17. Radiography with cosmic-ray and compact accelerator muons; Exploring inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms

    PubMed Central

    NAGAMINE, Kanetada

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic-ray muons (CRM) arriving from the sky on the surface of the earth are now known to be used as radiography purposes to explore the inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms, ranging in thickness from meter to kilometers scale, such as volcanic mountains, blast furnaces, nuclear reactors etc. At the same time, by using muons produced by compact accelerators (CAM), advanced radiography can be realized for objects with a thickness in the sub-millimeter to meter range, with additional exploration capability such as element identification and bio-chemical analysis. In the present report, principles, methods and specific research examples of CRM transmission radiography are summarized after which, principles, methods and perspective views of the future CAM radiography are described. PMID:27725469

  18. Large-scale micromagnetic simulation of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets with Dy-rich shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, T.; Yokota, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale micromagnetic simulations have been performed using the energy minimization method on a model with structural features similar to those of Dy grain boundary diffusion (GBD)-processed sintered magnets. Coercivity increases as a linear function of the anisotropy field of the Dy-rich shell, which is independent of Dy composition in the core as long as the shell thickness is greater than about 15 nm. This result shows that the Dy contained in the initial sintered magnets prior to the GBD process is not essential for enhancing coercivity. Magnetization reversal patterns indicate that coercivity is strongly influenced by domain wall pinning at the grain boundary. This observation is found to be consistent with the one-dimensional pinning theory.

  19. Robotic large-scale application of wheat cell-free translation to structural studies including membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Emily T.; Makino, Shin-ichi; Nozawa, Akira; Matsubara, Yuko; Frederick, Ronnie O.; Primm, John G.; Goren, Michael A.; Fox, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    The use of the Protemist XE, an automated discontinuous-batch protein synthesis robot, in cell-free translation is reported. The soluble Galdieria sulphuraria protein DCN1 was obtained in greater than 2 mg total synthesis yield per mL of reaction mixture from the Protemist XE, and the structure was subsequently solved by X-ray crystallography using material from one 10 mL synthesis (PDB ID: 3KEV). The Protemist XE was also capable of membrane protein translation. Thus human sigma-1 receptor was translated in the presence of unilamellar liposomes and bacteriorhodopsin was translated directly into detergent micelles in the presence of all-trans-retinal. The versatility, ease of use, and compact size of the Protemist XE robot demonstrate its suitability for large-scale synthesis of many classes of proteins. PMID:20637905

  20. Searching for a correlation between cosmic-ray sources above 10{sup 19} eV and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kashti, Tamar; Waxman, Eli E-mail: eli.waxman@weizmann.ac.il

    2008-05-15

    We study the anisotropy signature which is expected if the sources of ultrahigh energy, >10{sup 19} eV, cosmic rays (UHECRs) are extra-galactic and trace the large scale distribution of luminous matter. Using the PSCz galaxy catalog as a tracer of the large scale structure (LSS), we derive the expected all sky angular distribution of the UHECR intensity. We define a statistic that measures the correlation between the predicted and observed UHECR arrival direction distributions, and show that it is more sensitive to the expected anisotropy signature than the power spectrum and the two-point correlation function. The distribution of the correlation statistic is not sensitive to the unknown redshift evolution of UHECR source density and to the unknown strength and structure of inter-galactic magnetic fields. We show, using this statistic, that recently published >5.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV Auger data are inconsistent with isotropy at Asymptotically-Equal-To 98% CL, and consistent with a source distribution that traces LSS, with some preference for a source distribution that is biased with respect to the galaxy distribution. The anisotropy signature should be detectable also at lower energy, >4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV. A few-fold increase of the Auger exposure is likely to increase the significance to >99% CL, but not to>99.9% CL (unless the UHECR source density is comparable to or larger than that of galaxies). In order to distinguish between different bias models, the systematic uncertainty in the absolute energy calibration of the experiments should be reduced to well below the current Asymptotically-Equal-To 25%.

  1. A Simple Evaporation Method for Large-Scale Production of Liquid Crystalline Lipid Nanoparticles with Various Internal Structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Lim, Sora; Shim, Jongwon; Song, Ji Eun; Chang, Jong Soo; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Cho, Eun Chul

    2015-09-16

    We present a simple and industrially accessible method of producing liquid crystalline lipid nanoparticles with various internal structures based on phytantriol, Pluronic F127, and vitamin E acetate. Bilayer vesicles were produced when an ethanolic solution dissolving the lipid components was mixed with deionized water. After the evaporation of ethanol from the aqueous mixture, vesicles were transformed into lipid-filled liquid crystalline nanoparticles with well-defined internal structures such as hexagonal lattices (mostly inverted cubic Pn3m), lined or coiled pattern (inverted hexagonal H2), and disordered structure (inverse microemulsion, L2), depending on the compositions. Further studies suggested that their internal structures were also affected by temperature. The internal structures were characterized from cryo-TEM and small-angle X-ray scattering results. Microcalorimetry studies were performed to investigate the degree of molecular ordering/crystallinity of lipid components within the nanostructures. From the comparative studies, we demonstrated the present method could produce the lipid nanoparticles with similar characteristics to those made from a conventional method. More importantly, the production only requires simple tools for mixing and ethanol evaporation and it is possible to produce 10 kg or so per batch of aqueous lipid nanoparticles dispersions, enabling the large-scale production of the liquid crystalline nanoparticles for various biomedical applications.

  2. STUDYING THE WHIM CONTENT OF LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURES ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT TO H 2356-309

    SciTech Connect

    Zappacosta, L.; Nicastro, F.; Maiolino, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Buote, D. A.; Fang, T.; Humphrey, P. J.; Gastaldello, F.

    2010-07-01

    We make use of a 500 ks Chandra HRC-S/LETG spectrum of the blazar H 2356-309, combined with a lower signal-to-noise ratio (S/N; 100 ks) pilot LETG spectrum of the same target, to search for the presence of warm-hot absorbing gas associated with two large-scale structures (LSSs) crossed by this sight line and to constrain its physical state and geometry. Strong (log N{sub O{sub VII}} {>=} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}) O VII K{alpha} absorption associated with a third LSS crossed by this line of sight (the Sculptor Wall (SW)), at z = 0.03, has already been detected in a previous work. Here, we focus on two additional prominent filamentary LSSs along the same line of sight, one at z = 0.062 (the Pisces-Cetus Supercluster (PCS)) and another at z = 0.128 (the 'Farther Sculptor Wall' (FSW)). The combined LETG spectrum has an S/N of {approx}11.6-12.6 per resolution element in the 20-25 A and an average 3{sigma} sensitivity to intervening O VII K{alpha} absorption line equivalent widths (EWs) of EW{sub O{sub VII}} {approx_gt} 14 mA in the available redshift range (z < 0.165). No statistically significant (i.e., {>=}3{sigma}) individual absorption is detected from any of the strong He- or H-like transitions of C, O, and Ne (the most abundant metals in gas with solar-like composition) at the redshifts of the PCS and FSW structures and down to the EW thresholds mentioned above. However, we are still able to constrain the physical and geometrical parameters of the putative absorbing gas associated with these structures, by performing a joint spectral fit of various marginal detections and upper limits of the strongest expected lines with our self-consistent hybrid-ionization WHIM spectral model. At the redshift of the PCS, we identify a warm phase with log T = 5.35{sup +0.07}{sub -0.13} K and log N{sub H} = (19.1 {+-} 0.2) cm{sup -2} possibly co-existing with a much hotter and statistically less significant phase with log T = 6.9{sup +0.1}{sub -0.8} K and log N{sub H} = 20.1{sup +0

  3. The Evolution Of 21 cm Structure (EOS): public, large-scale simulations of Cosmic Dawn and reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesinger, Andrei; Greig, Bradley; Sobacchi, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the Evolution Of 21 cm Structure (EOS) project: providing periodic, public releases of the latest cosmological 21 cm simulations. 21 cm interferometry is set to revolutionize studies of the Cosmic Dawn (CD) and Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Progress will depend on sophisticated data analysis pipelines, initially tested on large-scale mock observations. Here we present the 2016 EOS release: 10243, 1.6 Gpc, 21 cm simulations of the CD and EoR, calibrated to the Planck 2015 measurements. We include calibrated, sub-grid prescriptions for inhomogeneous recombinations and photoheating suppression of star formation in small-mass galaxies. Leaving the efficiency of supernovae feedback as a free parameter, we present two runs which bracket the contribution from faint unseen galaxies. From these two extremes, we predict that the duration of reionization (defined as a change in the mean neutral fraction from 0.9 to 0.1) should be between 2.7 ≲ Δzre ≲ 5.7. The large-scale 21 cm power during the advanced EoR stages can be different by up to a factor of ˜10, depending on the model. This difference has a comparable contribution from (i) the typical bias of sources and (ii) a more efficient negative feedback in models with an extended EoR driven by faint galaxies. We also present detectability forecasts. With a 1000 h integration, Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and (Square Kilometre Array phase 1) SKA1 should achieve a signal-to-noise of ˜few to hundreds throughout the EoR/CD. We caution that our ability to clean foregrounds determines the relative performance of narrow/deep versus wide/shallow surveys expected with SKA1. Our 21-cm power spectra, simulation outputs and visualizations are publicly available.

  4. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein-ligand structure determination.

    PubMed

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Collins, Patrick; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian; von Delft, Frank

    2017-03-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein-ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallographic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011), Acta Cryst. D67, 235-242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010), Acta Cryst. D66, 213-221] have entrenched the paradigm that a `project' is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects.

  5. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein–ligand structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian

    2017-01-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein–ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallo­graphic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011 ▸), Acta Cryst. D67, 235–242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010 ▸), Acta Cryst. D66, 213–221] have entrenched the paradigm that a ‘project’ is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects. PMID:28291762

  6. Study of materials and machines for 3D printed large-scale, flexible electronic structures using fused deposition modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seyeon

    The 3 dimensional printing (3DP), called to additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), is emerged to revolutionize manufacturing and completely transform how products are designed and fabricated. A great deal of research activities have been carried out to apply this new technology to a variety of fields. In spite of many endeavors, much more research is still required to perfect the processes of the 3D printing techniques especially in the area of the large-scale additive manufacturing and flexible printed electronics. The principles of various 3D printing processes are briefly outlined in the Introduction Section. New types of thermoplastic polymer composites aiming to specified functional applications are also introduced in this section. Chapter 2 shows studies about the metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) process. Various metal particles, copper and iron particles, are added into thermoplastics polymer matrices as the reinforcement filler. The thermo-mechanical properties, such as thermal conductivity, hardness, tensile strength, and fracture mechanism, of composites are tested to figure out the effects of metal fillers on 3D printed composite structures for the large-scale printing process. In Chapter 3, carbon/polymer composite filaments are developed by a simple mechanical blending process with an aim of fabricating the flexible 3D printed electronics as a single structure. Various types of carbon particles consisting of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), conductive carbon black (CCB), and graphite are used as the conductive fillers to provide the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with improved electrical conductivity. The mechanical behavior and conduction mechanisms of the developed composite materials are observed in terms of the loading amount of carbon fillers in this section. Finally, the prototype flexible electronics are modeled and manufactured by the FDM process using Carbon/TPU composite filaments and

  7. Quasi-linear regime of gravitational instability as a clue to understanding the large-scale structure in the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1992-01-01

    In the late seventies, an image of the large-scale structure in the Universe began to emerge as a result of the accumulation of the galaxy redshifts. Most of the galaxies are found to concentrate in large filaments and perhaps sheets leaving most of the volume empty. Similar structures were predicted theoretically in the frame of the adiabatic theory of galaxy formation (Zeldovich) and later in the hot dark matter cosmology. However, both scenarios have been ruled out by the observations. With these scenarios the dynamical part of the scenario was also erroneously rejected by many as well. In this talk, I derive the Zeldovich approximation from the exact dynamic equations and show that it is always better than the standard linear approximation. The advantage of the Zeldovich approximation is the greatest in the quasi-linear regime when delta(sub rms) is less than 1 (delta identical to delta(rho)/rho), but the displacement of the matter is essential. The range of scales in the quasi-linear regime depends upon the slope of the initial spectrum and increases with decreasing n, where n is the exponent, if the initial spectrum is approximated by a simple power law P(k) varies as k(exp n).

  8. Understanding the large-scale structure from the cosmic microwave background: shear calibration with CMB lensing; gas physics from the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaan, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    I will present two promising ways in which the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sheds light on critical uncertain physics and systematics of the large-scale structure. Shear calibration with CMB lensing: Realizing the full potential of upcoming weak lensing surveys requires an exquisite understanding of the errors in galaxy shape estimation. In particular, such errors lead to a multiplicative bias in the shear, degenerate with the matter density parameter and the amplitude of fluctuations. Its redshift-evolution can hide the true evolution of the growth of structure, which probes dark energy and possible modifications to general relativity. I will show that CMB lensing from a stage 4 experiment (CMB S4) can self-calibrate the shear for an LSST-like optical lensing survey. This holds in the presence of photo-z errors and intrinsic alignment. Evidence for the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect; cluster energetics: Through the kSZ effect, the baryon momentum field is imprinted on the CMB. I will report significant evidence for the kSZ effect from ACTPol and peculiar velocities reconstructed from BOSS. I will present the prospects for constraining cluster gas profiles and energetics from the kSZ effect with SPT-3G, AdvACT and CMB S4. This will provide constraints on galaxy formation and feedback models.

  9. Constraints on strain rates during large-scale mid-crustal shearing: An example from the basal Vaddas shear zone, northern Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, Deta; Stünitz, Holger; Nasipuri, Pritam; Menegon, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The Caledonian orogen in Scandinavia is characterized by large-scale crustal nappe stacks which were emplaced east-/southeast-wards onto the Baltica shield. Whereas original thrust relationships are generally obscured by syn- to post-collisional extensional deformation in the southern and central Scandinavian Caledonides, several large-scale thrust systems are well-preserved in the northern Scandinavian Caledonides in Troms and Finnmark. One example is the mid-crustal Vaddas shear zone, which emplaced the Vaddas nappe on top of the Kalak nappe complex. In this contribution we present a structural, petrological and geochronological analysis of the rocks under- and overlying the Vaddas shear zone in northern Troms, in order to estimate the strain rate associated with thrusting along this major shear zone. The Vaddas nappe above the investigated shear zone consists mainly of Upper Ordovician to Silurian metasediments, which were deposited in a marine environment and which were intruded by voluminous gabbroic intrusions, before they were sheared off from their substratum and transported on top of the Kalak nappe complex during the Caledonian orogeny. PT conditions from one of these gabbroic bodies indicate that the body intruded the metasediments at ~9 kbar (Getsinger et al., subm to G3), which corresponds to a depth of ~34 km. U-Pb SIMS dating of zircons from this gabbro indicate that intrusion occurred at 439±2 Ma. The Vaddas nappe is separated from the Kalak nappe by an at least ~150 m thick, amphibolite-facies shear zone with a subhorizontal fabric and top-to-the-SE shear sense. It has developed within the lowest part of the Vaddas nappe as well as the upper part of the Kalak nappe complex and PT calculations indicate that final shearing occurred at ~450° C and ~6 kbar (depth of ~23 km). U-Pb TIMS dating of titanites, which grow parallel to the shear fabric in the Kalak nappe complex, gives 206Pb/238U ages ranging from 442±1 to 429±1 Ma, indicating that

  10. Large-scale patterns of epiphytic lichen species richness: photobiont-dependent response to climate and forest structure.

    PubMed

    Marini, Lorenzo; Nascimbene, Juri; Nimis, Pier Luigi

    2011-09-15

    Lichens are composite organisms consisting of a symbiotic association of a fungus with a photosynthetic partner. Although the photobiont type is a key life-history trait, tests of the potential differential role of the main photobiont types in shaping large-scale patterns of lichen species richness are still absent. The aim of the study was to test the influences of forest structure and climate on epiphytic lichen species richness across Italy and to see whether these relationships change for groups of species sharing different photobiont types. Regional species richness of epiphytic lichens divided into three main photobiont types (i.e. chlorococcoid green algae, cyanobacteria, and Trentepohlia algae) was retrieved for each of the 20 administrative regions. Multiple linear regression was used to quantify the effect of climate and forest structure, and their potential interaction, on the regional species richness for the three photobiont types, accounting also for the effect of regional area. Regional species richness was associated with both climate and forest structure variables but the relationships with both factors were largely photobiont dependent. Regional area and precipitation were the only predictors included in all the models, confirming the strong dependence of lichens on atmospheric water supply, irrespective of the photobiont type. Number of species with chlorococcoid green algae were further positively associated with cover of high forest, whilst lichens with Trentepohlia were further enhanced by warm temperatures. Cyanolichen species richness was only related to area and precipitation. Our study shed light on the relative importance of climate and forest structure on lichen species richness patterns at the macroscale, showing a differential response of the photobiont types to various environmental determinants. This differential response suggested that the current and future impacts of global change on lichens cannot be generalized and that species

  11. Large Scale Laser Two-Photon Polymerization Structuring for Fabrication of Artificial Polymeric Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, M.; Purlys, V.; Žukauskas, A.; Rutkauskas, M.; Danilevičius, P.; Paipulas, D.; Bičkauskaitė, G.; Bukelskis, L.; Baltriukienė, D.; Širmenis, R.; Gaidukevičiutė, A.; Bukelskienė, V.; Gadonas, R.; Sirvydis, V.; Piskarskas, A.

    2010-11-01

    We present a femtosecond Laser Two-Photon Polymerization (LTPP) system of large scale three-dimensional structuring for applications in tissue engineering. The direct laser writing system enables fabrication of artificial polymeric scaffolds over a large area (up to cm in lateral size) with sub-micrometer resolution which could find practical applications in biomedicine and surgery. Yb:KGW femtosecond laser oscillator (Pharos, Light Conversion. Co. Ltd.) is used as an irradiation source (75 fs, 515 nm (frequency doubled), 80 MHz). The sample is mounted on wide range linear motor driven stages having 10 nm sample positioning resolution (XY—ALS130-100, Z—ALS130-50, Aerotech, Inc.). These stages guarantee an overall travelling range of 100 mm into X and Y directions and 50 mm in Z direction and support the linear scanning speed up to 300 mm/s. By moving the sample three-dimensionally the position of laser focus in the photopolymer is changed and one is able to write complex 3D (three-dimensional) structures. An illumination system and CMOS camera enables online process monitoring. Control of all equipment is automated via custom made computer software "3D-Poli" specially designed for LTPP applications. Structures can be imported from computer aided design STereoLihography (stl) files or programmed directly. It can be used for rapid LTPP structuring in various photopolymers (SZ2080, AKRE19, PEG-DA-258) which are known to be suitable for bio-applications. Microstructured scaffolds can be produced on different substrates like glass, plastic and metal. In this paper, we present microfabricated polymeric scaffolds over a large area and growing of adult rabbit myogenic stem cells on them. Obtained results show the polymeric scaffolds to be applicable for cell growth practice. It exhibit potential to use it for artificial pericardium in the experimental model in the future.

  12. Large Scale Laser Two-Photon Polymerization Structuring for Fabrication of Artificial Polymeric Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Malinauskas, M.; Purlys, V.; Zukauskas, A.; Rutkauskas, M.; Danilevicius, P.; Paipulas, D.; Bickauskaite, G.; Gadonas, R.; Piskarskas, A.; Bukelskis, L.; Baltriukiene, D.; Bukelskiene, V.; Sirmenis, R.; Gaidukeviciute, A.; Sirvydis, V.

    2010-11-10

    We present a femtosecond Laser Two-Photon Polymerization (LTPP) system of large scale three-dimensional structuring for applications in tissue engineering. The direct laser writing system enables fabrication of artificial polymeric scaffolds over a large area (up to cm in lateral size) with sub-micrometer resolution which could find practical applications in biomedicine and surgery. Yb:KGW femtosecond laser oscillator (Pharos, Light Conversion. Co. Ltd.) is used as an irradiation source (75 fs, 515 nm (frequency doubled), 80 MHz). The sample is mounted on wide range linear motor driven stages having 10 nm sample positioning resolution (XY--ALS130-100, Z--ALS130-50, Aerotech, Inc.). These stages guarantee an overall travelling range of 100 mm into X and Y directions and 50 mm in Z direction and support the linear scanning speed up to 300 mm/s. By moving the sample three-dimensionally the position of laser focus in the photopolymer is changed and one is able to write complex 3D (three-dimensional) structures. An illumination system and CMOS camera enables online process monitoring. Control of all equipment is automated via custom made computer software ''3D-Poli'' specially designed for LTPP applications. Structures can be imported from computer aided design STereoLihography (stl) files or programmed directly. It can be used for rapid LTPP structuring in various photopolymers (SZ2080, AKRE19, PEG-DA-258) which are known to be suitable for bio-applications. Microstructured scaffolds can be produced on different substrates like glass, plastic and metal. In this paper, we present microfabricated polymeric scaffolds over a large area and growing of adult rabbit myogenic stem cells on them. Obtained results show the polymeric scaffolds to be applicable for cell growth practice. It exhibit potential to use it for artificial pericardium in the experimental model in the future.

  13. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastian E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.

  14. The VVDS: Early Results on the Large Scale Structure Distribution of Galaxies out to z ˜ 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Vettolani, G.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bondi, M.; Bottini, D.; Busarello, G.; Cappi, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Charlot, S.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Mellier, Y.; Meneux, B.; Merluzzi, P.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Rizzo, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) is an on-going program to map the evolution of galaxies, large scale structures and AGNs from the redshift measurement of more than 100000 objects down to a magnitude IAB=24, in combination with a multi-wavelength dataset from radio to X-rays. We present here the first results obtained from more than 20000 spectra. Dedicated effort has been invested to successfully enter the "redshift desert" 1.5

  15. Structural Variant Detection by Large-scale Sequencing Reveals New Evolutionary Evidence on Breed Divergence between Chinese and European Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengju; Li, Junhui; Kang, Huimin; Wang, Haifei; Fan, Ziyao; Yin, Zongjun; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Zhiquan; Liu, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we performed a genome-wide SV detection among the genomes of thirteen pigs from diverse Chinese and European originated breeds by next genetation sequencing, and constrcuted a single-nucleotide resolution map involving 56,930 putative SVs. We firstly identified a SV hotspot spanning 35 Mb region on the X chromosome specifically in the genomes of Chinese originated individuals. Further scrutinizing this region by large-scale sequencing data of extra 111 individuals, we obtained the confirmatory evidence on our initial finding. Moreover, thirty five SV-related genes within the hotspot region, being of importance for reproduction ability, rendered significant different evolution rates between Chinese and European originated breeds. The SV hotspot identified herein offers a novel evidence for assessing phylogenetic relationships, as well as likely explains the genetic difference of corresponding phenotypes and features, among Chinese and European pig breeds. Furthermore, we employed various SVs to infer genetic structure of individuls surveyed. We found SVs can clearly detect the difference of genetic background among individuals. This clues us that genome-wide SVs can capture majority of geneic variation and be applied into cladistic analyses. Characterizing whole genome SVs demonstrated that SVs are significantly enriched/depleted with various genomic features. PMID:26729041

  16. Non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Walsh, Jonathan R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the non-Gaussian contribution to the covariance of the matter power spectrum at one-loop order in standard perturbation theory (SPT), using the framework of the effective field theory (EFT) of large scale structure (LSS). The complete one-loop contributions are evaluated for the first time, including the leading EFT corrections that involve seven independent operators, of which four appear in the power spectrum and bispectrum. We compare the non-Gaussian part of the one-loop covariance computed with both SPT and EFT of LSS to two separate simulations. In one simulation, we find that the one-loop prediction from SPT reproduces the simulation well to ki+kj˜0.25 h /Mpc , while in the other simulation we find a substantial improvement of EFT of LSS (with one free parameter) over SPT, more than doubling the range of k where the theory accurately reproduces the simulation. The disagreement between these two simulations points to unaccounted for systematics, highlighting the need for improved numerical and analytic understanding of the covariance.

  17. Structure of Wall-Eddies at Very Large Reynolds Number--A Large-Scale PIV Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommema, S. E.; Adrian, R. J.

    2000-11-01

    The results of an experiment performed in the first 5 m of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Large-scale PIV measurements (up to 2 m × 2 m field-of-view) were obtained in the streamwise / wall-normal plane of a very-large Reynolds number (Re_θ > 10^6, based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity), flat-plate, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Measurements were obtained at the SLTEST facility in the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Grounds. Coherent packets of ramp-like structures with downstream inclination are observed and show a remarkable resemblance to those observed in typical laboratory-scale experiments at far lower Reynolds number. The results are interpreted in terms of a vortex packet paradigm(Adrian, R.J., C.D. Meinhart, and C.D. Tomkins, Vortex organization in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer, to appear in J. Fluid Mech., 2000.) and begin to extend the model to high Reynolds numbers of technological importance. Additional results obtained during periods of non-neutral atmospheric stability are contrasted with those of the canonical neutral boundary layer. Sample smoke visualization images (3 m × 15 m field-of-view) are available online from the author.

  18. Reducing the two-loop large-scale structure power spectrum to low-dimensional, radial integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-11-01

    Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Trying to simplify this, we show how two-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to low-dimensional, radial integrals. Many of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional fast Fourier transform, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals that are needed otherwise. The general idea of this fast fourier transform perturbation theory method is to switch between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions and integrate over orientations, leaving only radial integrals. This reformulation is independent of the underlying shape of the initial linear density power spectrum and should easily accommodate features such as those from baryonic acoustic oscillations. We also discuss how to account for halo bias and redshift space distortions.

  19. Stringent restriction from the growth of large-scale structure on apparent acceleration in inhomogeneous cosmological models.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Mustapha; Peel, Austin; Troxel, M A

    2013-12-20

    Probes of cosmic expansion constitute the main basis for arguments to support or refute a possible apparent acceleration due to different expansion rates in the Universe as described by inhomogeneous cosmological models. We present in this Letter a separate argument based on results from an analysis of the growth rate of large-scale structure in the Universe as modeled by the inhomogeneous cosmological models of Szekeres. We use the models with no assumptions of spherical or axial symmetries. We find that while the Szekeres models can fit very well the observed expansion history without a Λ, they fail to produce the observed late-time suppression in the growth unless Λ is added to the dynamics. A simultaneous fit to the supernova and growth factor data shows that the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM) provides consistency with the data at a confidence level of 99.65%, while the Szekeres model without Λ achieves only a 60.46% level. When the data sets are considered separately, the Szekeres with no Λ fits the supernova data as well as the ΛCDM does, but provides a very poor fit to the growth data with only 31.31% consistency level compared to 99.99% for the ΛCDM. This absence of late-time growth suppression in inhomogeneous models without a Λ is consolidated by a physical explanation.

  20. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    DOE PAGES

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; ...

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets formore » which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.« less

  1. Structure Constraints in a Constraint-Based Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Wan-Lin; Golden, Keith

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we report our work on a new constraint domain, where variables can take structured values. Earth-science data processing (ESDP) is a planning domain that requires the ability to represent and reason about complex constraints over structured data, such as satellite images. This paper reports on a constraint-based planner for ESDP and similar domains. We discuss our approach for translating a planning problem into a constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) and for representing and reasoning about structured objects and constraints over structures.

  2. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  3. Large scale three dimensional P velocity structure beneath the Western U. S, and the lost Farallon plate

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowicz, B.A.

    1980-05-01

    The results of a recent large scale three-dimensional study of P velocity beneath North Americal are analyzed from the point of view of the search for the fossil Farallon plate in the mantle beneath the western edge of the North American continent.

  4. Multimodal MR-imaging reveals large-scale structural and functional connectivity changes in profound early blindness

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Corinna M.; Hirsch, Gabriella V.; Zajac, Lauren; Koo, Bang-Bon; Collignon, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    between occipital and frontal and somatosensory-motor areas and between temporal (mainly fusiform and parahippocampus) and parietal, frontal, and other temporal areas. Correlations in white matter connectivity and functional connectivity observed between early blind and sighted controls showed an overall high degree of association. However, comparing the relative changes in white matter and functional connectivity between early blind and sighted controls did not show a significant correlation. In summary, these findings provide complimentary evidence, as well as highlight potential contradictions, regarding the nature of regional and large scale neuroplastic reorganization resulting from early onset blindness. PMID:28328939

  5. Using IBEX data to constrain the heliosphere's large-scale structure: interstellar neutral gas and the Warm Breeze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, Maciej; McComas, David; Galli, Andre; Kucharek, Harald; Wurz, Peter; Sokol, Justyna M.; Schwadron, Nathan; Heirtzler, David M.; Kubiak, M. Marzena A.; Möbius, Eberhard; Fuselier, Stephen; Swaczyna, Paweł; Leonard, Trevor; Park, Jeewoo

    2016-07-01

    The large-scale structure of the heliosphere is governed by the interaction of the partly ionized, magnetized interstellar gas and the magnetized, fully ionized solar wind, structured in heliolatitude. Determining factors of this interaction are the density and flow velocity of interstellar gas relative to the Sun, the Mach number of this flow and the strength and inclination of the interstellar magnetic field to the flow vector at the interstellar side, and the magnitude of dynamic pressure of solar wind and the strength of its embedded magnetic field at the solar side. As a result of charge exchange interactions operating in the boundary region between the heliosphere and interstellar matter, a new population of neutral atoms is created, in addition to the population of unperturbed interstellar neutral gas. Both of these populations penetrate deep inside the heliosphere, where they can be sampled by the first space probe dedicated to observations of the heliosphere and its immediate surroundings by means of neutral atoms: the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Due to distortion of the heliosphere from axial symmetry, the secondary population of interstellar neutrals, created via charge exchange between the plasma flowing past the heliopause and the unperturbed pristine neutral interstellar gas, appears to be coming from a different direction than the unperturbed interstellar neutral flow. These two directions should be coplanar with the plane defined by the local interstellar magnetic field and the flow direction of the unperturbed gas. IBEX provides an unprecedented opportunity to study and interpret these relations. The IBEX science team have recently accomplished important milestones in researching the primary and secondary populations of interstellar gas and their relation to the local interstellar magnetic fields. First, the temperature and velocity vector of the inflowing interstellar neutral gas has been determined with unprecedented robustness based

  6. A Modified Parallel Tree Code for N-Body Simulation of the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Gambera, M.

    2000-09-01

    N-body codes for performing simulations of the origin and evolution of the large-scale structure of the universe have improved significantly over the past decade in terms of both the resolution achieved and the reduction of the CPU time. However, state-of-the-art N-body codes hardly allow one to deal with particle numbers larger than a few 107, even on the largest parallel systems. In order to allow simulations with larger resolution, we have first reconsidered the grouping strategy as described in J. Barnes (1990, J. Comput. Phys. 87, 161) (hereafter B90) and applied it with some modifications to our WDSH-PT (Work and Data SHaring-Parallel Tree) code (U. Becciani et al., 1996, Comput. Phys. Comm. 99, 1). In the first part of this paper we will give a short description of the code adopting the algorithm of J. E. Barnes and P. Hut (1986, Nature 324, 446) and in particular the memory and work distribution strategy applied to describe the data distribution on a CC-NUMA machine like the CRAY-T3E system. In very large simulations (typically N>=107), due to network contention and the formation of clusters of galaxies, an uneven load easily verifies. To remedy this, we have devised an automatic work redistribution mechanism which provided a good dynamic load balance without adding significant overhead. In the second part of the paper we describe the modification to the Barnes grouping strategy we have devised to improve the performance of the WDSH-PT code. We will use the property that nearby particles have similar interaction lists. This idea has been checked in B90, where an interaction list is built which applies everywhere within a cell Cgroup containing a small number of particles Ncrit. B90 reuses this interaction list for each particle p∈Cgroup in the cell in turn. We will assume each particle p to have the same interaction list. We consider that the agent force Fp on a particle p can be decomposed into two terms Fp=Ffar+Fnear. The first term Ffar is the same for

  7. The kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect of the large-scale structure (I): dependence on neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncarelli, M.; Villaescusa-Navarro, F.; Baldi, M.

    2017-01-01

    The study of neutrinos in astrophysics requires the combination of different observational probes. The temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background induced via the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect may provide interesting information since they are expected to receive significant contribution from high-redshift plasma. We present a set of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that include a treatment of the neutrino component considering 4 different sum of neutrino masses: Σmν = (0, 0.15, 0.3, 0.6) eV. Using their outputs we modelled the kSZ effect due to the large-scale structure after the reionisation by producing mock maps, then computed the kSZ power spectrum and studied how it depends on zre and Σmν. We also run as set of 4 simulations to study and correct possible systematics due to resolution, finite box size and astrophysics. With massless neutrinos we obtain D^kSZ_{3000}=4.0 μK2 (zre=8.8), enough to account for all of the kSZ signal of D^kSZ_{3000}=(2.9 ± 1.3)μK2 measured with the South Pole Telescope (George et al. 2015). This translates into an upper limit on the kSZ effect due to patchy reionisation of D^kSZ,patchy_{3000}<1.0 μK2 (95% C.L.). Massive neutrinos induce a damping of kSZ effect power of about 8, 12 and 40 per cent for Σmν = (0.15, 0.3, 0.6) eV, respectively. We study the dependence of the kSZ signal with zre and the neutrino mass fraction, fν, and obtain D^kSZ_{3000}∝zre0.26(1 - fν)14.3. Interestingly, the scaling with fν is significantly shallower with respect to the equivalent thermal SZ effect, and may be used to break the degeneracy with other cosmological parameters.

  8. Inside pyroclastic density currents - uncovering the enigmatic flow structure and transport behaviour in large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are the most lethal threat from volcanoes. While there are two main types of PDCs (fully turbulent, fully dilute pyroclastic surges and more concentrated pyroclastic flows encompassing non-turbulent to turbulent transport) pyroclastic flows, which are the subject of the present study, are far more complex than dilute pyroclastic surges and remain the least understood type despite their far greater hazard, greater runout length and ability to transport vast quantities of material across the Earth's surface. Here we present large-scale experiments of natural volcanic material and gas in order to provide the missing quantitative view of the internal structure and gas-particle transport mechanisms in pyroclastic flows. We show that the outer flow structure with head, body and wake regions broadly resembles current PDC analogues of dilute gravity currents. However, the internal structure, in which lower levels consist of a concentrated granular fluid and upper levels are more dilute, contrasts significantly with the internal structure of fully dilute gravity currents. This bipartite vertical structure shows strong analogy to current conceptual models of high-density turbidity currents, which are responsible for the distribution of coarse sediment in marine basins and of great interest to the hydrocarbon industry. The lower concentrated and non-turbulent levels of the PDC (granular-fluid basal flow) act as a fast-flowing carrier for the more dilute and turbulent upper levels of the current (ash-cloud surge). Strong kinematic coupling between these flow parts reduces viscous dissipation and entrainment of ambient air into the lower part of the ash-cloud surge. This leads to a state of forced super-criticality whereby fast and destructive PDCs can endure even at large distances from volcanoes. Importantly, the basal flow/ash-cloud surge coupling yields a characteristically smooth rheological boundary across the non

  9. 3-D imaging of large scale buried structure by 1-D inversion of very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aydmer, A.A.; Chew, W.C.; Cui, T.J.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for large scale three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface imaging of inhomogeneous background is presented. One-dimensional (1-D) multifrequency distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) is employed in the inversion. Simulation results utilizing synthetic scattering data are given. Calibration of the very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) experimental waveforms is detailed along with major problems encountered in practice and their solutions. This discussion is followed by the results of a large scale application of the method to the experimental data provided by the VETEM system of the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is shown to have a computational complexity that is promising for on-site inversion.

  10. The Large-Scale Environment during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 and THORPEX Pacific Asian Regional Campaign

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    study examines the effects of large-scale circulations (e.g., ENSO, Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Indian Ocean Dipole ( IOD ), Antarctic Oscillation...However, IOD and AAO have even less significance. The MT signal is significant in the ACE values, but less significant in the STY numbers. The...conclusions were that ENSO strongly moderates TC activity and numbers of the most intense TCs in the WNP, while PDO, IOD , and AAO merely reinforce a

  11. Testing deviations from ΛCDM with growth rate measurements from six large-scale structure surveys at z = 0.06-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Shadab; Ho, Shirley; Silvestri, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    We use measurements from the Planck satellite mission and galaxy redshift surveys over the last decade to test three of the basic assumptions of the standard model of cosmology, ΛCDM (Λ cold dark matter): the spatial curvature of the universe, the nature of dark energy and the laws of gravity on large scales. We obtain improved constraints on several scenarios that violate one or more of these assumptions. We measure w0 = -0.94 ± 0.17 (18 per cent measurement) and 1 + wa = 1.16 ± 0.36 (31 per cent measurement) for models with a time-dependent equation of state, which is an improvement over current best constraints. In the context of modified gravity, we consider popular scalar-tensor models as well as a parametrization of the growth factor. In the case of one-parameter f(R) gravity models with a ΛCDM background, we constrain B0 < 1.36 × 10-5 (1σ C.L.), which is an improvement by a factor of 4 on the current best. We provide the very first constraint on the coupling parameters of general scalar-tensor theory and stringent constraint on the only free coupling parameter of Chameleon models. We also derive constraints on extended Chameleon models, improving the constraint on the coupling by a factor of 6 on the current best. The constraints on coupling parameter for Chameleon model rule out the value of β1 = 4/3 required for f(R) gravity. We also measure γ = 0.612 ± 0.072 (11.7 per cent measurement) for growth index parametrization. We improve all the current constraints by combining results from various galaxy redshift surveys in a coherent way, which includes a careful treatment of scale dependence introduced by modified gravity.

  12. Monitoring and evaluation of a large-scale community-based program: recommendations for overcoming barriers to structured implementation.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Joanne Marguerite; Achat, Helen Mary

    2011-02-01

    Accountability for the use of limited health resources requires quality information for ongoing monitoring of program effectiveness. We outline the challenges involved in the monitoring and evaluation of a large-scale community nurse home visiting program. Efforts to establish and maintain rigorous assessment were impaired by interrelated difficulties, impacting on the quality of information collected. The consequences and outcomes of these challenges are discussed. Recommendations to facilitate the monitoring and evaluation of community-based programs are made. Successful program monitoring and evaluation, guided by these recommendations, will support the ongoing review of program activities and evidence-based decision making to inform current operation and future planning.

  13. A hierarchical research by large-scale and ab initio electronic structure theories—Si and Ge cleavage and stepped (111)-2×1 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, T.; Tanikawa, M.; Ishii, A.

    2010-09-01

    The ab initio calculation with the density functional theory and plane-wave bases is carried out for stepped Si(1 1 1)-2×1 surfaces that were predicted in a cleavage simulation by the large-scale (order- N) electronic structure theory (T. Hoshi, Y. Iguchi and T. Fujiwara, Phys. Rev. B 72 (2005) 075323). The present ab initio calculation confirms the predicted stepped structure and its bias-dependent STM image. Moreover, two (meta)stable step-edge structures are found and compared. The investigation is carried out also for Ge(1 1 1)-2×1 surfaces, so as to construct a common understanding among elements. The present study demonstrates the general importance of the hierarchical research between large-scale and ab initio electronic structure theories.

  14. Global structure and dynamics of large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind: Voyager 2 observations during 2005 and 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Acũna, M. H.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Wang, C.; Richardson, J. D.

    2008-02-01

    The Voyager 2 (V2) observations of daily averages of the solar wind during 2005 and 2006 from 75.3 AU to 81.6 AU between ~25.7°S and 27.1°S show both a step-like trend in the speed V(t) and ``large-scale fluctuations'' of the magnetic field strength B, speed V, density N and temperature T. The distribution functions of B, N, and NV2 observed by V2 are lognormal and that of V is approximately Gaussian. We introduce a method for specifying the boundary conditions at all latitudes (except near the poles) on a Sun-centered surface of radius of 1 AU, based on solar magnetic field observations. This paper uses only the boundary conditions at the latitude of V2 and a 1-D time-dependent MHD model to calculate the radial evolution of the large-scale fluctuations of B(t), V(t) and N(t) at distances between 1 and 90 AU. This model explains the V2 observations of a lognormal distribution of B and the Gaussian distribution of V, but not the observed lognormal distributions of N and NV2. The lognormal distribution of B observed by V2 was produced primarily by dynamical processes beyond 1 AU.

  15. Study on spatial structure of large scale retail stores based on space syntax: case study in Wuhan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Qingming; Zhou, Jingnan; Sliuzas, Richard

    2009-10-01

    This research analyzes the spatial pattern of large-scale stores based on space syntax theory and explores the correlation between the variations in syntax accessibility and the spatial pattern of large-scale stores. This research develops a framework of spatial topology analysis based on the space syntax theory, which includes the following modifications: the trail to break the traditional long axial line network of space syntax and apply this partitioned network in the topological analysis; the trail to analyze the bus route network; By taking both the syntax accessibility of road and bus network into consideration, we produce the scopes of urban syntax centers of city level, local level and sub local level respectively. In the analysis of the retail distribution pattern, the city level, local level and sub local level urban retail centers are suggested respectively according to the spatial distributions of the quantity and scale of the retail stores. The spatial distribution pattern of each retail format is studied as spatial correlations between the retail locations and the urban space syntax centers based on a case study in Wuhan, China. The Space Syntax can be a useful tool to explain the allocation logic of urban retail space in large cities. We suggest to apply the partitioned transportation network instead of the traditional long axial line network.

  16. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  17. Effects of Large-Scale Releases on the Genetic Structure of Red Sea Bream (Pagrus major, Temminck et Schlegel) Populations in Japan.

    PubMed

    Blanco Gonzalez, Enrique; Aritaki, Masato; Knutsen, Halvor; Taniguchi, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale hatchery releases are carried out for many marine fish species worldwide; nevertheless, the long-term effects of this practice on the genetic structure of natural populations remains unclear. The lack of knowledge is especially evident when independent stock enhancement programs are conducted simultaneously on the same species at different geographical locations, as occurs with red sea bream (Pagrus major, Temminck et Schlegel) in Japan. In this study, we examined the putative effects of intensive offspring releases on the genetic structure of red sea bream populations along the Japanese archipelago by genotyping 848 fish at fifteen microsatellite loci. Our results suggests weak but consistent patterns of genetic divergence (F(ST) = 0.002, p < 0.001). Red sea bream in Japan appeared spatially structured with several patches of distinct allelic composition, which corresponded to areas receiving an important influx of fish of hatchery origin, either released intentionally or from unintentional escapees from aquaculture operations. In addition to impacts upon local populations inhabiting semi-enclosed embayments, large-scale releases (either intentionally or from unintentional escapes) appeared also to have perturbed genetic structure in open areas. Hence, results of the present study suggest that independent large-scale marine stock enhancement programs conducted simultaneously on one species at different geographical locations may compromise native genetic structure and lead to patchy patterns in population genetic structure.

  18. Effects of Large-Scale Releases on the Genetic Structure of Red Sea Bream (Pagrus major, Temminck et Schlegel) Populations in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Blanco Gonzalez, Enrique; Aritaki, Masato; Knutsen, Halvor; Taniguchi, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale hatchery releases are carried out for many marine fish species worldwide; nevertheless, the long-term effects of this practice on the genetic structure of natural populations remains unclear. The lack of knowledge is especially evident when independent stock enhancement programs are conducted simultaneously on the same species at different geographical locations, as occurs with red sea bream (Pagrus major, Temminck et Schlegel) in Japan. In this study, we examined the putative effects of intensive offspring releases on the genetic structure of red sea bream populations along the Japanese archipelago by genotyping 848 fish at fifteen microsatellite loci. Our results suggests weak but consistent patterns of genetic divergence (FST = 0.002, p < 0.001). Red sea bream in Japan appeared spatially structured with several patches of distinct allelic composition, which corresponded to areas receiving an important influx of fish of hatchery origin, either released intentionally or from unintentional escapees from aquaculture operations. In addition to impacts upon local populations inhabiting semi-enclosed embayments, large-scale releases (either intentionally or from unintentional escapes) appeared also to have perturbed genetic structure in open areas. Hence, results of the present study suggest that independent large-scale marine stock enhancement programs conducted simultaneously on one species at different geographical locations may compromise native genetic structure and lead to patchy patterns in population genetic structure. PMID:25993089

  19. Research on structural characteristics of large-scale CdS thin films deposited by CBD under low ammonia condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yu-ming; Gao, Lin; Yin, Fu-hong; Qiao, Zai-xiang; Liu, Hao; Feng, Shao-jun; Sun, Hai-tao; Hang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layers with the scale of 10 cm×10 cm are deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) with different temperatures and thiourea concentrations under low ammonia condition. There are obvious hexagonal phases and cubic phases in CdS thin films under the conditions of low temperature and high thiourea concentration. The main reason is that the heterogeneous reaction is dominant for homogeneous reaction. At low temperature, CdS thin films with good uniformity and high transmittance are deposited by adjusting the thiourea concentration, and there is almost no precipitation in reaction solution. In addition, the low temperature is desired in assembly line. The transmittance and the band gap of CdS thin films are above 80% and about 2.4 eV, respectively. These films are suitable for the buffer layers of large-scale Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells.

  20. VIPERS: An Unprecedented View of Galaxies and Large-scale Structure Halfway Back in the Life of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, L.; The Vipers Team

    2013-03-01

    The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is an ongoing Large Programme to map in detail the large-scale distribution of galaxies at 0.5 < z <1.2. With a combination of volume and sampling density that is unique for these redshifts, it focuses on measuring galaxy clustering and related cosmological quantities as part of the grand challenge of understanding the origin of cosmic acceleration. Moreover, VIPERS has been designed to guarantee a broader legacy, allowing detailed investigations of the properties and evolutionary trends of z ~ 1 galaxies. The survey strategy exploits the specific advantages of VIMOS, aiming at a final sample of nearly 100 000 galaxy redshifts to iAB = 22.5 mag, which represents the largest redshift survey ever performed with ESO telescopes. In this article we describe the survey construction, together with early results based on a first sample of 55000 galaxies.

  1. Review of the Need for a Large-scale Test Facility for Research on the Effects of Extreme Winds on Structures

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Little

    1999-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), through the US Department of Energy (DOE), has proposed that a large-scale wind test facility (LSWTF) be constructed to study, in full-scale, the behavior of low-rise structures under simulated extreme wind conditions. To determine the need for, and potential benefits of, such a facility, the Idaho Operations Office of the DOE requested that the National Research Council (NRC) perform an independent assessment of the role and potential value of an LSWTF in the overall context of wind engineering research. The NRC established the Committee to Review the Need for a Large-scale Test Facility for Research on the Effects of Extreme Winds on Structures, under the auspices of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, to perform this assessment. This report conveys the results of the committee's deliberations as well as its findings and recommendations. Data developed at large-scale would enhanced the understanding of how structures, particularly light-frame structures, are affected by extreme winds (e.g., hurricanes, tornadoes, sever thunderstorms, and other events). With a large-scale wind test facility, full-sized structures, such as site-built or manufactured housing and small commercial or industrial buildings, could be tested under a range of wind conditions in a controlled, repeatable environment. At this time, the US has no facility specifically constructed for this purpose. During the course of this study, the committee was confronted by three difficult questions: (1) does the lack of a facility equate to a need for the facility? (2) is need alone sufficient justification for the construction of a facility? and (3) would the benefits derived from information produced in an LSWTF justify the costs of producing that information? The committee's evaluation of the need and justification for an LSWTF was shaped by these realities.

  2. On validating Quasi-Steady Quasi-Homogeneous nature of the relationgship between large-scale and small-scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Chernyshenko, Sergei

    2016-11-01

    A formal definition to the two hypotheses of the quasi-steady and quasi-homogeneous (QSQH) theory was proposed. The theory is supposed to explain the phenomenon of the large-scale structures influencing the small-scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer. Multi-objective optimisations were performed to find the optimal cut-off parameters for the new large-scale filters. The new filters were proved to obtain much more clear large-scale structures than the filter suggested by the previous studies. Calculations and comparisons for a set of statistical flow properties extracted from the databases of the direct numerical simulations of a plane channel flow were conducted. The accuracy of the predictions based on the QSQH theory was observed improving when the Reynolds number increases. Extrapolations of urms and two-points correlation from medium to high Reynolds number based on the QSQH approach were preformed and about 10 % accuracy was reported. The more interesting thing is that the QSQH theory implies a dependence of the mean profile log-law constants on the Reynolds number. The main overall result of the present work is the validations of the two hypotheses of the quasi-steady quasi-homogeneous theory in near-wall turbulent flows.

  3. Spatial Fingerprints of Community Structure in Human Interaction Network for an Extensive Set of Large-Scale Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kallus, Zsófia; Barankai, Norbert; Szüle, János; Vattay, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Human interaction networks inferred from country-wide telephone activity recordings were recently used to redraw political maps by projecting their topological partitions into geographical space. The results showed remarkable spatial cohesiveness of the network communities and a significant overlap between the redrawn and the administrative borders. Here we present a similar analysis based on one of the most popular online social networks represented by the ties between more than 5.8 million of its geo-located users. The worldwide coverage of their measured activity allowed us to analyze the large-scale regional subgraphs of entire continents and an extensive set of examples for single countries. We present results for North and South America, Europe and Asia. In our analysis we used the well-established method of modularity clustering after an aggregation of the individual links into a weighted graph connecting equal-area geographical pixels. Our results show fingerprints of both of the opposing forces of dividing local conflicts and of uniting cross-cultural trends of globalization. PMID:25993329

  4. Large-scale bedforms in the Platte River downstream from Grand Island, Nebraska; structure, process, and relationship to channel narrowing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Platte River channel in Nebraska, especially downstream from Grand Island, is characterized by large, periodic, and geometrically distinct bedforms called macroforms. Macroforms have dimensions commensurate with the width and depth of the channel and are emergent at all but the highest flow stages. The encroachment of vegetation on macroforms and their consequent stabilization since the large-scale development of irrigation in the Platte River basin is the major cause of the reduction in channel width upstream from Grand Island. From simple geometrical considerations of macroform shape, an equation is developed to predict the depth and duration of flow required to erode the stoss sides of the macroforms to remove new vegetal growth each year. The methods developed in this report to eliminate vegetal growth on macroforms may provide a useful management tool for controlling width of the Platte River channels. Although further testing is required to establish the validity of these methods at actual stream sites, a sample calculation for the Silver Creek reach shows good agreement between the flow conditions predicted by the methods developed in this report and actual flow conditions. (USGS)

  5. RCSLenS: testing gravitational physics through the cross-correlation of weak lensing and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Joudaki, Shahab; Heymans, Catherine; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; Nakajima, Reiko; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Viola, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    The unknown nature of `dark energy' motivates continued cosmological tests of large-scale gravitational physics. We present a new consistency check based on the relative amplitude of non-relativistic galaxy peculiar motions, measured via redshift-space distortion, and the relativistic deflection of light by those same galaxies traced by galaxy-galaxy lensing. We take advantage of the latest generation of deep, overlapping imaging and spectroscopic data sets, combining the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We quantify the results using the `gravitational slip' statistic EG, which we estimate as 0.48 ± 0.10 at z = 0.32 and 0.30 ± 0.07 at z = 0.57, the latter constituting the highest redshift at which this quantity has been determined. These measurements are consistent with the predictions of General Relativity, for a perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric in a Universe dominated by a cosmological constant, which are EG = 0.41 and 0.36 at these respective redshifts. The combination of redshift-space distortion and gravitational lensing data from current and future galaxy surveys will offer increasingly stringent tests of fundamental cosmology.