Science.gov

Sample records for largest nuclear institute

  1. Social Institutions and Nuclear Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Alvin M.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear technologists can offer an all but infinite source of relatively cheap and clean energy" but society must decide whether the price of eternal vigilance needed to ensure proper and safe operation of its nuclear energy system" is worth the benefits. (Author/AL)

  2. Social Institutions and Nuclear Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Alvin M.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear technologists can offer an all but infinite source of relatively cheap and clean energy" but society must decide whether the price of eternal vigilance needed to ensure proper and safe operation of its nuclear energy system" is worth the benefits. (Author/AL)

  3. Institutional plan -- Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The US nuclear electric utility industry established the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in 1979 to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability -- to promote excellence -- in the operation of its nuclear plants. After its formation, the Institute grew from a handful of on-loan personnel in late 1979 to an established work force of more than 400 permanent and on-loan personnel. INPO`s early years were marked by growth and evolution of its programs and organization. The Institute now focuses primarily on the effectiveness and enhancement of established programs and activities. For INPO to carry out its role, it must have the support of its members and participants and a cooperative but independent relationship with the NRC. A basis for that support and cooperation is an understanding of INPO`s role. This Institutional Plan is intended to provide that understanding by defining the Institute`s role and its major programs. This plan considers the existing and projected needs of the industry and the overall environment in which INPO and its members and participants operate.

  4. Successful Completion of the Largest Shipment of Russian Research Reactor High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Czech Republic to Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Jeff Chamberlin

    2008-07-01

    On December 8, 2007, the largest shipment of high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program in support of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. In February 2003, RRRFR Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Rež, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

  5. Evolution of nuclear spectroscopy at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, P.

    2001-07-01

    Experimental studies of nuclear excitations have been an important subject from the earliest days when the institute was established. The construction of 4 MeV proton cyclotron was mainly aimed to achieve this goal. Early experiments in nuclear spectroscopy were done with radioactive nuclei with the help of beta and gamma ray spectrometers. Small NaI(Tl) detectors were used for gamma--gamma coincidence, angular correlation and life time measurements. The excited states nuclear magnetic moments were measured in perturbed gamma--gamma angular correlation experiments. A high transmission magnetic beta ray spectrometer was used to measure internal conversion coefficients and beta--gamma coincidence studies. A large number of significant contributions were made during 1950--59 using these facilities. Proton beam in the cyclotron was made available in the late 1950's and together with 14 MeV neutrons obtained from a C-W generator a large number of short-lived nuclei were investigated during 1960's and 1970's. The introduction of high resolution Ge gamma detectors and the improved electronics helped to extend the spectroscopic work which include on-line (p,p'g) and (p,n g) reaction studies. Nuclear spectroscopic studies entered a new phase in the 1980's with the availability of 40--80 MeV alpha beam from the variable energy cyclotron at VECC, Calcutta. A number of experimental groups were formed in the institute to study nuclear level schemes with (a,xn g) reactions. Initially only two unsuppressed Ge detectors were used for coincidence studies. Later in 1989 five Ge detectors with a large six segmented NaI(Tl) multiplicity-sum detector system were successfully used to select various channels in (a ,xn g) reactions. From 1990 to date a variety of medium energy heavy ions were made available from the BARC-TIFR Pelletron and the Nuclear Science Centre Pelletron. The state of the art gamma detector arrays in these centres enabled the Saha Institute groups to undertake more

  6. Alternative institutional arrangements for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Bussard, D.

    1980-08-01

    This paper investigates how alternative organizations of nuclear power generation would effect the regulatory environment for nuclear power production, how it would effect financial constraints on new construction, and what governmental barriers to such reorganization exist.

  7. Nuclear Concepts & Technological Issues Institute: Teacher Activity Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Candace C., Ed.; Lunetta, Lois W., Ed.

    For many summers the Radiation Science and Engineering Center at Pennsylvania State University has been the site of a Nuclear Concepts and Technological Issues Institute for secondary school science teachers. As a culminating activity of the institute teachers develop lesson plans, laboratory experiments, demonstrations, or other activities and…

  8. p150Glued, the largest subunit of the dynactin complex, is nonessential in Neurospora but required for nuclear distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, J H; Minke, P F; Bruno, K S; Plamann, M

    1996-01-01

    Dynactin is a multisubunit complex that is required for cytoplasmic dynein, a minus-end-directed, microtubule-associated motor, to efficiently transport vesicles along microtubules in vitro. p150Glued, the largest subunit of dynactin, has been identified in vertebrates and Drosophila and recently has been shown to interact with cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chains in vitro. The mechanism by which dynactin facilitates cytoplasmic dynein-dependent vesicle transport is unknown. We have devised a genetic screen for cytoplasmic dynein/dynactin mutants in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. In this paper, we report that one of these mutants, ro-3, defines a gene encoding an apparent homologue of p150Glued, and we provide genetic evidence that cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin interact in vivo. The major structural features of vertebrate and Drosophila p150Glued, a microtubule-binding site at the N-terminus and two large alpha-helical coiled-coil regions contained within the distal two-thirds of the polypeptide, are conserved in Ro3. Drosophila p150Glued is essential for viability; however, ro-3 null mutants are viable, indicating that dynactin is not an essential complex in N. crassa. We show that N. crassa cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin mutants have abnormal nuclear distribution but retain the ability to organize cytoplasmic microtubules and actin in anucleate hyphae. Images PMID:8744947

  9. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations annual report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This annual report highlights the activities of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The topics of the report include the president and chairmen`s joint message, overview of programs serving as the foundation for most of its activities, performance indicators for the US nuclear utility industry, and INPO`s 1993 financial reports and rosters. INPO has four technical cornerstone programs that serve as the foundation for most of its activities. (1) Evaluations of nuclear power plants operated by member utilities are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis. (2) INPO supports its member utilities in their work to achieve and maintain accreditation of training programs. (3) Events analysis programs identify and communicate lessons learned from plant events so utilities can take action to prevent similar events at their plants. (4) INPO helps members improve in nuclear operations areas through assistance programs and other activities that continually evolve to meet the changing needs of the nuclear industry.

  10. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This annual report highlights the activities of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The topics of the report include the president and chairmen`s joint message, overview of programs serving as the foundation for most of its activities, performance indicators for the US nuclear utility industry, and INPO`s 1994 financial reports and rosters. INPO has four technical cornerstone programs that serve as the foundation for most of its activities. (1) Evaluations of nuclear power plants operated by member utilities are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis. (2) INPO supports its member utilities in their work to achieve and maintain accreditation of training programs. (3) Events analysis programs identify and communicate lessons learned from plant events so utilities can take action to prevent similar events at their plants. (4) INPO helps members improve in nuclear operations areas through assistance programs and other activities that continually evolve to meet the changing needs of the nuclear industry

  11. Institutional Strain and Precarious Values in Meeting Future Nuclear Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Matthews; Todd R. LaPorte

    1998-11-01

    This paper explores the implications of moderately expanding plutonium "pit" production capability within the strongly R&D culture of Los Alamos National Laboratory, especially in terms of the lab's current capacity or "fitness for the future" in which institutional stewardship of the nation's nuclear deterrent capability becomes a primary objective. The institutional properties needed to assure "future fitness" includes the organizational requisites highly reliable operations and sustained institutional constancy in a manner that evokes deep public trust and confidence. Estimates are made of the degree to which the key Division and most relevant Program office in this evolution already exhibits them.

  12. Largest College Endowments, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Of all endowments valued at more than $250-million, the UCLA Foundation had the highest rate of growth over the previous year, at 49 percent. This article presents a table of the largest college endowments in 2011. The table covers the "rank," "institution," "market value as of June 30, 2011," and "1-year change" of institutions participating in…

  13. Largest College Endowments, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Of all endowments valued at more than $250-million, the UCLA Foundation had the highest rate of growth over the previous year, at 49 percent. This article presents a table of the largest college endowments in 2011. The table covers the "rank," "institution," "market value as of June 30, 2011," and "1-year change" of institutions participating in…

  14. Epidemiological Characteristics of the Largest Kidney Transplant Program in Mexico: Western National Medical Center, Mexican Institute of Social Security.

    PubMed

    Solis-Vargas, E; Evangelista-Carrillo, L A; Puentes-Camacho, A; Rojas-Campos, E; Andrade-Sierra, J; Cerrillos-Gutiérrez, J I; Nieves-Hernández, J J; Jalomo-Martínez, B; Medina-Pérez, M; Martínez-Martínez, P; Monteón-Ramos, F J; Gómez-Navarro, B

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Transplant Center (CENATRA), in 2013, a total of 2707 transplantations were performed in Mexico; of them, 10% (270 transplantations) were done in our Tertiary Care Hospital (Western National Medical Center). This means that one in 10 transplant recipients undergoes transplantation at our medical center. The aim of our study was to describe the characteristics of and to compare changes in the kidney transplantation program over time. This was a cross-sectional study. Data were collected from the hospital transplant registry from January 1994 to December 2014. During the study period, 3643 kidney transplantations were conducted; most were living donor 3236 (89%), and only 407 patients (11%) received a graft from a deceased donor. Of living donors, 2786 (87%) were related, and 450 (13%) were genetically unrelated. The average recipient age was 28 years, and the average age of the donor was 34 years. It was observed that siblings donated more frequently (51%), followed by parents (34%). Among unrelated donors, spouses donated the most (66%). In 80% of cases, the cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was unknown (80%). The most frequent renal replacement therapy was peritoneal dialysis (54%), followed by hemodialysis (18%); only 5% of patients received preemptive kidney transplant. The most frequent immunosuppression scheme was tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone in 70% of patients. The Western National Medical Center is the largest kidney transplantation program in Mexico. The main activity is living donor transplantation. Recipients are relatively young persons with unknown etiology of ESRD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 10444 - Nuclear Energy Institute; Denial of Petition for Rulemaking

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 73 Nuclear Energy Institute; Denial of Petition for Rulemaking AGENCY: Nuclear... (NRC) is denying a petition for rulemaking (PRM) submitted by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) (the... rulemaking. The petitioner states that the nuclear energy industry has fully implemented numerous...

  16. Assessing the Institution of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Christopher

    2010-05-14

    The nuclear nonproliferation regime is facing a crisis of effectiveness. During the Cold War, the regime was relatively effective in stemming the proliferation of nuclear weapons and building an institutional structure that could, under certain conditions, ensure continued success. However, in the evolving global context, the traditional approaches are becoming less appropriate. Globalization has introduced new sets of stresses on the nonproliferation regime, such as the rise of non-state actors, broadening extensity and intensity of supply chains, and the multipolarization of power. This evolving global context demands an analytical and political flexibility in order to meet future threats. Current institutional capabilities established during the Cold War are now insufficient to meet the nonproliferation regime’s current and future needs. The research was based on information gathered through interviews and reviews of the relevant literature, and two dominant themes emerged. First, that human security should be integrated into the regime to account for the rise of non-state actors and networked violence. Second, confidence in the regime’s overall effectiveness has eroded at a time where verification-based confidence is becoming more essential. The research postulates that a critical analysis of the regime that fully utilizes institutional theory, with its focus on rules, normative structures, and procedures will be essential to adapting the regime to the current global context, building mechanisms for generating trust, creating better enforcement, and providing flexibility for the future.

  17. Cyclotron laboratory of the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Georgiev, L. S.

    2016-06-01

    An accelerator laboratory is presently under construction in Sofia at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The laboratory will use a TR24 type of cyclotron, which provides a possibility to accelerate a proton beam with an energy of 15 to 24 MeV and current of up to 0.4 mA. An accelerator with such parameters allows to produce a large variety of radioisotopes for development of radiopharmaceuticals. The most common radioisotopes that could be produced with such a cyclotron are PET isotopes like: 11C, 13N, 15O, 18F, 124I, 64Cu, 68Ge/68Ga, and SPECT isotopes like: 123I, 111In, 67Ga, 57Co, 99m Tc. Our aim is to use the cyclotron facility for research in the fields of radiopharmacy, radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, solid state physics, applied research, new materials and for education in all these fields including nuclear energy. The building of the laboratory will be constructed nearby the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and the cyclotron together with all the equipment needed will be installed there.

  18. The Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics Virtual Journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Ryan

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a weekly, online system for collecting and distributing scholarly articles of interest to researchers in nuclear astrophysics, a virtual journal (VJ), through the Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA). The articles are gathered from a variety of well-known publications, and our database of both current and past issues is easily searchable by topics, chosen by the editors, or by keywords. Subscribers are notified of each new VJ issue through an email-list server. The VJ is a source for experimental and theoretical data for the JINA reaction rate database, and the references to review and popular level articles are a convenient way to introduce students to the literature. There are two related journals: the JINA VJ and the SEGUE VJ. Both the journals and support information are available at http://groups.nscl.msu.edu/jina/journals.

  19. 75 FR 63725 - Nuclear Energy Institute; Consideration of Petition in the Rulemaking Process

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 70 Nuclear Energy Institute; Consideration of Petition in the Rulemaking Process... raised in a petition submitted by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), and is denying the remaining...

  20. Future projection of radiocesium flux to the ocean from the largest river impacted by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Adhiraga Pratama, Mochamad; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko; Matsui, Yasuto; Yamashiki, Yosuke

    2015-02-12

    Following the initial fall out from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), a significant amount of radiocesium has been discharged from Abukuma River into the Pacific Ocean. This study attempted to numerically simulate the flux of radiocesium into Abukuma River by developing the multiple compartment model which incorporate the transport process of the radionuclide from the ground surface of the catchment area into the river, a process called wash off. The results from the model show that the sub-basins with a high percentage of forest area release the radionuclides at lower rate compared to the other sub-basins. In addition the results show that the model could predict the seasonal pattern of the observed data. Despite the overestimation observed between the modeled data and the observed data, the values of R(2) obtained from (137)Cs and (134)Cs of 0.98 and 0.97 respectively demonstrate the accuracy of the model. Prediction of the discharge from the basin area for 100 years after the accident shows that, the flux of radiocesium into the Pacific Ocean is still relatively high with an order of magnitude of 10(9) bq.month(-1) while the total accumulation of the discharge is 111 TBq for (137)Cs and 44 TBq for (134)Cs.

  1. Future projection of radiocesium flux to the ocean from the largest river impacted by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Adhiraga Pratama, Mochamad; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko; Matsui, Yasuto; Yamashiki, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Following the initial fall out from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), a significant amount of radiocesium has been discharged from Abukuma River into the Pacific Ocean. This study attempted to numerically simulate the flux of radiocesium into Abukuma River by developing the multiple compartment model which incorporate the transport process of the radionuclide from the ground surface of the catchment area into the river, a process called wash off. The results from the model show that the sub-basins with a high percentage of forest area release the radionuclides at lower rate compared to the other sub-basins. In addition the results show that the model could predict the seasonal pattern of the observed data. Despite the overestimation observed between the modeled data and the observed data, the values of R2 obtained from 137Cs and 134Cs of 0.98 and 0.97 respectively demonstrate the accuracy of the model. Prediction of the discharge from the basin area for 100 years after the accident shows that, the flux of radiocesium into the Pacific Ocean is still relatively high with an order of magnitude of 109 bq.month−1 while the total accumulation of the discharge is 111 TBq for 137Cs and 44 TBq for 134Cs. PMID:25673214

  2. Could ICG-aided robotic cholecystectomy reduce the rate of open conversion reported with laparoscopic approach? A head to head comparison of the largest single institution studies.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, A; Danilkowicz, R; Elli, F E; Bianco, F; Masrur, M; Giulianotti, P C

    2017-03-01

    Comparative studies between robotic and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) focus heavily on economic considerations under the assumption of comparable clinical outcomes. Advancement of the robotic technique and the further widespread use of this approach suggest a need for newer comparison studies. 676 ICG-aided robotic cholecystectomies (ICG-aided RC) performed at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Division of General, Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery were compiled retrospectively. Additionally, 289 LC were similarly obtained. Data were compared to the largest single institution LC data sets from within the US and abroad. Statistically significant variations were found between UIC-RC and UIC-LC in minor biliary injuries (p = 0.049), overall open conversion (p ≤ 0.001), open conversion in the acute setting (p = 0.002), and mean blood loss (p < 0.001). UIC-RC open conversions were also significantly lower than Greenville Health System LC (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, UIC ICG-RC resulted in the lowest percentages of major biliary injuries (0 %) and highest percentage of biliary anomalies identified (2.07 %). ICG-aided cholangiography and the technical advantages associated with the robotic platform may significantly decrease the rate of open conversion in both the acute and non-acute setting. The sample size discrepancy and the non-randomized nature of our study do not allow for drawing definitive conclusions.

  3. Computer Security for Commercial Nuclear Power Plants - Literature Review for Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Central Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, Felicia Angelica; Waymire, Russell L.

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is providing training and consultation activities on security planning and design for the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNPCRI). As part of this effort, SNL performed a literature review on computer security requirements, guidance and best practices that are applicable to an advanced nuclear power plant. This report documents the review of reports generated by SNL and other organizations [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Nuclear Energy Institute, and International Atomic Energy Agency] related to protection of information technology resources, primarily digital controls and computer resources and their data networks. Copies of the key documents have also been provided to KHNP-CRI.

  4. Spatial assessment of radiocaesium in the largest lagoon in Fukushima after the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident.

    PubMed

    Kambayashi, Shota; Zhang, Jing; Narita, Hisashi

    2017-09-15

    Radionuclides deposited on land by global fallouts and nuclear power station accidents spread over coastal environments through estuarine areas connecting land to ocean. In this study, we monitored activity concentration of radiocaesium in surface sediment and re-suspended particles in Matsukawa-ura lagoon, the largest lagoon in Fukushima, after the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident. Radiocaesium distribution in surface sediment varied spatiotemporally and irregularly due to the effect of tidal waves. The effective half-life was significantly shorter than physical half-life, suggesting some system of radiocaesium discharge in the lagoon. Sediment trap observation revealed re-suspended particles from sediment were transported to the ocean. For these reasons, it is suggested that re-suspension of particles in the lagoon and their transportation to the ocean by the seawater exchange process are important processes of radiocaesium discharge. Moreover, our results show that seawater exchange process contributes to the dispersion of radiocaesium in the ocean. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences reveals that the largest reported mitochondrial genome in plants contains a significant amount of DNA having a nuclear origin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The melon belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family, whose economic importance among vegetable crops is second only to Solanaceae. The melon has a small genome size (454 Mb), which makes it suitable for molecular and genetic studies. Despite similar nuclear and chloroplast genome sizes, cucurbits show great variation when their mitochondrial genomes are compared. The melon possesses the largest plant mitochondrial genome, as much as eight times larger than that of other cucurbits. Results The nucleotide sequences of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes were determined. The chloroplast genome (156,017 bp) included 132 genes, with 98 single-copy genes dispersed between the small (SSC) and large (LSC) single-copy regions and 17 duplicated genes in the inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb). A comparison of the cucumber and melon chloroplast genomes showed differences in only approximately 5% of nucleotides, mainly due to short indels and SNPs. Additionally, 2.74 Mb of mitochondrial sequence, accounting for 95% of the estimated mitochondrial genome size, were assembled into five scaffolds and four additional unscaffolded contigs. An 84% of the mitochondrial genome is contained in a single scaffold. The gene-coding region accounted for 1.7% (45,926 bp) of the total sequence, including 51 protein-coding genes, 4 conserved ORFs, 3 rRNA genes and 24 tRNA genes. Despite the differences observed in the mitochondrial genome sizes of cucurbit species, Citrullus lanatus (379 kb), Cucurbita pepo (983 kb) and Cucumis melo (2,740 kb) share 120 kb of sequence, including the predicted protein-coding regions. Nevertheless, melon contained a high number of repetitive sequences and a high content of DNA of nuclear origin, which represented 42% and 47% of the total sequence, respectively. Conclusions Whereas the size and gene organisation of chloroplast genomes are similar among the cucurbit species, mitochondrial genomes show a wide variety of sizes, with a non

  6. The Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute : an integrated approach to safety, security & safeguards.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Adam David

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI) at Texas A&M University are working with Middle East regional partners to set up a nuclear energy safety, safeguards, and security educational institute in the Gulf region. SNL and NSSPI, partnered with the Khalifa University of Science, Technology, and Research (KUSTAR), with suppot from its key nuclear stakeholders, the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (ENEC), and the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR), plan to jointly establish the institute in Abu Dhabi. The Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute (GNEII) will be a KUSTAR-associated, credit-granting regional education program providing both classroom instruction and hands-on experience. The ultimate objective is for GNEII to be autonomous - regionally funded and staffed with personnel capable of teaching all GNEII courses five years after its inauguration. This is a strategic effort to indigenize a responsible nuclear energy culture - a culture shaped by an integrated understanding of nuclear safety, safeguards and security - in regional nuclear energy programs. GNEII also promotes international interests in developing a nuclear energy security and safety culture, increases collaboration between the nuclear energy security and safety communities, and helps to enhance global standards for nuclear energy technology in the Middle East.

  7. The Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute : an integrated approach to safety, security and safeguards.

    SciTech Connect

    Beeley, Phillip A.; Boyle, David R.; Williams, Adam David; Mohagheghi, Amir Hossein

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI) at Texas A&M University are working with Middle East regional partners to set up a nuclear energy safety, safeguards, and security educational institute in the Gulf region. SNL and NSSPI, partnered with the Khalifa University of Science, Technology, and Research (KUSTAR), with suppot from its key nuclear stakeholders, the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (ENEC), and the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR), plan to jointly establish the institute in Abu Dhabi. The Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute (GNEII) will be a KUSTAR-associated, credit-granting regional education program providing both classroom instruction and hands-on experience. The ultimate objective is for GNEII to be autonomous - regionally funded and staffed with personnel capable of teaching all GNEII courses five years after its inauguration. This is a strategic effort to indigenize a responsible nuclear energy culture - a culture shaped by an integrated understanding of nuclear safety, safeguards and security - in regional nuclear energy programs. GNEII also promotes international interests in developing a nuclear energy security and safety culture, increases collaboration between the nuclear energy security and safety communities, and helps to enhance global standards for nuclear energy technology in the Middle East.

  8. Institute for Nuclear Theory. Annual report No. 3, 1 March 1992--28 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.; Bertsch, G.; Henley, E.M.

    1993-07-01

    This report briefly discussion the following programs of the Institute for Nuclear Theory: fundamental interactions in nuclei; strangeness in hadrons and nuclei; microscopic nuclear structure theory; nuclear physics in atoms and molecules; phenomenology and lattice QCD; and large amplitude collective motion.

  9. Initial flux of sediment-associated radiocesium to the ocean from the largest river impacted by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiki, Yosuke; Onda, Yuichi; Smith, Hugh G.; Blake, William H.; Wakahara, Taeko; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Matsuura, Yuki; Yoshimura, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the flux of radiocesium in the Abukuma Basin (5,172 km2), the largest river system affected by fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) event. In the period from 10 August 2011 to 11 May 2012 an estimated 84 to 92% of the total radiocesium transported in the basin's fluvial system was carried in particulate form. During this monitoring period Typhoon Roke (September 2011) was observed to induce a significant and temporally punctuated redistribution of radiocesium. The storm-mobilised radiocesium was an estimated 6.18 Terabecquerels corresponding to 61.4% of the total load delivered to the coastal zone during the observation period. The total flux of radiocesium into the Pacific Ocean estimated at the outlet station (basin area 5,172 km2) was 5.34 TBq for 137Cs, and 4.74 TBq for 134Cs, corresponding to 1.13% of the total estimated radiocesium fallout over the basin catchment (890 TBq). This was equivalent to the estimated amount of direct leakage from FDNPP to the ocean during June 2011 to September 2012 of 17 TBq and the Level 3 Scale Leakage on 21August 2013 (24 TBq). PMID:24429978

  10. Initial flux of sediment-associated radiocesium to the ocean from the largest river impacted by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Yamashiki, Yosuke; Onda, Yuichi; Smith, Hugh G; Blake, William H; Wakahara, Taeko; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Matsuura, Yuki; Yoshimura, Kazuya

    2014-01-16

    This study aimed to quantify the flux of radiocesium in the Abukuma Basin (5,172 km(2)), the largest river system affected by fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) event. In the period from 10 August 2011 to 11 May 2012 an estimated 84 to 92% of the total radiocesium transported in the basin's fluvial system was carried in particulate form. During this monitoring period Typhoon Roke (September 2011) was observed to induce a significant and temporally punctuated redistribution of radiocesium. The storm-mobilised radiocesium was an estimated 6.18 Terabecquerels corresponding to 61.4% of the total load delivered to the coastal zone during the observation period. The total flux of radiocesium into the Pacific Ocean estimated at the outlet station (basin area 5,172 km(2)) was 5.34 TBq for (137)Cs, and 4.74 TBq for (134)Cs, corresponding to 1.13% of the total estimated radiocesium fallout over the basin catchment (890 TBq). This was equivalent to the estimated amount of direct leakage from FDNPP to the ocean during June 2011 to September 2012 of 17 TBq and the Level 3 Scale Leakage on 21 August 2013 (24 TBq).

  11. 75 FR 65249 - Anthony R. Pietrangelo on Behalf of the Nuclear Energy Institute; Receipt of Petition for Rulemaking

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 26 Anthony R. Pietrangelo on Behalf of the Nuclear Energy Institute; Receipt of Petition for Rulemaking AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Petition for... the NRC by Anthony R. Pietrangelo on behalf of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The petition...

  12. Institute for Nuclear Theory annual report No. 4, 1 March 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.; Bertsch, G.; Henley, E.M.

    1994-06-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Theory was created as a national center by the Department of Energy. It began operations March 1, 1990. This annual report summarizes the INT`s activities during its fourth year of operations.

  13. Radiation processing project at the institute of nuclear energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. M.; Fu, Y. K.; Wang, Y. H.; Chen, Y. T.; Wei, Y. H.; Lee, K. P.; Wang, Y. K.

    The utilization of scientific approach to preserve and sterilize the agricultural products has long been studied since 1954 and was adopted by several countries gradually since 1958. Starting from July 1977 this Institute began to study the preservation of potatoes and onions with reference to sprout inhibition which is discussed and its economical aspect is evaluated. The design concept of a megacurie 60Co irradiator at this Institute is illustrated. The progress of construction work for the irradiator and the safety device in particular are reported. Current research project on the preservation of agricultural products in this Institute is presented.

  14. Nuclear-related training and education offered by academic institutions (less-than-baccalaureate degree)

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, L.

    1982-01-01

    Current projections indicate that in addition to the 10,100 technician positions and 6100 existing operator positions in the nuclear power industry, another 9100 technicians and 9700 operators will be required over the next decade. With 56 nuclear plants currently in operation and an additional 35 plants under construction, it is essential that trained technical personnel be available for employment in the nuclear utilities. Because of the growing demand for technicians in the nuclear utility industry, this report has been prepared to identify the nuclear-related, less-than-baccalaureate, technical educational programs provided by academic institutions and to ascertain both the current number of students and the maximum number that could be trained, given present staff and facilities. The data serve as a gauge for the proportion of technician training required by the nuclear industry that can be provided by academic institutions.

  15. Remediation of old environmental liabilities in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc

    SciTech Connect

    Podlaha, J.

    2007-07-01

    The Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI) is a leading institution in all areas of nuclear R and D in the Czech Republic. The NRI's activity encompasses nuclear physics, chemistry, nuclear power, experiments at research nuclear reactors and many other topics. The NRI operates two research nuclear reactors, many facilities as a hot cell facility, research laboratories, technology for radioactive waste (RAW) management, radionuclide irradiators, an electron accelerator, etc. After 50 years of activities in the nuclear field, there are some environmental liabilities that shall be remedied in the NRI. There are three areas of remediation: (1) decommissioning of old obsolete facilities (e.g. decay tanks, RAW treatment technology, special sewage system), (2) treatment of RAW from operation and dismantling of nuclear facilities, and (3) elimination of spent fuel from research nuclear reactors operated by the NRI. The goal is to remedy the environmental liabilities and eliminate the potential negative impact on the environment. Based on this postulate, optimal remedial actions have been selected and recommended for the environmental remediation. Remediation of the environmental liabilities started in 2003 and will be finished in 2012. Some liabilities have already been successfully remedied. The most significant items of environmental liabilities are described in the paper together with information about the history, the current state, the progress, and the future activities in the field of remediation of environmental liabilities in the NRI. (authors)

  16. TLD environmental monitoring at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Taam, I H; da Rosa, L A R; Crispim, V R

    2008-09-01

    Since 2003 the Institute of Nuclear Engineering in Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil, operates a new cyclotron, RDS-111, to produce (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose to be used in nuclear medicine. Additionally, the IEN radioactive waste repository has been enlarged during the past last years, receiving a considerable amount of radioactive materials. Therefore, it became necessary to evaluate a possible increase of the environmental gamma exposure rates at the institute site due to the operation of the new accelerator and the enlargement of the institute waste repository as well. LiF:Mg,Cu,P, TLD-100H, and TL detectors were employed for environmental kerma rate evaluation and the results were compared with previous results obtained before the RDS-111 operation initialisation and the enlargement of IEN waste repository. No significant contribution for the enhancement of environmental gamma kerma rates was detected.

  17. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel of Nuclear Research Reactor VVR-S at the National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Lucian

    2009-05-01

    The Nuclear Research Reactor VVR-S (RR-VVR-S) located in Magurele-Bucharest, Romania, was designed for research and radioisotope production. It was commissioned in 1957 and operated without any event or accident for forty years until shut down in 1997. In 2002, by government decree, it was permanently shutdown for decommissioning. The National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) is responsible for decommissioning the RR-VVR-S, the first nuclear decommissioning project in Romania. In this context, IFIN-HH prepared and obtained approval from the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body for the Decommissioning Plan. One of the most important aspects for decommissioning the RR-VVR-S is solving the issue of the fresh and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored on site in wet storage pools. In the framework of the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), managed by the U.S. Department of Energy and in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Rosatom State Corporation, Romania repatriated all fresh HEU fuel to the Russian Federation in 2003 and the HEU SNF will be repatriated to Russia in 2009. With the experience and lessons learned from this action and with the financial support of the Romanian Government it will be possible for Romania to also repatriate the LEU SNF to the Russian Federation before starting the dismantling and decontamination of the nuclear facility. [4pt] In collaboration with K. Allen, Idaho National Laboratory, USA; L. Biro, National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control, Romania; and M. Dragusin, National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania.

  18. [Survey questionnaire of pediatric nuclear medicine examinations in 14 Japanese institutes].

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Under the auspices of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Nuclear Medicine, an annual aggregate from a 5-year period, 2007 to 2011, of a survey questionnaire of pediatric nuclear medicine examinations performed at 14 institutes in the Kanto region was conducted. The subjects were pediatric patients 15 years old or younger. The survey questions included the determination method for administered dose of radiopharmaceuticals, the items examined and number of examinations. Of 14 institutes, 11 determined administered doses using the formula: adult dose X (age +1) / (age+7), while the remaining 3 used the adult dose as the maximum dose and used a conversion formula based on age and physical condition. In 2011, in a total of 3,884 pediatric patients, renoscintigraphy accounted for 41.5%, brain 14.4%, pulmonary scintigraphy 12.9%, oncology 9.0%, hepatobiliary scintigraphy 6.3%, gastrointestinal scintigraphy 4.8%, musculoskeletal scintigraphy 4.3%, cardiology 2.5%, and other 4.9% of all nuclear medicine examinations. Pediatric nuclear medicine examinations in general hospitals accounted for only 3.4% of all examinations. A similar trend was observed in previous years. Since pediatric patients have a longer reproductive term and higher sensitivity to radiation exposure, pediatric nuclear medicine requires a strict selection of appropriate studies and administered dose. These results show the current practice and would warrant further consideration.

  19. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering - a model for University-National Laboratory collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Gammon, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the aims and activities of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE), from its foundation in 1958 through to 1993. The philosophy, structure and funding of the Institute are briefly reviewed, followed by an account of the development of national research facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, with particular emphasis on nuclear techniques of analysis using neutron scattering instruments and particle accelerators. AINSE`s program of Grants, Fellowships and Studentships are explained with many examples given of projects having significance in the context of Australia`s national goals. Conference and training programs are also included. The achievements during these years demonstrate that AINSE has been an efficient and cost- effective model for collaboration between universities and a major national laboratory. In recent years, industry, government organisations and the tertiary education system have undergone major re-structuring and rationalization. A new operational structure for AINSE has evolved in response to these changes and is described.

  20. Status and prospects of the injection complex of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostenko, A. A.; Logatchev, P. V.; Meshkov, O. I.; Nikiforov, D. A.; Andrianov, A. V.; Levichev, A. E.; Emanov, F. A.; Astrelina, K. V.; Blinov, M. F.; Tsyganov, A. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Koop, I. A.; Bolkhovityanov, D. Yu.; Dorokhov, V. L.

    2016-12-01

    This article presents the basic systems of the VEPP-5 injection complex of Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. The system of injection-extraction of electron and positron beams is described. The results of measurements of the bunch length made in the electron linear accelerator and the storage-cooler ring by a streak camera are provided. The development of assemblies of a prospective positron conversion system based on a liquid-lead target is also described.

  1. Saga is largest commercial submarine ever

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    The long-range autonomous submarine, Saga, went nuclear last year with an agreement between the French and two Canadian companies. The agreement to convert the prototype from Swedish Stirling closed-cycle combustion engines to a nuclear power supply will make Saga the first non-defense nuclear submarine. With an external hull displacement of 500 tons, Saga will be the largest commercial submarine ever built.

  2. Triton - Neptune Largest Satellite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-25

    Intriguing patterns of unknown origin appeared on the surface of Neptune largest satellite, Triton, in this image returned by NASA Voyager 2 on Aug. 22, 1989. Voyager images showed that Triton is one of the brightest objects in the solar system,

  3. Institutional implications of establishing safety goals for nuclear power plants. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, F.A.; Hooper, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to anticipate and address institutional problems that may arise from the adoption of NRC's proposed Policy Statement on Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants. The report emphasizes one particular category of institutional problems: the possible use of safety goals as a basis for legal challenges to NRC actions, and the resolution of such challenges by the courts. Three types of legal issues are identified and analyzed. These are, first, general legal issues such as access to the legal system, burden of proof, and standard of proof. Second is the particular formulation of goals. Involved here are such questions as sustainable rationale, definitions, avoided issues, vagueness of time and space details, and degree of conservatism. Implementation brings up the third set of issues which include interpretation and application, linkage to probabilistic risk assessment, consequences as compared to events, and the use of results.

  4. Test Facilities and Experience on Space Nuclear System Developments at the Kurchatov Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Garin, Vladimir P.; Glushkov, Evgeny S.; Kompaniets, George V.; Kukharkin, Nikolai E.; Madeev, Vicktor G.; Papin, Vladimir K.; Polyakov, Dmitry N.; Stepennov, Boris S.; Tchuniyaev, Yevgeny I.; Tikhonov, Lev Ya.; Uksusov, Yevgeny I.

    2004-02-04

    The complexity of space fission systems and rigidity of requirement on minimization of weight and dimension characteristics along with the wish to decrease expenditures on their development demand implementation of experimental works which results shall be used in designing, safety substantiation, and licensing procedures. Experimental facilities are intended to solve the following tasks: obtainment of benchmark data for computer code validations, substantiation of design solutions when computational efforts are too expensive, quality control in a production process, and 'iron' substantiation of criticality safety design solutions for licensing and public relations. The NARCISS and ISKRA critical facilities and unique ORM facility on shielding investigations at the operating OR nuclear research reactor were created in the Kurchatov Institute to solve the mentioned tasks. The range of activities performed at these facilities within the implementation of the previous Russian nuclear power system programs is briefly described in the paper. This experience shall be analyzed in terms of methodological approach to development of future space nuclear systems (this analysis is beyond this paper). Because of the availability of these facilities for experiments, the brief description of their critical assemblies and characteristics is given in this paper.

  5. Test Facilities and Experience on Space Nuclear System Developments at the Kurchatov Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Garin, Vladimir P.; Glushkov, Evgeny S.; Kompaniets, George V.; Kukharkin, Nikolai E.; Madeev, Vicktor G.; Papin, Vladimir K.; Polyakov, Dmitry N.; Stepennov, Boris S.; Tchuniyaev, Yevgeny I.; Tikhonov, Lev Ya.; Uksusov, Yevgeny I.

    2004-02-01

    The complexity of space fission systems and rigidity of requirement on minimization of weight and dimension characteristics along with the wish to decrease expenditures on their development demand implementation of experimental works which results shall be used in designing, safety substantiation, and licensing procedures. Experimental facilities are intended to solve the following tasks: obtainment of benchmark data for computer code validations, substantiation of design solutions when computational efforts are too expensive, quality control in a production process, and ``iron'' substantiation of criticality safety design solutions for licensing and public relations. The NARCISS and ISKRA critical facilities and unique ORM facility on shielding investigations at the operating OR nuclear research reactor were created in the Kurchatov Institute to solve the mentioned tasks. The range of activities performed at these facilities within the implementation of the previous Russian nuclear power system programs is briefly described in the paper. This experience shall be analyzed in terms of methodological approach to development of future space nuclear systems (this analysis is beyond this paper). Because of the availability of these facilities for experiments, the brief description of their critical assemblies and characteristics is given in this paper.

  6. The largest fossil rodent

    PubMed Central

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R. Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000 kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene–Pleistocene (4–2 Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities. PMID:18198140

  7. The largest fossil rodent.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R Ernesto

    2008-04-22

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene-Pleistocene (4-2Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities.

  8. Setup for potential bias experiments on the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, J.; Pal, R.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.

    1999-12-01

    An experimental setup for studying the influence of the radial electric field on very low qa plasma on the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak is presented. A high current, high voltage pulsed power supply, using a semiconductor controlled rectifier (SCR) as a dc switch is developed and used to bias a tungsten electrode inserted inside the plasma. The electrode's exposed length and its position inside the plasma are controlled by a double bellows assembly to optimize the electrode-exposed length. We show that using the force commutation method to turn the SCR off to get the power pulse desired has good potential for carrying out similar kinds of studies, especially in a low budget small tokamak.

  9. AMS at the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Ivascu, M.; Plostinaru, D.; Catana, D.; Marinescu, L.; Radulescu, M.; Nolte, E.

    2000-10-01

    A new beam line and injector deck for AMS measurements have been built at the 8 MV tandem accelerator of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Bucharest, Romania. The main components on the low-energy side are a high-current cesium sputter source, a 90° injection magnet and a pre-acceleration stage. At the high-energy side the beam line is achromatic, consisting of two 90° analysing magnets with mass energy product 120 MeV amu and a gas-filled ionization chamber. The system will be complete with a Wien filter and a multi-anode gas detector with time-of-flight discrimination. Presently, the AMS facility is undergoing tests and routine measurements are expected to start soon.

  10. The alpha and beta emitter measurement system in INER. Institute of Nuclear Energy Research.

    PubMed

    Wuu, Jyi-Lan; Yuan, Ming-Chen; Su, Shi-Hwa; Hwang, Wen-Son

    2002-01-01

    An alpha/beta emitter measurement system used to calibrate surface sources following the guidelines of ISO 8769 has been established in Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) around the year 2000. This system consists of a windowless proportional counter with a uniformity of 0.28% when measuring the emission rate of a source on a centered area of 100 mm x 150 mm, and a uniformity of 0.62% when the source area was 150 mm x 200 mm. Four 100 mm x 150 mm sources (90Sr + 90Y, 36Cl, 14C and 241Am) had been measured by this system. The measurement results of the above four sources when compared with those of National Physical Laboratory, UK (NPL) showed difference between the two laboratories of < 1%.

  11. The AMS Measurements and Its Applications in Nuclear Physics at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Shan; Shen Hongtao; He Ming; Dong Kejun; He Guozhu; Wang Xianggao; Yuan Jian; Wang Wei; Wu Shaoyong; Ruan Xiangdong; Wu Weimin

    2010-05-12

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), initiated in late 1970s at McMaster university based on the accelerator and detector technique, has long been applied in the studies on archaeology, geology, and cosmology, as a powerful tool for isotope dating. The advantages of AMS in the analysis of rare nuclides by direct counting of the atoms, small sample size and relatively free from the interferences of molecular ions have been well documented. This paper emphasizes that AMS can not only be used for archaeology, geology, environment, biology and so on, but also served as a unique tool for nuclear physics research. In this paper, the determination of the half-lives of {sup 79}Se, the measurements of the cross-sections of {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92g}Nb and {sup 238}U(n,3n){sup 236}U reactions, the detection and determination of ultratrace impurities in neutrino detector materials, and the measurement of the fission product nuclide {sup 126}Sn, are to be introduced, as some of examples of AMS applications in nuclear research conducted in AMS lab of China Institute of Atomic Energy. Searching for superheavy nuclides by using AMS is being planned.

  12. The AMS Measurements and Its Applications in Nuclear Physics at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Shen, Hongtao; He, Ming; Ruan, Xiangdong; Wu, Weimin; Dong, Kejun; He, Guozhu; Wang, Xianggao; Yuan, Jian; Wang, Wei; Wu, Shaoyong

    2010-05-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), initiated in late 1970s at McMaster university based on the accelerator and detector technique, has long been applied in the studies on archaeology, geology, and cosmology, as a powerful tool for isotope dating. The advantages of AMS in the analysis of rare nuclides by direct counting of the atoms, small sample size and relatively free from the interferences of molecular ions have been well documented. This paper emphasizes that AMS can not only be used for archaeology, geology, environment, biology and so on, but also served as a unique tool for nuclear physics research. In this paper, the determination of the half-lives of 79Se, the measurements of the cross-sections of 93Nb(n,2n)92gNb and 238U(n,3n)236U reactions, the detection and determination of ultratrace impurities in neutrino detector materials, and the measurement of the fission product nuclide 126Sn, are to be introduced, as some of examples of AMS applications in nuclear research conducted in AMS lab of China Institute of Atomic Energy. Searching for superheavy nuclides by using AMS is being planned.

  13. The tissue bank at the national nuclear research institute in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Esther Martínez-Pardo, María; Lourdes Reyes-Frías, Ma

    2003-01-01

    The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ, The National Nuclear Research Institute) received during 1997-1998 strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), to establish the first and only one tissue bank (BTR ININ tissue bank) in Mexico that uses ionising radiation as sterilising agent. In that time, the BTR staff was trained in different tissue banks in several countries. Basic equipment for tissue processing donated by the IAEA was received in 1998. In July, 1999 the Mexican Health Secretariat gave the Sanitary License No. 1062000001 to the BTR to operate as an official organ and tissue bank. In August, 2001 the ININ and the Hospital Materno Infantil (HMI-ISSEMYM) signed an agreement to collaborate in amnion processing. The hospital is responsible for donor selection, serology tests, tissue procurement and washing, since this hospital is the BTR amnion supplier. The tissues are collected by ININ weekly with complete documentation. The BTR is responsible for processing: cleaning, air drying, packaging, labelling, microbiological control and sterilisation by gamma irradiation. The sterilised tissue is kept under quarantine for 6 months to obtain the results of the donor second serology test. From March to June, 2002 the BTR has processed 347.86 units (50 cm(2) each), is say, 17,393 cm(2). In addition, the pig skin xenograft process has been implemented and a protocol for clinical applications of it is running at the Hospital Central Sur de Alta Especialidad (PEMEX). Also the ININ tissue bank present status and perspectives are described.

  14. Nuclear Explosives in Peacetime, A Scientists' Institute for Public Information Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodine, Virginia, Ed.; Bradford, Albert, Ed.

    Discussed are the commercial uses of nuclear explosives as well as the testing of nuclear weapons. Case histories of the use of nuclear explosives to stimulate oil and natural gas production are examined, and problems associated with nuclear blasting are discussed with special reference to canal construction. Effects of nuclear weapons testing are…

  15. Nuclear Explosives in Peacetime, A Scientists' Institute for Public Information Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodine, Virginia, Ed.; Bradford, Albert, Ed.

    Discussed are the commercial uses of nuclear explosives as well as the testing of nuclear weapons. Case histories of the use of nuclear explosives to stimulate oil and natural gas production are examined, and problems associated with nuclear blasting are discussed with special reference to canal construction. Effects of nuclear weapons testing are…

  16. Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) System Upgrades and Performance Testing at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) VNIIEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bushmelev, Vadim; Viktorov, Vladimir; Zhikharev, Stanislav; Yuferev, Vladimir; Singh, Surinder Paul; Kuzminski, Jozef; Hogan, Kevin; McKisson, Jacquelin

    2008-01-01

    The All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), founded in 1946 at the historic village of Sarov, in Nizhniy Novgorod Oblast, is the largest nuclear research center in the Rosatom complex. In the framework of international collaboration, the United States (US) Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency, in cooperation with US national laboratories, on the one hand, Rosatom and VNIIEF on the other hand, have focused their cooperative efforts to upgrade the existing material protection control and accountability system to prevent unauthorized access to the nuclear material. In this paper we will discuss the present status of material control and accounting (MC&A) system upgrades and the preliminary results from a pilot program on the MC&A system performance testing that was recently conducted at one technical area.

  17. 76 FR 28192 - Petition for Rulemaking Submitted by the Nuclear Energy Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Tara Inverso, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555; telephone: 301-415-1462, e... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR...

  18. The radioisotope complex project "RIC-80" at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute.

    PubMed

    Panteleev, V N; Barzakh, A E; Batist, L Kh; Fedorov, D V; Ivanov, V S; Moroz, F V; Molkanov, P L; Orlov, S Yu; Volkov, Yu M

    2015-12-01

    The high current cyclotron C-80 capable of producing 40-80 MeV proton beams with a current of up to 200 μA has been constructed at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. One of the main goals of the C-80 is the production of a wide spectrum of medical radionuclides for diagnostics and therapy. The project development of the radioisotope complex RIC-80 (radioisotopes at the cyclotron C-80) at the beam of C-80 has been completed. The RIC-80 complex is briefly discussed in this paper. The combination of the mass-separator with the target-ion source device, available at one of the new target stations for on-line or semi on-line production of a high purity separated radioisotopes, is explored in greater detail. The results of target and ion source tests for a mass-separator method for the production of high purity radioisotopes (82)Sr and (223,224)Ra are also presented.

  19. The radioisotope complex project “RIC-80” at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Panteleev, V. N. Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Moroz, F. V.; Molkanov, P. L.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-12-15

    The high current cyclotron C-80 capable of producing 40-80 MeV proton beams with a current of up to 200 μA has been constructed at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. One of the main goals of the C-80 is the production of a wide spectrum of medical radionuclides for diagnostics and therapy. The project development of the radioisotope complex RIC-80 (radioisotopes at the cyclotron C-80) at the beam of C-80 has been completed. The RIC-80 complex is briefly discussed in this paper. The combination of the mass-separator with the target-ion source device, available at one of the new target stations for on-line or semi on-line production of a high purity separated radioisotopes, is explored in greater detail. The results of target and ion source tests for a mass-separator method for the production of high purity radioisotopes {sup 82}Sr and {sup 223,224}Ra are also presented.

  20. Thermocathode radio-frequency gun for the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Getmanov, Ya.; Kenjebulatov, E.; Kolobanov, E.; Krutikhin, S.; Kurkin, G.; Ovchar, V.; Petrov, V. M.; Sedlyarov, I.

    2016-12-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) gun for a race-track microtron-recuperator injector driving the free-electron laser (FEL) (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) is being tested at a special stand. Electron bunches of the RF gun have an energy of up to 300 keV and a repetition rate of up to 90 MHz. The average electro-beam current can reach 100 mA in the continuous operation regime. The advantages of the new injector are as follows: long lifetime of the cathode for high average beam current; simple scheme of longitudinal beam bunching, which does not require an additional bunching resonator in the injector; absence of dark-current contamination of the injector beam; and comfortable RF gun operation due to the absence of a high potential of 300 kV at the cathode control circuits. In this study we describe the RF gun design, present the main characteristics of the injector with the RF gun, and give the results of testing.

  1. The radioisotope complex project "RIC-80" at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panteleev, V. N.; Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Moroz, F. V.; Molkanov, P. L.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-12-01

    The high current cyclotron C-80 capable of producing 40-80 MeV proton beams with a current of up to 200 μA has been constructed at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. One of the main goals of the C-80 is the production of a wide spectrum of medical radionuclides for diagnostics and therapy. The project development of the radioisotope complex RIC-80 (radioisotopes at the cyclotron C-80) at the beam of C-80 has been completed. The RIC-80 complex is briefly discussed in this paper. The combination of the mass-separator with the target-ion source device, available at one of the new target stations for on-line or semi on-line production of a high purity separated radioisotopes, is explored in greater detail. The results of target and ion source tests for a mass-separator method for the production of high purity radioisotopes 82Sr and 223,224Ra are also presented.

  2. Food irradiation studies at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan, Rep. of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ying-Kai; Tsai, Chao-Ming; Wu, Wen-Shi; Chang, Ming-Shia; Chang, Yung-Nien; Shu, Shih-Lin

    The use of radiation to inhibit sprouting of potatoes, onions, gingers and garlic was studied at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. The sprout inhibition doses of potatoes, onions, gingers and garlic were found to be 10, 5, 2.5, 7.5 Krads, respectively. Changes in the content of moisture, ash, reducing sugars, total sugars, lipids, proteins, fiber etc. were monitored in various agricultural foodstuffs both with and without γ-irradiation at various doses. Fungicides did not prevent potatoes from decaying at 10 or 25°C with or without gamma radiation. Onions treated with any of fungicides has significantly more healthy tissues than controls at 10°C but not 25°C after 30 and 60 days storage, regardless of the presence or absence of gamma radiation. Insect pests have been causing great damage to stored rice in Taiwan. The four most harmful insects are: Sitophilus Zeamais Mostschulsky. Rhyzopertha dominica. Tribolitum custaneum Herbst and Sitotroga cerealella Oliver. Adults, eggs or larvae of these insect pests were irradiated by 60Co gamma rays. The results show that 40 Krads of gamma-irradiation could completely control these four species of pests in stored rice.

  3. High frame rate imaging systems developed in Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binkang; Wang, Kuilu; Guo, Mingan; Ruan, Linbo; Zhang, Haibing; Yang, Shaohua; Feng, Bing; Sun, Fengrong; Chen, Yanli

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents high frame rate imaging systems developed in Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology in recent years. Three types of imaging systems are included. The first type of system utilizes EG&G RETICON Photodiode Array (PDA) RA100A as the image sensor, which can work at up to 1000 frame per second (fps). Besides working continuously, the PDA system is also designed to switch to capture flash light event working mode. A specific time sequence is designed to satisfy this request. The camera image data can be transmitted to remote area by coaxial or optic fiber cable and then be stored. The second type of imaging system utilizes PHOTOBIT Complementary Metal Oxygen Semiconductor (CMOS) PB-MV13 as the image sensor, which has a high resolution of 1280 (H) ×1024 (V) pixels per frame. The CMOS system can operate at up to 500fps in full frame and 4000fps partially. The prototype scheme of the system is presented. The third type of imaging systems adopts charge coupled device (CCD) as the imagers. MINTRON MTV-1881EX, DALSA CA-D1 and CA-D6 camera head are used in the systems development. The features comparison of the RA100A, PB-MV13, and CA-D6 based systems are given in the end.

  4. Institute for Nuclear Theory annual report No. 2, 1 March 1991--29 February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.; Henley, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics in Nuclear physics: electromagnetic interactions and few-nucleon systems; N*'s and nucleon structure; mesons and fields in nuclei; and nuclear astrophysics of type II supernovae. (LSP).

  5. The MaPLE device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics: Construction and its plasma aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subir; Basu, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Basu, Debjyoti; Chaudhuri, Manis

    2010-07-15

    The Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental (MaPLE) device is a low cost laboratory plasma device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics fabricated in-house with the primary aim of studying basic plasma physics phenomena such as plasma instabilities, wave propagation, and their nonlinear behavior in magnetized plasma regime in a controlled manner. The machine is specially designed to be a versatile laboratory device that can provide a number of magnetic and electric scenario to facilitate such studies. A total of 36 number of 20-turn magnet coils, designed such as to allow easy handling, is capable of producing a uniform, dc magnetic field of about 0.35 T inside the plasma chamber of diameter 0.30 m. Support structure of the coils is planned in an innovative way facilitating straightforward fabrication and easy positioning of the coils. Further special feature lies in the arrangement of the spacers between the coils that can be maneuvered rather easily to create different magnetic configurations. Various methods of plasma production can be suitably utilized according to the experimental needs at either end of the vacuum vessel. In the present paper, characteristics of a steady state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance method using 2.45 GHz microwave power are presented. Scans using simple probe drives revealed that a uniform and long plasma column having electron density {approx}3-5x10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} and temperature {approx}7-10 eV, is formed in the center of the plasma chamber which is suitable for wave launching experiments.

  6. The MaPLE device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics: construction and its plasma aspects.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subir; Basu, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Basu, Debjyoti; Chaudhuri, Manis; Chowdhuri, Manis

    2010-07-01

    The Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental (MaPLE) device is a low cost laboratory plasma device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics fabricated in-house with the primary aim of studying basic plasma physics phenomena such as plasma instabilities, wave propagation, and their nonlinear behavior in magnetized plasma regime in a controlled manner. The machine is specially designed to be a versatile laboratory device that can provide a number of magnetic and electric scenario to facilitate such studies. A total of 36 number of 20-turn magnet coils, designed such as to allow easy handling, is capable of producing a uniform, dc magnetic field of about 0.35 T inside the plasma chamber of diameter 0.30 m. Support structure of the coils is planned in an innovative way facilitating straightforward fabrication and easy positioning of the coils. Further special feature lies in the arrangement of the spacers between the coils that can be maneuvered rather easily to create different magnetic configurations. Various methods of plasma production can be suitably utilized according to the experimental needs at either end of the vacuum vessel. In the present paper, characteristics of a steady state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance method using 2.45 GHz microwave power are presented. Scans using simple probe drives revealed that a uniform and long plasma column having electron density approximately 3-5x10(10) cm(-3) and temperature approximately 7-10 eV, is formed in the center of the plasma chamber which is suitable for wave launching experiments.

  7. The MaPLE device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics: Construction and its plasma aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subir; Basu, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Basu, Debjyoti; Chaudhuri, Manis

    2010-07-01

    The Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental (MaPLE) device is a low cost laboratory plasma device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics fabricated in-house with the primary aim of studying basic plasma physics phenomena such as plasma instabilities, wave propagation, and their nonlinear behavior in magnetized plasma regime in a controlled manner. The machine is specially designed to be a versatile laboratory device that can provide a number of magnetic and electric scenario to facilitate such studies. A total of 36 number of 20-turn magnet coils, designed such as to allow easy handling, is capable of producing a uniform, dc magnetic field of about 0.35 T inside the plasma chamber of diameter 0.30 m. Support structure of the coils is planned in an innovative way facilitating straightforward fabrication and easy positioning of the coils. Further special feature lies in the arrangement of the spacers between the coils that can be maneuvered rather easily to create different magnetic configurations. Various methods of plasma production can be suitably utilized according to the experimental needs at either end of the vacuum vessel. In the present paper, characteristics of a steady state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance method using 2.45 GHz microwave power are presented. Scans using simple probe drives revealed that a uniform and long plasma column having electron density ˜3-5×1010 cm-3 and temperature ˜7-10 eV, is formed in the center of the plasma chamber which is suitable for wave launching experiments.

  8. Anthracite firing -- Largest steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, P.; Winkin, J.; Changqin, G.

    1998-07-01

    The size and scope of the Hanfeng Power Plant is a large undertaking by any definition. It is progressing very well with good coordination and cooperation of all those involved. Start-up is scheduled for the first unit in the year 2000 with the second unit following by eight months. The boiler island scope covers all equipment and structural steel from the bunkers to the stack. This includes the world's two largest anthracite fired boilers burning a blend of very low volatile Chinese anthracite and lean coal (bituminous). The coal blending is designed to maximize the use of the local anthracite coal. This is done by controlled blending at the entrance to the large FW D12D ball mills. Scaling up from earlier extensive experience with arch fired boilers is reviewed as well as key features of the Hanfeng boilers each of which are capable of generating 563 kg/s of steam at 540.8 C and 175 bar (equivalent to 717 MW of turbine/generator output). The design of the boiler and related equipment for the Hanfeng project has been the subject of in-depth reviews by independent engineers representing the banks to assure reliability of the boiler to support the economic model. It has been shown that FW's extensive experience burning anthracite coals has justified the scaling up of the various components to meet the requirements of the specification. This experience is based on operating similar type anthracite arch fired boilers with fuel blends that are comparable to the coals to be supplied for the Hanfeng project. The materials and equipment for the Hanfeng boiler island are being supplied on a multi-national basis in support of the various requirements of the financing institutions involved. The overall design has been finalized and the detail design is well underway. Most of the large critical components are already in manufacturing.

  9. Implementation of the MPC and A Operations Monitoring (MOM) System at IRT-T FSRE Nuclear Power Institute (NPI)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitdikov,I.; Zenkov, A.; Tsibulnikov, Y.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Pratt, W.T.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2008-07-13

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program has been working since 1994 with nuclear sites in Russia to upgrade the physical protection (PP) and material control and accounting (MC&A) functions at facilities containing weapons usable nuclear material. In early 2001, the MPC&A program initiated the MPC&A Operations Monitoring (MOM) Project to monitor facilities where MPC&A upgrades have been installed to provide increased confidence that personnel are present and vigilant, provide confidence that security procedures are being properly performed and provide additional assurance that nuclear materials have not been stolen. The MOM project began as a pilot project at the Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and a MOM system was successfully installed in October 2001. Following the success of the MEPhI pilot project, the MPC&A Program expanded the installation of MOM systems to several other Russian facilities, including the Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI) in Tomsk. The MOM system was made operational at NPI in October 2004. This paper is focused on the experience gained from operation of this system and the objectives of the MOM system. The paper also describes how the MOM system is used at NPI and, in particular, how the data is analyzed. Finally, potential expansion of the MOM system at NPI is described.

  10. Nuclear Fuel Traces Definition in Storage Ponds of Research VVR-2 and OR Reactors in NRC 'Kurchatov Institute'

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Alexey; Simirskii, Iurii; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Semin, Ilya; Volkovich, Anatoly

    2015-07-01

    The Gas Plant complex is the experimental base of the Institute of Nuclear Reactors, which is part of the Kurchatov Institute. In 1954 the commissioning of the first Soviet water-cooled water-moderated research reactor VVR-2 on enriched uranium, and until 1983 the complex operated two research water-cooled water-moderated reactors 3 MW (VVR-2) and 300 kW (OR) capacity, which were dismantled in connection with the overall upgrades of the complex. The complex has three storage ponds in the reactor building. They are sub-surface vessels filled with water (the volume of water in each is about 6 m{sup 3}). In 2007-2013 the spent nuclear fuel from storages was removed for processing to 'Mayk'. Survey of Storage Ponds by Underwater Collimated Spectrometric System shows a considerable layer of slime on the bottom of ponds and traces of spent nuclear fuel in one of the storage. For determination qualitative and the quantitative composition of radionuclide we made complex α-, β-, γ- spectrometric research of water and bottom slimes from Gas Plant complex storage ponds. We found the spent nuclear fuel in water and bottom slime in all storage ponds. Specific activity of radionuclides in the bottom slime exceeded specific activity of radionuclides in the ponds water and was closed to levels of high radioactive waste. Analysis of the obtained data and data from earlier investigation of reactor MR storage ponds showed distinctions of specific activity of uranium and plutonium radionuclides. (authors)

  11. A survey of the role of the UK physicist in nuclear medicine: a report of a joint working group of the British Institute of Radiology, British Nuclear Medicine Society, and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Tindale, W B; Thorley, P J; Nunan, T O; Lewington, V; Shields, R A; Williams, N R

    2003-01-01

    Guidelines for the provision of physics support to nuclear medicine were published in 1999 by a joint working group of the British Institute of Radiology, the British Nuclear Medicine Society, and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. Following publication of the guidelines, a survey was conducted by the working group to gather data on the actual level of physicist support in UK hospitals of different types and on the activities undertaken by physicists. The data were collected in the 12 months following the publication of guidelines and cover different hospital models and seven UK regions. The results provide evidence that many of the smaller units - small teaching hospitals and, particularly, small district general hospitals - have insufficient physics support. Although, on average, there is good agreement between the guidelines and the survey data for medium and large district general hospitals, there is wide variation in the level of physics provision between hospitals delivering apparently similar services. This emphasizes the need for national guidelines, against which institutions may be bench-marked and which may be used as a recommendation for the staffing levels necessary to ensure services are delivered safely and standards are not compromised. The complexity and variety of workload is an important factor in determining the level of physics support. As services develop, it is vital that this aspect is recognized to ensure that appropriate resources are available for the required physics input, even if any new service represents only a modest clinical throughput in terms of patient numbers.

  12. Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility.

  13. Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility.

  14. Forty years of the Institute for Nuclear Research (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 22 December 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    On 22 December 2010, the scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), devoted to the 40th anniversary of the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, was held at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS in Troitsk. The agenda of the session announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Matveev V A (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Introductory word"; (2) Gavrin V N (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Contribution of the SAGE results to the understanding of solar physics and neutrino physics"; (3) Domogatsky G V (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Baikal neutrino experiment"; (4) Tkachev I I (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Observation of the Greisen - Zatsepin - Kuz'min effect at the Telescope Array Observatory"; (5) Kudenko Yu G (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Neutrino T2K experiment: the first results"; (6) Sadykov R A (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Fields of study of condensed media at the neutron facility at the INR, RAS"; (7) Zhuikov B L (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Production of isotopes at the INR, RAS: reality and prospects".The papers written on the base of reports 1-5 and 7 are published below. In addition, the paper "High-power diode-pumped alkali lasers" by A M Shalagin is published. The paper is based on the report presented at the scientific session of the General Assembly of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS (13 December 2010) devoted to the 50th anniversary of the laser, the main materials of the session having been published in Usp. Fiz. Nauk 181 (8) 867 (2011) [Phys. Usp. 54 837 (2011)]. • Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences turns 40, V A Matveev Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 9, Pages 939-940 • The Russian-American gallium experiment SAGE, V N Gavrin Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 9

  15. Teaching the Nuclear Age: A History Institute for Teachers. Footnotes. Volume 14, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehner, Trudy

    2009-01-01

    On March 28-29, 2009, FPRI's Wachman Center hosted 43 teachers from across the country for a weekend of discussion on teaching the nuclear age. In his opening remarks, Walter A. McDougall observed that although students today are not made to crawl under their desks in air raid drills, that atomic power remains, and it is still necessary to raise a…

  16. Results in Developing an Engineering Degree Program in Safeguards and Security of Nuclear Materials at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.; Geraskin, Nikolay I.; Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Butler, Gilbert W.; Duncan, Cristen L.

    2007-07-01

    The world’s first master’s degree program in nuclear safeguards and security, established at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), has now graduated nine classes of students. Most of the graduates have gone on to work at government agencies, research organizations, or obtain their PhD. In order to meet the demand for safeguards and security specialists at nuclear facilities, MEPhI established a 5½ year engineering degree program that provides more hands-on training desired by facilities. In February 2004, the first students began their studies in the new discipline Nuclear Material Safeguards and Nonproliferation. This class, as well as other subsequent classes, included students who started the program in their third year of studies, as the first 2½ years consists of general engineering curriculum. Fourteen students made up the first graduating class, receiving their engineering degrees in February 2007. The topics addressed in this paper include specific features of the program caused by peculiarities of Russian education legislation and government quality control of academic education. This paper summarizes the main joint actions undertaken by MEPhI and the US National Laboratories in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, to develop the engineering degree program. Also discussed are the program’s specific training requirements, student internships, and job placement. The paper concludes with recommendations from a recent international seminar on nonproliferation education and training.

  17. The results of the investigations of Russian Research Center - {open_quotes}Kurchatov Institute{close_quotes} on molten salt applications to problems of nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V.M.

    1995-10-01

    The results of investigations on molten salt (MS) applications to problems of nuclear energy systems that have been conducted in Russian Research {open_quotes}Kurchatov Institute{close_quotes} are presented and discussed. The spectrum of these investigations is rather broad and covers the following items: physical characteristics of molten salt nuclear energy systems (MSNES); nuclear and radiation safety of MSNES; construction materials compatible with MS of different compositions; technological aspects of MS loops; in-reactor loop testing. It is shown that main findings of completed program support the conclusion that there are no physical nor technological obstacles on way of MS application to different nuclear energy systems.

  18. Program for upgrading nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at all facilities within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuferev, V.; Zhikharev, S.; Yakimov, Y.

    1998-12-31

    As part of the Department of Energy-Russian program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), plans have now been formulated to install an integrated MPC and A system at all facilities containing large quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF, Arzamas-16) complex. In addition to storage facilities, the complex houses a number of critical facilities used to conduct nuclear physics research and facilities for developing procedures for disassembly of nuclear weapons.

  19. Results and experience of 10 years of US-Ukraine cooperation in the MPC&A field at the Kiev Institute for Nuclear Research

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, V. I.; Vishnevski, I. N.; Kirischuk, V. I.; Romanova, O. P.; Robinson, P.; Dickerson, S.; Kuzmycz, G.; Sheppard, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research of the Academy of Sciences of Ukraine was the first Ukrainian organization to begin the implementation of Agreements of October 25 and December 18, 1993 between Ukraine and the US. Over a relatively short period of time and with the financial, technical and methodological assistance of the US DOE, the Institute for Nuclear Research was able to develop a modern system of physical protection of nuclear materials and its Research Reactor. The rapid progress of this work was aided by the diligence of the US-Ukraine group (Argonne and Sandia National Labs and the Institute for Nuclear Research) under the supervision of George Kuzmycz, a US DOE employee, and prompt resolution of numerous issues by the government authorities of the USA and Ukraine. The fresh fuel and nuclear materials storage were established in full compliance with international requirements. A modern MC&A system was developed at the Institute for Nuclear Research with the US assistance as well. The experience gained during the work with the Institute for Nuclear Research was used successfully by the US and Ukrainian parties at other nuclear facilities of Ukraine. The advanced training of Ukrainian specialists organized by the US DOE has played a very important role in the efficient use of the US Government assistance. Later on the Training Center for Physical Protection, Control and Accounting of Nuclear Material, named in honor of the late George Kuzmycz, was established at the Institute for Nuclear Research with the US assistance as well. The example of KINR allows us to say that US-Ukrainian cooperation and US MPC&A assistance to Ukraine has been implemented successfully and significant contributions have been made to the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. Along with this, we, at the KINR and its GKTC realize, that there is great deal of work ahead of us that we need to do in order to make our modest contribution into the implementation of the nuclear weapons non

  20. Largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Weitz, C. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution radar images from the Magellan spacecraft have allowed us to perform a detailed study on 25 large impact craters on Venus with diameters from 70 to 280 km. The dimension of these large craters is comparable with the characteristic thickness of the venusian lithosphere and the atmospheric scale height. Some physical parameters for the largest impact craters on Venus (LICV), such as depth, ring/diameter ratio, and range of ballistic ejecta deposits, have been obtained from the SAR images and the altimetry dataset produced by MIT. Data related to each of these parameters is discussed.

  1. Signature energetic analysis of accelerate electron beam after first acceleration station by accelerating stand of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sledneva, A. S.; Kobets, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    The linear electron accelerator based on the LINAC - 800 accelerator imported from the Netherland is created at Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in the framework of the project on creation of the Testbed with an electron beam of a linear accelerator with an energy up to 250 MV. Currently two accelerator stations with a 60 MV energy of a beam are put in operation and the work is to put the beam through accelerating section of the third accelerator station. The electron beam with an energy of 23 MeV is used for testing the crystals (BaF2, CsI (native), and LYSO) in order to explore the opportunity to use them in particle detectors in experiments: Muon g-2, Mu2e, Comet, whose preparation requires a detailed study of the detectors properties such as their irradiation by the accelerator beams.

  2. Opportunities for Russian Nuclear Weapons Institute developing computer-aided design programs for pharmaceutical drug discovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-23

    The goal of this study is to determine whether physicists at the Russian Nuclear Weapons Institute can profitably service the need for computer aided drug design (CADD) programs. The Russian physicists` primary competitive advantage is their ability to write particularly efficient code able to work with limited computing power; a history of working with very large, complex modeling systems; an extensive knowledge of physics and mathematics, and price competitiveness. Their primary competitive disadvantage is their lack of biology, and cultural and geographic issues. The first phase of the study focused on defining the competitive landscape, primarily through interviews with and literature searches on the key providers of CADD software. The second phase focused on users of CADD technology to determine deficiencies in the current product offerings, to understand what product they most desired, and to define the potential demand for such a product.

  3. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  4. DEVELOPMENT, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF THE MPC&A OPERATIONS MONITORING (MOM) SYSTEM AT THE JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (JINR) DUBNA, RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashov,V.V.; Pratt,W.; Romanov, Y.A.; Samoilov, V.N.; Shestakov, B.A.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2009-07-12

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Operations Monitoring (MOM) systems handling at the International Intergovernmental Organization - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is described in this paper. Category I nuclear material (plutonium and uranium) is used in JINR research reactors, facilities and for scientific and research activities. A monitoring system (MOM) was installed at JINR in April 2003. The system design was based on a vulnerability analysis, which took into account the specifics of the Institute. The design and installation of the MOM system was a collaborative effort between JINR, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Financial support was provided by DOE through BNL. The installed MOM system provides facility management with additional assurance that operations involving nuclear material (NM) are correctly followed by the facility personnel. The MOM system also provides additional confidence that the MPC&A systems continue to perform effectively.

  5. Rehabilitating China's largest inland river.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqing; Chen, Yaning; Zhang, Yaoqi; Xia, Yang

    2009-06-01

    Wetlands are particularly important for conserving China's biodiversity but riparian wetlands in the Tarim River basin in western China have been reduced by 46% during the last 3 decades. The world's largest habitat for Populus euphratica, which is in the Tarim River basin, significantly shrank. To protect and restore the deteriorated ecosystems along the Tarim River and its associated wetlands, China's government initiated a multimillion dollar river restoration project to release water from upper dams to the dried-up lower reaches of the Tarim River starting in 2000. We monitored the responses of groundwater and vegetation to water recharge in the lower reaches of the river from 2000 to 2006 by establishing nine 1000-m-long transects perpendicular to the river at intervals of 20-45 km along the 320-km river course below the Daxihaizi Reservoir, the source of water conveyance, to Lake Taitema, the terminus of the Tarim River. Water recharges from the Daxihaizi Reservoir to the lower reaches of the Tarim River significantly increased groundwater levels and vegetation coverage at all monitoring sites along the river. The mean canopy size of the endangered plant species P. euphratica doubled after 6 years of water recharge. Some rare migrating birds returned to rest on the restored wetlands in summer along the lower reaches of the Tarim River. The biggest challenge facing decision makers, however, is to balance water allocation and water rights between agricultural and natural ecosystems in a sustainable way. A large number of inhabitants in the Tarim Basin depend on these limited water resources for a living. At the same time, the endangered ecosystems need to be protected. Given the ecological, socioeconomic, and sociopolitical realities in the Tarim Basin, adaptive water policies and strategies are needed for water allocation in these areas of limited water resources.

  6. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Nuclear Science Symposium, 18th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 3rd, San Francisco, Calif., November 3-5, 1971, Proceedings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Potential advantages of fusion power reactors are discussed together with the protection of the public from radioactivity produced in nuclear power reactors, and the significance of tritium releases to the environment. Other subjects considered are biomedical instrumentation, radiation damage problems, low level environmental radionuclide analysis systems, nuclear techniques in environmental research, nuclear instrumentation, and space and plasma instrumentation. Individual items are abstracted in this issue.

  7. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Nuclear Science Symposium, 18th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 3rd, San Francisco, Calif., November 3-5, 1971, Proceedings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Potential advantages of fusion power reactors are discussed together with the protection of the public from radioactivity produced in nuclear power reactors, and the significance of tritium releases to the environment. Other subjects considered are biomedical instrumentation, radiation damage problems, low level environmental radionuclide analysis systems, nuclear techniques in environmental research, nuclear instrumentation, and space and plasma instrumentation. Individual items are abstracted in this issue.

  8. Investigation of radon level in air and tap water of workplaces at Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, P.; Youngchuay, U.; Kongsri, S.; Kongtana, A.

    2017-06-01

    Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) has continuously monitored radiation exposure and radionuclide in workplaces specifically radon gas to estimate effective dose for workers. Radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the world. In this study, radon in air and tap water at building no. 3, 7, 8, 9 and 18 on Ongkharak site of TINT have been measured for 5 years from 2012 to 2016. Radon level in air and tap water were investigated on 83 stations (workplaces) and 54 samples, respectively. Radon concentrations in air and tap water were measured by using the pulsed ionization chamber (ATMOS 12 DPX). Indoor radon concentrations in air were in the range of 12-138 Bq.m-3 with an average value of 30.13±17.05 Bq.m-3. Radon concentrations in tap water were in the range of 0.10 to 2.89 Bq.l-1 with an average value of 0.51±0.55 Bq.l-1. The results of radon concentrations at TINT were below the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) safety limit of 148 Bq.m-3 and 150 Bq.l-1, for, air and tap water, respectively. The average effective dose for TINT’s workers due to indoor radon exposure was approximately 0.20±0.11 mSv.y-1. The value is 100 times less than the annual dose limit for limit occupational radiation worker defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As a result, the TINT’s workplaces are radiologically safe from radon content in air and tap water.

  9. Gas-filled position-sensitive detectors of thermal neutrons at the Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Ganzha, G. A.; Ivanov, E. A.; Ilyin, D. S.; Kovalenko, S. N.; Kolkhidashvili, M. R.; Krivshich, A. G.; Nadtochy, A. V.; Runov, V. V.; Soloveĭ, V. A.; Shabanov, G. D.

    2010-05-01

    The manufacturing line for the development and fabrication of position-sensitive detectors of thermal neutrons has been organized at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Three detectors with sensitive regions 300 × 170 (prototype), 200 × 200, and 300 × 300 mm in size have been constructed to date. The detectors represent multiwire proportional chambers with cathode data readout to a delay line. The devices are filled with the 3He/CF4 gas mixture. These detectors are intended for modernizing the detector systems of the Vector and Membrana-2 diffractometers (VVR-M reactor, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina, Russia).

  10. Blueprint of the world`s largest uranium markets

    SciTech Connect

    Bizal, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    This article is a review of two recently released reports: (1) the EURATOM Supply Agency Annual Report for 1995, and (2) the US Energy Information Administration Uranium Industry Annual for 1995. These reports provide myraid information on uranium production, deliveries, contracts, and prices, as well as enrichment market activity during 1995 in the world`s largest nuclear fuel markets: the European Union and the United States.

  11. Revisiting the phylogeny of Ocellularieae, the second largest tribe within Graphidaceae (lichenized Ascomycota: Ostropales)

    Treesearch

    Ekaphan Kraichak; Sittiporn Parnmen; Robert Lücking; Eimy Rivas Plata; Andre Aptroot; Marcela E.S. Caceres; Damien Ertz; Armin Mangold; Joel A. Mercado-Diaz; Khwanruan Papong; Dries Van der Broeck; Gothamie Weerakoon; H. Thorsten. Lumbsch; NO-VALUE

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated 3-locus molecular phylogeny of tribe Ocellularieae, the second largest tribe within subfamily Graphidoideae in the Graphidaceae. Adding 165 newly generated sequences from the mitochondrial small subunit rDNA (mtSSU), the nuclear large subunit rDNA (nuLSU), and the second largest subunit of the DNA-directed RNA polymerase II (RPB2), we currently...

  12. A complex of complementary pulsed neutron sources, neutron and radiographic nano-diagnostic instruments at the Institute for Nuclear Research RAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptelov, E. A.; Ryabov, Yu V.; Alekseev, A. A.; Sidorkin, S. F.; Grachev, M. I.; Fedchenko, V. A.; Sadykov, R. A.; Lebed, Yu B.; Litvin, V. S.; Kuznetsov, S. P.; Clementyev, E. S.; Alekseev, P. A.; Trunov, V. A.; Bulkin, A. P.; Ulianov, V. A.; Axenov, S. N.

    2011-04-01

    A new large-scale research center for nano diagnostics and neutron and X-Ray studies of nanomaterials is briefly described. This center at the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INR RAS) is based on three specially designed spallation neutron sources driven by primary proton beams. Similar research centers on the basis of the high flux spallation neutron sources are created in the USA, Japan, Great Britain, Switzerland and will be build in China and the EU (Sweden). We discuss neutron and X-Ray instrumentation at the INR RAS and the corresponding domains of research of various materials including nano-systems.

  13. An investigation into the accuracy of the albedo dosimeter DVGN-01 in measuring personnel irradiation doses in the fields of neutron radiation at nuclear power installations of the joint institute for nuclear research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskrovnaya, L. G.; Goroshkova, E. A.; Mokrov, Yu. V.

    2010-05-01

    The calculated results of research into the accuracy of an individual albedo dosimeter DVGN-01 as it corresponds to the personal equivalent dose for neutrons H p (10) and to the effective dose for neutrons E eff in the neutron fields at Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Nuclear Power Installations (JNPI) upon different geometries of irradiations are presented. It has been shown that correction coefficients are required for the specific estimation of doses by the dosimeter. These coefficients were calculated using the energy sensitivity curve of the dosimeter and the known neutron spectra at JNPI. By using the correction factors, the uncertainties of both doses will not exceed the limits given to the personnel according to the standards.

  14. An assessment of radiation doses at an educational institution 57.8 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant 1 month after the nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Masayoshi; Kanda, Hideyuki; Kakamu, Takeyasu; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Miyake, Masao; Hayakawa, Takehito; Mori, Yayoi; Okochi, Toshiyasu; Hazama, Akihiro; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2012-03-01

    On 11 March 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake occurred. Due to this earthquake and subsequent tsunami, malfunctions occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Radioactive material even reached the investigated educational institution despite being 57.8 km away from the power station. With the goal of ensuring the safety of our students, we decided to carry out a risk assessment of the premises of this educational institution by measuring radiation doses at certain locations, making it possible to calculate estimated radiation accumulation. Systematic sampling was carried out at measurement points spaced at regular intervals for a total of 24 indoor and outdoor areas, with 137 measurements at heights of 1 cm and 100 cm above the ground surface. Radiation survey meters were used to measure environmental radiation doses. Radiation dose rates and count rates were higher outdoors than indoors, and higher 1 cm above the ground surface than at 100 cm. Radiation doses 1 cm above the ground surface were higher on grass and moss than on asphalt and soil. The estimated radiation exposure for a student spending an average of 11 h on site at this educational institution was 9.80 μSv. Environmental radiation doses at our educational institution 57.8 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant 1 month after the accident were lower than the national regulation dose for schools (3.8 μSv/h) at most points. Differences in radiation doses depending on outdoor surface properties are important to note for risk reduction.

  15. Largest separable balls around the maximally mixed bipartite quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Barnum, Howard

    2002-12-01

    For finite-dimensional bipartite quantum systems, we find the exact size of the largest balls, in spectral lp norms for 1<=p<=∞, of separable (unentangled) matrices around the identity matrix. This implies a simple and intuitively meaningful geometrical sufficient condition for separability of bipartite density matrices: that their purity tr ρ2 not be too large. Theoretical and experimental applications of these results include algorithmic problems such as computing whether or not a state is entangled, and practical ones such as obtaining information about the existence or nature of entanglement in states reached by nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computation implementations or other experimental situations.

  16. Uranus - Montage of Uranus' five largest satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Montage of Uranus' five largest satellites. From top to bottom in order of decreasing distance from Uranus are Oberon, Titania, Umbriel, Ariel, and Miranda. Images are presented to show correct relative sizes and brightness. Coverage is incomplete for Miranda and Ariel; gray circles depict missing areas.

  17. First Light for World's Largest 'Thermometer Camera'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    LABOCA in Service at APEX The world's largest bolometer camera for submillimetre astronomy is now in service at the 12-m APEX telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Chilean Andes. LABOCA was specifically designed for the study of extremely cold astronomical objects and, with its large field of view and very high sensitivity, will open new vistas in our knowledge of how stars form and how the first galaxies emerged from the Big Bang. ESO PR Photo 35a/07 ESO PR Photo 35a/07 LABOCA on APEX "A large fraction of all the gas in the Universe has extremely cold temperatures of around minus 250 degrees Celsius, a mere 20 degrees above absolute zero," says Karl Menten, director at the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, Germany, that built LABOCA. "Studying these cold clouds requires looking at the light they radiate in the submillimetre range, with very sophisticated detectors." Astronomers use bolometers for this task, which are, in essence, thermometers. They detect incoming radiation by registering the resulting rise in temperature. More specifically, a bolometer detector consists of an extremely thin foil that absorbs the incoming light. Any change of the radiation's intensity results in a slight change in temperature of the foil, which can then be registered by sensitive electronic thermometers. To be able to measure such minute temperature fluctuations requires the bolometers to be cooled down to less than 0.3 degrees above absolute zero, that is below minus 272.85 degrees Celsius. "Cooling to such low temperatures requires using liquid helium, which is no simple feat for an observatory located at 5100m altitude," says Carlos De Breuck, the APEX instrument scientist at ESO. Nor is it simple to measure the weak temperature radiation of astronomical objects. Millimetre and submillimetre radiation opens a window into the enigmatic cold Universe, but the signals from space are heavily absorbed by water vapour in the Earth

  18. Noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features: a single-institutional experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Higuchi, Miyoko; Suzuki, Ayana; Hayashi, Toshitetsu; Kuma, Seiji; Miyauchi, Akira

    2017-09-12

    Noninvasive encapsulated follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) was reclassified as noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP). To date, no studies on NIFTP have been reported in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical, cytological, and pathological findings of 54 cases of NIFTP from a single center in Japan, and compare them with those in the western countries. There were no significant differences in age, sex, or tumor size between patients with NIFTP and those with invasive encapsulated follicular variant -PTC. Ultrasound investigation showed a high suspicion lesion in NIFTP and invasive encapsulated follicular variant -PTC in 6.5% and 44.1%, respectively (p<0.001). On fine needle aspiration cytology, 75.7% of NIFTP cases were reported as suspicious for malignancy or malignant. Nuclear grooves and irregular-shaped nuclei were observed in 94.6% of cases of NIFTP. Pathologically, 27.8% cases of NIFTP and 13.0% cases of invasive encapsulated follicular variant -PTC had been originally diagnosed as macrofollicular variants of PTC. There were no NIFTP cases with nodal metastasis. We concluded that NIFTP should be renounced noninvasive encapsulated follicular variant -PTC, and should be considered as a malignant tumor with exceeding indolent behavior, and lobectomy alone should be satisfactory for the diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Education and training in the field of nuclear instrumentation and measurement: CEA/INSTN (National Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Technologies) strategy to improve and develop new pedagogical tools and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vitart, Xavier; Foulon, Francois; Bodineau, Jean Christophe; Lescop, Bernard; Massiot, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Part of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), the National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INSTN) is a higher education institution whose mission is to provide students and professionals a high level of scientific and technological qualification in all disciplines related to nuclear energy applications. In this frame, INSTN carries out education and training (E and T) programs in nuclear instrumentation and radioprotection. Its strategy has always been to complete theoretical courses by training courses and laboratory works carried out on an extensive range of training tools that includes a large panel of nuclear instrumentation as well as software applications. Since its creation in 1956, the INSTN has conducted both education and vocational programs on ionizing radiation detection. An extensive range of techniques have commonly been used during practical works with students and employees of companies who need to get the knowledge and specialization in this field. Today, the INSTN is mainly equipped with usual detectors and electronics in large numbers in order to be able to accommodate up to 48 trainees at the same time in two classrooms, with only two trainees for one workstation in order to optimize their learning. In the field of the neutron detection systems, the INSTN has strongly developed its offer taking advantage of the use of research reactors, such as ISIS reactor (700 kW) at Saclay. The implementation of neutron detection systems specific to the courses offers a unique way of observing and analysing the signal coming from neutron detectors, as well as learning how to set the parameters of the detection system in real conditions. Providing the trainees with an extensive overview of each part of the neutron monitoring instrumentation apply to a nuclear reactor, hands-on measurements on the ISIS reactor play a major role in ensuring a practical and comprehensive understanding of the neutron detection system and

  20. World's largest sapphire for many applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattak, Chandra P.; Shetty, Raj; Schwerdtfeger, C. Richard; Ullal, Saurabh

    2016-10-01

    Sapphire has been used for many high technology applications because of its excellent optical, mechanical, high temperature, abrasion resistance and dielectric properties. However, it is expensive and the volume of sapphire used has been limited. The potential sapphire requirements for LED and consumer electronic applications are very high. Emphasis has been on producing larger sapphire boules to achieve significant cost reductions so these applications are realized. World's largest sapphire boules, 500 mm diameter 300+kg, have been grown to address these markets.

  1. Effect of the size of experimental channels of the lead slowing-down spectrometer SVZ-100 (Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow) on the moderation constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latysheva, L. N.; Bergman, A. A.; Sobolevsky, N. M.; Ilić, R. D.

    2013-04-01

    Lead slowing-down (LSD) spectrometers have a low energy resolution (about 30%), but their luminosity is 103 to 104 times higher than that of time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers. A high luminosity of LSD spectrometers makes it possible to use them to measure neutron cross section for samples of mass about several micrograms. These features specify a niche for the application of LSD spectrometers in measuring neutron cross sections for elements hardly available in macroscopic amounts—in particular, for actinides. A mathematical simulation of the parameters of SVZ-100 LSD spectrometer of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Moscow) is performed in the present study on the basis of the MCNPX code. It is found that the moderation constant, which is the main parameter of LSD spectrometers, is highly sensitive to the size and shape of detecting volumes in calculations and, hence, to the real size of experimental channels of the LSD spectrometer.

  2. Effect of the size of experimental channels of the lead slowing-down spectrometer SVZ-100 (Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow) on the moderation constant

    SciTech Connect

    Latysheva, L. N.; Bergman, A. A.; Sobolevsky, N. M.; Ilic, R. D.

    2013-04-15

    Lead slowing-down (LSD) spectrometers have a low energy resolution (about 30%), but their luminosity is 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} times higher than that of time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers. A high luminosity of LSD spectrometers makes it possible to use them to measure neutron cross section for samples of mass about several micrograms. These features specify a niche for the application of LSD spectrometers in measuring neutron cross sections for elements hardly available in macroscopic amounts-in particular, for actinides. A mathematical simulation of the parameters of SVZ-100 LSD spectrometer of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Moscow) is performed in the present study on the basis of the MCNPX code. It is found that the moderation constant, which is the main parameter of LSD spectrometers, is highly sensitive to the size and shape of detecting volumes in calculations and, hence, to the real size of experimental channels of the LSD spectrometer.

  3. Flight performance of the largest volant bird

    PubMed Central

    Ksepka, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Pelagornithidae is an extinct clade of birds characterized by bizarre tooth-like bony projections of the jaws. Here, the flight capabilities of pelagornithids are explored based on data from a species with the largest reported wingspan among birds. Pelagornis sandersi sp. nov. is represented by a skull and substantial postcranial material. Conservative wingspan estimates (∼6.4 m) exceed theoretical maximums based on extant soaring birds. Modeled flight properties indicate that lift:drag ratios and glide ratios for P. sandersi were near the upper limit observed in extant birds and suggest that pelagornithids were highly efficient gliders, exploiting a long-range soaring ecology. PMID:25002475

  4. Flight performance of the largest volant bird.

    PubMed

    Ksepka, Daniel T

    2014-07-22

    Pelagornithidae is an extinct clade of birds characterized by bizarre tooth-like bony projections of the jaws. Here, the flight capabilities of pelagornithids are explored based on data from a species with the largest reported wingspan among birds. Pelagornis sandersi sp. nov. is represented by a skull and substantial postcranial material. Conservative wingspan estimates (∼6.4 m) exceed theoretical maximums based on extant soaring birds. Modeled flight properties indicate that lift:drag ratios and glide ratios for P. sandersi were near the upper limit observed in extant birds and suggest that pelagornithids were highly efficient gliders, exploiting a long-range soaring ecology.

  5. Flight performance of the largest volant bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksepka, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Pelagornithidae is an extinct clade of birds characterized by bizarre tooth-like bony projections of the jaws. Here, the flight capabilities of pelagornithids are explored based on data from a species with the largest reported wingspan among birds. Pelagornis sandersi sp. nov. is represented by a skull and substantial postcranial material. Conservative wingspan estimates (∼6.4 m) exceed theoretical maximums based on extant soaring birds. Modeled flight properties indicate that lift:drag ratios and glide ratios for P. sandersi were near the upper limit observed in extant birds and suggest that pelagornithids were highly efficient gliders, exploiting a long-range soaring ecology.

  6. Fiji's largest marine reserve benefits reef sharks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, J. S.; Fullwood, L. A. F.

    2013-03-01

    To provide more information about whether sharks benefit from no-take marine reserves, we quantified the relative abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside and outside of Namena, Fiji's largest reserve (60.6 km2). Using stereo baited remote underwater video systems (stereo-BRUVs), we found that the abundance and biomass of sharks was approximately two and four times greater in shallow and deep locations, respectively, within the Namena reserve compared to adjacent fished areas. The greater abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside Namena is likely a result of greater prey availability rather than protection from fishing. This study demonstrates that marine reserves can benefit sharks.

  7. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Scott; Peate, David; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid; Self, Stephen; Mawby, Michael; Jerram, Dougal; Marsh, Goonie

    2010-05-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are sites of the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic and silicic eruptions in Earth history. The magma volumes, eruptive mechanisms, frequency and associated aerosol emissions of these eruptions are critical for understanding any interpreted climate forcing and environmental change by LIPs. The largest volume (>1000 km3 dense rock equivalent) and magnitude (>M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (104-105 km2) basaltic lava flow fields and silicic ignimbrites and are the main building blocks of LIPs. Available information on the largest eruptive units are primarily from the Columbia River and Deccan provinces for the dimensions of flood basalt eruptions, and the Paraná-Etendeka and Afro-Arabian provinces for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions. In addition, three large-volume (675- 2,000 km3) silicic lava flows have also been mapped out in the Mesoproterozoic Gawler Range province (Australia), an interpreted LIP remnant. Magma volumes of >1000 km3 have also been emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs, and may contribute substantial aerosol emissions through shallow degassing and crystallisation. The data sets indicate comparable eruption magnitudes between the basaltic and silicic eruptions, but due to considerable volumes residing as co-ignimbrite ash deposits, the current volume constraints for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions may be considerably underestimated. Magma composition thus appears to be no barrier to the volume of magma emitted during an individual eruption. Despite this general similarity in magnitude, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in terms of eruption style, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basaltic eruptions are dominantly effusive and Hawaiian-Strombolian in style, with magma discharge rates of ~107-108 kg s-1 producing dominantly compound pahoehoe lava flow fields. The major flood basalt eruption durations are most

  8. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukstins Peate, I.; Bryan, S. E.; Peate, D. W.; Self, S.; Mawby, M.; Jerram, D. A.; Marsh, J.

    2010-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) host the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic & silicic eruptions on Earth. Understanding magma volumes, eruptive mechanisms, frequency and aerosol emissions are critical to interpret climate forcing and environmental change. The largest volume (>1000 km3 dre) and magnitude (>M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (104-105 km2) basaltic flow fields and silicic ignimbrites that are the main building blocks of LIPs. Magma volumes >1000 km3 are also emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs, and may contribute substantial aerosol emissions through shallow degassing and crystallization. Basaltic and silicic eruptions have comparable magnitudes, but silicic ignimbrite volumes may be significantly underestimated due to unrecognized and correlated, but voluminous co-ignimbrite ash deposits. Magma composition appears to be no barrier to individual eruption volume. Despite similar magnitudes, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in eruption mechanism, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basalts are dominantly effusive Hawaiian-Strombolian, with magma discharge rates of ~107-108 kg/s, and produce dominantly compound pahoehoe flow fields over eruption durations most likely >10 yrs. Some large-volume silicic lavas were emplaced by effusive and fissure eruptions, but discharge rates are unknown and may be up to an order of magnitude greater than those of flood basalt lavas for emplacement to be on realistic time scales (<10 years). Most silicic eruptions are moderately to highly explosive, producing co-current pyroclastic fountains (rarely Plinian) with discharge rates of 109-1011 kg/s that emplace welded to rheomorphic ignimbrites. Stratospheric ash and aerosol injections may be greater from co-ignimbrite ash clouds than eruption plumes. At present, durations for large-magnitude silicic eruptions are unconstrained. At discharge rates of 109 kg/s, equivalent to

  9. Collapse of the world's largest herbivores.

    PubMed

    Ripple, William J; Newsome, Thomas M; Wolf, Christopher; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Everatt, Kristoffer T; Galetti, Mauro; Hayward, Matt W; Kerley, Graham I H; Levi, Taal; Lindsey, Peter A; Macdonald, David W; Malhi, Yadvinder; Painter, Luke E; Sandom, Christopher J; Terborgh, John; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2015-05-01

    Large wild herbivores are crucial to ecosystems and human societies. We highlight the 74 largest terrestrial herbivore species on Earth (body mass ≥100 kg), the threats they face, their important and often overlooked ecosystem effects, and the conservation efforts needed to save them and their predators from extinction. Large herbivores are generally facing dramatic population declines and range contractions, such that ~60% are threatened with extinction. Nearly all threatened species are in developing countries, where major threats include hunting, land-use change, and resource depression by livestock. Loss of large herbivores can have cascading effects on other species including large carnivores, scavengers, mesoherbivores, small mammals, and ecological processes involving vegetation, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and fire regimes. The rate of large herbivore decline suggests that ever-larger swaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs.

  10. Scientists conduct largest coastal experiment on record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, Julie

    Duck, N.C.—Something out of the ordinary has been happening near this quiet, resort town on the Outer Banks. More than 100 coastal scientists, students, and technicians have descended on the Army Corps of Engineer's Waterways Experiment Station primarily to study movement of sediment in the surf zone. In fact, a large percentage of the U.S. near-shore research community has flooded the Duck area to execute the largest coastal experiment ever undertaken. The researchers have brought with them more than 80 computers and an array of exotic gadgets to carry out “DUCK94,” an unprecedented project that has been three years in the making.

  11. Testing a Parachute for Mars in World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    In this image, two engineers are dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

    The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

    The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Testing a Parachute for Mars in World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    In this image, two engineers are dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

    The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

    The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  13. Second report of work carried out by the Institute for Nuclear Research for Los Alamos National Laboratory under Agreement 2493N0005-35

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrin, V.; Matveev, V.

    1996-02-23

    This report provides information about work carried out to complete the tasks required of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) of the Russian Academy of Sciences in accordance with Agreement 2493N0005-35 with Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report details work carried out for the following parts of the agreement under Task Order 002: the INR shall measure the 51Cr source activity to an accuracy of at least 5% by measuring the amount of 51Cr activity remaining in each of the irradiated enriched 50Cr rods used in the Cr calibration experiment, this shall be done by direct counting using a high resolution Ge solid state detector; the INR shall measure the level of any residual radioimpurities in the 51Cr source by direct counting each of the rods of the 51Cr source using a high resolution Ge solid state detector. The following sections of this report shall constitute the following deliverables: a report describing the procedures used to measure the amount of residual 51Cr in the irradiated 50Cr rods, along with the value of the 51Cr source intensity determined using this method; a list of the long-lived radioimpurities and their intensities in the irradiated 50Cr rods.

  14. Largest clinic in the world? (Bogota).

    PubMed

    1971-01-01

    The IPPF member, the Asociacion Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana (Profamilia), is discussed and its clinic, the Pilot Center in Bogota, reputed to be the largest family clinic in the world, is described. From January 1966 until the end of 1970, the Pilot Center served 59,469 new acceptors. Of the 31 Profamilia clinics in Colombia, the Pilot Center was visited by 22% of all new acceptors during 1970. Profamilia established the first vasectomy clinic in Latin America in February 1970. By the end of 1970, 92 vasectomies had been performed. Profamilia has expanded its family planning program, and part of this expansion is a result of Profamilia's extensive use of mass media in its education campaign. In 1970, there was a 24% increase in new acceptors over 1969 and a 66% increase in follow-up visits. 62,292 radio spots and 7 television programs were broadcast and announcements about family planning were shown in public cinemas in the latter half of 1970. Nearly 300,000 women attended talks, meetings, and film shows on family planning, and approximately 2 million leaflets and information sheets were distributed. To increase community involvement, Profamilia held 26 short courses for various groups including religious and community leaders. Profamilia also conducted a training course for doctors and sociologists from Colombia and other Latin American countries.

  15. IDA (Institute for Defense Analyses) GAMMA-Ray Laser Annual Summary Report (1986). Investigation of the Feasibility of Developing a Laser Using Nuclear Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Defense Analyses (if abl,) DoD-IDA Management Office, OUSD(A) 6c. ADDRESS (City, Stale, and ZIp Code) 7b. ADDRESS (CITY, STATE , AND ZIP CODE) 1801 N...effect,- Borrmann effect, Dressed nuclear states , Nuclear isomers, Nuclear data, Nuclear structure, Multiphoton excitation, Atomic shielding of...0 2. Summary of the Theory and Aspects of Mixed-Symmetry States .......... 20 C. Dicke Superradiance for the Case of the Totally Symmetric Multiplet

  16. Rethinking how to address the world's largest infectious killer in the world's largest country.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Barry R

    2016-05-06

    India has the largest number of people suffering from tuberculosis (TB) of any country in the world. Analysis of the increasing Multi-Drug Resistant TB problem has revealed multiple challenges to the health system that must be addressed in order to control the TB epidemic there.Journal of Public Health Policy advance online publication, 6 May 2016 doi:10.1057/jphp.2016.16.

  17. Quality assurance for measurements of the radioactivity in the area of the"Horia Hulubei" National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, IFIN-HH.

    PubMed

    Stochioiu, Ana; Luca, Aurelian; Sahagia, Maria; Margineanu, Romul Mircea; Tudor, Ion

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents one part of the activities deployed by the Laboratory for Environment and Personnel Dosimetry (LDPM) of IFIN-HH, namely the radiological monitoring of the environment within the Institute's area and its surrounding influence zone, according to the program approved by the National Regulatory Body for Nuclear Activities, CNCAN. The representative reports regard the radioactive content of soil, surface and underground water, cultivated and spontaneous vegetation, aerosols and atmospheric fallout, sediments. The common requirement is that the measured quantities be precise and the reported values be reliable and credible. This goal is achieved by maintaining a Quality System, verified within the obtaining and maintaining of the laboratory accreditation, according to the international standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005.The LDPM is accredited by the Romanian accreditation body, RENAR, member of the European Accreditation, EA and is designed by CNCAN as a notified testing laboratory. Many measurements were performed in collaboration with the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory (RML) from IFIN-HH, RENAR accredited and CNCAN notified for calibration and for testing in the field of radioactivity measurement. This paper proposes a short presentation of the important aspects in our activity: i. description of equipment, samplingmethods, processing and measurement of environmental samples; ii. validation of equipment and methods by participation in international and national proficiency tests; iii. a five year follow chart, containing the results in measurement of samples; iv. a recent application, with a wide impact in Romanian mass media: the credible daily report on the possible influence of Fukushima accident over the Romanian environmental radioactivity.

  18. Publisher's Note: ''The MaPLE device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics: Construction and its plasma aspects'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 073507 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subir; Basu, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Basu, Debjyoti; Chaudhuri, Manis

    2010-07-15

    The Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental (MaPLE) device is a low cost laboratory plasma device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics fabricated in-house with the primary aim of studying basic plasma physics phenomena such as plasma instabilities, wave propagation, and their nonlinear behavior in magnetized plasma regime in a controlled manner. The machine is specially designed to be a versatile laboratory device that can provide a number of magnetic and electric scenario to facilitate such studies. A total of 36 number of 20-turn magnet coils, designed such as to allow easy handling, is capable of producing a uniform, dc magnetic field of about 0.35 T inside the plasma chamber of diameter 0.30 m. Support structure of the coils is planned in an innovative way facilitating straightforward fabrication and easy positioning of the coils. Further special feature lies in the arrangement of the spacers between the coils that can be maneuvered rather easily to create different magnetic configurations. Various methods of plasma production can be suitably utilized according to the experimental needs at either end of the vacuum vessel. In the present paper, characteristics of a steady state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance method using 2.45 GHz microwave power are presented. Scans using simple probe drives revealed that a uniform and long plasma column having electron density {approx} 3-5 Multiplication-Sign 1010 cm-3 and temperature {approx} 7-10 eV, is formed in the center of the plasma chamber which is suitable for wave launching experiments.

  19. Relative biological effectiveness of the 60-MeV therapeutic proton beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, Poland.

    PubMed

    Słonina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Swakoń, Jan; Kabat, Damian; Grzanka, Leszek; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Sowa, Urszula

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of a 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Kraków, the first one to operate in Poland. RBE was assessed at the surviving fractions (SFs) of 0.01, 0.1, and 0.37, for normal human fibroblasts from three cancer patients. The cells were irradiated near the Bragg peak of the pristine beam and at three depths within a 28.4-mm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). Reference radiation was provided by 6-MV X-rays. The mean RBE value at SF = 0.01 for fibroblasts irradiated near the Bragg peak of pristine beam ranged between 1.06 and 1.15. The mean RBE values at SF = 0.01 for these cells exposed at depths of 2, 15, and 27 mm of the SOBP ranged between 0.95-1.00, 0.97-1.02, and 1.05-1.11, respectively. A trend was observed for RBE values to increase with survival level and with depth in the SOBP: at SF = 0.37 and at the depth of 27 mm, RBE values attained their maximum (1.19-1.24). The RBE values estimated at SF = 0.01 using normal human fibroblasts for the 60-MeV proton radiotherapy beam at the IFJ PAN in Kraków are close to values of 1.0 and 1.1, used in clinical practice.

  20. Largest-ever Ozone Hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA instrument has detected an Antarctic ozone 'hole' (what scientists call an 'ozone depletion area') that is three times larger than the entire land mass of the United States-the largest such area ever observed. The 'hole' expanded to a record size of approximately 11 million square miles (28.3 million square kilometers) on Sept. 3, 2000. The previous record was approximately 10.5 million square miles (27.2 million square km) on Sept. 19, 1998. The ozone hole's size currently has stabilized, but the low levels in its interior continue to fall. The lowest readings in the ozone hole are typically observed in late September or early October each year. 'These observations reinforce concerns about the frailty of Earth's ozone layer. Although production of ozone-destroying gases has been curtailed under international agreements, concentrations of the gases in the stratosphere are only now reaching their peak. Due to their long persistence in the atmosphere, it will be many decades before the ozone hole is no longer an annual occurrence,' said Dr. Michael J. Kurylo, manager of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. Ozone molecules, made up of three atoms of oxygen, comprise a thin layer of the atmosphere that absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Most atmospheric ozone is found between approximately six miles (9.5 km) and 18 miles (29 km) above the Earth's surface. Scientists continuing to investigate this enormous hole are somewhat surprised by its size. The reasons behind the dimensions involve both early-spring conditions, and an extremely intense Antarctic vortex. The Antarctic vortex is an upper-altitude stratospheric air current that sweeps around the Antarctic continent, confining the Antarctic ozone hole. 'Variations in the size of the ozone hole and of ozone depletion accompanying it from one year to the next are not unexpected,' said Dr. Jack Kaye, Office of Earth Sciences Research Director, NASA Headquarters

  1. U.S.-Russian cooperation in nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podvig, Pavel

    2010-02-01

    The United States and Russia, the two largest nuclear powers, have a special obligation to provide leadership in nuclear disarmament and in strengthening the nuclear non-proliferation regime. In the past year the two countries made an effort to restart the arms control process by concluding a new treaty that would bring their legal disarmament obligations in line with the realities of their post-cold war relationships. The process of negotiating deeper nuclear reductions in the new environment turned out to be rather difficult, since the approaches that the countries used in the past are not well suited to dealing with issues like conversion of strategic nuclear delivery systems to conventional missions, tactical nuclear weapons, or dismantlement of nuclear warheads. This presentation considers the recent progress in U.S.-Russian arms control process and outlines the key issues at the negotiations. It also considers prospects for further progress in bilateral nuclear disarmament and issues that will be encountered at later stages of the process. The author argues that success of the arms reductions will depend on whether the United States and Russia will be able to build an institutional framework for cooperation on a range of issues - from traditional arms control to securing nuclear materials and from missile defense to strengthening the international nuclear safeguards. )

  2. The National Ignition Facility: The World's Largest Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I

    2003-10-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. When completed, NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing an international center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} Bars, conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars, planets and in nuclear weapons. NIF has now completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilo-joules of infrared light, exceeding design requirements. Operation of single beams at the second harmonic (531 nm) and third harmonic (351 nm) at greater than 10 kilojoules have also exceeded the performance criteria. NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance and results from recent laser commissioning shots, and plans for commissioning diagnostics for experiments on NIF.

  3. Work of the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Automatics with the U.S. laboratory-to-laboratory program for cooperation on nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, J.R.; Smoot, J.L.; Hoida, Hiroshi

    1996-12-31

    The All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) is one of the scientific research institutes participating in the US/Russian Laboratory-to-Laboratory Program in Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A). The Institute has provided instrumentation and measurement techniques to the Russian defense program and to the medical, gas and oil, and manufacturing industries. VNIIA is improving MPC and A in Russia by providing support to the Russian institutes and enterprises in the Ministry of Atomic Energy. VNIIA has a primary role in determining the requirements and specifications and developing procedures for testing and certification of MPC and A equipment, and is instrumental in strengthening the Russian infrastructure for supplying MPC and A equipment. Contracts have been placed with VNIIA by Russian suppliers to test, certify, and prepare for manufacturing hand-held special nuclear material detection equipment they have developed. A contract also is in place with VNIIA to test and evaluate a US-manufactured pedestrian portal monitor. Work for 1996 includes certifying these portal monitors and portable radiation detection equipment for use in Russian facilities, testing and evaluating a US active well coincidence counter and gamma-ray isotopic measurement methods, and developing guidelines for statistical evaluation methods used in MPC and A. This paper reviews the status of this effort and describes the plans for continuing this work in 1996.

  4. Modelling Thermal Emission to Constrain Io's Largest Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; De Pater, I.; de Kleer, K.; Head, J. W., III; Wilson, L.

    2016-12-01

    Massive, voluminous, low-silica content basalt lava flows played a major role in shaping the surfaces of the terrestrial planets and the Moon [1] but the mechanisms of eruption, including effusion rate profiles and flow regime, are often obscure. However, eruptions of large volumes of lava and the emplacement of thick, areally extensive silicate lava flows are extant on the volcanic jovian moon Io [2], thus providing a template for understanding how these processes behaved elsewhere in the Solar System. We have modelled data of the largest of these eruptions to constrain eruption processes from the evolution of the wavelength variation of the resulting thermal emission [3]. We continue to refine our models to further constrain eruption parameters. We focus on large "outburst" eruptions, large lava fountains which feed lava flows [4] which have been directly observed on Io from the Galileo spacecraft [5, 6]. Outburst data continue to be collected by large ground-based telescopes [7, 8]. These data have been fitted with a sophisticated thermal emission model to derive eruption parameters such as areal coverage and effusion rates. We have created a number of tools for investigating and constraining effusion rate for Io's largest eruptions. It remains for all of the components to be integrated into a single model with rheological properties dependent on flow regime and the effects of heat loss. The crucial advance on previous estimates of lava flow emplacement on Io [e.g., 5] is that, by keeping track of the temperature distribution on the surface of the lava flows (a function of flow regime and varying effusion rate) the integrated thermal emission spectrum can be synthesized. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. We thank the NASA OPR Program (NNN13D466T) and NSF (Grant AST-1313485) for supports. Refs: [1] Wilson, L. and J. W. Head (2016), Icarus, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.039. [2

  5. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    SciTech Connect

    Uenlue, Kenan; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-07-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale Reactor

  6. Trial operation of material protection, control, and accountability systems at two active nuclear material handling sites within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Skripka, G.; Vatulin, V.; Yuferev, V.

    1997-11-01

    This paper discusses Russian Federal Nuclear Center (RFNC)-VNIIEF activities in the area of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) procedures enhancement. The goal of such activities is the development of an automated systems for MPC and A at two of the active VNIIEF research sites: a research (reactor) site and a nuclear material production facility. The activities for MPC and A system enhancement at both sites are performed in the framework of a VNIIEF-Los Alamos National Laboratory contract with participation from Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and PANTEX Plant in accordance with Russian programs supported by MinAtom. The American specialists took part in searching for possible improvement of technical solutions, ordering equipment, and delivering and testing the equipment that was provided by the Americans.

  7. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 24: Nuclear Systems and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  8. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 23: Nuclear Chemical Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  9. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 5: Introduction to Nuclear Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  10. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 24: Nuclear Systems and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  11. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 23: Nuclear Chemical Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  12. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 5: Introduction to Nuclear Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  13. Inside the nation's largest mental health institution: a prevalence study in a state prison system.

    PubMed

    Al-Rousan, Tala; Rubenstein, Linda; Sieleni, Bruce; Deol, Harbans; Wallace, Robert B

    2017-04-20

    The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world which has created a public health crisis. Correctional facilities have become a front line for mental health care. Public health research in this setting could inform criminal justice reform. We determined prevalence rates for mental illnesses and related comorbidities among all inmates in a state prison system. Cross-sectional study using the Iowa Corrections Offender Network which contains health records of all inmates in Iowa. The point prevalence of both ICD-9 and DSM-IV codes for mental illnesses, timing of diagnosis and interval between incarceration and mental illness diagnosis were determined. The average inmate (N = 8574) age was 36.7 ± 12.4 years; 17% were ≥50 years. The majority of inmates were men (91%) and white (65%).Obesity was prevalent in 38% of inmates, and 51% had a history of smoking. Almost half of inmates were diagnosed with a mental illness (48%), of whom, 29% had a serious mental illness (41% of all females and 27% of all males), and 26% had a history of a substance use disorder. Females had higher odds of having both a mental illness and substance use disorder. Almost all mental illness diagnoses were first made during incarceration (99%). The mean interval to diagnosis of depression, anxiety, PTSD and personality disorders were 26, 24, 21 and 29 months respectively. Almost 90% of mental illnesses were recognized by the 6(th) year of incarceration. The mean interval from incarceration to first diagnosis (recognition) of a substance abuse history was 11 months. There is a substantial burden of mental illness among inmates. Racial, age and gender disparities in mental health care are coupled with a general delay in diagnosis and treatment. A large part of understanding the mental health problem in this country starts at prisons.

  14. Testing a Parachute for Mars in World Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-20

    The team developing the landing system for NASA Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

  15. Radiation Exposure Levels in Diagnostic Patients Injected with 99mTc, 67Ga and 131I at the Mexican National Institute of Cancerology Nuclear Medicine Department

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.; Gomez-Argumosa, E.; Estrada-Lobato, E.; Medina, L. A.

    2006-09-08

    According to the Mexican Radiation Safety regulations for patients treated in a nuclear medicine service, the exposure rate limit at 1 m from the patients is 5 mR/h before leaving the hospital. Three groups of patients have been monitored after: a) whole body bone studies with 740 MBq of 99mTc-MDP (207 patients); b) infection studies after i.v. administration of 185 MBq of 67Ga (207 patients); and c) thyroid studies with 185 MBq of 131I (142 patients). The results indicated that the average exposure rate levels in each group were: a) 0.57 {+-} 0.17 mR/h, b) 0.47 {+-} 0.20 mR/h, and c) 0.86 {+-} 0.14 mR/h. This study has shown that the Nuclear Medicine Department at INCAN complies with the NOM-013-NUCL-1995 Mexican regulation.

  16. Radiation Exposure Levels in Diagnostic Patients Injected with 99mTc, 67Ga and 131I at the Mexican National Institute of Cancerology Nuclear Medicine Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.; Gómez-Argumosa, E.; Estrada-Lobato, E.; Medina, L. A.

    2006-09-01

    According to the Mexican Radiation Safety regulations for patients treated in a nuclear medicine service, the exposure rate limit at 1 m from the patients is 5 mR/h before leaving the hospital. Three groups of patients have been monitored after: a) whole body bone studies with 740 MBq of 99mTc-MDP (207 patients); b) infection studies after i.v. administration of 185 MBq of 67Ga (207 patients); and c) thyroid studies with 185 MBq of 131I (142 patients). The results indicated that the average exposure rate levels in each group were: a) 0.57 ± 0.17 mR/h, b) 0.47 ± 0.20 mR/h, and c) 0.86 ± 0.14 mR/h. This study has shown that the Nuclear Medicine Department at INCAN complies with the NOM-013-NUCL-1995 Mexican regulation.

  17. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre

  18. Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Policy Analysis of Student Speech Regulation at America's Twenty Largest Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard Kirk; Hunnicutt, Kay Hartwell

    1994-01-01

    A survey of the 20 largest public universities in the United States revealed that only half of the institutions had policies that addressed hostile or harassing speech or conduct. It also found that 8 of these 10 university regulations may violate constitutional principles regarding the regulation of student speech. (Author/MDM)

  19. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Reese; George Miller; Stephen Frantz; Denis Beller; Denis Beller; Ed Morse; Melinda Krahenbuhl; Bob Flocchini; Jim Elliston

    2010-12-07

    The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program.

  20. Economics of nuclear power.

    PubMed

    Rossin, A D; Rieck, T A

    1978-08-18

    With 12 percent of U.S. electricity now being supplied by nuclear power, Commonwealth Edison has found nuclear plants to be good investments relative to other base load energy sources. The country's largest user of nuclear power, Commonwealth Edison, estimates that its commitment to nuclear saved its customers about 10 percent on their electric bills in 1977, compared to the cost with the next best alternative, coal. This advantage is seen as continuing, contrary to criticisms of the economics and reliability of nuclear power and claims that it has hidden subsidies. It is concluded that there is a need for both nuclear and coal and that government policy precluding or restricting either would be unwise.

  1. Watching the Creation of Southern California's Largest Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The new Diamond Valley Lake Reservoir near the city of Hemet in Riverside County is billed as the largest earthworks construction project in U.S.history. Construction began in 1995 and involved 31 million cubic meters of foundation excavation and 84 million cubic meters of embankment construction. This set of MISR images captures the most recent phase in the reservoir's activation. At the upper left is a natural-color view acquired by the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on March 14, 2000 (Terra orbit 1273), shortly after the Metropolitan Water District began filling the reservoir with water from the Colorado River and Northern California. Water appears darker than the surrounding land. The image at the upper right was acquired nearly one year later on March 1, 2001 (Terra orbit 6399), and shows a clear increase in the reservoir's water content. When full, the lake will hold nearly a trillion liters of water.

    According to the Metropolitan Water District, the 7 kilometer x 3 kilometer reservoir nearly doubles Southern California's above-groundwater storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against drought and a six-month emergency supply in the event of earthquake damage to a major aqueduct. In the face of electrical power shortages, it is also expected to reduce dependence on the pumping of water from northern mountains during the high-demand summer months. An unexpected result of site excavation was the uncovering of mastodon and mammoth skeletons along with bones from extinct species not previously thought to have been indigenous to the area, such as the giant long-horned bison and North American lion. A museum and interpretive center is being built to protect these finds.

    The lower MISR image, from May 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view combining data from the instrument's 26-degree forward view (displayed as blue) with data from the 26-degree backward

  2. Watching the Creation of Southern California's Largest Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The new Diamond Valley Lake Reservoir near the city of Hemet in Riverside County is billed as the largest earthworks construction project in U.S.history. Construction began in 1995 and involved 31 million cubic meters of foundation excavation and 84 million cubic meters of embankment construction. This set of MISR images captures the most recent phase in the reservoir's activation. At the upper left is a natural-color view acquired by the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on March 14, 2000 (Terra orbit 1273), shortly after the Metropolitan Water District began filling the reservoir with water from the Colorado River and Northern California. Water appears darker than the surrounding land. The image at the upper right was acquired nearly one year later on March 1, 2001 (Terra orbit 6399), and shows a clear increase in the reservoir's water content. When full, the lake will hold nearly a trillion liters of water.

    According to the Metropolitan Water District, the 7 kilometer x 3 kilometer reservoir nearly doubles Southern California's above-groundwater storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against drought and a six-month emergency supply in the event of earthquake damage to a major aqueduct. In the face of electrical power shortages, it is also expected to reduce dependence on the pumping of water from northern mountains during the high-demand summer months. An unexpected result of site excavation was the uncovering of mastodon and mammoth skeletons along with bones from extinct species not previously thought to have been indigenous to the area, such as the giant long-horned bison and North American lion. A museum and interpretive center is being built to protect these finds.

    The lower MISR image, from May 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view combining data from the instrument's 26-degree forward view (displayed as blue) with data from the 26-degree backward

  3. Brazil opens its first private research institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanissevich, Alicia

    2017-05-01

    The Brazilian filmmaker João Moreira Salles - whose family owns one of the largest banks in Brazil - has established a new institute in Rio de Janeiro that will support basic research across all sciences.

  4. Nuclear energy related research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Program Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Center for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities, and industry also contribute to many projects.

  5. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-29

    Beijing XINHUA in English 1200 GMT 26 Oct 89 1505 GMT 24 Oct 89 [Text] Chengdu, October 24 (XINHUA)-China’s largest experimental controlled nuclear fusion...performance and are The Soviet reactor will be pressurised light water reactor tested regularly for their performance. Further, the of the VVER

  6. Kalman filter-based fast track reconstruction for charged particles in a Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment using parallel computing on a multicore server at the Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablyazimov, T. O.; Zyzak, M. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Kisel, P. I.

    2015-05-01

    One of the main goals in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment (GSI, Germany) is to find parameters of charged particle trajectories. An online full event reconstruction is planned to be carried out in this experiment, thus demanding fast algorithms be developed, which make the most of the capabilities of modern CPU and GPU architectures. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the Kalman filter-based track reconstruction for charged particles implemented by using various code parallelization methods. A multicore server located at the Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (LIT JINR), with two CPU Intel Xeon X5660 processors and a GPU Nvidia GTX 480 video card is used.

  7. Nuclear Successor States of the Soviet Union, Nuclear Weapon and Sensitive Export Status Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    on Territory X X X X Nuclear Power Reactors X X X Nuclear Research Reactors X X X X Nuclear Weapons Design X Uranium Enrichment X Spent Fuel... nuclear power reactors . American inspectors will be allowed into Sverdlovsk-44 to verify that the HEU actually comes from dismantled warheads (see Nuclear ...fuel rod fabrication (Electrostal Machine Building Plant), Research reactors : Kurchatov Institute (5 kg HEU and 4 kg LEU) and Institute of Nuclear

  8. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  9. Nuclear Politics in Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    system. States with prestige are recognized by other actors as having a high 21 Nuclear Politics in Iran standing either generally or with regard to...Nuclear Politics in Iran Edited by Judith S. Yaphe MIDDLE EAST STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVES 1 Center for Strategic Research Institute for National...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAY 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nuclear Politics in

  10. Afterglows from the largest explosions in the universe

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1999-01-01

    The distinction of “largest explosions in the universe” has been bestowed on cosmic gamma-ray bursts. Their afterglows are brighter than supernovae and therefore are called hypernovae. Photometry and spectroscopy of these afterglows have provided major breakthroughs in our understanding of this mysterious phenomenon. PMID:10220364

  11. Animals as Our Companions: World's Largest Math Event 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Inc., Reston, VA.

    The World's Largest Math Event 6 (WLME 6) is the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) celebration of mathematics and mathematics education and is the highlight of Mathematics Education Month. This year's event, slated for April 28, 2000, features the theme "Animals as Our Companions". This theme encourages students to…

  12. Building Earth's Largest Library: Driving into the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Steve

    1999-01-01

    Examines the Amazon.com online bookstore as a blueprint for designing the world's largest library. Topics include selection; accessibility and convenience; quality of Web sites and search tools; personalized service; library collection development, including interlibrary loan; library catalogs and catalog records; a circulation system; costs;…

  13. Analysis of human standing balance by largest lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang; Taha, Zahari

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyse the relationship between nonlinear dynamic character and individuals' standing balance by the largest Lyapunov exponent, which is regarded as a metric for assessing standing balance. According to previous study, the largest Lyapunov exponent from centre of pressure time series could not well quantify the human balance ability. In this research, two improvements were made. Firstly, an external stimulus was applied to feet in the form of continuous horizontal sinusoidal motion by a moving platform. Secondly, a multiaccelerometer subsystem was adopted. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in this experiment. A new metric, coordinated largest Lyapunov exponent was proposed, which reflected the relationship of body segments by integrating multidimensional largest Lyapunov exponent values. By using this metric in actual standing performance under sinusoidal stimulus, an obvious relationship between the new metric and the actual balance ability was found in the majority of the subjects. These results show that the sinusoidal stimulus can make human balance characteristics more obvious, which is beneficial to assess balance, and balance is determined by the ability of coordinating all body segments.

  14. Analysis of Human Standing Balance by Largest Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang; Taha, Zahari

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyse the relationship between nonlinear dynamic character and individuals' standing balance by the largest Lyapunov exponent, which is regarded as a metric for assessing standing balance. According to previous study, the largest Lyapunov exponent from centre of pressure time series could not well quantify the human balance ability. In this research, two improvements were made. Firstly, an external stimulus was applied to feet in the form of continuous horizontal sinusoidal motion by a moving platform. Secondly, a multiaccelerometer subsystem was adopted. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in this experiment. A new metric, coordinated largest Lyapunov exponent was proposed, which reflected the relationship of body segments by integrating multidimensional largest Lyapunov exponent values. By using this metric in actual standing performance under sinusoidal stimulus, an obvious relationship between the new metric and the actual balance ability was found in the majority of the subjects. These results show that the sinusoidal stimulus can make human balance characteristics more obvious, which is beneficial to assess balance, and balance is determined by the ability of coordinating all body segments. PMID:25866500

  15. NAFTA: The World's Largest Trading Zone Turns 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrarini, Tawni Hunt; Day, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Everyone under the age of 20 who has grown up in North America has lived in the common market created by NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement. In a zone linking the United States, Canada, and Mexico, most goods and investments flow freely across borders to users, consumers, and investors. In 1994, NAFTA created the largest relatively…

  16. NAFTA: The World's Largest Trading Zone Turns 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrarini, Tawni Hunt; Day, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Everyone under the age of 20 who has grown up in North America has lived in the common market created by NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement. In a zone linking the United States, Canada, and Mexico, most goods and investments flow freely across borders to users, consumers, and investors. In 1994, NAFTA created the largest relatively…

  17. 360 Video Tour of the World’s Largest Laser

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-15

    Welcome to the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the world’s largest and most energetic laser system. It draws researchers from around the globe for experiments that can’t be conducted anywhere else on Earth. Let’s take a closer look.

  18. The Single Largest Education Donor Comes with Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    For the last decade, in districts big and small, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has emerged as the largest private funder of educational efforts. This began with an initiative around small schools in the early to mid-2000s, mostly abandoned now, and has gained traction in the past few years in areas such as teacher evaluation, the Common…

  19. Cassini sheds light on Titan's second largest lake, Ligeia Mare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is known for its dense, planet-like atmosphere and large lakes most likely made of methane and ethane. It has been suggested that Titan's atmosphere and surface are a model of early Earth. Since the early 2000s, NASA's Cassini space probe has been unlocking secrets of the distant moon.

  20. The Single Largest Education Donor Comes with Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    For the last decade, in districts big and small, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has emerged as the largest private funder of educational efforts. This began with an initiative around small schools in the early to mid-2000s, mostly abandoned now, and has gained traction in the past few years in areas such as teacher evaluation, the Common…

  1. The Power of Nature. World's Largest Math Event 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Inc., Reston, VA.

    The theme of the fifth annual World's Largest Math Event (WLME 5) is "The Power of Nature." This theme encourages students to explore natural forces that affect humankind, including phenomena such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and snowstorms, and the mathematics that underlies their study. The 15 activities for WLMES have been grouped into five…

  2. Multi-institutional study of nuclear KIFC1 as a biomarker of poor prognosis in African American women with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Angela; Garlapati, Chakravarthy; Li, Xiaoxian (Bill); Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Wright, Nikita; Bhattarai, Shristi; Mittal, Karuna; Wetherilt, Ceyda Sönmez; Krishnamurti, Uma; Reid, Michelle D.; Jones, Mildred; Gupta, Meenakshi; Osan, Remus; Pattni, Sonal; Riaz, Ansa; Klimov, Sergey; Rao, Arundhati; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Rida, Padmashree C. G.; Aneja, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear KIFC1 (nKIFC1) predicts worse outcomes in breast cancer, but its prognostic value within racially distinct triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients is unknown. Thus, nKIFC1 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 163 African American (AA) and 144 White TNBC tissue microarrays (TMAs) pooled from four hospitals. nKIFC1 correlated significantly with Ki67 in White TNBCs but not in AA TNBCs, suggesting that nKIFC1 is not merely a surrogate for proliferation in AA TNBCs. High nKIFC1 weighted index (WI) was associated with significantly worse overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (Hazard Ratios [HRs] = 3.5, 3.1, and 3.8, respectively; P = 0.01, 0.009, and 0.007, respectively) in multivariable Cox models in AA TNBCs but not White TNBCs. Furthermore, KIFC1 knockdown more severely impaired migration in AA TNBC cells than White TNBC cells. Collectively, these data suggest that nKIFC1 WI an independent biomarker of poor prognosis in AA TNBC patients, potentially due to the necessity of KIFC1 for migration in AA TNBC cells. PMID:28218233

  3. Multi-institutional study of nuclear KIFC1 as a biomarker of poor prognosis in African American women with triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Angela; Garlapati, Chakravarthy; Li, Xiaoxian Bill; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Wright, Nikita; Bhattarai, Shristi; Mittal, Karuna; Wetherilt, Ceyda Sönmez; Krishnamurti, Uma; Reid, Michelle D; Jones, Mildred; Gupta, Meenakshi; Osan, Remus; Pattni, Sonal; Riaz, Ansa; Klimov, Sergey; Rao, Arundhati; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Rida, Padmashree C G; Aneja, Ritu

    2017-02-20

    Nuclear KIFC1 (nKIFC1) predicts worse outcomes in breast cancer, but its prognostic value within racially distinct triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients is unknown. Thus, nKIFC1 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 163 African American (AA) and 144 White TNBC tissue microarrays (TMAs) pooled from four hospitals. nKIFC1 correlated significantly with Ki67 in White TNBCs but not in AA TNBCs, suggesting that nKIFC1 is not merely a surrogate for proliferation in AA TNBCs. High nKIFC1 weighted index (WI) was associated with significantly worse overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (Hazard Ratios [HRs] = 3.5, 3.1, and 3.8, respectively; P = 0.01, 0.009, and 0.007, respectively) in multivariable Cox models in AA TNBCs but not White TNBCs. Furthermore, KIFC1 knockdown more severely impaired migration in AA TNBC cells than White TNBC cells. Collectively, these data suggest that nKIFC1 WI an independent biomarker of poor prognosis in AA TNBC patients, potentially due to the necessity of KIFC1 for migration in AA TNBC cells.

  4. ALMA Partners Break Ground on World's Largest Millimeter Wavelength Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Scientists and dignitaries from North America, Europe, and Chile broke ground today (Thursday, November 6, 2003) on what will be the world's largest, most sensitive radio telescope operating at millimeter wavelengths. ALMA - the Atacama Large Millimeter Array - will be a single instrument composed of 64 high-precision antennas located on the Chajnantor plain of the Chilean Andes in the District of San Pedro de Atacama, 16,500 feet (5,000 meters) above sea level. ALMA's primary function will be to observe and image with unprecedented clarity the enigmatic cold regions of the Universe, which are optically dark, yet shine brightly in the millimeter portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. ALMA Array Artist's Conception of ALMA Array in Compact Configuration (Click on Image for Larger Version) Other Images Available: Artist's conception of the antennas for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array Moonrise over ALMA test equipment near Cerro Chajnantor, Chile VertexRSI antenna at the VLA test site The Atacama Large Millimeter Array is an international astronomy facility. ALMA is an equal partnership between Europe and North America, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile, and is funded in North America by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), and in Europe by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Spain. ALMA construction and operations are led on behalf of North America by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which is managed by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), and on behalf of Europe by ESO. "The U.S. National Science Foundation joins today with our North American partner, Canada, and with the European Southern Observatory, Spain, and Chile to prepare for a spectacular new instrument," said Dr. Rita Colwell, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation. "The Atacama Large Millimeter Array will expand our vision of the Universe with "eyes" that pierce the shrouded mantles of

  5. Bayesian Predictive Distribution for the Magnitude of the Largest Aftershock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock sequences, which follow large earthquakes, last hundreds of days and are characterized by well defined frequency-magnitude and spatio-temporal distributions. The largest aftershocks in a sequence constitute significant hazard and can inflict additional damage to infrastructure. Therefore, the estimation of the magnitude of possible largest aftershocks in a sequence is of high importance. In this work, we propose a statistical model based on Bayesian analysis and extreme value statistics to describe the distribution of magnitudes of the largest aftershocks in a sequence. We derive an analytical expression for a Bayesian predictive distribution function for the magnitude of the largest expected aftershock and compute the corresponding confidence intervals. We assume that the occurrence of aftershocks can be modeled, to a good approximation, by a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a temporal event rate given by the modified Omori law. We also assume that the frequency-magnitude statistics of aftershocks can be approximated by Gutenberg-Richter scaling. We apply our analysis to 19 prominent aftershock sequences, which occurred in the last 30 years, in order to compute the Bayesian predictive distributions and the corresponding confidence intervals. In the analysis, we use the information of the early aftershocks in the sequences (in the first 1, 10, and 30 days after the main shock) to estimate retrospectively the confidence intervals for the magnitude of the expected largest aftershocks. We demonstrate by analysing 19 past sequences that in many cases we are able to constrain the magnitudes of the largest aftershocks. For example, this includes the analysis of the Darfield (Christchurch) aftershock sequence. The proposed analysis can be used for the earthquake hazard assessment and forecasting associated with the occurrence of large aftershocks. The improvement in instrumental data associated with early aftershocks can greatly enhance the analysis and

  6. Statistics of largest loops in a random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertas, Deniz; Kantor, Yacov

    1997-01-01

    We report further findings on the size distribution of the largest neutral segments in a sequence of N randomly charged monomers [D. Ertaş and Y. Kantor, Phys. Rev. E 53, 846 (1996)]. Upon mapping to one-dimensional random walks (RW's), this corresponds to finding the probability distribution for the size L of the largest segment that returns to its starting position in an N-step RW. We focus primarily on the large N, l=L/N<<1 limit, which exhibits an essential singularity. We establish analytical upper and lower bounds on the probability distribution, and numerically probe the distribution down to l~0.04 (corresponding to probabilities as low as 10-15) using a recursive Monte Carlo algorithm. We also investigate the possibility of singularities at l=1/k for integer k.

  7. Status and ecological effects of the world's largest carnivores.

    PubMed

    Ripple, William J; Estes, James A; Beschta, Robert L; Wilmers, Christopher C; Ritchie, Euan G; Hebblewhite, Mark; Berger, Joel; Elmhagen, Bodil; Letnic, Mike; Nelson, Michael P; Schmitz, Oswald J; Smith, Douglas W; Wallach, Arian D; Wirsing, Aaron J

    2014-01-10

    Large carnivores face serious threats and are experiencing massive declines in their populations and geographic ranges around the world. We highlight how these threats have affected the conservation status and ecological functioning of the 31 largest mammalian carnivores on Earth. Consistent with theory, empirical studies increasingly show that large carnivores have substantial effects on the structure and function of diverse ecosystems. Significant cascading trophic interactions, mediated by their prey or sympatric mesopredators, arise when some of these carnivores are extirpated from or repatriated to ecosystems. Unexpected effects of trophic cascades on various taxa and processes include changes to bird, mammal, invertebrate, and herpetofauna abundance or richness; subsidies to scavengers; altered disease dynamics; carbon sequestration; modified stream morphology; and crop damage. Promoting tolerance and coexistence with large carnivores is a crucial societal challenge that will ultimately determine the fate of Earth's largest carnivores and all that depends upon them, including humans.

  8. Evolutionary institutionalism.

    PubMed

    Fürstenberg, Dr Kai

    Institutions are hard to define and hard to study. Long prominent in political science have been two theories: Rational Choice Institutionalism (RCI) and Historical Institutionalism (HI). Arising from the life sciences is now a third: Evolutionary Institutionalism (EI). Comparative strengths and weaknesses of these three theories warrant review, and the value-to-be-added by expanding the third beyond Darwinian evolutionary theory deserves consideration. Should evolutionary institutionalism expand to accommodate new understanding in ecology, such as might apply to the emergence of stability, and in genetics, such as might apply to political behavior? Core arguments are reviewed for each theory with more detailed exposition of the third, EI. Particular attention is paid to EI's gene-institution analogy; to variation, selection, and retention of institutional traits; to endogeneity and exogeneity; to agency and structure; and to ecosystem effects, institutional stability, and empirical limitations in behavioral genetics. RCI, HI, and EI are distinct but complementary. Institutional change, while amenable to rational-choice analysis and, retrospectively, to criticaljuncture and path-dependency analysis, is also, and importantly, ecological. Stability, like change, is an emergent property of institutions, which tend to stabilize after change in a manner analogous to allopatric speciation. EI is more than metaphorically biological in that institutional behaviors are driven by human behaviors whose evolution long preceded the appearance of institutions themselves.

  9. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  10. Rare gas record in the largest Apollo 15 rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Lightner, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results obtained from mass-spectrometry analyses of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in a 182-mg chip of the largest Apollo 15 rock 15555 are presented. The spallation krypton data indicate a well-shielded location through most of the time during which the rock was exposed to cosmic rays. Gas retention ages are estimated. No evidence for the presence of products from plutonium-244 or iodine-129 was found.

  11. A local Echo State Property through the largest Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Wainrib, Gilles; Galtier, Mathieu N

    2016-04-01

    Echo State Networks are efficient time-series predictors, which highly depend on the value of the spectral radius of the reservoir connectivity matrix. Based on recent results on the mean field theory of driven random recurrent neural networks, enabling the computation of the largest Lyapunov exponent of an ESN, we develop a cheap algorithm to establish a local and operational version of the Echo State Property.

  12. World's largest TLP moves onto deepwater Norwegian location

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1992-05-04

    This paper reports that the world's largest and most sophisticated tension leg platform (TLP) was floated out to Snorre oil field in the Norwegian North Sea last month. The 78,000 ton unit built by Norwegian independent, Sega Petroleum AS, Oslo, was installed in the southern part of block 34/7 and should produce first oil in August, about a month ahead of schedule.

  13. Rare gas record in the largest Apollo 15 rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Lightner, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results obtained from mass-spectrometry analyses of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in a 182-mg chip of the largest Apollo 15 rock 15555 are presented. The spallation krypton data indicate a well-shielded location through most of the time during which the rock was exposed to cosmic rays. Gas retention ages are estimated. No evidence for the presence of products from plutonium-244 or iodine-129 was found.

  14. Development of Curricula for Nuclear Radiation Protection, Nuclear Instrumentation, and Nuclear Materials Processing Technologies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.

    A study was conducted to assist two-year postsecondary educational institutions in providing technical specialty courses for preparing nuclear technicians. As a result of project activities, curricula have been developed for five categories of nuclear technicians and operators: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and…

  15. Development of Curricula for Nuclear Radiation Protection, Nuclear Instrumentation, and Nuclear Materials Processing Technologies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.

    A study was conducted to assist two-year postsecondary educational institutions in providing technical specialty courses for preparing nuclear technicians. As a result of project activities, curricula have been developed for five categories of nuclear technicians and operators: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and…

  16. Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Multi-Institutional Prospective Study of Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia Among Eight Asian Countries

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Tatsuya Nakano, Takashi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional prospective single-arm study was conducted among eight Asian countries. Between 1999 and 2002, 120 patients (64 with Stage IIB and 56 with Stage IIIB) with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated RT. External beam RT consisted of 30 Gy to the whole pelvis, 1.5 Gy/fraction twice daily, followed by 20 Gy of pelvic RT with central shielding at a dose of 2-Gy fractions daily. A small bowel displacement device was used with the patient in the prone position. In addition to central shielding RT, intracavitary brachytherapy was started. Acute and late morbidities were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Results: The median overall treatment time was 35 days. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 4.7 years. The 5-year pelvic control and overall survival rate for all patients was 84% and 70%, respectively. The 5-year pelvic control and overall survival rate was 78% and 69% for tumors {>=}6 cm in diameter, respectively. No treatment-related death occurred. Grade 3-4 late toxicities of the small intestine, large intestine, and bladder were observed in 1, 1, and 2 patients, respectively. The 5-year actuarial rate of Grade 3-4 late toxicity at any site was 5%. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that accelerated hyperfractionated RT achieved sufficient pelvic control and survival without increasing severe toxicity. This treatment could be feasible in those Asian countries where chemoradiotherapy is not available.

  17. What Is the Largest Einstein Radius in the Universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Blandford, Roger D.

    2008-08-05

    The Einstein radius plays a central role in lens studies as it characterizes the strength of gravitational lensing. In particular, the distribution of Einstein radii near the upper cutoff should probe the probability distribution of the largest mass concentrations in the universe. Adopting a triaxial halo model, we compute expected distributions of large Einstein radii. To assess the cosmic variance, we generate a number of Monte-Carlo realizations of all-sky catalogues of massive clusters. We find that the expected largest Einstein radius in the universe is sensitive to parameters characterizing the cosmological model, especially {sigma}{sub s}: for a source redshift of unity, they are 42{sub -7}{sup +9}, 35{sub -6}{sup +8}, and 54{sub -7}{sup +12} arcseconds (errors denote 1{sigma} cosmic variance), assuming best-fit cosmological parameters of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year (WMAP5), three-year (WMAP3) and one-year (WMAP1) data, respectively. These values are broadly consistent with current observations given their incompleteness. The mass of the largest lens cluster can be as small as {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub {circle_dot}}. For the same source redshift, we expect in all-sky {approx} 35 (WMAP5), {approx} 15 (WMAP3), and {approx} 150 (WMAP1) clusters that have Einstein radii larger than 2000. For a larger source redshift of 7, the largest Einstein radii grow approximately twice as large. While the values of the largest Einstein radii are almost unaffected by the level of the primordial non-Gaussianity currently of interest, the measurement of the abundance of moderately large lens clusters should probe non-Gaussianity competitively with cosmic microwave background experiments, but only if other cosmological parameters are well-measured. These semi-analytic predictions are based on a rather simple representation of clusters, and hence calibrating them with N-body simulations will help to improve the accuracy. We also find that these 'superlens

  18. Institutional paranoia.

    PubMed

    Kulenović, M

    1995-01-01

    Taken separately, the concepts of institution and paranoia have no bearing on this work. They acquire their full new meaning as "institutional paranoia" only when they are taken together. Institutional paranoia is not a mental illness in the ordinary sense. It is a state, a condition, which exists in all associations and communities which have the same goal and concurrent intentions. The author's analysis of the problem is based on observation and monitoring of circumstances, discussions and content analysis, as well as on the use of questionnaires in several health institutions over a long period of time. He focuses his attention primarily on health, political, and economic institutions. The results of observation and analysis point to some interesting phenomena which require further study, regardless of their positive or negative outcome. With additional interventions, the content and dynamics of this process in institutions can contribute to the gradual diminishing of institutional paranoia, and sometimes its complete disappearance over a long time.

  19. Neutron-Proton equilibration in dynamically deformed nuclear systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Manso, Alis; McIntosh, A. B.; Jedele, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the nuclear Equation of State (nEoS) is fundamental for describing nuclear reaction dynamics, understanding the origin of the elements and characterizing the structure of neutron stars. The density dependence of the asymmetry energy still represents the largest uncertainty in the nEoS. We demonstrate a new time-sensitive method for studying reaction dynamics that may allow new types of constraints on the asymmetry energy. We study neutron-proton equilibration in dynamically deformed nuclear systems by investigating the correlations between the largest fragments produced in collisions of 70Zn +70Zn, 64Zn +64Zn, 64Ni +64Ni and 70Zn +64Zn at 35 MeV per nucleon measured at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The extent of equilibration is investigated using the rotation angle as a clock. The equilibration follows an exponential trend with consistent rate constants across a wide variety of reaction partners and systems, indicating the equilibration follows first order kinetics. The statistical and dynamical components are separated on average; the equilibration curve for the purely dynamical is consistent with the overall equilibration curve, indicating the robustness of the method to statistical contamination.

  20. Production of cloned NIBS (Nippon Institute for Biological Science) and α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase knockout MGH miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer using the NIBS breed as surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Horii, Wataru; Hirakata, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Yuji; Waki, Shiori; Sano, Junichi; Saitoh, Toshiki; Sahara, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akira; Yazawa, Hajime; Sachs, David H.; Nunoya, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Background Nuclear transfer (NT) technologies offer a means for producing the genetically modified pigs necessary to develop swine models for mechanistic studies of disease processes as well as to serve as organ donors for xenotransplantation. Most previous studies have used commercial pigs as surrogates. Method and Results In this study, we established a cloning technique for miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using Nippon Institute for Biological Science (NIBS) miniature pigs as surrogates. Moreover, utilizing this technique, we have successfully produced an α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) miniature swine. Fibroblasts procured from a NIBS miniature pig fetus were injected into 1312 enucleated oocytes. The cloned embryos were transferred to 11 surrogates of which five successfully delivered 13 cloned offspring; the production efficiency was 1.0% (13/1312). In a second experiment, lung fibroblasts obtained from neonatal GalT-KO MGH miniature swine were used as donor cells and 1953 cloned embryos were transferred to 12 surrogates. Six cloned offspring were born from five surrogates, a production efficiency of 0.3% (6/1953). Conclusions These results demonstrate successful establishment of a miniature pig cloning technique by SCNT using NIBS miniature pigs as surrogates. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of successful production of GalT-KO miniature swine using miniature swine surrogates. This technique could help to ensure a stable supply of the cloned pigs through the use of miniature pig surrogates and could expand production in countries with limited space or in facilities with special regulations such as specific pathogen-free or good laboratory practice. PMID:23581451

  1. Trends of Training Courses Conducted in the Human Resources Development Center of the National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology After the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuko; Iida, Haruzo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-07-01

    Environmental contamination with radioactive materials caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in 2011 raised a serious health concern among residents in Japan, and the demand for radiation experts who can handle the radiation-associated problems has increased. The Human Resources Development Center (HRDC) of the National Institute of for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology in Japan has offered a variety of training programs covering a wide range of technologies associated with radiation since 1959. In this study, the time-course change in the number and age of the applicants for training programs regularly scheduled at HRDC were analyzed to characterize the demand after the NPP accident. The results suggested that the demand for the training of industrial radiation experts elevated sharply after the NPP accident followed by a prompt decrease, and that young people were likely stimulated to learn the basics of radiation. The demand for the training of medical radiation experts was kept high regardless of the NPP accident. The demand for the training of radiation emergency experts fluctuated apparently with three components: a terminating demand after the criticality accident that occurred in 1999, an urgent demand for handling of the NPP accident, and a sustained demand from local governments that undertook reinforcement of their nuclear disaster prevention program. The demand for the training of school students appeared to be increasing after the NPP accident. It could be foreseen that the demand for training programs targeting young people and medical radiation experts would be elevated in future.

  2. Longevity in Calumma parsonii, the World's largest chameleon.

    PubMed

    Tessa, Giulia; Glaw, Frank; Andreone, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Large body size of ectothermic species can be correlated with high life expectancy. We assessed the longevity of the World's largest chameleon, the Parson's chameleon Calumma parsonii from Madagascar by using skeletochronology of phalanges taken from preserved specimens held in European natural history museums. Due to the high bone resorption we can provide only the minimum age of each specimen. The highest minimum age detected was nine years for a male and eight years for a female, confirming that this species is considerably long living among chameleons. Our data also show a strong correlation between snout-vent length and estimated age.

  3. JET, the largest tokamak on the eve of DT operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, L. D.

    2016-11-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) is the world's largest operating tokamak and the only such machine capable of operating with the fuel mixture (deuterium-tritium) foreseen for a fusion reactor. Since it came into operation in 1983, JET has explored fusion plasmas "in conditions and dimensions approaching those of a fusion reactor" [1]. JET has demonstrated world-record levels of fusion power and energy production, in conditions where the ratio of the fusion power generated to the input power to the plasma, Q, approaches unity.

  4. Largest Lyapunov Exponent for Many Particle Systems at Low Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zon, R.; van Beijeren, H.; Dellago, Ch.

    1998-03-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent λ+ for a dilute gas with short range interactions in equilibrium is studied by a mapping to a clock model, in which every particle carries a watch, with a discrete time that is advanced at collisions. This model has a propagating front solution with a speed that determines λ+, for which we find a density dependence as predicted by Krylov, but with a larger prefactor. Simulations for the clock model and for hard sphere and hard disk systems confirm these results and are in excellent mutual agreement. They show a slow convergence of λ+ with increasing particle number, in good agreement with a prediction by Brunet and Derrida.

  5. The Largest Fragment of a Homogeneous Fragmentation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyprianou, Andreas; Lane, Francis; Mörters, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show that in homogeneous fragmentation processes the largest fragment at time t has size e^{-t Φ '(overline{p})}t^{-3/2 (log Φ )'(overline{p})+o(1)}, where Φ is the Lévy exponent of the fragmentation process, and overline{p} is the unique solution of the equation (log Φ )'(bar{p})=1/1+bar{p}. We argue that this result is in line with predictions arising from the classification of homogeneous fragmentation processes as logarithmically correlated random fields.

  6. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  7. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  8. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  9. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  10. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  11. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  12. CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Ovarian Cancer Proteome Dataset from Previously Genome Characterized Tumors | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).  This is one of the largest public datasets covering the proteome, phosphoproteome and glycoproteome with complementary deep genomic sequencing data on the same tumor.

  13. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  14. Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  15. Mars Parachute Testing in World Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-22

    The parachute for NASA next mission to Mars passed flight-qualification testing in March and April 2009 inside the world largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif. NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, to be launched in 2011 and land on Mars in 2012, will use the largest parachute ever built to fly on an extraterrestrial mission. This image shows a duplicate qualification-test parachute inflated in an 80-mile-per-hour (36-meter-per-second) wind inside the test facility. The parachute uses a configuration called disk-gap-band. It has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 16 meters (51 feet). Most of the orange and white fabric is nylon, though a small disk of heavier polyester is used near the vent in the apex of the canopy due to higher stresses there. It is designed to survive deployment at Mach 2.2 in the Martian atmosphere, where it will generate up to 65,000 pounds of drag force. The wind tunnel is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide, big enough to house a Boeing 737. It is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the Arnold Engineering Development Center of the U.S. Air Force. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11995

  16. Orion: The Largest Infrared Hybrid Focal Plane in Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Albert M.; Merrill, Michael; Ball, William J.; Henden, Arne A.; Vrba, Frederick J.; McCreight, Craig R.

    2003-03-01

    Orion is a program to develop a 2048x2048 infrared focal plane using InSb PV detectors. It is the natural follow-on to the successful Aladdin 1024x1024 program, which was the largest IR focal plane of the 90's. Although the pixels are somewhat smaller than Aladdin, the overall focal plane is over 50mm in size and for the present is the largest IR focal plane of the 21st century. The work is being done by Raytheon Infrared Operations (RIO but better known as SBRC) by many of the same people who created the Aladdin focal plane. The design is very similar to the successful Aladdin design with the addition of reference pixels to lower noise and drift effects in long integrations. So far we have made five focal plane modules with hybridized InSb detectors. In this paper we will discuss the unique design features of this device as well as present test data taken from these devices.

  17. The largest molecular cloud complexes in the first galactic quadrant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Cohen, R. S.; Thaddeus, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Columbia CO survey of the first Galactic quadrant was used to determine the locations and physical properties of the largest molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy. Within the range of the survey (l = 12-60 deg), 26 complexes were detected with masses greater than 5 x 10 to the 5th solar masses, and roughly several hundred such complexes are deduced to exist throughout the Galaxy within the solar circle. These complexes are the parent objects of much of the Population I in the Galaxy. Distances to most of the complexes were determined kinematically, the distance ambiguity being resolved with the aid of associated H II regions, OB associations, masers, and other early Population I objects. The largest complexes are good tracers of spiral structure, the Sagittarius arm in particular being delineated with unprecedented clarity. A total of 17 large complexes are distributed rather uniformly along a 15 kpc stretch of the arm with a spacing comparable to that of the strings of regularly spaced H Ii regions observed in external galaxies. Power-law relations exist between the line widths and sizes of the complexes and between their densities and sizes. The forms of these relations are in good agreement with those found previously and are extended by roughly an order of magnitude in cloud mass.

  18. Fishing down the largest coral reef fish species.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Douglas

    2014-07-15

    Studies on remote, uninhabited, near-pristine reefs have revealed surprisingly large populations of large reef fish. Locations such as the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, northern Marianas Islands, Line Islands, U.S. remote Pacific Islands, Cocos-Keeling Atoll and Chagos archipelago have much higher reef fish biomass than islands and reefs near people. Much of the high biomass of most remote reef fish communities lies in the largest species, such as sharks, bumphead parrots, giant trevally, and humphead wrasse. Some, such as sharks and giant trevally, are apex predators, but others such as bumphead parrots and humphead wrasse, are not. At many locations, decreases in large reef fish species have been attributed to fishing. Fishing is well known to remove the largest fish first, and a quantitative measure of vulnerability to fishing indicates that large reef fish species are much more vulnerable to fishing than small fish. The removal of large reef fish by fishing parallels the extinction of terrestrial megafauna by early humans. However large reef fish have great value for various ecological roles and for reef tourism.

  19. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 12: Reactor Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 7: Reactor Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  2. Nuclear Technology Series. Course l: Radiation Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  3. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 18: Radiological Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  4. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 19: Radiation Shielding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 27: Metrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 28: Welding Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  7. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 7: Reactor Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  8. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 19: Radiation Shielding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  9. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 12: Reactor Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  10. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 27: Metrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  11. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 18: Radiological Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  12. Nuclear Technology Series. Course l: Radiation Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  13. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 28: Welding Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  14. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  15. [Institutional Renewal].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The theme of this journal issue is "Institutional Renewal." Projects designed to address the issues of the 1980s at 18 colleges are described, and 15 definitions of institutional renewal are presented. Participating colleges were provided expert advice through the Association of American College's (AAC) Project Lodestar (renamed…

  16. Hubble Catches Jupiter's Largest Moon Going to the 'Dark Side'

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Hubble Catches Jupiter's Largest Moon Going to the 'Dark Side' HST/WFPC2 Image of Jupiter and Ganymede Taken April 9, 2007 NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has caught Jupiter's moon Ganymede playing a game of "peek-a-boo." In this crisp Hubble image, Ganymede is shown just before it ducks behind the giant planet. Ganymede completes an orbit around Jupiter every seven days. Because Ganymede's orbit is tilted nearly edge-on to Earth, it routinely can be seen passing in front of and disappearing behind its giant host, only to reemerge later. Composed of rock and ice, Ganymede is the largest moon in our solar system. It is even larger than the planet Mercury. But Ganymede looks like a dirty snowball next to Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. Jupiter is so big that only part of its Southern Hemisphere can be seen in this image. Hubble's view is so sharp that astronomers can see features on Ganymede's surface, most notably the white impact crater, Tros, and its system of rays, bright streaks of material blasted from the crater. Tros and its ray system are roughly the width of Arizona. The image also shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the large eye-shaped feature at upper left. A storm the size of two Earths, the Great Red Spot has been raging for more than 300 years. Hubble's sharp view of the gas giant planet also reveals the texture of the clouds in the Jovian atmosphere as well as various other storms and vortices. Astronomers use these images to study Jupiter's upper atmosphere. As Ganymede passes behind the giant planet, it reflects sunlight, which then passes through Jupiter's atmosphere. Imprinted on that light is information about the gas giant's atmosphere, which yields clues about the properties of Jupiter's high-altitude haze above the cloud tops. This color image was made from three images taken on April 9, 2007, with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in red, green, and blue filters. The image shows Jupiter and Ganymede in close to natural colors. For

  17. Earth's Largest Meteorite Impact Craters discovered in South America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellndorfer, J. M.; Schmidt-Falkenberg, H.

    2014-12-01

    Novel analysis of high resolution InSAR-based digital elevation data from the year 2001 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission combined with a recently produced dataset of pan-tropical vegetation height from ALOS-1 SAR and IceSAT/GLAS Lidar estimates led to the quasi-bald-Earth discovery of four sizable near-perfect circle arcs in South America under dense tropical forests ranging in length from 216 km to 441 km. Terrain elevation profiles of cross-sections across the arcs show a distinct vertical rising and falling in elevations of hundreds of meters over a horizontal distance of tens of kilometers. It is hypothesized that these sizable arcs and associated rim-like topographic terrain features are remnants of huge meteorite impact craters with diameters ranging from 770 km to 1,310 km, thus forming potentially the largest known impact carter structures discovered on Earth today. The potential impact crater rim structures are located north of the eastern Amazon River, in the coastal region of Recife and Natal, and in the Brazilian, Bolivian and Paraguayan border region encompassing the Pantanal. Elevation profiles, hillshades and gray-shaded elevation maps were produced to support the geomorphologic analysis. It is also speculated whether in three of the four potential impact craters, central uplift domes or peaks, which are typical for complex impact crater structures can be identified. The worlds largest iron ore mining area of Carajás in Para, Brazil, falls exactly in the center of the largest hypothesized circular impact crater showing topographic elevations similar to the rim structure discovered 655 km to the north-north-west. Based on the topographic/geomorphologic driven hypothesis, geologic exploration of these topographic features is needed to test whether indeed meteorite impact craters could be verified, what the more exact ellipsoidal shapes of the potential impact craters might be, and to determine when during geologic times the impacts would have taken

  18. The depths of the largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Ford, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    The largest impact craters on Venus may be used as evidence of various geological processes within the Venusian crust. We are continuing to construct a data base for the further investigation of large craters on Venus (LCV). We hope to find evidence of crater relaxation that might constrain the thickness and thermal gradient of the crust, as was proposed in an earlier work. The current work concentrates on 27 impact craters with diameters (d) larger than 70 km, i.e., large enough that the footprint of the Magellan altimeter has a good chance of sampling the true crater bottom. All altimeter echoes from points located within (d/2)+70 km from the crater center have been inspected.

  19. The largest Silurian vertebrate and its palaeoecological implications

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Brian; Zhu, Min; Zhao, Wenjin; Jia, Liaotao; Zhu, You'an

    2014-01-01

    An apparent absence of Silurian fishes more than half-a-metre in length has been viewed as evidence that gnathostomes were restricted in size and diversity prior to the Devonian. Here we describe the largest pre-Devonian vertebrate (Megamastax amblyodus gen. et sp. nov.), a predatory marine osteichthyan from the Silurian Kuanti Formation (late Ludlow, ~423 million years ago) of Yunnan, China, with an estimated length of about 1 meter. The unusual dentition of the new form suggests a durophagous diet which, combined with its large size, indicates a considerable degree of trophic specialisation among early osteichthyans. The lack of large Silurian vertebrates has recently been used as constraint in palaeoatmospheric modelling, with purported lower oxygen levels imposing a physiological size limit. Regardless of the exact causal relationship between oxygen availability and evolutionary success, this finding refutes the assumption that pre-Emsian vertebrates were restricted to small body sizes. PMID:24921626

  20. Correlates of species richness in the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Voyer, A; Padial, J M; Castroviejo-Fisher, S; De La Riva, I; Vilà, C

    2011-01-01

    Although tropical environments are often considered biodiversity hotspots, it is precisely in such environments where least is known about the factors that drive species richness. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative analyses to study correlates of species richness for the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation: New World direct-developing frogs. Clade-age and species richness were nonsignficantly, negatively correlated, suggesting that clade age alone does not explain among-clade variation in species richness. A combination of ecological and morphological traits explained 65% of the variance in species richness. A more vascularized ventral skin, the ability to colonize high-altitude ranges, encompassing a large variety of vegetation types, correlated significantly with species richness, whereas larger body size was marginally correlated with species richness. Hence, whereas high-altitude ranges play a role in shaping clade diversity in the Neotropics, intrinsic factors, such as skin structures and possibly body size, might ultimately determine which clades are more speciose than others. PMID:21401771

  1. Giant fibroepithelial stromal polyp of the vulva: largest case reported

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibroepithelial stromal polyps are site-specific mesenchymal lesions that are commonly found in the vulvovaginal region in premenopausal females. These polyps usually are less than 5 cm in diameter and are most commonly identified during routine gynecological examination. Although the stromal polyp is benign, its differential diagnosis includes some malignant vulva lesions making it critical to ensure that an accurate pathologic diagnosis is made. Case We present a case of a 21 year old female with a giant fibroepithelial stromal polyp of the vulva. Upon review of the literature this is the largest reported fibroepithelial stromal polyp to date. Conclusion Fibroepithelial stromal polyps can grow as large as 390 grams and can be 18.5-cm in diameter. Microscopic evaluation of the polyp is critical in the exclusion of malignancy with this diagnosis. PMID:23842282

  2. 1. Photocopy of undated wash drawing. The largest building is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of undated wash drawing. The largest building is the Hotel Williams. Next to it is the Williams House (Williams Hotel Annex), HABS No. MI-258 A. Below them are the log cabins built by the American Fur Company (from left to right): Log Building No. 1 (MI-258 C), Log Building No. 2 (MI-258 D), Log Building No. 3 (not documented), Log Building No. 4 (MI-258 E), and Log Building No. 5 (MI-258 F). (Williams Log House, MI-258 B, and Log Building No. 8, MI-258 G, are not shown). The drawing is in the collection of the Michigan Historical Commission. Although it does not have a date, it was painted in the early 20th century after the main building was constructed. - Hotel Williams, Murray Bay, Munising, Alger County, MI

  3. Opportunities for biodiversity gains under the world's largest reforestation programme

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Fangyuan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xinlei; Fisher, Brendan; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Jianguo; Tang, Ya; Yu, Douglas W.; Wilcove, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Reforestation is a critical means of addressing the environmental and social problems of deforestation. China's Grain-for-Green Program (GFGP) is the world's largest reforestation scheme. Here we provide the first nationwide assessment of the tree composition of GFGP forests and the first combined ecological and economic study aimed at understanding GFGP's biodiversity implications. Across China, GFGP forests are overwhelmingly monocultures or compositionally simple mixed forests. Focusing on birds and bees in Sichuan Province, we find that GFGP reforestation results in modest gains (via mixed forest) and losses (via monocultures) of bird diversity, along with major losses of bee diversity. Moreover, all current modes of GFGP reforestation fall short of restoring biodiversity to levels approximating native forests. However, even within existing modes of reforestation, GFGP can achieve greater biodiversity gains by promoting mixed forests over monocultures; doing so is unlikely to entail major opportunity costs or pose unforeseen economic risks to households. PMID:27598524

  4. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene at the World's Largest Mass Gathering.

    PubMed

    Vortmann, Michael; Balsari, Satchit; Holman, Susan R; Greenough, P Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The 2013 Kumbh Mela, a Hindu religious festival and the largest human gathering on earth, drew an estimated 120 million pilgrims to bathe at the holy confluence of the Ganga (Ganges) and Yamuna rivers. To accommodate the massive numbers, the Indian government constructed a temporary city on the flood plains of the two rivers and provided it with roads, electricity, water and sanitation facilities, police stations, and a tiered healthcare system. This phenomenal operation and its impacts have gone largely undocumented. To address this gap, the authors undertook an evaluation and systematic monitoring initiative to study preparedness and response to public health emergencies at the event. This paper describes the water, sanitation, and hygiene components, with particular emphasis on preventive and mitigation strategies; the capacity for surveillance and response to diarrheal disease outbreaks; and the implications of lessons learned for other mass gatherings.

  5. The 260: The Largest Solid Rocket Motor Ever Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimmins, P.; Cousineau, M.; Rogers, C.; Shell, V.

    1999-01-01

    Aerojet in the mid 1960s, under contract to NASA, built and static hot fire tested the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) in history for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of utilizing large SRMs for space exploration. This program successfully fabricated two high strength steel chambers, loaded each with approximately 1,68 million pounds of propellant, and static test fired these giants with their nozzles up from an underground silo located adjacent to the Florida everglades. Maximum thrust and total impulse in excess of 5,000,000 lbf and 3,470,000,000 lbf-sec were achieved. Flames from the second firing, conducted at night, were seen over eighty miles away. For comparative purposes: the thrust developed was nearly 100 times that of a Minuteman III second stage and the 260 in.-dia cross-section was over 3 times that of the Space Shuttle SRM.

  6. Opportunities for biodiversity gains under the world's largest reforestation programme.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fangyuan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xinlei; Fisher, Brendan; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Jianguo; Tang, Ya; Yu, Douglas W; Wilcove, David S

    2016-09-06

    Reforestation is a critical means of addressing the environmental and social problems of deforestation. China's Grain-for-Green Program (GFGP) is the world's largest reforestation scheme. Here we provide the first nationwide assessment of the tree composition of GFGP forests and the first combined ecological and economic study aimed at understanding GFGP's biodiversity implications. Across China, GFGP forests are overwhelmingly monocultures or compositionally simple mixed forests. Focusing on birds and bees in Sichuan Province, we find that GFGP reforestation results in modest gains (via mixed forest) and losses (via monocultures) of bird diversity, along with major losses of bee diversity. Moreover, all current modes of GFGP reforestation fall short of restoring biodiversity to levels approximating native forests. However, even within existing modes of reforestation, GFGP can achieve greater biodiversity gains by promoting mixed forests over monocultures; doing so is unlikely to entail major opportunity costs or pose unforeseen economic risks to households.

  7. Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, William J.; Newsome, Thomas M.; Wolf, Christopher; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Everatt, Kristoffer T.; Galetti, Mauro; Hayward, Matt W.; Kerley, Graham I. H.; Levi, Taal; Lindsey, Peter A.; Macdonald, David W.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Painter, Luke E.; Sandom, Christopher J.; Terborgh, John; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2015-01-01

    Large wild herbivores are crucial to ecosystems and human societies. We highlight the 74 largest terrestrial herbivore species on Earth (body mass ≥100 kg), the threats they face, their important and often overlooked ecosystem effects, and the conservation efforts needed to save them and their predators from extinction. Large herbivores are generally facing dramatic population declines and range contractions, such that ~60% are threatened with extinction. Nearly all threatened species are in developing countries, where major threats include hunting, land-use change, and resource depression by livestock. Loss of large herbivores can have cascading effects on other species including large carnivores, scavengers, mesoherbivores, small mammals, and ecological processes involving vegetation, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and fire regimes. The rate of large herbivore decline suggests that ever-larger swaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs. PMID:26601172

  8. Spitzer/IRAC Photometry Of The Four Largest Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Richard; Emery, J.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.

    2012-10-01

    The surfaces of the four largest Uranian satellites are dominated by water ice and a spectrally neutral constituent that is likely carbonaceous in composition. CO2 ice has been detected on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania, with no detection on the furthest regular Uranian satellite, Oberon (Grundy et al., 2003, 2006). Whether CO2 ice is primordial or is actively produced in the Uranian system is unclear; however, it seems unlikely that primordial CO2 ice would remain exposed on an icy satellite surface over the age of the Solar System. One possible mechanism for producing CO2 ice is bombardment of water ice and carbonaceous material by charged particles caught in Uranus’ magnetic field. Unlike the other large Uranian satellites, Oberon spends part of its orbit outside the confines of Uranus’ magnetic field, which might help explain why CO2 ice has yet to be detected on Oberon. We are using photometric data gathered by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), in order to search for the signature of CO2 ice on Oberon, and confirm its presence on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania at longer wavelengths than previous studies. IRAC collects data in four different channels, which are centered roughly at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 µm. Additionally, we are gathering spectroscopic data using SpeX on IRTF, at similar longitudes to the IRAC observations, in order to characterize the distribution of CO2 ice on these icy satellites over a wide range of near-infrared wavelengths. Our preliminary photometry results for Oberon indicate that there is a steep reduction in reflected solar flux from channel 1 to channel 2, suggesting that surface materials are absorbing photons at wavelengths within the bandpass of channel 2. We will present the results of our photometric analysis of the four largest Uranian moons.

  9. Supergranulation as the Sun's largest buoyantly driven mode of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Solar supergranulation has been characterized as horizontally divergent flow motions having a typical scale of 32 Mm using Doppler imaging, granule tracking and helioseismology. Unlike granules, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale height at the photosphere, supergranules do not appear to correspond to any particular length scale of the flow. Possible explanations ranging from convection theories involving Helium ionization to spatial correlation or self-organization of granular flows have been proposed as physical mechanisms to explain solar supergranulation. However, its existence remains largely a mystery. Remarkably, horizontal velocity power spectra obtained from Doppler imaging and correlation tracking of flow features at the solar surface reveal the presence of peaks corresponding to granular and supergranular scales, followed by a monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation, which suggests that large-scale modes in the deep layers of the convection zone may be suppressed. Using 3D anelastic simulations of solar convection we investigate whether supergranulation may reflect the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection inside the Sun. Results show that the amount of kinetic energy contained in the largest flow scales relative to that associated with supergranular motions is a function of the depth of the transition from a convectively unstable to convectively stable mean stratification inside the simulation. This suggests that the observed monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation may be explained by rapid cooling in the subphotospheric layers and an essentially isentropic solar interior, wherein convective driving is effectively suppressed.

  10. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

  11. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  12. Burn Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... a resource to the community. Learn more The Burn Institute reaches thousands of children and adults each year through fire and burn prevention education, burn survivor support programs and the ...

  13. Largest Aftershocks of Megathrust Earthquakes in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, J.; Tsuzuki, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake of Mw9.0 induced the earthquake activity in high level all over Japan. It included not only earthquakes near active faults but also volcanic earthquakes. Although we have observed tens of thousands of aftershocks, yet we do not know which is the largest aftershock of the 2011 megathrust. There occurred several megathrust earthquakes worldwide in the last one hundred years, which are almost the same size or larger than the 2011 megathrust. We have studied their largest aftershocks based on our new hypothesis of along-dip double segmentation (ADDS) and along-strike single segmentation (ASSS). ADDS in the Tohoku-oki region along the Japan trench is characterized by the apparent absence of earthquakes in the trench-ward segments as opposed to the Japan Island-ward segments that have repeated small earthquakes of up to Mw8 class. In contrast, the 1960 Chile and the 2010 Maule megathrusts are characterized by ASSS with the weak seismic activity before the main event everywhere in the subduction zone. The difference between these two types of seismic segmentations would be that strongly coupled areas of trench-ward segments give rise to ADDS, whereas almost 100% coupled areas of shallow-parts of subduction zones give rise to ASSS. In other words, the phenomenon of a seismic gap can be identified for an ASSS megathrust, where as a doughnut pattern of seismic activity appears prior to a main ADDS event. In summary, most of the largest aftershocks of ADDS megathrusts are earthquakes of outer-rise(outer trench-slope) normal faultings, where there occur two types, dip-slip and strike-slip, depending on the structure of subducting oceanic plates. The 1933 Sanriku-oki Mw8.6 (the 1896 Meiji-Sanriku M~8.5) and the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw7.7 (the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw9.0) are the former and the 1987 Off Alaska Mw7.8 (the 1964 Alaska Mw9.2) and the 2012 Sumatra Mw8.6 (the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Mw9.3) are the latter. Those of ASSS megathrusts occurred

  14. Spectral properties of the largest asteroids associated with Taurid Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M.; Birlan, M.; Nedelcu, D. A.; Vaubaillon, J.; Cristescu, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The Taurid Complex is a massive stream of material in the inner part of the Solar System. It contains objects spanning the range of 10-6-103 m, considered by some authors to have a common cometary origin. The asteroids belonging to Taurid Complex are on Apollo type orbit, with most of them being flagged as potentially hazardous asteroids. In this context, understanding the nature and the origin of this asteroidal population is not only of scientific interest but also of practical importance. Aims: We aim to investigate the surface mineralogy of the asteroids associated with Taurid Complex using visible and near-infrared spectral data. Compositional linking between these asteroids and meteorites can be derived based on the obtained spectra. Methods: We obtained spectra of six of the largest asteroids (2201, 4183, 4486, 5143, 6063, and 269690) associated with Taurid complex. The observations were made with the IRTF telescope equipped with the spectro-imager SpeX. Their taxonomic classification is made using Bus-DeMeo taxonomy. The asteroid spectra are compared with the meteorite spectra from the Relab database. Mineralogical models were applied to determine their surface composition. All the spectral analysis is made in the context of the already published physical data. Results: Five of the objects studied in this paper present spectral characteristics similar to the S taxonomic complex. The spectra of ordinary chondrites (spanning H, L, and LL subtypes) are the best matches for these asteroid spectra. The asteroid (269690) 1996 RG3 presents a flat featureless spectrum which could be associated to a primitive C-type object. The increased reflectance above 2.1 microns constrains its geometrical albedo to a value around 0.03. Conclusions: While there is an important dynamical grouping among the Taurid Complex asteroids, the spectral data of the largest objects do not support a common cometary origin. Furthermore, there are significant variations between the

  15. Outsourced Investment Management: An Overview for Institutional Decision-Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John S.; Jarvis, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Outsourcing of investment management is a growing trend among institutional investors. With a broad range of institutions using or exploring the outsourced chief investment officer (OCIO) model, portfolio size is no longer the determining factor driving the outsourcing decision. For all but the largest institutional investors--those with deep…

  16. Diverse Hispanic population to become largest U.S. minority.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    High immigration rates and relatively high birth rates have made Hispanics the second fastest growing minority population in the US. Only the Asian population is growing faster. In 1996, 11% of the US's population was Hispanic. However, Hispanic Americans are projected to outnumber African Americans by 2005, and by 2050, the Hispanic population in the US is projected to total approximately 100 million, 25% of the US population and the largest of the country's ethnic minorities. Latinos have the lowest rates of high school and college graduation of any major population group in the US. Since relevant data first became available in 1972 and until 1994, the median income of Latino families has remained below that of White families, but above that of African American families. The Hispanics' median family income of $24,000 in 1995 was below that of African American families. Puerto Rican and Mexican families are most likely to be poor, while Cubans are least likely. There is considerable diversity within the US's Hispanic population. For example, some Hispanics speak only Spanish, while others speak no Spanish at all. Hispanic Americans come from many countries and cultures, making the differences between and within the Hispanic ethnic groups sometimes as great as their similarities. Most Americans do not understand that Hispanics are an ethnic group, not a racial group.

  17. Huge-LQG- the largest structure in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowes, R. G.; Raghunathan, S.; Harris, K. A.; Campusano, L. E.; Sochting, I. K.; Graham, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    A large quasar group (LQG) of particularly large size and high membership has been identified in the DR7QSO catalogue of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It has characteristic size (volume^{1/3}) ˜ 500 Mpc (proper size, present epoch), longest dimension ˜ 1240 Mpc, membership of 73 quasars and mean redshift z=1.27. In terms of both size and membership, it is the most extreme LQG found in the DR7QSO catalog for the redshift range 1.0 < z <1.8 of our current investigation. Its location on the sky is ˜ 8.8 degrees north (˜ 615 Mpc projected) of the Clowes & Campusano LQG at the same redshift, z=1.28, which is itself one of the more extreme examples. This new, Huge-LQG appears to be the largest structure currently known in the early Universe. Its size suggests incompatibility with the Yadav et al. (2010) scale of homogeneity for the concordance cosmology, and thus challenges the assumption of the cosmological principle.

  18. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2016-07-12

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  19. Developmental origins of the world’s largest flowers, Rafflesiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Nikolov, Lachezar A.; Endress, Peter K.; Sugumaran, M.; Sasirat, Sawitree; Vessabutr, Suyanee; Kramer, Elena M.; Davis, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Rafflesiaceae, which produce the world’s largest flowers, have captivated the attention of biologists for nearly two centuries. Despite their fame, however, the developmental nature of the floral organs in these giants has remained a mystery. Most members of the family have a large floral chamber defined by a diaphragm. The diaphragm encloses the reproductive organs where pollination by carrion flies occurs. In lieu of a functional genetic system to investigate floral development in these highly specialized holoparasites, we used comparative studies of structure, development, and gene-expression patterns to investigate the homology of their floral organs. Our results surprisingly demonstrate that the otherwise similar floral chambers in two Rafflesiaceae subclades, Rafflesia and Sapria, are constructed very differently. In Rafflesia, the diaphragm is derived from the petal whorl. In contrast, in Sapria it is derived from elaboration of a unique ring structure located between the perianth and the stamen whorl, which, although developed to varying degrees among the genera, appears to be a synapomorphy of the Rafflesiaceae. Thus, the characteristic features that define the floral chamber in these closely related genera are not homologous. These differences refute the prevailing hypothesis that similarities between Sapria and Rafflesia are ancestral in the family. Instead, our data indicate that Rafflesia-like and Sapria-like floral chambers represent two distinct derivations of this morphology. The developmental repatterning we identified in Rafflesia, in particular, may have provided architectural reinforcement, which permitted the explosive growth in floral diameter that has arisen secondarily within this subclade. PMID:24167265

  20. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2014-04-03

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  1. [A Standing Balance Evaluation Method Based on Largest Lyapunov Exponent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang; Zhao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of human standing balance scientifically, we in this study proposed a new evaluation method based on the chaos nonlinear analysis theory. In this method, a sinusoidal acceleration stimulus in forward/backward direction was forced under the subjects' feet, which was supplied by a motion platform. In addition, three acceleration sensors, which were fixed to the shoulder, hip and knee of each subject, were applied to capture the balance adjustment dynamic data. Through reconstructing the system phase space, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of the dynamic data of subjects' different segments, then used the sum of the squares of the difference between each LLE (SSDLLE) as the balance capabilities evaluation index. Finally, 20 subjects' indexes were calculated, and compared with evaluation results of existing methods. The results showed that the SSDLLE were more in line with the subjects' performance during the experiment, and it could measure the body's balance ability to some extent. Moreover, the results also illustrated that balance level was determined by the coordinate ability of various joints, and there might be more balance control strategy in the process of maintaining balance.

  2. Benchmark Testing of the Largest Titanium Aluminide Sheet Subelement Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Krause, David L.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate wrought titanium aluminide (gamma TiAl) as a viable candidate material for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) exhaust nozzle, an international team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field successfully fabricated and tested the largest gamma TiAl sheet structure ever manufactured. The gamma TiAl sheet structure, a 56-percent subscale divergent flap subelement, was fabricated for benchmark testing in three-point bending. Overall, the subelement was 84-cm (33-in.) long by 13-cm (5-in.) wide by 8-cm (3-in.) deep. Incorporated into the subelement were features that might be used in the fabrication of a full-scale divergent flap. These features include the use of: (1) gamma TiAl shear clips to join together sections of corrugations, (2) multiple gamma TiAl face sheets, (3) double hot-formed gamma TiAl corrugations, and (4) brazed joints. The structural integrity of the gamma TiAl sheet subelement was evaluated by conducting a room-temperature three-point static bend test.

  3. Largest US oil and gas fields, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-06

    The Largest US Oil and Gas Fields is a technical report and part of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) series presenting distributions of US crude oil and natural gas resources, developed using field-level data collected by EIA`s annual survey of oil and gas proved reserves. The series` objective is to provide useful information beyond that routinely presented in the EIA annual report on crude oil and natural gas reserves. These special reports also will provide oil and gas resource analysts with a fuller understanding of the nature of US crude oil and natural gas occurrence, both at the macro level and with respect to the specific subjects addressed. The series` approach is to integrate EIA`s crude oil and natural gas survey data with related data obtained from other authoritative sources, and then to present illustrations and analyses of interest to a broad spectrum of energy information users ranging from the general public to oil and gas industry personnel.

  4. Characterization of the Largest Effector Gene Cluster of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Vincon, Volker; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-01-01

    In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function. PMID:24992561

  5. Largest meteor since Tunguska event explodes above Russian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-02-01

    The meteor that disintegrated in the atmosphere above Chelyabinsk, Russia, on 15 February, injuring more than 1000 people and causing widespread property damage from the shock wave, is the largest such incident since the 1908 Tunguska event in Siberia, according to Paul Chodas, research scientist in the Near-Earth Object (NEO) program office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. During a 15 February teleconference, Chodas said it was an "incredible coincidence" that asteroid DA14 passed safely by Earth on the same day as the Chelyabinsk meteor; the 45-meter-wide asteroid sped by the planet at a distance of just 27,700 kilometers away on its closest approach. He stressed that the meteor was not related to DA14. The meteor "was coming from the wrong direction and at a completely different velocity," he said, noting that the orbit of the meteor went out to the asteroid belt while the orbit of DA14 "is very Earth-like, it does not go out so far."

  6. Elephants have relatively the largest cerebellum size of mammals.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Busisiwe C; Spocter, Muhammad A; Haagensen, Mark; Manger, Paul R

    2012-04-01

    The current study used MR imaging to determine the volume of the cerebellum and its component parts in the brain of three adult male African elephants (Loxodonta africana) and compared this with published data from Asian elephants and other mammalian species including odontocete cetaceans, primates, chiropterans, insectivores, carnivores, and artiodactyls. The cerebellum of the adult elephant has a volume of ∼925 mL (average of both African and Asian species). Allometric analysis indicates that the elephant has the largest relative cerebellum size of all mammals studied to date. In addition, both odontocete cetaceans and microchiropterans appear to have large relative cerebellar sizes. The vermal and hemispheric components of the African elephant cerebellum are both large relative to other mammals of similar brain size, however, for odontocete cetaceans the vermal component is small and the hemispheric component is large. These volumetric observations are related to life-histories and anatomies of the species investigated. The current study provides context for one aspect of the elephant brain in the broader picture of mammalian brain evolution.

  7. Characterization of the largest effector gene cluster of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Brefort, Thomas; Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Neidig, Nina; Doehlemann, Gunther; Vincon, Volker; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-07-01

    In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function.

  8. Largest known historical eruption in Africa: Dubbi volcano, Eritrea, 1861

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiart, Pierre; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2000-04-01

    Dubbi volcano, located in the northeast part of the Afar triangle, erupted explosively in May 1861, showering maritime traffic in the Red Sea with pumice and plunging coastal settlements into darkness. Earthquakes associated with the opening phase of the eruption were felt in Yemen, and explosions were heard as far as Massawa, 330 km distant. More than 100 local inhabitants were reported killed, possibly as a result of pyroclastic flow emplacement. By October 1861, activity switched to basaltic fire-fountaining focused along a 4-km-long summit fissure that fed several lava flows that traveled as far as 22 km. We present a reconstruction of this unusual explosive and effusive eruption sequence based on interpretation of contemporary accounts, analysis of satellite imagery, field work, and laboratory geochemistry. The volume of lava flows alone, 3.5 km3, makes this the largest reported historical eruption in Africa. An anomalously cold Northern Hemisphere summer in 1862, recorded in tree-ring records, could be the result of Dubbi's sulfate aerosol veil.

  9. LHC World Largest Vacuum Systems Being Commissioned at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Jose Miguel

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with its 26.7 km of circumference and three different vacuum systems for the beams and insulation vacuum for magnets and liquid helium transfer lines, will have the world's largest vacuum system operating over a wide range of pressures and employing an impressive array of vacuum technologies. This system is composed by 54 km of UHV vacuum for the circulating beams and 50 km of insulation vacuum. Over the 54 km of UHV beam vacuum, 48 km of this are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K). The remaining 6 km of beam vacuum containing the insertions for “cleaning” the proton beams, radiofrequency cavities for accelerating the protons as well as beam-monitoring equipment is at ambient temperature and uses non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings. The noble gases and methane is pumped out by 780 ion pumps. Pressure readings are provided by 170 Bayard-Alpert gauges and 1084 gauges (Pirani and cold cathode Penning). The cryogenic insulation vacuums while technically less demanding, impress by their size (50 km) and volume (15000 m3). Once roughed using mechanical pumps, the vacuum relies on the cryopumping which allows reaching pressure in the 10-4 Pa range.

  10. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F

    2011-11-22

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century.

  11. Annual trauma load of the world's largest indoor skiing center.

    PubMed

    Van Laarhoven, S N; Latten, G; de Loos, E; van Hemert, W; Vles, G F

    2017-04-01

    There is limited data on the trauma load caused by indoor skiing centers. Therefore, all patients treated at the accident and emergency department of our level I trauma center who sustained injuries at the world's largest indoor skiing center were analyzed during a 3-year period. Business intelligence was used to identify all patients who sustained injury at SnowWorld, Landgraaf, The Netherlands, and were seen at the accident and emergency department of the Zuyderland Medical Center from January 1, 2012 till December 31, 2014. Data were collected on patient characteristics, trauma mechanism, transportation, admission, diagnostics, injury and its severity, and treatment. Of the 732 patients seen, 305 had a fracture and 80 a dislocation. Most patients were male snowboarders and most injuries were sustained during winter. More than 2000 X-rays and 100 CT scans were required. Seventy-two patients were admitted and immediate surgery was performed in 21 patients. Ten patients had Injury Severity Scores of 10 or higher. Snowboarders differed significantly from skiers on several parameters, e.g., 1 in 4 snowboarders seen had sustained a distal radius fracture compared to 1 in 100 skiers. Acquiring more insight into the characteristics of this specific patient population could benefit clinical care and help clinicians identify and target preventive strategies. IV.

  12. Four corners: The largest US methane anomaly viewed from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kort, Eric A.; Frankenberg, Christian; Costigan, Keeley R.; Lindenmaier, Rodica; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Wunch, Debra

    2014-10-01

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas and ozone precursor. Quantifying methane emissions is critical for projecting and mitigating changes to climate and air quality. Here we present CH4 observations made from space combined with Earth-based remote sensing column measurements. Results indicate the largest anomalous CH4 levels viewable from space over the conterminous U.S. are located at the Four Corners region in the Southwest U.S. Emissions exceeding inventory estimates, totaling 0.59 Tg CH4/yr [0.50-0.67; 2σ], are necessary to bring high-resolution simulations and observations into agreement. This underestimated source approaches 10% of the EPA estimate of total U.S. CH4 emissions from natural gas. The persistence of this CH4 signal from 2003 onward indicates that the source is likely from established gas, coal, and coalbed methane mining and processing. This work demonstrates that space-based observations can identify anomalous CH4 emission source regions and quantify their emissions with the use of a transport model.

  13. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2011-01-01

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century. PMID:22025693

  14. 75 FR 16523 - FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company; Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company; Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Exemption 1.0 Background FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company (FENOC, the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating License... M.S. Fertel, Nuclear Energy Institute). The licensee's request for an exemption is...

  15. US nuclear weapons policy

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.

    1990-12-05

    We are closing chapter one'' of the nuclear age. Whatever happens to the Soviet Union and to Europe, some of the major determinants of nuclear policy will not be what they have been for the last forty-five years. Part of the task for US nuclear weapons policy is to adapt its nuclear forces and the oganizations managing them to the present, highly uncertain, but not urgently competitive situation between the US and the Soviet Union. Containment is no longer the appropriate watchword. Stabilization in the face of uncertainty, a more complicated and politically less readily communicable goal, may come closer. A second and more difficult part of the task is to deal with what may be the greatest potential source of danger to come out of the end of the cold war: the breakup of some of the cooperative institutions that managed the nuclear threat and were created by the cold war. These cooperative institutions, principally the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Warsaw Pact, the US-Japan alliance, were not created specifically to manage the nuclear threat, but manage it they did. A third task for nuclear weapons policy is that of dealing with nuclear proliferation under modern conditions when the technologies needed to field effective nuclear weapons systems and their command and control apparatus are ever more widely available, and the leverage over some potential proliferators, which stemmed from superpower military support, is likely to be on the wane. This paper will make some suggestions regarding these tasks, bearing in mind that the unsettled nature of that part of the world most likely to become involved in nuclear weapons decisions today must make any suggestions tentative and the allowance for surprise more than usually important.

  16. The Colombian nuclear scenario: Challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    In Colombia, the absence of nuclear-oriented policies based on technical knowledge, the closing of the Nuclear Affairs Institute (1956-1998), the association of the word "nuclear" with weapons, plus the country's last six decades of internal conflict and narcotraffic have discourage the technical, social and environmental nuclear advance. However, there are technical, social and economic national challenges that could be faced by the present nuclear technical capacities.

  17. Cassini RADAR Observes Titan's Kraken Mare, The Largest Extraterrestrial Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging by Cassini's RADAR instrument beginning in 2006 revealed the presence of hundreds of hydrocarbon lakes and three large seas in Titan's north polar region [1,2]. Kraken Mare appeared to be the largest sea in IR images [3] but only the northern end was imaged by RADAR prior to 2012. High altitude SAR (HiSAR) observations on recent Titan flybys T84, T91, and T92 now provide complete coverage of Kraken and environs to ~50°N, at resolutions of 2-10 km. Backscatter statistics of the sea are 0.002 × 0.04, i.e., any return is substantially less than the noise and much less than typical dry land cross sections of 0.1-1.5. We conclude that Kraken is liquid filled to substantial depth over its entire extent. A surprising result is that the major seas all lie within a 1800 x 900 km 'box' (Fig.1). A third of the area inside this box (0.6 M km2) is sea, whereas the largest lake outside the box is only 0.005 M km2. Kraken's overall shape is complex (lobateness 4.4 vs 2.1 for Ligeia) but its 0.44 M km2 is divided by 20 to 160 km wide straits into 5 sub-basins that are elongated E-W across the box. Numerous straight shoreline segments parallel the edges of the box. Others parallel the 10°, 80°, and 170°W meridians, as do the rectangular drainage patterns mapped by [4]. These alignments suggest a key role for tectonics in creating the depressions occupied by the northern seas. Fensal and Aztlan (the 'lazy H' of dune-filled lows straddling the equator at longitudes 0°-70°W) form a similar pattern of elongated depressions connected by a narrow strait within a rectangular box. In contrast, Titan's small lakes are widely distributed. Multiple depressions with radar-dark floors have been identified near the south pole and hypothesized as former seabeds [5], but though similar in size to the northern seas, they are not aligned with one another or tightly clustered. Thus, the geography of the north and south poles will remain distinct even if

  18. Genome size analyses of Pucciniales reveal the largest fungal genomes.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Sílvia; Ramos, Ana Paula; Pires, Ana Sofia; Azinheira, Helena G; Caldeirinha, Patrícia; Link, Tobias; Abranches, Rita; Silva, Maria do Céu; Voegele, Ralf T; Loureiro, João; Talhinhas, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales) are biotrophic plant pathogens which exhibit diverse complexities in their life cycles and host ranges. The completion of genome sequencing of a few rust fungi has revealed the occurrence of large genomes. Sequencing efforts for other rust fungi have been hampered by uncertainty concerning their genome sizes. Flow cytometry was recently applied to estimate the genome size of a few rust fungi, and confirmed the occurrence of large genomes in this order (averaging 225.3 Mbp, while the average for Basidiomycota was 49.9 Mbp and was 37.7 Mbp for all fungi). In this work, we have used an innovative and simple approach to simultaneously isolate nuclei from the rust and its host plant in order to estimate the genome size of 30 rust species by flow cytometry. Genome sizes varied over 10-fold, from 70 to 893 Mbp, with an average genome size value of 380.2 Mbp. Compared to the genome sizes of over 1800 fungi, Gymnosporangium confusum possesses the largest fungal genome ever reported (893.2 Mbp). Moreover, even the smallest rust genome determined in this study is larger than the vast majority of fungal genomes (94%). The average genome size of the Pucciniales is now of 305.5 Mbp, while the average Basidiomycota genome size has shifted to 70.4 Mbp and the average for all fungi reached 44.2 Mbp. Despite the fact that no correlation could be drawn between the genome sizes, the phylogenomics or the life cycle of rust fungi, it is interesting to note that rusts with Fabaceae hosts present genomes clearly larger than those with Poaceae hosts. Although this study comprises only a small fraction of the more than 7000 rust species described, it seems already evident that the Pucciniales represent a group where genome size expansion could be a common characteristic. This is in sharp contrast to sister taxa, placing this order in a relevant position in fungal genomics research.

  19. Flow mixing at the World's largest river confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Jim; Ianniruberto, Marco; Gualtieri, Carlo; Paes de Almeida, Renato; Freitas, Bernardo; Nogueira, Pedro; Cisneros, Julia

    2017-04-01

    River confluences form key nodes within all fluvial networks and points of significant, and non-linear, changes in flow discharge, sediment grain size and bed morphology. It is generally acknowledged that the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics within the confluence zone are influenced by the junction planform, the momentum flux ratio between the merging streams, and the level of concordance between channel beds at the confluence entrance. Recent work has also identified the role of density differences between the confluent flows as potentially exerting a significant influence on fluid mixing. Perhaps the most well-known example, which has attracted considerable recent study, is at the world's largest river confluence - the Rio Solimões and Rio Negro (the Encontro das Águas), near Manaus, in the Amazonian basin. This paper sheds new light on the patterns of mixing at the Encontro das Águas as revealed by combined multibeam echo sounder (MBES) and acoustic Doppler current profiling (aDcp) surveys. The MBES survey reveals that the scour and bed morphology at this confluence, that can be up to c. 80m deep, is dominated by the presence of Cretaceous bedrock and that the mobile bedload sediment from the Rio Solimões is confined to a narrow zone of transport. The suspended sediment plume from the Rio Solimões interacts with the bedrock, which can comprise subaqueous roughness up to 20m in height, and is consequently diverted both laterally and vertically by this topography. The aDcp surveys reveal the nature of this topographic interaction and suggest that the routing of sediment-laden fluid within the junction, and the patterns of upwelling on the flow surface, are significantly influenced by these flow-bedrock interactions. Details of the topography and these fluid dynamic interactions will be presented, together with an analysis of satellite imagery that links the longevity of the location of some of the upwellings to the presence of bedrock roughness.

  20. Stratification at the Earth's largest hyperacidic lake and its consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudron, Corentin; Campion, Robin; Rouwet, Dmitri; Lecocq, Thomas; Capaccioni, Bruno; Syahbana, Devy; Suparjan; Purwanto, Bambang Heri; Bernard, Alain

    2017-02-01

    Volcanic lakes provide windows into the interior of volcanoes as they integrate the heat flux discharged by a magma body and condense volcanic gases. Volcanic lake temperatures and geochemical compositions therefore typically serve as warnings for resumed unrest or prior to eruptions. If acidic and hot, these lakes are usually considered to be too convective to allow any stratification within their waters. Kawah Ijen volcano, featuring the largest hyperacidic lake on Earth (volume of 27 million m3), is less homogeneous than previously thought. Hourly temperature measurements reveal the development of a stagnant layer of cold waters (<30 °C), overlying warmer and denser water (generally above 30 °C and density ∼1.083 kg/m3). Examination of 20 yrs of historical records and temporary measurements show a systematic thermal stratification during rainy seasons. The yearly rupture of stratification at the end of the rainy season causes a sudden release of dissolved gases below the cold water layer which appears to generate a lake overturn, i.e. limnic eruption, and a resonance of the lake, i.e. a seiche, highlighting a new hazard for these extreme reservoirs. A minor non-volcanic event, such as a heavy rainfall or an earthquake, may act as a trigger. The density driven overturn requires specific salinity-temperature conditions for the colder and less saline top water layer to sink into the hot saline water. Spectacular degassing occurs when the dissolved gases, progressively stored during the rainy season due to a weakened diffusion of carbon dioxide in the top layer, are suddenly released. These findings challenge the homogenization assumption at acidic lakes and stress the need to develop appropriate monitoring setups.

  1. High feeding costs limit dive time in the largest whales.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Gutiérrez, A; Croll, D A; Tershy, B R

    2002-06-01

    Large body size usually extends dive duration in air-breathing vertebrates. However, the two largest predators on earth, the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) and the fin whale (B. physalus), perform short dives for their size. Here, we test the hypothesis that the foraging behavior of these two species (lunge-feeding) is energetically expensive and limits their dive duration. We estimated the cost of lunge-feeding in both species using an approach that combined attaching time/depth recorders to seven blue whales and eight fin whales and comparing the collected dive information with predictions made by optimality models of dive behavior. We show that the rate at which whales recovered from a foraging dive was twice that of a non-foraging dive and that the cost of foraging relative to the cost of travel to and from the prey patch was 3.15 in blue whales (95 % CI 2.58-3.72) and 3.60 in fin whales (95 % CI 2.35-4.85). Whales foraged in small areas (<1 km(2)) and foraging bouts lasted more than one dive, indicating that prey did not disperse and thus that prey dispersal could not account for the limited dive durations of the whales. Despite the enormous size of blue whales and fin whales, the high energetic costs of lunge-feeding confine them to short durations of submergence and to areas with dense prey aggregations. As a corollary, because of their limited foraging time under water, these whales may be particularly vulnerable to perturbations in prey abundance.

  2. Global assessment of nutrient loads to the world's largest lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Gabriel; Reder, Klara; Malsy, Marcus; Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Lakes are essential resources of drinking water for a large part of mankind. Even so, most of the industrial and domestic waste water is discharged - often untreated - into rivers and streams that are finally the tributaries of these important freshwater bodies. Additionally, diffuse nutrient sources such as fertilizer and atmospheric deposition exacerbate existing algal blooms and low oxygen concentrations in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. In this tense atmosphere of competing water uses, it is necessary to analyze all sources of pollution as well as their total contributions in order to protect these water bodies against deterioration. Finally, this is a general and urgently needed basis for developing recommendations for involved stakeholders and decision makers. Therefore, the project eartH2Observe, initiated and financed by the European Commission, creates the necessary and underlying quantitative and qualitative hydrological and water use data. In this context, information for global as well as for regional water resource assessments is being prepared based on new earth observations and an ensemble of global hydrological models. As a member of this ensemble, WaterGAP3 provides global estimates of lake water quality relevant parameters on a 5 arc minutes grid, namely total phosphorus and total nitrogen. These nutrient loads to lakes from different sources such as industrial fertilizer, organic fertilizer, domestic loads, atmospheric deposition, and urban surface runoff are estimated for the period 1990 to 2010 in a monthly time step. Whereas nutrient loads and their changes into numerous lakes worldwide are calculated, a special focus is set on nutrient loads into the large and shallow Lake Peipus, which is located between Estonia and Russia and subject to blooms of harmful cyanobacteria. We present estimates, trends, as well as sources of present nutrient loads (TN and TP) to the world's largest lakes with detailed insights to the Lake Peipus situation

  3. [Comparative analysis of semiotic shifts, established by LCS of blood plasma from random samples of studied subjects from the zone of the Chernobyl accident, "Ural Radiation Trace", and collaborators from St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences].

    PubMed

    Ternovoĭ, K S; Selezneva, T N; Akleev, A V; Pashkov, I A; Noskin, L A; Klopov, N V; Noskin, V A; Starodub, N F

    1998-01-01

    Using the developed "semiotic" classifier of laser correlation spectra of blood plasma the authors have carried out the verification of organism states of patients from the zone of Chernobyl accident, "Ural radiation trace" and collaborators from Sanct-Petersbourg Institute of Nuclear Physics. An analysis of results obtained using accidental selections which differed as to the character of radiation injury evidences for high informativeness of "semiotic" classifier of laser correlation spectra of blood plasma.

  4. Mapping Biomass for REDD in the Largest Forest of Central Africa: the Democratic Republic of Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Aurelie; Saatchi, Sassan

    2014-05-01

    With the support of the International Climate Initiative (ICI) of the Federal Ministry of the Environment, Conservation, and Nuclear Security, the implementation of the German Development Bank KfW, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Germany, the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and local DRC partners will produce a national scale biomass map for the entire forest coverage of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) along with feasibility assessments of different forest protection measures within a framework of a REDD+ model project. The « Carbon Map and Model (CO2M&M) » project will produce a national forest biomass map for the DRC, which will enable quantitative assessments of carbon stocks and emissions in the largest forest of the Congo Basin. This effort will support the national REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) program in DRC, which plays a major role in sustainable development and poverty alleviation. This map will be developed from field data, complemented by airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and aerial photos, systematically sampled throughout the forests of the DRC and up-scaled to satellite images to accurately estimate carbon content in all forested areas. The second component of the project is to develop specific approaches for model REDD projects in key landscapes. This project represents the largest LiDAR-derived mapping effort in Africa, under unprecedented logistical constraints, which will provide one of the poorest nations in the world with the richest airborne and satellites derived datasets for analyzing forest structure, biomass and biodiversity.

  5. E-Competent Teacher and Principal as the Foundation of E-Competent School E-Education, the Largest School Informatization Project in Slovenia 2008-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Šverc, Magdalena; Flogie, Andrej; Krabonja, Maja Vicic; Percic, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2008-2013 Ministry of Education in the Republic of Slovenia prepared largest project of informatization of educational institutions. One of the main goals of the project E-Education is the development of the standard E-Competent Teacher, School Principal and IT Expert. The standard E-Competent Teacher, Principal and IT Expert…

  6. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  7. Nuclear ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  8. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  9. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations.

  10. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-04

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  11. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-01

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  12. Phylogeny and diversification of the largest avian radiation

    PubMed Central

    Barker, F. Keith; Cibois, Alice; Schikler, Peter; Feinstein, Julie; Cracraft, Joel

    2004-01-01

    The order Passeriformes (“perching birds”) comprises extant species diversity comparable to that of living mammals. For over a decade, a single phylogenetic hypothesis based on DNA–DNA hybridization has provided the primary framework for numerous comparative analyses of passerine ecological and behavioral evolution and for tests of the causal factors accounting for rapid radiations within the group. We report here a strongly supported phylogenetic tree based on two single-copy nuclear gene sequences for the most complete sampling of passerine families to date. This tree is incongruent with that derived from DNA–DNA hybridization, with half of the nodes from the latter in conflict and over a third of the conflicts significant as assessed under maximum likelihood. Our historical framework suggests multiple waves of passerine dispersal from Australasia into Eurasia, Africa, and the New World, commencing as early as the Eocene, essentially reversing the classical scenario of oscine biogeography. The revised history implied by these data will require reassessment of comparative analyses of passerine diversification and adaptation. PMID:15263073

  13. Genome size analyses of Pucciniales reveal the largest fungal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Sílvia; Ramos, Ana Paula; Pires, Ana Sofia; Azinheira, Helena G.; Caldeirinha, Patrícia; Link, Tobias; Abranches, Rita; Silva, Maria do Céu; Voegele, Ralf T.; Loureiro, João; Talhinhas, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales) are biotrophic plant pathogens which exhibit diverse complexities in their life cycles and host ranges. The completion of genome sequencing of a few rust fungi has revealed the occurrence of large genomes. Sequencing efforts for other rust fungi have been hampered by uncertainty concerning their genome sizes. Flow cytometry was recently applied to estimate the genome size of a few rust fungi, and confirmed the occurrence of large genomes in this order (averaging 225.3 Mbp, while the average for Basidiomycota was 49.9 Mbp and was 37.7 Mbp for all fungi). In this work, we have used an innovative and simple approach to simultaneously isolate nuclei from the rust and its host plant in order to estimate the genome size of 30 rust species by flow cytometry. Genome sizes varied over 10-fold, from 70 to 893 Mbp, with an average genome size value of 380.2 Mbp. Compared to the genome sizes of over 1800 fungi, Gymnosporangium confusum possesses the largest fungal genome ever reported (893.2 Mbp). Moreover, even the smallest rust genome determined in this study is larger than the vast majority of fungal genomes (94%). The average genome size of the Pucciniales is now of 305.5 Mbp, while the average Basidiomycota genome size has shifted to 70.4 Mbp and the average for all fungi reached 44.2 Mbp. Despite the fact that no correlation could be drawn between the genome sizes, the phylogenomics or the life cycle of rust fungi, it is interesting to note that rusts with Fabaceae hosts present genomes clearly larger than those with Poaceae hosts. Although this study comprises only a small fraction of the more than 7000 rust species described, it seems already evident that the Pucciniales represent a group where genome size expansion could be a common characteristic. This is in sharp contrast to sister taxa, placing this order in a relevant position in fungal genomics research. PMID:25206357

  14. GIS learning tool for world's largest earthquakes and their causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Moumita

    The objective of this thesis is to increase awareness about earthquakes among people, especially young students by showing the five largest and two most predictable earthquake locations in the world and their plate tectonic settings. This is a geographic based interactive tool which could be used for learning about the cause of great earthquakes in the past and the safest places on the earth in order to avoid direct effect of earthquakes. This approach provides an effective way of learning for the students as it is very user friendly and more aligned to the interests of the younger generation. In this tool the user can click on the various points located on the world map which will open a picture and link to the webpage for that point, showing detailed information of the earthquake history of that place including magnitude of quake, year of past quakes and the plate tectonic settings that made this place earthquake prone. Apart from knowing the earthquake related information students will also be able to customize the tool to suit their needs or interests. Students will be able to add/remove layers, measure distance between any two points on the map, select any place on the map and know more information for that place, create a layer from this set to do a detail analysis, run a query, change display settings, etc. At the end of this tool the user has to go through the earthquake safely guidelines in order to be safe during an earthquake. This tool uses Java as programming language and uses Map Objects Java Edition (MOJO) provided by ESRI. This tool is developed for educational purpose and hence its interface has been kept simple and easy to use so that students can gain maximum knowledge through it instead of having a hard time to install it. There are lots of details to explore which can help more about what a GIS based tool is capable of. Only thing needed to run this tool is latest JAVA edition installed in their machine. This approach makes study more fun and

  15. Institution Morphisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  16. Institutional Censorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, John Gordon; Bowers, H. Paxton

    1970-01-01

    The difficulty an individual who has been denied access to library material faces in obtaining a remedy in the courts dictates that the library profession go on record against all forms of institutional censorship or unreasonable restrictions on use of library materials. (Author/JS)

  17. Institutional Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1975-01-01

    Institutional paralysis of higher education is the result of the disjunction between faculty and administration; the disjunction between substantive planning and bugetary decision-making; the disjunction between departmental structures and functional areas of university concern; and the disjunction between the theory of direct democracy and its…

  18. Institutional Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden R., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    This publication's theme, "Institutional Change," is broadly examined in fourteen articles that range from research and opinion to allegory and satire. A student teacher, a dean, and a state education director are among the authors. Articles concern: 1) key elements of change; 2) relationships between local, county, state, and federal educational…

  19. Institutional betrayal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carly Parnitzke; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    A college freshman reports a sexual assault and is met with harassment and insensitive investigative practices leading to her suicide. Former grade school students, now grown, come forward to report childhood abuse perpetrated by clergy, coaches, and teachers--first in trickles and then in waves, exposing multiple perpetrators with decades of unfettered access to victims. Members of the armed services elect to stay quiet about sexual harassment and assault during their military service or risk their careers by speaking up. A Jewish academic struggles to find a name for the systematic destruction of his people in Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. These seemingly disparate experiences have in common trusted and powerful institutions (schools, churches, military, government) acting in ways that visit harm upon those dependent on them for safety and well-being. This is institutional betrayal. The purpose of this article is to describe psychological research that examines the role of institutions in traumatic experiences and psychological distress following these experiences. We demonstrate the ways in which institutional betrayal has been left unseen by both the individuals being betrayed as well as the field of psychology and introduce means by which to identify and address this betrayal.

  20. Enhancing professionalism at GPU Nuclear

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Late in 1988, GPU Nuclear embarked on a major program aimed at enhancing professionalism at its Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island nuclear generating stations. The program was also to include its corporate headquarters in Parsippany, New Jersey. The overall program was to take several directions, including on-site degree programs, a sabbatical leave-type program for personnel to finish college degrees, advanced technical training for licensed staff, career progression for senior reactor operators, and expanded teamwork and leadership training for control room crew. The largest portion of this initiative was the development and delivery of professionalism training to the nearly 2,000 people at both nuclear generating sites.

  1. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  2. Drilling the Bushveld Complex- the world's largest layered mafic intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Webb, S. J.; Trumbull, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The fact that surprising new discoveries can be made in layered mafic intrusions (e.g., subtle 100-150 m cyclicity in apparently homogeneous cumulates over 1000s of m) means that we are still in the first-order characterization phase of understanding these objects. Accordingly, we have secured funding from ICDP for a planning workshop to be held in Johannesburg in early 2014, aimed at scientific drilling of the Bushveld Complex, the world's largest layered mafic intrusion. Science objectives include, but are not limited to: 1. Magma chamber processes & melt evolution. How many melts/magmas/mushes were involved, what were their compositions and how did they interact? What, if anything, is missing from the Complex, and where did it go? Did Bushveld magmatism have an effect upon Earth's atmosphere at 2 Ga? 2. Crust-mantle interactions & origin of Bushveld granitoids. Are Bushveld granites & rhyolites crustal melts, differentiates from the mafic magmas or products of immiscibility? How can the evolved isotopic signatures in the mafic rocks (e.g., epsilon Nd to -8) be understood? 3. Origin of ore deposits. What were the relative roles of gravity settling, magma mixing, immiscibility and hydrothermal fluid transport in producing the PGE, Cr and V deposits? We have identified 3 potential drilling targets representing a total of ~12 km of drill core. Exact locations of drill sites are to be discussed at the workshop. Target A- East-Central Bushveld Complex. We propose 3 overlapping 3 km boreholes that will provide the first roof-to-floor continuous coverage of the Rustenburg Layered Suite. These boreholes will represent a curated, internationally available reference collection of Bushveld material for present and future research. Target B- Southeastern Bushveld Complex. We propose a single borehole of ~2 km depth, collared in Rooiberg felsite, and positioned to intersect the Roof Zone, Upper Zone, Main Zone and floor of the Complex. Amongst other things, this site will

  3. Smart-Geology for the World's largest fossil oyster reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Djuricic, Ana; Rasztovits, Sascha; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    The geo-edutainment park "Fossilienwelt Weinviertel" at Stetten in Lower Austria exposes the world's largest fossil oyster biostrome. In the past decade, significant progress has been made in 3D digitizing sensor technology. To cope with the high amount of data, processing methods have been automated to a high degree. Consequently, we formulated the hypothesis that appropriate application of state-of-the-art 3D digitizing, data processing, and visualization technologies allows for a significant automation in paleontological prospection, making an evaluation of huge areas commercially feasible in both time and costs. We call the necessary processing steps "Smart Geology", being characterized by automation and large volumes of data. The Smart Geology project (FWF P 25883-N29) investigates three topics, 3D digitizing, automated geological and paleontological analysis and interpretation and finally investigating the applicability of smart devices for on-site accessibility of project data in order to support the two scientific hypotheses concerning the emerging process of the shell bed, i.e. was it formed by a tsunami or a major storm, and does it preserve pre- and post-event features. This contribution concentrates on the innovative and sophisticated 3D documentation and visualization processes being applied to virtualise approximately 15.000 fossil oysters at the approximately 25 by 17 m accessible shell bad. We decided to use a Terrestrial Laserscanner (TLS) for the determination of the geometrical 3D structures. The TLS achieves about 2 mm single point measurement accuracy. The scanning campaign provides a "raw" point cloud of approximately 1 bio. points at the respective area. Due to the scanning configuration used, the occurrence of occluded ares is minimized hence the full 3D structure of this unique site can be modelled. In addition, approximately 300 photos were taken with a nominal resolution of 0.6 mm per pixel. Sophisticated artificial lightning (close to

  4. Nuclear exoticism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  5. Nuclear exoticism

    SciTech Connect

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-15

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  6. White Paper on Nuclear Astrophysics and Low Energy Nuclear Physics - Part 1. Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Arcones, Almudena; Escher, Jutta E.; Others, M.

    2016-04-04

    This white paper informs the nuclear astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21 - 23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9 - 10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12 - 13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. With the developments outlined in this white paper, answers to long-standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade.

  7. COMPLEX BIOGEOGRAPHIC SCENARIOS REVEALED IN THE DIVERSIFICATION OF THE LARGEST WOODPECKER RADIATION IN THE NEW WORLD.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Vázquez-Miranda, Hernán; Hernández-Alonso, Germán; García-Trejo, Erick A; Sánchez-González, Luis A

    2017-04-12

    Phylogenetic relationships and patterns of evolution within Melanerpes, one of the most diverse groups of New World woodpeckers (22-23 lineages), have been complicated due to complex plumages and morphological adaptations. In an attempt to resolve these issues, we obtained sequence data from four nuclear introns and two mitochondrial protein-coding genes for 22 of the 24 currently recognized species in the genus. We performed phylogenetic analyses involving Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference, species-tree divergence dating, and biogeographic reconstructions. Tree topologies from the concatenated and species-tree analyses of the mtDNA and nDNA showed broadly similar patterns, with three relatively well-supported groups apparent: a) the Sphyrapicus clade (four species); b) the typical Melanerpes clade, which includes temperate and subtropical dry forest black-backed species; and c) the mostly barred-backed species, here referred to as the "Centurus" clade. The phylogenetic position of Melanerpes superciliaris regarding the rest of Melanerpes is ambiguous as it is recovered as sister to the rest of Melanerpes or as sister to a group including Sphyrapicus + Melanerpes. Our species tree estimations recovered the same well-delimited highly-supported clades. Geographic range evolution (estimated in BioGeoBEARS) was best explained by a DIVALIKE + j model, which includes vicariance, founder effect speciation, and anagenetic dispersal (range expansion) as important processes involved in the diversification of the largest radiation of woodpeckers in the New World.

  8. Next-Generation Museomics Disentangles One of the Largest Primate Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Johannes; Sawyer, Susanna; Valente, Luis M.; Bailey, Sebastian; Finstermeier, Knut; Sabin, Richard; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Sonet, Gontran; Nagy, Zoltán T.; Lenglet, Georges; Mayer, Frieder; Savolainen, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Guenons (tribe Cercopithecini) are one of the most diverse groups of primates. They occupy all of sub-Saharan Africa and show great variation in ecology, behavior, and morphology. This variation led to the description of over 60 species and subspecies. Here, using next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) in combination with targeted DNA capture, we sequenced 92 mitochondrial genomes from museum-preserved specimens as old as 117 years. We infer evolutionary relationships and estimate divergence times of almost all guenon taxa based on mitochondrial genome sequences. Using this phylogenetic framework, we infer divergence dates and reconstruct ancestral geographic ranges. We conclude that the extraordinary radiation of guenons has been a complex process driven by, among other factors, localized fluctuations of African forest cover. We find incongruences between phylogenetic trees reconstructed from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, which can be explained by either incomplete lineage sorting or hybridization. Furthermore, having produced the largest mitochondrial DNA data set from museum specimens, we document how NGS technologies can “unlock” museum collections, thereby helping to unravel the tree-of-life. [Museum collection; next-generation DNA sequencing; primate radiation; speciation; target capture.] PMID:23503595

  9. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast: 307 Treated Cases, the Largest Mexican Experience at a Single Breast Disease Institution

    PubMed Central

    Ruvalcaba-Limón, Eva; Jiménez-López, Josefina; Bautista-Piña, Verónica; Ramírez-Bollas, Julio; Morales-Vásquez, Flavia; Domínguez-Reyes, Carlos; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Phyllodes tumor (PT) of the breast in Hispanic patients is more frequently reported with large tumors and with more borderline/malignant subtypes compared with other populations. The objective of this study was to describe characteristics of patients with PT and to identify differences among subtypes in a Mexican population. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on patients with PT. Sociodemographic, histopathologic, and treatment characteristics were compared among subtypes, including only surgically treated cases due the complete surgical-specimen study requirement for appropriate WHO classification. Results: During 10 years, 346 PT were diagnosed; only 307 were included (305 patients), with a mean age of 41.7 yr. Self-detected lump took place in 91.8%, usually discovered 6 months previously, with median tumor size of 4.5 cm. Local wide excisions were done in 213 (69.8%) and mastectomies in 92 (30.1%). Immediate breast reconstruction took place in 38% and oncoplastic procedures in 23%. PT were classified as benign in 222 (72.3%) cases, borderline in 50 (16.2%), and malignant in 35 (11.4%), with pathological tumor size of 4.2, 5.4, and 8.7 cm, respectively (P<0.001). Patients with malignant PT were older (48 yr), with more diabetics (14.3%), less breastfeeding (37.1%), more smokers (17.1%), with more postmenopausal cases (42.9%), and older age at menopause (51.5 years) compared with the remaining subtypes (P<0.05). Relapse occurred in 8.2% of patients with follow-up. Conclusion: In comparison with other Hispanic publications, these Mexican patients had similar age, with smaller tumors, modestly higher benign PT, fewer malignant PT, and lower documented relapse cases. PMID:28855932

  10. Storing and Accessing the Largest Astronomical Catalogs with the SAI CAS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koposov, S.; Bartunov, O.; Belinskiy, A.; Karpov, S.

    2007-10-01

    We present a new project -- SAI CAS (Sternberg Astronomical Institute Catalog Access Services). The goal of this project is to provide the Russian and international community with online access to major large astronomical catalogs (USNO-A2.0/B1.0, SDSS, 2MASS, GSC I/II, DENIS, UCAC) and provide tools and services facilitating scientific research using these catalogs. Currently SAI CAS is the largest astronomical data center in Russia. It provides primary services such as cone search, cross match between catalogs inside a region on the sky, and between system and user catalogs, etc. Several science projects in Russia already use SAI CAS. The SAI CAS project is based on open source software and is an open source itself. The system uses relational database storage (PostgreSQL), where all data and metadata are stored. The spatial searches and cross matches are performed using the Q3C plugin for PostgreSQL. Our system can be accessed via web-services (SOAP and simple HTTP POST/GET) and web interfaces. The SAI CAS project is located at http://vo.astronet.ru.

  11. Astronomer's new guide to the galaxy: largest map of cold dust revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    Astronomers have unveiled an unprecedented new atlas of the inner regions of the Milky Way, our home galaxy, peppered with thousands of previously undiscovered dense knots of cold cosmic dust -- the potential birthplaces of new stars. Made using observations from the APEX telescope in Chile, this survey is the largest map of cold dust so far, and will prove an invaluable map for observations made with the forthcoming ALMA telescope, as well as the recently launched ESA Herschel space telescope. ESO PR Photo 24a/09 View of the Galactic Plane from the ATLASGAL survey (annotated and in five sections) ESO PR Photo 24b/09 View of the Galactic Plane from the ATLASGAL survey (annotated) ESO PR Photo 24c/09 View of the Galactic Plane from the ATLASGAL survey (in five sections) ESO PR Photo 24d/09 View of the Galactic Plane from the ATLASGAL survey ESO PR Photo 24e/09 The Galactic Centre and Sagittarius B2 ESO PR Photo 24f/09 The NGC 6357 and NGC 6334 nebulae ESO PR Photo 24g/09 The RCW120 nebula ESO PR Video 24a/09 Annotated pan as seen by the ATLASGAL survey This new guide for astronomers, known as the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) shows the Milky Way in submillimetre-wavelength light (between infrared light and radio waves [1]). Images of the cosmos at these wavelengths are vital for studying the birthplaces of new stars and the structure of the crowded galactic core. "ATLASGAL gives us a new look at the Milky Way. Not only will it help us investigate how massive stars form, but it will also give us an overview of the larger-scale structure of our galaxy", said Frederic Schuller from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, leader of the ATLASGAL team. The area of the new submillimetre map is approximately 95 square degrees, covering a very long and narrow strip along the galactic plane two degrees wide (four times the width of the full Moon) and over 40 degrees long. The 16 000 pixel-long map was made with the LABOCA submillimetre

  12. The ``Nuclear Renaissance'' and the Spread of Nuclear Weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, Edwin S.

    2007-05-01

    As interest grows around the world in nuclear power as an energy source that could help control greenhouse gas emissions, some have proclaimed the arrival of a ``nuclear renaissance.'' But can the increased risks of more nuclear power be managed? The political crisis surrounding Iran's pursuit of uranium enrichment has exposed weaknesses in the nuclear nonproliferation regime. Also, al Qaeda's declared interest in weapons of mass destruction raises the concern that terrorists could acquire nuclear weapons by stealing materials from poorly secured facilities. Growth of nuclear energy would require the construction of many additional uranium enrichment plants. And the generation of more spent nuclear fuel without a credible waste disposal strategy would increase political support for reprocessing, which separates large quantities of weapon-usable plutonium from spent fuel. There is little evidence that the various institutional arrangements and technical schemes proposed to mitigate the security risks of a major nuclear expansion would be effective. This talk will focus on the measures necessary to allow large-scale global growth of nuclear power without resulting in an unacceptably high risk of nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism, and will discuss the feasibility of such measures. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.E1.2

  13. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  14. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  15. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  16. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  17. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ... Related Documents: Nuclear Medicine Fact Sheet.pdf SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ...

  18. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  19. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 11: Radiation Detection and Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 34: Control Systems II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  2. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 4: Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  3. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 2: Radiation Protection I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  4. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 16: Mechanical Component Characteristics and Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 22: Advanced Radionuclide Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 31: Quality-Assurance Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  7. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 33: Control Systems I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  8. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 20: Radiation Monitoring Techniques (Radiochemical).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  9. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  10. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 35: Systems and Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  11. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  12. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 9: Reactor Auxiliary Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  13. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 13: Power Plant Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  14. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  15. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 29: Civil/Structural Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  16. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 33: Control Systems I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  17. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  18. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 9: Reactor Auxiliary Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  19. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 4: Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 31: Quality-Assurance Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 16: Mechanical Component Characteristics and Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  2. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 22: Advanced Radionuclide Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  3. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 13: Power Plant Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  4. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 25: Radioactive Material Handling Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 10: Power Plant Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 3: Principles of Process Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  7. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 2: Radiation Protection I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  8. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 21: Radioactive Materials Disposal and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  9. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  10. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 11: Radiation Detection and Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  11. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 35: Systems and Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  12. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  13. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 15: Metallurgy and Metals Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  14. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 20: Radiation Monitoring Techniques (Radiochemical).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  15. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 34: Control Systems II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  16. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 29: Civil/Structural Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  17. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 3: Principles of Process Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  18. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 15: Metallurgy and Metals Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  19. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 10: Power Plant Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 25: Radioactive Material Handling Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 21: Radioactive Materials Disposal and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  2. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  3. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  4. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  5. Cyclotron-based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Research at the cyclotron institute is summarized. These major areas are covered: nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; polarization studies; interdisciplinary nuclear science; instrumentation and systems development; and publications. (GHT)

  6. The role played by stakeholders in the public debate that brought Italy out of the club of nuclear energy producers.

    PubMed

    Cantone, Marie Claire; Sturloni, Giancarlo; Brunelli, Giancarlo

    2007-10-01

    In 1964, Italy was the fourth largest world producer of electricity generated by nuclear reactors, second in Europe only to United Kingdom. In subsequent years, various controversial political events contributed towards drastically slowing down the development of the Italian national nuclear program. The 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, which caused a public outcry all over Europe, had particularly serious repercussions in Italy. In a controversial referendum, held in November 1987, Italian citizens voted to repeal three laws promoting the installation of nuclear power plants (NPP) on Italian soil and allowing the National Institute for Electrical Energy (ENEL) to participate in the construction of NPP's abroad. This work analyzes the reasons for that decision and the communication strategies of the stakeholders that took part in the public debate on nuclear energy during the weeks following the Chernobyl accident. Drawing from the methodologies used in media studies, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of two leading Italian newspapers was performed. The results reveal that a variety of stakeholders, upholding different values and interests, took part in the debate. There being no tradition of a public dialogue and participation in Italy, the debate was polarized to a "yes/no choice," which eventually caused Italy to abandon the production of nuclear power for civilian use.

  7. Engineering the largest RNA virus genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Almazán, Fernando; González, José M.; Pénzes, Zoltan; Izeta, Ander; Calvo, Enrique; Plana-Durán, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2000-01-01

    The construction of cDNA clones encoding large-size RNA molecules of biological interest, like coronavirus genomes, which are among the largest mature RNA molecules known to biology, has been hampered by the instability of those cDNAs in bacteria. Herein, we show that the application of two strategies, cloning of the cDNAs into a bacterial artificial chromosome and nuclear expression of RNAs that are typically produced within the cytoplasm, is useful for the engineering of large RNA molecules. A cDNA encoding an infectious coronavirus RNA genome has been cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome. The rescued coronavirus conserved all of the genetic markers introduced throughout the sequence and showed a standard mRNA pattern and the antigenic characteristics expected for the synthetic virus. The cDNA was transcribed within the nucleus, and the RNA translocated to the cytoplasm. Interestingly, the recovered virus had essentially the same sequence as the original one, and no splicing was observed. The cDNA was derived from an attenuated isolate that replicates exclusively in the respiratory tract of swine. During the engineering of the infectious cDNA, the spike gene of the virus was replaced by the spike gene of an enteric isolate. The synthetic virus replicated abundantly in the enteric tract and was fully virulent, demonstrating that the tropism and virulence of the recovered coronavirus can be modified. This demonstration opens up the possibility of employing this infectious cDNA as a vector for vaccine development in human, porcine, canine, and feline species susceptible to group 1 coronaviruses. PMID:10805807

  8. Institutional Corruption in Higher Education: Analysis of Causes and Reforms at the Second-Largest Institution of Higher Education in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresse, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Corruption in higher education is an emerging topic in the field of education research. (Osipian 2008). Different aspects of such corruption have been addressed in numerous papers by various researchers. These papers indicate different aspects of the problem. Many of the papers evidence the global nature of this problem by highlighting corruption…

  9. 10 CFR 4.24 - Assurances from institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING... to an institution of higher education, the assurance required by § 4.21 shall extend to admission... respect to an institution of higher education, hospital, or any other institution, insofar as...

  10. 10 CFR 4.24 - Assurances from institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING... to an institution of higher education, the assurance required by § 4.21 shall extend to admission... respect to an institution of higher education, hospital, or any other institution, insofar as...

  11. 10 CFR 4.24 - Assurances from institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING... to an institution of higher education, the assurance required by § 4.21 shall extend to admission... respect to an institution of higher education, hospital, or any other institution, insofar as...

  12. 10 CFR 4.24 - Assurances from institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING... to an institution of higher education, the assurance required by § 4.21 shall extend to admission... respect to an institution of higher education, hospital, or any other institution, insofar as...

  13. Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Schneider, Andre; Horowitz, Charles; Berry, Don; Briggs, Christian

    2014-03-01

    For decades it has been theorized that just below nuclear saturation density matter undergoes a series of phase transitions. These phases, which are expected to exist in core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars, involve a range of exotic nuclear shapes collectively known as nuclear pasta. Recently, Jose Pons and collaborators suggested that ``the maximum period of isolated X-ray pulsars may be the first observational evidence for an amorphous inner crust, ..., possibly owing to the existence of a nuclear pasta phase.'' In this talk we present results of semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta and discuss how each phase might contribute to neutron star crust properties.

  14. Nuclear orientation and nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The present generation of on-line nuclear orientation facilities promises to revolutionize the gathering of nuclear structure information, especially for the hitherto poorly known and understood nuclei far from stability. Following a brief review of the technological developments that have facilitated these experiments, the nuclear spectroscopic information that can be obtained is summarized. Applications to understanding nuclear structure are reviewed, and challenges for future studies are discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Politics of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Colglazier, E.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    In November of 1979, the Program in Science, Technology and Humanism and the Energy Committee of the Aspen Institute organized a conference on resolving the social, political, and institutional conflicts over the permanent siting of radioactive wastes. This book was written as a result of this conference. The chapters provide a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the governance issues connected with radioactive waste management as well as a sampling of the diverse views of the interested parties. Chapter 1 looks in depth of radioactive waste management in the United States, with special emphasis on the events of the Carter Administration as well as on the issues with which the Reagen administration must deal. Chapter 2 compares waste management policies and programs among the industralized countries. Chapter 3 examines the factional controversies in the last administration and Congress over nuclear waste issues. Chapter 4 examines the complex legal questions involved in the federal-state conflicts over nuclear waste management. Chapter 5 examines the concept of consultation and concurrence from the perspectives of a host state that is a candidate for a repository and an interested state that has special concerns regarding the demonstration of nuclear waste disposal technology. Chapter 6 examines US and European perspectives concerning public participation in nuclear waste management. Chapter 7 discusses propaganda in the issues. The epilogue attempts to assess the prospects for consensus in the United States on national policies for radioactive waste management. All of the chapter in this book should be interpreted as personal assessments. (DP)

  16. Nuclear networking.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  17. Draft Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Department of Energy recognizes that the success of its program to develop and implement a national system for nuclear waste management and disposal depends on broad-based public understanding and acceptance. While each program element has its particular sensitivity, the transportation of the waste may potentially affect the greatest number of people, and accordingly is highly visible and potentially issue-laden. Therefore, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has developed this Transportation Institutional Plan to lay the foundation for interaction among all interested parties for the purpose of identifying and resolving issues of concern. The Plan is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 provides bachground information and discusses the purpose of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system. Chapter 2 introduces the major participants who must interact to build both the system itself and the consensus philosophy that is essential for effective operations. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will ensure wide participation in program planning and implementation. And, finally, Chapter 4 suggests a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. The Plan's appendices provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Nuclear War: A Selected Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    International Institute for Strategic Studies, 1975. 37pp. (U162.6• .R7) 109. Rotblat , Joseph . Nuclear Radiation in Warfare. Cambridge, MA...and Political Policy. Rutherford, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1971. 265pp. (UA23 .B66) 18. Boyce, Joseph B. Winning the Unthinkable War... Joseph P. Tactical Nuclear WeOns Detgrrent or Deytriirent. aW Ineitablo: A Cmprehenive Test Ban Treaty. Two Monographs. Carlisle Barracks: US Army

  19. Molecular screening in nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetinovic, A.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Markelj, S.; Vesic, J.

    2015-12-01

    The dependence of electron screening in nuclear reactions on projectile or target atomic number has been studied by bombarding different hydrogen-containing targets with beams of 7Li , 11B , and 19F . The largest electron screening potentials were obtained in a graphite target containing hydrogen as an impurity. Some measured potentials are almost two orders of magnitude above the theoretical predictions. To explain the measurements, a new concept of electron screening is introduced.

  20. An Institutional Approach to Course Redesign at a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Rudolph J.; Ramirez, Adrian D.; Hernandez, Chris

    2013-01-01

    As with many higher education institutions, Fresno State struggles with graduation rates. The overall six-year graduation rate for first-time, full-time freshmen hovers around 50 percent. The graduation gap between the two largest ethnic groups, White (55.6) and Hispanic (43.5), was 12.1 percentage points in 2012. This article reports on the…

  1. NRPB3, the third largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, is essential for stomatal patterning and differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Xu, Fan; Wu, Zhongliang; Wu, Yujun; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-05-01

    Stomata are highly specialized epidermal structures that control transpiration and gas exchange between plants and the environment. Signal networks underlying stomatal development have been previously uncovered but much less is known about how signals involved in stomatal development are transmitted to RNA polymerase II (Pol II or RPB), which plays a central role in the transcription of mRNA coding genes. Here, we identify a partial loss-of-function mutation of the third largest subunit of nuclear DNA-dependent Pol II (NRPB3) that exhibits an increased number of stomatal lineage cells and paired stomata. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that NRPB3 is not only required for correct stomatal patterning, but is also essential for stomatal differentiation. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NRPB3 directly interacts with two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, FAMA and INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1), indicating that NRPB3 serves as an acceptor for signals from transcription factors involved in stomatal development. Our findings highlight the surprisingly conserved activating mechanisms mediated by the third largest subunit of Pol II in eukaryotes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Nuclear Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Erich

    2010-07-27

    We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s-wave neutrons (or single s-wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the ''thickness'' of the nuclear surface in the mean-free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are, where they occur, what their properties are and some of their impact on nuclear observations.

  3. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  4. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  5. Worldwide Report, Nuclear Development and Proliferation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Operation Also hit by the market crunch is the world’s largest mine Roessing, outside Swakopmund which is run by the Rio Tinto Zinc group, says...Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS-TND-84- ■016 2 July 1984 WORLDWIDE REPORT NUCLEAR DEVELOPMENT AND PROLIFERATION CONTENTS ASIA PEOPLE ’S REPUBLIC OF... training " in mastering nuclear technology "for peaceful ends," a technology currently controlled by the great powers. Brazil and the PRC are not

  6. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  7. Nuclear Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E G

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  8. White paper on nuclear astrophysics and low energy nuclear physics Part 1: Nuclear astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Arcones, Almudena; Bardayan, Dan W.; Beers, Timothy C.; ...

    2016-12-28

    This white paper informs the nuclear astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also summarizes the outcome of the nuclear astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21–23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9–10, 2012more » Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). Our white paper is informed informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12–13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. Answers to long standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade because of the developments outlined in this white paper.« less

  9. White paper on nuclear astrophysics and low energy nuclear physics Part 1: Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcones, Almudena; Bardayan, Dan W.; Beers, Timothy C.; Bernstein, Lee A.; Blackmon, Jeffrey C.; Messer, Bronson; Brown, B. Alex; Brown, Edward F.; Brune, Carl R.; Champagne, Art E.; Chieffi, Alessandro; Couture, Aaron J.; Danielewicz, Pawel; Diehl, Roland; El-Eid, Mounib; Escher, Jutta E.; Fields, Brian D.; Fröhlich, Carla; Herwig, Falk; Hix, William Raphael; Iliadis, Christian; Lynch, William G.; McLaughlin, Gail C.; Meyer, Bradley S.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Nunes, Filomena; O'Shea, Brian W.; Prakash, Madappa; Pritychenko, Boris; Reddy, Sanjay; Rehm, Ernst; Rogachev, Grigory; Rutledge, Robert E.; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Michael S.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Steiner, Andrew W.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Timmes, F. X.; Townsley, Dean M.; Wiescher, Michael; Zegers, Remco G. T.; Zingale, Michael

    2017-05-01

    This white paper informs the nuclear astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21-23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9-10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12-13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. With the developments outlined in this white paper, answers to long standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade.

  10. White paper on nuclear astrophysics and low energy nuclear physics Part 1: Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Arcones, Almudena; Bardayan, Dan W.; Beers, Timothy C.; Bernstein, Lee A.; Blackmon, Jeffrey C.; Messer, Bronson; Brown, B. Alex; Brown, Edward F.; Brune, Carl R.; Champagne, Art E.; Chieffi, Alessandro; Couture, Aaron J.; Danielewicz, Pawel; Diehl, Roland; El-Eid, Mounib; Escher, Jutta E.; Fields, Brian D.; Fröhlich, Carla; Herwig, Falk; Hix, William Raphael; Iliadis, Christian; Lynch, William G.; McLaughlin, Gail C.; Meyer, Bradley S.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Nunes, Filomena; O’Shea, Brian W.; Prakash, Madappa; Pritychenko, Boris; Reddy, Sanjay; Rehm, Ernst; Rogachev, Grigory; Rutledge, Robert E.; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Michael S.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Steiner, Andrew W.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Townsley, Dean M.; Wiescher, Michael; Zegers, Remco G. T.; Zingale, Michael

    2016-12-28

    This white paper informs the nuclear astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also summarizes the outcome of the nuclear astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21–23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9–10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). Our white paper is informed informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12–13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. Answers to long standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade because of the developments outlined in this white paper.

  11. Small Business Grants at the National Cancer Institute and National Institutes of Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Houston

    2002-10-01

    Ten Federal Agencies set aside 2.5% of their external research budget for US small businesses—mainly for technology research and development, including radiation sensor system developments. Five agencies also set aside another 0.15% for the Small Business Technology Transfer Program, which is intended to facilitate technology transfers from research laboratories to public use through small businesses. The second largest of these agencies is the Department of Health and Human Services, and almost all of its extramural research funds flow through the 28 Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health. For information, instructions, and application forms, visit the NIH website's Omnibus Solicitation for SBIR and STTR applications. The National Cancer Institute is the largest NIH research unit and SBIR/STTR participant. NCI also issues SBIR and STTR Program Announcements of its own that feature details modified to better support its initiatives and objectives in cancer prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring.

  12. A Global Experiment in the Internationalization of Chinese Universities: Models, Experiences, Policies, and Prospects of the Confucius Institutes' First Decade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jun; Xiaohong, Tian

    2016-01-01

    As of year-end 2014, the Confucius Institutes--the largest international educational cooperation project in human history, and the largest internationalization project in the history of Chinese universities--celebrated their first decade of existence. This case study examines 27 Confucius Institutes in 15 countries spread across six continents…

  13. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  14. Nuclear privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffs, E.

    1995-11-01

    The United Kingdom government announced in May 1995 plans to privatize the country`s two nuclear generating companies, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear. Under the plan, the two companies will become operating divisions of a unified holding company, to be called British Electric, with headquarters in Scotland. Britain`s nuclear plants were left out of the initial privatization in 1989 because the government believed the financial community would be unwilling to accept the open-ended liability of decommissioning the original nine stations based on the Magnox gas-cooled reactor. Six years later, the government has found a way around this by retaining these power stations in state ownership, leaving the new nuclear company with the eight Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) stations and the recently completed Sizewell B PWR stations. The operating Magnox stations are to be transferred to BNFL, which operates two Magnox stations of their own at Calder Hall and Chapelcross.

  15. Nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) processes plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. This fact sheet responds to your September 6, 1991, request, that we describe the methods and facilities for DOE's plutonium processing. Plutonium, which is used to make nuclear weapons, does not exist in nature and has to be produced. However, DOE no longer produces plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. Instead, DOE processes and recycles the plutonium from retired nuclear weapons and the plutonium that remains as scrap or residue from plutonium processing. This paper reports that DOE recovers plutonium through two basic processes-aqueous and pyrochemical-at four processing sites-Rocky Flats, Savannah River, Hanford, and Los Alamos. However, because of environmental and safety concerns and reductions in nuclear weapons, DOE has closed or may close most of the processing facilities. Only Los Alamos' processing facilities are currently operating.

  16. Institute Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann; Steadman, Jackie; Little, Sally; Underwood, Debra; Blackman, Mack; Simonds, Judy

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a study conducted by the MSFC working group on Institutes in 1995 on the structure, organization and business arrangements of Institutes at a time when the agency was considering establishing science institutes. Thirteen institutes, ten science centers associated with the state of Georgia, Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and IIT Research Institute (IITRI), and general data on failed institutes were utilized to form this report. The report covers the working group's findings on institute mission, structure, director, board of directors/advisors, the working environment, research arrangements, intellectual property rights, business management, institute funding, and metrics.

  17. Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Deborah H.; And Others

    This report presents data on the number of students enrolled and the number of bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded in academic year 1981-82 from 72 United States institutions offering degree programs in nuclear engineering or nuclear options within other engineering fields. Presented as well are historical data for the last decade…

  18. Simulating the Nuclear Threat in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houseman, Gerald L.

    1989-01-01

    Suggests using simulation technique in the classroom to illustrate decision making, the perspectives of those in power, and the processes and institutions of government. Uses the simulation of a nuclear emergency alert to identify the issues and problems of nuclear confrontation. Provides instructions and an outline for the class. (NL)

  19. Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Deborah H.; And Others

    This report presents data on the number of students enrolled and the number of bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded in academic year 1981-82 from 72 United States institutions offering degree programs in nuclear engineering or nuclear options within other engineering fields. Presented as well are historical data for the last decade…

  20. Swedish nuclear waste efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

  1. Managing consumptive and nonconsumptive use in the United States largest wilderness

    Treesearch

    Vicki Snitzler; Barbara Cellarius

    2007-01-01

    With more than 13 million acres (5,260,913 ha) of land and in excess of 9 million acres (3,642,171 ha) of designated Wilderness, Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve is the largest national park in the United States and includes the country’s largest single-name wilderness area. Park managers face a variety of challenges in managing consumptive and...

  2. Customized overhead cranes for installation of India's largest 3.6m optical telescope at Devasthal, Nainital, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangia, Tarun; Yadava, Shobhit; Kumar, Brijesh; Ghanti, A. S.; Hardikar, P. M.

    2016-07-01

    India's largest 3.6 m aperture optical telescope facility has been recently established at Devasthal site by Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observation Sciences (ARIES), an autonomous Institute under Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. The telescope is equipped with active optics and it is designed to be used for seeinglimited observations at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. A steel building with rotating cylindrical steel Dome was erected to house 3.6m telescope and its accessories at hilltop of Devasthal site. Customized cranes were essentially required inside the building as there were space constraints around the telescope building for operating big external heavy duty cranes from outside, transportation constraints in route for bringing heavy weight cranes, altitude of observatory, and sharp bends etc. to site. To meet the challenge of telescope installation from inside the telescope building by lifting components through its hatch, two Single Girder cranes and two Under Slung cranes of 10 MT capacity each were specifically designed and developed. All the four overhead cranes were custom built to achieve the goal of handling telescope mirror and its various components during installation and assembly. Overhead cranes were installed in limited available space inside the building and tested as per IS 3177. Cranes were equipped with many features like VVVFD compatibility, provision for tandem operation, digital load display, anti-collision mechanism, electrical interlocks, radio remote, low hook height and compact carriage etc. for telescope integration at site.

  3. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  4. Nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Halley-Stott, Richard P; Pasque, Vincent; Gurdon, J B

    2013-06-01

    There is currently particular interest in the field of nuclear reprogramming, a process by which the identity of specialised cells may be changed, typically to an embryonic-like state. Reprogramming procedures provide insight into many mechanisms of fundamental cell biology and have several promising applications, most notably in healthcare through the development of human disease models and patient-specific tissue-replacement therapies. Here, we introduce the field of nuclear reprogramming and briefly discuss six of the procedures by which reprogramming may be experimentally performed: nuclear transfer to eggs or oocytes, cell fusion, extract treatment, direct reprogramming to pluripotency and transdifferentiation.

  5. Application of largest Lyapunov exponent analysis on the studies of dynamics under external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odavić, Jovan; Mali, Petar; Tekić, Jasmina; Pantić, Milan; Pavkov-Hrvojević, Milica

    2017-06-01

    Dynamics of driven dissipative Frenkel-Kontorova model is examined by using largest Lyapunov exponent computational technique. Obtained results show that besides the usual way where behavior of the system in the presence of external forces is studied by analyzing its dynamical response function, the largest Lyapunov exponent analysis can represent a very convenient tool to examine system dynamics. In the dc driven systems, the critical depinning force for particular structure could be estimated by computing the largest Lyapunov exponent. In the dc+ac driven systems, if the substrate potential is the standard sinusoidal one, calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent offers a more sensitive way to detect the presence of Shapiro steps. When the amplitude of the ac force is varied the behavior of the largest Lyapunov exponent in the pinned regime completely reflects the behavior of Shapiro steps and the critical depinning force, in particular, it represents the mirror image of the amplitude dependence of critical depinning force. This points out an advantage of this technique since by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent in the pinned regime we can get an insight into the dynamics of the system when driving forces are applied. Additionally, the system is shown to be not chaotic even in the case of incommensurate structures and large amplitudes of external force, which is a consequence of overdampness of the model and the Middleton's no passing rule.

  6. 10 CFR 61.59 - Institutional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.59 Institutional requirements. (a) Land ownership... Commission; and administration of funds to cover the costs for these activities. The period of...

  7. 10 CFR 61.59 - Institutional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Institutional requirements. 61.59 Section 61.59 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE... Commission; and administration of funds to cover the costs for these activities. The period of...

  8. Second Nuclear Era

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.M.; Spiewak, I.; Barkenbus, J.N.; Livingston, R.S.; Phung, D.L.

    1984-03-01

    The Institute for Energy Analysis with support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has studied the decline of the present nuclear era in the United States and the characteristics of a Second Nuclear Era which might be instrumental in restoring nuclear power to an appropriate place in the energy options of our country. The study has determined that reactors operating today are much safer than they were at the time of the TMI accident. A number of concepts for a supersafe reactor were reviewed and at least two were found that show considerable promise, the PIUS, a Swedish pressurized water design, and a gas-cooled modular design of German and US origin. Although new, safer, incrementally improved, conventional reactors are under study by the nuclear industry, the complete lack of new orders in the United States will slow their introduction and they are likely to be more expensive than present designs. The study recommends that supersafe reactors be taken seriously and that federal and private funds both be used to design and, if feasible, to build a prototype reactor of substantial size. 146 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) is located in Zarechny, approximately 60 km east of Ekaterinberg along the Trans-Siberian Highway. Zarechny, a small city of approximately 30,000 residents, was built to support BNPP operations. It is a closed city to unescorted visitors. Residents must show identification for entry. BNPP is one of the first and oldest commercial nuclear power plants in Russia and began operations in 1964. As for most nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation, BNPP is operated by Rosenergoatom, which is subordinated to the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (Minatom). BNPP is the site of three nuclear reactors, Units 1, 2, and 3. Units 1 and 2, which have been shut-down and defueled, were graphite moderated reactors. The units were shut-down in 1981 and 1989. Unit 3, a BN-600 reactor, is a 600 MW(electric) sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Unit 3 went on-line in April 1980 and produces electric power which is fed into a distribution grid and thermal power which provides heat to Zarechny. The paper also discusses the SF NIKIET, the Sverdiovsk Branch of NIKIET, Moscow, which is the research and development branch of the parent NIKEIT and is primarily a design institute responsible for reactor design. Central to its operations is a 15 megawatt IVV research reactor. The paper discusses general security and fissile material control and accountability at these two facilities.

  10. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Brian E.; Judge, Steven

    2007-08-01

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient.

  11. Nuclear materials safeguards for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Tape, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    Basic concepts of domestic and international safeguards are described, with an emphasis on safeguards systems for the fuel cycles of commercial power reactors. Future trends in institutional and technical measures for nuclear materials safeguards are outlined. The conclusion is that continued developments in safeguards approaches and technology, coupled with institutional measures that facilitate the global management and protection of nuclear materials, are up to the challenge of safeguarding the growing inventories of nuclear materials in commercial fuel cycles in technologically advanced States with stable governments that have signed the nonproliferation treaty. These same approaches also show promise for facilitating international inspection of excess weapons materials and verifying a fissile materials cutoff convention.

  12. (Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

  13. Nuclear battlefields

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, W.M.; Fieldhouse, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides complete data on the nuclear operations and research facilities in the U.S.A., the U.S.S.R., France, China and the U.K. It describes detailed estimates on the U.S.S.R.'s nuclear stockpile for over 500 locations. It shows how non-nuclear countries cooperate with the world-wide war machine. And it maps the U.S. nuclear facilities from Little America, WY, and Charleston, SC, to the battleships patroling the world's oceans and subs stalking under the sea. The data were gathered from unclassified sources through the Freedom of Information Act, from data supplied to military installations, and from weapons source books. It provides guidance for policymakers, government and corporate officials.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  15. Nuclear Disarmament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  16. Japanese suppliers in transition from domestic nuclear reactor vendors to international suppliers

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.; Rowan, W.J.

    1994-06-27

    Japan is emerging as a major leader and exporter of nuclear power technology. In the 1990s, Japan has the largest and strongest nuclear power supply industry worldwide as a result of the largest domestic nuclear power plant construction program. The Japanese nuclear power supply industry has moved from dependence on foreign technology to developing, design, building, and operating its own power plants. This report describes the Japanese nuclear power supply industry and examines one supplier--the Mitsubishi group--to develop an understanding of the supply industry and its relationship to the utilities, government, and other organizations.

  17. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  18. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  19. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  20. Nuclear accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Mobley, J.A.

    1982-05-01

    A nuclear accident with radioactive contamination can happen anywhere in the world. Because expert nuclear emergency teams may take several hours to arrive at the scene, local authorities must have a plan of action for the hours immediately following an accident. The site should be left untouched except to remove casualties. Treatment of victims includes decontamination and meticulous wound debridement. Acute radiation syndrome may be an overwhelming sequela.

  1. [Studies on the largest Lyapunov exponents of the standing posture in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Keisuke; Tokita, Takashi; Ito, Yatsuji; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kuze, Bunya

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the body sway in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction by the largest Lyapunov exponents using a chaotic time series analysis. The largest Lyapunov exponent is regarded as a parameter indexing an orbital instability. Subjects consisted of 55 normal healthy subjects, 11 patients diagnosed as having vestibular neuritis (VN), 6 patients diagnosed as having sudden deafness (SD) with vertigo, 23 patients diagnosed as having Meniere disease (MD), 11 patients diagnosed as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and 14 patients diagnosed as having other vestibular disorders. Using a stabilometer, the sway of the body center of gravity in an upright standing position was recorded with eyes open and closed for 60 seconds under each condition. From the time series data obtained, the largest Lyapunov exponents were calculated using a chaos analysis program. In normal healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction, the largest Lyapunov exponents on right-left sway were larger than those on forward-backward sway with eyes open and closed. The largest Lyapunov exponents in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction on forward-backward sway with eyes closed were significantly larger than those in normal healthy subjects. A few patients with the instability of standing posture judged from conventional analysis (area of sway, locus length per time) showed higher values of the LLE. We investigated the variation of the values of the largest Lyapunov exponents in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction at each stage during recovery from their vestibular damage. The largest Lyapunov exponents at the early stage with stable standing posture were significantly higher than those at the late stable stage with stable standing posture. Some patients at the very early stage had lower values of the largest Lyapunov exponents. We speculate that the orbital instability indicated by the values of the

  2. Nuclear telemedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, R. T.; Szasz, I. J.

    1990-06-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine patient images have been transniitted for 8 years from a regional conununity hospital to a university teaching hospital 700 kiloinetres away employing slow scan TV and telephone. Transruission and interpretation were done at the end of each working day or as circumstances required in cases of emergencies. Referring physicians received the nuclear medicine procedure report at the end of the completion day or within few minutes of completion in case of emergency procedures. To date more than 25 patient studies have been transmitted for interpretation. Blinded reinterpretation of the original hard copy data of 350 patient studies resulted in 100 agreement with the interpretation of transmitted data. This technique provides high quality diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine services in remote hospitals where the services of an on-site nuclear physician is not available. 2. HISTORY Eight years ago when the nuclear medicine physician at Trail Regional Hospital left the Trail area and an other could not be recruited we examined the feasibility of image transmission by phone for interpretation since closing the department would have imposed unacceptable physical and financial hardship and medical constraints on the patient population the nearest nuclear medicine facility was at some 8 hours drive away. In hospital patients would have to be treated either based purely on physical findings or flown to Vancouver at considerable cost to the health care system (estimated cost $1500.

  3. PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Taiichi; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2014-12-01

    The 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3) was held at KGU Kannai Media Center, Kanto Gakuin University, Yokohama, Japan, from May 26 to 30, 2014. Yokohama is the second largest city in Japan, about 25 km southeast of Tokyo. The first workshop of the series was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008 and the second one was in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. The purpose of SOTANCP3 was to discuss the present status and future perspectives of the nuclear cluster physics. The following nine topics were selected in order to cover most of the scientific programme and highlight an area where new ideas have emerged over recent years: (1) Cluster structures and many-body correlations in stable and unstable nuclei (2) Clustering aspects of nuclear reactions and resonances (3) Alpha condensates and analogy with condensed matter approaches (4) Role of tensor force in cluster physics and ab initio approaches (5) Clustering in hypernuclei (6) Nuclear fission, superheavy nuclei, and cluster decay (7) Cluster physics and nuclear astrophysics (8) Clustering in nuclear matter and neutron stars (9) Clustering in hadron and atomic physics There were 122 participants, including 53 from 17 foreign countries. In addition to invited talks, we had many talks selected from contributed papers. There were plenary, parallel, and poster sessions. Poster contributions were also presented as four-minute talks in parallel sessions. This proceedings contains the papers presented in invited and selected talks together with those presented in poster sessions. We would like to express our gratitude to the members of the International Advisory Committee and those of the Organizing Committee for their efforts which made this workshop successful. In particular we would like to present our great thanks to Drs. Y. Funaki, W. Horiuchi, N. Itagaki, M. Kimura, T. Myo, and T. Yoshida. We would like also to thank the following organizations for their sponsors: RCNP

  4. Manpower Requirements in the Nuclear Power Industry, 1982-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ruth C.

    A study projected employment needs created by growth and employee turnover for the nuclear power industry over the next decade. Only employment by electric utilities in the commercial generation of nuclear power was investigated. Employment data for 1981 were collected in a survey of 60 member utilities of the Institute of Nuclear Power…

  5. The Agaricus bisporus cox1 gene: the longest mitochondrial gene and the largest reservoir of mitochondrial group i introns.

    PubMed

    Férandon, Cyril; Moukha, Serge; Callac, Philippe; Benedetto, Jean-Pierre; Castroviejo, Michel; Barroso, Gérard

    2010-11-18

    In eukaryotes, introns are located in nuclear and organelle genes from several kingdoms. Large introns (up to 5 kbp) are frequent in mitochondrial genomes of plant and fungi but scarce in Metazoa, even if these organisms are grouped with fungi among the Opisthokonts. Mitochondrial introns are classified in two groups (I and II) according to their RNA secondary structure involved in the intron self-splicing mechanism. Most of these mitochondrial group I introns carry a "Homing Endonuclease Gene" (heg) encoding a DNA endonuclease acting in transfer and site-specific integration ("homing") and allowing intron spreading and gain after lateral transfer even between species from different kingdoms. Opposed to this gain mechanism, is another which implies that introns, which would have been abundant in the ancestral genes, would mainly evolve by loss. The importance of both mechanisms (loss and gain) is matter of debate. Here we report the sequence of the cox1 gene of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus, the most widely cultivated mushroom in the world. This gene is both the longest mitochondrial gene (29,902 nt) and the largest group I intron reservoir reported to date with 18 group I and 1 group II. An exhaustive analysis of the group I introns available in cox1 genes shows that they are mobile genetic elements whose numerous events of loss and gain by lateral transfer combine to explain their wide and patchy distribution extending over several kingdoms. An overview of intron distribution, together with the high frequency of eroded heg, suggests that they are evolving towards loss. In this landscape of eroded and lost intron sequences, the A. bisporus cox1 gene exhibits a peculiar dynamics of intron keeping and catching, leading to the largest collection of mitochondrial group I introns reported to date in a Eukaryote.

  6. Draft sequencing and assembly of the genome of the world's largest fish, the whale shark: Rhincodon typus Smith 1828.

    PubMed

    Read, Timothy D; Petit, Robert A; Joseph, Sandeep J; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Weil, M Ryan; Ahmad, Maida; Bhimani, Ravila; Vuong, Jocelyn S; Haase, Chad P; Webb, D Harry; Tan, Milton; Dove, Alistair D M

    2017-07-14

    The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) has by far the largest body size of any elasmobranch (shark or ray) species. Therefore, it is also the largest extant species of the paraphyletic assemblage commonly referred to as fishes. As both a phenotypic extreme and a member of the group Chondrichthyes - the sister group to the remaining gnathostomes, which includes all tetrapods and therefore also humans - its genome is of substantial comparative interest. Whale sharks are also listed as an endangered species on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of threatened species and are of growing popularity as both a target of ecotourism and as a charismatic conservation ambassador for the pelagic ecosystem. A genome map for this species would aid in defining effective conservation units and understanding global population structure. We characterised the nuclear genome of the whale shark using next generation sequencing (454, Illumina) and de novo assembly and annotation methods, based on material collected from the Georgia Aquarium. The data set consisted of 878,654,233 reads, which yielded a draft assembly of 1,213,200 contigs and 997,976 scaffolds. The estimated genome size was 3.44Gb. As expected, the proteome of the whale shark was most closely related to the only other complete genome of a cartilaginous fish, the holocephalan elephant shark. The whale shark contained a novel Toll-like-receptor (TLR) protein with sequence similarity to both the TLR4 and TLR13 proteins of mammals and TLR21 of teleosts. The data are publicly available on GenBank, FigShare, and from the NCBI Short Read Archive under accession number SRP044374. This represents the first shotgun elasmobranch genome and will aid studies of molecular systematics, biogeography, genetic differentiation, and conservation genetics in this and other shark species, as well as providing comparative data for studies of evolutionary biology and immunology across the jawed vertebrate lineages.

  7. The Agaricus bisporus cox1 Gene: The Longest Mitochondrial Gene and the Largest Reservoir of Mitochondrial Group I Introns

    PubMed Central

    Férandon, Cyril; Moukha, Serge; Callac, Philippe; Benedetto, Jean-Pierre; Castroviejo, Michel; Barroso, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, introns are located in nuclear and organelle genes from several kingdoms. Large introns (up to 5 kbp) are frequent in mitochondrial genomes of plant and fungi but scarce in Metazoa, even if these organisms are grouped with fungi among the Opisthokonts. Mitochondrial introns are classified in two groups (I and II) according to their RNA secondary structure involved in the intron self-splicing mechanism. Most of these mitochondrial group I introns carry a “Homing Endonuclease Gene” (heg) encoding a DNA endonuclease acting in transfer and site-specific integration (“homing”) and allowing intron spreading and gain after lateral transfer even between species from different kingdoms. Opposed to this gain mechanism, is another which implies that introns, which would have been abundant in the ancestral genes, would mainly evolve by loss. The importance of both mechanisms (loss and gain) is matter of debate. Here we report the sequence of the cox1 gene of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus, the most widely cultivated mushroom in the world. This gene is both the longest mitochondrial gene (29,902 nt) and the largest group I intron reservoir reported to date with 18 group I and 1 group II. An exhaustive analysis of the group I introns available in cox1 genes shows that they are mobile genetic elements whose numerous events of loss and gain by lateral transfer combine to explain their wide and patchy distribution extending over several kingdoms. An overview of intron distribution, together with the high frequency of eroded heg, suggests that they are evolving towards loss. In this landscape of eroded and lost intron sequences, the A. bisporus cox1 gene exhibits a peculiar dynamics of intron keeping and catching, leading to the largest collection of mitochondrial group I introns reported to date in a Eukaryote. PMID:21124976

  8. The 10 largest public and philanthropic funders of health research in the world: what they fund and how they distribute their funds.

    PubMed

    Viergever, Roderik F; Hendriks, Thom C C

    2016-02-18

    Little is known about who the main public and philanthropic funders of health research are globally, what they fund and how they decide what gets funded. This study aims to identify the 10 largest public and philanthropic health research funding organizations in the world, to report on what they fund, and on how they distribute their funds. The world's key health research funding organizations were identified through a search strategy aimed at identifying different types of funding organizations. Organizations were ranked by their reported total annual health research expenditures. For the 10 largest funding organizations, data were collected on (1) funding amounts allocated towards 20 health areas, and (2) schemes employed for distributing funding (intramural/extramural, project/'people'/organizational and targeted/untargeted funding). Data collection consisted of a review of reports and websites and interviews with representatives of funding organizations. Data collection was challenging; data were often not reported or reported using different classification systems. Overall, 55 key health research funding organizations were identified. The 10 largest funding organizations together funded research for $37.1 billion, constituting 40% of all public and philanthropic health research spending globally. The largest funder was the United States National Institutes of Health ($26.1 billion), followed by the European Commission ($3.7 billion), and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council ($1.3 billion). The largest philanthropic funder was the Wellcome Trust ($909.1 million), the largest funder of health research through official development assistance was USAID ($186.4 million), and the largest multilateral funder was the World Health Organization ($135.0 million). Funding distribution mechanisms and funding patterns varied substantially between the 10 largest funders. There is a need for increased transparency about who the main funders of health research are

  9. 100 Companies Receiving the Largest Dollar Volume of Prime Contract Awards: Fiscal Year 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    aircr-’t. Nuclear submarines. M- 1 tank. TOMAHAWK, STINGER, RIM-66 standard missiles, and SPARROW missile systems. MK-15 close-in weapon system. 3...General Electric Co. AEGIS missile system. F-100, T-700, and F-110 engines. Nuclear reactors for submarines. Underwater sound equipment. RDT&E for missile...space systems, ships, aircraft, and electronics/ communication equipment. 4. Tenneco, Inc. Nuclear aircraft carriers. SSN-688 submarine. 5. Raytheon

  10. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  11. Nuclear Trafficking in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Amir; White, Michael A.; Fontoura, Beatriz M.A.

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the cytoplasm and the nucleus are separated by a double-membraned nuclear envelope (NE). Thus, transport of molecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm occurs via gateways termed the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are the largest intracellular channels in nature. While small molecules can passively translocate through the NPC, large molecules are actively imported into the nucleus by interacting with receptors that bind nuclear pore complex proteins (Nups). Regulatory factors then function in assembly and disassembly of transport complexes. Signaling pathways, cell cycle, pathogens, and other physiopathological conditions regulate various constituents of the nuclear transport machinery. Here, we will discuss several findings related to modulation of nuclear transport during physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis, viral infection, and congenital syndrome. We will also explore chemical biological approaches that are being used as probes to reveal new mechanisms that regulate nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and that are serving as starting points for drug development. PMID:24530809

  12. The Multivariate Largest Lyapunov Exponent as an Age-Related Metric of Quiet Standing Balance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang

    2015-01-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent has been researched as a metric of the balance ability during human quiet standing. However, the sensitivity and accuracy of this measurement method are not good enough for clinical use. The present research proposes a metric of the human body's standing balance ability based on the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent which can quantify the human standing balance. The dynamic multivariate time series of ankle, knee, and hip were measured by multiple electrical goniometers. Thirty-six normal people of different ages participated in the test. With acquired data, the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent was calculated. Finally, the results of the proposed approach were analysed and compared with the traditional method, for which the largest Lyapunov exponent and power spectral density from the centre of pressure were also calculated. The following conclusions can be obtained. The multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent has a higher degree of differentiation in differentiating balance in eyes-closed conditions. The MLLE value reflects the overall coordination between multisegment movements. Individuals of different ages can be distinguished by their MLLE values. The standing stability of human is reduced with the increment of age.

  13. The Multivariate Largest Lyapunov Exponent as an Age-Related Metric of Quiet Standing Balance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang

    2015-01-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent has been researched as a metric of the balance ability during human quiet standing. However, the sensitivity and accuracy of this measurement method are not good enough for clinical use. The present research proposes a metric of the human body's standing balance ability based on the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent which can quantify the human standing balance. The dynamic multivariate time series of ankle, knee, and hip were measured by multiple electrical goniometers. Thirty-six normal people of different ages participated in the test. With acquired data, the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent was calculated. Finally, the results of the proposed approach were analysed and compared with the traditional method, for which the largest Lyapunov exponent and power spectral density from the centre of pressure were also calculated. The following conclusions can be obtained. The multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent has a higher degree of differentiation in differentiating balance in eyes-closed conditions. The MLLE value reflects the overall coordination between multisegment movements. Individuals of different ages can be distinguished by their MLLE values. The standing stability of human is reduced with the increment of age. PMID:26064182

  14. Role Ambiguity in Institutional Marketing and Enrollment Management. AIR 1984 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muston, Ray A.

    Enrollment management and marketing strategies employed by the largest state university users of American College Testing (ACT) program tests were studied. The primary objective was to develop a descriptive profile of institutional practices and role performance factors. The study population was the 54 largest state university users of ACT student…

  15. Role Ambiguity in Institutional Marketing and Enrollment Management. AIR 1984 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muston, Ray A.

    Enrollment management and marketing strategies employed by the largest state university users of American College Testing (ACT) program tests were studied. The primary objective was to develop a descriptive profile of institutional practices and role performance factors. The study population was the 54 largest state university users of ACT student…

  16. Nuclear proliferation-resistance and safeguards for future nuclear fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Y.; Inoue, N.; Senzaki, M.

    2009-03-01

    Corresponding to the world nuclear security concerns, future nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) should have high proliferation-resistance (PR) and physical protection (PP), while promotion of the peaceful use of the nuclear energy must not be inhibited. In order to accomplish nuclear non-proliferation from NFC, a few models of the well-PR systems should be developed so that international community can recognize them as worldwide norms. To find a good balance of 'safeguard-ability (so-called extrinsic measure or institutional barrier)' and 'impede-ability (intrinsic feature or technical barrier)' will come to be essential for NFC designers to optimize civilian nuclear technology with nuclear non-proliferation, although the advanced safeguards with high detectability can still play a dominant role for PR in the states complying with full institutional controls. Accomplishment of such goal in a good economic efficiency is a future key challenge.

  17. Nuclear risk

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, M.

    1989-01-01

    The title of our session, Nuclear Risk Versus Other Power Options, is provocative. It is also a title with different meanings to different people. To the utility chief executive officer, nuclear power is a high-risk financial undertaking because of political and economic barriers to cost recovery. To the utility dispatcher, it is a high-risk future power source since plant completion and start-up dates can be delayed for very long times due to uncertain legal and political issues. To the environmentalist, concerned about global effects such as greenhouse and acid rain, nuclear power is a relatively low risk energy source. To the financial people, nuclear power is a cash cow turned sour because of uncertainties as to what new plants will cost and whether they will even be allowed to operate. The statistics on risk are known and the results of probability risk assessment calculations of risks are known. The challenge is not to make nuclear power safer, it is already one of the safest, if not the safest, source of power currently available. The challenge is to find a way to communicate this to the public.

  18. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS AND JACOBI ENSEMBLES: LARGEST EIGENVALUE, TRACY–WIDOM LIMITS AND RATES OF CONVERGENCE1

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Iain M.

    2009-01-01

    Let A and B be independent, central Wishart matrices in p variables with common covariance and having m and n degrees of freedom, respectively. The distribution of the largest eigenvalue of (A + B)−1 B has numerous applications in multivariate statistics, but is difficult to calculate exactly. Suppose that m and n grow in proportion to p. We show that after centering and, scaling, the distribution is approximated to second-order, O(p−2/3), by the Tracy–Widom law. The results are obtained for both complex and then real-valued data by using methods of random matrix theory to study the largest eigenvalue of the Jacobi unitary and orthogonal ensembles. Asymptotic approximations of Jacobi polynomials near the largest zero play a central role. PMID:20157626

  19. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS AND JACOBI ENSEMBLES: LARGEST EIGENVALUE, TRACY-WIDOM LIMITS AND RATES OF CONVERGENCE.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Iain M

    2008-12-01

    Let A and B be independent, central Wishart matrices in p variables with common covariance and having m and n degrees of freedom, respectively. The distribution of the largest eigenvalue of (A + B)(-1)B has numerous applications in multivariate statistics, but is difficult to calculate exactly. Suppose that m and n grow in proportion to p. We show that after centering and, scaling, the distribution is approximated to second-order, O(p(-2/3)), by the Tracy-Widom law. The results are obtained for both complex and then real-valued data by using methods of random matrix theory to study the largest eigenvalue of the Jacobi unitary and orthogonal ensembles. Asymptotic approximations of Jacobi polynomials near the largest zero play a central role.

  20. Nuclear shape, mechanics, and mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Lammerding, Jan

    2008-06-06

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus contains the genome and is the site of transcriptional regulation. The nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle and is exposed to mechanical forces transmitted through the cytoskeleton from outside the cell and from force generation within the cell. Here, we discuss the effect of intra- and extracellular forces on nuclear shape and structure and how these force-induced changes could be implicated in nuclear mechanotransduction, ie, force-induced changes in cell signaling and gene transcription. We review mechanical studies of the nucleus and nuclear structural proteins, such as lamins. Dramatic changes in nuclear shape, organization, and stiffness are seen in cells where lamin proteins are mutated or absent, as in genetically engineered mice, RNA interference studies, or human disease. We examine the different mechanical pathways from the force-responsive cytoskeleton to the nucleus. We also highlight studies that link changes in nuclear shape with cell function during developmental, physiological, and pathological modifications. Together, these studies suggest that the nucleus itself may play an important role in the response of the cell to force.

  1. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  2. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  3. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  4. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  5. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  6. The future of nuclear power: value orientations and risk perception.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Stephen C; Rosa, Eugene A; Dan, Amy; Dietz, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, there has been a revival of interest in nuclear power. Two decades ago, the expansion of nuclear power in the United States was halted by widespread public opposition as well as rising costs and less than projected increases in demand for electricity. Can the renewed enthusiasm for nuclear power overcome its history of public resistance that has persisted for decades? We propose that attitudes toward nuclear power are a function of perceived risk, and that both attitudes and risk perceptions are a function of values, beliefs, and trust in the institutions that influence nuclear policy. Applying structural equation models to data from a U.S. national survey, we find that increased trust in the nuclear governance institutions reduces perceived risk of nuclear power and together higher trust and lower risk perceptions predict positive attitudes toward nuclear power. Trust in environmental institutions and perceived risks from global environmental problems do not predict attitudes toward nuclear power. Values do predict attitudes: individuals with traditional values have greater support for, while those with altruistic values have greater opposition to, nuclear power. Nuclear attitudes do not vary by gender, age, education, income, or political orientation, though nonwhites are more supportive than whites. These findings are consistent with, and provide an explanation for, a long series of public opinion polls showing public ambivalence toward nuclear power that persists even in the face of renewed interest for nuclear power in policy circles.

  7. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  8. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2010-08-15

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) was declared by the 62nd General Assembly of the United Nations and was also endorsed by UNESCO. Investigations in the realms of particle and nuclear physicsmake a large contribution in the development of our ideas of the properties of the Universe. The present article discusses some problems of the evolution of the Universe, nucleosyntheses, and cosmochronology from the point of view of nuclear and particle physics. Processes occurring in the Universe are compared with the mechanisms of the production and decay of nuclei, as well as with the mechanisms of their interaction at high energies. Examples that demonstrate the potential of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and the properties of the Universe are given. The results that come from investigations into nuclear reactions induced by beams of radioactive nuclei and which make it possible to take a fresh look at the nucleosynthesis scenario in the range at light nuclei are presented.

  9. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This paper discusses how, as part of the Department of Energy's implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, DOE is required to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and, if it determines that the site is suitable, recommend to the President its selection for a nuclear waste repository. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in considering development of the plan, issued five objections, one of which is DOE's failure to recognize the range of alternative conceptual models of the Yucca Mountain site that can be supported by the limited existing technical data. At the end of the quarter DOE directed its project offices in Washington and Texas to begin orderly phase-out of all site-specific repository activities. Costs for this phase-out are $53 million for the Deaf Smith site and $85 million for the Hanford site.

  10. Enlarged Multilocus Data set Provides Surprisingly Younger Time of Origin for the Plethodontidae, the Largest Family of Salamanders.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xing-Xing; Liang, Dan; Chen, Meng-Yun; Mao, Rong-Li; Wake, David B; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Deep phylogenetic relationships of the largest salamander family Plethodontidae have been difficult to resolve, probably reflecting a rapid diversification early in their evolutionary history. Here, data from 50 independent nuclear markers (total 48,582 bp) are used to reconstruct the phylogeny and divergence times for plethodontid salamanders, using both concatenation and coalescence-based species tree analyses. Our results robustly resolve the position of the enigmatic eastern North American four-toed salamander (Hemidactylium) as the sister taxon of Batrachoseps + Tribe Bolitoglossini, thus settling a long-standing question. Furthermore, we statistically reject sister taxon status of Karsenia and Hydromantes, the only plethodontids to occur outside the Americas, leading us to new biogeographic hypotheses. Contrary to previous long-standing arguments that plethodontid salamanders are an old lineage originating in the Cretaceous (more than 90 Ma), our analyses lead to the hypothesis that these salamanders are much younger, arising close to the K-T boundary (~66 Ma). These time estimates are highly stable using alternative calibration schemes and dating methods. Our data simulation highlights the potential risk of making strong arguments about phylogenetic timing based on inferences from a handful of nuclear genes, a common practice. Based on the newly obtained timetree and ancestral area reconstruction results, we argue that (i) the classic "Out of Appalachia" hypothesis of plethodontid origins is problematic; (ii) the common ancestor of extant plethodontids may have originated in northwestern North America in the early Paleocene; (iii) origins of Eurasian plethodontids likely result from two separate dispersal events from western North America via Beringia in the late Eocene (~42 Ma) and the early Miocene (~23 Ma), respectively.

  11. The Transformation of an Astronomical Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVorkin, David H.

    2012-01-01

    In 1954 the Astrophysical Observatory of the Smithsonian Institution was closed down in Washington and transferred to Harvard, becoming the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. It was a bureau of the Harvard College Observatory but was wholly governed by the Smithsonian in Washington. Historians such as the speaker and Ron Doel have explored the nature of the transfer, but not so much its implications. Specifically, soon after the transfer, the SAO geared up for the IGY, the only astronomical institution to do so in a big way, and the NSF became the conduit for a vastly increased level of activity of a character and scale only dreamed of by astronomers prior to the Cold War era. This support, and soon additional NASA and Air Force support, led to the SAO becoming one of the largest astronomical institutions on the planet by the mid-1960s. We will explore some of the implications.

  12. Nuclear Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  13. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect

    Fossion, Ruben

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  14. Transit profiles: The thirty largest agencies for the 1992 section 15 report year. Statistical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This publication consists of consolidated profiles for the thirty (30) largest transit agencies in the United States. The criteria used to determine the thirty (30) largest transit agencies is operating expense reported for the 1992 report year. The data contained in each profile consists of general and summary reports, as well as modal, performance, and trend indicators for the 1992 report year. The 1992 Report Year is defined as a transit reporting agency with a fiscal year ending on or between January 1 and December 31.

  15. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  16. Astronomers Break Ground on Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) - World's Largest Millimeter Wavelength Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Scientists and dignitaries from Europe, North America and Chile are breaking ground today (Thursday, November 6, 2003) on what will be the world's largest, most sensitive radio telescope operating at millimeter wavelengths . ALMA - the "Atacama Large Millimeter Array" - will be a single instrument composed of 64 high-precision antennas located in the II Region of Chile, in the District of San Pedro de Atacama, at the Chajnantor altiplano, 5,000 metres above sea level. ALMA 's primary function will be to observe and image with unprecedented clarity the enigmatic cold regions of the Universe, which are optically dark, yet shine brightly in the millimetre portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is an international astronomy facility. ALMA is an equal partnership between Europe and North America, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile, and is funded in North America by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), and in Europe by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Spain. ALMA construction and operations are led on behalf of North America by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which is managed by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), and on behalf of Europe by ESO. " ALMA will be a giant leap forward for our studies of this relatively little explored spectral window towards the Universe" , said Dr. Catherine Cesarsky , Director General of ESO. "With ESO leading the European part of this ambitious and forward-looking project, the impact of ALMA will be felt in wide circles on our continent. Together with our partners in North America and Chile, we are all looking forward to the truly outstanding opportunities that will be offered by ALMA , also to young scientists and engineers" . " The U.S. National Science Foundation joins today with our North American partner, Canada, and with the European Southern Observatory, Spain, and Chile to prepare

  17. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at UTK is involved in heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. During the last year experimental work has been in 3 broad areas: structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, structure of nuclei far from stability, and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. Results in these areas are described in this document under: properties of high-spin states, study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics (PHENIX, etc.). Another important component of the work is theoretical interpretation of experimental results (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research).

  18. Nuclear winter or nuclear fall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, André

    Climate is universal. If a major modern nuclear war (i.e., with a large number of small-yield weapons) were to happen, it is not even necessary to have a specific part of the world directly involved for there to be cause to worry about the consequences for its inhabitants and their future. Indeed, smoke from fires ignited by the nuclear explosions would be transported by winds all over the world, causing dark and cold. According to the first study, by Turco et al. [1983], air surface temperature over continental areas of the northern mid-latitudes (assumed to be the nuclear war theatre) would fall to winter levels even in summer (hence the term “nuclear winter”) and induce drastic climatic conditions for several months at least. The devastating effects of a nuclear war would thus last much longer than was assumed initially. Discussing to what extent these estimations of long-term impacts on climate are reliable is the purpose of this article.

  19. Physical and Functional Interaction between the Bloom's Syndrome Gene Product and the Largest Subunit of Chromatin Assembly Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Renjie; Bachrati, Csanád Z.; Pedrazzi, Graziella; Kuster, Patrick; Petkovic, Maja; Li, Ji-Liang; Egli, Dieter; Hickson, Ian D.; Stagljar, Igor

    2004-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a genomic instability disorder characterized by cancer susceptibility. The protein defective in BS, BLM, belongs to the RecQ family of DNA helicases. In this study, we found that BLM interacts with hp150, the largest subunit of chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1), in vitro and in vivo. Colocalization of a proportion of the cellular complement of these two proteins is found at specific nuclear foci coinciding with sites of DNA synthesis in the S phase. This colocalization increases in the presence of agents that damage DNA or inhibit DNA replication. In support of a functional interaction between BLM and CAF-1, we show that BLM inhibits CAF-1-mediated chromatin assembly during DNA repair in vitro. Although CAF-1 activity is not altered in BLM-deficient cells, the absence of BLM does impair the ability of CAF-1 to be mobilized within the nucleus in response to hydroxyurea treatment. Our results provide the first link between BLM and chromatin assembly coupled to DNA repair and suggest that BLM and CAF-1 function in a coordinated way to promote survival in response to DNA damage and/or replication blockade. PMID:15143166

  20. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  1. Nuclear Terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2001-01-01

    As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

  2. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  3. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  4. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  5. Nuclear orbiting

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear orbiting following collisions between sd and p shell nuclei is discussed. The dependence of this process on the real and imaginary parts of the nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed, as well as the evolution of the dinucleus toward a fully equilibrated fused system. 26 refs., 15 figs.

  6. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  7. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    The technical principles and practices of the civil nuclear industry are described with particular reference to fission and its products, natural and artificial radioactivity elements principally concerned and their relationships, main types of reactor, safety issues, the fuel cycle, waste management, issues related to weapon proliferation, environmental considerations and possible future developments.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  9. 360 Video Tour of the World’s Largest Laser

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-08-24

    Welcome to the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the world’s largest and most energetic laser system. It draws researchers from around the globe for experiments that can’t be conducted anywhere else on Earth. Let’s take a closer look.

  10. Phase space reconstruction and estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent for gait kinematic data

    SciTech Connect

    Josiński, Henryk; Świtoński, Adam; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2015-03-10

    The authors describe an example of application of nonlinear time series analysis directed at identifying the presence of deterministic chaos in human motion data by means of the largest Lyapunov exponent. The method was previously verified on the basis of a time series constructed from the numerical solutions of both the Lorenz and the Rössler nonlinear dynamical systems.

  11. Enrollment Trends: The Nation's 50 Largest School Districts. ERS Trends Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spectrum, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This table ranks Fall 1986 enrollments in the nation's 50 largest school districts and compares the percentage of enrollment changes for Fall 1986 and 1985, Fall 1985 and 1984, and Fall 1986 and 1971. New York City schools head the list with over 940,000 students enrolled in Fall 1986. (MLH)

  12. Enrollment Trends: The Nation's 50 Largest School Districts. ERS Trends Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spectrum, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A table presents data on the fall 1984 enrollments in the 50 largest school districts in the United States and on the percentages of change in enrollment in these districts from 1983 to 1984, from 1982 to 1983, and from 1971 to 1984. (PGD)

  13. The Wide Variations in the Black-White Higher Education Gap in America's Largest Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Compares black-white performances in educational attainment among adults who reside in the 15 most populous U.S. cities or metropolitan areas, focusing on: the best-performing cities for African American high school completions; racial differences in African American college completions in the nation's largest cities; cities with high percentages…

  14. EPA Administrator and San Francisco Bay Area government agencies celebrate nations largest solar energy partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy joined Bay Area agencies to celebrate the Regional Renewable Energy Procurement Project (R-REP), the nation's largest solar energy government collaboration and the launch of the Federal Agg

  15. New Observational Evidence of Active Asteroid P/2010 A2: Slow Rotation of the Largest Fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoonyoung; Ishiguro, Masateru; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2017-06-01

    We report new observations of the active asteroid P/2010 A2 taken when it made its closest approach to Earth (1.06 au in 2017 January) after its first discovery in 2010. Despite a crucial role of the rotational period in clarifying its ejection mechanism, the rotational property of P/2010 A2 has not yet been studied due to the extreme faintness of this tiny object (∼120 m in diameter). Taking advantage of the best observing geometry since the discovery, we succeed in obtaining the rotational light curve of the largest fragment with Gemini/GMOS-N. We find that (1) the largest fragment has a double-peaked period of 11.36 ± 0.02 hr spinning much slower than its critical spin period; (2) the largest fragment is a highly elongated object (a/b ≥ 1.94) with an effective radius of {61.9}-9.2+16.8 m; (3) the size distribution of the ejecta follows a broken power law (the power indices of the cumulative size distributions of the dust and fragments are 2.5 ± 0.1 and 5.2 ± 0.1, respectively); (4) the mass ratio of the largest fragment to the total ejecta is around 0.8; and (5) the dust cloud morphology is in agreement with the anisotropic ejection model in Kim et al. These new characteristics of the ejecta obtained in this work are favorable to the impact shattering hypothesis.

  16. Coordinated observations using the world largest low-frequency radio telescopes and space misiions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Zarka, Ph.; Kolyadin, V. L.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Stepkin, S. V.; Panchenko, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Fischer, G.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Melnik, V. N.; Litvinenko, G. V.; Sidorchuk, M. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Vasilyeva, Ya. Yu.; Bojko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Mann, G.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Koval, A. A.; Mylostna, K.; Pylaev, O. S.; Shepelev, V. A.; Reznik, A. P.

    2013-09-01

    The positive possibilities of astrophysical objects studies(including the Solar system investigations) using coordinated observations with the largest existing and coming low frequency radio telescopes are shown. The observations of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn, ant others with UTR-2, URAN, NDA radio telescopes, and WIND, Cassini and STEREO space missions at frequencies lower than 40 MHz have been carried out.

  17. Solar system radio emissions studies with the largest low-frequency radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Litvinenko, G.; Kolyadin, V.; Zarka, P.; Mylostna, K.; Vasylieva, I.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Sidorchuk, M.; Rucker, H.; Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the trends and tasks in the field of lowfrequency studies of radio emission from the Solar system's objects. The world's largest decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN have a unique combination of sensitivity and time/frequency resolution parameters, providing the capability of the most detailed studies of various types of solar and planetary emissions.

  18. The 2003 Music in Our School's Month and World's Largest Concert Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    On March 13, 2003 millions of school children, teachers, and citizens from around the world participate simultaneously in the "World's Largest Concert" (WLC). This concert, a sing-along program, is broadcast on PBS and the Armed Forces Radio and Television Network overseas. Participating in the WLC is a way to celebrate Music in Our…

  19. Is Bigger Easier? John Forte: Administrating One of the Largest Districts in the Country.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    In this interview, John Forte, Fairfax County (Virginia) Public Schools' assistant superintendent for general services, explains how he uses his training and professional experience to oversee a smoothly running operation in one of the nation's largest school districts. His real challenge is providing extra support to students in low-income areas.…

  20. 45. FINISHING STANDS, 98INCH CONTINUOUS HOT STRIP MILL, WORLD'S LARGEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. FINISHING STANDS, 98-INCH CONTINUOUS HOT STRIP MILL, WORLD'S LARGEST AT THE TIME OF INSTALLATION IN 1937. THE MILL WAS REPLACED BY A NEW 84-INCH MILL IN 1971 AND IS SEEN HERE PARTIALLY DISMANTLED IN PREPARATION FOR DEMOLITION. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. Profile of a Woman Officer; Findings of a Study of Executives in America's 1300 Largest Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    The typical woman officer from the nation's largest industrial, banking, retail and utility companies is married, at least 50 years of age, has had some college, was born into a family of low or lower middle class income, and has a work salary of less than $30,000. While the number of women officers in leading business organizations is small, the…

  2. Discovery of the largest orbweaving spider species: the evolution of gigantism in Nephila.

    PubMed

    Kuntner, Matjaz; Coddington, Jonathan A

    2009-10-21

    More than 41,000 spider species are known with about 400-500 added each year, but for some well-known groups, such as the giant golden orbweavers, Nephila, the last valid described species dates from the 19(th) century. Nephila are renowned for being the largest web-spinning spiders, making the largest orb webs, and are model organisms for the study of extreme sexual size dimorphism (SSD) and sexual biology. Here, we report on the discovery of a new, giant Nephila species from Africa and Madagascar, and review size evolution and SSD in Nephilidae. We formally describe N. komaci sp. nov., the largest web spinning species known, and place the species in phylogenetic context to reconstruct the evolution of mean size (via squared change parsimony). We then test female and male mean size correlation using phylogenetically independent contrasts, and simulate nephilid body size evolution using Monte Carlo statistics. Nephila females increased in size almost monotonically to establish a mostly African clade of true giants. In contrast, Nephila male size is effectively decoupled and hovers around values roughly one fifth of female size. Although N. komaci females are the largest Nephila yet discovered, the males are also large and thus their SSD is not exceptional.

  3. Pterosaur from the latest cretaceous of west Texas: discovery of the largest flying creature.

    PubMed

    Lawson, D A

    1975-03-14

    Three partial skeletons of a large pterosaur have been found in the latest Cretaceous nonmarine rock of West Texas. This flying reptile had thin, elongate, perhaps toothless jaws and a long neck similar to Pterodaustro and Pterodactylus. With an estimated wingspan of 15.5 meters, it is undoutbtedly the largest flying creature presently known.

  4. Profile of a Woman Officer; Findings of a Study of Executives in America's 1300 Largest Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    The typical woman officer from the nation's largest industrial, banking, retail and utility companies is married, at least 50 years of age, has had some college, was born into a family of low or lower middle class income, and has a work salary of less than $30,000. While the number of women officers in leading business organizations is small, the…

  5. The 2003 Music in Our School's Month and World's Largest Concert Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    On March 13, 2003 millions of school children, teachers, and citizens from around the world participate simultaneously in the "World's Largest Concert" (WLC). This concert, a sing-along program, is broadcast on PBS and the Armed Forces Radio and Television Network overseas. Participating in the WLC is a way to celebrate Music in Our…

  6. Introduction to Special Edition (of the Journal of Nuclear Materials Management) on Reducing the Threat from Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2007-03-01

    Introductory article for special edition of the JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT outlining the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technical Division. In particular the International Nuclear and Radiological Security Standing Committee and its initial focus covering four topical areas--Radiological Threat Reduction, Nuclear Smuggling and Illicit Trafficking, Countering Nuclear Terrorism, and Radioligical Terrorism Consequence Management.

  7. The strongest gravitational lenses. III. The order statistics of the largest Einstein radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waizmann, J.-C.; Redlich, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Bartelmann, M.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The Einstein radius of a gravitational lens is a key characteristic. It encodes information about decisive quantities such as halo mass, concentration, triaxiality, and orientation with respect to the observer. Therefore, the largest Einstein radii can potentially be utilised to test the predictions of the ΛCDM model. Aims: Hitherto, studies have focussed on the single largest observed Einstein radius. We extend those studies by employing order statistics to formulate exclusion criteria based on the n largest Einstein radii and apply these criteria to the strong lensing analysis of 12 MACS clusters at z> 0.5. Methods: We obtain the order statistics of Einstein radii by a Monte Carlo approach, based on the semi-analytic modelling of the halo population on the past lightcone. After sampling the order statistics, we fit a general extreme value distribution to the first-order distribution, which allows us to derive analytic relations for the order statistics of the Einstein radii. Results: We find that the Einstein radii of the 12 MACS clusters are not in conflict with the ΛCDM expectations. Our exclusion criteria indicate that, in order to exhibit tension with the concordance model, one would need to observe approximately twenty Einstein radii with θeff ≳ 30″, ten with θeff ≳ 35″, five with θeff ≳ 42″, or one with θeff ≳ 74″ in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.0 on the full sky (assuming a source redshift of zs = 2). Furthermore, we find that, with increasing order, the haloes with the largest Einstein radii are on average less aligned along the line-of-sight and less triaxial. In general, the cumulative distribution functions steepen for higher orders, giving them better constraining power. Conclusions: A framework that allows the individual and joint order distributions of the n-largest Einstein radii to be derived is presented. From a statistical point of view, we do not see any evidence of an Einstein ring problem even for the

  8. Lobbying Behaviors of Higher Education Institutions: Structures, Attempts, and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Brent; Miller, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    As colleges and universities are under increased pressure to demonstrate their effectiveness, leaders have come to rely on government relations personnel to adequately tell the story of the activities and needs of the campus. State governments typically are the largest single supplier of public institution funding, yet they have been challenged by…

  9. Medical Expenditure for Chronic Diseases in Mexico: The Case of Selected Diagnoses Treated by the Largest Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Block, Miguel Angel; Alarcon-Irigoyen, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases (CD) are a public health emergency in Mexico. Despite concern regarding the financial burden of CDs in the country, economic studies have focused only on diabetes, hypertension, and cancer. Furthermore, these estimated financial burdens were based on hypothetical epidemiology models or ideal healthcare scenarios. The present study estimates the annual expenditure per patient and the financial burden for the nine most prevalent CDs, excluding cancer, for each of the two largest public health providers in the country: the Ministry of Health (MoH) and the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). Methods Using the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (ENSANUT) as the main source of data, health services consumption related to CDs was obtained from patient reports. Unit costs for each provided health service (e.g. consultation, drugs, hospitalization) were obtained from official reports. Prevalence data was obtained from the published literature. Annual expenditure due to health services consumption was calculated by multiplying the quantity of services consumed by the unit cost of each health service. Results The most expensive CD in both health institutions was chronic kidney disease (CKD), with an annual unit cost for MoH per patient of US$ 8,966 while for IMSS the expenditure was US$ 9,091. Four CDs (CKD, arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and chronic ischemic heart disease) accounted for 88% of the total CDs financial burden (US$ 1.42 billion) in MoH and 85% (US$ 3.96 billion) in IMSS. The financial burden of the nine CDs analyzed represents 8% and 25% of the total annual MoH and IMSS health expenditure, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The financial burden from the nine most prevalent CDs, excluding cancer, is already high in Mexico. This finding by itself argues for the need to improve health promotion and disease detection, diagnosis, and treatment to ensure CD primary and secondary prevention. If the

  10. Medical Expenditure for Chronic Diseases in Mexico: The Case of Selected Diagnoses Treated by the Largest Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Block, Miguel Angel; Alarcon-Irigoyen, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases (CD) are a public health emergency in Mexico. Despite concern regarding the financial burden of CDs in the country, economic studies have focused only on diabetes, hypertension, and cancer. Furthermore, these estimated financial burdens were based on hypothetical epidemiology models or ideal healthcare scenarios. The present study estimates the annual expenditure per patient and the financial burden for the nine most prevalent CDs, excluding cancer, for each of the two largest public health providers in the country: the Ministry of Health (MoH) and the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). Using the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (ENSANUT) as the main source of data, health services consumption related to CDs was obtained from patient reports. Unit costs for each provided health service (e.g. consultation, drugs, hospitalization) were obtained from official reports. Prevalence data was obtained from the published literature. Annual expenditure due to health services consumption was calculated by multiplying the quantity of services consumed by the unit cost of each health service. The most expensive CD in both health institutions was chronic kidney disease (CKD), with an annual unit cost for MoH per patient of US$ 8,966 while for IMSS the expenditure was US$ 9,091. Four CDs (CKD, arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and chronic ischemic heart disease) accounted for 88% of the total CDs financial burden (US$ 1.42 billion) in MoH and 85% (US$ 3.96 billion) in IMSS. The financial burden of the nine CDs analyzed represents 8% and 25% of the total annual MoH and IMSS health expenditure, respectively. The financial burden from the nine most prevalent CDs, excluding cancer, is already high in Mexico. This finding by itself argues for the need to improve health promotion and disease detection, diagnosis, and treatment to ensure CD primary and secondary prevention. If the status quo remains, the financial burden could be higher.

  11. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  12. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  13. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  14. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  15. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  16. Nuclear data for applications manpower survey - 1982: Nuclear Data Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.

    1983-10-01

    To assess the manpower in nuclear data for applications, the Nuclear Data Committee conducted a survey in 1982 of personnel at institutions that have a major commitment to providing such data. Responses were received from 333 researchers (including 55 students) who are estimated to constitute 90% of the manpower base at the 33 organizations responding to the survey. Those researchers who spend 10% or more of their time in nuclear data for applications are defined to be active in the field; 175 respondents fall in this category. The non-student researchers active in the field average 47 years of age and spend about 83 man-years per year on nuclear data activities. Data were also compiled on the educational background of the respondents, source of research support, citizenship, profession, types of nuclear data and other activities, use of experimental facilities, and specialties. Career goals of the students are summarized. Some inferences on the present and future manpower in nuclear data are drawn from these results.

  17. Nuclear material accounting software for Ukraine

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, M.; Ewing, T.; Lindley, R.; McWilliams, C.; Roche, C.; Sakunov, I.; Walters, G.

    1999-07-26

    Among the needs identified during initial surveys of nuclear facilities in Ukraine was improved accounting software for reporting material inventories to the regulatory body. AIMAS (Automated Inventory/Material Accounting System) is a PC-based application written in Microsoft Access that was jointly designed by an US/Ukraine development team. The design is highly flexible and configurable, and supports a wide range of computing infrastructure needs and facility requirements including situations where networks are not available or reliable. AIMAS has both English and Russian-language options for displays and reports, and it operates under Windows 3.1, 95, or NT 4.0{trademark}. AIMAS functions include basic physical inventory tracking, transaction histories, reporting, and system administration functions (system configuration, security, data backup and recovery). Security measures include multilevel password access control, all transactions logged with the user identification, and system administration control. Interfaces to external modules provide nuclear fuel burn-up adjustment and barcode scanning capabilities for physical inventory taking. AIMAS has been installed at Kiev Institute of Nuclear Research (KINR), South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant (SUNPP), Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT), Sevastopol Institute of Nuclear Energy and Industry (SINEI), and the Ministry of Environmental Protection and Nuclear Safety/Nuclear Regulatory Administration (MEPNS/NRA). Facility specialists are being trained to use the application to track material movement and report to the national regulatory authority.

  18. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Vision Project

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a project to examine possible futures associated with the global nuclear enterprise over the course of the next 50 years. All major components are included in this study--weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear power, nuclear materials, and institutional and public factors. To examine key issues, the project has been organized around three main activity areas--workshops, research and analyses, and development of linkages with other synergistic world efforts. This paper describes the effort--its current and planned activities--as well as provides discussion of project perspectives on nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear energy, and nuclear materials focus areas.

  19. Swimmer-Training Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This satirical essay proposes an institution of higher learning that would prepare students to become swimmers" and swimming instructors. Curriculum, teaching methods, student selection and evaluation are modelled on certain contemporary teacher-training institutes. (PD)

  20. Papers on the nuclear regulatory dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Freeman, S.D.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    The four papers contained in this report are titled: (1) From Prescriptive to Performance-Based Regulation of Nuclear Power; (2) Nuclear Regulatory Reform: A Technology-Forcing Approach; (3) Improving the Regulation of Nuclear Power; and (4) Science and Its Limits: The Regulators' Dilemma. These four papers investigate issues relating to the long-term regulation of nuclear energy. They were prepared as part of the Institute for Energy Analysis' project on Nuclear Regulation funded by a grant from the Mellon Foundation and a smaller grant by the MacArthur Foundation. Originally this work was to be supplemented by contributions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and from the Department of Energy. These contributions were not forthcoming, and as a result the scope of our investigations was more restricted than we had originally planned.

  1. Canadian institute honours Hawking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-11-01

    The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, has announced that a major new extension to its campus will be known as the Stephen Hawking Centre. The extension, which is currently being built, is due to open in 2011 and will double the size of the institute. It will also provide a home for the institute's Masters students, the first of whom joined the Perimeter Institute this autumn as part of its Perimeter Scholars international programme.

  2. 78 FR 23684 - Personnel Access Authorization Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... behalf of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI or the petitioner) on January 25, 2013. The petition was...; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 73 Personnel Access Authorization Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Petition for rulemaking; notice of receipt...

  3. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 6: Instrumentation and Control of Reactors and Plant Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  4. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 14: Introduction to Quality Assurance/Quality Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 6: Instrumentation and Control of Reactors and Plant Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 14: Introduction to Quality Assurance/Quality Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  7. Implementing Institutional Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Although many agree that institutional research in higher education has come of age and is accepted as a part of institutional management, great variations exist in the extent to which institutional research findings are synthesized and utilized in management decision-making. A number of reasons can be identified as accounting for this phenomenon,…

  8. Astronomical Institute of Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Astronomical Institute of Athens is the oldest research institute of modern Greece (it faces the Parthenon). The Astronomical Institute (AI) of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) started its observational projects in 1847. The modern computer and research center are housed at the Penteli Astronomical Station with major projects and international collaborations focused on extragalactic ...

  9. Netherlands Maritime Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefsmit, R. G. A.

    1976-01-01

    Account of the aims and activities of the Netherlands Maritime Institute provided by the Secretary to the Institute's Board of Directors, The Institute's intent is "to promote maritime activities, including the shipbuilding-shipping relationship, in the broadest sense of the word." (Editor/RK)

  10. Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (HIA) is the Institute within the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL of Canada responsible for providing astronomical facilities, and developing related instrumentation and software for Canadian researchers. The Institute was established in 1975, and now operates 1.8 m and 1.2 m optical telescopes at the DOMINION ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY close to Victoria, BC, as we...

  11. 100 Companies Receiving the Largest Dollar Volume of Prime Contract Awards, fiscal Year 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    systems, and electronics/communication equipment. 2. General Dynamics Corp. F-16 FALCON fighter aircraft. Nuclear submarines. M-1 tank. TOMAHAWK...100 and F-110 engines. Nuclear reactors for submarines. Underwater sound equipment. RDT&E for missile/space systems, ships, aircraft, and...6 E G & G PRINCETON APPLIED RES 229 E G & G RETICON 18,294 E G & G ROTRON 434 E G & G SEALOL INC 1,813 E G & G SPECIAL PROJECTS INC 931 E G & G

  12. Nuclear power plant life extension

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.D.; Bustard, L.D.; Harrison, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension represents an opportunity to achieve additional productive years of operation from existing nuclear power facilities. This is particularly important since operating licenses for over 50 GW of nuclear capacity will expire by the year 2010. By the year 2015, 85% of the total planned nuclear electric capacity will face retirement due to license expirations. Achieving additional productive years of operation from the nation's existing light water reactors is the goal of ongoing utility, vendor, US Department of Energy, and Electric Power Research Institute programs. Identifying potential technical issues associated with extending plant life and scoping realistic solutions represent first steps toward the development of a coordinated national plant life extension strategy. This is a substantial effort that must consider the breadth of issues associated with nuclear power plant design, operation, and licensing, and the numerous potential plant life extension strategies that may be appropriate to different utilities. Such an effort must enlist the expertise of the full spectrum of organizations in the nuclear industry including utilities, vendors, consultants, national laboratories, and professional organizations. A primary focus of these efforts is to identify operational changes and improvements in record-keeping, which, if implemented now, could enhance and preserve the life extension option.

  13. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  14. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  15. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three-nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between LQCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from LQCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  16. Hadronic nuclear energy: An approach towards green energy

    SciTech Connect

    Das Sarma, Indrani B.

    2015-03-10

    Nuclear energy is undoubtedly the largest energy source capable of meeting the total energy requirements to a large extent in long terms. However the conventional nuclear energy involves production of high level of radioactive wastes which possesses threat, both to the environment and mankind. The modern day demand of clean, cheap and abundant energy gets fulfilled by the novel fuels that have been developed through hadronic mechanics/chemistry. In the present paper, a short review of Hadronic nuclear energy by intermediate controlled nuclear synthesis and particle type like stimulated neutron decay and double beta decay has been presented.

  17. Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Streek, Penny Vande; Carretta, Robert; Weiland, Frederick L.

    1994-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following epitomes of progress in nuclear medicine. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and clinical importance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, and scholars to stay abreast of progress in medicine, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The epitomes included here were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Nuclear Medicine of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under the direction of Dr Lyons and the panel. PMID:7529452

  18. Mapping Hispanic-Serving Institutions: A Typology of Institutional Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Crisp, Gloria; Elizondo, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), institutions that enroll at least 25% Hispanic students, are institutionally diverse, including a much wider array of institutional types than other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). Furthermore, they have distinctive institutional characteristics from those typically emphasized in institutional typologies…

  19. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  20. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.