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Sample records for largest ribonucleoprotein particle

  1. Structural Dynamics of the Vault Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casañas, Arnau; Querol, Jordi; Fita, Ignasi; Verdaguer, Núria

    Vaults are ubiquitous, highly conserved, 13 MDa ribonucleoprotein particles, involved in a diversity of cellular processes, including multidrug resistance, transport mechanisms and signal transmission. There are between 104 and 106 vault particles per mammalian cell and they do not trigger autoimmunity. The vault particle shows a hollow barrel-shaped structure organized in two identical moieties, each consisting of 39 copies of the major vault protein (MVP). Other data indicated that vault halves can dissociate at acidic pH. The high resolution, crystal structure of the of the seven N-terminal domains (R1-R7) of MVP, forming the central vault barrel, together with that of the native vault particle (solved at 8 Å resolution), revealed the interactions governing vault association and suggested a pH-dependent mechanism for a reversible dissociation induced by low pH. Vault particles posses many features making them very promising vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic agents including self-assembly, 100 nm size range, emerging atomic-level structural information, natural presence in humans ensuring biocompability, recombinant production system, existing features for targeting species to the large lumen and a dynamic structure that may be controlled for manipulation of drug release kinetics. All these attributes provide vaults with enormous potential as a drug/gene delivery platform.

  2. Characterization of L1-Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Martin S.; LaCava, John; Dai, Lixin; Mita, Paolo; Burns, Kathleen H.; Rout, Michael P.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2016-01-01

    The LINE-1 retrotransposon (L1) encodes two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p, which bind to the L1 RNA in cis, forming a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is critical for retrotransposition. Interactions with both permissive and repressive host factors pervade every step of the L1 life cycle. Until recently, limitations in detection and production precluded in-depth characterization of L1 RNPs. Inducible expression and recombinant engineering of epitope tags have made detection of both L1 ORFs routine. Here, we describe large-scale production of L1-expressing HEK-293T cells in suspension cell culture, cryomilling and affinity capture of L1 RNP complexes, sample preparation for analysis by mass spectrometry, and assay using the L1 element amplification protocol (LEAP) and qRT-PCR. PMID:26895062

  3. Characterization of L1-Ribonucleoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Martin S; LaCava, John; Dai, Lixin; Mita, Paolo; Burns, Kathleen H; Rout, Michael P; Boeke, Jef D

    2016-01-01

    The LINE-1 retrotransposon (L1) encodes two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p, which bind to the L1 RNA in cis, forming a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is critical for retrotransposition. Interactions with both permissive and repressive host factors pervade every step of the L1 life cycle. Until recently, limitations in detection and production precluded in-depth characterization of L1 RNPs. Inducible expression and recombinant engineering of epitope tags have made detection of both L1 ORFs routine. Here, we describe large-scale production of L1-expressing HEK-293T cells in suspension cell culture, cryomilling and affinity capture of L1 RNP complexes, sample preparation for analysis by mass spectrometry, and assay using the L1 element amplification protocol (LEAP) and qRT-PCR.

  4. A vault ribonucleoprotein particle exhibiting 39-fold dihedral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Koji; Tanaka, Hideaki; Sumizawa, Tomoyuki; Yoshimura, Masato; Yamashita, Eiki; Iwasaki, Kenji; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2008-05-01

    A vault from rat liver was crystallized in space group C2. Rotational symmetry searches indicated that the particle has 39-fold dihedral symmetry. Vault is a 12.9 MDa ribonucleoprotein particle with a barrel-like shape, two protruding caps and an invaginated waist structure that is highly conserved in a wide variety of eukaryotes. Multimerization of the major vault protein (MVP) is sufficient to assemble the entire exterior shell of the barrel-shaped vault particle. Multiple copies of two additional proteins, vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) and telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1), as well as a small vault RNA (vRNA), are also associated with vault. Here, the crystallization of vault particles is reported. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 708.0, b = 385.0, c = 602.9 Å, β = 124.8°. Rotational symmetry searches based on the R factor and correlation coefficient from noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) averaging indicated that the particle has 39-fold dihedral symmetry.

  5. Purification of Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particles via a Tagged Nascent Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Inchaustegui Gil, Diana P.; Clayton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic fates of mRNAs are influenced by interactions between RNA-binding proteins and cis regulatory motifs. In the cytoplasm, mRNAs are present as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles, which include not only proteins that bind directly to the mRNA, but also additional proteins that are recruited via protein-protein interactions. Many labs have sought to purify such particles from cells, with limited success. We here describe a simple two-step procedure to purify actively translated mRNAs, with their associated proteins, from polysomes. We use a reporter mRNA that encodes a protein with three streptavidin binding peptides at the N-terminus. The polysomal reporter mRNA, with associated proteins, is purified via binding to a streptavidin matrix. The method takes four days, and can be applied in any cell that can be genetically manipulated. Using Trypanosoma brucei as a model system, we routinely purified 8% of the input reporter mRNA, with roughly 22-fold enrichment relative to un-tagged mRNAs, a final reporter-mRNA:total-mRNA ratio of about 1:10, and a protein purification factor of slightly over 1000-fold. Although the overall reporter mRNP composition is masked by the presence of proteins that are associated with many polysomal mRNAs, our method can be used to detect association of an RNA-binding protein that binds to specifically to a reporter mRNA. PMID:26808308

  6. Spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles repeatedly cycle through Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Stanek, David; Pridalová-Hnilicová, Jarmila; Novotný, Ivan; Huranová, Martina; Blazíková, Michaela; Wen, Xin; Sapra, Aparna K; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2008-06-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear structure closely associated with import and biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). Here, we tested whether CBs also contain mature snRNPs and whether CB integrity depends on the ongoing snRNP splicing cycle. Sm proteins tagged with photoactivatable and color-maturing variants of fluorescent proteins were used to monitor snRNP behavior in living cells over time; mature snRNPs accumulated in CBs, traveled from one CB to another, and they were not preferentially replaced by newly imported snRNPs. To test whether CB integrity depends on the snRNP splicing cycle, two human orthologues of yeast proteins involved in distinct steps in spliceosome disassembly after splicing, hPrp22 and hNtr1, were depleted by small interfering RNA treatment. Surprisingly, depletion of either protein led to the accumulation of U4/U6 snRNPs in CBs, suggesting that reassembly of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP was delayed. Accordingly, a relative decrease in U5 snRNPs compared with U4/U6 snRNPs was observed in CBs, as well as in nuclear extracts of treated cells. Together, the data show that particular phases of the spliceosome cycle are compartmentalized in living cells, with reassembly of the tri-snRNP occurring in CBs.

  7. Properties of a ribonucleoprotein particle isolated from Nonidet P-40-treated Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Davis, N L; Rueckert, R R

    1972-11-01

    A ribonucleoprotein particle containing about 20% ribonucleic acid (RNA), and containing little if any phospholipid or glucosamine, was recovered in high yield after treatment of Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus and B77 virus with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. This structure, which probably derives from the internal ribonucleoprotein filament described in electron microscopy studies, contained 80 to 90% of the viral 60 to 70S RNA and only about 10% of the protein present in intact virions. It sedimented in glycerol density gradients at approximately 130S and had a buoyant density in sucrose of about 1.34 g/ml. Studies with (32)P-labeled virus indicated that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained approximately 30 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight viral RNA. Intact virions contained about 70 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight RNA. Electrophoretic studies in dodecyl sulfate-containing polyacrylamide gels showed that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained only 5 of the 11 polypeptides found in the virion; of these the major component was a polypeptide weighing 14,000 daltons.

  8. Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles.

    PubMed

    Noda, Takeshi; Sagara, Hiroshi; Yen, Albert; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi; Cheng, R Holland; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-26

    In viruses, as in eukaryotes, elaborate mechanisms have evolved to protect the genome and to ensure its timely replication and reliable transmission to progeny. Influenza A viruses are enveloped, spherical or filamentous structures, ranging from 80 to 120 nm in diameter. Inside each envelope is a viral genome consisting of eight single-stranded negative-sense RNA segments of 890 to 2,341 nucleotides each. These segments are associated with nucleoprotein and three polymerase subunits, designated PA, PB1 and PB2; the resultant ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) resemble a twisted rod (10-15 nm in width and 30-120 nm in length) that is folded back and coiled on itself. Late in viral infection, newly synthesized RNPs are transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, where they are incorporated into progeny virions capable of infecting other cells. Here we show, by transmission electron microscopy of serially sectioned virions, that the RNPs of influenza A virus are organized in a distinct pattern (seven segments of different lengths surrounding a central segment). The individual RNPs are suspended from the interior of the viral envelope at the distal end of the budding virion and are oriented perpendicular to the budding tip. This finding argues against random incorporation of RNPs into virions, supporting instead a model in which each segment contains specific incorporation signals that enable the RNPs to be recruited and packaged as a complete set. A selective mechanism of RNP incorporation into virions and the unique organization of the eight RNP segments may be crucial to maintaining the integrity of the viral genome during repeated cycles of replication.

  9. Modeling large RNAs and ribonucleoprotein particles using molecular mechanics techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, A; Tan, R K; Harvey, S C

    1994-01-01

    There is a growing body of low-resolution structural data that can be utilized to devise structural models for large RNAs and ribonucleoproteins. These models are routinely built manually. We introduce an automated refinement protocol to utilize such data for building low-resolution three-dimensional models using the tools of molecular mechanics. In addition to specifying the positions of each nucleotide, the protocol provides quantitative estimates of the uncertainties in those positions, i.e., the resolution of the model. In typical applications, the resolution of the models is about 10-20 A. Our method uses reduced representations and allows us to refine three-dimensional structures of systems as big as the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs, which are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than nucleic acids that can be examined by traditional all-atom modeling methods. Nonatomic resolution structural data--secondary structure, chemical cross-links, chemical and enzymatic footprinting patterns, protein positions, solvent accessibility, and so on--are combined with known motifs in RNA structure to predict low-resolution models of large RNAs. These structural constraints are imposed on the RNA chain using molecular mechanics-type potential functions with parameters based on the quality of experimental data. Surface potential functions are used to incorporate shape and positional data from electron microscopy image reconstruction experiments into our models. The structures are optimized using techniques of energy refinement to get RNA folding patterns. In addition to providing a consensus model, the method finds the range of models consistent with the data, which allows quantitative evaluation of the resolution of the model. The method also identifies conflicts in the experimental data. Although our protocol is aimed at much larger RNAs, we illustrate these techniques using the tRNA structure as an example and test-bed. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7521223

  10. Synthesis of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles by the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Francoeur, A M; Gritzmacher, C A; Peebles, C L; Reese, R T; Tan, E M

    1985-01-01

    Sera from patients with autoimmune diseases have been used to identify small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) present in higher eukaryotic cells and also in dinoflagellates. Previously these sera have not detected crossreactive snRNP protein antigens of other lower eukaryotes such as yeast, Tetrahymena, or Dictyostelium. We report that anti-Sm, anti-U1-RNP, and anti-La/SS-B human antisera react with specific snRNP protein antigens synthesized by the protozoan Plasmodium falciparum, the human malarial parasite. These results suggest that the structure and antigenicity (and thus probably the function) of snRNPs have been widely conserved in eukaryote evolution. Images PMID:2582421

  11. Crystal structure of a transfer-ribonucleoprotein particle that promotes asparagine formation

    PubMed Central

    Blaise, Mickaël; Bailly, Marc; Frechin, Mathieu; Behrens, Manja Annette; Fischer, Frédéric; Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Becker, Hubert Dominique; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Thirup, Søren; Kern, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Four out of the 22 aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) are systematically or alternatively synthesized by an indirect, two-step route requiring an initial mischarging of the tRNA followed by tRNA-dependent conversion of the non-cognate amino acid. During tRNA-dependent asparagine formation, tRNAAsn promotes assembly of a ribonucleoprotein particle called transamidosome that allows channelling of the aa-tRNA from non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase active site to the GatCAB amidotransferase site. The crystal structure of the Thermus thermophilus transamidosome determined at 3 Å resolution reveals a particle formed by two GatCABs, two dimeric ND-AspRSs and four tRNAsAsn molecules. In the complex, only two tRNAs are bound in a functional state, whereas the two other ones act as an RNA scaffold enabling release of the asparaginyl-tRNAAsn without dissociation of the complex. We propose that the crystal structure represents a transient state of the transamidation reaction. The transamidosome constitutes a transfer-ribonucleoprotein particle in which tRNAs serve the function of both substrate and structural foundation for a large molecular machine. PMID:20717102

  12. Functionality of In vitro Reconstituted Group II Intron RmInt1-Derived Ribonucleoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Molina-Sánchez, Maria D; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En) and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3' end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods.

  13. Functionality of In vitro Reconstituted Group II Intron RmInt1-Derived Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Sánchez, Maria D.; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M.; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En) and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3′ end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods. PMID:27730127

  14. Active transport of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in a reconstituted cell-free system.

    PubMed

    French, B T; Schumm, D E; Webb, T E

    1987-08-01

    The ability of a reconstituted cell-free system to transport mRNA as a ribonucleoprotein particle has been examined. Poly(A) messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs), UV cross-linked after release from isolated liver nuclei in a cell-free system, exhibited a buoyant density of 1.33 g/cm3 in cesium sulfate and 1.47 g/cm3 in cesium chloride, values identical to those of poly(A) mRNP isolated directly from liver polysomes. Furthermore, the in vivo and in vitro transported mRNP showed a similar degree of resistance to RNase digestion and had sedimentation coefficients approximately 2.5 times that of the isolated mRNA. Release of both total mRNA and alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was proportional to the concentration of a specific cytoplasmic protein. Removal of the transport proteins from the cytosol with streptomycin sulfate provided a basal system incapable of supporting the active transport of alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA. Hybridization of released RNA with a recombinant probe specific for intron 6 of alpha 2 mu-globulin showed that intron sequences were retained within the nucleus under optimal alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA transport conditions and that the transported alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was of mature size.

  15. THE RIBONUCLEOPROTEIN NATURE OF LARGE PARTICLES IN THE MEIOSPORANGIA OF ALLOMYCES

    PubMed Central

    Rorem, Edward S.; Machlis, Leonard

    1957-01-01

    Particles averaging 3 to 4 µ in diameter, which are called chromospheres and fill the immature meiosporangia of the watermold Allomyces, were isolated and analyzed. The preparations were obtained by repeated centrifugations or by passage of the homogenate into a column of sand saturated with oleic acid, followed by selective elution of the chromospheres with alternate layers of oleic acid and an aqueous solution. The chromospheres contain approximately 12 per cent RNA, no DNA, and 60 per cent protein. It was concluded that they are pure or nearly pure ribonucleoprotein. Analysis of meiosporangia with chromospheres and after the chromospheres have disappeared showed no significant change in RNA or free amino acids. It was concluded that chromosphere disappearance is a fragmentation into small granules. The relation of chromospheres to postmeiotic chromospheres and nuclear caps is discussed. Speculation as to the function of these bodies is presented. PMID:13481022

  16. The ribonucleoprotein nature of large particles in the meiosporangia of Allomyces.

    PubMed

    ROREM, E S; MACHLIS, L

    1957-11-25

    Particles averaging 3 to 4 micro in diameter, which are called chromospheres and fill the immature meiosporangia of the watermold Allomyces, were isolated and analyzed. The preparations were obtained by repeated centrifugations or by passage of the homogenate into a column of sand saturated with oleic acid, followed by selective elution of the chromospheres with alternate layers of oleic acid and an aqueous solution. The chromospheres contain approximately 12 per cent RNA, no DNA, and 60 per cent protein. It was concluded that they are pure or nearly pure ribonucleoprotein. Analysis of meiosporangia with chromospheres and after the chromospheres have disappeared showed no significant change in RNA or free amino acids. It was concluded that chromosphere disappearance is a fragmentation into small granules. The relation of chromospheres to postmeiotic chromospheres and nuclear caps is discussed. Speculation as to the function of these bodies is presented.

  17. Investigating Engineered Ribonucleoprotein Particles to Improve Oral RNAi Delivery in Crop Insect Pests.

    PubMed

    Gillet, François-Xavier; Garcia, Rayssa A; Macedo, Leonardo L P; Albuquerque, Erika V S; Silva, Maria C M; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2017-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops producing double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) are being investigated largely as an RNA interference (RNAi)-based resistance strategy against crop insect pests. However, limitations of this strategy include the sensitivity of dsRNA to insect gut nucleases and its poor insect cell membrane penetration. Working with the insect pest cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis), we showed that the chimeric protein PTD-DRBD (peptide transduction domain-dsRNA binding domain) combined with dsRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) that improves the effectiveness of the RNAi mechanism in the insect. The RNP slows down nuclease activity, probably by masking the dsRNA. Furthermore, PTD-mediated internalization in insect gut cells is achieved within minutes after plasma membrane contact, limiting the exposure time of the RNPs to gut nucleases. Therefore, the RNP provides an approximately 2-fold increase in the efficiency of insect gene silencing upon oral delivery when compared to naked dsRNA. Taken together, these data demonstrate the role of engineered RNPs in improving dsRNA stability and cellular entry, representing a path toward the design of enhanced RNAi strategies in GM plants against crop insect pests.

  18. The 3.2 Angstrom Resolution Structure of the Polymorphic Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speir, Jeffrey Alan

    Structural studies of the polymorphic cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have resulted in high resolution structures for two distinct icosahedral ribonucleoprotein particle conformations dependent upon whether acidic or basic pH conditions prevail. CCMV is stable below pH 6.5, however metal-free particles maintain a 10% increase in hydrodynamic volume at pH >=q 7.5. Identification of this swollen' form of CCMV, which can easily be disrupted with 1M NaCl, led to the first reassembly of an icosahedral virus in vitro from purified viral protein and RNA to form infectious particles, and its assembly has been the subject of biochemical and biophysical investigations for over twenty-five years. Under well defined conditions of pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration, CCMV capsid protein or capsid protein and RNA will reassemble to form icosahedral particles of various sizes, sheets, tubes, rosettes, and a variety of laminar structures which resemble virion structures from non-related virus families. Analysis of native particles at 3.2A resolution and swollen particles at 28A resolution has suggested that the chemical basis for the formation of polymorphic icosahedral and anisometric structures is: (i) hexamers formed of beta-barrel subunits stabilized by an unusual hexameric parallel beta structure made up of their N-termini, (ii) the location of protein-RNA interactions, (iii) divalent metal cation binding sites that regulate quasi-symmetrical subunit associations, (iv) charge repulsion across the same interfaces when lacking divalent metal ions at basic pH, which induces the formation of sixty 20A diameter portals for RNA release, and (v) a novel, C-terminal-based, subunit dimer assembly unit. The use of C- and N-terminal arms in CCMV has not been observed in other icosahedral RNA virus structures determined at near atomic resolution, however, their detailed interactions and roles in stabilizing the quaternary organization of CCMV are related to that found

  19. Largest Lyapunov Exponent for Many Particle Systems at Low Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zon, R.; van Beijeren, H.; Dellago, Ch.

    1998-03-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent λ+ for a dilute gas with short range interactions in equilibrium is studied by a mapping to a clock model, in which every particle carries a watch, with a discrete time that is advanced at collisions. This model has a propagating front solution with a speed that determines λ+, for which we find a density dependence as predicted by Krylov, but with a larger prefactor. Simulations for the clock model and for hard sphere and hard disk systems confirm these results and are in excellent mutual agreement. They show a slow convergence of λ+ with increasing particle number, in good agreement with a prediction by Brunet and Derrida.

  20. Translational control of the oogenic program by components of OMA ribonucleoprotein particles in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Spike, Caroline A; Coetzee, Donna; Nishi, Yuichi; Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Yamamoto, Ikuko; Lin, Rueyling; Greenstein, David

    2014-12-01

    The oocytes of most sexually reproducing animals arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this period of arrest, enables oocytes to acquire the cytoplasmic components needed to produce healthy progeny and to gain competence to complete meiosis. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the major sperm protein hormone promotes meiotic resumption (also called meiotic maturation) and the cytoplasmic flows that drive oocyte growth. Prior work established that two related TIS11 zinc-finger RNA-binding proteins, OMA-1 and OMA-2, are redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. We affinity purified OMA-1 and identified associated mRNAs and proteins using genome-wide expression data and mass spectrometry, respectively. As a class, mRNAs enriched in OMA-1 ribonucleoprotein particles (OMA RNPs) have reproductive functions. Several of these mRNAs were tested and found to be targets of OMA-1/2-mediated translational repression, dependent on sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs). Consistent with a major role for OMA-1 and OMA-2 in regulating translation, OMA-1-associated proteins include translational repressors and activators, and some of these proteins bind directly to OMA-1 in yeast two-hybrid assays, including OMA-2. We show that the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 is an OMA-1-associated protein, which also represses the translation of several OMA-1/2 target mRNAs. In the accompanying article in this issue, we show that LIN-41 prevents meiotic maturation and promotes oocyte growth in opposition to OMA-1/2. Taken together, these data support a model in which the conserved regulators of mRNA translation LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 coordinately control oocyte growth and the proper spatial and temporal execution of the meiotic maturation decision.

  1. Translational Control of the Oogenic Program by Components of OMA Ribonucleoprotein Particles in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Caroline A.; Coetzee, Donna; Nishi, Yuichi; Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Yamamoto, Ikuko; Lin, Rueyling; Greenstein, David

    2014-01-01

    The oocytes of most sexually reproducing animals arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this period of arrest, enables oocytes to acquire the cytoplasmic components needed to produce healthy progeny and to gain competence to complete meiosis. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the major sperm protein hormone promotes meiotic resumption (also called meiotic maturation) and the cytoplasmic flows that drive oocyte growth. Prior work established that two related TIS11 zinc-finger RNA-binding proteins, OMA-1 and OMA-2, are redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. We affinity purified OMA-1 and identified associated mRNAs and proteins using genome-wide expression data and mass spectrometry, respectively. As a class, mRNAs enriched in OMA-1 ribonucleoprotein particles (OMA RNPs) have reproductive functions. Several of these mRNAs were tested and found to be targets of OMA-1/2-mediated translational repression, dependent on sequences in their 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs). Consistent with a major role for OMA-1 and OMA-2 in regulating translation, OMA-1-associated proteins include translational repressors and activators, and some of these proteins bind directly to OMA-1 in yeast two-hybrid assays, including OMA-2. We show that the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 is an OMA-1-associated protein, which also represses the translation of several OMA-1/2 target mRNAs. In the accompanying article in this issue, we show that LIN-41 prevents meiotic maturation and promotes oocyte growth in opposition to OMA-1/2. Taken together, these data support a model in which the conserved regulators of mRNA translation LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 coordinately control oocyte growth and the proper spatial and temporal execution of the meiotic maturation decision. PMID:25261697

  2. Structure and expression of the Drosophila melanogaster gene for the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mancebo, R; Lo, P C; Mount, S M

    1990-01-01

    A genomic clone encoding the Drosophila U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein was isolated by hybridization with a human U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein cDNA. Southern blot and in situ hybridizations showed that this U1 70K gene is unique in the Drosophila genome, residing at cytological position 27D1,2. Polyadenylated transcripts of 1.9 and 3.1 kilobases were observed. While the 1.9-kilobase mRNA is always more abundant, the ratio of these two transcripts is developmentally regulated. Analysis of cDNA and genomic sequences indicated that these two RNAs encode an identical protein with a predicted molecular weight of 52,879. Comparison of the U1 70K proteins predicted from Drosophila, human, and Xenopus cDNAs revealed 68% amino acid identity in the most amino-terminal 214 amino acids, which include a sequence motif common to many proteins which bind RNA. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but is highly charged and contains distinctive arginine-rich regions in all three species. These arginine-rich regions contain stretches of arginine-serine dipeptides like those found in transformer, transformer-2, and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins, all of which have been identified as regulators of mRNA splicing in Drosophila melanogaster. Images PMID:1692955

  3. Role of intermolecular/intrastructural B- and T-cell determinants in the diversification of autoantibodies to ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed Central

    Fatenejad, S; Mamula, M J; Craft, J

    1993-01-01

    The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (sn-RNP) particle, which consists of the U1 small RNA and multiple polypeptides, is a central target of the autoimmune response in systemic lupus erythematosus. Autoantibodies to the individual proteins of the U1 snRNP typically co-occur in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, an observation reconciled by postulating that the intact RNA-protein complex serves as the autoimmunogen and that snRNP-specific autoreactive T cells are necessary for autoantibody production. In this study, we demonstrated that normal mice did not develop antibody responses following immunization with purified self (murine) snRNPs. However, when such mice were coimmunized with self snRNPs in conjunction with the human (foreign) U1 snRNP A protein, they developed autoantibodies directed against individual proteins of the U1 snRNP, in addition to anti-A antibodies; we have previously shown that such mice develop snRNP-specific, autoreactive T cells. Intact snRNPs as a co-immunogen were a prerequisite for antibody expansion, since this response was abrogated by disruption of snRNP particles with pancreatic RNase prior to immunization. These findings indicate that autoreactive helper T cells can drive autoantibody production to the individual proteins of snRNP particles and that such autoantibody responses may require the presence of intact snRNP particles that possess intrastructural B-cell and helper-T-cell determinants. These results also suggest that induction of an immune response to one component of an autoantigenic snRNP complex, possibly through priming with molecular mimics, can induce the diversification of autoantibodies that is characteristic of that found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8265662

  4. Functional and Structural Impact of Target Uridine Substitutions on the H/ACA Ribonucleoprotein Particle Pseudouridine Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2010-09-17

    Box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein protein particles catalyze the majority of pseudouridylation in functional RNA. Different from stand alone pseudouridine synthases, the RNP pseudouridine synthase comprises multiple protein subunits and an RNA subunit. Previous studies showed that each subunit, regardless its location, is sensitive to the step of subunit placement at the catalytic center and potentially to the reaction status of the substrate. Here we describe the impact of chemical substitutions of target uridine on enzyme activity and structure. We found that 3-methyluridine in place of uridine inhibited its isomerization while 2{prime}-deoxyuridine or 4-thiouridine did not. Significantly, crystal structures of an archaeal box H/ACA RNP bound with the nonreactive and the two postreactive substrate analogues showed only subtle structural changes throughout the assembly except for a conserved tyrosine and a substrate anchoring loop of Cbf5. Our results suggest a potential role of these elements and the subunit that contacts them in substrate binding and product release.

  5. Regulation of polyribosome formation and protein synthesis in the uterus. Isolation of cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles and the principal properties of the cell-free protein-synthesizing system

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ching-Sung; Hamilton, Terrell H.

    1967-01-01

    1. Three procedures for isolating ribonucleoprotein particles from the cytoplasmic fraction of rat-uterus homogenates are described. By procedure 1, ribonucleoprotein particles were isolated in the presence of 5mm-Mg2+ and 25mm-K+, and the postmitochondrial supernatant fraction was made to 1·3% (w/v) in potassium deoxycholate. About 50% of the RNA and protein of the microsomal fraction was recovered in the monomeric ribosomes isolated. By procedure 2, ribonucleoprotein particles were isolated in the presence of 10mm-Mg2+ and 0·1m-K+, and in the absence of detergent. The ribosomes obtained were primarily polymeric, but recovery of microsomal RNA and protein was only 32%. By procedure 3, ribonucleoprotein particles were isolated according to procedure 1 but without the use of detergent. A mixture of polymeric and monomeric ribosomes was obtained, and the recovery of microsomal RNA and protein was about 60%. 2. Uterine polymeric and monomeric ribosomes, isolated by procedure 3 and designated `polyribosomal preparation', were examined for protein-synthesizing capabilities. The principal properties of the cell-free protein-synthesizing system containing the polyribosomal preparation are described. The efficiency of amino acid incorporation in the complete system incubated for 30min. and containing the polyribosomal preparation was found to be either 2·5 molecules of [14C]leucine or 2·2 molecules of [14C]-valine incorporated/ribosome. Assay of the preparation in the complete cell-free system containing 10mm-sodium fluoride indicated that 40% of the incorporation activity is a result of initiation of new polypeptide chains and 60% is due to completion of previously existing chains. Monomeric ribosomes obtained by various treatments of the polyribosomal preparation with sodium fluoride, ribonuclease and potassium deoxycholate had decreased incorporation activity in the cell-free system. However, monomeric ribosomes obtained by treatment with sodium fluoride only had an

  6. Complete MALDI-ToF MS analysis of cross-linked peptide–RNA oligonucleotides derived from nonlabeled UV-irradiated ribonucleoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    KÜHN-HÖLSKEN, EVA; LENZ, CHRISTOF; SANDER, BJÖRN; LÜHRMANN, REINHARD; URLAUB, HENNING

    2005-01-01

    Protein–RNA cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to elucidate hitherto noncharacterized protein–RNA contacts in ribonucleoprotein particles, as, for example, within spliceosomes. Here, we describe an improved methodology for the sequence analysis of purified peptide–RNA oligonucleotide cross-links that is based solely on MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The utility of this methodology is demonstrated on cross-links isolated from UV-irradiated spliceosomal particles; these were (1) [15.5K–61K–U4atac] small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles prepared by reconstitution in vitro, and (2) U1 snRNP particles purified from HeLa cells. We show that the use of 2′,4′,6′-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) as MALDI matrix allows analysis of cross-linked peptide–RNA oligonucleotides in the reflectron mode at high resolution, enabling sufficient accuracy to assign unambiguously cross-linked RNA sequences. Most important, post-source decay (PSD) analysis under these conditions was successfully applied to obtain sequence information about the cross-linked peptide and RNA moieties within a single spectrum, including the identification of the actual cross-linking site. Thus, in U4atac snRNA we identified His270 in the spliceosomal U4/U6 snRNP-specific protein 61K (hPrp31p) cross-linked to U44; in the U1 snRNP we show that Leu175 of the U1 snRNP-specific 70K protein is cross-linked to U30 of U1 snRNA. This type of analysis is applicable to any type of RNP complex and may be expected to pave the way for the further analysis of protein–RNA complexes in much lower abundance and/or of cross-links that are obtained in low yield. PMID:16314460

  7. Non-canonical binding interactions of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of P34 protein modulate binding within the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP)

    PubMed Central

    Kamina, Anyango D.; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are involved in many aspects of RNA metabolism. In Trypanosoma brucei, our laboratory has identified two trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37 that are involved in the maturation of the 60S subunit during ribosome biogenesis. These proteins are part of the T. brucei 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) and P34 binds to 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein L5 through its N-terminus and its RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. We generated truncated P34 proteins to determine these domains’ interactions with 5S rRNA and L5. Our analyses demonstrate that RRM1 of P34 mediates the majority of binding with 5S rRNA and the N-terminus together with RRM1 contribute the most to binding with L5. We determined that the consensus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) 1 and 2 sequences, characteristic of canonical RRM domains, are not fully conserved in the RRM domains of P34. However, the aromatic amino acids previously described to mediate base stacking interactions with their RNA target are conserved in both of the RRM domains of P34. Surprisingly, mutation of these aromatic residues did not disrupt but instead enhanced 5S rRNA binding. However, we identified four arginine residues located in RRM1 of P34 that strongly impact L5 binding. These mutational analyses of P34 suggest that the binding site for 5S rRNA and L5 are near each other and specific residues within P34 regulate the formation of the 5S RNP. These studies show the unique way that the domains of P34 mediate binding with the T. brucei 5S RNP. PMID:28542332

  8. Non-canonical binding interactions of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of P34 protein modulate binding within the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP).

    PubMed

    Kamina, Anyango D; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are involved in many aspects of RNA metabolism. In Trypanosoma brucei, our laboratory has identified two trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37 that are involved in the maturation of the 60S subunit during ribosome biogenesis. These proteins are part of the T. brucei 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) and P34 binds to 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein L5 through its N-terminus and its RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. We generated truncated P34 proteins to determine these domains' interactions with 5S rRNA and L5. Our analyses demonstrate that RRM1 of P34 mediates the majority of binding with 5S rRNA and the N-terminus together with RRM1 contribute the most to binding with L5. We determined that the consensus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) 1 and 2 sequences, characteristic of canonical RRM domains, are not fully conserved in the RRM domains of P34. However, the aromatic amino acids previously described to mediate base stacking interactions with their RNA target are conserved in both of the RRM domains of P34. Surprisingly, mutation of these aromatic residues did not disrupt but instead enhanced 5S rRNA binding. However, we identified four arginine residues located in RRM1 of P34 that strongly impact L5 binding. These mutational analyses of P34 suggest that the binding site for 5S rRNA and L5 are near each other and specific residues within P34 regulate the formation of the 5S RNP. These studies show the unique way that the domains of P34 mediate binding with the T. brucei 5S RNP.

  9. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below.

  10. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    On August 9–11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  11. Cloning of the cDNA for U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Czernik, A. J.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a plant cDNA that encodes U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) 70K protein. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein cDNA is not full length and lacks the coding region for 68 amino acids in the amino-terminal region as compared to human U1 snRNP 70K protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the plant U1 snRNP 70K protein with the amino acid sequence of animal and yeast U1 snRNP 70K protein showed a high degree of homology. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein is more closely related to the human counter part than to the yeast 70K protein. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but, like the vertebrate 70K proteins, is rich in charged amino acids. Northern analysis with the RNA isolated from different parts of the plant indicates that the snRNP 70K gene is expressed in all of the parts tested. Southern blotting of genomic DNA using the cDNA indicates that the U1 snRNP 70K protein is coded by a single gene.

  12. Leucine periodicity of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) A' protein is implicated in snRNP assembly via protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Fresco, L D; Harper, D S; Keene, J D

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant A' protein could be reconstituted into U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) upon addition to HeLa cell extracts as determined by coimmunoprecipitation and particle density; however, direct binding to U2 RNA could not be demonstrated except in the presence of the U2 snRNP B" protein. Mutational analysis indicated that a central core region of A' was required for particle reconstitution. This region consists of five tandem repeats of approximately 24 amino acids each that exhibit a periodicity of leucine and asparagine residues that is distinct from the leucine zipper. Similar leucine-rich (Leu-Leu motif) repeats are characteristic of a diverse array of soluble and membrane-associated proteins from yeasts to humans but have not been reported previously to reside in nuclear proteins. Several of these proteins, including Toll, chaoptin, RNase/angiogenin inhibitors, lutropin-choriogonadotropin receptor, carboxypeptidase N, adenylyl cyclase, CD14, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev, may be involved in protein-protein interactions. Our findings suggest that in cell extracts the Leu-Leu motif of A' is required for reconstitution with U2 snRNPs and perhaps with other components involved in splicing through protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1825347

  13. Interaction domains and nuclear targeting signals in subunits of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle-associated splicing factor SF3a.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Jung; Ferfoglia, Fabio; Raleff, Flore; Krämer, Angela

    2011-04-15

    Human splicing factor SF3a is a component of the mature U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and its three subunits of 60, 66, and 120 kDa are essential for splicing in vitro and in vivo. The SF3a heterotrimer forms in the cytoplasm and enters the nucleus independently of the U2 snRNP. Here, we have analyzed domains required for in vitro interactions between the SF3a subunits. Our results indicate that the SF3a66-SF3a120 interaction is mediated by a 27-amino acid region in SF3a120 C-terminal to the second suppressor-of-white-apricot and prp21/spp91 domain and amino acids 108-210 of SF3a66. Neither of these sequences contains known structural motifs, suggesting that the interaction domains are novel. Moreover, an ∼100-amino acid region, including the SURP2 domain of SF3a120 but extending into neighboring regions, is sufficient for binding to SF3a60. Analysis of determinants for nuclear import of SF3a demonstrates that SF3a120 provides the major nuclear localization signal and SF3a60 contributes to nuclear import.

  14. The carboxyterminal zinc fingers of TFIIIA interact with the tip of helix V of 5S RNA in the 7S ribonucleoprotein particle.

    PubMed Central

    Sands, M S; Bogenhagen, D F

    1991-01-01

    Immature Xenopus laevis oocytes contain large quantities of a 7S ribonucleoprotein particle containing transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) and 5S RNA in a 1:1 molar ratio. We have reconstituted RNPs containing 5S RNA and either intact TFIIIA or proteolytic fragments that represent progressive C-terminal deletions of the protein. A partial trypsin digestion fragment encompassing the amino terminal seven zinc fingers of TFIIIA rebinds 5S RNA with nearly the same affinity as intact TFIIIA. We have compared the RNase protection patterns resulting from binding of intact and deleted forms of TFIIIA. RNAse protection assays using cobra venom nuclease were performed on complexes reconstituted with 5' and 3' end-labeled 5S RNA. Similar experiments with 3' end-labeled 5S RNA were performed with nuclease alpha-sarcin. With both nucleases, nucleotides in helix V of 5S RNA show more complete protection from nuclease cleavage when the RNA is bound to intact TFIIIA than when it is bound to a 20 kDa tryptic fragment of TFIIIA lacking the C-terminal portion of the protein. These results suggest that fingers 8 and 9 of TFIIIA interact with the distal portion of helix V in the 5S RNA. Images PMID:1827669

  15. Purification of the spliced leader ribonucleoprotein particle from Leptomonas collosoma revealed the existence of an Sm protein in trypanosomes. Cloning the SmE homologue.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, I; Palfi, Z; Bindereif, A; Michaeli, S

    1999-04-30

    Trans-splicing in trypanosomes involves the addition of a common spliced leader (SL) sequence, which is derived from a small RNA, the SL RNA, to all mRNA precursors. The SL RNA is present in the cell in the form of a ribonucleoprotein, the SL RNP. Using conventional chromatography and affinity selection with 2'-O-methylated RNA oligonucleotides at high ionic strength, five proteins of 70, 16, 13, 12, and 8 kDa were co-selected with the SL RNA from Leptomonas collosoma, representing the SL RNP core particle. Under conditions of lower ionic strength, additional proteins of 28 and 20 kDa were revealed. On the basis of peptide sequences, the gene coding for a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 11.9 kDa was cloned and identified as homologue of the cis-spliceosomal SmE. The protein carries the Sm motifs 1 and 2 characteristic of Sm antigens that bind to all known cis-spliceosomal uridylic acid-rich small nuclear RNAs (U snRNAs), suggesting the existence of Sm proteins in trypanosomes. This finding is of special interest because trypanosome snRNPs are the only snRNPs examined to date that are not recognized by anti-Sm antibodies. Because of the early divergence of trypanosomes from the eukaryotic lineage, the trypanosome SmE protein represents one of the primordial Sm proteins in nature.

  16. Small stable RNAs from Escherichia coli: evidence for the existence of new molecules and for a new ribonucleoprotein particle containing 6S RNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Bailey, S C; Apirion, D

    1978-02-01

    Small stable RNA molecules of Escherichia coli other than 5S (rRNA) and 4S (tRNA) were studied. Two of the molecules corresponded to 4.5S and 6S RNA, which have been reported previously. The third stable RNA molecule, 10S RNA, has not been described before. RNA labeled with (32)P(i) or [(14)C]uracil for a relatively long time, when separated in 5%/12% tandem polyacrylamide gels, displayed three bands corresponding to 10S, 6S, and 4.5S RNA in addition to rRNA and tRNA bands. These RNAs were stable in pulse-chase-labeling experiments. The amount of these RNAs was small, comprising only 0.2 to 0.5% of the total (32)P incorporation. However, this amount represented a large number of molecules; for 6S and 4.5S, it was about 1,000/DNA molecule. These three RNAs were found in the postribosomal supernatant fraction. None of them was found in purified nucleoid fractions in which the tightly coiled DNA molecules were contained. Of these three RNAs, 6S RNA was unique in that it seemed to exist in a ribonucleoprotein particle. All these RNAs, as well as tRNA, were very stable in the cell under various physiological conditions. 5S RNA was less stable. On the other hand, purified 6S RNA was more susceptible than tRNA to cell nucleases when incubated with cell extracts, suggesting that, being in a particle, it is protected from cell nucleases.

  17. The C-protein tetramer binds 230 to 240 nucleotides of pre-mRNA and nucleates the assembly of 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, M; Rech, J E; Northington, S J; Flicker, P F; Mayeda, A; Krainer, A R; LeStourgeon, W M

    1994-01-01

    A series of in vitro protein-RNA binding studies using purified native (C1)3C2 and (A2)3B1 tetramers, total soluble heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), and pre-mRNA molecules differing in length and sequence have revealed that a single C-protein tetramer has an RNA site size of 230 to 240 nucleotides (nt). Two tetramers bind twice this RNA length, and three tetramers fold monoparticle lengths of RNA (700 nt) into a unique 19S triangular complex. In the absence of this unique structure, the basic A- and B-group proteins bind RNA to form several different artifactual structures which are not present in preparations of native hnRNP and which do not function in hnRNP assembly. Three (A2)3B1 tetramers bind the 19S complex to form a 35S assembly intermediate. Following UV irradiation to immobilize the C proteins on the packaged RNA, the 19S triangular complex is recovered as a remnant structure from both native and reconstituted hnRNP particles. C protein-RNA complexes composed of three, six, or nine tetramers (one, two, or three triangular complexes) nucleate the stoichiometric assembly of monomer, dimer, and trimer hnRNP particles. The binding of C-protein tetramers to RNAs longer than 230 nt is through a self-cooperative combinatorial mode. RNA packaged in the 19S complex and in 40S hnRNP particles is efficiently spliced in vitro. These findings demonstrate that formation of the triangular C protein-RNA complex is an obligate first event in the in vitro and probably the in vivo assembly the 40S hnRNP core particle, and they provide insight into the mechanism through which the core proteins package 700-nt increments of RNA. These findings also demonstrate that unless excluded by other factors, the C proteins are likely to be located along the length of nascent transcripts. Images PMID:8264621

  18. Conserved composition of mammalian box H/ACA and box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles and their interaction with the common factor Nopp140.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Isaac, C; Wang, C; Dragon, F; Pogacic, V; Meier, U T

    2000-02-01

    Small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (snoRNPs) mainly catalyze the modification of rRNA. The two major classes of snoRNPs, box H/ACA and box C/D, function in the pseudouridylation and 2'-O-methylation, respectively, of specific nucleotides. The emerging view based on studies in yeast is that each class of snoRNPs is composed of a unique set of proteins. Here we present a characterization of mammalian snoRNPs. We show that the previously characterized NAP57 is specific for box H/ACA snoRNPs, whereas the newly identified NAP65, the rat homologue of yeast Nop5/58p, is a component of the box C/D class. Using coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the nucleolar and coiled-body protein Nopp140 interacts with both classes of snoRNPs. This interaction is corroborated in vivo by the exclusive depletion of snoRNP proteins from nucleoli in cells transfected with a dominant negative Nopp140 construct. Interestingly, RNA polymerase I transcription is arrested in nucleoli depleted of snoRNPs, raising the possibility of a feedback mechanism between rRNA modification and transcription. Moreover, the Nopp140-snoRNP interaction appears to be conserved in yeast, because depletion of Srp40p, the yeast Nopp140 homologue, in a conditional lethal strain induces the loss of box H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs. We propose that Nopp140 functions as a chaperone of snoRNPs in yeast and vertebrate cells.

  19. The immunolocalization of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in testicular cells during the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Moussa, F; Oko, R; Hermo, L

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cellular and subcellular distribution of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) in the adult rat testis in relation to the different cell types at the various stages of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. The distribution of snRNPs in the nucleus and cytoplasm of germ cells was quantitated in an attempt to correlate RNA processing with morphological and functional changes occurring during the development of these cells. Light-microscopic immunoperoxidase staining of rat testes with polyclonal anti-Sm and monoclonal anti-Y12 antibodies localized spliceosome snRNPs in the nuclei and cytoplasm of germ cells up to step 10 spermatids. Nuclear staining was intense in Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and in the early steps of round spermatid development. Although comparatively weaker, cytoplasmic staining for snRNPs was strongest in mid and late pachytene spermatocytes and early round spermatids. Quantitative electron-microscopic immunogold labeling of Lowicryl embedded testicular sections confirmed the light-microscopic observations but additionally showed that the snRNP content peaked in the cytoplasm of midpachytene spermatocytes and in the nuclei of late pachytene spermatocytes. The immunogold label tended to aggregate into distinct loci over the nuclear chromatin. The chromatoid body of spermatids and spermatocytes and the finely granular material in the interstices of mitochondrial aggregates of spermatocytes were found to be additional sites of snRNP localization and were intensely labeled. This colocalization suggests that these dense cytoplasmic structures may be functionally related. Anti-U1 snRNP antibodies applied to frozen sections showed the same LM localization pattern as spliceosome snRNPs. Anti-U3 snRNP antibodies applied to frozen sections stained nucleoli of germ cells where pre-rRNA is spliced.

  20. The ribonucleoprotein Csr network.

    PubMed

    Seyll, Ethel; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2013-11-08

    Ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential regulatory components in bacteria. In this review, we focus on the carbon storage regulator (Csr) network, which is well conserved in the bacterial world. This regulatory network is composed of the CsrA master regulator, its targets and regulators. CsrA binds to mRNA targets and regulates translation either negatively or positively. Binding to small non-coding RNAs controls activity of this protein. Expression of these regulators is tightly regulated at the level of transcription and stability by various global regulators (RNAses, two-component systems, alarmone). We discuss the implications of these complex regulations in bacterial adaptation.

  1. The Ribonucleoprotein Csr Network

    PubMed Central

    Seyll, Ethel; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential regulatory components in bacteria. In this review, we focus on the carbon storage regulator (Csr) network, which is well conserved in the bacterial world. This regulatory network is composed of the CsrA master regulator, its targets and regulators. CsrA binds to mRNA targets and regulates translation either negatively or positively. Binding to small non-coding RNAs controls activity of this protein. Expression of these regulators is tightly regulated at the level of transcription and stability by various global regulators (RNAses, two-component systems, alarmone). We discuss the implications of these complex regulations in bacterial adaptation. PMID:24217225

  2. Ribonucleoprotein of avian infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Davies, H A; Dourmashkin, R R; Macnaughton, M R

    1981-03-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was examined by electron microscopy after shadowing with carbon/platinum. Linear RNP strands up to 6.7 microns in length, from three IVB strains, were sensitive to both pancreatic RNase and to proteases. These strands were obtained from spontaneously disrupted complete particles but not from disrupted incomplete particles that lacked RNP. They were also released from Nonidet P40-disrupted particles and could be isolated on sucrose density gradients at a density of 1.27 g/ml. In some cases, helical RNP complexes associated with virus particles were observed that were similar to RNPs of human coronavirus strain 229E and mouse hepatitis virus strain 3.

  3. Current and future emission estimates of exhaust gases and particles from shipping at the largest port in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Keun; Shon, Zang-Ho

    2014-05-01

    The emissions of exhaust gases (NOx , SO2, VOCs, and CO2) and particles (e.g., PM) from ships traversing Busan Port in Korea were estimated over three different years (the years 2006, 2008, and 2009). This analysis was performed according to the ship operational modes ("at sea," "maneuvering," and "in port") and ship types based on an activity-based method. The ship emissions for current (base year 2009) and future scenarios (years 2020 and 2050) were also compared. The annual emissions of SO2, VOCs, PM, and CO2 were highest (9.6 × 10(3), 374, 1.2 × 10(3), and 5.6 × 10(5) ton year(-1), respectively) in 2008. In contrast, the annual NO x emissions were highest (11.7 × 10(3) ton year(-1)) in 2006 due mainly to the high NO x emission factor. The emissions of air pollutants for each ship operational mode differed considerably, with the largest emission observed in "in port" mode. In addition, the largest fraction (approximately 45-67%) of the emissions of all air pollutants during the study period was emitted from container ships. The future ship emissions of most pollutants (except for SO2 and PM) in 2020 and 2050 are estimated to be 1.4-1.8 and 4.7-6.1 times higher than those in 2009 (base year), respectively.

  4. Purification and characterization of a simple ribonucleoprotein particle containing small nucleoplasmic RNAs (snRNP) as a subset of RNP containing heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNP) from HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Brunel, C; Widada, J S; Lelay, M N; Jeanteur, P; Liautard, J P

    1981-02-25

    A ribonucleoprotein complex whose RNA complement consists exclusively of small nuclear RNA species (snRNA) has been purified from particles containing heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNP) from HeLa cells. This was accomplished by taking advantage of their ability to band at a density of about 1.43 g/cm3 in plain cesium chloride as well as in cesium chloride gradients containing 0.5% sarkosyl without prior aldehyde fixation. After these two steps of equilibrium density centrifugation, these snRNPs were still largely contaminated by free proteins (and especially phosphoproteins). A final step of purification by velocity sedimentation in a sucrose gradient containing 0.5 M cesium chloride and 0.5% sarkosyl was efficient in completely eliminating all free proteins. U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6 species according to the nomenclature of Lerner et al. (Nature, (1980) 283, 220-224) were found in these purified snRNPs, while a significant part of U6 and a small amount of U2 were found in the bottom fraction. 5S species behaved entirely as free RNA and is presumably a contaminant of cytoplasmic origin. Electrophoresis of proteins from snRNP labeled in vivo with (35S) methionine, revealed four bands with migrations corresponding to molecular weights ranging between 10,000 and 14,000 daltons.

  5. Ribonucleoprotein particles of bacterial small non-coding RNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) and its interaction with RNA polymerase core may link transcription to mRNA fate

    PubMed Central

    van Nues, Rob W.; Castro-Roa, Daniel; Yuzenkova, Yulia; Zenkin, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Coupled transcription and translation in bacteria are tightly regulated. Some small RNAs (sRNAs) control aspects of this coupling by modifying ribosome access or inducing degradation of the message. Here, we show that sRNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) specifically associates with core enzyme of RNAP in vivo and in vitro, independently of σ factor and away from the main nucleic-acids-binding channel of RNAP. We also show that, in the cells, IsrA exists as ribonucleoprotein particles (sRNPs), which involve a defined set of proteins including Hfq, S1, CsrA, ProQ and PNPase. Our findings suggest that IsrA might be directly involved in transcription or can participate in regulation of gene expression by delivering proteins associated with it to target mRNAs through its interactions with transcribing RNAP and through regions of sequence-complementarity with the target. In this eukaryotic-like model only in the context of a complex with its target, IsrA and its associated proteins become active. In this manner, in the form of sRNPs, bacterial sRNAs could regulate a number of targets with various outcomes, depending on the set of associated proteins. PMID:26609136

  6. Purification and characterization of a simple ribonucleoprotein particle containing small nucleoplasmic RNAs (snRNP) as a subset of RNP containing heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNP) from HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, C; Widada, J S; Lelay, M N; Jeanteur, P; Liautard, J P

    1981-01-01

    A ribonucleoprotein complex whose RNA complement consists exclusively of small nuclear RNA species (snRNA) has been purified from particles containing heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNP) from HeLa cells. This was accomplished by taking advantage of their ability to band at a density of about 1.43 g/cm3 in plain cesium chloride as well as in cesium chloride gradients containing 0.5% sarkosyl without prior aldehyde fixation. After these two steps of equilibrium density centrifugation, these snRNPs were still largely contaminated by free proteins (and especially phosphoproteins). A final step of purification by velocity sedimentation in a sucrose gradient containing 0.5 M cesium chloride and 0.5% sarkosyl was efficient in completely eliminating all free proteins. U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6 species according to the nomenclature of Lerner et al. (Nature, (1980) 283, 220-224) were found in these purified snRNPs, while a significant part of U6 and a small amount of U2 were found in the bottom fraction. 5S species behaved entirely as free RNA and is presumably a contaminant of cytoplasmic origin. Electrophoresis of proteins from snRNP labeled in vivo with (35S) methionine, revealed four bands with migrations corresponding to molecular weights ranging between 10,000 and 14,000 daltons. Images PMID:6164981

  7. A Host YB-1 Ribonucleoprotein Complex Is Hijacked by Hepatitis C Virus for the Control of NS3-Dependent Particle Production

    PubMed Central

    Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Germain, Marie-Anne; Motorina, Alena; Bonneil, Éric; Thibault, Pierre; Baril, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) orchestrates the different stages of its life cycle in time and space through the sequential participation of HCV proteins and cellular machineries; hence, these represent tractable molecular host targets for HCV elimination by combination therapies. We recently identified multifunctional Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1 or YBX1) as an interacting partner of NS3/4A protein and HCV genomic RNA that negatively regulates the equilibrium between viral translation/replication and particle production. To identify novel host factors that regulate the production of infectious particles, we elucidated the YB-1 interactome in human hepatoma cells by a quantitative mass spectrometry approach. We identified 71 YB-1-associated proteins that included previously reported HCV regulators DDX3, heterogeneous nuclear RNP A1, and ILF2. Of the potential YB-1 interactors, 26 proteins significantly modulated HCV replication in a gene-silencing screening. Following extensive interaction and functional validation, we identified three YB-1 partners, C1QBP, LARP-1, and IGF2BP2, that redistribute to the surface of core-containing lipid droplets in HCV JFH-1-expressing cells, similarly to YB-1 and DDX6. Importantly, knockdown of these proteins stimulated the release and/or egress of HCV particles without affecting virus assembly, suggesting a functional YB-1 protein complex that negatively regulates virus production. Furthermore, a JFH-1 strain with the NS3 Q221L mutation, which promotes virus production, was less sensitive to this negative regulation, suggesting that this HCV-specific YB-1 protein complex modulates an NS3-dependent step in virus production. Overall, our data support a model in which HCV hijacks host cell machinery containing numerous RNA-binding proteins to control the equilibrium between viral RNA replication and NS3-dependent late steps in particle production. PMID:23986595

  8. A host YB-1 ribonucleoprotein complex is hijacked by hepatitis C virus for the control of NS3-dependent particle production.

    PubMed

    Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Germain, Marie-Anne; Motorina, Alena; Bonneil, Éric; Thibault, Pierre; Baril, Martin; Lamarre, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) orchestrates the different stages of its life cycle in time and space through the sequential participation of HCV proteins and cellular machineries; hence, these represent tractable molecular host targets for HCV elimination by combination therapies. We recently identified multifunctional Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1 or YBX1) as an interacting partner of NS3/4A protein and HCV genomic RNA that negatively regulates the equilibrium between viral translation/replication and particle production. To identify novel host factors that regulate the production of infectious particles, we elucidated the YB-1 interactome in human hepatoma cells by a quantitative mass spectrometry approach. We identified 71 YB-1-associated proteins that included previously reported HCV regulators DDX3, heterogeneous nuclear RNP A1, and ILF2. Of the potential YB-1 interactors, 26 proteins significantly modulated HCV replication in a gene-silencing screening. Following extensive interaction and functional validation, we identified three YB-1 partners, C1QBP, LARP-1, and IGF2BP2, that redistribute to the surface of core-containing lipid droplets in HCV JFH-1-expressing cells, similarly to YB-1 and DDX6. Importantly, knockdown of these proteins stimulated the release and/or egress of HCV particles without affecting virus assembly, suggesting a functional YB-1 protein complex that negatively regulates virus production. Furthermore, a JFH-1 strain with the NS3 Q221L mutation, which promotes virus production, was less sensitive to this negative regulation, suggesting that this HCV-specific YB-1 protein complex modulates an NS3-dependent step in virus production. Overall, our data support a model in which HCV hijacks host cell machinery containing numerous RNA-binding proteins to control the equilibrium between viral RNA replication and NS3-dependent late steps in particle production.

  9. Mitochondrial and cytoplasmic ribosomes from mammalian tissues. Further characterization of ribosomal subunits and validity of buoyant-density methods for determination of the chemical composition and partial specific volume of ribonucleoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Ada; Ferrini, Ugo; Londei, Paola; Cammarano, Piero; Maraldi, Nadir

    1977-01-01

    1. At 0–4°C mitochondrial ribosomes (55S) dissociate into 39S and 29S subunits after exposure to 300mm-K+ in the presence of 3.0mm-Mg2+. When these subunits are placed in a medium containing a lower concentration of K+ ions (25mm), approx. 75% of the subparticles recombine giving 55S monomers. 2. After negative staining the large subunits (20.3nm width) usually show a roundish profile, whereas the small subunits (12nm width) show an elongated, often bipartite, profile. The dimensions of the 55S ribosomes are 25.5nm×20.0nm×21.0nm, indicating a volume ratio of mitochondrial to cytosol ribosomes of 1:1.5. 3. The 39S and 29S subunits obtained in high-salt media at 0–4°C have a buoyant density of 1.45g/cm3; from the rRNA content calculated from buoyant density and from the rRNA molecular weights it is confirmed that the two subparticles have weights of 2.0×106 daltons and 1.20×106 daltons; the weights of the two subunits of cytosol ribosomes are 2.67×106 and 1.30×106 daltons. 4. The validity of the isodensity-equilibrium-centrifugation methods used to calculate the chemical composition of ribosomes was reinvestigated; it is confirmed that (a) reaction of ribosomal subunits with 6.0% (v/v) formaldehyde at 0°C is sufficient to fix the particles, so that they remain essentially stable after exposure to dodecyl sulphate or centrifugation in CsCl, and (b) the partial specific volume of ribosomal subunits is a simple additive function of the partial specific volumes of RNA and protein. The RNA content is linearly related to buoyant density by the equation RNA (% by wt.)=349.5−(471.2×1/ρCsCl), where 1/ρCsCl=[unk]RNP (partial specific volume of ribonucleoprotein). 5. The nucleotide compositions of the two subunit rRNA species of mitochondrial ribosomes from rodents (42% and 43% G+C) are distinctly different from those of cytoplasmic ribosomes. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:563718

  10. Modeling the largest inflow of Changjiang freshwater into the Yellow Sea in 2012 with particle-tracking experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ji-Seok; Moon, Jae-Hong; Lee, Joon-Ho; Pang, Ig-Chan

    2016-12-01

    Abnormally low-salinity water originating from the Changjiang River (CR) was observed at the central Yellow Sea (YS) in 2012, which was quite unique compared to other years. In this study, the intrusion process of the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW) into the YS interior was examined using a hindcast simulation (2003-2012) with particle-tracking experiments. The particles representing the behavior of the CDW were released at the CR mouth from May to August, and then tracked. The simulated salinity patterns coincide fairly well with those derived from observations, particularly showing a large low-salinity structure around the central YS in 2012. A substantial intrusion of freshwater into the YS occurred in 2012, and this accounted for approximately 16% of all the released particles in 2012 which is twice as high as the mean average covering the 10 years. According to the trajectories in 2012, the particles took less than 50 days to travel from the mouth to the YS interior and followed mainly two paths toward the YS. One pathway traveled northward to the central entrance of the YS and then reached the western coast of Korea. This pathway was attributed to the strong easterly winds in late June and early August when three consecutive typhoons passed through the YS, which was a unique pattern that is rarely found in other years. The other pathway involved particles trapped along the Jiangsu coast drifting farther to the north up to the Shandon Peninsula against the anticyclonic tidal residual circulations during the passage of typhoons.

  11. Phosphorylation of the C proteins in heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles in HeLa cells: Characterization of in vivo phosphorylation, comparison with in vitro phosphorylation using casein kinase II, and preliminary studies on the effects of phosphorylation on particle structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Newly formed pre-messenger RNA associates with protein to form heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles. In HeLa cells, hnRNP particles contain six core proteins. Two proteins, termed C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}, are phosphorylated in vitro by casein kinase 11 (CKII). C{sub 1} protein became {sup 32}P-labeled after HeLa cells were incubated with ({sup 32}P)-orthophosphate in vivo (ibid). Because phosphorylation is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism, C protein phosphorylation was studied in greater detail. C protein phosphorylation in hnRNP particles was investigated in HeLa cells incubated with ({sup 32}P)-orthophosphate in vivo. Immunoblotting in pH 3.5-10 isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels indicated that C proteins focus only at pH 5.0. In pH 4.5-5.5 IEF gels, individually purified C, and 2 proteins resolve into the same four closely spaced, {sup 32}P-labeled bands. A fifth, unlabeled, more basic species was detached when hnRNP particles were purified without NaF. All {sup 32}P-labeled species contained identical amounts of {sup 32}P per unit protein suggesting that charge heterogeneity is not due to differential phosphorylation. Attempts to detect bound carbohydrate were unsuccessful. {sup 32}P-labeled phosphate was readily removed by potato acid phosphatase. E. coli alkaline phosphatase and snake venom phosphodiesterase were ineffective. {sup 32}P-label was found exclusively in phosphoserine. One-dimensional peptide mapping with chymotrypsin and S. aureus protease detected two phosphorylated peptides. C protein phosphorylation was also investigated in vitro. Incubation of hnRNP particles with rabbit liver CKII and {sup 32}P-ATP followed by IEF in pH 4.5-5.5 gels indicated that all four C protein species were {sup 32}P-labeled. {sup 32}P-label was found exclusively in phosphoserine.

  12. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA- dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of posttranslational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates. PMID:19167202

  13. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines.

    PubMed

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-02-01

    Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA-dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of post-translational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates.

  14. Recognition of U1 and U2 small nuclear RNAs can be altered by a 5-amino-acid segment in the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) B" protein and through interactions with U2 snRNP-A' protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, R C; Keene, J D

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the sequence elements influencing RNA recognition in two closely related small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) proteins, U1 snRNP-A and U2 snRNP-B". A 5-amino-acid segment in the RNA-binding domain of the U2 snRNP-B" protein was found to confer U2 RNA recognition when substituted into the corresponding position in the U1 snRNP-A protein. In addition, B", but not A, was found to require the U2 snRNP-A' protein as an accessory factor for high-affinity binding to U2 RNA. The pentamer segment in B" that conferred U2 RNA recognition was not sufficient to allow the A' enhancement of U2 RNA binding by B", thus implicating other sequences in this protein-protein interaction. Sequence elements involved in these interactions have been localized to variable loops of the RNA-binding domain as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (D. Hoffman, C.C. Query, B. Golden, S.W. White, and J.D. Keene, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, in press). These findings suggest a role for accessory proteins in the formation of RNP complexes and pinpoint amino acid sequences that affect the specificity of RNA recognition in two members of a large family of proteins involved in RNA processing. Images PMID:1826042

  15. Molecular cloning of Xenopus fibrillarin, a conserved U3 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein recognized by antisera from humans with autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lapeyre, B; Mariottini, P; Mathieu, C; Ferrer, P; Amaldi, F; Amalric, F; Caizergues-Ferrer, M

    1990-01-01

    Autoantibodies against U3 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein are associated with scleroderma autoimmune disease. They were shown to react with fibrillarin, a 34- to 36-kilodalton protein that has been detected in all eukaryotes tested from humans to yeasts. We isolated a 1.6-kilobase cDNA encoding fibrillarin from a Xenopus laevis cDNA library. The protein contains a 79-residue-long Gly-Arg-rich domain in its N-terminal region and a putative RNA-binding domain with ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence in its central portion. This is the first report of cloning of fibrillarin, and the deduced protein sequence is in agreement with the involvement of the protein in a ribonucleoprotein particle. Images PMID:2136767

  16. Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in the amphibian germinal vesicle: loops, spheres, and snurposomes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of snRNPs in the germinal vesicle (GV) of frogs and salamanders by immunofluorescent staining and in situ nucleic acid hybridization. The major snRNAs involved in pre-mRNA splicing (U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6) occur together in nearly all loops of the lampbrush chromosomes, and in hundreds to thousands of small granules (1-4 microns diameter) suspended in the nucleoplasm. The loops and granules also contain several antigens that are regularly associated with snRNAs or spliceosomes (the Sm antigen, U1- and U2- specific antigens, and the splicing factor SC35). A second type of granule, often distinguishable by morphology, contains only U1 snRNA and associated antigens. We propose the term "snurposome" to describe the granules that contain snRNPs ("snurps"). Those that contain only U1 snRNA are A snurposomes, whereas those that contain all the splicing snRNAs are B snurposomes. GVs contain a third type of snRNP granule, which we call the C snurposome. C snurposomes range in size from less than 1 micron to giant structures greater than 20 microns in diameter. Usually, although not invariably, they have B snurposomes on their surface. They may also contain from one to hundreds of inclusions. Because of their remarkably spherical shape, C snurposomes with their associated B snurposomes have long been referred to as spheres or sphere organelles. Most spheres are free in the nucleoplasm, but a few are attached to chromosomes at specific chromosome loci, the sphere organizers (SOs). The relationship of sphere organelles to other snRNP- containing structures in the GV is obscure. We show by immunofluorescent staining that the lampbrush loops and B snurposomes also react with antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Transcription units on the loops are uniformly stained by anti-hnRNP and anti-snRNP antibodies, suggesting that nascent transcripts are associated with hnRNPs and snRNPs along their entire length, perhaps

  17. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  18. Ribonucleoprotein complexes that control circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongni; Liang, Xiaodi; Chen, Xianyun; Guo, Jinhu

    2013-04-25

    Circadian clocks are internal molecular time-keeping mechanisms that enable organisms to adjust their physiology and behavior to the daily surroundings. Misalignment of circadian clocks leads to both physiological and health impairment. Post-transcriptional regulation and translational regulation of circadian clocks have been extensively investigated. In addition, accumulating evidence has shed new light on the involvement of ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) in the post-transcriptional regulation of circadian clocks. Numerous RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and RNPs have been implicated in the post-transcriptional modification of circadian clock proteins in different model organisms. Herein, we summarize the advances in the current knowledge on the role of RNP complexes in circadian clock regulation.

  19. Cotranscriptional Recruitment of RNA Exosome Cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and Two Distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) Complexes Assists the Exonuclease Rrp6p in the Targeting and Degradation of an Aberrant Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particle (mRNP) in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs. PMID:24047896

  20. Requirement of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein C for BRCA Gene Expression and Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, Rachel W.; Cai, Hong; Simhadri, Srilatha; Ule, Jernej; König, Julian; Xia, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNP C) is a core component of 40S ribonucleoprotein particles that bind pre-mRNAs and influence their processing, stability and export. Breast cancer tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 form a complex and play key roles in homologous recombination (HR), DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and cell cycle regulation following DNA damage. Methods PALB2 nucleoprotein complexes were isolated using tandem affinity purification from nuclease-solubilized nuclear fraction. Immunofluorescence was used for localization studies of proteins. siRNA-mediated gene silencing and flow cytometry were used for studying DNA repair efficiency and cell cycle distribution/checkpoints. The effect of hnRNP C on mRNA abundance was assayed using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Results and Significance We identified hnRNP C as a component of a nucleoprotein complex containing breast cancer suppressor proteins PALB2, BRCA2 and BRCA1. Notably, other components of the 40S ribonucleoprotein particle were not present in the complex. hnRNP C was found to undergo significant changes of sub-nuclear localization after ionizing radiation (IR) and to partially localize to DNA damage sites. Depletion of hnRNP C substantially altered the normal balance of repair mechanisms following DSB induction, reducing HR usage in particular, and impaired S phase progression after IR. Moreover, loss of hnRNP C strongly reduced the abundance of key HR proteins BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and BRIP1, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the downregulation of their mRNAs due to aberrant splicing. Our results establish hnRNP C as a key regulator of BRCA gene expression and HR-based DNA repair. They also suggest the existence of an RNA regulatory program at sites of DNA damage, which involves a unique function of hnRNP C that is independent of the 40S ribonucleoprotein particles and most other hnRNP proteins. PMID:23585894

  1. Triton - Neptune Largest Satellite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-25

    Intriguing patterns of unknown origin appeared on the surface of Neptune largest satellite, Triton, in this image returned by NASA Voyager 2 on Aug. 22, 1989. Voyager images showed that Triton is one of the brightest objects in the solar system,

  2. Largest College Endowments, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Of all endowments valued at more than $250-million, the UCLA Foundation had the highest rate of growth over the previous year, at 49 percent. This article presents a table of the largest college endowments in 2011. The table covers the "rank," "institution," "market value as of June 30, 2011," and "1-year change" of institutions participating in…

  3. Largest College Endowments, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Of all endowments valued at more than $250-million, the UCLA Foundation had the highest rate of growth over the previous year, at 49 percent. This article presents a table of the largest college endowments in 2011. The table covers the "rank," "institution," "market value as of June 30, 2011," and "1-year change" of institutions participating in…

  4. The elemental composition and origin of fine ambient particles in the largest Polish conurbation: first results from the short-term winter campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Grzegorz; Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta

    2016-07-01

    Diurnal (24-h) samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5, ambient particles with an aerodynamic diameter not greater than 2.5 μm) and soil samples were collected in an urban area in Warsaw, in winter. The samples were analysed for 24 elements with an Epsilon 5 spectrometer (PANalytical). The results were then arranged and compared with the results of research conducted earlier in Poland and other parts of the world. Afterwards, sources of ambient PM2.5 were identified and the share of each in the concentration of PM2.5 was evaluated by means of enrichment factor (EF) analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and multi-linear regression analysis (MLRA). The results were interpreted using a detailed analysis of correlations between diurnal concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5-elements, and of changes in meteorological conditions. The winter average ambient concentration of PM2.5 in Warsaw, was 10.7 ± 7.5 μg/m3 and was much lower than in the other sites in Poland. In Warsaw, regardless of the concentration of PM2.5, the concentrations of certain PM2.5-bound elements, mainly toxic, were high, e.g. the average ambient concentrations of PM2.5-bound Se, As, Co, V, Cd and Ni were 12.7 ± 30.5, 10.6 ± 34.4, 9.4 ± 13.7, 15.1 ± 32.7, 9.6 ± 22.2 and 3.5 ± 5.0 ng/m3, respectively. The elemental composition and concentrations of PM2.5 appeared to be influenced mainly by the anthropogenic emissions (energy production based on coal and biomass combustion, whose mean contribution to the concentration of PM2.5 was 18.4 %, and energy production based on oil combustion with a contribution of 9.9 % in PM2.5). A mixture of soil matter and road dust was also identified in PM2.5 (8 %). The mean contribution of traffic (exhaust) emissions to the concentration of PM2.5 in an urban area, selected as representative of the Warsaw conurbation, was assessed at 15.4 %.

  5. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  6. The largest fossil rodent

    PubMed Central

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R. Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000 kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene–Pleistocene (4–2 Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities. PMID:18198140

  7. The largest fossil rodent.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R Ernesto

    2008-04-22

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene-Pleistocene (4-2Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities.

  8. Mechanical Stability and Reversible Fracture of Vault Particles

    PubMed Central

    Llauró, Aida; Guerra, Pablo; Irigoyen, Nerea; Rodríguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Vaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells, with an unclear cellular function and promising applications as vehicles for drug delivery. In this article, we examine the local stiffness of individual vaults and probe their structural stability with atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions. Our data show that the barrel, the central part of the vault, governs both the stiffness and mechanical strength of these particles. In addition, we induce single-protein fractures in the barrel shell and monitor their temporal evolution. Our high-resolution atomic force microscopy topographies show that these fractures occur along the contacts between two major vault proteins and disappear over time. This unprecedented systematic self-healing mechanism, which enables these particles to reversibly adapt to certain geometric constraints, might help vaults safely pass through the nuclear pore complex and potentiate their role as self-reparable nanocontainers. PMID:24507609

  9. Data on structural transitions in domains of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2016-09-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled "in vitro properties of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes" (Makarov et al., 2015 [1]), demonstrating that upon incubation with viral RNA the poa semilatent hordeivirus (PSLV) TGB1 protein (the movement 63 K protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block) in vitro forms RNP structures resembling filamentous virus-like particles and its internal domain (ID) performs a major structural role in this process. This article reports the additional results on the structural lability of ID and the structural transitions in the C-terminal NTPase/helicase domain (HELD) induced by interaction with tRNA and phosphorylation.

  10. Phosphorylation of rat liver heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2 and C can be modulated by calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bosser, R; Faura, M; Serratosa, J; Renau-Piqueras, J; Pruschy, M; Bachs, O

    1995-01-01

    It was previously reported that the phosphorylation of three proteins of 36, 40 to 42, and 50 kDa by casein kinase 2 is inhibited by calmodulin in nuclear extracts from rat liver cells (R. Bosser, R. Aligué, D. Guerini, N. Agell, E. Carafoli, and O. Bachs, J. Biol. Chem. 268:15477-15483, 1993). By immunoblotting, peptide mapping, and endogenous phosphorylation experiments, the 36- and 40- to 42-kDa proteins have been identified as the A2 and C proteins, respectively, of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. To better understand the mechanism by which calmodulin inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins, they were purified by using single-stranded DNA chromatography, and the effect of calmodulin on their phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 was analyzed. Results revealed that whereas calmodulin inhibited the phosphorylation of purified A2 and C proteins in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, it did not affect the casein kinase 2 phosphorylation of a different protein substrate, i.e., beta-casein. These results indicate that the effect of calmodulin was not on casein kinase 2 activity but on specific protein substrates. The finding that the A2 and C proteins can bind to a calmodulin-Sepharose column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner suggests that this association could prevent the phosphorylation of the proteins by casein kinase 2. Immunoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that such interactions could also occur in vivo, since calmodulin and A2 and C proteins colocalize on the ribonucleoprotein particles in rat liver cell nuclei. PMID:7823935

  11. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  12. In vitro properties of hordeivirus TGB1 protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Makhotenko, Antonida V; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2015-11-01

    Hordeivirus movement protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block (TGB1 protein, TGBp1) interacts in vivo with viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs to form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that are considered to be a form of viral genome (non-virion transport form) capable of cell-to-cell and long-distance transport in infected plants. The structures of these RNPs have not been elucidated. The poa semilatent virus (PSLV) TGBp1 contains a structured C-terminal NTPase/helicase domain and an N-terminal extension region consisting of two domains - a completely intrinsically disordered extreme N-terminal domain and an internal domain (ID) with structure resembling a partially disordered molten globule. Here, we characterized the structures assembled in vitro by the full-length PSLV TGBp1 alone or in the presence of viral RNA. The PSLV TGBp1 was capable of multimerization and self-assembly into extended high-molecular-mass complexes. These complexes disassembled to apparent monomers upon incubation with ATP. Upon incubation with viral RNA, the PSLV TGBp1 in vitro formed RNP structures that appeared as filamentous particles resembling virions of helical filamentous plant viruses in morphology and dimensions. By comparing the biophysical characteristics of PSLV TGBp1 and its domains in the presence and absence of RNA, we show that the ID plays the main structural role in the self-interactions and RNA interactions of TGBp1 leading to the assembly of virus-like RNP particles.

  13. Reconstitution of archaeal H/ACA small ribonucleoprotein complexes active in pseudouridylation.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Bruno; Muller, Sébastien; Branlant, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    Pseudouridine (Psi) are frequently modified residues in RNA. In Eukarya, their formation is catalyzed by enzymes or by ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) containing H/ACA snoRNAs. H/ACA sRNA and putative ORFs for H/ACA sRNP proteins (L7Ae, aCBF5, aNOP10 and aGAR1) were found in Archaea. Here, by using Pyrococcus abyssi recombinant proteins and an in vitro transcribed P.abyssi H/ACA sRNA, we obtained the first complete in vitro reconstitution of an active H/ACA RNP. Both L7Ae and the aCBF5 RNA:Psi synthase bind directly the sRNA; aCBF5 also interacts directly and independently with aNOP10 and aGAR1. Presence of aCBF5, aNOP10 and a U residue at the pseudouridylation site in the target RNA are required for RNA target recruitment. In agreement, we found that the aCBF5-aNOP10 pair is the minimal set of proteins needed for the formation of a particle active for pseudouridylation. However, particles more efficient in targeted pseudouridylation can be formed with the addition of proteins L7Ae and/or aGAR1. Although necessary for optimal activity, the conserved ACA motif in the sRNA was found to be not essential.

  14. The expression profile of RNA-binding proteins in primary and metastatic colorectal cancer: relationship of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hope, Nicholas R; Murray, Graeme I

    2011-03-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins are a group of RNA-binding proteins with a range of key cellular functions, which are dysregulated in tumorigenesis including regulation of translational and RNA processing. The aims of this study were to define the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein expression profile in primary and metastatic colorectal cancer and to establish the clinicopathologic significance of this expression. A tissue microarray containing 515 primary colorectal cancers, 224 lymph node metastasis of colorectal cancer, and 50 normal colon samples was immunostained for 6 heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L displayed the most frequent strong immunoreactivity in primary colorectal tumor samples. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (P < .001) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (P = .003) showed significant alterations in nuclear expression in tumors compared with normal colonic epithelium, whereas heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (P = .001), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I (P < .001), and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (P < .001) all showed significant aberrant cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in tumor cells. There were also significant differences in cytoplasmic immunoreactivity between the primary tumor and the corresponding lymph node metastasis for heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (P = .001), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I (P < .001), and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (P = .001). Nuclear heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H (χ(2) = 72.1; P < .001), cytoplasmic heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I (χ(2) = 28.1; P < .001), and cytoplasmic heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (χ(2) = 13.2; P = .04) all showed significant associations with tumor stage. There was a significant relationship between strong nuclear

  15. A chicken mRNA similar to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1.

    PubMed

    Mozdziak, Paul E; Giamario, Carol; Dibner, Julia J; McCoy, Darell W

    2004-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins are predominantly nuclear RNA-binding proteins that function in a variety of cellular activities. The objective of these experiments was to clone a cDNA for a chicken protein similar to other previously reported heterogeneous ribonucleoproteins for other species. The 5' and 3' ends of the chicken mRNA were cloned using Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). Subsequently, the expression of the mRNA sequence was confirmed via Northern analysis. The deduced amino acid sequence was approximately 86% identical to corresponding regions of human, mouse, or zebrafish proteins similar to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1. The expression data confirmed the size of the predicted mRNA sequence. The newly identified sequence may be employed in future studies aimed at understanding the role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in avian species.

  16. Structure of a functional ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine synthase bound to a substrate RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Bo; Zhou, Jing; Kahen, Elliot; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong

    2009-09-29

    Box H/ACA small nucleolar and Cajal body ribonucleoprotein particles comprise the most complex pseudouridine synthases and are essential for ribosome and spliceosome maturation. The multistep and multicomponent-mediated enzyme mechanism remains only partially understood. Here we report a crystal structure at 2.35 {angstrom} of a substrate-bound functional archaeal enzyme containing three of the four proteins, Cbf5, Nop10 and L7Ae, and a box H/ACA RNA that reveals detailed information about the protein-only active site. The substrate RNA, containing 5-fluorouridine at the modification position, is fully docked and catalytically rearranged by the enzyme in a manner similar to that seen in two stand-alone pseudouridine synthases. Structural analysis provides a mechanism for plasticity in the diversity of guide RNA sequences used and identifies a substrate-anchoring loop of Cbf5 that also interacts with Gar1 in unliganded structures. Activity analyses of mutated proteins and RNAs support the structural findings and further suggest a role of the Cbf5 loop in regulation of enzyme activity.

  17. 20S small nuclear ribonucleoprotein U5 shows a surprisingly complex protein composition.

    PubMed

    Bach, M; Winkelmann, G; Lührmann, R

    1989-08-01

    U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), purified from HeLa nuclear extracts (splicing extracts), shows a complex protein composition. In addition to the snRNP proteins B', B, D, D', E, F, and G, which are present in each of the major snRNPs U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5, U5 snRNP contains a number of unique proteins characterized by apparent molecular masses of 40, 52, 100, 102, 116, and 200 (mostly a double band) kDa. The latter set of proteins may be regarded as U5-specific for the following reasons. They are not only eluted specifically, together with snRNP particles, from anti-2,2,7-trimethylguanosine immunoaffinity columns by 7-methylguanosine, they also cofractionate with U5 snRNP during chromatography and, most importantly, in glycerol gradient centrifugation. These U5 snRNP particles show a high sedimentation constant of about 20S. U5 snRNPs that lack the U5-specific proteins are also found in nuclear extracts but have (in comparison) a lower sedimentation value of only 8-10S. Autoimmune sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were identified that, on immunoblots with purified U5 snRNP proteins, reacted selectively with the 100- or 200-kDa proteins. This indicates that at least the high molecular mass U5-specific proteins are structurally distinct and not derived one from the other by proteolytic degradation. The existence of so many unique proteins in the U5 snRNP suggests that this snRNP particle may exert its function during splicing mainly by virtue of its protein components.

  18. N-methylation of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rieker, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Several of the core proteins on the 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (hnRNP) from HeLa cells contain N/sup G/,N/sup G/-dimethyl-L-arginine (uDMA). 3-deazaadenosine (c/sup 3/Ado), an inhibitor of and substrate for s-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, has been used to study the methylation patterns of the individual polypeptides. Trimethyllysine and uDMA formation in total cellular protein were inhibited in the presence of the drug while other methylated basic amino acids were unaffected. This inhibition was reversed within 60 min after removal of the drug from the medium. Monolayer HeLa cultures were incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/H)-L-methoinine for 12 hours in the presence of 50 uM c/sup 3/Ado. Purified particles were obtained by centrifugation of nuclear extracts on sucrose density gradients. The core proteins were isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, acid hydrolyzed and analyzed for radioactivity incorporated into methionine and methylated basic amino acids. The ratio of radioactivity incorporated into uDMA relative to that into methionine for the two major particle proteins with molecular weights of 31,000 (A/sub 1/) and 43,000 (A/sub 2/) was about 2.0 and 0.2 in control cultures. In the presence of c/sup 3/Ado, these ratios were depressed 60 to 80%. Results of pulse-chase experiments suggested that A/sub 1/ and A/sub 2/ are metabolically stable proteins (t/sub 0.5/ > 75 hr), whether or not the proteins were undermethylated. Monomethyl-L-arginine may be a precursor in the formation of u-DMA.

  19. The structure and function of small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Reichow, Steve L; Hamma, Tomoko; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R; Varani, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotes and archaea use two sets of specialized ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to carry out sequence-specific methylation and pseudouridylation of RNA, the two most abundant types of modifications of cellular RNAs. In eukaryotes, these protein-RNA complexes localize to the nucleolus and are called small nucleolar RNPs (snoRNPs), while in archaea they are known as small RNPs (sRNP). The C/D class of sno(s)RNPs carries out ribose-2'-O-methylation, while the H/ACA class is responsible for pseudouridylation of their RNA targets. Here, we review the recent advances in the structure, assembly and function of the conserved C/D and H/ACA sno(s)RNPs. Structures of each of the core archaeal sRNP proteins have been determined and their assembly pathways delineated. Furthermore, the recent structure of an H/ACA complex has revealed the organization of a complete sRNP. Combined with current biochemical data, these structures offer insight into the highly homologous eukaryotic snoRNPs.

  20. The human hnRNP M proteins: identification of a methionine/arginine-rich repeat motif in ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Datar, K V; Dreyfuss, G; Swanson, M S

    1993-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that proteins which directly bind to nascent RNA polymerase II transcripts, the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), play an important role in both transcript-specific packaging and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a group of abundant hnRNPs, the M1-M4 proteins, which appear as a cluster of four proteins of 64,000-68,000 daltons by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The M proteins are pre-mRNA binding proteins in vivo, and they bind avidly to poly(G) and poly(U) RNA homopolymers in vitro. Covalently associated polyadenylated RNA-protein complexes, generated by irradiating living HeLa cells with UV light, were purified and used to elicit antibodies in mice. The resulting antisera were then employed to isolate cDNA clones for the largest M protein, M4, by immunological screening. The deduced amino acid sequence of M4 indicates that the M proteins are members of the ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence family of RNA-binding proteins with greatest similarity to a hypothetical RNA-binding protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The M proteins also possess an unusual hexapeptide-repeat region rich in methionine and arginine residues (MR repeat motif) that resembles a repeat in the 64,000 dalton subunit of cleavage stimulation factor, which is involved in 3'-end maturation of pre-mRNAs. Proteins immunologically related to M exist in divergent eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Images PMID:8441656

  1. Largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Weitz, C. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution radar images from the Magellan spacecraft have allowed us to perform a detailed study on 25 large impact craters on Venus with diameters from 70 to 280 km. The dimension of these large craters is comparable with the characteristic thickness of the venusian lithosphere and the atmospheric scale height. Some physical parameters for the largest impact craters on Venus (LICV), such as depth, ring/diameter ratio, and range of ballistic ejecta deposits, have been obtained from the SAR images and the altimetry dataset produced by MIT. Data related to each of these parameters is discussed.

  2. The Thoc1 ribonucleoprotein and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Chinnam, Meenalakshmi; Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Xiaojing; Gold, David L; Khoury, Thaer; Nikitin, Alexander Yu; Foster, Barbara A; Li, Yanping; Bshara, Wiam; Morrison, Carl D; Payne Ondracek, Rochelle D; Mohler, James L; Goodrich, David W

    2014-11-01

    The majority of newly diagnosed prostate cancers will remain indolent, but distinguishing between aggressive and indolent disease is imprecise. This has led to the important clinical problem of overtreatment. THOC1 encodes a nuclear ribonucleoprotein whose expression is higher in some cancers than in normal tissue. The hypothesis that THOC1 may be a functionally relevant biomarker that can improve the identification of aggressive prostate cancer has not been tested. THOC1 protein immunostaining was evaluated in a retrospective collection of more than 700 human prostate cancer specimens and the results associated with clinical variables and outcome. Thoc1 was conditionally deleted in an autochthonous mouse model (n = 22 or 23 per genotype) to test whether it is required for prostate cancer progression. All statistical tests were two-sided. THOC1 protein immunostaining increases with higher Gleason score and more advanced Tumor/Node/Metastasis stage. Time to biochemical recurrence is statistically significantly shorter for cancers with high THOC1 protein (log-rank P = .002, and it remains statistically significantly associated with biochemical recurrence after adjusting for Gleason score, clinical stage, and prostate-specific antigen levels (hazard ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 2.51, P = .04). Thoc1 deletion prevents prostate cancer progression in mice, but has little effect on normal tissue. Prostate cancer cells deprived of Thoc1 show gene expression defects that compromise cell growth. Thoc1 is required to support the unique gene expression requirements of aggressive prostate cancer in mice. In humans, high THOC1 protein immunostaining associates with prostate cancer aggressiveness and recurrence. Thus, THOC1 protein is a functionally relevant molecular marker that may improve the identification of aggressive prostate cancers, potentially reducing overtreatment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  3. Higher expression of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein k in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fushi; Shen, Alex; Shanas, Reneé; Bhattacharyya, Achyut; Lian, Fangru; Hostetter, Galen; Shi, Jiaqi

    2010-10-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is an essential RNA and DNA binding protein involved in gene expression and signal transduction. The role of hnRNP K in cancer is relatively understudied. However, several cellular functions strongly indicate that hnRNP K is involved in tumorigenesis. Oncogenes c-Src, c-myc, and eIF4E are regulated by hnRNP K. We have shown an increased cytoplasmic hnRNP K in pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we investigated the altered expression of hnRNP K protein and its correlation with p-ERK in melanoma using human melanoma cell lines and tissue microarray. The protein levels of hnRNP K and p-ERK in 8 human melanoma cell lines and a melanoma progression tissue microarray containing 80 melanoma, 23 dysplastic nevi, and 14 benign nevi specimens were analyzed using Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis. hnRNP K was knocked down by siRNA, and its effect on melanoma cells was assessed. We showed a higher hnRNP K protein level in both melanoma cell lines and melanoma tissue specimens, which correlated with a higher c-myc expression. An increase in the cytoplasmic hnRNP K and eIF4E protein levels in melanoma cells is also seen. p-ERK level was also higher in dysplastic nevi and melanoma tissues, but did not correlate with hnRNP K protein level. We then demonstrated that knocking down of hnRNP K by siRNA inhibited melanoma cell growth and colony formation, as well as c-myc expression. hnRNP K expression correlated with melanoma and may play a role in melanoma tumorigenesis.

  4. Tobacco nuclear gene for the 31 kd chloroplast ribonucleoprotein: genomic organization, sequence analysis and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y Q; Ye, L Z; Sugita, M; Sugiura, M

    1991-01-01

    We have previously identified three chloroplast ribonucleoproteins and characterized their cDNAs. Here we present the genomic organization, sequence and expression of one of their genes. The 31 kd ribonucleoprotein (cp31) from tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) chloroplasts is coded for by a single-copy nuclear gene. This gene was isolated and its sequence was determined. The gene contains four exons and three introns. The position of its first intron is conserved among the genes for the maize abscisic acid-induced glycine-rich protein, the human hnRNP A1 protein and cp31. The transcription start site was determined to be 168 bp upstream from the translational initiation codon in both leaf and root tissues. No alternatively spliced transcripts was detected, suggesting that a diversity of chloroplast ribonucleoproteins is generated probably by gene amplification rather than alternative splicing. Images PMID:2057356

  5. Anthracite firing -- Largest steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, P.; Winkin, J.; Changqin, G.

    1998-07-01

    The size and scope of the Hanfeng Power Plant is a large undertaking by any definition. It is progressing very well with good coordination and cooperation of all those involved. Start-up is scheduled for the first unit in the year 2000 with the second unit following by eight months. The boiler island scope covers all equipment and structural steel from the bunkers to the stack. This includes the world's two largest anthracite fired boilers burning a blend of very low volatile Chinese anthracite and lean coal (bituminous). The coal blending is designed to maximize the use of the local anthracite coal. This is done by controlled blending at the entrance to the large FW D12D ball mills. Scaling up from earlier extensive experience with arch fired boilers is reviewed as well as key features of the Hanfeng boilers each of which are capable of generating 563 kg/s of steam at 540.8 C and 175 bar (equivalent to 717 MW of turbine/generator output). The design of the boiler and related equipment for the Hanfeng project has been the subject of in-depth reviews by independent engineers representing the banks to assure reliability of the boiler to support the economic model. It has been shown that FW's extensive experience burning anthracite coals has justified the scaling up of the various components to meet the requirements of the specification. This experience is based on operating similar type anthracite arch fired boilers with fuel blends that are comparable to the coals to be supplied for the Hanfeng project. The materials and equipment for the Hanfeng boiler island are being supplied on a multi-national basis in support of the various requirements of the financing institutions involved. The overall design has been finalized and the detail design is well underway. Most of the large critical components are already in manufacturing.

  6. Rehabilitating China's largest inland river.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqing; Chen, Yaning; Zhang, Yaoqi; Xia, Yang

    2009-06-01

    Wetlands are particularly important for conserving China's biodiversity but riparian wetlands in the Tarim River basin in western China have been reduced by 46% during the last 3 decades. The world's largest habitat for Populus euphratica, which is in the Tarim River basin, significantly shrank. To protect and restore the deteriorated ecosystems along the Tarim River and its associated wetlands, China's government initiated a multimillion dollar river restoration project to release water from upper dams to the dried-up lower reaches of the Tarim River starting in 2000. We monitored the responses of groundwater and vegetation to water recharge in the lower reaches of the river from 2000 to 2006 by establishing nine 1000-m-long transects perpendicular to the river at intervals of 20-45 km along the 320-km river course below the Daxihaizi Reservoir, the source of water conveyance, to Lake Taitema, the terminus of the Tarim River. Water recharges from the Daxihaizi Reservoir to the lower reaches of the Tarim River significantly increased groundwater levels and vegetation coverage at all monitoring sites along the river. The mean canopy size of the endangered plant species P. euphratica doubled after 6 years of water recharge. Some rare migrating birds returned to rest on the restored wetlands in summer along the lower reaches of the Tarim River. The biggest challenge facing decision makers, however, is to balance water allocation and water rights between agricultural and natural ecosystems in a sustainable way. A large number of inhabitants in the Tarim Basin depend on these limited water resources for a living. At the same time, the endangered ecosystems need to be protected. Given the ecological, socioeconomic, and sociopolitical realities in the Tarim Basin, adaptive water policies and strategies are needed for water allocation in these areas of limited water resources.

  7. Human telomerase and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins share a unique specificity of Sm protein association.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dragony; Collins, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear structures that host RNA modification and assembly reactions. Some RNAs transit Cajal bodies, while others must concentrate in Cajal bodies to function. Here we report that at least a subfraction of human telomerase RNA and individual resident Cajal body RNAs is associated with Sm proteins. Surprisingly, of seven Sm proteins assembled into a heteroheptameric ring, only a subset copurifies telomerase and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins. We show that a Cajal body RNA localization motif determines this specificity. These discoveries expand the cellular repertoire of Sm protein assemblies and their involvement in ribonucleoprotein localization and function.

  8. A Seasonal Trend of Single Scattering Albedo in Southern African Biomass-burning Particles: Implications for Satellite Products and Estimates of Emissions for the World's Largest Biomass-burning Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S. J.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Hyer, E. J.; Ward, D. E.; Dubovik, O.; hide

    2013-01-01

    As a representative site of the southern African biomass-burning region, sun-sky data from the 15 year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) deployment at Mongu, Zambia, was analyzed. For the biomass-burning season months (July-November), we investigate seasonal trends in aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals. The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from approx.. 0.84 in July to approx. 0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Angstrom exponent (440-870 nm; r(exp 2) = 0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r(exp 2) = 0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, burning season SSA retrievals for the Etosha Pan, Namibia AERONET site also show very similar increasing single scattering albedo values and decreasing imaginary refractive index as the season progresses. Furthermore, retrievals of SSA at 388 nm from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument satellite sensor show similar seasonal trends as observed by AERONET and suggest that this seasonal shift is widespread throughout much of southern Africa. A seasonal shift in the satellite retrieval bias of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer collection 5 dark target algorithm is consistent with this seasonal SSA trend since the algorithm assumes a constant value of SSA. Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, however, appears less sensitive to the absorption-induced bias.

  9. A seasonal trend of single scattering albedo in southern African biomass-burning particles: Implications for satellite products and estimates of emissions for the world's largest biomass-burning source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S. J.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Hyer, E. J.; Ward, D. E.; Dubovik, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Sorokin, M.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-06-01

    As a representative site of the southern African biomass-burning region, sun-sky data from the 15 year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) deployment at Mongu, Zambia, was analyzed. For the biomass-burning season months (July-November), we investigate seasonal trends in aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals. The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from ~0.84 in July to ~0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Ångström exponent (440-870 nm; r2 = 0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r2 = 0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, burning season SSA retrievals for the Etosha Pan, Namibia AERONET site also show very similar increasing single scattering albedo values and decreasing imaginary refractive index as the season progresses. Furthermore, retrievals of SSA at 388 nm from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument satellite sensor show similar seasonal trends as observed by AERONET and suggest that this seasonal shift is widespread throughout much of southern Africa. A seasonal shift in the satellite retrieval bias of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer collection 5 dark target algorithm is consistent with this seasonal SSA trend since the algorithm assumes a constant value of SSA. Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, however, appears less sensitive to the absorption-induced bias.

  10. The stability, polyadenylic acid content and ribonucleoprotein form of nulcear ribonucleic acid in artichoke.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, K S; Ingle, J

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear preparation, containing 60-80% of the total tissue DNA and less than 0.5% of the total rRNA, was used to characterize the nuclear RNA species synthesized in cultured artichoke explants. The half-lives of the nuclear RNA species were estimated from first-order-decay analyses to be: hnRNA (heterogeneous nuclear RNA) containing poly(A), 38 min; hnRNA lacking poly(A), 37 min; 2.5 X 10(6)-mol. wt. precursor rRNA, 24 min; 1.4 X 10(6)-mol.wt. precursor rRNA, 58 min; 1.0 X 10(6)-mol.wt. precursor rRNA, 52 min. The shorter half-lives are probably overestimates, owing to the time required for equilibration of the nucleotide-precursor pools. The pathway of rRNA synthesis is considered in terms of these kinetic measurements. The rate of accumulation of cytoplasmic polydisperse RNA suggested that as much as 40% of the hnRNA may be transported to the cytoplasm. The 14-25% of the hnRNA that contained a poly(A) tract had an average molecular size of 0.7 X 10(6) daltons. The poly(A) segment was 40-200 nucleotides long, consisted of at least 95% AMP and accounted for 8-10% of the [32P]orthophosphate incorporated into the poly(A)-containing hnRNA. Ribonucleoprotein particles released from nuclei by sonication, lysis in EDTA or incubation in buffer were analysed by sedimentation through sucrose gradients and by isopycnic centrifugation in gradients of metrizamide and CsCl. More than 50% of the hnRNA remained bound to the chromatin after each treatment. The hnRNA was always associated with protein but the densities of isolated particles suggested that the ratio of protein to RNA was lower than that reported for mammalian cells, The particles separated from chromatin were not enriched for poly(A)-containing hnRNA. PMID:1008819

  11. The stability, polyadenylic acid content and ribonucleoprotein form of nulcear ribonucleic acid in artichoke.

    PubMed

    Chapman, K S; Ingle, J

    1976-12-01

    A nuclear preparation, containing 60-80% of the total tissue DNA and less than 0.5% of the total rRNA, was used to characterize the nuclear RNA species synthesized in cultured artichoke explants. The half-lives of the nuclear RNA species were estimated from first-order-decay analyses to be: hnRNA (heterogeneous nuclear RNA) containing poly(A), 38 min; hnRNA lacking poly(A), 37 min; 2.5 X 10(6)-mol. wt. precursor rRNA, 24 min; 1.4 X 10(6)-mol.wt. precursor rRNA, 58 min; 1.0 X 10(6)-mol.wt. precursor rRNA, 52 min. The shorter half-lives are probably overestimates, owing to the time required for equilibration of the nucleotide-precursor pools. The pathway of rRNA synthesis is considered in terms of these kinetic measurements. The rate of accumulation of cytoplasmic polydisperse RNA suggested that as much as 40% of the hnRNA may be transported to the cytoplasm. The 14-25% of the hnRNA that contained a poly(A) tract had an average molecular size of 0.7 X 10(6) daltons. The poly(A) segment was 40-200 nucleotides long, consisted of at least 95% AMP and accounted for 8-10% of the [32P]orthophosphate incorporated into the poly(A)-containing hnRNA. Ribonucleoprotein particles released from nuclei by sonication, lysis in EDTA or incubation in buffer were analysed by sedimentation through sucrose gradients and by isopycnic centrifugation in gradients of metrizamide and CsCl. More than 50% of the hnRNA remained bound to the chromatin after each treatment. The hnRNA was always associated with protein but the densities of isolated particles suggested that the ratio of protein to RNA was lower than that reported for mammalian cells, The particles separated from chromatin were not enriched for poly(A)-containing hnRNA.

  12. Tissue-specific expression and cDNA cloning of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, G.; Amara, S.G.; Lerner, M.R. )

    1988-07-01

    Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases have antibodies against nuclear antigens. An example is anti-Sm sera, which recognize proteins associated with small nuclear RNA molecules (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles). In this paper anti-Sm sera were used to probe immunoblots of various rat tissues. A previously unidentified M{sub r} 28,000 polypeptide was recognized by these anti-Sm sera. This polypeptide, referred to as N, is expressed in a tissue-specific manner, being most abundant in rat brain, less so in heart, and undetectable in the other tissues examined. Immunoprecipitation experiments using antibodies directed against the cap structure of small nuclear RNAs have demonstrated that N is a snRNP-associated polypeptide. Anti-Sm serum was also used to isolate a partial cDNA clone ({lambda}rb91) from a rat brain phage {lambda}gt11 cDNA expression library. A longer cDNA clone was obtained by rescreening the library with {lambda}rb91. In vitro transcription and subsequent translation of this subcloned, longer insert (pGMA2) resulted in a protein product with the same electrophoretic and immunological properties as N, confirming that pGMA2 encodes N. The tissue distribution of N and the involvement of snRNP particles in nuclear pre-mRNA processing may imply a role for N in tissue-specific pre-mRNA splicing.

  13. Conserved residues in Lassa fever virus Z protein modulate viral infectivity at the level of the ribonucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles.

  14. Glycolytic enzymes localize to ribonucleoprotein granules in Drosophila germ cells, bind Tudor and protect from transposable elements.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Thomson, Travis C; Creed, T Michael; Tu, Shikui; Loganathan, Sudan N; Jackson, Christina A; McCluskey, Patrick; Lin, Yanyan; Collier, Scott E; Weng, Zhiping; Lasko, Paul; Ohi, Melanie D; Arkov, Alexey L

    2015-03-01

    Germ cells give rise to all cell lineages in the next-generation and are responsible for the continuity of life. In a variety of organisms, germ cells and stem cells contain large ribonucleoprotein granules. Although these particles were discovered more than 100 years ago, their assembly and functions are not well understood. Here we report that glycolytic enzymes are components of these granules in Drosophila germ cells and both their mRNAs and the enzymes themselves are enriched in germ cells. We show that these enzymes are specifically required for germ cell development and that they protect their genomes from transposable elements, providing the first link between metabolism and transposon silencing. We further demonstrate that in the granules, glycolytic enzymes associate with the evolutionarily conserved Tudor protein. Our biochemical and single-particle EM structural analyses of purified Tudor show a flexible molecule and suggest a mechanism for the recruitment of glycolytic enzymes to the granules. Our data indicate that germ cells, similarly to stem cells and tumor cells, might prefer to produce energy through the glycolytic pathway, thus linking a particular metabolism to pluripotency. © 2015 The Authors.

  15. Monoclonal autoantibody recognizing a unique set of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Winkler, A; Watson-McKown, R; Wise, K S

    1988-01-01

    A murine IgG2a, kappa-monoclonal autoantibody (mAb) F78 is described that recognizes a novel epitope associated with small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes (snRNP). F78 selectively immunoprecipitated a unique pattern of small nuclear RNA (U1, U2, and U4 to U6) characterized by a marked depletion of U1 and an elevated proportion of U2 compared with known patterns immunoprecipitated by previously described anti-RNP (2.73) and anti-Sm (7.13, Y12) mAb. Analysis of immunoprecipitated RNA from extracts previously cleared with mAb F78 and probed with anti-RNP mAb 2.73 further indicated the presence of two distinct subsets of U1. Immunoblots of whole cell extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) without heating showed that F78 selectively bound to a trypsin-sensitive component of apparent m.w. greater than 120,000 which was decreased in size following RNase A treatment. The anti-Sm mAb, but not the anti-RNP mAb, also recognized this component in unheated samples. Heating before SDS-PAGE resulted in abrogation of binding to the F78 epitope. Immunoprecipitation of unlabeled or [35S]methionine-labeled cell extracts with F78 revealed the presence of most snRNP peptides, but the absence of peptide C and the 68,000 m.w. component, known to be selectively associated with U1-specific snRNP. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE analysis of F78 immunoprecipitates confirmed that the epitope recognized by this mAb resides on a heat-dissociable complex containing snRNP-related peptides B, B', D, E, F, and G, but lacking U1-associated peptides. F78 mAb therefore defines a subset of snRNP which lack anti-RNP associated U1 RNA as well as peptides known to be selectively associated with this RNA species. It apparently recognizes an epitope associated with an assembled form of these particles and may be useful in examining structures involved in RNA processing.

  16. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  17. Knocking out consumer concerns and regulator's rules: efficient use of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoprotein complexes for genome editing in cereals.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Felix; Puchta, Holger

    2017-02-28

    Selection-free genome editing using Cas9 ribonucleoprotein embryo bombardment has been achieved for maize and wheat. This is a breakthrough that should make new breeding technologies more acceptable for worldwide use.

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 in health and neurodegenerative disease: from structural insights to post-transcriptional regulatory roles.

    PubMed

    Bekenstein, Uriya; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are a family of conserved nuclear proteins that associate with nascent RNA polymerase II transcripts to yield hnRNP particles, playing key roles in mRNA metabolism, DNA-related functions and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNPs accompany transcripts from stages of transcriptional regulation through splicing and post-transcriptional regulation, and are believed to affect the majority of expressed genes in mammals. Most hnRNP mRNA transcripts undergo alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, to yield a remarkable diversity of proteins with numerous functional elements that work in concert in their multiple functions. Therefore, mis-regulation of hnRNPs leads to different maladies. Here, we focus on the role of one of the best-known members of this protein family, hnRNP A1 in RNA metabolism, and address recent works that note its multileveled involvement in several neurodegenerative disorders. Initially discovered as a DNA binding protein, hnRNP A1 includes two RNA recognition motifs, and post-translational modifications of these and other regions in this multifunctional protein alter both its nuclear pore shuttling properties and its RNA interactions and affect transcription, mRNA splicing and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNP A1 plays several key roles in neuronal functioning and its depletion, either due to debilitated cholinergic neurotransmission or under autoimmune reactions causes drastic changes in RNA metabolism. Consequently, hnRNP A1 decline contributes to the severity of symptoms in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) and HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). At the translational level, these properties of hnRNP A1 led to massive research efforts aimed at developing RNA

  19. Dynamic Association of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein as a Messenger Ribonucleoprotein between Microtubules and Polyribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Houping; Dictenberg, Jason B.; Ku, Li; Li, Wen; Bassell, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is a selective RNA-binding protein that regulates translation and plays essential roles in synaptic function. FMRP is bound to specific mRNA ligands, actively transported into neuronal processes in a microtubule-dependent manner, and associated with polyribosomes engaged in translation elongation. However, the biochemical relationship between FMRP–microtubule association and FMRP–polyribosome association remains elusive. Here, we report that although the majority of FMRP is incorporated into elongating polyribosomes in the soluble cytoplasm, microtubule-associated FMRP is predominantly retained in translationally dormant, polyribosome-free messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes. Interestingly, FMRP–microtubule association is increased when mRNPs are dynamically released from polyribosomes as a result of inhibiting translation initiation. Furthermore, the I304N mutant FMRP that fails to be incorporated into polyribosomes is associated with microtubules in mRNP particles and transported into neuronal dendrites in a microtubule-dependent, 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine-stimulated manner with similar kinetics to that of wild-type FMRP. Hence, polyribosome-free FMRP–mRNP complexes travel on microtubules and wait for activity-dependent translational derepression at the site of function. The dual participation of FMRP in dormant mRNPs and polyribosomes suggests distinct roles of FMRP in dendritic transport and translational regulation, two distinct phases that control local protein production to accommodate synaptic plasticity. PMID:17978095

  20. Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins of Drosophila: Identification of U1 RNA-associated proteins and their behavior during heat shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wieben, E.D.; Pederson, T.

    1982-08-01

    In Drosophila, two nuclear proteins of approximately 26,000 and 14,000 molecular weight are recognized by a human autoimmune antibody for mammalian ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that contain U1 small nuclear RNA. The antibody-selected Drosophila RNP contains, in addition to these two proteins, a single RNA species that has been identified as U1 by hybridization with a cloned Drosophila U1 DNA probe. Small nuclear RNP isolated from human cells under the same conditions as used for Drosophila and selected by the anti-U1 RNP-specific antibody contains eight proteins, two of which are similar in molecular weight to the two Drosophila U1 RNP proteins. Thus, even though the nucleotide sequences of Drosophila and human U1 RNA are about 72% homologous, and the corresponding RNPs are both recognized by the same human autoantibody, Drosophila U1 RNP appears to have a simpler protein complement that its mammalian counterpart. The two Drosophila U1 RNA-associated proteins are synthesized at normal or slightly increased rates during the heat shock response and are incorporated into antibody-recognizable RNP complexes. This raises the possibility that U1 RNP is an indispensable nuclear element for cell survival during heat shock.

  1. Isolation of Cognate Cellular and Viral Ribonucleoprotein Complexes of HIV-1 RNA Applicable to Proteomic Discovery and Molecular Investigations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepali; Boeras, Ioana; Singh, Gatikrushna; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    All decisions affecting the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) RNA are executed by ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs). HIV-1 RNA cycles through a progression of host RNPs composed of RNA-binding proteins regulating all stages of synthesis, processing, nuclear transport, translation, decay, and co-localization with assembling virions. RNA affinity chromatography is a versatile method to identify RNA-binding proteins to investigate the molecular basis of viral and cellular posttranscriptional control of gene expression. The bait is a HIV-1 RNA motif immobilized on a solid support, typically magnetic or Sepharose beads. The prey is pre-formed RNPs admixed in lysate from cells or concentrated virus particles. The methodology distinguishes high-affinity RNA-protein interactions from low-affinity complexes by increases in ionic strength during progressive elution cycles. Here, we describe RNA affinity chromatography of the 5' untranslated region of HIV-1, obtaining mixtures of high-affinity RNA binding proteins suitable for mass spectrometry and proteome identification.

  2. Autoantibody to Th ribonucleoprotein (nucleolar 7-2 RNA protein particle) in patients with systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Y.; Medsger, T.A. Jr. )

    1990-12-01

    We studied sera of 371 consecutive new patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) who were first evaluated during 1984-1988. All sera were tested for antinuclear antibodies by immunofluorescence staining using HEp-2 cells as substrate. We excluded 219 sera showing dark nucleoli and screened for antibodies to Th in the remaining 152 sera by immunoprecipitation of a 32P-labeled HeLa cell extract. Fifteen (4.0%) of 371 sera were anti-Th+. Anti-Th antibodies were present in 14 (8.4%) of 167 SSc patients with limited cutaneous involvement, in 1 of 167 with diffuse cutaneous involvement, and in 0 of 37 with SSc overlap syndrome. Among 244 controls with other connective tissue diseases, anti-Th was detected in only 3 patients, all having primary Raynaud's phenomenon of less than 2 years duration. In the subgroup with SSc with limited cutaneous involvement, the 14 anti-Th+ patients had a significantly greater frequency of puffy fingers, small bowel involvement, and hypothyroidism, and a significantly lower frequency of arthralgia and/or arthritis. Their cumulative survival rate from the time of onset of symptoms was lower than that for anti-Th- patients (78% versus 91% at 10 years), primarily due to 3 deaths from pulmonary arterial hypertension (2 from primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 from pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary interstitial fibrosis). Serum anti-Th antibodies are present almost exclusively in patients with SSc with limited cutaneous involvement or in those with primary Raynaud's phenomenon whose disease may evolve to SSc with limited cutaneous involvement, and these antibodies may identify those patients who are at greater risk for reduced survival.

  3. The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate Cancer Treatment Assignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    this research are to test whether pThoc1 can improve the assignment of prostate cancer patients to therapy . We have made significant progress on the...recommended treatment. The objectives of this proposal are to test whether pThoc1 can improve the assignment of prostate cancer patients to therapy ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0475 TITLE: The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate Cancer Treatment Assignment PRINCIPAL

  4. Efficient genome editing in the mouse brain by local delivery of engineered Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Staahl, Brett T; Benekareddy, Madhurima; Coulon-Bainier, Claire; Banfal, Ashwin A; Floor, Stephen N; Sabo, Jennifer K; Urnes, Cole; Munares, Gabriela Acevedo; Ghosh, Anirvan; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-02-13

    We demonstrate editing of post-mitotic neurons in the adult mouse brain following injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes in the hippocampus, striatum and cortex. Engineered variants of Cas9 with multiple SV40 nuclear localization sequences enabled a tenfold increase in the efficiency of neuronal editing in vivo. These advances indicate the potential of genome editing in the brain to correct or inactivate the underlying genetic causes of neurological diseases.

  5. The influenza virus NEP (NS2 protein) mediates the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, R E; Talon, J; Palese, P

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear import and export of viral nucleic acids is crucial for the replication cycle of many viruses, and elucidation of the mechanism of these steps may provide a paradigm for understanding general biological processes. Influenza virus replicates its RNA genome in the nucleus of infected cells. The influenza virus NS2 protein, which had no previously assigned function, was shown to mediate the nuclear export of virion RNAs by acting as an adaptor between viral ribonucleoprotein complexes and the nuclear export machinery of the cell. A functional domain on the NS2 with characteristics of a nuclear export signal was mapped: it interacts with cellular nucleoporins, can functionally replace the effector domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein and mediates rapid nuclear export when cross-linked to a reporter protein. Microinjection of anti-NS2 antibodies into infected cells inhibited nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins, suggesting that the Rev-like NS2 mediates this process. Therefore, we have renamed this Rev-like factor the influenza virus nuclear export protein or NEP. We propose a model by which NEP acts as a protein adaptor molecule bridging viral ribonucleoproteins and the nuclear pore complex. PMID:9427762

  6. Trans splicing in Leishmania enriettii and identification of ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the spliced leader and U2 equivalent RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.I.; Wirth, D.F.

    1988-06-01

    The 5' ends of Leishmania mRNAs contain an identical 35-nucleotide sequence termed the spliced leader (SL) or 5' mini-exon. The SL sequence is at the 5' end of an 85-nucleotide primary transcript that contains a consensus eucaryotic 5' intron-exon splice junction immediately 3' to the SL. The SL is added to protein-coding genes immediately 3' to a consensus eucaryotic 3' intron-exon splice junction. The authors' previous work demonstrated possible intermediates in discontinuous mRNA processing that contain the 50 nucleotides of the SL primary transcript 3' to the SL, the SL intron sequence (SLIS). These RNAs have a 5' terminus at the splice junction of the SL and the SLIS. The authors examined a Leishmania nuclear extract for these RNAs in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Density centrifugation analysis showed that the SL RNA is predominately in RNP complexes at 60S, while the SLIS-containing RNAs are in complexes at 40S. They also demonstrated that the SLIS can be released from polyadenylated RNA by incubation with a HeLa cell extract containing debranching enzymatic activity. These data suggested that Leishmania enriettii mRNAs are assembled by bimolecular or trans splicing as has been recently demonstrated for Trypanosoma brucei. Furthermore, they determined the partial sequence of the Leishmania U2 equivalent RNA and demonstrated that it cosediments with the SL RNA at 60S in a nuclear extract. These RNP particles may be analogous to so-called spliceosomes that have been demonstrated in other systems.

  7. Rabies Group-Specific Ribonucleoprotein Antigen and a Test System for Grouping and Typing of Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, L. G.; Dietzschold, B.; Dierks, R. E.; Matthaeus, W.; Enzmann, P.-J.; Strohmaier, K.

    1973-01-01

    Cell-associated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) was isolated from BHK-21 cells infected with several strains of rabies and rabies-related viruses. The RNP-antigen from rabies and related viruses induced the formation of complement-fixing, precipitating, and immunofluorescent antibodies, and proved to be the group-specific antigen common to all rabies viruses. Antigens of the envelope which induce virus-neutralizing antibodies are apparently determinative for the serotype of a virus as evidenced by two-way neutralization tests. A combination of these methods seems to be a useful approach to the serological grouping and typing of rhabdoviruses. Images PMID:4196634

  8. Direct Cytosolic Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-Ribonucleoprotein for Efficient Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Mout, Rubul; Ray, Moumita; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Lee, Yi-Wei; Tay, Tristan; Sasaki, Kanae; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-03-28

    Genome editing through the delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-ribonucleoprotein (Cas9-RNP) reduces unwanted gene targeting and avoids integrational mutagenesis that can occur through gene delivery strategies. Direct and efficient delivery of Cas9-RNP into the cytosol followed by translocation to the nucleus remains a challenge. Here, we report a remarkably highly efficient (∼90%) direct cytoplasmic/nuclear delivery of Cas9 protein complexed with a guide RNA (sgRNA) through the coengineering of Cas9 protein and carrier nanoparticles. This construct provides effective (∼30%) gene editing efficiency and opens up opportunities in studying genome dynamics.

  9. Uranus - Montage of Uranus' five largest satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Montage of Uranus' five largest satellites. From top to bottom in order of decreasing distance from Uranus are Oberon, Titania, Umbriel, Ariel, and Miranda. Images are presented to show correct relative sizes and brightness. Coverage is incomplete for Miranda and Ariel; gray circles depict missing areas.

  10. Malleable ribonucleoprotein machine: protein intrinsic disorder in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Coelho Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes; Espinosa, Julio; Islam, Sameen; Martinez, Osvaldo; Thanki, Jayesh Jamnadas; Mazariegos, Stephanie; Nguyen, Tam; Larina, Maya; Xue, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that a significant fraction of any given proteome is presented by proteins that do not have unique 3D structures as a whole or in significant parts. These intrinsically disordered proteins possess dramatic structural and functional variability, being especially enriched in signaling and regulatory functions since their lack of fixed structure defines their ability to be involved in interaction with several proteins and allows them to be re-used in multiple pathways. Among recognized disorder-based protein functions are interactions with nucleic acids and multi-target binding; i.e., the functions ascribed to many spliceosomal proteins. Therefore, the spliceosome, a multimegadalton ribonucleoprotein machine catalyzing the excision of introns from eukaryotic pre-mRNAs, represents an attractive target for the focused analysis of the abundance and functionality of intrinsic disorder in its proteinaceous components. In yeast cells, spliceosome consists of five small nuclear RNAs (U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6) and a range of associated proteins. Some of these proteins constitute cores of the corresponding snRNA-protein complexes known as small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). Other spliceosomal proteins have various auxiliary functions. To gain better understanding of the functional roles of intrinsic disorder, we have studied the prevalence of intrinsically disordered proteins in the yeast spliceosome using a wide array of bioinformatics methods. Our study revealed that similar to the proteins associated with human spliceosomes (Korneta & Bujnicki, 2012), proteins found in the yeast spliceosome are enriched in intrinsic disorder. PMID:23638354

  11. Saga is largest commercial submarine ever

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    The long-range autonomous submarine, Saga, went nuclear last year with an agreement between the French and two Canadian companies. The agreement to convert the prototype from Swedish Stirling closed-cycle combustion engines to a nuclear power supply will make Saga the first non-defense nuclear submarine. With an external hull displacement of 500 tons, Saga will be the largest commercial submarine ever built.

  12. World's largest sapphire for many applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattak, Chandra P.; Shetty, Raj; Schwerdtfeger, C. Richard; Ullal, Saurabh

    2016-10-01

    Sapphire has been used for many high technology applications because of its excellent optical, mechanical, high temperature, abrasion resistance and dielectric properties. However, it is expensive and the volume of sapphire used has been limited. The potential sapphire requirements for LED and consumer electronic applications are very high. Emphasis has been on producing larger sapphire boules to achieve significant cost reductions so these applications are realized. World's largest sapphire boules, 500 mm diameter 300+kg, have been grown to address these markets.

  13. Efficient in vivo gene editing using ribonucleoproteins in skin stem cells of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbo; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Wang, Wenjie; Qian, Nannan; Duan, Jinzhi; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Ting

    2017-02-14

    The prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in mammalian cells with the potential to bring curative therapies to patients with genetic diseases. However, efficient in vivo delivery of this genome editing machinery and indeed the very feasibility of using these techniques in vivo remain challenging for most tissue types. Here, we show that nonreplicable Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins can be used to correct genetic defects in skin stem cells of postnatal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mice. We developed a method to locally deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into the skin of postnatal mice. This method results in rapid gene editing in epidermal stem cells. Using this method, we show that Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins efficiently excise exon80, which covers the point mutation in our RDEB mouse model, and thus restores the correct localization of the collagen VII protein in vivo. The skin blistering phenotype is also significantly ameliorated after treatment. This study provides an in vivo gene correction strategy using ribonucleoproteins as curative treatment for genetic diseases in skin and potentially in other somatic tissues.

  14. Efficient in vivo gene editing using ribonucleoproteins in skin stem cells of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenbo; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Wang, Wenjie; Qian, Nannan; Duan, Jinzhi; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Ting

    2017-01-01

    The prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in mammalian cells with the potential to bring curative therapies to patients with genetic diseases. However, efficient in vivo delivery of this genome editing machinery and indeed the very feasibility of using these techniques in vivo remain challenging for most tissue types. Here, we show that nonreplicable Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins can be used to correct genetic defects in skin stem cells of postnatal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mice. We developed a method to locally deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into the skin of postnatal mice. This method results in rapid gene editing in epidermal stem cells. Using this method, we show that Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins efficiently excise exon80, which covers the point mutation in our RDEB mouse model, and thus restores the correct localization of the collagen VII protein in vivo. The skin blistering phenotype is also significantly ameliorated after treatment. This study provides an in vivo gene correction strategy using ribonucleoproteins as curative treatment for genetic diseases in skin and potentially in other somatic tissues. PMID:28137859

  15. Flight performance of the largest volant bird

    PubMed Central

    Ksepka, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Pelagornithidae is an extinct clade of birds characterized by bizarre tooth-like bony projections of the jaws. Here, the flight capabilities of pelagornithids are explored based on data from a species with the largest reported wingspan among birds. Pelagornis sandersi sp. nov. is represented by a skull and substantial postcranial material. Conservative wingspan estimates (∼6.4 m) exceed theoretical maximums based on extant soaring birds. Modeled flight properties indicate that lift:drag ratios and glide ratios for P. sandersi were near the upper limit observed in extant birds and suggest that pelagornithids were highly efficient gliders, exploiting a long-range soaring ecology. PMID:25002475

  16. Flight performance of the largest volant bird.

    PubMed

    Ksepka, Daniel T

    2014-07-22

    Pelagornithidae is an extinct clade of birds characterized by bizarre tooth-like bony projections of the jaws. Here, the flight capabilities of pelagornithids are explored based on data from a species with the largest reported wingspan among birds. Pelagornis sandersi sp. nov. is represented by a skull and substantial postcranial material. Conservative wingspan estimates (∼6.4 m) exceed theoretical maximums based on extant soaring birds. Modeled flight properties indicate that lift:drag ratios and glide ratios for P. sandersi were near the upper limit observed in extant birds and suggest that pelagornithids were highly efficient gliders, exploiting a long-range soaring ecology.

  17. Flight performance of the largest volant bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksepka, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Pelagornithidae is an extinct clade of birds characterized by bizarre tooth-like bony projections of the jaws. Here, the flight capabilities of pelagornithids are explored based on data from a species with the largest reported wingspan among birds. Pelagornis sandersi sp. nov. is represented by a skull and substantial postcranial material. Conservative wingspan estimates (∼6.4 m) exceed theoretical maximums based on extant soaring birds. Modeled flight properties indicate that lift:drag ratios and glide ratios for P. sandersi were near the upper limit observed in extant birds and suggest that pelagornithids were highly efficient gliders, exploiting a long-range soaring ecology.

  18. Fiji's largest marine reserve benefits reef sharks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, J. S.; Fullwood, L. A. F.

    2013-03-01

    To provide more information about whether sharks benefit from no-take marine reserves, we quantified the relative abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside and outside of Namena, Fiji's largest reserve (60.6 km2). Using stereo baited remote underwater video systems (stereo-BRUVs), we found that the abundance and biomass of sharks was approximately two and four times greater in shallow and deep locations, respectively, within the Namena reserve compared to adjacent fished areas. The greater abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside Namena is likely a result of greater prey availability rather than protection from fishing. This study demonstrates that marine reserves can benefit sharks.

  19. Analysis of RNA Folding and Ribonucleoprotein Assembly by Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pljevaljčić, Goran; Robertson-Anderson, Rae; van der Schans, Edwin; Millar, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary To execute their diverse range of biological functions, RNA molecules must fold into specific tertiary structures and/or associate with one or more proteins to form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of RNA folding and RNP assembly processes, directly revealing different conformational subpopulations that are hidden in conventional ensemble measurements. Moreover, kinetic processes can be observed without the need to synchronize a population of molecules. In this chapter, we describe the fluorescence spectroscopic methods used for single-molecule measurements of freely diffusing or immobilized RNA molecules or RNA-protein complexes. We also provide practical protocols to prepare the fluorescently labeled RNA and protein molecules required for such studies. Finally, we provide two examples of how these various preparative and spectroscopic methods are employed in the study of RNA folding and RNP assembly processes. PMID:22573447

  20. Cytoplasmic Ribonucleoprotein Foci in Eukaryotes: Hotspots of Bio(chemical)Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Layana, Carla; Ferrero, Paola; Rivera-Pomar, Rolando

    2012-01-01

    The life of an mRNA from transcription to degradation offers multiple control check points that regulate gene expression. Transcription, splicing, and translation have been widely studied for many years; however, in recent years, new layers of posttranscriptional and posttranslational control have been uncovered. They involve the regulation of the metabolism of mRNA in cytoplasmic foci. They are collections of ribonucleoprotein complexes that, in most cases, remain still uncharacterized, except the processing bodies (PBs) and stress granules (SGs), which have been studied (and reviewed) in detail. A challenging prospective is to know how many different classes of foci exist, which functions they support, how are they formed, and how do they relate one to each other. Here, we present an update of the component of the different granules, a possible function, and hypothesis on their in vivo dynamics related to translational control. PMID:22693427

  1. Antibodies to ribosomal ribonucleoprotein. Prevalence in systemic rheumatic diseases and partial characterization of the antigen.

    PubMed

    Cortés, J J; Mendoza, F; Reyes, P A

    1987-08-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to ribosomal ribonucleoproteins (rRNP) was studied in patients with rheumatic diseases. Seven patients had precipitating antibodies against rRNP, 6 had systemic lupus erythematosus, one had primary Sjögren's syndrome. Anti-rRNP was not present in mixed connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, CREST, primary Raynaud's or normal control sera. A partial immunological identity precipitin line was present between (U1) nRNP and rRNP, but these were distinct in physicochemical properties. Western blot analysis of ribosomal extract using anti-rRNP IgG revealed 2 polypeptides called rA and rB which appear to be the important antigenic determinants.

  2. Genome editing in maize directed by CRISPR–Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Svitashev, Sergei; Schwartz, Christine; Lenderts, Brian; Young, Joshua K.; Mark Cigan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA double-strand breaks have been shown to significantly increase the frequency and precision of genome editing. In the past two decades, several double-strand break technologies have been developed. CRISPR–Cas9 has quickly become the technology of choice for genome editing due to its simplicity, efficiency and versatility. Currently, genome editing in plants primarily relies on delivering double-strand break reagents in the form of DNA vectors. Here we report biolistic delivery of pre-assembled Cas9–gRNA ribonucleoproteins into maize embryo cells and regeneration of plants with both mutated and edited alleles. Using this method of delivery, we also demonstrate DNA- and selectable marker-free gene mutagenesis in maize and recovery of plants with mutated alleles at high frequencies. These results open new opportunities to accelerate breeding practices in a wide variety of crop species. PMID:27848933

  3. Conserved regions of ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP are involved in interactions with its substrate.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2013-08-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a ubiquitous and essential site-specific eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein with a large catalytic RNA moiety that is closely related to the RNA component of RNase P, and multiple proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. Here, we report the results of an ultraviolet-cross-linking analysis of interactions between a photoreactive RNase MRP substrate and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP holoenzyme. The results show that the substrate interacts with phylogenetically conserved RNA elements universally found in all enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family, as well as with a phylogenetically conserved RNA region that is unique to RNase MRP, and demonstrate that four RNase MRP protein components, all shared with RNase P, interact with the substrate. Implications for the structural organization of RNase MRP and the roles of its components are discussed.

  4. Nuclear dynamics of influenza A virus ribonucleoproteins revealed by live-cell imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Loucaides, Eva M.; Kirchbach, Johann C. von; Foeglein, Agnes; Sharps, Jane; Fodor, Ervin; Digard, Paul

    2009-11-10

    The negative sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by the viral RNA polymerase. Only four viral polypeptides are required but multiple cellular components are potentially involved. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterise the dynamics of GFP-tagged viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components in living cells. The nucleoprotein (NP) displayed very slow mobility that significantly increased on formation of transcriptionally active RNPs. Conversely, single or dimeric polymerase subunits showed fast nuclear dynamics that decreased upon formation of heterotrimers, suggesting increased interaction of the full polymerase complex with a relatively immobile cellular component(s). Treatment with inhibitors of cellular transcription indicated that in part, this reflected an interaction with cellular RNA polymerase II. Analysis of mutated influenza virus polymerase complexes further suggested that this was through an interaction between PB2 and RNA Pol II separate from PB2 cap-binding activity.

  5. tRNA Core Hypothesis for the Transition from the RNA World to the Ribonucleoprotein World

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Savio T.; Rêgo, Thais G.; José, Marco V.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the tRNA core hypothesis, which emphasizes the central role of tRNAs molecules in the origin and evolution of fundamental biological processes. tRNAs gave origin to the first genes (mRNA) and the peptidyl transferase center (rRNA), proto-tRNAs were at the core of a proto-translation system, and the anticodon and operational codes then arose in tRNAs molecules. Metabolic pathways emerged from evolutionary pressures of the decoding systems. The transitions from the RNA world to the ribonucleoprotein world to modern biological systems were driven by three kinds of tRNAs transitions, to wit, tRNAs leading to both mRNA and rRNA. PMID:27023615

  6. [Stimulating effect of cellular RNA on the in vitro polymerizing activity of influenza virus ribonucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Tentsov, Iu Iu; Bukrinskaia, A G

    1981-01-01

    The stimulating effect of RNAs isolated from noninfected and influenza virus-infected chick fibroblasts on the polymerase activity of influenza virus intracellular ribonucleoprotein (RNP) was studied in vitro. The infected cells were shown to contain two classes of RNAs which stimulated well the polymerase activity of influenza virus RNP. One class seemed to be represented by a heterogenous cellular 10-20 S mRNA since it contained poly (A)-sequences and was present in noninfected cells. The other RNA class was induced during the infection and differed in number of properties from the RNA isolated from noninfected cells. This class RNA was smaller (4-10 S) and appeared not to contain poly(A)-sequences. Treatment of both noninfected and infected cells with actinomycin D resulted in inhibition of synthesis of both classes of RNA-primers.

  7. Association of Nonribosomal Nucleolar Proteins in Ribonucleoprotein Complexes during Interphase and Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Piñol-Roma, Serafín

    1999-01-01

    rRNA precursors are bound throughout their length by specific proteins, as the pre-rRNAs emerge from the transcription machinery. The association of pre-rRNA with proteins as ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes persists during maturation of 18S, 5.8S, and 28S rRNA, and through assembly of ribosomal subunits in the nucleolus. Preribosomal RNP complexes contain, in addition to ribosomal proteins, an unknown number of nonribosomal nucleolar proteins, as well as small nucleolar RNA-ribonucleoproteins (sno-RNPs). This report describes the use of a specific, rapid, and mild immunopurification approach to isolate and analyze human RNP complexes that contain nonribosomal nucleolar proteins, as well as ribosomal proteins and rRNA. Complexes immunopurified with antibodies to nucleolin—a major nucleolar RNA-binding protein—contain several distinct specific polypeptides that include, in addition to nucleolin, the previously identified nucleolar proteins B23 and fibrillarin, proteins with electrophoretic mobilities characteristic of ribosomal proteins including ribosomal protein S6, and a number of additional unidentified proteins. The physical association of these proteins with one another is mediated largely by RNA, in that the complexes dissociate upon digestion with RNase. Complexes isolated from M-phase cells are similar in protein composition to those isolated from interphase cell nuclear extracts. Therefore, the predominant proteins that associate with nucleolin in interphase remain in RNP complexes during mitosis, despite the cessation of rRNA synthesis and processing in M-phase. In addition, precursor rRNA, as well as processed 18S and 28S rRNA and candidate rRNA processing intermediates, is found associated with the immunopurified complexes. The characteristics of the rRNP complexes described here, therefore, indicate that they represent bona fide precursors of mature cytoplasmic ribosomal subunits. PMID:9880328

  8. Structure and conformational plasticity of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein core.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Eric J; Didychuk, Allison L; Liao, Honghong; Hu, Panzhou; Brow, David A; Butcher, Samuel E

    2017-01-01

    U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is a key component of the active site of the spliceosome, a large ribonucleoprotein complex that catalyzes the splicing of precursor messenger RNA. Prior to its incorporation into the spliceosome, U6 is bound by the protein Prp24, which facilitates unwinding of the U6 internal stem-loop (ISL) so that it can pair with U4 snRNA. A previously reported crystal structure of the `core' of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) contained an ISL-stabilized A62G mutant of U6 bound to all four RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domains of Prp24 [Montemayor et al. (2014), Nature Struct. Mol. Biol. 21, 544-551]. The structure revealed a novel topology containing interlocked rings of protein and RNA that was not predicted by prior biochemical and genetic data. Here, the crystal structure of the U6 snRNP core with a wild-type ISL is reported. This complex crystallized in a new space group, apparently owing in part to the presence of an intramolecular cross-link in RRM1 that was not observed in the previously reported U6-A62G structure. The structure exhibits the same protein-RNA interface and maintains the unique interlocked topology. However, the orientation of the wild-type ISL is altered relative to the A62G mutant structure, suggesting inherent structural dynamics that may facilitate its pairing with U4. Consistent with their similar architectures in the crystalline state, the wild-type and A62G variants of U6 exhibit similar Prp24-binding affinities and electrophoretic mobilities when analyzed by gel-shift assay.

  9. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Scott; Peate, David; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid; Self, Stephen; Mawby, Michael; Jerram, Dougal; Marsh, Goonie

    2010-05-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are sites of the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic and silicic eruptions in Earth history. The magma volumes, eruptive mechanisms, frequency and associated aerosol emissions of these eruptions are critical for understanding any interpreted climate forcing and environmental change by LIPs. The largest volume (>1000 km3 dense rock equivalent) and magnitude (>M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (104-105 km2) basaltic lava flow fields and silicic ignimbrites and are the main building blocks of LIPs. Available information on the largest eruptive units are primarily from the Columbia River and Deccan provinces for the dimensions of flood basalt eruptions, and the Paraná-Etendeka and Afro-Arabian provinces for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions. In addition, three large-volume (675- 2,000 km3) silicic lava flows have also been mapped out in the Mesoproterozoic Gawler Range province (Australia), an interpreted LIP remnant. Magma volumes of >1000 km3 have also been emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs, and may contribute substantial aerosol emissions through shallow degassing and crystallisation. The data sets indicate comparable eruption magnitudes between the basaltic and silicic eruptions, but due to considerable volumes residing as co-ignimbrite ash deposits, the current volume constraints for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions may be considerably underestimated. Magma composition thus appears to be no barrier to the volume of magma emitted during an individual eruption. Despite this general similarity in magnitude, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in terms of eruption style, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basaltic eruptions are dominantly effusive and Hawaiian-Strombolian in style, with magma discharge rates of ~107-108 kg s-1 producing dominantly compound pahoehoe lava flow fields. The major flood basalt eruption durations are most

  10. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukstins Peate, I.; Bryan, S. E.; Peate, D. W.; Self, S.; Mawby, M.; Jerram, D. A.; Marsh, J.

    2010-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) host the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic & silicic eruptions on Earth. Understanding magma volumes, eruptive mechanisms, frequency and aerosol emissions are critical to interpret climate forcing and environmental change. The largest volume (>1000 km3 dre) and magnitude (>M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (104-105 km2) basaltic flow fields and silicic ignimbrites that are the main building blocks of LIPs. Magma volumes >1000 km3 are also emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs, and may contribute substantial aerosol emissions through shallow degassing and crystallization. Basaltic and silicic eruptions have comparable magnitudes, but silicic ignimbrite volumes may be significantly underestimated due to unrecognized and correlated, but voluminous co-ignimbrite ash deposits. Magma composition appears to be no barrier to individual eruption volume. Despite similar magnitudes, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in eruption mechanism, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basalts are dominantly effusive Hawaiian-Strombolian, with magma discharge rates of ~107-108 kg/s, and produce dominantly compound pahoehoe flow fields over eruption durations most likely >10 yrs. Some large-volume silicic lavas were emplaced by effusive and fissure eruptions, but discharge rates are unknown and may be up to an order of magnitude greater than those of flood basalt lavas for emplacement to be on realistic time scales (<10 years). Most silicic eruptions are moderately to highly explosive, producing co-current pyroclastic fountains (rarely Plinian) with discharge rates of 109-1011 kg/s that emplace welded to rheomorphic ignimbrites. Stratospheric ash and aerosol injections may be greater from co-ignimbrite ash clouds than eruption plumes. At present, durations for large-magnitude silicic eruptions are unconstrained. At discharge rates of 109 kg/s, equivalent to

  11. Diversity of a ribonucleoprotein family in tobacco chloroplasts: two new chloroplast ribonucleoproteins and a phylogenetic tree of ten chloroplast RNA-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L H; Li, Y Q; Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Go, M; Konishi, T; Watanabe, A; Sugiura, M

    1991-01-01

    Two new ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) have been identified from a tobacco chloroplast lysate. These two proteins (cp29A and cp29B) are nuclear-encoded and have a less affinity to single-stranded DNA as compared with three other chloroplast RNPs (cp28, cp31 and cp33) previously isolated. DNA sequencing revealed that both contain two consensus sequence-type homologous RNA-binding domains (CS-RBDs) and a very acidic amino-terminal domain but shorter than that of cp28, cp31 and cp33. Comparison of cp29A and cp29B showed a 19 amino acid insertion in the region separating the two CS-RBDs in cp29B. This insertion results in three tandem repeats of a glycine-rich sequence of 10 amino acids, which is a novel feature in RNPs. The two proteins are encoded by different single nuclear genes and no alternatively spliced transcripts could be identified. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the ten chloroplast CS-RBDs. These results suggest that there is a sizable RNP family in chloroplasts and the diversity was mainly generated through a series of gene duplications rather than through alternative pre-mRNA splicing. The gene for cp29B contains three introns. The first and second introns interrupt the first CS-RBD and the third intron does the second CS-RBD. The position of the first intron site is the same as that in the human hnRNP A1 protein gene. Images PMID:1721701

  12. Collapse of the world's largest herbivores.

    PubMed

    Ripple, William J; Newsome, Thomas M; Wolf, Christopher; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Everatt, Kristoffer T; Galetti, Mauro; Hayward, Matt W; Kerley, Graham I H; Levi, Taal; Lindsey, Peter A; Macdonald, David W; Malhi, Yadvinder; Painter, Luke E; Sandom, Christopher J; Terborgh, John; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2015-05-01

    Large wild herbivores are crucial to ecosystems and human societies. We highlight the 74 largest terrestrial herbivore species on Earth (body mass ≥100 kg), the threats they face, their important and often overlooked ecosystem effects, and the conservation efforts needed to save them and their predators from extinction. Large herbivores are generally facing dramatic population declines and range contractions, such that ~60% are threatened with extinction. Nearly all threatened species are in developing countries, where major threats include hunting, land-use change, and resource depression by livestock. Loss of large herbivores can have cascading effects on other species including large carnivores, scavengers, mesoherbivores, small mammals, and ecological processes involving vegetation, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and fire regimes. The rate of large herbivore decline suggests that ever-larger swaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs.

  13. Scientists conduct largest coastal experiment on record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, Julie

    Duck, N.C.—Something out of the ordinary has been happening near this quiet, resort town on the Outer Banks. More than 100 coastal scientists, students, and technicians have descended on the Army Corps of Engineer's Waterways Experiment Station primarily to study movement of sediment in the surf zone. In fact, a large percentage of the U.S. near-shore research community has flooded the Duck area to execute the largest coastal experiment ever undertaken. The researchers have brought with them more than 80 computers and an array of exotic gadgets to carry out “DUCK94,” an unprecedented project that has been three years in the making.

  14. Largest clinic in the world? (Bogota).

    PubMed

    1971-01-01

    The IPPF member, the Asociacion Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana (Profamilia), is discussed and its clinic, the Pilot Center in Bogota, reputed to be the largest family clinic in the world, is described. From January 1966 until the end of 1970, the Pilot Center served 59,469 new acceptors. Of the 31 Profamilia clinics in Colombia, the Pilot Center was visited by 22% of all new acceptors during 1970. Profamilia established the first vasectomy clinic in Latin America in February 1970. By the end of 1970, 92 vasectomies had been performed. Profamilia has expanded its family planning program, and part of this expansion is a result of Profamilia's extensive use of mass media in its education campaign. In 1970, there was a 24% increase in new acceptors over 1969 and a 66% increase in follow-up visits. 62,292 radio spots and 7 television programs were broadcast and announcements about family planning were shown in public cinemas in the latter half of 1970. Nearly 300,000 women attended talks, meetings, and film shows on family planning, and approximately 2 million leaflets and information sheets were distributed. To increase community involvement, Profamilia held 26 short courses for various groups including religious and community leaders. Profamilia also conducted a training course for doctors and sociologists from Colombia and other Latin American countries.

  15. The nuclear export protein of H5N1 influenza A viruses recruits Matrix 1 (M1) protein to the viral ribonucleoprotein to mediate nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Flies, Joe; Bolte, Hardin; Reuther, Peter; Vreede, Frank; Schwemmle, Martin

    2014-07-18

    In influenza A virus-infected cells, replication and transcription of the viral genome occurs in the nucleus. To be packaged into viral particles at the plasma membrane, encapsidated viral genomes must be exported from the nucleus. Intriguingly, the nuclear export protein (NEP) is involved in both processes. Although NEP stimulates viral RNA synthesis by binding to the viral polymerase, its function during nuclear export implicates interaction with viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP)-associated M1. The observation that both interactions are mediated by the C-terminal moiety of NEP raised the question whether these two features of NEP are linked functionally. Here we provide evidence that the interaction between M1 and the vRNP depends on the NEP C terminus and its polymerase activity-enhancing property for the nuclear export of vRNPs. This suggests that these features of NEP are linked functionally. Furthermore, our data suggest that the N-terminal domain of NEP interferes with the stability of the vRNP-M1-NEP nuclear export complex, probably mediated by its highly flexible intramolecular interaction with the NEP C terminus. On the basis of our data, we propose a new model for the assembly of the nuclear export complex of Influenza A vRNPs.

  16. Rethinking how to address the world's largest infectious killer in the world's largest country.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Barry R

    2016-05-06

    India has the largest number of people suffering from tuberculosis (TB) of any country in the world. Analysis of the increasing Multi-Drug Resistant TB problem has revealed multiple challenges to the health system that must be addressed in order to control the TB epidemic there.Journal of Public Health Policy advance online publication, 6 May 2016 doi:10.1057/jphp.2016.16.

  17. DNA-Free Genetically Edited Grapevine and Apple Protoplast Using CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Malnoy, Mickael; Viola, Roberto; Jung, Min-Hee; Koo, Ok-Jae; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Velasco, Riccardo; Nagamangala Kanchiswamy, Chidananda

    2016-01-01

    The combined availability of whole genome sequences and genome editing tools is set to revolutionize the field of fruit biotechnology by enabling the introduction of targeted genetic changes with unprecedented control and accuracy, both to explore emergent phenotypes and to introduce new functionalities. Although plasmid-mediated delivery of genome editing components to plant cells is very efficient, it also presents some drawbacks, such as possible random integration of plasmid sequences in the host genome. Additionally, it may well be intercepted by current process-based GMO regulations, complicating the path to commercialization of improved varieties. Here, we explore direct delivery of purified CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to the protoplast of grape cultivar Chardonnay and apple cultivar such as Golden delicious fruit crop plants for efficient targeted mutagenesis. We targeted MLO-7, a susceptible gene in order to increase resistance to powdery mildew in grape cultivar and DIPM-1, DIPM-2, and DIPM-4 in the apple to increase resistance to fire blight disease. Furthermore, efficient protoplast transformation, the molar ratio of Cas9 and sgRNAs were optimized for each grape and apple cultivar. The targeted mutagenesis insertion and deletion rate was analyzed using targeted deep sequencing. Our results demonstrate that direct delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 RNPs to the protoplast system enables targeted gene editing and paves the way to the generation of DNA-free genome edited grapevine and apple plants.

  18. An association between RBMX, a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and ARTS-1 regulates extracellular TNFR1 release

    SciTech Connect

    Adamik, Barbara; Islam, Aminul; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Hawari, Feras I.; Zhang Jing; Levine, Stewart J.

    2008-07-04

    The type I, 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1) is released to the extracellular space by two mechanisms, the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains. Both pathways appear to be regulated by an interaction between TNFR1 and ARTS-1 (aminopeptidase regulator of TNFR1 shedding). Here, we sought to identify ARTS-1-interacting proteins that modulate TNFR1 release. Co-immunoprecipitation identified an association between ARTS-1 and RBMX (RNA-binding motif gene, X chromosome), a 43-kDa heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein. RNA interference attenuated RBMX expression, which reduced both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the IL-1{beta}-mediated inducible proteolytic cleavage of soluble TNFR1 ectodomains. Reciprocally, over-expression of RBMX increased TNFR1 exosome-like vesicle release and the IL-1{beta}-mediated inducible shedding of TNFR1 ectodomains. This identifies RBMX as an ARTS-1-associated protein that regulates both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains.

  19. Biogenesis, assembly, and export of viral messenger ribonucleoproteins in the influenza A virus infected cell.

    PubMed

    York, Ashley; Fodor, Ervin

    2013-08-01

    The flow of genetic information from sites of transcription within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translational machinery of eukaryotic cells is obstructed by a physical blockade, the nuclear double membrane, which must be overcome in order to adhere to the central dogma of molecular biology, DNA makes RNA makes protein. Advancement in the field of cellular and molecular biology has painted a detailed picture of the molecular mechanisms from transcription of genes to mRNAs and their processing that is closely coupled to export from the nucleus. The rules that govern delivering messenger transcripts from the nucleus must be obeyed by influenza A virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae that has adopted a nuclear replication cycle. The negative-sense genome of influenza A virus is segmented into eight individual viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and single-stranded RNA encapsidated in viral nucleoprotein. Influenza A virus mRNAs fall into three major categories, intronless, intron-containing unspliced and spliced. During evolutionary history, influenza A virus has conceived a way of negotiating the passage of viral transcripts from the nucleus to cytoplasmic sites of protein synthesis. The major mRNA nuclear export NXF1 pathway is increasingly implicated in viral mRNA export and this review considers and discusses the current understanding of how influenza A virus exploits the host mRNA export pathway for replication.

  20. 3' UTR length and messenger ribonucleoprotein composition determine endocleavage efficiencies at termination codons.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Volker; Haberman, Nejc; Ottens, Franziska; Ule, Jernej; Gehring, Niels H

    2014-10-23

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) degrades different classes of mRNAs, including transcripts with premature termination codons (PTCs). The NMD factor SMG6 initiates degradation of substrate mRNAs by endonucleolytic cleavage. Here, we aim to delineate the cascade of NMD-activating events that culminate in endocleavage. We report that long 3' UTRs elicit SMG6-mediated endonucleolytic degradation. The presence of an exon-junction complex (EJC) within the 3' UTR strongly stimulates endocleavage in a distance-independent manner. The interaction of SMG6 with EJCs is not required for endocleavage. Whereas the core NMD component UPF2 supports endonucleolytic decay of long 3' UTR mRNAs, it is mostly dispensable during EJC-stimulated endocleavage. Using high-throughput sequencing, we map endocleavage positions of different PTC-containing reporter mRNAs and an endogenous NMD substrate to regions directly at and downstream of the termination codon. These results reveal how messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) parameters differentially influence SMG6-executed endonucleolysis and uncover central characteristics of this phenomenon associated with translation termination.

  1. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Sandmaier, Shelley E S; Kim, Chan-Mi; Mileham, Alan; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2017-02-14

    The domestic pig is an important "dual purpose" animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community for the use of large animal models such as pigs to either serve as an alternative, or complement investigations from the mouse. However, the use of pig has not proven popular due to technical difficulties and time required in generating models with desired genetic modifications. In this regard, the ability to directly modify the genome in the zygote and generate edited animals is highly desirable. This report demonstrates for the first time, the generation of gene targeted animals by direct injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complex and short stretches of DNA sequences into porcine zygotes. The Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was pre-complexed with a single guide RNA targeting downstream of the ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene, and co-injected with a single-stranded repair template into porcine zygotes. Using this approach a line of pigs that carry pseudo attP sites within the COL1A locus to enable phiC31 integrase mediated introduction of transgenes has been generated. This new route for genome engineering in pigs via zygote injection should greatly enhance applications in both agriculture and biomedicine.

  2. Targeted Gene Knockin in Porcine Somatic Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Eun; Park, Chi-Hun; Powell, Anne; Martin, Jessica; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-05-26

    The pig is an ideal large animal model for genetic engineering applications. A relatively short gestation interval and large litter size makes the pig a conducive model for generating and propagating genetic modifications. The domestic pig also shares close similarity in anatomy, physiology, size, and life expectancy, making it an ideal animal for modeling human diseases. Often, however, the technical difficulties in generating desired genetic modifications such as targeted knockin of short stretches of sequences or transgenes have impeded progress in this field. In this study, we have investigated and compared the relative efficiency of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in engineering targeted knockin of pseudo attP sites downstream of a ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene in porcine somatic cells and generated live fetuses by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). By leveraging these knockin pseudo attP sites, we have demonstrated subsequent phiC31 integrase mediated integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene into the site. This work for the first time created an optimized protocol for CRISPR/Cas mediated knockin in porcine somatic cells, while simultaneously creating a stable platform for future transgene integration and generating transgenic animals.

  3. A high-throughput pipeline for the production of synthetic antibodies for analysis of ribonucleoprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hong; Laver, John D.; Jeon, Jouhyun; Singh, Fateh; Ancevicius, Kristin; Fan, Yujie; Cao, Wen Xi; Nie, Kun; Yang, Zhenglin; Luo, Hua; Wang, Miranda; Rissland, Olivia; Westwood, J. Timothy; Kim, Philip M.; Smibert, Craig A.; Lipshitz, Howard D.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs plays an essential role in the control of gene expression. mRNAs are regulated in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) along with associated protein and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) cofactors. A global understanding of post-transcriptional control in any cell type requires identification of the components of all of its RNP complexes. We have previously shown that these complexes can be purified by immunoprecipitation using anti-RBP synthetic antibodies produced by phage display. To develop the large number of synthetic antibodies required for a global analysis of RNP complex composition, we have established a pipeline that combines (i) a computationally aided strategy for design of antigens located outside of annotated domains, (ii) high-throughput antigen expression and purification in Escherichia coli, and (iii) high-throughput antibody selection and screening. Using this pipeline, we have produced 279 antibodies against 61 different protein components of Drosophila melanogaster RNPs. Together with those produced in our low-throughput efforts, we have a panel of 311 antibodies for 67 RNP complex proteins. Tests of a subset of our antibodies demonstrated that 89% immunoprecipitate their endogenous target from embryo lysate. This panel of antibodies will serve as a resource for global studies of RNP complexes in Drosophila. Furthermore, our high-throughput pipeline permits efficient production of synthetic antibodies against any large set of proteins. PMID:26847261

  4. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Sandmaier, Shelley E. S.; Kim, Chan-Mi; Mileham, Alan; Donovan, David M.; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2017-01-01

    The domestic pig is an important “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community for the use of large animal models such as pigs to either serve as an alternative, or complement investigations from the mouse. However, the use of pig has not proven popular due to technical difficulties and time required in generating models with desired genetic modifications. In this regard, the ability to directly modify the genome in the zygote and generate edited animals is highly desirable. This report demonstrates for the first time, the generation of gene targeted animals by direct injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complex and short stretches of DNA sequences into porcine zygotes. The Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was pre-complexed with a single guide RNA targeting downstream of the ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene, and co-injected with a single-stranded repair template into porcine zygotes. Using this approach a line of pigs that carry pseudo attP sites within the COL1A locus to enable phiC31 integrase mediated introduction of transgenes has been generated. This new route for genome engineering in pigs via zygote injection should greatly enhance applications in both agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:28195163

  5. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  6. Genome surgery using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Daesik; Koo, Taeyoung; Kim, Kwang-eun; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2017-01-01

    RNA-guided genome surgery using CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases has shown promise for the treatment of diverse genetic diseases. Yet, the potential of such nucleases for therapeutic applications in nongenetic diseases is largely unexplored. Here, we focus on age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in adults, which is associated with retinal overexpression of, rather than mutations in, the VEGFA gene. Subretinal injection of preassembled, Vegfa gene–specific Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) into the adult mouse eye gave rise to mutagenesis at the target site in the retinal pigment epithelium. Furthermore, Cas9 RNPs effectively reduced the area of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a mouse model of AMD. Genome-wide profiling of Cas9 off-target effects via Digenome-seq showed that off-target mutations were rarely induced in the human genome. Because Cas9 RNPs can function immediately after in vivo delivery and are rapidly degraded by endogenous proteases, their activities are unlikely to be hampered by antibody- and cell-mediated adaptive immune systems. Our results demonstrate that in vivo genome editing with Cas9 RNPs has the potential for the local treatment for nongenetic degenerative diseases, expanding the scope of RNA-guided genome surgery to a new dimension. PMID:28209587

  7. Fragile X mental retardation protein stimulates ribonucleoprotein assembly of influenza A virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuo; Cao, Mengmeng; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Xue; Li, Jianguo; Wang, Conghui; Gabriel, Gülsah; Xue, Qinghua; Yi, Yonghong; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Deng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of the influenza A virus is responsible for the transcription and replication of viral RNA in the nucleus. These processes require interplay between host factors and RNP components. Here, we report that the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) targets influenza virus RNA synthesis machinery and facilitates virus replication both in cell culture and in mice. We demonstrate that FMRP transiently associates with viral RNP and stimulates viral RNP assembly through RNA-mediated interaction with the nucleoprotein. Furthermore, the KH2 domain of FMRP mediates its association with the nucleoprotein. A point mutation (I304N) in the KH2 domain, identified from a Fragile X syndrome patient, disrupts the FMRP-nucleoprotein association and abolishes the ability of FMRP to participate in viral RNP assembly. We conclude that FMRP is a critical host factor used by influenza viruses to facilitate viral RNP assembly. Our observation reveals a mechanism of influenza virus RNA synthesis and provides insights into FMRP functions.

  8. Expression and localization of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Ningling; Lin, Xianhua; Jin, Li; Xu, Hong; Li, Rong; Huang, Hefeng

    2016-02-26

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is involved in several important cellular processes that are relevant to cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cancer development. However, details of hnRNP K expression during mammalian oogenesis and preimplantation embryo development are lacking. The present study investigates the expression and cellular localization of K protein in the mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos using immunostaining. We demonstrate, for the first time, that hnRNP K is abundantly expressed in the nuclei of mouse oocytes in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. In germ vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes, hnRNP K accumulates in the germinal vesicle in a spot distribution manner. After germinal vesicle breakdown, speckled hnRNP K is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm. However, after fertilization, the K protein relocates into the female and male pronucleus and persists in the blastomere nuclei. Localization of K protein in the human ovary and ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) was also investigated. Overall, this study provides important morphological evidence to better understand the possible roles of hnRNP K in mammalian oogenesis and early embryo development. - Highlights: • HnRNP K localizes in the nucleus of GV-stage oocyte in a punctate distribution. • HnRNP K strongly accumulates in zygotic pronuclei as condensed spots. • The localization of hnRNP K during oogenesis and embryogenesis is characteristic. • HnRNP K might have an important role in oogenesis and embryonic development.

  9. DNA-Free Genetically Edited Grapevine and Apple Protoplast Using CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Malnoy, Mickael; Viola, Roberto; Jung, Min-Hee; Koo, Ok-Jae; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Velasco, Riccardo; Nagamangala Kanchiswamy, Chidananda

    2016-01-01

    The combined availability of whole genome sequences and genome editing tools is set to revolutionize the field of fruit biotechnology by enabling the introduction of targeted genetic changes with unprecedented control and accuracy, both to explore emergent phenotypes and to introduce new functionalities. Although plasmid-mediated delivery of genome editing components to plant cells is very efficient, it also presents some drawbacks, such as possible random integration of plasmid sequences in the host genome. Additionally, it may well be intercepted by current process-based GMO regulations, complicating the path to commercialization of improved varieties. Here, we explore direct delivery of purified CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to the protoplast of grape cultivar Chardonnay and apple cultivar such as Golden delicious fruit crop plants for efficient targeted mutagenesis. We targeted MLO-7, a susceptible gene in order to increase resistance to powdery mildew in grape cultivar and DIPM-1, DIPM-2, and DIPM-4 in the apple to increase resistance to fire blight disease. Furthermore, efficient protoplast transformation, the molar ratio of Cas9 and sgRNAs were optimized for each grape and apple cultivar. The targeted mutagenesis insertion and deletion rate was analyzed using targeted deep sequencing. Our results demonstrate that direct delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 RNPs to the protoplast system enables targeted gene editing and paves the way to the generation of DNA-free genome edited grapevine and apple plants. PMID:28066464

  10. Fragile X mental retardation protein stimulates ribonucleoprotein assembly of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuo; Cao, Mengmeng; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Xue; Li, Jianguo; Wang, Conghui; Gabriel, Gülsah; Xue, Qinghua; Yi, Yonghong; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Deng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of the influenza A virus is responsible for the transcription and replication of viral RNA in the nucleus. These processes require interplay between host factors and RNP components. Here, we report that the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) targets influenza virus RNA synthesis machinery and facilitates virus replication both in cell culture and in mice. We demonstrate that FMRP transiently associates with viral RNP and stimulates viral RNP assembly through RNA-mediated interaction with the nucleoprotein. Furthermore, the KH2 domain of FMRP mediates its association with the nucleoprotein. A point mutation (I304N) in the KH2 domain, identified from a Fragile X syndrome patient, disrupts the FMRP-nucleoprotein association and abolishes the ability of FMRP to participate in viral RNP assembly. We conclude that FMRP is a critical host factor used by influenza viruses to facilitate viral RNP assembly. Our observation reveals a mechanism of influenza virus RNA synthesis and provides insights into FMRP functions.

  11. Active Yeast Telomerase Shares Subunits with Ribonucleoproteins RNase P and RNase MRP.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Bruno; Laterreur, Nancy; Perederina, Anna; Noël, Jean-François; Dubois, Marie-Line; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2016-05-19

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that replenishes telomeric DNA and maintains genome integrity. Minimally, telomerase activity requires a templating RNA and a catalytic protein. Additional proteins are required for activity on telomeres in vivo. Here, we report that the Pop1, Pop6, and Pop7 proteins, known components of RNase P and RNase MRP, bind to yeast telomerase RNA and are essential constituents of the telomerase holoenzyme. Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 binding is specific and involves an RNA domain highly similar to a protein-binding domain in the RNAs of RNase P/MRP. The results also show that Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 function to maintain the essential components Est1 and Est2 on the RNA in vivo. Consistently, addition of Pop1 allows for telomerase activity reconstitution with wild-type telomerase RNA in vitro. Thus, the same chaperoning module has allowed the evolution of functionally and, remarkably, structurally distinct RNPs, telomerase, and RNases P/MRP from unrelated progenitor RNAs.

  12. Efficient DNA-free genome editing of bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhen; Chen, Kunling; Li, Tingdong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yanpeng; Zhao, Qian; Liu, Jinxing; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Cuimin; Ran, Yidong; Gao, Caixia

    2017-01-18

    Substantial efforts are being made to optimize the CRISPR/Cas9 system for precision crop breeding. The avoidance of transgene integration and reduction of off-target mutations are the most important targets for optimization. Here, we describe an efficient genome editing method for bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Starting from RNP preparation, the whole protocol takes only seven to nine weeks, with four to five independent mutants produced from 100 immature wheat embryos. Deep sequencing reveals that the chance of off-target mutations in wheat cells is much lower in RNP mediated genome editing than in editing with CRISPR/Cas9 DNA. Consistent with this finding, no off-target mutations are detected in the mutant plants. Because no foreign DNA is used in CRISPR/Cas9 RNP mediated genome editing, the mutants obtained are completely transgene free. This method may be widely applicable for producing genome edited crop plants and has a good prospect of being commercialized.

  13. Efficient DNA-free genome editing of bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhen; Chen, Kunling; Li, Tingdong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yanpeng; Zhao, Qian; Liu, Jinxing; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Cuimin; Ran, Yidong; Gao, Caixia

    2017-01-01

    Substantial efforts are being made to optimize the CRISPR/Cas9 system for precision crop breeding. The avoidance of transgene integration and reduction of off-target mutations are the most important targets for optimization. Here, we describe an efficient genome editing method for bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Starting from RNP preparation, the whole protocol takes only seven to nine weeks, with four to five independent mutants produced from 100 immature wheat embryos. Deep sequencing reveals that the chance of off-target mutations in wheat cells is much lower in RNP mediated genome editing than in editing with CRISPR/Cas9 DNA. Consistent with this finding, no off-target mutations are detected in the mutant plants. Because no foreign DNA is used in CRISPR/Cas9 RNP mediated genome editing, the mutants obtained are completely transgene free. This method may be widely applicable for producing genome edited crop plants and has a good prospect of being commercialized. PMID:28098143

  14. Effects of stress and aging on ribonucleoprotein assembly and function in the germ line

    PubMed Central

    Schisa, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of cell types, ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes play critical roles in regulating RNA metabolism. The germ line contains RNPs found also in somatic cells, such as processing (P) bodies and stress granules, as well as several RNPs unique to the germ line, including germ granules, nuage, Balbiani bodies, P granules, U bodies, and sponge bodies. Recent advances have identified a conserved response of germ line RNPs to environmental stresses such as nutritional stress and heat shock. The RNPs increase significantly in size based on cytology; their morphology and subcellular localization changes, and their composition changes. These dynamic changes are reversible when stresses diminish, and similar changes occur in response to aging or extended meiotic arrest prior to fertilization of oocytes. Intriguing correlations exist between the dynamics of the RNPs and the microtubule cytoskeleton and its motor proteins, suggesting a possible mechanism for the assembly and dissociation of the large RNP granules. Similarly, coordinated changes of the nuclear membrane and endoplasmic reticulum may also help unravel the regulatory mechanisms of RNP dynamics. Based on their composition, the RNPs are thought to regulate mRNA decay and/or translation, and initial support for some of these roles is now at hand. Ultimately, the question of why RNP remodeling occurs to such a large extent during a variety of stresses and aging remains to be fully answered, but a current attractive hypothesis is that the plasticity promotes the maintenance of oocyte quality. PMID:24523207

  15. K-homology Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins Regulate Floral Organ Identity and Determinacy in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cazorla, Encarnación; Ripoll, Juan José; Andújar, Alfonso; Bailey, Lindsay J.; Martínez-Laborda, Antonio; Yanofsky, Martin F.; Vera, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control is nowadays considered a main checking point for correct gene regulation during development, and RNA binding proteins actively participate in this process. Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS WITH KH DOMAINS (FLK) and PEPPER (PEP) genes encode RNA-binding proteins that contain three K-homology (KH)-domain, the typical configuration of Poly(C)-binding ribonucleoproteins (PCBPs). We previously demonstrated that FLK and PEP interact to regulate FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a central repressor of flowering time. Now we show that FLK and PEP also play an important role in the maintenance of the C-function during floral organ identity by post-transcriptionally regulating the MADS-box floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG). Previous studies have indicated that the KH-domain containing protein HEN4, in concert with the CCCH-type RNA binding protein HUA1 and the RPR-type protein HUA2, facilitates maturation of the AG pre-mRNA. In this report we show that FLK and PEP genetically interact with HEN4, HUA1, and HUA2, and that the FLK and PEP proteins physically associate with HUA1 and HEN4. Taken together, these data suggest that HUA1, HEN4, PEP and FLK are components of the same post-transcriptional regulatory module that ensures normal processing of the AG pre-mRNA. Our data better delineates the roles of PEP in plant development and, for the first time, links FLK to a morphogenetic process. PMID:25658099

  16. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 post-transcriptionally regulates Drp1 expression in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So Jung; Lee, Heejin; Jo, Doo Shin; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Han Byeol; Seo, Hae Mi; Rubinsztein, David C; Koh, Jae-Young; Lee, Eun Kyung; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2015-12-01

    Excessive mitochondrial fission is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) possesses specific fission activity in the mitochondria and peroxisomes. Various post-translational modifications of Drp1 are known to modulate complex mitochondrial dynamics. However, the post-transcriptional regulation of Drp1 remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) regulates Drp1 expression at the post-transcriptional level. hnRNP A1 directly interacts with Drp1 mRNA at its 3'UTR region, and enhances translation potential without affecting mRNA stability. Down-regulation of hnRNP A1 induces mitochondrial elongation by reducing Drp1 expression. Moreover, depletion of hnRNP A1 suppresses 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial fission and dysfunction. In contrast, over-expression of hnRNP A1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation by increasing Drp1 expression. Additionally, hnRNP A1 significantly exacerbates 3-NP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, treatment with 3-NP induces subcellular translocation of hnRNP A1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, which accelerates the increase in Drp1 expression in hnRNP A1 over-expressing cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that hnRNP A1 controls mitochondrial dynamics by post-transcriptional regulation of Drp1.

  17. Post-transcriptional controls by ribonucleoprotein complexes in the acquisition of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Kim, Chongtae; Lee, Heejin; Kim, Wook; Lee, Eun Kyung

    2013-08-20

    Acquisition of drug resistance leads to failure of anti-cancer treatments and therapies. Although several successive chemotherapies are available, along with efforts towards clinical applications of new anti-cancer drugs, it is generally realized that there is a long way to go to treat cancers. Resistance to anti-cancer drugs results from various factors, including genetic as well as epigenetic differences in tumors. Determining the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the acquisition of drug resistance may be a helpful approach for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure. Several studies have shown that the acquisition of drug resistance is tightly regulated by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug metabolism. Here, we review our current understanding of ribonucleoprotein complexes, including RBPs and miRNAs, which play critical roles in the acquisition of drug resistance and have potential clinical implications for cancer.

  18. Biogenesis, assembly, and export of viral messenger ribonucleoproteins in the influenza A virus infected cell

    PubMed Central

    York, Ashley; Fodor, Ervin

    2013-01-01

    The flow of genetic information from sites of transcription within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translational machinery of eukaryotic cells is obstructed by a physical blockade, the nuclear double membrane, which must be overcome in order to adhere to the central dogma of molecular biology, DNA makes RNA makes protein. Advancement in the field of cellular and molecular biology has painted a detailed picture of the molecular mechanisms from transcription of genes to mRNAs and their processing that is closely coupled to export from the nucleus. The rules that govern delivering messenger transcripts from the nucleus must be obeyed by influenza A virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae that has adopted a nuclear replication cycle. The negative-sense genome of influenza A virus is segmented into eight individual viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and single-stranded RNA encapsidated in viral nucleoprotein. Influenza A virus mRNAs fall into three major categories, intronless, intron-containing unspliced and spliced. During evolutionary history, influenza A virus has conceived a way of negotiating the passage of viral transcripts from the nucleus to cytoplasmic sites of protein synthesis. The major mRNA nuclear export NXF1 pathway is increasingly implicated in viral mRNA export and this review considers and discusses the current understanding of how influenza A virus exploits the host mRNA export pathway for replication. PMID:23807439

  19. A high-throughput pipeline for the production of synthetic antibodies for analysis of ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hong; Laver, John D; Jeon, Jouhyun; Singh, Fateh; Ancevicius, Kristin; Fan, Yujie; Cao, Wen Xi; Nie, Kun; Yang, Zhenglin; Luo, Hua; Wang, Miranda; Rissland, Olivia; Westwood, J Timothy; Kim, Philip M; Smibert, Craig A; Lipshitz, Howard D; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-04-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs plays an essential role in the control of gene expression. mRNAs are regulated in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) along with associated protein and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) cofactors. A global understanding of post-transcriptional control in any cell type requires identification of the components of all of its RNP complexes. We have previously shown that these complexes can be purified by immunoprecipitation using anti-RBP synthetic antibodies produced by phage display. To develop the large number of synthetic antibodies required for a global analysis of RNP complex composition, we have established a pipeline that combines (i) a computationally aided strategy for design of antigens located outside of annotated domains, (ii) high-throughput antigen expression and purification in Escherichia coli, and (iii) high-throughput antibody selection and screening. Using this pipeline, we have produced 279 antibodies against 61 different protein components of Drosophila melanogaster RNPs. Together with those produced in our low-throughput efforts, we have a panel of 311 antibodies for 67 RNP complex proteins. Tests of a subset of our antibodies demonstrated that 89% immunoprecipitate their endogenous target from embryo lysate. This panel of antibodies will serve as a resource for global studies of RNP complexes in Drosophila. Furthermore, our high-throughput pipeline permits efficient production of synthetic antibodies against any large set of proteins. © 2016 Na et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Influenza Virus Ribonucleoprotein Complexes Gain Preferential Access to Cellular Export Machinery through Chromatin Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Geoffrey P.; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Zvirblis, Gintautas; Götz, Veronika; Wolff, Thorsten; Naffakh, Nadia; Schwemmle, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to most RNA viruses, influenza viruses replicate their genome in the nucleus of infected cells. As a result, newly-synthesized vRNA genomes, in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), must be exported to the cytoplasm for productive infection. To characterize the composition of vRNP export complexes and their interplay with the nucleus of infected cells, we affinity-purified tagged vRNPs from biochemically fractionated infected nuclei. After treatment of infected cells with leptomycin B, a potent inhibitor of Crm1-mediated export, we isolated vRNP export complexes which, unexpectedly, were tethered to the host-cell chromatin with very high affinity. At late time points of infection, the cellular export receptor Crm1 also accumulated at the same regions of the chromatin as vRNPs, which led to a decrease in the export of other nuclear Crm1 substrates from the nucleus. Interestingly, chromatin targeting of vRNP export complexes brought them into association with Rcc1, the Ran guanine exchange factor responsible for generating RanGTP and driving Crm1-dependent nuclear export. Thus, influenza viruses gain preferential access to newly-generated host cell export machinery by targeting vRNP export complexes at the sites of Ran regeneration. PMID:21909257

  1. Messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes isolated by oligodeoxythymidylate-cellulose chromatography from Neurospora crassa polysomes.

    PubMed Central

    Mirkes, P E

    1977-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes were isolated from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dissociated polysomes of Neurospora crassa. Approximately 15% of the [3H]uridine incorporated into polysomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) during a 15-min pulse was eluted from oligodeoxythymidylate-cellulose as an mRNP complex. The isolated mRNP complexes exhibited sedimentation coefficients ranging from 15S to greater than 60S. RNA isolated from these mRNP complexes sedimented in sucrose gradients between 4S and 40S, with broad peaks at 15S and 24S. The buoyant density of mRNP complexes eluted with 25% formamide was 1.42 to 1.44 g/cm3, whereas for mRNP complexes eluted with 50% formamide it was 1.48 to 1.50 g/cm3. Six polypeptides, with molecular weights of 14,000, 19,000, 24,000, 31,000, 44,000, and 66,000, were associated with mRNP complexes eluted with 25% formamide. The mRNP complexes eluted with 50% formamide had one associated polypeptide, of molecular weight 27,000. PMID:141447

  2. Crystal structure of the human heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 RNA-recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Katherine; Melville, Zephan; Aligholizadeh, Ehson; Roth, Braden M; Varney, Kristen M; Carrier, France; Pozharski, Edwin; Weber, David J

    2017-04-01

    The heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) is upregulated in hypoxic regions of various solid tumors and promotes tumor growth via the coordination of mRNA transcripts associated with pro-survival genes. Thus, hnRNP A18 represents an important therapeutic target in tumor cells. Presented here is the first X-ray crystal structure to be reported for the RNA-recognition motif of hnRNP A18. By comparing this structure with those of homologous RNA-binding proteins (i.e. hnRNP A1), three residues on one face of an antiparallel β-sheet (Arg48, Phe50 and Phe52) and one residue in an unstructured loop (Arg41) were identified as likely to be involved in protein-nucleic acid interactions. This structure helps to serve as a foundation for biophysical studies of this RNA-binding protein and structure-based drug-design efforts for targeting hnRNP A18 in cancer, such as malignant melanoma, where hnRNP A18 levels are elevated and contribute to disease progression.

  3. The Thoc1 encoded ribonucleoprotein is required for myeloid progenitor cell homeostasis in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Pitzonka, Laura; Ullas, Sumana; Chinnam, Meenalakshmi; Povinelli, Benjamin J; Fisher, Daniel T; Golding, Michelle; Appenheimer, Michelle M; Nemeth, Michael J; Evans, Sharon; Goodrich, David W

    2014-01-01

    Co-transcriptionally assembled ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes are critical for RNA processing and nuclear export. RNPs have been hypothesized to contribute to the regulation of coordinated gene expression, and defects in RNP biogenesis contribute to genome instability and disease. Despite the large number of RNPs and the importance of the molecular processes they mediate, the requirements for individual RNP complexes in mammalian development and tissue homeostasis are not well characterized. THO is an evolutionarily conserved, nuclear RNP complex that physically links nascent transcripts with the nuclear export apparatus. THO is essential for early mouse embryonic development, limiting characterization of the requirements for THO in adult tissues. To address this shortcoming, a mouse strain has been generated allowing inducible deletion of the Thoc1 gene which encodes an essential protein subunit of THO. Bone marrow reconstitution was used to generate mice in which Thoc1 deletion could be induced specifically in the hematopoietic system. We find that granulocyte macrophage progenitors have a cell autonomous requirement for Thoc1 to maintain cell growth and viability. Lymphoid lineages are not detectably affected by Thoc1 loss under the homeostatic conditions tested. Myeloid lineages may be more sensitive to Thoc1 loss due to their relatively high rate of proliferation and turnover.

  4. The Thoc1 Encoded Ribonucleoprotein Is Required for Myeloid Progenitor Cell Homeostasis in the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chinnam, Meenalakshmi; Povinelli, Benjamin J.; Fisher, Daniel T.; Golding, Michelle; Appenheimer, Michelle M.; Nemeth, Michael J.; Evans, Sharon; Goodrich, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Co-transcriptionally assembled ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes are critical for RNA processing and nuclear export. RNPs have been hypothesized to contribute to the regulation of coordinated gene expression, and defects in RNP biogenesis contribute to genome instability and disease. Despite the large number of RNPs and the importance of the molecular processes they mediate, the requirements for individual RNP complexes in mammalian development and tissue homeostasis are not well characterized. THO is an evolutionarily conserved, nuclear RNP complex that physically links nascent transcripts with the nuclear export apparatus. THO is essential for early mouse embryonic development, limiting characterization of the requirements for THO in adult tissues. To address this shortcoming, a mouse strain has been generated allowing inducible deletion of the Thoc1 gene which encodes an essential protein subunit of THO. Bone marrow reconstitution was used to generate mice in which Thoc1 deletion could be induced specifically in the hematopoietic system. We find that granulocyte macrophage progenitors have a cell autonomous requirement for Thoc1 to maintain cell growth and viability. Lymphoid lineages are not detectably affected by Thoc1 loss under the homeostatic conditions tested. Myeloid lineages may be more sensitive to Thoc1 loss due to their relatively high rate of proliferation and turnover. PMID:24830368

  5. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex and RNA splicing alterations in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Hales, Chadwick M.; Chen, Ping-Chung; Gozal, Yair; Dammer, Eric B.; Fritz, Jason J.; Wang, Xusheng; Xia, Qiangwei; Duong, Duc M.; Street, Craig; Cantero, Gloria; Cheng, Dongmei; Jones, Drew R.; Wu, Zhiping; Li, Yuxin; Diner, Ian; Heilman, Craig J.; Rees, Howard D.; Wu, Hao; Lin, Li; Szulwach, Keith E.; Gearing, Marla; Mufson, Elliott J.; Bennett, David A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Wingo, Thomas S.; Sun, Yi E.; Jin, Peng; Hanfelt, John; Willcock, Donna M.; Levey, Allan; Lah, James J.; Peng, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of insoluble protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. The universal presence of β-amyloid and tau in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has facilitated advancement of the amyloid cascade and tau hypotheses that have dominated AD pathogenesis research and therapeutic development. However, the underlying etiology of the disease remains to be fully elucidated. Here we report a comprehensive study of the human brain-insoluble proteome in AD by mass spectrometry. We identify 4,216 proteins, among which 36 proteins accumulate in the disease, including U1-70K and other U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) spliceosome components. Similar accumulations in mild cognitive impairment cases indicate that spliceosome changes occur in early stages of AD. Multiple U1 snRNP subunits form cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in AD but not in other examined neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Comparison of RNA from AD and control brains reveals dysregulated RNA processing with accumulation of unspliced RNA species in AD, including myc box-dependent-interacting protein 1, clusterin, and presenilin-1. U1-70K knockdown or antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of U1 snRNP increases the protein level of amyloid precursor protein. Thus, our results demonstrate unique U1 snRNP pathology and implicate abnormal RNA splicing in AD pathogenesis. PMID:24023061

  6. Core structure of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein at 1.7-Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Eric J; Curran, Elizabeth C; Liao, Hong Hong; Andrews, Kristie L; Treba, Christine N; Butcher, Samuel E; Brow, David A

    2014-06-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic assembly of five small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that removes introns from eukaryotic pre-mRNA. U6, the most conserved of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), participates directly in catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae U6 snRNP core containing most of the U6 snRNA and all four RRM domains of the Prp24 protein. It reveals a unique interlocked RNP architecture that sequesters the 5' splice site-binding bases of U6 snRNA. RRMs 1, 2 and 4 of Prp24 form an electropositive groove that binds double-stranded RNA and may nucleate annealing of U4 and U6 snRNAs. Substitutions in Prp24 that suppress a mutation in U6 localize to direct RNA-protein contacts. Our results provide the most comprehensive view to date of a multi-RRM protein bound to RNA and reveal striking coevolution of protein and RNA structure.

  7. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein associated polypeptide N accelerates cell proliferation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Jiancheng

    2015-10-01

    The spliceosome, the large RNA‑protein molecular complex, is crucial for pre‑mRNA splicing. Several antitumor drugs have been found to tightly bind to the components of the spliceosome and mutations in the spliceosome have been reported in several types of cancer. However, the involvement of the spliceosome in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains unclear. In the present study, small nuclear ribonucleoprotein associated polypeptide N (SNRPN), a key constituent of spliceosomes, was disrupted in BxPC‑3 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells using lentivirus‑mediated RNA interference (RNAi). It was found that knockdown of SNRPN reduced the proliferation ability of BxPC‑3 cells, as determined by an MTT assay. Furthermore, cell colony formation was impaired in SNRPN depleted adenocarcinoma cells and cell cycle analysis showed that depletion of SNRPN led to S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results suggest that SNRPN is a key player in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth, and targeted loss of SNRPN may be a potential therapeutic method for pancreatic cancer.

  8. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J; Walter, Cheryl T; Dent, Kyle C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V; Hiscox, Julian A; Green, Todd J; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M; Fooks, Anthony R; Ashcroft, Alison E; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ranson, Neil A; Barr, John N; Edwards, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N-RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses.

  9. Targeted Gene Knockin in Porcine Somatic Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Eun; Park, Chi-Hun; Powell, Anne; Martin, Jessica; Donovan, David M.; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2016-01-01

    The pig is an ideal large animal model for genetic engineering applications. A relatively short gestation interval and large litter size makes the pig a conducive model for generating and propagating genetic modifications. The domestic pig also shares close similarity in anatomy, physiology, size, and life expectancy, making it an ideal animal for modeling human diseases. Often, however, the technical difficulties in generating desired genetic modifications such as targeted knockin of short stretches of sequences or transgenes have impeded progress in this field. In this study, we have investigated and compared the relative efficiency of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in engineering targeted knockin of pseudo attP sites downstream of a ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene in porcine somatic cells and generated live fetuses by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). By leveraging these knockin pseudo attP sites, we have demonstrated subsequent phiC31 integrase mediated integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene into the site. This work for the first time created an optimized protocol for CRISPR/Cas mediated knockin in porcine somatic cells, while simultaneously creating a stable platform for future transgene integration and generating transgenic animals. PMID:27240344

  10. Role and molecular mechanism of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in tumor development and progression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a member of the hnRNP family, which exists in the nucleus and the cytoplasm simultaneously. It is a multifunctional protein that can participate in a variety of regulatory progressions of gene expression and signal transduction, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription, RNA alternative splicing and translation. hnRNP K not only directly binds to the kinases, but also recruits the associated factors regarding transcription, splicing and translation to control gene expression, and therefore, it serves as a docking platform for integrating transduction pathways to nucleic acid-directed processes. Numerous studies also show that abnormal expression of hnRNP K is closely associated with the tumor formation. This protein is overexpressed in numerous types of cancer and its aberrant cytoplasmic localization is also associated with a worse prognosis for patients. These results consistently indicate that hnRNP K has a key role in cancer progression. To understand the hnRNP K pathophysiological process in tumor disease, the previous research results regarding the association between hnRNP K and tumors were reviewed.

  11. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism.

  12. Regulation of heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 transport by phosphorylation in cells stressed by osmotic shock

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, Eric; Guil, Sònia; Myers, Michael; Moscat, Jorge; Cáceres, Javier F.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    2005-01-01

    Heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 is an alternative splicing factor that is mainly nuclear, although it shuttles rapidly between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Cells stressed by osmotic shock (OSM) activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase3/6-p38 signaling pathway, which in turn results in accumulation of hnRNP A1 in the cytoplasm. This effect modulates alternative splicing regulation in vivo and correlates with increased hnRNP A1 phosphorylation. We have characterized the molecular mechanism involved in the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in NIH 3T3 cells subjected to OSM. This treatment results in serine-specific phosphorylation within a C-terminal peptide, dubbed the “F-peptide,” which is adjacent to the M9 motif that mediates bidirectional transport of hnRNP A1. Analysis of mutants in which the F-peptide serines were replaced by aspartic acids or alanines showed that F-peptide phosphorylation is required for the subcellular redistribution of hnRNP A1 in cells subjected to OSM. Furthermore, F-peptide phosphorylation modulates the interaction of hnRNP A1 with transportin Trn1. Our findings suggest that the phosphorylation of F-peptide by cell-signaling pathways regulates the rate of hnRNP A1 nuclear import. PMID:15738418

  13. Spitzer/IRAC Photometry Of The Four Largest Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Richard; Emery, J.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.

    2012-10-01

    The surfaces of the four largest Uranian satellites are dominated by water ice and a spectrally neutral constituent that is likely carbonaceous in composition. CO2 ice has been detected on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania, with no detection on the furthest regular Uranian satellite, Oberon (Grundy et al., 2003, 2006). Whether CO2 ice is primordial or is actively produced in the Uranian system is unclear; however, it seems unlikely that primordial CO2 ice would remain exposed on an icy satellite surface over the age of the Solar System. One possible mechanism for producing CO2 ice is bombardment of water ice and carbonaceous material by charged particles caught in Uranus’ magnetic field. Unlike the other large Uranian satellites, Oberon spends part of its orbit outside the confines of Uranus’ magnetic field, which might help explain why CO2 ice has yet to be detected on Oberon. We are using photometric data gathered by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), in order to search for the signature of CO2 ice on Oberon, and confirm its presence on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania at longer wavelengths than previous studies. IRAC collects data in four different channels, which are centered roughly at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 µm. Additionally, we are gathering spectroscopic data using SpeX on IRTF, at similar longitudes to the IRAC observations, in order to characterize the distribution of CO2 ice on these icy satellites over a wide range of near-infrared wavelengths. Our preliminary photometry results for Oberon indicate that there is a steep reduction in reflected solar flux from channel 1 to channel 2, suggesting that surface materials are absorbing photons at wavelengths within the bandpass of channel 2. We will present the results of our photometric analysis of the four largest Uranian moons.

  14. Largest-ever Ozone Hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA instrument has detected an Antarctic ozone 'hole' (what scientists call an 'ozone depletion area') that is three times larger than the entire land mass of the United States-the largest such area ever observed. The 'hole' expanded to a record size of approximately 11 million square miles (28.3 million square kilometers) on Sept. 3, 2000. The previous record was approximately 10.5 million square miles (27.2 million square km) on Sept. 19, 1998. The ozone hole's size currently has stabilized, but the low levels in its interior continue to fall. The lowest readings in the ozone hole are typically observed in late September or early October each year. 'These observations reinforce concerns about the frailty of Earth's ozone layer. Although production of ozone-destroying gases has been curtailed under international agreements, concentrations of the gases in the stratosphere are only now reaching their peak. Due to their long persistence in the atmosphere, it will be many decades before the ozone hole is no longer an annual occurrence,' said Dr. Michael J. Kurylo, manager of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. Ozone molecules, made up of three atoms of oxygen, comprise a thin layer of the atmosphere that absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Most atmospheric ozone is found between approximately six miles (9.5 km) and 18 miles (29 km) above the Earth's surface. Scientists continuing to investigate this enormous hole are somewhat surprised by its size. The reasons behind the dimensions involve both early-spring conditions, and an extremely intense Antarctic vortex. The Antarctic vortex is an upper-altitude stratospheric air current that sweeps around the Antarctic continent, confining the Antarctic ozone hole. 'Variations in the size of the ozone hole and of ozone depletion accompanying it from one year to the next are not unexpected,' said Dr. Jack Kaye, Office of Earth Sciences Research Director, NASA Headquarters

  15. First Light for World's Largest 'Thermometer Camera'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    LABOCA in Service at APEX The world's largest bolometer camera for submillimetre astronomy is now in service at the 12-m APEX telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Chilean Andes. LABOCA was specifically designed for the study of extremely cold astronomical objects and, with its large field of view and very high sensitivity, will open new vistas in our knowledge of how stars form and how the first galaxies emerged from the Big Bang. ESO PR Photo 35a/07 ESO PR Photo 35a/07 LABOCA on APEX "A large fraction of all the gas in the Universe has extremely cold temperatures of around minus 250 degrees Celsius, a mere 20 degrees above absolute zero," says Karl Menten, director at the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, Germany, that built LABOCA. "Studying these cold clouds requires looking at the light they radiate in the submillimetre range, with very sophisticated detectors." Astronomers use bolometers for this task, which are, in essence, thermometers. They detect incoming radiation by registering the resulting rise in temperature. More specifically, a bolometer detector consists of an extremely thin foil that absorbs the incoming light. Any change of the radiation's intensity results in a slight change in temperature of the foil, which can then be registered by sensitive electronic thermometers. To be able to measure such minute temperature fluctuations requires the bolometers to be cooled down to less than 0.3 degrees above absolute zero, that is below minus 272.85 degrees Celsius. "Cooling to such low temperatures requires using liquid helium, which is no simple feat for an observatory located at 5100m altitude," says Carlos De Breuck, the APEX instrument scientist at ESO. Nor is it simple to measure the weak temperature radiation of astronomical objects. Millimetre and submillimetre radiation opens a window into the enigmatic cold Universe, but the signals from space are heavily absorbed by water vapour in the Earth

  16. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding the 60-kD component of the human SS-A/Ro ribonucleoprotein autoantigen.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chetrit, E; Gandy, B J; Tan, E M; Sullivan, K F

    1989-01-01

    SS-A/Ro is a nucleocytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particle that is a common target of autoimmune response in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Previously, SS-A/Ro has been shown to be composed of at least two polypeptide antigens of 60 and 52 kD noncovalently associated with a set of small RNAs, designated Y1-Y5. A serum from an SS patient was selected to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA library constructed from human T cell lymphoblastic leukemia (MOLT-4) mRNA. An immunoreactive clone was isolated that possessed a 1.8-kb cDNA insert. In vitro transcription and translation of the cDNA resulted in the synthesis of a 57.5-kD polypeptide which was specifically immunoprecipitated by SS-A/Ro antisera. The identity of the cDNA encoded protein as the 60-kD SS-A/Ro antigen was established by proteolytic peptide mapping of the cDNA-encoded protein and the 60-kD HeLa cell antigen. The sequence of the cDNA shows that the 60-kD SS-A/Ro protein possesses both RNA binding protein consensus sequences and a single zinc-finger motif. Recombinant SS-A/Ro antigen produced in bacteria proved to be a sensitive and specific reagent for detection of anti-SS-A/Ro antibodies in patient sera. The availability of the 60-kD SS-A/Ro cDNA will enable detailed analysis of the molecular structure and function of the SS-A/Ro RNP particle and its role in autoimmune pathology. Images PMID:2649513

  17. Structural analysis of respiratory syncytial virus reveals the position of M2-1 between the matrix protein and the ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabriella; Holl, Jens M; Williams, Grant M; Alonas, Eric; Vanover, Daryll; Lifland, Aaron W; Gudheti, Manasa; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Nair, Vinod; Yi, Hong; Graham, Barney S; Santangelo, Philip J; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2014-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of nonsegmented, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA genome viruses, is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants, young children, and the elderly or immunocompromised. There are many open questions regarding the processes that regulate human RSV (hRSV) assembly and budding. Here, using cryo-electron tomography, we identified virus particles that were spherical, filamentous, and asymmetric in structure, all within the same virus preparation. The three particle morphologies maintained a similar organization of the surface glycoproteins, matrix protein (M), M2-1, and the ribonucleoprotein (RNP). RNP filaments were traced in three dimensions (3D), and their total length was calculated. The measurements revealed the inclusion of multiple full-length genome copies per particle. RNP was associated with the membrane whenever the M layer was present. The amount of M coverage ranged from 24% to 86% in the different morphologies. Using fluorescence light microscopy (fLM), direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), and a proximity ligation assay (PLA), we provide evidence illustrating that M2-1 is located between RNP and M in isolated viral particles. In addition, regular spacing of the M2-1 densities was resolved when hRSV viruses were imaged using Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) cryo-electron tomography. Our studies provide a more complete characterization of the hRSV virion structure and substantiation that M and M2-1 regulate virus organization. hRSV is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children as well as elderly or immunocompromised individuals. We used cryo-electron tomography and Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron tomography to visualize populations of purified hRSV in 3D. We observed the three distinct morphologies, spherical, filamentous, and asymmetric, which maintained comparable organizational profiles

  18. Ribonomic analysis of human DZIP1 reveals its involvement in ribonucleoprotein complexes and stress granules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background DZIP1 (DAZ-interacting protein 1) has been described as a component of the Hh signaling pathway with a putative regulatory role in ciliogenesis. DZIP1 interacts with DAZ RNA binding proteins in embryonic stem cells and human germ cells suggesting a role in mRNA regulation. Results We investigated DZIP1 function in HeLa cells and its involvement in ribonucleoprotein complexes. DZIP1 was predominantly located in granules in the cytoplasm. Under oxidative stress conditions, DZIP1 re-localized to stress granules. DZIP appears to be important for the formation of stress granules during the stress response. We used immunoprecipitation assays with antibodies against DZIP1 and microarray hybridization to identify mRNAs associated with DZIP1. The genetic networks formed by the DZIP1-associated mRNAs were involved in cell cycle and gene expression regulation. DZIP1 is involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We used cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of this pathway, to analyze the expression of DZIP1 and its associated mRNAs. The abundance of DZIP1-associated mRNAs increased with treatment; however, the silencing or overexpression of DZIP1 in HeLa cells had no effect on the accumulation of the associated mRNAs. Polysomal profile analysis by sucrose gradient centrifugation demonstrated the presence of DZIP1 in the polysomal fraction. Conclusions Our results suggest that DZIP1 is part of an RNP complex that occupies various subcellular locations. The diversity of the mRNAs associated with DZIP1 suggests that this protein is a component of different RNPs associated with translating polysomes and with RNA granules. PMID:24993635

  19. Insulin Inhibits Nrf2 Gene Expression via Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein F/K in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anindya; Abdo, Shaaban; Zhao, Shuiling; Wu, Chin-Han; Shi, Yixuan; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Chenier, Isabelle; Alquier, Thierry; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2017-01-23

    Oxidative stress induces endogenous antioxidants via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), potentially preventing tissue injury. We investigated whether insulin affects renal Nrf2 expression in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and studied its underlying mechanism. Insulin normalized hyperglycemia, hypertension, oxidative stress and renal injury, inhibited renal Nrf2 and angiotensinogen (Agt) gene expression and up-regulated heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) and hnRNP K expression in Akita mice with T1D. In immortalized rat renal proximal tubular cells, insulin suppressed Nrf2 and Agt but stimulated hnRNP F and hnRNP K gene transcription in high glucose via p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. Transfection with small interfering RNAs of p44/42 MAPK, hnRNP F or hnRNP K blocked insulin inhibition of Nrf2 gene transcription. Insulin curbed Nrf2 promoter activity via a specific DNA-responsive element that binds hnRNP F/K, and hnRNP F/K overexpression curtailed Nrf2 promoter activity. In hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic mice, renal Nrf2 and Agt expression was down-regulated, whereas hnRNP F/K expression was up-regulated. Thus, the beneficial actions of insulin in diabetic nephropathy appear to be mediated, in part, by suppressing renal Nrf2 and Agt gene transcription and preventing Nrf2 stimulation of Agt expression via hnRNP F/K. These findings identify hnRNP F/K and Nrf2 as potential therapeutic targets in diabetes.

  20. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein F Stimulates Sirtuin-1 Gene Expression and Attenuates Nephropathy Progression in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chao-Sheng; Shi, Yixuan; Chenier, Isabelle; Ghosh, Anindya; Wu, Chin-Han; Cailhier, Jean-Francois; Ethier, Jean; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the mechanism of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) renoprotective action in a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model (db/db). Immortalized rat renal proximal tubular cells (IRPTCs) and kidneys from humans with T2D were also studied. The db/db mice developed hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, and nephropathy at age 20 weeks compared with their db/m littermates. These abnormalities, with the exception of hyperglycemia, were attenuated in db/dbhnRNP F-transgenic (Tg) mice specifically overexpressing hnRNP F in their RPTCs. Sirtuin-1, Foxo3α, and catalase expression were significantly decreased in RPTCs from db/db mice and normalized in db/dbhnRNP F-Tg mice. In vitro, hnRNP F overexpression stimulated Sirtuin-1 and Foxo3α with downregulation of acetylated p53 expression and prevented downregulation of Sirtuin-1 and Foxo3α expression in IRPTCs by high glucose plus palmitate. Transfection of Sirtuin-1 small interfering RNA prevented hnRNP F stimulation of Foxo3α and downregulation of acetylated p53 expression. hnRNP F stimulated Sirtuin-1 transcription via hnRNP F-responsive element in the Sirtuin-1 promoter. Human T2D kidneys exhibited more RPTC apoptosis and lower expression of hnRNP F, SIRTUIN-1, and FOXO3α than nondiabetic kidneys. Our results demonstrate that hnRNP F protects kidneys against oxidative stress and nephropathy via stimulation of Sirtuin-1 expression and signaling in diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  1. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K inhibits heat shock-induced transcriptional activity of heat shock factor 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, A Young; Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2017-08-04

    When cells are exposed to heat shock and various other stresses, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is activated, and the heat shock response (HSR) is elicited. To better understand the molecular regulation of the HSR, we used 2D-PAGE-based proteome analysis to screen for heat shock-induced post-translationally modified cellular proteins. Our analysis revealed that two protein spots typically present on 2D-PAGE gels and containing heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) with trioxidized Cys(132) disappeared after the heat shock treatment and reappeared during recovery, but the total amount of hnRNP K protein remained unchanged. We next tested whether hnRNP K plays a role in HSR by regulating HSF1 and found that hnRNP K inhibits HSF1 activity, resulting in reduced expression of hsp70 and hsp27 mRNAs. hnRNP K also reduced binding affinity of HSF1 to the heat shock element by directly interacting with HSF1 but did not affect HSF1 phosphorylation-dependent activation or nuclear localization. hnRNP K lost its ability to induce these effects when its Cys(132) was substituted with Ser, Asp, or Glu. These findings suggest that hnRNP K inhibits transcriptional activity of HSF1 by inhibiting its binding to heat shock element and that the oxidation status of Cys(132) in hnRNP K is critical for this inhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Coilin Can Form a Complex with the U7 Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Michel; Gall, Joseph G.

    1998-01-01

    Coiled bodies (CBs) in the amphibian oocyte nucleus are spherical structures up to 10 μm or more in diameter, much larger than their somatic counterparts, which rarely exceed 1 μm. Oocyte CBs may have smaller granules attached to their surface or embedded within them, which are identical in structure and composition to the many hundreds of B-snurposomes found free in the nucleoplasm. The matrix of the CBs contains the diagnostic protein p80-coilin, which is colocalized with the U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), whereas the attached and embedded B-snurposomes contain splicing snRNPs. A few of the 50–100 CBs in the oocyte nucleus are attached to lampbrush chromosomes at the histone gene loci. By coimmunoprecipitation we show that coilin and the U7 snRNP can form a weak but specific complex in the nucleoplasm, which is dependent on the special U7 Sm-binding site. Under the same conditions coilin does not associate with the U1 and U2 snRNPs. Coilin is a nucleic acid-binding protein, as shown by its interaction with single-stranded DNA and with poly r(U) and poly r(G). We suggest that an important function of coilin is to form a transient complex with the U7 snRNP and accompany it to the CBs. In the case of CBs attached to chromosomes at the histone gene loci, the U7 snRNP is thus brought close to the actual site of histone pre-mRNA transcription. PMID:9763457

  3. An RNA Hybridization Assay for Screening Influenza A Virus Polymerase Inhibitors Using the Entire Ribonucleoprotein Complex.

    PubMed

    Roch, Franz-Ferdinand; Hinterkörner, Georg; Menke, John; Tang, Guo-Qing; Cusack, Stephen; Butzendobler, Barbara; Buschmann, Helmut; Datta, Kausiki; Wolkerstorfer, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Novel antiviral drugs, which are less prone to resistance development, are desirable alternatives to the currently approved drugs for the treatment of potentially serious influenza virus infections. The viral polymerase is highly conserved and serves as an attractive target for antiviral drugs since potent inhibitors would directly stop viral replication at an early stage. Recent structural studies on the functional domains of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase, which comprises subunits PA, PB1, and PB2, opened the way to a structure-based approach for optimizing inhibitors of viral replication. These strategies, however, are limited by the use of isolated protein fragments instead of employing the entire ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), which represents the functional form of the influenza polymerase in infected cells. In this study, we have established a screening assay for efficient and reliable analysis of potential influenza polymerase inhibitors of various molecular targets such as monoselective polymerase inhibitors targeting the endonuclease site, the cap-binding domain, and the polymerase active site, respectively. By utilizing whole viral RNPs and a radioactivity-free endpoint detection with the capability for efficient compound screening while offering high-content information on potential inhibitors to drive medicinal chemistry program in a reliable manner, this biochemical assay provides significant advantages over the currently available conventional assays. We propose that this assay can eventually be adapted for coinstantaneous analysis and subsequent optimization of two or more different chemical scaffold classes targeting multiple active sites within the polymerase complex, thus enabling the evaluation of drug combinations and characterization of molecules with dual functionality.

  4. High specificity of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribonucleoprotein as antigen in serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Solana, M E; Katzin, A M; Umezawa, E S; Miatello, C S

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the performance of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribosomal fraction (Tulahuen and Y strains) in order to improve the diagnostic specificity of the test. A total of 100 serum samples from patients with chronic Chagas' disease from Brazil and Argentina were studied. Sera from 116 patients, without Chagas' disease, including 10 with active mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and 20 with visceral leishmaniasis, were used as controls. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the ribosomal fraction (ribonucleoproteins [RNPs]) in the ELISA were found in 97% of samples from patients with Chagas' disease. A total of 99% of the sera from patients without the disease were negative, including sera from patients with mucocutaneous and visceral leishmaniases. The distribution of IgG isotypes in randomly chosen serum samples was determined by ELISA; IgG1 and IgG3 were predominant (100% exhibited IgG1 and 85% exhibited IgG3, and 50% also presented the IgG2 isotype. The distribution of the IgG subclasses was confirmed by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. When total IgG was assayed by Western blot assay, no correlation was found between the pattern of serum reactivity and the clinical features of the patients with Chagas' disease. Therefore, no typical profile of polypeptide recognition could be associated with any clinical form of Chagas' disease (cardiomyopathy or megaviscera). Our results showed that sera from patients with Chagas' disease react with ribosomal antigens and display a typical profile of IgG isotypes (IgG1 plus IgG3).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7650167

  5. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  6. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation.

  7. Muscle developmental defects in heterogeneous nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Chia; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Lee, Chien-Chin; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is crucial for regulating alternative splicing. Its integrated function within an organism has not, however, been identified. We generated hnRNP A1 knockout mice to study the role of hnRNP A1 in vivo. The knockout mice, hnRNP A1−/−, showed embryonic lethality because of muscle developmental defects. The blood pressure and heart rate of the heterozygous mice were higher than those of the wild-type mice, indicating heart function defects. We performed mouse exon arrays to study the muscle development mechanism. The processes regulated by hnRNP A1 included cell adhesion and muscle contraction. The expression levels of muscle development-related genes in hnRNP A1+/− mice were significantly different from those in wild-type mice, as detected using qRT-PCR. We further confirmed the alternative splicing patterns of muscle development-related genes including mef2c, lrrfip1, usp28 and abcc9. Alternative mRNA isoforms of these genes were increased in hnRNP A1+/− mice compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, we revealed that the functionally similar hnRNP A2/B1 did not compensate for the expression of hnRNP A1 in organisms. In summary, our study demonstrated that hnRNP A1 plays a critical and irreplaceable role in embryonic muscle development by regulating the expression and alternative splicing of muscle-related genes. PMID:28077597

  8. Antiviral activity of KR-23502 targeting nuclear export of influenza B virus ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yejin; Lee, Hye Won; Shin, Jin Soo; Go, Yun Young; Kim, Chonsaeng; Shin, Daeho; Malpani, Yashwardhan; Han, Soo Bong; Jung, Young-Sik; Kim, Meehyein

    2016-10-01

    The spiro compound 5,6-dimethyl-3H,3'H-spiro(benzofuran-2,1'-isobenzofuran)-3,3'-dione (KR-23502) has antiviral activity against influenza A and more potently B viruses. The aim of this study is to elucidate its mechanism of action. Subcellular localization and time-course expression of influenza B viral proteins, nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein 1 (M1), showed that KR-23502 reduced their amounts within 5 h post-infection. Early steps of virus life cycle, including virus entry, nuclear localization of NP and viral RNA-dependent RNA replication, were not affected by KR-23502. Instead it interrupted a later event corresponding to nuclear export of NP and M1 proteins. Delivery of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP)-M1 complex has been known to be mediated by the viral nuclear export protein (NEP) through interaction with cellular chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein. In this study, we experimentally demonstrated that the compound targets the nuclear export of vRNP. Moreover, a single mutation (aspartate to glycine) at amino acid position 54 in M1 [M1(D54G)] was detected after 18 passages in the presence of KR-23502 with a 2-fold increase in 50% effective concentration indicating that this compound has a relatively high genetic barrier to resistance. Interestingly, it was observed that proteasome-mediated degradation of M1(D54G) was attenuated by KR-23502. In conclusion, we suggest that KR-23502 shows its anti-influenza activity by downregulating NEP/CRM1-mediated nuclear export of influenza vRNP and M1. KR-23502 provides a core chemical skeleton for further structure-based design of novel antivirals against influenza viruses.

  9. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K is a Novel Regulator of Androgen Receptor Translation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Nishit K; Kim, Jayoung; Cinar, Bekir; Ramachandran, Aruna; Hager, Martin H; Di Vizio, Dolores; Adam, Rosalyn M; Rubin, Mark A; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Freeman, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression in prostate cancer (PCa) is still poorly understood. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in PCa cells was previously shown to lower AR expression by a rapamycin-sensitive, post-transcriptional mechanism involving the AR mRNA 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR). In a search for an intermediate within the EGFR/PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway that regulates AR at this site, we identified the nucleic acid binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K), by mass spectrometric analysis of Akt immune complexes from lipid raft-enriched subcellular fractions. We show here that hnRNP-K is a novel inhibitor of AR mRNA translation that regulates androgen-responsive gene expression and PCa cell proliferation. A functional hnRNP-K binding site involved in down-regulating AR protein levels was identified in the AR mRNA 5′-UTR. Further analysis revealed that hnRNP-K is also able to inhibit AR translation in the absence of the 5′-UTR, consistent with the presence of additional predicted hnRNP-K binding sites within the AR open reading frame and in the 3′-UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of a human PCa tissue microarray revealed an inverse correlation between hnRNP-K expression and AR protein levels in organ-confined PCa tumors and a substantial decline in cytoplasmic hnRNP-K in metastases, despite an overall increase in hnRNP-K levels in metastatic tumors. These data suggest that translational inhibition of AR by hnRNP-K may occur in organ-confined tumors but possibly at a reduced level in metastases. HnRNP-K is the first protein identified that directly interacts with and regulates the AR translational apparatus. PMID:19258514

  10. In vitro reconstitution and activity of a C/D box methylation guide ribonucleoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Arina D.; Ziesche, Sonia; Ebhardt, Holger; Dennis, Patrick P.

    2002-01-01

    The genomes of hyperthermophilic Archaea encode dozens of methylation guide, C/D box small RNAs that guide 2′-O-methylation of ribose to specific sites in rRNA and various tRNAs. The genes encoding the Sulfolobus homologues of eukaryotic proteins that are known to be present in C/D box small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) complexes were cloned, and the proteins (aFIB, aNOP56, and aL7a) were expressed and purified. The purified proteins along with an in vitro transcript of the Sulfolobus sR1 small RNA were reconstituted in vitro, into an RNP complex. The order of assembly of the three proteins onto the RNA was aL7a, aNOP56, and aFIB. The complex was active in targeting S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-dependent, site-specific 2′-O-methylation of ribose to a short fragment of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) that was complementary to the D box guide region of the sR1 small RNA. The presence of aFIB was essential for methylation; mutant proteins having amino acid replacements in the SAM-binding motif of aFIB were able to assemble into an RNP complex, but the resulting complexes were defective in methylation activity. These experiments define the minimal number of components and the conditions required to achieve in vitro RNA guide-directed 2′-O-methylation of ribose in a target RNA. PMID:11959980

  11. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation. PMID:28106162

  12. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    DOE PAGES

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; ...

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9more » RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.« less

  13. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E; Haliburton, Genevieve E; Ye, Chun J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marson, Alexander

    2015-08-18

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently "knock out" genes and "knock in" targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4(+) T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  14. Protein and gene expression characteristics of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Lin; Liu, Fei; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Xiao-Hang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression characteristics of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRNPH1) mRNA and protein in cell lines and tissues of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS Western blotting was used to assess the expression of HNRNPH1 protein in seven ESCC cell lines and 30 paired fresh tissue specimens. The subcellular localization of HNRNPH1 was determined by immunofluorescence in ESCC cells. The RNA sequencing data from 87 patients with ESCC were obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA), and the expression and clinical characteristics analysis of different transcript variants of HNRNPH1 were evaluated in this dataset. In addition, immunohistochemistry was carried out to detect the expression of HNRNPH1 protein in 125 patients. RESULTS The expression of HNRNPH1 protein varied across different ESCC cell lines. It was exclusively restricted to the nucleus of the ESCC cells. There are two transcript variants of the HNRNPH1 gene. Variant 1 was constitutively expressed, and its expression did not change during tumorigenesis. In contrast, levels of variant 2 were low in non-tumorous tissues and were dramatically increased in ESCC (P = 0.0026). The high levels of variant 2 were associated with poorer differentiated tumors (P = 0.0287). Furthermore, in paired fresh tissue specimens, HNRNPH1 protein was overexpressed in 73.3% (22/30) of neoplastic tissues. HNRNPH1 was significantly upregulated in ESCC, with strong staining in 43.2% (54/125) of tumor tissues and 22.4% (28/125) of matched non-cancerous tissues (P = 0.0005). Positive HNRNPH1 expression was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation degree (P = 0.0337). CONCLUSION The different alternative transcript variants of HNRNPH1 exhibited different expression changes during tumorigenesis. Its mRNA and protein were overexpressed in ESCC and associated with poorer differentiation of tumor cells. These findings highlight the potential of HNRNPH1 in the therapy and diagnosis

  15. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells. PMID:26216948

  16. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K Interacts with Abi-1 at Postsynaptic Sites and Modulates Dendritic Spine Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Proepper, Christian; Steinestel, Konrad; Schmeisser, Michael J.; Heinrich, Jutta; Steinestel, Julie; Bockmann, Juergen; Liebau, Stefan; Boeckers, Tobias M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Abelson-interacting protein 1 (Abi-1) plays an important role for dendritic branching and synapse formation in the central nervous system. It is localized at the postsynaptic density (PSD) and rapidly translocates to the nucleus upon synaptic stimulation. At PSDs Abi-1 is in a complex with several other proteins including WASP/WAVE or cortactin thereby regulating the actin cytoskeleton via the Arp 2/3 complex. Principal Findings We identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK), a 65 kDa ssDNA/RNA-binding-protein that is involved in multiple intracellular signaling cascades, as a binding partner of Abi-1 at postsynaptic sites. The interaction with the Abi-1 SH3 domain is mediated by the hnRNPK-interaction (KI) domain. We further show that during brain development, hnRNPK expression becomes more and more restricted to granule cells of the cerebellum and hippocampal neurons where it localizes in the cell nucleus as well as in the spine/dendritic compartment. The downregulation of hnRNPK in cultured hippocampal neurons by RNAi results in an enlarged dendritic tree and a significant increase in filopodia formation. This is accompanied by a decrease in the number of mature synapses. Both effects therefore mimic the neuronal morphology after downregulation of Abi-1 mRNA in neurons. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a novel interplay between hnRNPK and Abi-1 in the nucleus and at synaptic sites and show obvious similarities regarding both protein knockdown phenotypes. This indicates that hnRNPK and Abi-1 act synergistic in a multiprotein complex that regulates the crucial balance between filopodia formation and synaptic maturation in neurons. PMID:22102872

  17. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein k interacts with Abi-1 at postsynaptic sites and modulates dendritic spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Proepper, Christian; Steinestel, Konrad; Schmeisser, Michael J; Heinrich, Jutta; Steinestel, Julie; Bockmann, Juergen; Liebau, Stefan; Boeckers, Tobias M

    2011-01-01

    Abelson-interacting protein 1 (Abi-1) plays an important role for dendritic branching and synapse formation in the central nervous system. It is localized at the postsynaptic density (PSD) and rapidly translocates to the nucleus upon synaptic stimulation. At PSDs Abi-1 is in a complex with several other proteins including WASP/WAVE or cortactin thereby regulating the actin cytoskeleton via the Arp 2/3 complex. We identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK), a 65 kDa ssDNA/RNA-binding-protein that is involved in multiple intracellular signaling cascades, as a binding partner of Abi-1 at postsynaptic sites. The interaction with the Abi-1 SH3 domain is mediated by the hnRNPK-interaction (KI) domain. We further show that during brain development, hnRNPK expression becomes more and more restricted to granule cells of the cerebellum and hippocampal neurons where it localizes in the cell nucleus as well as in the spine/dendritic compartment. The downregulation of hnRNPK in cultured hippocampal neurons by RNAi results in an enlarged dendritic tree and a significant increase in filopodia formation. This is accompanied by a decrease in the number of mature synapses. Both effects therefore mimic the neuronal morphology after downregulation of Abi-1 mRNA in neurons. Our findings demonstrate a novel interplay between hnRNPK and Abi-1 in the nucleus and at synaptic sites and show obvious similarities regarding both protein knockdown phenotypes. This indicates that hnRNPK and Abi-1 act synergistic in a multiprotein complex that regulates the crucial balance between filopodia formation and synaptic maturation in neurons.

  18. Arabidopsis CML38, a Calcium Sensor That Localizes to Ribonucleoprotein Complexes under Hypoxia Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Carlee; Li, Tian

    2016-01-01

    During waterlogging and the associated oxygen deprivation stress, plants respond by the induction of adaptive programs, including the redirected expression of gene networks toward the synthesis of core hypoxia-response proteins. Among these core response proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is the calcium sensor CML38, a protein related to regulator of gene silencing calmodulin-like proteins (rgsCaMs). CML38 transcripts are up-regulated more than 300-fold in roots within 6 h of hypoxia treatment. Transfer DNA insertional mutants of CML38 show an enhanced sensitivity to hypoxia stress, with lowered survival and more severe inhibition of root and shoot growth. By using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) translational fusions, CML38 protein was found to be localized to cytosolic granule structures similar in morphology to hypoxia-induced stress granules. Immunoprecipitation of CML38 from the roots of hypoxia-challenged transgenic plants harboring CML38pro::CML38:YFP followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of protein targets associated with messenger RNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes including stress granules, which are known to accumulate as messenger RNA storage and triage centers during hypoxia. This finding is further supported by the colocalization of CML38 with the mRNP stress granule marker RNA Binding Protein 47 (RBP47) upon cotransfection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Ruthenium Red treatment results in the loss of CML38 signal in cytosolic granules, suggesting that calcium is necessary for stress granule association. These results confirm that CML38 is a core hypoxia response calcium sensor protein and suggest that it serves as a potential calcium signaling target within stress granules and other mRNPs that accumulate during flooding stress responses. PMID:26634999

  19. Large-Scale Analysis of Kinase Signaling in Yeast Pseudohyphal Development Identifies Regulation of Ribonucleoprotein Granules.

    PubMed

    Shively, Christian A; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Norman, Kaitlyn L; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Xu, Tao; Sheidy, Daniel T; Dobry, Craig J; Sabath, Ivan; Cosky, Eric E P; Tran, Elizabeth J; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Andrews, Philip C; Kumar, Anuj

    2015-10-01

    Yeast pseudohyphal filamentation is a stress-responsive growth transition relevant to processes required for virulence in pathogenic fungi. Pseudohyphal growth is controlled through a regulatory network encompassing conserved MAPK (Ste20p, Ste11p, Ste7p, Kss1p, and Fus3p), protein kinase A (Tpk2p), Elm1p, and Snf1p kinase pathways; however, the scope of these pathways is not fully understood. Here, we implemented quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify each of these signaling networks, generating a kinase-dead mutant in filamentous S. cerevisiae and surveying for differential phosphorylation. By this approach, we identified 439 phosphoproteins dependent upon pseudohyphal growth kinases. We report novel phosphorylation sites in 543 peptides, including phosphorylated residues in Ras2p and Flo8p required for wild-type filamentous growth. Phosphoproteins in these kinase signaling networks were enriched for ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components, and we observe co-localization of Kss1p, Fus3p, Ste20p, and Tpk2p with the RNP component Igo1p. These kinases localize in puncta with GFP-visualized mRNA, and KSS1 is required for wild-type levels of mRNA localization in RNPs. Kss1p pathway activity is reduced in lsm1Δ/Δ and pat1Δ/Δ strains, and these genes encoding P-body proteins are epistatic to STE7. The P-body protein Dhh1p is also required for hyphal development in Candida albicans. Collectively, this study presents a wealth of data identifying the yeast phosphoproteome in pseudohyphal growth and regulatory interrelationships between pseudohyphal growth kinases and RNPs.

  20. Eubacterial components similar to small nuclear ribonucleoproteins: identification of immunoprecipitable proteins and capped RNAs in a cyanobacterium and a gram-positive eubacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, S A; O'Neil, J; Watcharapijarn, J; Moe-Kirvan, C; Vijay, S; Silva, V

    1993-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles play an important role in the processing of pre-mRNA. snRNPs have been identified immunologically in a variety of cells, but none have ever been observed in prokaryotic systems. This report provides the first evidence for the presence of snRNP-like components in two types of prokaryotic cells: those of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis and those of the gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus subtilis. These components consist of snRNP-immunoreactive proteins and RNAs, including some with the snRNP-unique 5' m2,2,7G (m3G) cap. Immunoreactivity was determined by immunoprecipitation procedures, with either antinuclear-antibody-positive (RNP- and Sm-monospecific) patient sera or a m3G monoclonal antibody, with radiolabelled cell extracts that were preadsorbed with antinuclear-antibody-negative sera. S. leopoliensis immunoprecipitates showed the presence of high-molecular-mass proteins (14 to 70 kDa) and RNAs (138 to 243 nucleotides) that are analogous in size to proteins and RNAs found in human (HEp-2) cell immunoprecipitates but absent in Escherichia coli immunoprecipitates. Thin-layer chromatography of S. leopoliensis immunoprecipitates confirmed the presence of a capped nucleotide similar to a capped nucleotide in HEp-2 immunoprecipitates; no such nucleotide was observed in E. coli immunoprecipitates. Immunoreactive RNAs (117-170 nucleotides) were identified in a second eubacterium, B. subtilis, as well. This work suggests that snRNPs or their evolutionary predecessors predate the emergence of eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:8458830

  1. A distinct mechanism for the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex of the Tomato spotted wilt virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Liu, Baocheng; Ding, Zhenzhen; Li, Guobang; Liu, Meizi; Zhu, Dantong; Sun, Yuna; Dong, Shishang; Lou, Zhiyong

    2017-09-13

    The tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) belongs to the Tospovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family and represents the sole plant-infecting group within bunyavirus. TSWV encodes a nucleocapsid protein (N) which encapsidates the RNA genome to form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). In addition, the N has multiple roles during the infection of plant cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of the full-length TSWV N. The N features a body domain consisting of an N- and C-lobe. These lobes clamp a positively charged groove which may constitute the RNA binding site. Furthermore, the body domains are flanked by N- and C-terminal arms which mediate homotypic interactions to the neighboring subunits, resulting in a ring-shaped N trimer. Interestingly, the C-terminus of one protomer forms an additional interaction with the protomer of an adjacent trimer in the crystal, which may constitute a higher-order oligomerization contact. In this way, this study provides insights into the structure and trimeric assembly of TSWV N which help to explain previous functional findings, but also suggests distinct N interactions within a higher-order RNP.Importance TSWV is one of the most devastating plant pathogens that cause severe diseases in numerous agronomic and ornamental crops worldwide. TSWV is also the prototypic member of the Tospovirus genus, which is the sole group of plant-infecting viruses in bunyavirus family. This study determined the structure of full-length TSWV N in an oligomeric state. The structural observations explain previously identified biological properties of TSWV N. Most importantly, the additional homotypic interaction between the C-terminus of one protomer with another protomer indicates there is a distinct mechanism of RNP formation in the bunyavirus family, thereby enhancing current knowledge of --ssRNA virus-encoded N. TSWV N is the last remaining representative N with an unknown structure in the bunyavirus family. Combined with previous studies, the

  2. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and G inhibits the transcription of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sheng; Korzan, Wayne J.; Chen, Chun-Chun; Fernald, Russell D.

    2008-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) causes the release of gonadotropins from the pituitary to control reproduction. Here we report that two heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP-A/B and hnRNP-G) bind to the GnRH-I upstream promoter region in a cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni. We identified these binding proteins using a newly developed homology based method of mass spectrometric peptide mapping. We show that both hnRNP-A/B and hnRNP-G co-localize with GnRH1 in the pre-optic area of the hypothalamus in the brain. We also demonstrated that these ribonucleoproteins exhibit similar binding capacity in vivo, using immortalized mouse GT1-7 cells where overexpression of either hnRNP-A/B or hnRNP-G significantly down-regulate GnRH1 mRNA levels in GT1-7 cells, suggesting that both act as repressors in GnRH1 transcriptional regulation. PMID:17920292

  3. Affinity purification of influenza virus ribonucleoprotein complexes from the chromatin of infected cells.

    PubMed

    Chase, Geoffrey P; Schwemmle, Martin

    2012-06-03

    Like all negative-strand RNA viruses, the genome of influenza viruses is packaged in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNP), in which the single-stranded genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (NP), and associated with the trimeric polymerase complex consisting of the PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits. However, in contrast to most RNA viruses, influenza viruses perform viral RNA synthesis in the nuclei of infected cells. Interestingly, viral mRNA synthesis uses cellular pre-mRNAs as primers, and it has been proposed that this process takes place on chromatin. Interactions between the viral polymerase and the host RNA polymerase II, as well as between NP and host nucleosomes have also been characterized. Recently, the generation of recombinant influenza viruses encoding a One-Strep-Tag genetically fused to the C-terminus of the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase (rWSN-PB2-Strep) has been described. These recombinant viruses allow the purification of PB2-containing complexes, including vRNPs, from infected cells. To obtain purified vRNPs, cell cultures are infected, and vRNPs are affinity purified from lysates derived from these cells. However, the lysis procedures used to date have been based on one-step detergent lysis, which, despite the presence of a general nuclease, often extract chromatin-bound material only inefficiently. Our preliminary work suggested that a large portion of nuclear vRNPs were not extracted during traditional cell lysis, and therefore could not be affinity purified. To increase this extraction efficiency, and to separate chromatin-bound from non-chromatin-bound nuclear vRNPs, we adapted a step-wise subcellular extraction protocol to influenza virus-infected cells. Briefly, this procedure first separates the nuclei from the cell and then extracts soluble nuclear proteins (here termed the "nucleoplasmic" fraction). The remaining insoluble nuclear material is then digested with Benzonase, an unspecific DNA/RNA nuclease, followed by

  4. Targeting a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the caprin-1 protein and the c-Myc mRNA suppresses tumor growth in mice: an identification of a novel oncotarget.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ya-Qi; Yang, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Yue-Zhi; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Lee, Chih-Hao; Hsu, Hsing-Yu; Chang, Chien-Chung; Lee, Shiow-Ju

    2015-02-10

    Tylophorine compounds have been the focus of drug development for decades. Tylophorine derivatives exhibit anti-cancer activities but their cellular targets remain unknown. We used a biotinylated tylophorine derivative to probe for the interacting cellular target(s) of tylophorine. Tylophorine directly binds to caprin-1 and consequently enhances the recruitment of G3BP1, c-Myc mRNA, and cyclin D2 mRNA to form a ribonucleoprotein complex. Subsequently, this tylophorine targeted ribonucleoprotein complex is sequestered to the polysomal fractions and the protein expressions of the associated mRNA-transcripts are repressed. Caprin-1 depleted carcinoma cells become more resistant to tylophorine, associated with decreased formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex targeted by tylophorine. Consequently, tylophorine downregulates c-Myc and cyclins D1/D2, causing hypophosphorylation of Rb and suppression of both processing-body formation and the Warburg effect. Gene expression profiling and gain-of-c-Myc-function experiments also revealed that the downregulated c-Myc contributes to the anti-oncogenic effects of tylophorine compounds. Furthermore, the potent tylophorine derivative dibenzoquinoline-33b elicited a similar effect, as c-Myc protein levels were also decreased in xenograft tumors treated with dibenzoquinoline-33b. Thus, tylophorine compounds exert anti-cancer activity predominantly by targeting and sequestering the caprin-1 protein and c-Myc mRNA associated ribonucleoprotein complex.

  5. Targeting a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the caprin-1 protein and the c-Myc mRNA suppresses tumor growth in mice: an identification of a novel oncotarget

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ya-Qi; Yang, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Yue-Zhi; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Lee, Chih-Hao; Hsu, Hsing-Yu; Chang, Chien-Chung; Lee, Shiow-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Tylophorine compounds have been the focus of drug development for decades. Tylophorine derivatives exhibit anti-cancer activities but their cellular targets remain unknown. We used a biotinylated tylophorine derivative to probe for the interacting cellular target(s) of tylophorine. Tylophorine directly binds to caprin-1 and consequently enhances the recruitment of G3BP1, c-Myc mRNA, and cyclin D2 mRNA to form a ribonucleoprotein complex. Subsequently, this tylophorine targeted ribonucleoprotein complex is sequestered to the polysomal fractions and the protein expressions of the associated mRNA-transcripts are repressed. Caprin-1 depleted carcinoma cells become more resistant to tylophorine, associated with decreased formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex targeted by tylophorine. Consequently, tylophorine downregulates c-Myc and cyclins D1/D2, causing hypophosphorylation of Rb and suppression of both processing-body formation and the Warburg effect. Gene expression profiling and gain-of-c-Myc-function experiments also revealed that the downregulated c-Myc contributes to the anti-oncogenic effects of tylophorine compounds. Furthermore, the potent tylophorine derivative dibenzoquinoline-33b elicited a similar effect, as c-Myc protein levels were also decreased in xenograft tumors treated with dibenzoquinoline-33b. Thus, tylophorine compounds exert anti-cancer activity predominantly by targeting and sequestering the caprin-1 protein and c-Myc mRNA associated ribonucleoprotein complex. PMID:25669982

  6. Comparative study of two box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine-synthases: relation between conformational dynamics of the guide RNA, enzyme assembly and activity.

    PubMed

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Tillault, Anne-Sophie; Blaud, Magali; Leclerc, Fabrice; Branlant, Christiane; Charpentier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA) is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10-L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21.

  7. Testing a Parachute for Mars in World Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-20

    The team developing the landing system for NASA Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

  8. Functional Consequences of RNA 5'-Terminal Deletions on Coxsackievirus B3 RNA Replication and Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Nicolas; Garcia, Magali; Bouin, Alexis; Nguyen, Joseph H C; Tran, Genevieve P; Andreoletti, Laurent; Semler, Bert L

    2017-08-15

    Group B coxsackieviruses are responsible for chronic cardiac infections. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the virus can persist in the human heart long after the signs of acute myocarditis have abated are still not completely understood. Recently, coxsackievirus B3 strains with 5'-terminal deletions in genomic RNAs were isolated from a patient suffering from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, suggesting that such mutant viruses may be the forms responsible for persistent infection. These deletions lacked portions of 5' stem-loop I, which is an RNA secondary structure required for viral RNA replication. In this study, we assessed the consequences of the genomic deletions observed in vivo for coxsackievirus B3 biology. Using cell extracts from HeLa cells, as well as transfection of luciferase replicons in two types of cardiomyocytes, we demonstrated that coxsackievirus RNAs harboring 5' deletions ranging from 7 to 49 nucleotides in length can be translated nearly as efficiently as those of wild-type virus. However, these 5' deletions greatly reduced the synthesis of viral RNA in vitro, which was detected only for the 7- and 21-nucleotide deletions. Since 5' stem-loop I RNA forms a ribonucleoprotein complex with cellular and viral proteins involved in viral RNA replication, we investigated the binding of the host cell protein PCBP2, as well as viral protein 3CD(pro), to deleted positive-strand RNAs corresponding to the 5' end. We found that binding of these proteins was conserved but that ribonucleoprotein complex formation required higher PCBP2 and 3CD(pro) concentrations, depending on the size of the deletion. Overall, this study confirmed the characteristics of persistent CVB3 infection observed in heart tissues and provided a possible explanation for the low level of RNA replication observed for the 5'-deleted viral genomes-a less stable ribonucleoprotein complex formed with proteins involved in viral RNA replication.IMPORTANCE Dilated cardiomyopathy is

  9. Nuclear export of the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein complex: Interaction of Hsc70 with viral proteins M1 and NS2.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ken; Shimizu, Teppei; Noda, Saiko; Tsukahara, Fujiko; Maru, Yoshiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The influenza virus replicates in the host cell nucleus, and the progeny viral ribonucleoprotein complex (vRNP) is exported to the cytoplasm prior to maturation. NS2 has a nuclear export signal that mediates the nuclear export of vRNP by the vRNP-M1-NS2 complex. We previously reported that the heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) protein binds to M1 protein and mediates vRNP export. However, the interactions among M1, NS2, and Hsc70 are poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that Hsc70 interacts with M1 more strongly than with NS2 and competes with NS2 for M1 binding, suggesting an important role of Hsc70 in the nuclear export of vRNP.

  10. Physical and Functional Interaction between Heterochromatin Protein 1α and the RNA-binding Protein Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein U*

    PubMed Central

    Ameyar-Zazoua, Maya; Souidi, Mouloud; Fritsch, Lauriane; Robin, Philippe; Thomas, Audrey; Hamiche, Ali; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Harel-Bellan, Annick

    2009-01-01

    By combining biochemical purification and mass spectrometry, we identified proteins associated with human heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α) both in the nucleoplasm and in chromatin. Some of these are RNA-binding proteins, and among them is the protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U)/SAF-A, which is linked to chromatin organization and transcriptional regulation. Here, we demonstrate that hnRNP U is a bona fide HP1α-interacting molecule. More importantly, hnRNP U depletion reduces HP1α-dependent gene silencing and disturbs HP1α subcellular localization. Thus, our data demonstrate that hnRNP U is involved in HP1α function, shedding new light on the mode of action of HP1α and on the function of hnRNP U. PMID:19617346

  11. Influenza Virus-Induced Caspase-Dependent Enlargement of Nuclear Pores Promotes Nuclear Export of Viral Ribonucleoprotein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mühlbauer, Dirk; Dzieciolowski, Julia; Hardt, Martin; Hocke, Andreas; Schierhorn, Kristina L.; Mostafa, Ahmed; Müller, Christin; Wisskirchen, Christian; Herold, Susanne; Wolff, Thorsten; Ziebuhr, John

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses (IAV) replicate their segmented RNA genome in the nucleus of infected cells and utilize caspase-dependent nucleocytoplasmic export mechanisms to transport newly formed ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) to the site of infectious virion release at the plasma membrane. In this study, we obtained evidence that apoptotic caspase activation in IAV-infected cells is associated with the degradation of the nucleoporin Nup153, an integral subunit of the nuclear pore complex. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed a distinct enlargement of nuclear pores in IAV-infected cells. Transient expression and subcellular accumulation studies of multimeric marker proteins in virus-infected cells provided additional evidence for increased nuclear pore diameters facilitating the translocation of large protein complexes across the nuclear membrane. Furthermore, caspase 3/7 inhibition data obtained in this study suggest that active, Crm1-dependent IAV RNP export mechanisms are increasingly complemented by passive, caspase-induced export mechanisms at later stages of infection. IMPORTANCE In contrast to the process seen with most other RNA viruses, influenza virus genome replication occurs in the nucleus (rather than the cytoplasm) of infected cells. Therefore, completion of the viral replication cycle critically depends on intracellular transport mechanisms that ensure the translocation of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes across the nuclear membrane. Here, we demonstrate that virus-induced cellular caspase activities cause a widening of nuclear pores, thereby facilitating nucleocytoplasmic translocation processes and, possibly, promoting nuclear export of newly synthesized RNPs. These passive transport mechanisms are suggested to complement Crm1-dependent RNP export mechanisms known to occur at early stages of the replication cycle and may contribute to highly efficient production of infectious virus progeny at late stages of the viral

  12. Direct Recruitment of ERK Cascade Components to Inducible Genes Is Regulated by Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K*

    PubMed Central

    Mikula, Michal; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2011-01-01

    Components of the ERK cascade are recruited to genes, but it remains unknown how they are regulated at these sites. The RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K interacts with kinases and is found along genes including the mitogen-inducible early response gene EGR-1. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitations to study co-recruitment of hnRNP K and ERK cascade activity along the EGR-1 gene. These measurements revealed that the spatiotemporal binding patterns of ERK cascade transducers (GRB2, SOS, B-Raf, MEK, and ERK) at the EGR-1 locus resemble both hnRNP K and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Inhibition of EGR-1 transcription with either serum-responsive factor knockdown or 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole altered recruitment of all of the above ERK cascade components along this locus that mirrored the changes in Pol II and hnRNP K profiles. siRNA knockdown of hnRNP K decreased the levels of active MEK and ERK at the EGR-1, changes associated with decreased levels of elongating pre-mRNA and less efficient splicing. The hnRNP K dependence and pattern of ERK cascade activation at the c-MYC locus were different from at EGR-1. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitations revealed that hnRNP K was associated with the EGR-1 but not c-MYC mRNAs. These data suggest a model where Pol II transcription-driven recruitment of hnRNP K along the EGR-1 locus compartmentalizes activation of the ERK cascade at these genes, events that regulate synthesis of mature mRNA. PMID:21233203

  13. RIBOSOME PRECURSOR PARTICLES IN NUCLEOLI

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Ming C.; Perry, Robert P.

    1969-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles containing the precursors of ribosomal RNA were extracted from L cell nucleoli and analyzed under conditions comparable to those used in the characterization of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Using nucleoli from cells suitably labeled with 3H-uridine, we detected three basic RNP components, sedimenting at approximately 62S, 78S, and 110S in sucrose gradients containing magnesium. A fourth particle, sedimenting at about 95S, appears to be a dimer of the 62S and 78S components. When centrifuged in gradients containing EDTA, the 62S, 78S, and 110S particles sediment at about 55S, 65S, and 80S, respectively. RNA was extracted from RNP particles which were prepared by two cycles of zonal centrifugation. The 62S particles yielded 32S RNA and a detectable amount of 28S RNA, the 78S structures, 32S RNA and possibly some 36S RNA, and the 110S particles, a mixture of 45S, 36S, and 32S RNA's. When cells were pulsed briefly and further incubated in the presence of actinomycin D, there was a gradual shift of radioactivity from heavier to lighter particles. This observation is consistent with the scheme of maturation: 110S → 78S → 62S. The principal buoyant densities in cesium chloride of the 110S, 78S, and 62S particles are 1.465, 1.490, and 1.545, respectively. These densities are all significantly lower than 1.570, which is characteristic of the mature large subunit of cytoplasmic ribosomes, suggesting that the precursor particles have a relatively higher ratio of protein to RNA, and that ribosome maturation involves, in addition to decrease in the size of the RNA molecules, a progressive decrease in the proportion of associated protein. PMID:5815062

  14. Molecular definition of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) using autoimmune antibody: immunological relationship with hnRNP P.

    PubMed

    Hassfeld, W; Chan, E K; Mathison, D A; Portman, D; Dreyfuss, G; Steiner, G; Tan, E M

    1998-01-15

    Serum from a patient showing symptoms related to autoimmunity was found to contain autoantibodies to the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and to several novel nuclear antigens with estimated molecular weights of 40, 43, 72, 74 and 82 kDa. Using this serum for screening a human cDNA expression library a 2.5 kb cDNA clone was isolated which encoded the complete sequence of a protein of 633 amino acids. Sequence analysis revealed a modular structure of the protein: an acidic N-terminal region of approximately 150 amino acids was followed by three adjacent consensus sequence RNA binding domains located in the central part of the protein. In the C-terminal portion a nuclear localization signal and an octapeptide (PPPRMPPP) with similarity to a major B cell epitope of the snRNP core protein B were identified. This was followed by a glycine- and arginine-rich section of approximately 120 amino acids forming another type of RNA binding motif, a RGG box. Interestingly, three copies of a tyrosine-rich decapeptide were found interspersed in the RGG box region. The major in vitro translation product of the cDNA co-migrated in SDS-PAGE with the 82 kDa polypeptide that was recognized by autoantibodies. The structural motifs as well as the immunofluorescence pattern generated by anti-82 kDa antibodies suggested that the antigen was one of the proteins of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complex. Subsequently the 82 kDa antigen was identified as hnRNP R protein by its presence in immunoprecipitated hnRNP complexes and co-migration of the recombinant protein with this hitherto uncharacterized hnRNP constituent in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The concomitant autoimmune response to a hnRNP component of the pre-mRNA processing machinery and to NuMA, a protein engaged in mitotic events and reported to be associated with mRNA splicing complexes in interphase, may indicate physical and functional association of these antigens. Support for this notion

  15. Afterglows from the largest explosions in the universe

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1999-01-01

    The distinction of “largest explosions in the universe” has been bestowed on cosmic gamma-ray bursts. Their afterglows are brighter than supernovae and therefore are called hypernovae. Photometry and spectroscopy of these afterglows have provided major breakthroughs in our understanding of this mysterious phenomenon. PMID:10220364

  16. Animals as Our Companions: World's Largest Math Event 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Inc., Reston, VA.

    The World's Largest Math Event 6 (WLME 6) is the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) celebration of mathematics and mathematics education and is the highlight of Mathematics Education Month. This year's event, slated for April 28, 2000, features the theme "Animals as Our Companions". This theme encourages students to…

  17. Building Earth's Largest Library: Driving into the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Steve

    1999-01-01

    Examines the Amazon.com online bookstore as a blueprint for designing the world's largest library. Topics include selection; accessibility and convenience; quality of Web sites and search tools; personalized service; library collection development, including interlibrary loan; library catalogs and catalog records; a circulation system; costs;…

  18. Analysis of human standing balance by largest lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang; Taha, Zahari

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyse the relationship between nonlinear dynamic character and individuals' standing balance by the largest Lyapunov exponent, which is regarded as a metric for assessing standing balance. According to previous study, the largest Lyapunov exponent from centre of pressure time series could not well quantify the human balance ability. In this research, two improvements were made. Firstly, an external stimulus was applied to feet in the form of continuous horizontal sinusoidal motion by a moving platform. Secondly, a multiaccelerometer subsystem was adopted. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in this experiment. A new metric, coordinated largest Lyapunov exponent was proposed, which reflected the relationship of body segments by integrating multidimensional largest Lyapunov exponent values. By using this metric in actual standing performance under sinusoidal stimulus, an obvious relationship between the new metric and the actual balance ability was found in the majority of the subjects. These results show that the sinusoidal stimulus can make human balance characteristics more obvious, which is beneficial to assess balance, and balance is determined by the ability of coordinating all body segments.

  19. Analysis of Human Standing Balance by Largest Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang; Taha, Zahari

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyse the relationship between nonlinear dynamic character and individuals' standing balance by the largest Lyapunov exponent, which is regarded as a metric for assessing standing balance. According to previous study, the largest Lyapunov exponent from centre of pressure time series could not well quantify the human balance ability. In this research, two improvements were made. Firstly, an external stimulus was applied to feet in the form of continuous horizontal sinusoidal motion by a moving platform. Secondly, a multiaccelerometer subsystem was adopted. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in this experiment. A new metric, coordinated largest Lyapunov exponent was proposed, which reflected the relationship of body segments by integrating multidimensional largest Lyapunov exponent values. By using this metric in actual standing performance under sinusoidal stimulus, an obvious relationship between the new metric and the actual balance ability was found in the majority of the subjects. These results show that the sinusoidal stimulus can make human balance characteristics more obvious, which is beneficial to assess balance, and balance is determined by the ability of coordinating all body segments. PMID:25866500

  20. NAFTA: The World's Largest Trading Zone Turns 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrarini, Tawni Hunt; Day, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Everyone under the age of 20 who has grown up in North America has lived in the common market created by NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement. In a zone linking the United States, Canada, and Mexico, most goods and investments flow freely across borders to users, consumers, and investors. In 1994, NAFTA created the largest relatively…

  1. NAFTA: The World's Largest Trading Zone Turns 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrarini, Tawni Hunt; Day, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Everyone under the age of 20 who has grown up in North America has lived in the common market created by NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement. In a zone linking the United States, Canada, and Mexico, most goods and investments flow freely across borders to users, consumers, and investors. In 1994, NAFTA created the largest relatively…

  2. 360 Video Tour of the World’s Largest Laser

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-15

    Welcome to the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the world’s largest and most energetic laser system. It draws researchers from around the globe for experiments that can’t be conducted anywhere else on Earth. Let’s take a closer look.

  3. The Single Largest Education Donor Comes with Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    For the last decade, in districts big and small, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has emerged as the largest private funder of educational efforts. This began with an initiative around small schools in the early to mid-2000s, mostly abandoned now, and has gained traction in the past few years in areas such as teacher evaluation, the Common…

  4. Cassini sheds light on Titan's second largest lake, Ligeia Mare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is known for its dense, planet-like atmosphere and large lakes most likely made of methane and ethane. It has been suggested that Titan's atmosphere and surface are a model of early Earth. Since the early 2000s, NASA's Cassini space probe has been unlocking secrets of the distant moon.

  5. The Single Largest Education Donor Comes with Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    For the last decade, in districts big and small, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has emerged as the largest private funder of educational efforts. This began with an initiative around small schools in the early to mid-2000s, mostly abandoned now, and has gained traction in the past few years in areas such as teacher evaluation, the Common…

  6. The Power of Nature. World's Largest Math Event 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Inc., Reston, VA.

    The theme of the fifth annual World's Largest Math Event (WLME 5) is "The Power of Nature." This theme encourages students to explore natural forces that affect humankind, including phenomena such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and snowstorms, and the mathematics that underlies their study. The 15 activities for WLMES have been grouped into five…

  7. Influenza A virus ribonucleoproteins modulate host recycling by competing with Rab11 effectors.

    PubMed

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Alenquer, Marta; Sousa, Ana Laura; Kellen, Bárbara; Ramalho, José; Tranfield, Erin M; Amorim, Maria João

    2016-04-15

    Influenza A virus assembly is an unclear process, whereby individual virion components form an infectious particle. The segmented nature of the influenza A genome imposes a problem to assembly because it requires packaging of eight distinct RNA particles (vRNPs). It also allows genome mixing from distinct parental strains, events associated with influenza pandemic outbreaks. It is important to public health to understand how segmented genomes assemble, a process that is dependent on the transport of components to assembly sites. Previously, it has been shown that vRNPs are carried by recycling endosome vesicles, resulting in a change of Rab11 distribution. Here, we describe that vRNP binding to recycling endosomes impairs recycling endosome function, by competing for Rab11 binding with family-interacting proteins, and that there is a causal relationship between Rab11 ability to recruit family-interacting proteins and Rab11 redistribution. This competition reduces recycling sorting at an unclear step, resulting in clustering of single- and double-membraned vesicles. These morphological changes in Rab11 membranes are indicative of alterations in protein and lipid homeostasis during infection. Vesicular clustering creates hotspots of the vRNPs that need to interact to form an infectious particle. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Human RNase P ribonucleoprotein is required for formation of initiation complexes of RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Serruya, Raphael; Orlovetskie, Natalie; Reiner, Robert; Dehtiar-Zilber, Yana; Wesolowski, Donna; Altman, Sidney; Jarrous, Nayef

    2015-01-01

    Human RNase P is implicated in transcription of small non-coding RNA genes by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but the precise role of this ribonucleoprotein therein remains unknown. We here show that targeted destruction of HeLa nuclear RNase P inhibits transcription of 5S rRNA genes in whole cell extracts, if this precedes the stage of initiation complex formation. Biochemical purification analyses further reveal that this ribonucleoprotein is recruited to 5S rRNA genes as a part of proficient initiation complexes and the activity persists at reinitiation. Knockdown of RNase P abolishes the assembly of initiation complexes by preventing the formation of the initiation sub-complex of Pol III. Our results demonstrate that the structural intactness, but not the endoribonucleolytic activity per se, of RNase P is critical for the function of Pol III in cells and in extracts. PMID:25953854

  9. A Novel Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein-Like Protein Interacts with NS1 of the Minute Virus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Colin E.; Boden, Richard A.; Astell, Caroline R.

    1999-01-01

    NS1, the major nonstructural parvovirus protein of the minute virus of mice, is a multifunctional protein responsible for several aspects of viral replication. NS1 transactivates the P38 promoter (used to express the structural proteins), as well as its own strong promoter, P4. To study the mechanism of activation and to map regions of NS1 responsible for transactivation, NS1 and various deletions of NS1 were cloned in frame with the GAL4DB and cotransfected into COS-7 and LA9 cells with a synthetic GAL4-responsive reporter plasmid. These studies showed NS1 can directly activate transcription through its 129 carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues. Any deletion from this region of the C terminus, even as few as 8 amino acids, completely abolishes transactivation. A yeast two-hybrid system used to identify protein-protein interactions demonstrated that NS1 is able to dimerize when expressed in yeast cells. However, only an almost complete NS11–638 bait was able to interact with the full-length NS1. A two-hybrid screen identified a HeLa cell cDNA clone (NS1-associated protein 1 [NSAP1]) that interacts with NS11–276 and NS11–638. An additional sequence was predicted from human EST (expressed sequence tag) data, and the cDNA was estimated to be at least 2,221 bp long, potentially encoding a 562-amino-acid protein product. A polyclonal antibody raised to a synthetic peptide within NSAP1 recognizes an ∼65-kDa cellular protein. This NSAP1 cDNA has not previously been characterized, but the predicted protein sequence is 80% identical to the recently identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) R (W. Hassfeld et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 26:439–445, 1998). NSAP1 contains four ribonucleoprotein domains, as well as a highly repetitive C-terminal region. A closely related mouse cDNA (deduced from murine EST data) encodes a protein with only a single amino acid residue change from the human protein. NSAP1 is predicted to be a 65-kDa polynucleotide binding

  10. Bayesian Predictive Distribution for the Magnitude of the Largest Aftershock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock sequences, which follow large earthquakes, last hundreds of days and are characterized by well defined frequency-magnitude and spatio-temporal distributions. The largest aftershocks in a sequence constitute significant hazard and can inflict additional damage to infrastructure. Therefore, the estimation of the magnitude of possible largest aftershocks in a sequence is of high importance. In this work, we propose a statistical model based on Bayesian analysis and extreme value statistics to describe the distribution of magnitudes of the largest aftershocks in a sequence. We derive an analytical expression for a Bayesian predictive distribution function for the magnitude of the largest expected aftershock and compute the corresponding confidence intervals. We assume that the occurrence of aftershocks can be modeled, to a good approximation, by a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a temporal event rate given by the modified Omori law. We also assume that the frequency-magnitude statistics of aftershocks can be approximated by Gutenberg-Richter scaling. We apply our analysis to 19 prominent aftershock sequences, which occurred in the last 30 years, in order to compute the Bayesian predictive distributions and the corresponding confidence intervals. In the analysis, we use the information of the early aftershocks in the sequences (in the first 1, 10, and 30 days after the main shock) to estimate retrospectively the confidence intervals for the magnitude of the expected largest aftershocks. We demonstrate by analysing 19 past sequences that in many cases we are able to constrain the magnitudes of the largest aftershocks. For example, this includes the analysis of the Darfield (Christchurch) aftershock sequence. The proposed analysis can be used for the earthquake hazard assessment and forecasting associated with the occurrence of large aftershocks. The improvement in instrumental data associated with early aftershocks can greatly enhance the analysis and

  11. Method for the isolation and identification of mRNAs, microRNAs and protein components of ribonucleoprotein complexes from cell extracts using RIP-Chip.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Garrett M; Gubin, Matthew M; Magee, Joseph D; Techasintana, Patsharaporn; Calaluce, Robert; Atasoy, Ulus

    2012-09-29

    As a result of the development of high-throughput sequencing and efficient microarray analysis, global gene expression analysis has become an easy and readily available form of data collection. In many research and disease models however, steady state levels of target gene mRNA does not always directly correlate with steady state protein levels. Post-transcriptional gene regulation is a likely explanation of the divergence between the two. Driven by the binding of RNA Binding Proteins (RBP), post-transcriptional regulation affects mRNA localization, stability and translation by forming a Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex with target mRNAs. Identifying these unknown de novo mRNA targets from cellular extracts in the RNP complex is pivotal to understanding mechanisms and functions of the RBP and their resulting effect on protein output. This protocol outlines a method termed RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray (RIP-Chip), which allows for the identification of specific mRNAs associated in the ribonucleoprotein complex, under changing experimental conditions, along with options to further optimize an experiment for the individual researcher. With this important experimental tool, researchers can explore the intricate mechanisms associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation as well as other ribonucleoprotein interactions.

  12. Statistics of largest loops in a random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertas, Deniz; Kantor, Yacov

    1997-01-01

    We report further findings on the size distribution of the largest neutral segments in a sequence of N randomly charged monomers [D. Ertaş and Y. Kantor, Phys. Rev. E 53, 846 (1996)]. Upon mapping to one-dimensional random walks (RW's), this corresponds to finding the probability distribution for the size L of the largest segment that returns to its starting position in an N-step RW. We focus primarily on the large N, l=L/N<<1 limit, which exhibits an essential singularity. We establish analytical upper and lower bounds on the probability distribution, and numerically probe the distribution down to l~0.04 (corresponding to probabilities as low as 10-15) using a recursive Monte Carlo algorithm. We also investigate the possibility of singularities at l=1/k for integer k.

  13. Status and ecological effects of the world's largest carnivores.

    PubMed

    Ripple, William J; Estes, James A; Beschta, Robert L; Wilmers, Christopher C; Ritchie, Euan G; Hebblewhite, Mark; Berger, Joel; Elmhagen, Bodil; Letnic, Mike; Nelson, Michael P; Schmitz, Oswald J; Smith, Douglas W; Wallach, Arian D; Wirsing, Aaron J

    2014-01-10

    Large carnivores face serious threats and are experiencing massive declines in their populations and geographic ranges around the world. We highlight how these threats have affected the conservation status and ecological functioning of the 31 largest mammalian carnivores on Earth. Consistent with theory, empirical studies increasingly show that large carnivores have substantial effects on the structure and function of diverse ecosystems. Significant cascading trophic interactions, mediated by their prey or sympatric mesopredators, arise when some of these carnivores are extirpated from or repatriated to ecosystems. Unexpected effects of trophic cascades on various taxa and processes include changes to bird, mammal, invertebrate, and herpetofauna abundance or richness; subsidies to scavengers; altered disease dynamics; carbon sequestration; modified stream morphology; and crop damage. Promoting tolerance and coexistence with large carnivores is a crucial societal challenge that will ultimately determine the fate of Earth's largest carnivores and all that depends upon them, including humans.

  14. BRL Particle Sizing Interferometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    and m" is the index of refraction. Thus, the same visibility function as for Class I particles still applies. However, the fringe period is scaled ...amplitudes of the probability density plot are relative. The largest amplitude is chosen to fit a convenient scale on the paper. The first column indicates...the numerical integration,it is difficult to discern or physically visualize the scaling laws which relate visibility to particle index-of-refraction

  15. Factors involved in the generation and replication of rhabdovirus defective T particles.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J J; Villarreal, L P; Breindl, M

    1976-01-01

    Previous indications that cloned B virions might be genetically predisposed to generate a particular defective T particle are shown to be inaccurate. T particle generation was found to be a much more random process than was previously believed. We show that the previously observed generation of particular sizes of T particles by B virion pools is due to the random generation of T particles during preparation of first-passage pools of cloned B virions, and these breed true during the additional passages needed to produce visible quantities of T particles. It is also shown that different host cell lines selectively amplify different T particles, suggesting a strong role of host cell factors in T particle replication. Surprisingly, our line of HeLa cells did not generate or replicate detectable T particles of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) Indiana after either serial undiluted passage or direct addition of T particles, even though the added T particles strongly interfered with B virion replication. In contrast to VSV, rabies virus generates large amounts of T particles during the first passage of cloned B virions, and every rabies-infected baby hamster kidney-21 cell culture evolves into a persistent carrier state. We find that T particle RNA is biologically inactive although T particle nucleocapsid ribonucleoprotein replicates and interferes in cells coinfected with B virions. Efforts to study the mechanism of T particle generation by in vitro attempts to generate T particles or modify their size (using sheared ribonucleoprotein or chemical or UV mutagenesis) were unsuccessful. The kinetics of UV and nitrous acid inactivation of T particles indicate a smaller target size relative to B virions, even after correcting for lengths of RNA molecules. The intercalating dye proflavine does not photosensitize VSV B virions or T particles when present during replication, indicating that there is little or no RNA base pairing in the helical nucleocapsids of either. PMID

  16. Rare gas record in the largest Apollo 15 rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Lightner, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results obtained from mass-spectrometry analyses of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in a 182-mg chip of the largest Apollo 15 rock 15555 are presented. The spallation krypton data indicate a well-shielded location through most of the time during which the rock was exposed to cosmic rays. Gas retention ages are estimated. No evidence for the presence of products from plutonium-244 or iodine-129 was found.

  17. A local Echo State Property through the largest Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Wainrib, Gilles; Galtier, Mathieu N

    2016-04-01

    Echo State Networks are efficient time-series predictors, which highly depend on the value of the spectral radius of the reservoir connectivity matrix. Based on recent results on the mean field theory of driven random recurrent neural networks, enabling the computation of the largest Lyapunov exponent of an ESN, we develop a cheap algorithm to establish a local and operational version of the Echo State Property.

  18. World's largest TLP moves onto deepwater Norwegian location

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1992-05-04

    This paper reports that the world's largest and most sophisticated tension leg platform (TLP) was floated out to Snorre oil field in the Norwegian North Sea last month. The 78,000 ton unit built by Norwegian independent, Sega Petroleum AS, Oslo, was installed in the southern part of block 34/7 and should produce first oil in August, about a month ahead of schedule.

  19. Blueprint of the world`s largest uranium markets

    SciTech Connect

    Bizal, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    This article is a review of two recently released reports: (1) the EURATOM Supply Agency Annual Report for 1995, and (2) the US Energy Information Administration Uranium Industry Annual for 1995. These reports provide myraid information on uranium production, deliveries, contracts, and prices, as well as enrichment market activity during 1995 in the world`s largest nuclear fuel markets: the European Union and the United States.

  20. Rare gas record in the largest Apollo 15 rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Lightner, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results obtained from mass-spectrometry analyses of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in a 182-mg chip of the largest Apollo 15 rock 15555 are presented. The spallation krypton data indicate a well-shielded location through most of the time during which the rock was exposed to cosmic rays. Gas retention ages are estimated. No evidence for the presence of products from plutonium-244 or iodine-129 was found.

  1. Special Sm core complex functions in assembly of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Preusser, Christian; Palfi, Zsofia; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2009-08-01

    The processing of polycistronic pre-mRNAs in trypanosomes requires the spliceosomal small ribonucleoprotein complexes (snRNPs) U1, U2, U4/U6, U5, and SL, each of which contains a core of seven Sm proteins. Recently we reported the first evidence for a core variation in spliceosomal snRNPs; specifically, in the trypanosome U2 snRNP, two of the canonical Sm proteins, SmB and SmD3, are replaced by two U2-specific Sm proteins, Sm15K and Sm16.5K. Here we identify the U2-specific, nuclear-localized U2B'' protein from Trypanosoma brucei. U2B'' interacts with a second U2 snRNP protein, U2-40K (U2A'), which in turn contacts the U2-specific Sm16.5K/15K subcomplex. Together they form a high-affinity, U2-specific binding complex. This trypanosome-specific assembly differs from the mammalian system and provides a functional role for the Sm core variation found in the trypanosomal U2 snRNP.

  2. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity associated with the yeast viral p91/20S RNA ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, M P; Esteban, R; Fujimura, T

    1997-01-01

    20S RNA is a noninfectious viral single-stranded RNA found in most laboratory strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 20S RNA encodes a protein of 91 kDa (p91) that contains the common motifs found among RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from RNA viruses. p91 and 20S RNA are noncovalently associated in vivo, forming a ribonucleoprotein complex. We detected an RNA polymerase activity in p91/20S RNA complexes isolated by high-speed centrifugation. The activity was not inhibited by actinomycin D nor alpha-amanitin. The majority of the in vitro products was 20S RNA and the rest was the complementary strands of 20S RNA. Because the extracts were prepared from cells accumulating 20S RNA over its complementary strands, these in vitro products reflect the corresponding activities in vivo. When the p91/20S RNA complexes were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the polymerase activity cosedimented with the complexes. Furthermore, an RNA polymerase activity was detected in the complex by an antibody-linked polymerase assay using anti-p91 antiserum, suggesting that p91 is present in the active RNA polymerase machinery. These results together indicate that p91 is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or a subunit thereof responsible for 20S RNA replication. PMID:8990396

  3. Translational upregulation of folate receptors is mediated by homocysteine via RNA-heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Aśok C.; Tang, Ying-Sheng; Khan, Rehana A.; Biju, Mangatt P.; Xiao, Xiangli; Li, Qing-Jun; Sun, Xin-Lai; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2004-01-01

    Cellular acquisition of folate is mediated by folate receptors (FRs) in many malignant and normal human cells. Although FRs are upregulated in folate deficiency and downregulated following folate repletion, the mechanistic basis for this relationship is unclear. Previously we demonstrated that interaction of an 18-base cis-element in the 5′-untranslated region of FR mRNA and a cystolic trans-factor (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 [hnRNP E1]) is critical for FR synthesis. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this interaction, especially within the context of FR regulation and folate status, have remained obscure. Human cervical carcinoma cells exhibited progressively increasing upregulation of FRs after shifting of folate-replete cells to low-folate media, without a proportionate rise in FR mRNA or rise in hnRNP E1. Translational FR upregulation was accompanied by a progressive accumulation of the metabolite homocysteine within cultured cells, which stimulated interaction of the FR mRNA cis-element and hnRNP E1 as well as FR biosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Abrupt reversal of folate deficiency also led to a rapid parallel reduction in homocysteine and FR biosynthesis to levels observed in folate-replete cells. Collectively, these results suggest that homocysteine is the key modulator of translational upregulation of FRs and establishes the linkage between perturbed folate metabolism and coordinated upregulation of FRs. PMID:14722620

  4. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein R Cooperates with Mediator to Facilitate Transcription Reinitiation on the c-Fos Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Aya; Shimada, Miho; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Nishimura, Ken; Hisatake, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The c-fos gene responds to extracellular stimuli and undergoes robust but transient transcriptional activation. Here we show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) facilitates transcription reinitiation of the c-fos promoter in vitro in cooperation with Mediator. Consistently, hnRNP R interacts with the Scaffold components (Mediator, TBP, and TFIIH) as well as TFIIB, which recruits RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and TFIIF to Scaffold. The cooperative action of hnRNP R and Mediator is diminished by the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module, which is comprised of CDK8, Cyclin C, MED12 and MED13 of the Mediator subunits. Interestingly, we find that the length of the G-free cassettes, and thereby their transcripts, influences the hnRNP R-mediated facilitation of reinitiation. Indeed, indicative of a possible role of the transcript in facilitating transcription reinitiation, the RNA transcript produced from the G-free cassette interacts with hnRNP R through its RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) domain. Mutational analyses of hnRNP R indicate that facilitation of initiation and reinitiation requires distinct domains of hnRNP R. Knockdown of hnRNP R in mouse cells compromised rapid induction of the c-fos gene but did not affect transcription of constitutive genes. Together, these results suggest an important role for hnRNP R in regulating robust response of the c-fos gene. PMID:23967313

  5. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 regulates rhythmic synthesis of mouse Nfil3 protein via IRES-mediated translation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor, interleukin 3, regulated (Nfil3, also known as E4 Promoter-Binding Protein 4 (E4BP4)) protein is a transcription factor that binds to DNA and generally represses target gene expression. In the circadian clock system, Nfil3 binds to a D-box element residing in the promoter of clock genes and contributes to their robust oscillation. Here, we show that the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of Nfil3 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and that IRES-mediated translation occurs in a phase-dependent manner. We demonstrate that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) binds to a specific region of Nfil3 mRNA and regulates IRES-mediated translation. Knockdown of hnRNP A1 almost completely abolishes protein oscillation without affecting mRNA oscillation. Moreover, we observe that intracellular calcium levels, which are closely related to bone formation, depend on Nfil3 levels in osteoblast cell lines. We suggest that the 5′-UTR mediated cap-independent translation of Nfil3 mRNA contributes to the rhythmic expression of Nfil3 by interacting with the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1. These data provide new evidence that the posttranscriptional regulation of clock gene expression is important during bone metabolism. PMID:28220845

  6. Systemic delivery of siRNA in pumpkin by a plant PHLOEM SMALL RNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1-ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie A; Lucas, William J

    2014-11-01

    In plants, the vascular system, specifically the phloem, functions in delivery of small RNA (sRNA) to exert epigenetic control over developmental and defense-related processes. Although the importance of systemic sRNA delivery has been established, information is currently lacking concerning the nature of the protein machinery involved in this process. Here, we show that a PHLOEM SMALL-RNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) serves as the basis for formation of an sRNA ribonucleoprotein complex (sRNPC) that delivers sRNA (primarily 24 nt) to sink organs. Assembly of this complex is facilitated through PSRP1 phosphorylation by a phloem-localized protein kinase, PSRPK1. During long-distance transport, PSRP1-sRNPC is stable against phloem phosphatase activity. Within target tissues, phosphatase activity results in disassembly of PSRP1-sRNPC, a process that is probably required for unloading cargo sRNA into surrounding cells. These findings provide an insight into the mechanism involved in delivery of sRNA associated with systemic gene silencing in plants.

  7. A Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein, Pumpkin RBP50, Forms the Basis of a Phloem-Mobile Ribonucleoprotein Complex[W

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Brandom, Jeri L.; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Ringgold, Vanessa; Lough, Tony J.; Lucas, William J.

    2009-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are integral components of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and play a central role in RNA processing. In plants, some RBPs function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. The angiosperm phloem translocation stream contains a unique population of RBPs, but little is known regarding the nature of the proteins and mRNA species that constitute phloem-mobile RNP complexes. Here, we identified and characterized a 50-kD pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima cv Big Max) phloem RNA binding protein (RBP50) that is evolutionarily related to animal polypyrimidine tract binding proteins. In situ hybridization studies indicated a high level of RBP50 transcripts in companion cells, while immunolocalization experiments detected RBP50 in both companion cells and sieve elements. A comparison of the levels of RBP50 present in vascular bundles and phloem sap indicated that this protein is highly enriched in the phloem sap. Heterografting experiments confirmed that RBP50 is translocated from source to sink tissues. Collectively, these findings established that RBP50 functions as a non-cell-autonomous RBP. Protein overlay, coimmunoprecipitation, and cross-linking experiments identified the phloem proteins and mRNA species that constitute RBP50-based RNP complexes. Gel mobility-shift assays demonstrated that specificity, with respect to the bound mRNA, is established by the polypyrimidine tract binding motifs within such transcripts. We present a model for RBP50-based RNP complexes within the pumpkin phloem translocation stream. PMID:19122103

  8. Antibodies specific for Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 cross-react with human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, J. William; deGannes, Samantha L.; Pate, Kimberly A.; Zhao, Xiurong

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), and antibodies to the EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) are consistently increased in MS patients. The hypothesis of this study is that anti-EBNA-1 antibodies cross-react with a self antigen in MS patients. We affinity purified anti-EBNA-1 antibodies from human plasma, used the anti-EBNA-1 to immunoprecipitate antigens from human brain, and identified bound antigens with mass spectrometry. Anti-EBNA-1 consistently bound heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (HNRNPL). We expressed both the long and short isoforms of this protein, and verified with Western blots and ELISA that the long isoform cross-reacts with EBNA-1. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that anti-EBNA-1 bound to an antigen in the nucleus of cultured rat central nervous system cells. ELISA demonstrated the presence of antibodies to HNRNPL in the plasma of both healthy controls and MS patients, but anti-HNRNPL was not increased in MS patients. We conclude that HNRNPL is an autoantigen which cross-reacts with EBNA-1. The relevance of this autoantigen to MS and other autoimmune diseases remains to be investigated. PMID:26637929

  9. Antibodies specific for Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 cross-react with human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J William; deGannes, Samantha L; Pate, Kimberly A; Zhao, Xiurong

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), and antibodies to the EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) are consistently increased in MS patients. The hypothesis of this study is that anti-EBNA-1 antibodies cross-react with a self antigen in MS patients. We affinity purified anti-EBNA-1 antibodies from human plasma, used the anti-EBNA-1 to immunoprecipitate antigens from human brain, and identified bound antigens with mass spectrometry. Anti-EBNA-1 consistently bound heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (HNRNPL). We expressed both the long and short isoforms of this protein, and verified with Western blots and ELISA that the long isoform cross-reacts with EBNA-1. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that anti-EBNA-1 bound to an antigen in the nucleus of cultured rat central nervous system cells. ELISA demonstrated the presence of antibodies to HNRNPL in the plasma of both healthy controls and MS patients, but anti-HNRNPL was not increased in MS patients. We conclude that HNRNPL is an autoantigen which cross-reacts with EBNA-1. The relevance of this autoantigen to MS and other autoimmune diseases remains to be investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein L is required for the survival and functional integrity of murine hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreau, Marie-Claude; Grapton, Damien; Helness, Anne; Vadnais, Charles; Fraszczak, Jennifer; Shooshtarizadeh, Peiman; Wilhelm, Brian; Robert, François; Heyd, Florian; Möröy, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation and survival of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has to be strictly coordinated to ensure the timely production of all blood cells. Here we report that the splice factor and RNA binding protein hnRNP L (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L) is required for hematopoiesis, since its genetic ablation in mice reduces almost all blood cell lineages and causes premature death of the animals. In agreement with this, we observed that hnRNP L deficient HSCs lack both the ability to self-renew and foster hematopoietic differentiation in transplanted hosts. They also display mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated levels of γH2AX, are Annexin V positive and incorporate propidium iodide indicating that they undergo cell death. Lin-c-Kit+ fetal liver cells from hnRNP L deficient mice show high p53 protein levels and up-regulation of p53 target genes. In addition, cells lacking hnRNP L up-regulated the expression of the death receptors TrailR2 and CD95/Fas and show Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Parp cleavage. Treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk, but not the deletion of p53, restored cell survival in hnRNP L deficient cells. Our data suggest that hnRNP L is critical for the survival and functional integrity of HSCs by restricting the activation of caspase-dependent death receptor pathways. PMID:27271479

  11. Rapid isolation and single-molecule analysis of ribonucleoproteins from cell lysate by SNAP-SiMPull.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Margaret L; Paulson, Joshua; Hoskins, Aaron A

    2015-05-01

    Large macromolecular complexes such as the spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) play a variety of roles within the cell. Despite their biological importance, biochemical studies of snRNPs and other machines are often thwarted by practical difficulties in the isolation of sufficient amounts of material. Studies of the snRNPs as well as other macromolecular machines would be greatly facilitated by new approaches that enable their isolation and biochemical characterization. One such approach is single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) that combines in situ immunopurification of complexes from cell lysates with subsequent single-molecule fluorescence microscopy experiments. We report the development of a new method, called SNAP-SiMPull, that can readily be applied to studies of splicing factors and snRNPs isolated from whole-cell lysates. SNAP-SiMPull overcomes many of the limitations imposed by conventional SiMPull strategies that rely on fluorescent proteins. We have used SNAP-SiMPull to study the yeast branchpoint bridging protein (BBP) as well as the U1 and U6 snRNPs. SNAP-SiMPull will likely find broad use for rapidly isolating complex cellular machines for single-molecule fluorescence colocalization experiments. © 2015 Rodgers et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. The U3 small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein component Imp4p is a telomeric DNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Tu, Pei-Jung; Lee, Ying-Yuan; Kuo, Chun-Chen; Lin, Yi-Chien; Wu, Chi-Fang; Lin, Jing-Jer

    2007-01-01

    Imp4p is a component of U3 snoRNP (small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein) involved in the maturation of 18S rRNA. We have shown that Imp4p interacts with Cdc13p, a single-stranded telomere-binding protein involved in telomere maintenance. To understand the role of Imp4p in telomeres, we purified recombinant Imp4p protein and tested its binding activity towards telomeric DNA using electrophoretic mobility-shift assays. Our results showed that Imp4p bound specifically to single-stranded telomeric DNA in vitro. The interaction of Imp4p to telomeres in vivo was also demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. Significantly, the binding of Imp4p to telomeres was not limited to yeast proteins, since the hImp4 (human Imp4) also bound to vertebrate single-stranded telomeric DNA. Thus we conclude that Imp4p is a novel telomeric DNA-binding protein that, in addition to its role in rRNA processing, might participate in telomere function. PMID:17803460

  13. Understanding the Role of Metal Ions in RNA Folding and Function: Lessons from RNase P, a Ribonucleoprotein Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael E.; Christian, Eric L.

    There is a large and rapidly growing literature relating RNA function to metal ion identity and concentration; however, due to the complexity and large number of interactions it remains a significant experimental challenge to tie the interactions of individual ions to specific aspects of RNA function. Investigation of the ribonculeopro-tein enzyme RNase P function has assisted in defining characteristics of RNA—metal ion interactions and provided a useful model system for understanding RNA catalysis and ribonucleoprotein assembly. The goal of this chapter is to review progress in understanding the physical basis of functional metal ion interactions with P RNA and relate this progress to the development of our understanding of RNA metal ion interactions in general. The research results reviewed here encompass: (1) Determination of the contribution of divalent metal ion binding to specific aspects of enzyme function, (2) Identification of individual metal ion binding sites in P RNA and their contribution to function, and (3) The effect of protein binding on RNA—metal ion affinity.

  14. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 regulates rhythmic synthesis of mouse Nfil3 protein via IRES-mediated translation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2017-02-21

    Nuclear factor, interleukin 3, regulated (Nfil3, also known as E4 Promoter-Binding Protein 4 (E4BP4)) protein is a transcription factor that binds to DNA and generally represses target gene expression. In the circadian clock system, Nfil3 binds to a D-box element residing in the promoter of clock genes and contributes to their robust oscillation. Here, we show that the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of Nfil3 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and that IRES-mediated translation occurs in a phase-dependent manner. We demonstrate that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) binds to a specific region of Nfil3 mRNA and regulates IRES-mediated translation. Knockdown of hnRNP A1 almost completely abolishes protein oscillation without affecting mRNA oscillation. Moreover, we observe that intracellular calcium levels, which are closely related to bone formation, depend on Nfil3 levels in osteoblast cell lines. We suggest that the 5'-UTR mediated cap-independent translation of Nfil3 mRNA contributes to the rhythmic expression of Nfil3 by interacting with the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1. These data provide new evidence that the posttranscriptional regulation of clock gene expression is important during bone metabolism.

  15. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein F Suppresses Angiotensinogen Gene Expression and Attenuates Hypertension and Kidney Injury in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chao-Sheng; Chang, Shiao-Ying; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G.; Ingelfinger, Julie R.; Zhang, Shao Ling; Chan, John S.D.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the impact of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) overexpression on angiotensinogen (Agt) gene expression, hypertension, and renal proximal tubular cell (RPTC) injury in high-glucose milieu both in vivo and in vitro. Diabetic Akita transgenic (Tg) mice specifically overexpressing hnRNP F in their RPTCs were created, and the effects on systemic hypertension, Agt gene expression, renal hypertrophy, and interstitial fibrosis were studied. We also examined immortalized rat RPTCs stably transfected with control plasmid or plasmid containing hnRNP F cDNA in vitro. The results showed that hnRNP F overexpression attenuated systemic hypertension, suppressed Agt and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) gene expression, and reduced urinary Agt and angiotensin II levels, renal hypertrophy, and glomerulotubular fibrosis in Akita hnRNP F-Tg mice. In vitro, hnRNP F overexpression prevented the high-glucose stimulation of Agt and TGF-β1 mRNA expression and cellular hypertrophy in RPTCs. These data suggest that hnRNP F plays a modulatory role and can ameliorate hypertension, renal hypertrophy, and interstitial fibrosis in diabetes. The underlying mechanism is mediated, at least in part, via the suppression of intrarenal Agt gene expression in vivo. hnRNP F may be a potential target in the treatment of hypertension and kidney injury in diabetes. PMID:22664958

  16. Definition of a discontinuous immunodominant epitope at the NH2 terminus of the La/SS-B ribonucleoprotein autoantigen.

    PubMed Central

    McNeilage, L J; Umapathysivam, K; Macmillan, E; Guidolin, A; Whittingham, S; Gordon, T

    1992-01-01

    High-titer IgG autoantibodies to the La/SS-B ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are a hallmark of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome. Anti-La/SS-B-positive human sera bind to multiple epitopes on recombinant La/SS-B, although the initial response is against an immunodominant epitope within the first 107 NH2-terminal amino acids (aa). Sequence analysis has identified a striking homology between aa 88-101 in this NH2-terminal region of La/SS-B and a feline retroviral gag polypeptide suggesting the anti-La/SS-B response may be initiated by cross-reactivity with an exogenous agent. In the present study, detailed mapping of this NH2-terminal epitope, using recombinant La/SS-B purified from the expression of overlapping DNA fragments spanning aa 1-107, has shown that this immunodominant epitope is a complex conformational or discontinuous epitope dependent upon both aa 12-28 and 82-99 for expression, even though these regions share no homology with each other. This requirement questions the significance of the homology between La/SS-B and a retroviral gag polypeptide in the generation of the B cell response to La/SS-B and is in accord with the general concept that B cells recognize conformational epitopes on antigens rather than small linear peptide sequences. The finding also reinforces the notion that native autoantigen could be the initiator of the autoimmune response. Images PMID:1373741

  17. A Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Platform for Functional Genetic Studies of HIV-Host Interactions in Primary Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hultquist, Judd F; Schumann, Kathrin; Woo, Jonathan M; Manganaro, Lara; McGregor, Michael J; Doudna, Jennifer; Simon, Viviana; Krogan, Nevan J; Marson, Alexander

    2016-10-25

    New genetic tools are needed to understand the functional interactions between HIV and human host factors in primary cells. We recently developed a method to edit the genome of primary CD4(+) T cells by electroporation of CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Here, we adapted this methodology to a high-throughput platform for the efficient, arrayed editing of candidate host factors. CXCR4 or CCR5 knockout cells generated with this method are resistant to HIV infection in a tropism-dependent manner, whereas knockout of LEDGF or TNPO3 results in a tropism-independent reduction in infection. CRISPR/Cas9 RNPs can furthermore edit multiple genes simultaneously, enabling studies of interactions among multiple host and viral factors. Finally, in an arrayed screen of 45 genes associated with HIV integrase, we identified several candidate dependency/restriction factors, demonstrating the power of this approach as a discovery platform. This technology should accelerate target validation for pharmaceutical and cell-based therapies to cure HIV infection.

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo . E-mail: sueokae@post.saga-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression.

  19. Rapid isolation and single-molecule analysis of ribonucleoproteins from cell lysate by SNAP-SiMPull

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Margaret L.; Paulson, Joshua; Hoskins, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Large macromolecular complexes such as the spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) play a variety of roles within the cell. Despite their biological importance, biochemical studies of snRNPs and other machines are often thwarted by practical difficulties in the isolation of sufficient amounts of material. Studies of the snRNPs as well as other macromolecular machines would be greatly facilitated by new approaches that enable their isolation and biochemical characterization. One such approach is single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) that combines in situ immunopurification of complexes from cell lysates with subsequent single-molecule fluorescence microscopy experiments. We report the development of a new method, called SNAP-SiMPull, that can readily be applied to studies of splicing factors and snRNPs isolated from whole-cell lysates. SNAP-SiMPull overcomes many of the limitations imposed by conventional SiMPull strategies that rely on fluorescent proteins. We have used SNAP-SiMPull to study the yeast branchpoint bridging protein (BBP) as well as the U1 and U6 snRNPs. SNAP-SiMPull will likely find broad use for rapidly isolating complex cellular machines for single-molecule fluorescence colocalization experiments. PMID:25805862

  20. Recognition of subsets of the mammalian A/B-type core heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides by novel autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Dangli, A; Plomaritoglou, A; Boutou, E; Vassiliadou, N; Moutsopoulos, H M; Guialis, A

    1996-01-01

    The structurally related A/B-type core heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) polypeptides of 34-39 kDa (A1, A2, B1 and B2) belong to a family of RNA-binding proteins that are major components of 40 S hnRNP complexes. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mapping analysis we compared each member of the A/B-type core proteins in the human and rat liver cells. This comparison revealed the unique presence in rat cells of major protein species, referred to as mBx polypeptides, that appeared as three charge isoforms at a position corresponding to the minor HeLa B1b protein spot. In addition, clear differences in the ratios of the A1 polypeptide to the A1b isoform were observed. The detection, in sera of patients with rheumatic autoimmune diseases, of two novel autoantibody specificities, one recognizing solely B2 protein and the second both the B2 and mBx polypeptides, helped to identify mBx proteins as new A/B-type hnRNP components, immunologically related to B2 protein. A common immunoreactive V8 protease peptide of approx. 17 kDa has been identified in B2 and mBx hnRNP polypeptides. mBx protein species are identified in cells of murine origin, and have a ubiquitous tissue distribution and developmental appearance. PMID:9003360

  1. An analytical platform for mass spectrometry-based identification and chemical analysis of RNA in ribonucleoprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Taoka, Masato; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Nobe, Yuko; Masaki, Shunpei; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical platform of RNA, which combines direct nano-flow reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) on a spray tip column and a high-resolution LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Operating RPLC under a very low flow rate with volatile solvents and MS in the negative mode, we could estimate highly accurate mass values sufficient to predict the nucleotide composition of a ∼21-nucleotide small interfering RNA, detect post-transcriptional modifications in yeast tRNA, and perform collision-induced dissociation/tandem MS-based structural analysis of nucleolytic fragments of RNA at a sub-femtomole level. Importantly, the method allowed the identification and chemical analysis of small RNAs in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, such as the pre-spliceosomal RNP complex, which was pulled down from cultured cells with a tagged protein cofactor as bait. We have recently developed a unique genome-oriented database search engine, Ariadne, which allows tandem MS-based identification of RNAs in biological samples. Thus, the method presented here has broad potential for automated analysis of RNA; it complements conventional molecular biology-based techniques and is particularly suited for simultaneous analysis of the composition, structure, interaction, and dynamics of RNA and protein components in various cellular RNP complexes. PMID:19740761

  2. Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Polypeptide A-Mediated Alternative Polyadenylation of STAT5B during Th1 Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feifei; Fu, Yonggui; Lu, Chan; Feng, Yuchao; Wang, Qiong; Huo, Zhanfeng; Jia, Xin; Chen, Chengyong; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2017-09-27

    T cells are activated and differentiated into Th cells depending on the rapid and accurate changes in the cell transcriptome. In addition to changes in mRNA expression, the sequences of many transcripts are altered by alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation (APA). We profiled the APA sites of human CD4(+) T cell subsets with high-throughput sequencing and found that Th1 cells harbored more genes with shorter tandem 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) than did naive T cells. We observed that STAT5B, a key regulator of Th1 differentiation, possessed three major APA sites and preferred shorter 3' UTRs in Th1 cells. In addition, small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide A (SNRPA) was found to bind directly to STAT5B 3' UTR and facilitate its APA switching. We also found that p65 activation triggered by TCR signaling could promote SNRPA transcription and 3' UTR shortening of STAT5B. Thus we propose that the APA switching of STAT5B induced by TCR activation is mediated by SNRPA. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. What Is the Largest Einstein Radius in the Universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Blandford, Roger D.

    2008-08-05

    The Einstein radius plays a central role in lens studies as it characterizes the strength of gravitational lensing. In particular, the distribution of Einstein radii near the upper cutoff should probe the probability distribution of the largest mass concentrations in the universe. Adopting a triaxial halo model, we compute expected distributions of large Einstein radii. To assess the cosmic variance, we generate a number of Monte-Carlo realizations of all-sky catalogues of massive clusters. We find that the expected largest Einstein radius in the universe is sensitive to parameters characterizing the cosmological model, especially {sigma}{sub s}: for a source redshift of unity, they are 42{sub -7}{sup +9}, 35{sub -6}{sup +8}, and 54{sub -7}{sup +12} arcseconds (errors denote 1{sigma} cosmic variance), assuming best-fit cosmological parameters of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year (WMAP5), three-year (WMAP3) and one-year (WMAP1) data, respectively. These values are broadly consistent with current observations given their incompleteness. The mass of the largest lens cluster can be as small as {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub {circle_dot}}. For the same source redshift, we expect in all-sky {approx} 35 (WMAP5), {approx} 15 (WMAP3), and {approx} 150 (WMAP1) clusters that have Einstein radii larger than 2000. For a larger source redshift of 7, the largest Einstein radii grow approximately twice as large. While the values of the largest Einstein radii are almost unaffected by the level of the primordial non-Gaussianity currently of interest, the measurement of the abundance of moderately large lens clusters should probe non-Gaussianity competitively with cosmic microwave background experiments, but only if other cosmological parameters are well-measured. These semi-analytic predictions are based on a rather simple representation of clusters, and hence calibrating them with N-body simulations will help to improve the accuracy. We also find that these 'superlens

  4. Footprinting analysis of interactions between the largest eukaryotic RNase P/MRP protein Pop1 and RNase P/MRP RNA components.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Robert D; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2015-09-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related catalytic ribonucleoproteins involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules, including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. The catalytic RNA component of eukaryotic RNase P retains the core elements of the bacterial RNase P ribozyme; however, the peripheral RNA elements responsible for the stabilization of the global architecture are largely absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. At the same time, the protein makeup of eukaryotic RNase P is considerably more complex than that of the bacterial RNase P. RNase MRP, an essential and ubiquitous eukaryotic enzyme, has a structural organization resembling that of eukaryotic RNase P, and the two enzymes share most of their protein components. Here, we present the results of the analysis of interactions between the largest protein component of yeast RNases P/MRP, Pop1, and the RNA moieties of the enzymes, discuss structural implications of the results, and suggest that Pop1 plays the role of a scaffold for the stabilization of the global architecture of eukaryotic RNase P RNA, substituting for the network of RNA-RNA tertiary interactions that maintain the global RNA structure in bacterial RNase P. © 2015 Fagerlund et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Footprinting analysis of interactions between the largest eukaryotic RNase P/MRP protein Pop1 and RNase P/MRP RNA components

    PubMed Central

    Fagerlund, Robert D.; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related catalytic ribonucleoproteins involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules, including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. The catalytic RNA component of eukaryotic RNase P retains the core elements of the bacterial RNase P ribozyme; however, the peripheral RNA elements responsible for the stabilization of the global architecture are largely absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. At the same time, the protein makeup of eukaryotic RNase P is considerably more complex than that of the bacterial RNase P. RNase MRP, an essential and ubiquitous eukaryotic enzyme, has a structural organization resembling that of eukaryotic RNase P, and the two enzymes share most of their protein components. Here, we present the results of the analysis of interactions between the largest protein component of yeast RNases P/MRP, Pop1, and the RNA moieties of the enzymes, discuss structural implications of the results, and suggest that Pop1 plays the role of a scaffold for the stabilization of the global architecture of eukaryotic RNase P RNA, substituting for the network of RNA–RNA tertiary interactions that maintain the global RNA structure in bacterial RNase P. PMID:26135751

  6. Isolation and characterization of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA-ribonucleoprotein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y.D.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure of cells to UV light of sufficient intensity brings about crosslinking of RNA to proteins which are in direct contact with it in vivo. The major (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins which become crosslinked to poly(A)/sup +/hnRNA in HeLa cells are of 120K, 68K, 53K, 43K, 41K, 38K, and 36K (K = kilodaltons). By immunizing mice with UV crosslinked complexes two monoclonal antibodies (2B12 and 4F4) against the C proteins (41K and 43K) and one (3G6) against the 120K protein of the hnRNP complex were obtained. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates that the C proteins and 120K are segregated to the nucleus and are not associated with nucleoli or chromatin. The two C proteins are highly related to each other antigenically. Monoclonal antibody 4F4 identifies the C proteins of the hnRNP complex in widely divergent species from human to lizard. The C proteins are phosphorylated and are in contact with hnRNA in vivo. The hnRNP complex was isolated from vertebrate cell nuclei by immunoprecipitation with these monoclonal antibodies. This complex contains proteins and hnRNA of up to approx.10 kb. The major steady state labeled (/sup 35/S)methionine labeled proteins of the isolated complex from HeLa cells are of 34K, 36K, 36K (A1 and A2), 37K, 38K (B1 and B2), 41K, 43K (C1 and C2) and doublets at 68K and at 120K. These proteins are organized into a 30S particle. Large hnRNP complexes are composed of multiples of 30S particles which are connected by highly nuclease sensitive stretches of hnRNA. It it concluded that the hnRNP structure is an integral component of the mRNA formation pathway in the eukaryotic cell.

  7. Largest separable balls around the maximally mixed bipartite quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Barnum, Howard

    2002-12-01

    For finite-dimensional bipartite quantum systems, we find the exact size of the largest balls, in spectral lp norms for 1<=p<=∞, of separable (unentangled) matrices around the identity matrix. This implies a simple and intuitively meaningful geometrical sufficient condition for separability of bipartite density matrices: that their purity tr ρ2 not be too large. Theoretical and experimental applications of these results include algorithmic problems such as computing whether or not a state is entangled, and practical ones such as obtaining information about the existence or nature of entanglement in states reached by nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computation implementations or other experimental situations.

  8. Longevity in Calumma parsonii, the World's largest chameleon.

    PubMed

    Tessa, Giulia; Glaw, Frank; Andreone, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Large body size of ectothermic species can be correlated with high life expectancy. We assessed the longevity of the World's largest chameleon, the Parson's chameleon Calumma parsonii from Madagascar by using skeletochronology of phalanges taken from preserved specimens held in European natural history museums. Due to the high bone resorption we can provide only the minimum age of each specimen. The highest minimum age detected was nine years for a male and eight years for a female, confirming that this species is considerably long living among chameleons. Our data also show a strong correlation between snout-vent length and estimated age.

  9. JET, the largest tokamak on the eve of DT operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, L. D.

    2016-11-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) is the world's largest operating tokamak and the only such machine capable of operating with the fuel mixture (deuterium-tritium) foreseen for a fusion reactor. Since it came into operation in 1983, JET has explored fusion plasmas "in conditions and dimensions approaching those of a fusion reactor" [1]. JET has demonstrated world-record levels of fusion power and energy production, in conditions where the ratio of the fusion power generated to the input power to the plasma, Q, approaches unity.

  10. The Largest Fragment of a Homogeneous Fragmentation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyprianou, Andreas; Lane, Francis; Mörters, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show that in homogeneous fragmentation processes the largest fragment at time t has size e^{-t Φ '(overline{p})}t^{-3/2 (log Φ )'(overline{p})+o(1)}, where Φ is the Lévy exponent of the fragmentation process, and overline{p} is the unique solution of the equation (log Φ )'(bar{p})=1/1+bar{p}. We argue that this result is in line with predictions arising from the classification of homogeneous fragmentation processes as logarithmically correlated random fields.

  11. Testing a Parachute for Mars in World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    In this image, two engineers are dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

    The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

    The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Mars Parachute Testing in World Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-22

    The parachute for NASA next mission to Mars passed flight-qualification testing in March and April 2009 inside the world largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif. NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, to be launched in 2011 and land on Mars in 2012, will use the largest parachute ever built to fly on an extraterrestrial mission. This image shows a duplicate qualification-test parachute inflated in an 80-mile-per-hour (36-meter-per-second) wind inside the test facility. The parachute uses a configuration called disk-gap-band. It has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 16 meters (51 feet). Most of the orange and white fabric is nylon, though a small disk of heavier polyester is used near the vent in the apex of the canopy due to higher stresses there. It is designed to survive deployment at Mach 2.2 in the Martian atmosphere, where it will generate up to 65,000 pounds of drag force. The wind tunnel is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide, big enough to house a Boeing 737. It is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the Arnold Engineering Development Center of the U.S. Air Force. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11995

  13. Orion: The Largest Infrared Hybrid Focal Plane in Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Albert M.; Merrill, Michael; Ball, William J.; Henden, Arne A.; Vrba, Frederick J.; McCreight, Craig R.

    2003-03-01

    Orion is a program to develop a 2048x2048 infrared focal plane using InSb PV detectors. It is the natural follow-on to the successful Aladdin 1024x1024 program, which was the largest IR focal plane of the 90's. Although the pixels are somewhat smaller than Aladdin, the overall focal plane is over 50mm in size and for the present is the largest IR focal plane of the 21st century. The work is being done by Raytheon Infrared Operations (RIO but better known as SBRC) by many of the same people who created the Aladdin focal plane. The design is very similar to the successful Aladdin design with the addition of reference pixels to lower noise and drift effects in long integrations. So far we have made five focal plane modules with hybridized InSb detectors. In this paper we will discuss the unique design features of this device as well as present test data taken from these devices.

  14. The largest molecular cloud complexes in the first galactic quadrant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Cohen, R. S.; Thaddeus, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Columbia CO survey of the first Galactic quadrant was used to determine the locations and physical properties of the largest molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy. Within the range of the survey (l = 12-60 deg), 26 complexes were detected with masses greater than 5 x 10 to the 5th solar masses, and roughly several hundred such complexes are deduced to exist throughout the Galaxy within the solar circle. These complexes are the parent objects of much of the Population I in the Galaxy. Distances to most of the complexes were determined kinematically, the distance ambiguity being resolved with the aid of associated H II regions, OB associations, masers, and other early Population I objects. The largest complexes are good tracers of spiral structure, the Sagittarius arm in particular being delineated with unprecedented clarity. A total of 17 large complexes are distributed rather uniformly along a 15 kpc stretch of the arm with a spacing comparable to that of the strings of regularly spaced H Ii regions observed in external galaxies. Power-law relations exist between the line widths and sizes of the complexes and between their densities and sizes. The forms of these relations are in good agreement with those found previously and are extended by roughly an order of magnitude in cloud mass.

  15. Testing a Parachute for Mars in World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    In this image, two engineers are dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

    The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

    The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  16. Fishing down the largest coral reef fish species.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Douglas

    2014-07-15

    Studies on remote, uninhabited, near-pristine reefs have revealed surprisingly large populations of large reef fish. Locations such as the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, northern Marianas Islands, Line Islands, U.S. remote Pacific Islands, Cocos-Keeling Atoll and Chagos archipelago have much higher reef fish biomass than islands and reefs near people. Much of the high biomass of most remote reef fish communities lies in the largest species, such as sharks, bumphead parrots, giant trevally, and humphead wrasse. Some, such as sharks and giant trevally, are apex predators, but others such as bumphead parrots and humphead wrasse, are not. At many locations, decreases in large reef fish species have been attributed to fishing. Fishing is well known to remove the largest fish first, and a quantitative measure of vulnerability to fishing indicates that large reef fish species are much more vulnerable to fishing than small fish. The removal of large reef fish by fishing parallels the extinction of terrestrial megafauna by early humans. However large reef fish have great value for various ecological roles and for reef tourism.

  17. The Thoc1 Encoded Ribonucleoprotein Is a Substrate for the NEDD4-1 E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fei; Fan, Chuandong; Wang, Xinjiang; Goodrich, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes form around nascent RNA during transcription to facilitate proper transcriptional elongation, RNA processing, and nuclear export. RNPs are highly heterogeneous, and different types of RNPs tend to package functionally related transcripts. These observations have inspired the hypothesis that RNP mediated mechanisms help specify coordinated gene expression. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that mutations in RNP components can cause defects in specific developmental pathways. How RNP biogenesis itself is regulated, however, is not well understood. The evolutionarily conserved THO RNP complex functions early during transcription to package nascent transcripts and facilitate subsequent RNP biogenesis. THO deficiency compromises transcriptional elongation as well as RNP mediated events like 3′ end formation and nuclear export for some transcripts. Using molecularly manipulated cells and in vitro reconstituted biochemical reactions, we demonstrate that the essential THO protein component encoded by the Thoc1 gene is poly-ubiquitinated by the NEDD4-1 E3 ubiquitin ligase. Poly-ubiquitinated pThoc1 is degraded by the proteasome. These results indicate THO activity is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and that this regulation is evolutionarily conserved between yeast and mammals. Manipulation of NEDD4-1 levels has modest effects on Thoc1 protein levels under steady state conditions, but destabilization of Thoc1 protein upon treatment with a transcriptional elongation inhibitor is dependent on NEDD4-1. This suggests NEDD4-1 functions in conjunction with other post-translational mechanisms to regulate Thoc1 protein and THO activity. PMID:23460917

  18. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  19. Ribonucleoprotein assembly defects correlate with spinal muscular atrophy severity and preferentially affect a subset of spliceosomal snRNPs.

    PubMed

    Gabanella, Francesca; Butchbach, Matthew E R; Saieva, Luciano; Carissimi, Claudia; Burghes, Arthur H M; Pellizzoni, Livio

    2007-09-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by reduced levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMN together with Gemins2-8 and unrip proteins form a macromolecular complex that functions in the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) of both the major and the minor splicing pathways. It is not known whether the levels of spliceosomal snRNPs are decreased in SMA. Here we analyzed the consequence of SMN deficiency on snRNP metabolism in the spinal cord of mouse models of SMA with differing phenotypic severities. We demonstrate that the expression of a subset of Gemin proteins and snRNP assembly activity are dramatically reduced in the spinal cord of severe SMA mice. Comparative analysis of different tissues highlights a similar decrease in SMN levels and a strong impairment of snRNP assembly in tissues of severe SMA mice, although the defect appears smaller in kidney than in neural tissue. We further show that the extent of reduction in both Gemin proteins expression and snRNP assembly activity in the spinal cord of SMA mice correlates with disease severity. Remarkably, defective SMN complex function in snRNP assembly causes a significant decrease in the levels of a subset of snRNPs and preferentially affects the accumulation of U11 snRNP--a component of the minor spliceosome--in tissues of severe SMA mice. Thus, impairment of a ubiquitous function of SMN changes the snRNP profile of SMA tissues by unevenly altering the normal proportion of endogenous snRNPs. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that SMN deficiency affects the splicing machinery and in particular the minor splicing pathway of a rare class of introns in SMA.

  20. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui; Kurimoto, Akiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  1. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein H1/H2-dependent Unsplicing of Thymidine Phosphorylase Results in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Michal; Bram, Eran E.; Akerman, Martin; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2011-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) catalyzes the conversion of thymidine to thymine and 2-deoxyribose-1-phosphate. The latter plays an important role in induction of angiogenesis. As such, many human malignancies exhibit TP overexpression that correlates with increased microvessel density, formation of aggressive tumors, and dismal prognosis. Because TP is frequently overexpressed in cancer, pro-drugs were developed that utilize TP activity for their bioactivation to cytotoxic drugs. In this respect, TP is indispensable for the pharmacologic activity of the chemotherapeutic drug capecitabine, as it converts its intermediary metabolite 5′-deoxyfluorouridine to 5-fluorouracil. Thus, loss of TP function confers resistance to the prodrug capecitabine, currently used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and breast cancer. However, drug resistance phenomena may frequently emerge that compromise the pharmacologic activity of capecitabine. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to TP-activated prodrugs is an important goal toward the overcoming of such drug resistance phenomena. Here, we discovered that lack of TP protein in drug-resistant tumor cells is due to unsplicing of its pre-mRNA. Advanced bioinformatics identified the family of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) H/F as candidate splicing factors potentially responsible for impaired TP splicing. Indeed, whereas parental cells lacked nuclear localization of hnRNPs H1/H2 and F, drug-resistant cells harbored marked levels of these splicing factors. Nuclear RNA immunoprecipitation experiments established a strong binding of hnRNP H1/H2 to TP pre-mRNA, hence implicating them in TP splicing. Moreover, introduction of hnRNP H2 into drug-sensitive parental cells recapitulated aberrant TP splicing and 5′-deoxyfluorouridine resistance. Thus, this is the first study identifying altered function of hnRNP H1/H2 in tumor cells as a novel determinant of aberrant TP splicing thereby

  2. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1/H2-dependent unsplicing of thymidine phosphorylase results in anticancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Stark, Michal; Bram, Eran E; Akerman, Martin; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2011-02-04

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) catalyzes the conversion of thymidine to thymine and 2-deoxyribose-1-phosphate. The latter plays an important role in induction of angiogenesis. As such, many human malignancies exhibit TP overexpression that correlates with increased microvessel density, formation of aggressive tumors, and dismal prognosis. Because TP is frequently overexpressed in cancer, pro-drugs were developed that utilize TP activity for their bioactivation to cytotoxic drugs. In this respect, TP is indispensable for the pharmacologic activity of the chemotherapeutic drug capecitabine, as it converts its intermediary metabolite 5'-deoxyfluorouridine to 5-fluorouracil. Thus, loss of TP function confers resistance to the prodrug capecitabine, currently used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and breast cancer. However, drug resistance phenomena may frequently emerge that compromise the pharmacologic activity of capecitabine. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to TP-activated prodrugs is an important goal toward the overcoming of such drug resistance phenomena. Here, we discovered that lack of TP protein in drug-resistant tumor cells is due to unsplicing of its pre-mRNA. Advanced bioinformatics identified the family of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) H/F as candidate splicing factors potentially responsible for impaired TP splicing. Indeed, whereas parental cells lacked nuclear localization of hnRNPs H1/H2 and F, drug-resistant cells harbored marked levels of these splicing factors. Nuclear RNA immunoprecipitation experiments established a strong binding of hnRNP H1/H2 to TP pre-mRNA, hence implicating them in TP splicing. Moreover, introduction of hnRNP H2 into drug-sensitive parental cells recapitulated aberrant TP splicing and 5'-deoxyfluorouridine resistance. Thus, this is the first study identifying altered function of hnRNP H1/H2 in tumor cells as a novel determinant of aberrant TP splicing thereby

  3. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K is over expressed, aberrantly localised and is associated with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, B; McKay, M; Dundas, S R; Lawrie, L C; Telfer, C; Murray, G I

    2006-10-09

    Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a member of the hnRNP family which has several different cellular roles including transcription, mRNA shuttling, RNA editing and translation. Several reports implicate hnRNP K having a role in tumorigenesis, for instance hnRNP K increases transcription of the oncogene c-myc and hnRNP K expression is regulated by the p53/MDM 2 pathway. In this study comparing normal colon to colorectal cancer by proteomics, hnRNP K was identified as being overexpressed in this type of cancer. Immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody to hnRNP K (which we developed) on colorectal cancer tissue microarray, confirmed that hnRNP K was overexpressed in colorectal cancer (P<0.001) and also showed that hnRNP K had an aberrant subcellular localisation in cancer cells. In normal colon hnRNP K was exclusively nuclear whereas in colorectal cancer the protein localised both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. There were significant increases in both nuclear (P=0.007) and cytoplasmic (P=0.001) expression of hnRNP K in Dukes C tumours compared with early stage tumours. In Dukes C patient's good survival was associated with increased hnRNP K nuclear expression (P=0.0093). To elaborate on the recent observation that hnRNP K is regulated by p53, the expression profiles of these two proteins were also analysed. There was no correlation between hnRNP K and p53 expression, however, patients who presented tumours that were positive for hnRNP K and p53 had a poorer survival outcome (P=0.045).

  4. Alterations in polyribosome and messenger ribonucleic acid metabolism and messenger ribonucleoprotein utilization in osmotically stressed plant seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Polyribosome aggregation state in growing tissues of barley and wheat leaf of stems of pea and squash was studied in relation to seedling growth and water status of the growing tissue in plants at various levels of osmotic stress. It was found to be highly correlated with water potential and osmotic potential of the growing tissue and with leaf of stem elongation rate. Stress rapidly reduced polyribosome content and water status in growing tissues of barley leaves; changes were slow and slight in the non-growing leaf blade. Membrane-bound and free polyribosomes were equally sensitive to stress-induced disaggregation. Incorporation of /sup 32/PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ into ribosomal RNA was rapidly inhibited by stress, but stability of poly(A)/sup +/RNA relative to ribosomal RNA was similar in stressed and unstressed tissues, with a half-life of about 12 hours. Stress also caused progressive loss of poly(A)/sup +/RNA from these tissues. Quantitation of poly(A) and in vitro messenger template activity in polysome gradient fractions showed a shift of activity from the polysomal region to the region of 20-60 S in stressed plants. Messenger RNA in the 20-60 S region coded for the same peptides as mRNA found in the polysomal fraction. Nonpolysomal and polysome-derived messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes (mRNP) were isolated, and characteristic proteins were found associated with either fraction. Polysomal mRNP from stressed or unstressed plants were translated with similar efficiency in a wheat germ cell-free system. It was concluded that no translational inhibitory activity was associated with nonpolysomal mRNP from barley prepared as described.

  5. Endothelial cell-binding activity of anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein antibodies in patients with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okawa-Takatsuji, M; Aotsuka, S; Uwatoko, S; Takaono, M; Iwasaki, K; Kinoshita, M; Sumiya, M

    2001-01-01

    In order to elucidate the immunological properties of anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) antibody, one of the autoantibodies detected in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTDs), we tested the endothelial cell-binding by anti-U1-RNP antibodies and epitopes on human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to which the autoantibody bound. IgG fractions positive for anti-U1-RNP from patients with CTDs bound to the HPAECs. Furthermore, intact and F(ab′)2 IgG anti-U1-RNP purified by affinity chromatography also bound to endothelial cells. The binding activity of IgG fractions positive for anti-U1-RNP to the endothelial cells could be effectively absorbed by U1-RNP-Sepharose. An immunoblotting assay of purified IgG anti-U1-RNP antibodies showed that these antibodies could bind to various membrane proteins of NP40-treated HPAECs such as 68, 48, 43, 38, 33, 29, 28 and 24 kDa. Some bands, 68, 33, 28 and 24 kDa, seemed to correspond to components of U1-RNP, i.e. 68 kDa, A, B′ and C peptides, respectively. We confirmed that the anti-U1-RNP antibody from patients with CTDs can directly recognize a variety of antigens on the endothelial surface of the pulmonary artery, including the components of U1-RNP or other unknown polypeptides. These results suggest that binding to pulmonary artery endothelial cells of this autoantibody may be one of the triggers of endothelial cell inflammation in CTDs. PMID:11703381

  6. A novel SDS-stable dimer of a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein at presynaptic terminals of squid neurons.

    PubMed

    Lico, D T P; Lopes, G S; Brusco, J; Rosa, J C; Gould, R M; De Giorgis, J A; Larson, R E

    2015-08-06

    The presence of mRNAs in synaptic terminals and their regulated translation are important factors in neuronal communication and plasticity. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complexes are involved in the translocation, stability, and subcellular localization of mRNA and the regulation of its translation. Defects in these processes and mutations in components of the hnRNP complexes have been related to the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite much data on mRNA localization and evidence for protein synthesis, as well as the presence of translation machinery, in axons and presynaptic terminals, the identity of RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA transport and function in presynaptic regions is lacking. We previously characterized a strongly basic RNA-binding protein (p65), member of the hnRNPA/B subfamily, in squid presynaptic terminals. Intriguingly, in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), p65 migrated as a 65-kDa protein, whereas members of the hnRNPA/B family typically have molecular masses ranging from 35 to 42kDa. In this report we present further biochemical and molecular characterization that shows endogenous p65 to be an SDS-stable dimer composed of ∼37-kDa hnRNPA/B-like subunits. We cloned and expressed a recombinant protein corresponding to squid hnRNPA/B-like protein and showed its propensity to aggregate and form SDS-stable dimers in vitro. Our data suggest that this unique hnRNPA/B-like protein co-localizes with synaptic vesicle protein 2 and RNA-binding protein ELAV and thus may serve as a link between local mRNA processing and presynaptic function and regulation.

  7. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F/H proteins modulate the alternative splicing of the apoptotic mediator Bcl-x.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Daniel; Revil, Timothée; Fisette, Jean-François; Chabot, Benoit

    2005-06-17

    Bcl-x is a member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins that are key regulators of apoptosis. The Bcl-x pre-mRNA is alternatively spliced to yield Bcl-x(S) and Bcl-x(L), two isoforms that have been associated, respectively, with the promotion and the prevention of apoptosis. We have investigated some of the elements and factors involved in the production of these two splice variants. Deletion mutagenesis using a human Bcl-x minigene identifies two regions in exon 2 that modulate Bcl-x 5'-splice site selection in human HeLa cells. One region (B3) is located upstream of the Bcl-x(L) 5'-splice site and enforces Bcl-x(L) production in cells and splicing extracts. The other region (B2) is located immediately downstream of the 5'-splice site of Bcl-x(S) and favors Bcl-x(S) production in vivo and in vitro. A 30-nucleotide G-rich element (B2G) is responsible for the activity of the B2 element. We show that recombinant heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) F and H proteins bind to B2G, and mutating the G stretches abolishes binding. Moreover, the addition of hnRNP F to a HeLa extract improved the production of the Bcl-x(S) variant in a manner that was dependent on the integrity of the G stretches in B2G. Consistent with the in vitro results, small interfering RNA-mediated RNA interference targeting hnRNP F and H decreased the Bcl-x(S)/Bcl-x(L) ratio of plasmid-derived and endogenously produced Bcl-x transcripts. Our results document a positive role for the hnRNP F/H proteins in the production of the proapoptotic regulator Bcl-x(S.).

  8. Hubble Catches Jupiter's Largest Moon Going to the 'Dark Side'

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Hubble Catches Jupiter's Largest Moon Going to the 'Dark Side' HST/WFPC2 Image of Jupiter and Ganymede Taken April 9, 2007 NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has caught Jupiter's moon Ganymede playing a game of "peek-a-boo." In this crisp Hubble image, Ganymede is shown just before it ducks behind the giant planet. Ganymede completes an orbit around Jupiter every seven days. Because Ganymede's orbit is tilted nearly edge-on to Earth, it routinely can be seen passing in front of and disappearing behind its giant host, only to reemerge later. Composed of rock and ice, Ganymede is the largest moon in our solar system. It is even larger than the planet Mercury. But Ganymede looks like a dirty snowball next to Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. Jupiter is so big that only part of its Southern Hemisphere can be seen in this image. Hubble's view is so sharp that astronomers can see features on Ganymede's surface, most notably the white impact crater, Tros, and its system of rays, bright streaks of material blasted from the crater. Tros and its ray system are roughly the width of Arizona. The image also shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the large eye-shaped feature at upper left. A storm the size of two Earths, the Great Red Spot has been raging for more than 300 years. Hubble's sharp view of the gas giant planet also reveals the texture of the clouds in the Jovian atmosphere as well as various other storms and vortices. Astronomers use these images to study Jupiter's upper atmosphere. As Ganymede passes behind the giant planet, it reflects sunlight, which then passes through Jupiter's atmosphere. Imprinted on that light is information about the gas giant's atmosphere, which yields clues about the properties of Jupiter's high-altitude haze above the cloud tops. This color image was made from three images taken on April 9, 2007, with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in red, green, and blue filters. The image shows Jupiter and Ganymede in close to natural colors. For

  9. Earth's Largest Meteorite Impact Craters discovered in South America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellndorfer, J. M.; Schmidt-Falkenberg, H.

    2014-12-01

    Novel analysis of high resolution InSAR-based digital elevation data from the year 2001 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission combined with a recently produced dataset of pan-tropical vegetation height from ALOS-1 SAR and IceSAT/GLAS Lidar estimates led to the quasi-bald-Earth discovery of four sizable near-perfect circle arcs in South America under dense tropical forests ranging in length from 216 km to 441 km. Terrain elevation profiles of cross-sections across the arcs show a distinct vertical rising and falling in elevations of hundreds of meters over a horizontal distance of tens of kilometers. It is hypothesized that these sizable arcs and associated rim-like topographic terrain features are remnants of huge meteorite impact craters with diameters ranging from 770 km to 1,310 km, thus forming potentially the largest known impact carter structures discovered on Earth today. The potential impact crater rim structures are located north of the eastern Amazon River, in the coastal region of Recife and Natal, and in the Brazilian, Bolivian and Paraguayan border region encompassing the Pantanal. Elevation profiles, hillshades and gray-shaded elevation maps were produced to support the geomorphologic analysis. It is also speculated whether in three of the four potential impact craters, central uplift domes or peaks, which are typical for complex impact crater structures can be identified. The worlds largest iron ore mining area of Carajás in Para, Brazil, falls exactly in the center of the largest hypothesized circular impact crater showing topographic elevations similar to the rim structure discovered 655 km to the north-north-west. Based on the topographic/geomorphologic driven hypothesis, geologic exploration of these topographic features is needed to test whether indeed meteorite impact craters could be verified, what the more exact ellipsoidal shapes of the potential impact craters might be, and to determine when during geologic times the impacts would have taken

  10. The depths of the largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Ford, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    The largest impact craters on Venus may be used as evidence of various geological processes within the Venusian crust. We are continuing to construct a data base for the further investigation of large craters on Venus (LCV). We hope to find evidence of crater relaxation that might constrain the thickness and thermal gradient of the crust, as was proposed in an earlier work. The current work concentrates on 27 impact craters with diameters (d) larger than 70 km, i.e., large enough that the footprint of the Magellan altimeter has a good chance of sampling the true crater bottom. All altimeter echoes from points located within (d/2)+70 km from the crater center have been inspected.

  11. The largest Silurian vertebrate and its palaeoecological implications

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Brian; Zhu, Min; Zhao, Wenjin; Jia, Liaotao; Zhu, You'an

    2014-01-01

    An apparent absence of Silurian fishes more than half-a-metre in length has been viewed as evidence that gnathostomes were restricted in size and diversity prior to the Devonian. Here we describe the largest pre-Devonian vertebrate (Megamastax amblyodus gen. et sp. nov.), a predatory marine osteichthyan from the Silurian Kuanti Formation (late Ludlow, ~423 million years ago) of Yunnan, China, with an estimated length of about 1 meter. The unusual dentition of the new form suggests a durophagous diet which, combined with its large size, indicates a considerable degree of trophic specialisation among early osteichthyans. The lack of large Silurian vertebrates has recently been used as constraint in palaeoatmospheric modelling, with purported lower oxygen levels imposing a physiological size limit. Regardless of the exact causal relationship between oxygen availability and evolutionary success, this finding refutes the assumption that pre-Emsian vertebrates were restricted to small body sizes. PMID:24921626

  12. Correlates of species richness in the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Voyer, A; Padial, J M; Castroviejo-Fisher, S; De La Riva, I; Vilà, C

    2011-01-01

    Although tropical environments are often considered biodiversity hotspots, it is precisely in such environments where least is known about the factors that drive species richness. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative analyses to study correlates of species richness for the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation: New World direct-developing frogs. Clade-age and species richness were nonsignficantly, negatively correlated, suggesting that clade age alone does not explain among-clade variation in species richness. A combination of ecological and morphological traits explained 65% of the variance in species richness. A more vascularized ventral skin, the ability to colonize high-altitude ranges, encompassing a large variety of vegetation types, correlated significantly with species richness, whereas larger body size was marginally correlated with species richness. Hence, whereas high-altitude ranges play a role in shaping clade diversity in the Neotropics, intrinsic factors, such as skin structures and possibly body size, might ultimately determine which clades are more speciose than others. PMID:21401771

  13. Giant fibroepithelial stromal polyp of the vulva: largest case reported

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibroepithelial stromal polyps are site-specific mesenchymal lesions that are commonly found in the vulvovaginal region in premenopausal females. These polyps usually are less than 5 cm in diameter and are most commonly identified during routine gynecological examination. Although the stromal polyp is benign, its differential diagnosis includes some malignant vulva lesions making it critical to ensure that an accurate pathologic diagnosis is made. Case We present a case of a 21 year old female with a giant fibroepithelial stromal polyp of the vulva. Upon review of the literature this is the largest reported fibroepithelial stromal polyp to date. Conclusion Fibroepithelial stromal polyps can grow as large as 390 grams and can be 18.5-cm in diameter. Microscopic evaluation of the polyp is critical in the exclusion of malignancy with this diagnosis. PMID:23842282

  14. 1. Photocopy of undated wash drawing. The largest building is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of undated wash drawing. The largest building is the Hotel Williams. Next to it is the Williams House (Williams Hotel Annex), HABS No. MI-258 A. Below them are the log cabins built by the American Fur Company (from left to right): Log Building No. 1 (MI-258 C), Log Building No. 2 (MI-258 D), Log Building No. 3 (not documented), Log Building No. 4 (MI-258 E), and Log Building No. 5 (MI-258 F). (Williams Log House, MI-258 B, and Log Building No. 8, MI-258 G, are not shown). The drawing is in the collection of the Michigan Historical Commission. Although it does not have a date, it was painted in the early 20th century after the main building was constructed. - Hotel Williams, Murray Bay, Munising, Alger County, MI

  15. Opportunities for biodiversity gains under the world's largest reforestation programme

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Fangyuan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xinlei; Fisher, Brendan; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Jianguo; Tang, Ya; Yu, Douglas W.; Wilcove, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Reforestation is a critical means of addressing the environmental and social problems of deforestation. China's Grain-for-Green Program (GFGP) is the world's largest reforestation scheme. Here we provide the first nationwide assessment of the tree composition of GFGP forests and the first combined ecological and economic study aimed at understanding GFGP's biodiversity implications. Across China, GFGP forests are overwhelmingly monocultures or compositionally simple mixed forests. Focusing on birds and bees in Sichuan Province, we find that GFGP reforestation results in modest gains (via mixed forest) and losses (via monocultures) of bird diversity, along with major losses of bee diversity. Moreover, all current modes of GFGP reforestation fall short of restoring biodiversity to levels approximating native forests. However, even within existing modes of reforestation, GFGP can achieve greater biodiversity gains by promoting mixed forests over monocultures; doing so is unlikely to entail major opportunity costs or pose unforeseen economic risks to households. PMID:27598524

  16. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene at the World's Largest Mass Gathering.

    PubMed

    Vortmann, Michael; Balsari, Satchit; Holman, Susan R; Greenough, P Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The 2013 Kumbh Mela, a Hindu religious festival and the largest human gathering on earth, drew an estimated 120 million pilgrims to bathe at the holy confluence of the Ganga (Ganges) and Yamuna rivers. To accommodate the massive numbers, the Indian government constructed a temporary city on the flood plains of the two rivers and provided it with roads, electricity, water and sanitation facilities, police stations, and a tiered healthcare system. This phenomenal operation and its impacts have gone largely undocumented. To address this gap, the authors undertook an evaluation and systematic monitoring initiative to study preparedness and response to public health emergencies at the event. This paper describes the water, sanitation, and hygiene components, with particular emphasis on preventive and mitigation strategies; the capacity for surveillance and response to diarrheal disease outbreaks; and the implications of lessons learned for other mass gatherings.

  17. The 260: The Largest Solid Rocket Motor Ever Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimmins, P.; Cousineau, M.; Rogers, C.; Shell, V.

    1999-01-01

    Aerojet in the mid 1960s, under contract to NASA, built and static hot fire tested the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) in history for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of utilizing large SRMs for space exploration. This program successfully fabricated two high strength steel chambers, loaded each with approximately 1,68 million pounds of propellant, and static test fired these giants with their nozzles up from an underground silo located adjacent to the Florida everglades. Maximum thrust and total impulse in excess of 5,000,000 lbf and 3,470,000,000 lbf-sec were achieved. Flames from the second firing, conducted at night, were seen over eighty miles away. For comparative purposes: the thrust developed was nearly 100 times that of a Minuteman III second stage and the 260 in.-dia cross-section was over 3 times that of the Space Shuttle SRM.

  18. Opportunities for biodiversity gains under the world's largest reforestation programme.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fangyuan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xinlei; Fisher, Brendan; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Jianguo; Tang, Ya; Yu, Douglas W; Wilcove, David S

    2016-09-06

    Reforestation is a critical means of addressing the environmental and social problems of deforestation. China's Grain-for-Green Program (GFGP) is the world's largest reforestation scheme. Here we provide the first nationwide assessment of the tree composition of GFGP forests and the first combined ecological and economic study aimed at understanding GFGP's biodiversity implications. Across China, GFGP forests are overwhelmingly monocultures or compositionally simple mixed forests. Focusing on birds and bees in Sichuan Province, we find that GFGP reforestation results in modest gains (via mixed forest) and losses (via monocultures) of bird diversity, along with major losses of bee diversity. Moreover, all current modes of GFGP reforestation fall short of restoring biodiversity to levels approximating native forests. However, even within existing modes of reforestation, GFGP can achieve greater biodiversity gains by promoting mixed forests over monocultures; doing so is unlikely to entail major opportunity costs or pose unforeseen economic risks to households.

  19. Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, William J.; Newsome, Thomas M.; Wolf, Christopher; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Everatt, Kristoffer T.; Galetti, Mauro; Hayward, Matt W.; Kerley, Graham I. H.; Levi, Taal; Lindsey, Peter A.; Macdonald, David W.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Painter, Luke E.; Sandom, Christopher J.; Terborgh, John; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2015-01-01

    Large wild herbivores are crucial to ecosystems and human societies. We highlight the 74 largest terrestrial herbivore species on Earth (body mass ≥100 kg), the threats they face, their important and often overlooked ecosystem effects, and the conservation efforts needed to save them and their predators from extinction. Large herbivores are generally facing dramatic population declines and range contractions, such that ~60% are threatened with extinction. Nearly all threatened species are in developing countries, where major threats include hunting, land-use change, and resource depression by livestock. Loss of large herbivores can have cascading effects on other species including large carnivores, scavengers, mesoherbivores, small mammals, and ecological processes involving vegetation, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and fire regimes. The rate of large herbivore decline suggests that ever-larger swaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs. PMID:26601172

  20. Supergranulation as the Sun's largest buoyantly driven mode of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Solar supergranulation has been characterized as horizontally divergent flow motions having a typical scale of 32 Mm using Doppler imaging, granule tracking and helioseismology. Unlike granules, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale height at the photosphere, supergranules do not appear to correspond to any particular length scale of the flow. Possible explanations ranging from convection theories involving Helium ionization to spatial correlation or self-organization of granular flows have been proposed as physical mechanisms to explain solar supergranulation. However, its existence remains largely a mystery. Remarkably, horizontal velocity power spectra obtained from Doppler imaging and correlation tracking of flow features at the solar surface reveal the presence of peaks corresponding to granular and supergranular scales, followed by a monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation, which suggests that large-scale modes in the deep layers of the convection zone may be suppressed. Using 3D anelastic simulations of solar convection we investigate whether supergranulation may reflect the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection inside the Sun. Results show that the amount of kinetic energy contained in the largest flow scales relative to that associated with supergranular motions is a function of the depth of the transition from a convectively unstable to convectively stable mean stratification inside the simulation. This suggests that the observed monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation may be explained by rapid cooling in the subphotospheric layers and an essentially isentropic solar interior, wherein convective driving is effectively suppressed.

  1. Solar particle events and their radiation threats

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    Energetic particles from the Sun have only been studied in detail during the last three decades. The modern record is good, although the number of the largest solar particle events are very few. The nuclides made by solar energetic particles in lunar rocks have been used to extend the record of these particles {approximately} 10{sup 7} years. The modern and ancient records are similar. By combining both sets of data, it has been inferred that solar particle events much larger than the largest events observed during the last four solar cycles are very rare.

  2. Scaling laws for the largest Lyapunov exponent in long-range systems: A random matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Anteneodo, Celia; Vallejos, Raúl O

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the laws that rule the behavior of the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) in many particle systems with long-range interactions. We consider as a representative system the so-called Hamiltonian alpha-XY model where the adjustable parameter alpha controls the range of the interactions of N ferromagnetic spins in a lattice of dimension d. In previous work the dependence of the LLE with the system size N, for sufficiently high energies, was established through numerical simulations. In the thermodynamic limit, the LLE becomes constant for alpha>d whereas it decays as an inverse power law of N for alpha

  3. No nitrate spikes detectable in several polar ice cores following the largest known solar events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhaldi, Florian; McConnell, Joseph R.; Adolphi, Florian; Arienzo, Monica; Chellman, Nathan J.; Maselli, Olivia; Sigl, Michael; Muscheler, Raimund

    2017-04-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are a genuine and recognized threat to our modern society which is increasingly relying on satellites and technological infrastructures. However, knowledge on the frequency and on the upper limit of the intensity of major solar storms is largely limited by the relatively short direct observation period. In an effort to extend the observation period and because atmospheric ionization induced by solar particles can lead to the production of odd nitrogen, spikes in the nitrate content of ice cores have been tentatively used to reconstruct both the occurrence and intensity of past SEP events. Yet the reliability of its use as such a proxy has been long debated. This is partly due to differing chemistry-climate model outputs, equivocal detection of nitrate spikes in single ice cores for single events, and possible alternative sources to explain nitrate spikes in ice cores. Here we present nitrate measurements from several Antarctic and Greenland ice cores for time periods covering the largest known solar events. More specifically, we use new highly-resolved nitrate and biomass burning proxy species data (e.g. black carbon) from continuous flow analysis following the largest known solar events from the paleo record - the SEP events of 775 and 994 AD. We also consider the historical Carrington event of 1859 as well as contemporary events from the past 60 years which were observed by satellites. Doing so we show that i) there are no reproducible nitrate spikes in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores following any of these major events and that ii) most nitrate spikes found in ice cores are related to biomass burning plumes. Our analysis thus suggests that ice-core nitrate data is not a reliable proxy for atmospheric ionization by SEP events. In light of our results, we advocate that nitrate spikes so far identified from single ice cores should not be used to assess the intensity and occurrence rate of extreme solar events.

  4. Largest Aftershocks of Megathrust Earthquakes in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, J.; Tsuzuki, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake of Mw9.0 induced the earthquake activity in high level all over Japan. It included not only earthquakes near active faults but also volcanic earthquakes. Although we have observed tens of thousands of aftershocks, yet we do not know which is the largest aftershock of the 2011 megathrust. There occurred several megathrust earthquakes worldwide in the last one hundred years, which are almost the same size or larger than the 2011 megathrust. We have studied their largest aftershocks based on our new hypothesis of along-dip double segmentation (ADDS) and along-strike single segmentation (ASSS). ADDS in the Tohoku-oki region along the Japan trench is characterized by the apparent absence of earthquakes in the trench-ward segments as opposed to the Japan Island-ward segments that have repeated small earthquakes of up to Mw8 class. In contrast, the 1960 Chile and the 2010 Maule megathrusts are characterized by ASSS with the weak seismic activity before the main event everywhere in the subduction zone. The difference between these two types of seismic segmentations would be that strongly coupled areas of trench-ward segments give rise to ADDS, whereas almost 100% coupled areas of shallow-parts of subduction zones give rise to ASSS. In other words, the phenomenon of a seismic gap can be identified for an ASSS megathrust, where as a doughnut pattern of seismic activity appears prior to a main ADDS event. In summary, most of the largest aftershocks of ADDS megathrusts are earthquakes of outer-rise(outer trench-slope) normal faultings, where there occur two types, dip-slip and strike-slip, depending on the structure of subducting oceanic plates. The 1933 Sanriku-oki Mw8.6 (the 1896 Meiji-Sanriku M~8.5) and the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw7.7 (the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw9.0) are the former and the 1987 Off Alaska Mw7.8 (the 1964 Alaska Mw9.2) and the 2012 Sumatra Mw8.6 (the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Mw9.3) are the latter. Those of ASSS megathrusts occurred

  5. Modelling Thermal Emission to Constrain Io's Largest Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; De Pater, I.; de Kleer, K.; Head, J. W., III; Wilson, L.

    2016-12-01

    Massive, voluminous, low-silica content basalt lava flows played a major role in shaping the surfaces of the terrestrial planets and the Moon [1] but the mechanisms of eruption, including effusion rate profiles and flow regime, are often obscure. However, eruptions of large volumes of lava and the emplacement of thick, areally extensive silicate lava flows are extant on the volcanic jovian moon Io [2], thus providing a template for understanding how these processes behaved elsewhere in the Solar System. We have modelled data of the largest of these eruptions to constrain eruption processes from the evolution of the wavelength variation of the resulting thermal emission [3]. We continue to refine our models to further constrain eruption parameters. We focus on large "outburst" eruptions, large lava fountains which feed lava flows [4] which have been directly observed on Io from the Galileo spacecraft [5, 6]. Outburst data continue to be collected by large ground-based telescopes [7, 8]. These data have been fitted with a sophisticated thermal emission model to derive eruption parameters such as areal coverage and effusion rates. We have created a number of tools for investigating and constraining effusion rate for Io's largest eruptions. It remains for all of the components to be integrated into a single model with rheological properties dependent on flow regime and the effects of heat loss. The crucial advance on previous estimates of lava flow emplacement on Io [e.g., 5] is that, by keeping track of the temperature distribution on the surface of the lava flows (a function of flow regime and varying effusion rate) the integrated thermal emission spectrum can be synthesized. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. We thank the NASA OPR Program (NNN13D466T) and NSF (Grant AST-1313485) for supports. Refs: [1] Wilson, L. and J. W. Head (2016), Icarus, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.039. [2

  6. Spectral properties of the largest asteroids associated with Taurid Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M.; Birlan, M.; Nedelcu, D. A.; Vaubaillon, J.; Cristescu, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The Taurid Complex is a massive stream of material in the inner part of the Solar System. It contains objects spanning the range of 10-6-103 m, considered by some authors to have a common cometary origin. The asteroids belonging to Taurid Complex are on Apollo type orbit, with most of them being flagged as potentially hazardous asteroids. In this context, understanding the nature and the origin of this asteroidal population is not only of scientific interest but also of practical importance. Aims: We aim to investigate the surface mineralogy of the asteroids associated with Taurid Complex using visible and near-infrared spectral data. Compositional linking between these asteroids and meteorites can be derived based on the obtained spectra. Methods: We obtained spectra of six of the largest asteroids (2201, 4183, 4486, 5143, 6063, and 269690) associated with Taurid complex. The observations were made with the IRTF telescope equipped with the spectro-imager SpeX. Their taxonomic classification is made using Bus-DeMeo taxonomy. The asteroid spectra are compared with the meteorite spectra from the Relab database. Mineralogical models were applied to determine their surface composition. All the spectral analysis is made in the context of the already published physical data. Results: Five of the objects studied in this paper present spectral characteristics similar to the S taxonomic complex. The spectra of ordinary chondrites (spanning H, L, and LL subtypes) are the best matches for these asteroid spectra. The asteroid (269690) 1996 RG3 presents a flat featureless spectrum which could be associated to a primitive C-type object. The increased reflectance above 2.1 microns constrains its geometrical albedo to a value around 0.03. Conclusions: While there is an important dynamical grouping among the Taurid Complex asteroids, the spectral data of the largest objects do not support a common cometary origin. Furthermore, there are significant variations between the

  7. Diverse Hispanic population to become largest U.S. minority.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    High immigration rates and relatively high birth rates have made Hispanics the second fastest growing minority population in the US. Only the Asian population is growing faster. In 1996, 11% of the US's population was Hispanic. However, Hispanic Americans are projected to outnumber African Americans by 2005, and by 2050, the Hispanic population in the US is projected to total approximately 100 million, 25% of the US population and the largest of the country's ethnic minorities. Latinos have the lowest rates of high school and college graduation of any major population group in the US. Since relevant data first became available in 1972 and until 1994, the median income of Latino families has remained below that of White families, but above that of African American families. The Hispanics' median family income of $24,000 in 1995 was below that of African American families. Puerto Rican and Mexican families are most likely to be poor, while Cubans are least likely. There is considerable diversity within the US's Hispanic population. For example, some Hispanics speak only Spanish, while others speak no Spanish at all. Hispanic Americans come from many countries and cultures, making the differences between and within the Hispanic ethnic groups sometimes as great as their similarities. Most Americans do not understand that Hispanics are an ethnic group, not a racial group.

  8. Huge-LQG- the largest structure in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowes, R. G.; Raghunathan, S.; Harris, K. A.; Campusano, L. E.; Sochting, I. K.; Graham, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    A large quasar group (LQG) of particularly large size and high membership has been identified in the DR7QSO catalogue of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It has characteristic size (volume^{1/3}) ˜ 500 Mpc (proper size, present epoch), longest dimension ˜ 1240 Mpc, membership of 73 quasars and mean redshift z=1.27. In terms of both size and membership, it is the most extreme LQG found in the DR7QSO catalog for the redshift range 1.0 < z <1.8 of our current investigation. Its location on the sky is ˜ 8.8 degrees north (˜ 615 Mpc projected) of the Clowes & Campusano LQG at the same redshift, z=1.28, which is itself one of the more extreme examples. This new, Huge-LQG appears to be the largest structure currently known in the early Universe. Its size suggests incompatibility with the Yadav et al. (2010) scale of homogeneity for the concordance cosmology, and thus challenges the assumption of the cosmological principle.

  9. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2016-07-12

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  10. Developmental origins of the world’s largest flowers, Rafflesiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Nikolov, Lachezar A.; Endress, Peter K.; Sugumaran, M.; Sasirat, Sawitree; Vessabutr, Suyanee; Kramer, Elena M.; Davis, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Rafflesiaceae, which produce the world’s largest flowers, have captivated the attention of biologists for nearly two centuries. Despite their fame, however, the developmental nature of the floral organs in these giants has remained a mystery. Most members of the family have a large floral chamber defined by a diaphragm. The diaphragm encloses the reproductive organs where pollination by carrion flies occurs. In lieu of a functional genetic system to investigate floral development in these highly specialized holoparasites, we used comparative studies of structure, development, and gene-expression patterns to investigate the homology of their floral organs. Our results surprisingly demonstrate that the otherwise similar floral chambers in two Rafflesiaceae subclades, Rafflesia and Sapria, are constructed very differently. In Rafflesia, the diaphragm is derived from the petal whorl. In contrast, in Sapria it is derived from elaboration of a unique ring structure located between the perianth and the stamen whorl, which, although developed to varying degrees among the genera, appears to be a synapomorphy of the Rafflesiaceae. Thus, the characteristic features that define the floral chamber in these closely related genera are not homologous. These differences refute the prevailing hypothesis that similarities between Sapria and Rafflesia are ancestral in the family. Instead, our data indicate that Rafflesia-like and Sapria-like floral chambers represent two distinct derivations of this morphology. The developmental repatterning we identified in Rafflesia, in particular, may have provided architectural reinforcement, which permitted the explosive growth in floral diameter that has arisen secondarily within this subclade. PMID:24167265

  11. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2014-04-03

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  12. [A Standing Balance Evaluation Method Based on Largest Lyapunov Exponent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang; Zhao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of human standing balance scientifically, we in this study proposed a new evaluation method based on the chaos nonlinear analysis theory. In this method, a sinusoidal acceleration stimulus in forward/backward direction was forced under the subjects' feet, which was supplied by a motion platform. In addition, three acceleration sensors, which were fixed to the shoulder, hip and knee of each subject, were applied to capture the balance adjustment dynamic data. Through reconstructing the system phase space, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of the dynamic data of subjects' different segments, then used the sum of the squares of the difference between each LLE (SSDLLE) as the balance capabilities evaluation index. Finally, 20 subjects' indexes were calculated, and compared with evaluation results of existing methods. The results showed that the SSDLLE were more in line with the subjects' performance during the experiment, and it could measure the body's balance ability to some extent. Moreover, the results also illustrated that balance level was determined by the coordinate ability of various joints, and there might be more balance control strategy in the process of maintaining balance.

  13. Benchmark Testing of the Largest Titanium Aluminide Sheet Subelement Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Krause, David L.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate wrought titanium aluminide (gamma TiAl) as a viable candidate material for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) exhaust nozzle, an international team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field successfully fabricated and tested the largest gamma TiAl sheet structure ever manufactured. The gamma TiAl sheet structure, a 56-percent subscale divergent flap subelement, was fabricated for benchmark testing in three-point bending. Overall, the subelement was 84-cm (33-in.) long by 13-cm (5-in.) wide by 8-cm (3-in.) deep. Incorporated into the subelement were features that might be used in the fabrication of a full-scale divergent flap. These features include the use of: (1) gamma TiAl shear clips to join together sections of corrugations, (2) multiple gamma TiAl face sheets, (3) double hot-formed gamma TiAl corrugations, and (4) brazed joints. The structural integrity of the gamma TiAl sheet subelement was evaluated by conducting a room-temperature three-point static bend test.

  14. Largest US oil and gas fields, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-06

    The Largest US Oil and Gas Fields is a technical report and part of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) series presenting distributions of US crude oil and natural gas resources, developed using field-level data collected by EIA`s annual survey of oil and gas proved reserves. The series` objective is to provide useful information beyond that routinely presented in the EIA annual report on crude oil and natural gas reserves. These special reports also will provide oil and gas resource analysts with a fuller understanding of the nature of US crude oil and natural gas occurrence, both at the macro level and with respect to the specific subjects addressed. The series` approach is to integrate EIA`s crude oil and natural gas survey data with related data obtained from other authoritative sources, and then to present illustrations and analyses of interest to a broad spectrum of energy information users ranging from the general public to oil and gas industry personnel.

  15. Characterization of the Largest Effector Gene Cluster of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Vincon, Volker; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-01-01

    In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function. PMID:24992561

  16. Largest meteor since Tunguska event explodes above Russian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-02-01

    The meteor that disintegrated in the atmosphere above Chelyabinsk, Russia, on 15 February, injuring more than 1000 people and causing widespread property damage from the shock wave, is the largest such incident since the 1908 Tunguska event in Siberia, according to Paul Chodas, research scientist in the Near-Earth Object (NEO) program office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. During a 15 February teleconference, Chodas said it was an "incredible coincidence" that asteroid DA14 passed safely by Earth on the same day as the Chelyabinsk meteor; the 45-meter-wide asteroid sped by the planet at a distance of just 27,700 kilometers away on its closest approach. He stressed that the meteor was not related to DA14. The meteor "was coming from the wrong direction and at a completely different velocity," he said, noting that the orbit of the meteor went out to the asteroid belt while the orbit of DA14 "is very Earth-like, it does not go out so far."

  17. Elephants have relatively the largest cerebellum size of mammals.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Busisiwe C; Spocter, Muhammad A; Haagensen, Mark; Manger, Paul R

    2012-04-01

    The current study used MR imaging to determine the volume of the cerebellum and its component parts in the brain of three adult male African elephants (Loxodonta africana) and compared this with published data from Asian elephants and other mammalian species including odontocete cetaceans, primates, chiropterans, insectivores, carnivores, and artiodactyls. The cerebellum of the adult elephant has a volume of ∼925 mL (average of both African and Asian species). Allometric analysis indicates that the elephant has the largest relative cerebellum size of all mammals studied to date. In addition, both odontocete cetaceans and microchiropterans appear to have large relative cerebellar sizes. The vermal and hemispheric components of the African elephant cerebellum are both large relative to other mammals of similar brain size, however, for odontocete cetaceans the vermal component is small and the hemispheric component is large. These volumetric observations are related to life-histories and anatomies of the species investigated. The current study provides context for one aspect of the elephant brain in the broader picture of mammalian brain evolution.

  18. Characterization of the largest effector gene cluster of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Brefort, Thomas; Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Neidig, Nina; Doehlemann, Gunther; Vincon, Volker; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-07-01

    In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function.

  19. Largest known historical eruption in Africa: Dubbi volcano, Eritrea, 1861

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiart, Pierre; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2000-04-01

    Dubbi volcano, located in the northeast part of the Afar triangle, erupted explosively in May 1861, showering maritime traffic in the Red Sea with pumice and plunging coastal settlements into darkness. Earthquakes associated with the opening phase of the eruption were felt in Yemen, and explosions were heard as far as Massawa, 330 km distant. More than 100 local inhabitants were reported killed, possibly as a result of pyroclastic flow emplacement. By October 1861, activity switched to basaltic fire-fountaining focused along a 4-km-long summit fissure that fed several lava flows that traveled as far as 22 km. We present a reconstruction of this unusual explosive and effusive eruption sequence based on interpretation of contemporary accounts, analysis of satellite imagery, field work, and laboratory geochemistry. The volume of lava flows alone, 3.5 km3, makes this the largest reported historical eruption in Africa. An anomalously cold Northern Hemisphere summer in 1862, recorded in tree-ring records, could be the result of Dubbi's sulfate aerosol veil.

  20. LHC World Largest Vacuum Systems Being Commissioned at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Jose Miguel

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with its 26.7 km of circumference and three different vacuum systems for the beams and insulation vacuum for magnets and liquid helium transfer lines, will have the world's largest vacuum system operating over a wide range of pressures and employing an impressive array of vacuum technologies. This system is composed by 54 km of UHV vacuum for the circulating beams and 50 km of insulation vacuum. Over the 54 km of UHV beam vacuum, 48 km of this are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K). The remaining 6 km of beam vacuum containing the insertions for “cleaning” the proton beams, radiofrequency cavities for accelerating the protons as well as beam-monitoring equipment is at ambient temperature and uses non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings. The noble gases and methane is pumped out by 780 ion pumps. Pressure readings are provided by 170 Bayard-Alpert gauges and 1084 gauges (Pirani and cold cathode Penning). The cryogenic insulation vacuums while technically less demanding, impress by their size (50 km) and volume (15000 m3). Once roughed using mechanical pumps, the vacuum relies on the cryopumping which allows reaching pressure in the 10-4 Pa range.

  1. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F

    2011-11-22

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century.

  2. Annual trauma load of the world's largest indoor skiing center.

    PubMed

    Van Laarhoven, S N; Latten, G; de Loos, E; van Hemert, W; Vles, G F

    2017-04-01

    There is limited data on the trauma load caused by indoor skiing centers. Therefore, all patients treated at the accident and emergency department of our level I trauma center who sustained injuries at the world's largest indoor skiing center were analyzed during a 3-year period. Business intelligence was used to identify all patients who sustained injury at SnowWorld, Landgraaf, The Netherlands, and were seen at the accident and emergency department of the Zuyderland Medical Center from January 1, 2012 till December 31, 2014. Data were collected on patient characteristics, trauma mechanism, transportation, admission, diagnostics, injury and its severity, and treatment. Of the 732 patients seen, 305 had a fracture and 80 a dislocation. Most patients were male snowboarders and most injuries were sustained during winter. More than 2000 X-rays and 100 CT scans were required. Seventy-two patients were admitted and immediate surgery was performed in 21 patients. Ten patients had Injury Severity Scores of 10 or higher. Snowboarders differed significantly from skiers on several parameters, e.g., 1 in 4 snowboarders seen had sustained a distal radius fracture compared to 1 in 100 skiers. Acquiring more insight into the characteristics of this specific patient population could benefit clinical care and help clinicians identify and target preventive strategies. IV.

  3. The National Ignition Facility: The World's Largest Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I

    2003-10-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. When completed, NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing an international center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} Bars, conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars, planets and in nuclear weapons. NIF has now completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilo-joules of infrared light, exceeding design requirements. Operation of single beams at the second harmonic (531 nm) and third harmonic (351 nm) at greater than 10 kilojoules have also exceeded the performance criteria. NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance and results from recent laser commissioning shots, and plans for commissioning diagnostics for experiments on NIF.

  4. Four corners: The largest US methane anomaly viewed from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kort, Eric A.; Frankenberg, Christian; Costigan, Keeley R.; Lindenmaier, Rodica; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Wunch, Debra

    2014-10-01

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas and ozone precursor. Quantifying methane emissions is critical for projecting and mitigating changes to climate and air quality. Here we present CH4 observations made from space combined with Earth-based remote sensing column measurements. Results indicate the largest anomalous CH4 levels viewable from space over the conterminous U.S. are located at the Four Corners region in the Southwest U.S. Emissions exceeding inventory estimates, totaling 0.59 Tg CH4/yr [0.50-0.67; 2σ], are necessary to bring high-resolution simulations and observations into agreement. This underestimated source approaches 10% of the EPA estimate of total U.S. CH4 emissions from natural gas. The persistence of this CH4 signal from 2003 onward indicates that the source is likely from established gas, coal, and coalbed methane mining and processing. This work demonstrates that space-based observations can identify anomalous CH4 emission source regions and quantify their emissions with the use of a transport model.

  5. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2011-01-01

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century. PMID:22025693

  6. New surprises in the largest magnetosphere of our solar system.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Norbert

    2007-10-12

    En route to its ultimate rendezvous with Pluto, the New Horizons spacecraft passed through the magnetic and plasma environment of Jupiter in February 2007. Onboard instruments collected high-resolution images, spectroscopic data, and information about charged particles. The results have revealed unusual structure and variation in Jupiter's plasma and large plasmoids that travel down the magnetotail. Data on Jupiter's aurora provide details of the interaction with the solar wind, and a major volcanic eruption from the moon Io was observed during the encounter.

  7. Incrimination of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein E1 (hnRNP-E1) as a Candidate Sensor of Physiological Folate Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ying-Sheng; Khan, Rehana A.; Zhang, Yonghua; Xiao, Suhong; Wang, Mu; Hansen, Deborah K.; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Antony, Aśok C.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the sensing of varying degrees of physiological folate deficiency, prior to adaptive optimization of cellular folate uptake through the translational up-regulation of folate receptors (FR) is unclear. Because homocysteine, which accumulates intracellularly during folate deficiency, stimulated interactions between heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 (hnRNP-E1) and an 18-base FR-α mRNA cis-element that led to increased FR biosynthesis and net up-regulation of FR at cell surfaces, hnRNP-E1 was a plausible candidate sensor of folate deficiency. Accordingly, using purified components, we evaluated the physiological basis whereby l-homocysteine triggered these RNA-protein interactions to stimulate FR biosynthesis. l-Homocysteine induced a concentration-dependent increase in RNA-protein binding affinity throughout the range of physiological folate deficiency, which correlated with a proportionate increase in translation of FR in vitro and in cultured human cells. Targeted reduction of newly synthesized hnRNP-E1 proteins by siRNA to hnRNP-E1 mRNA reduced both constitutive and l-homocysteine-induced rates of FR biosynthesis. Furthermore, l-homocysteine covalently bound hnRNP-E1 via multiple protein-cysteine-S-S-homocysteine mixed disulfide bonds within K-homology domains known to interact with mRNA. These data suggest that a concentration-dependent, sequential disruption of critical cysteine-S-S-cysteine bonds by covalently bound l-homocysteine progressively unmasks an underlying RNA-binding pocket in hnRNP-E1 to optimize interaction with FR-α mRNA cis-element preparatory to FR up-regulation. Collectively, such data incriminate hnRNP-E1 as a physiologically relevant, sensitive, cellular sensor of folate deficiency. Because diverse mammalian and viral mRNAs also interact with this RNA-binding domain with functional consequences to their protein expression, homocysteinylated hnRNP-E1 also appears well positioned to orchestrate a novel

  8. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  9. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei; Wang, Hualin; Lou, Zhiyong

    2015-11-11

    Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and in multiple

  10. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 regulates protein disulphide isomerase translation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, N; Peng, N; Huang, S; Wang, S Q; Zhao, J; Su, L; Zhang, Y; Zhang, S; Zhao, B; Miao, J

    2015-03-01

    Endothelium-derived protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation in vivo. But, how to control PDI overproduction in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-activated vascular endothelial cells (VECs) is not well understood. In this study, we try to answer this question using our newly identified activator of mTOC1 3-benzyl-5-((2-nitrophenoxy) methyl)-dihydrofuran-2 (3H)-one (3BDO) that has been shown to protect VECs. First, we performed a proteomics analysis on the oxLDL-activated vascular VECs in the presence or absence of 3BDO. Next, we constructed the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 (hnRNP E1) mutants at Ser43 and used the RNA-ChIP technique to investigate the relationship between hnRNP E1 and PDI production. Furthermore, we examined the effect of 3BDO on oxLDL-altered phosphorylation of Akt1 and Akt2. Finally, we studied the effect of 3BDO on oxLDL-altered PDI protein level in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice with advanced atherosclerosis. In VECs, oxLDL-increased PDI protein level, induced hnRNP E1 phosphorylation at Ser43, suppressed the binding of hnRNP E1 to PDI 5'UTR and induced the phosphorylation of Akt2 but not Akt1. All of these processes were blocked by 3BDO. Importantly, Ser43 mutant of hnRNP E1 inhibited the increase of PDI protein level and the decrease of the binding of hnRNP E1 and PDI 5'UTR induced by oxLDL. Furthermore, 3BDO suppressed oxLDL-induced PDI protein increase in the serum and plaque endothelium of apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice. hnRNP E1 is a new regulator of PDI translation in oxLDL-activated VECs, and 3BDO is a powerful agent for controlling PDI overproduction. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cassini RADAR Observes Titan's Kraken Mare, The Largest Extraterrestrial Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging by Cassini's RADAR instrument beginning in 2006 revealed the presence of hundreds of hydrocarbon lakes and three large seas in Titan's north polar region [1,2]. Kraken Mare appeared to be the largest sea in IR images [3] but only the northern end was imaged by RADAR prior to 2012. High altitude SAR (HiSAR) observations on recent Titan flybys T84, T91, and T92 now provide complete coverage of Kraken and environs to ~50°N, at resolutions of 2-10 km. Backscatter statistics of the sea are 0.002 × 0.04, i.e., any return is substantially less than the noise and much less than typical dry land cross sections of 0.1-1.5. We conclude that Kraken is liquid filled to substantial depth over its entire extent. A surprising result is that the major seas all lie within a 1800 x 900 km 'box' (Fig.1). A third of the area inside this box (0.6 M km2) is sea, whereas the largest lake outside the box is only 0.005 M km2. Kraken's overall shape is complex (lobateness 4.4 vs 2.1 for Ligeia) but its 0.44 M km2 is divided by 20 to 160 km wide straits into 5 sub-basins that are elongated E-W across the box. Numerous straight shoreline segments parallel the edges of the box. Others parallel the 10°, 80°, and 170°W meridians, as do the rectangular drainage patterns mapped by [4]. These alignments suggest a key role for tectonics in creating the depressions occupied by the northern seas. Fensal and Aztlan (the 'lazy H' of dune-filled lows straddling the equator at longitudes 0°-70°W) form a similar pattern of elongated depressions connected by a narrow strait within a rectangular box. In contrast, Titan's small lakes are widely distributed. Multiple depressions with radar-dark floors have been identified near the south pole and hypothesized as former seabeds [5], but though similar in size to the northern seas, they are not aligned with one another or tightly clustered. Thus, the geography of the north and south poles will remain distinct even if

  12. A second CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal in the influenza A virus NS2 protein contributes to the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengping; Chen, Jingjing; Chen, Quanjiao; Wang, Huadong; Yao, Yanfeng; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus NS2 protein, also called nuclear export protein (NEP), is crucial for the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins. However, the molecular mechanisms of NEP mediation in this process remain incompletely understood. A leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES2) in NEP, located at the predicted N2 helix of the N-terminal domain, was identified in the present study. NES2 was demonstrated to be a transferable NES, with its nuclear export activity depending on the nuclear export receptor chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-mediated pathway. The interaction between NEP and CRM1 is coordinately regulated by both the previously reported NES (NES1) and now the new NES2. Deletion of the NES1 enhances the interaction between NEP and CRM1, and deletion of the NES1 and NES2 motifs completely abolishes this interaction. Moreover, NES2 interacts with CRM1 in the mammalian two-hybrid system. Mutant viruses containing NES2 alterations generated by reversed genetics exhibit reduced viral growth and delay in the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). The NES2 motif is highly conserved in the influenza A and B viruses. The results demonstrate that leucine-rich NES2 is involved in the nuclear export of vRNPs and contributes to the understanding of nucleocytoplasmic transport of influenza virus vRNPs.

  13. Mechanistic and Structural Studies of Protein-Only RNase P Compared to Ribonucleoproteins Reveal the Two Faces of the Same Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schelcher, Cédric; Sauter, Claude; Giegé, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    RNase P, the essential activity that performs the 5′ maturation of tRNA precursors, can be achieved either by ribonucleoproteins containing a ribozyme present in the three domains of life or by protein-only enzymes called protein-only RNase P (PRORP) that occur in eukaryote nuclei and organelles. A fast growing list of studies has investigated three-dimensional structures and mode of action of PRORP proteins. Results suggest that similar to ribozymes, PRORP proteins have two main domains. A clear functional analogy can be drawn between the specificity domain of the RNase P ribozyme and PRORP pentatricopeptide repeat domain, and between the ribozyme catalytic domain and PRORP N4BP1, YacP-like Nuclease domain. Moreover, both types of enzymes appear to dock with the acceptor arm of tRNA precursors and make specific contacts with the corner of pre-tRNAs. While some clear differences can still be delineated between PRORP and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) RNase P, the two types of enzymes seem to use, fundamentally, the same catalytic mechanism involving two metal ions. The occurrence of PRORP and RNP RNase P represents a remarkable example of convergent evolution. It might be the unique witness of an ongoing replacement of catalytic RNAs by proteins for enzymatic activities. PMID:27348014

  14. Genome size analyses of Pucciniales reveal the largest fungal genomes.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Sílvia; Ramos, Ana Paula; Pires, Ana Sofia; Azinheira, Helena G; Caldeirinha, Patrícia; Link, Tobias; Abranches, Rita; Silva, Maria do Céu; Voegele, Ralf T; Loureiro, João; Talhinhas, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales) are biotrophic plant pathogens which exhibit diverse complexities in their life cycles and host ranges. The completion of genome sequencing of a few rust fungi has revealed the occurrence of large genomes. Sequencing efforts for other rust fungi have been hampered by uncertainty concerning their genome sizes. Flow cytometry was recently applied to estimate the genome size of a few rust fungi, and confirmed the occurrence of large genomes in this order (averaging 225.3 Mbp, while the average for Basidiomycota was 49.9 Mbp and was 37.7 Mbp for all fungi). In this work, we have used an innovative and simple approach to simultaneously isolate nuclei from the rust and its host plant in order to estimate the genome size of 30 rust species by flow cytometry. Genome sizes varied over 10-fold, from 70 to 893 Mbp, with an average genome size value of 380.2 Mbp. Compared to the genome sizes of over 1800 fungi, Gymnosporangium confusum possesses the largest fungal genome ever reported (893.2 Mbp). Moreover, even the smallest rust genome determined in this study is larger than the vast majority of fungal genomes (94%). The average genome size of the Pucciniales is now of 305.5 Mbp, while the average Basidiomycota genome size has shifted to 70.4 Mbp and the average for all fungi reached 44.2 Mbp. Despite the fact that no correlation could be drawn between the genome sizes, the phylogenomics or the life cycle of rust fungi, it is interesting to note that rusts with Fabaceae hosts present genomes clearly larger than those with Poaceae hosts. Although this study comprises only a small fraction of the more than 7000 rust species described, it seems already evident that the Pucciniales represent a group where genome size expansion could be a common characteristic. This is in sharp contrast to sister taxa, placing this order in a relevant position in fungal genomics research.

  15. Flow mixing at the World's largest river confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Jim; Ianniruberto, Marco; Gualtieri, Carlo; Paes de Almeida, Renato; Freitas, Bernardo; Nogueira, Pedro; Cisneros, Julia

    2017-04-01

    River confluences form key nodes within all fluvial networks and points of significant, and non-linear, changes in flow discharge, sediment grain size and bed morphology. It is generally acknowledged that the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics within the confluence zone are influenced by the junction planform, the momentum flux ratio between the merging streams, and the level of concordance between channel beds at the confluence entrance. Recent work has also identified the role of density differences between the confluent flows as potentially exerting a significant influence on fluid mixing. Perhaps the most well-known example, which has attracted considerable recent study, is at the world's largest river confluence - the Rio Solimões and Rio Negro (the Encontro das Águas), near Manaus, in the Amazonian basin. This paper sheds new light on the patterns of mixing at the Encontro das Águas as revealed by combined multibeam echo sounder (MBES) and acoustic Doppler current profiling (aDcp) surveys. The MBES survey reveals that the scour and bed morphology at this confluence, that can be up to c. 80m deep, is dominated by the presence of Cretaceous bedrock and that the mobile bedload sediment from the Rio Solimões is confined to a narrow zone of transport. The suspended sediment plume from the Rio Solimões interacts with the bedrock, which can comprise subaqueous roughness up to 20m in height, and is consequently diverted both laterally and vertically by this topography. The aDcp surveys reveal the nature of this topographic interaction and suggest that the routing of sediment-laden fluid within the junction, and the patterns of upwelling on the flow surface, are significantly influenced by these flow-bedrock interactions. Details of the topography and these fluid dynamic interactions will be presented, together with an analysis of satellite imagery that links the longevity of the location of some of the upwellings to the presence of bedrock roughness.

  16. Stratification at the Earth's largest hyperacidic lake and its consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudron, Corentin; Campion, Robin; Rouwet, Dmitri; Lecocq, Thomas; Capaccioni, Bruno; Syahbana, Devy; Suparjan; Purwanto, Bambang Heri; Bernard, Alain

    2017-02-01

    Volcanic lakes provide windows into the interior of volcanoes as they integrate the heat flux discharged by a magma body and condense volcanic gases. Volcanic lake temperatures and geochemical compositions therefore typically serve as warnings for resumed unrest or prior to eruptions. If acidic and hot, these lakes are usually considered to be too convective to allow any stratification within their waters. Kawah Ijen volcano, featuring the largest hyperacidic lake on Earth (volume of 27 million m3), is less homogeneous than previously thought. Hourly temperature measurements reveal the development of a stagnant layer of cold waters (<30 °C), overlying warmer and denser water (generally above 30 °C and density ∼1.083 kg/m3). Examination of 20 yrs of historical records and temporary measurements show a systematic thermal stratification during rainy seasons. The yearly rupture of stratification at the end of the rainy season causes a sudden release of dissolved gases below the cold water layer which appears to generate a lake overturn, i.e. limnic eruption, and a resonance of the lake, i.e. a seiche, highlighting a new hazard for these extreme reservoirs. A minor non-volcanic event, such as a heavy rainfall or an earthquake, may act as a trigger. The density driven overturn requires specific salinity-temperature conditions for the colder and less saline top water layer to sink into the hot saline water. Spectacular degassing occurs when the dissolved gases, progressively stored during the rainy season due to a weakened diffusion of carbon dioxide in the top layer, are suddenly released. These findings challenge the homogenization assumption at acidic lakes and stress the need to develop appropriate monitoring setups.

  17. High feeding costs limit dive time in the largest whales.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Gutiérrez, A; Croll, D A; Tershy, B R

    2002-06-01

    Large body size usually extends dive duration in air-breathing vertebrates. However, the two largest predators on earth, the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) and the fin whale (B. physalus), perform short dives for their size. Here, we test the hypothesis that the foraging behavior of these two species (lunge-feeding) is energetically expensive and limits their dive duration. We estimated the cost of lunge-feeding in both species using an approach that combined attaching time/depth recorders to seven blue whales and eight fin whales and comparing the collected dive information with predictions made by optimality models of dive behavior. We show that the rate at which whales recovered from a foraging dive was twice that of a non-foraging dive and that the cost of foraging relative to the cost of travel to and from the prey patch was 3.15 in blue whales (95 % CI 2.58-3.72) and 3.60 in fin whales (95 % CI 2.35-4.85). Whales foraged in small areas (<1 km(2)) and foraging bouts lasted more than one dive, indicating that prey did not disperse and thus that prey dispersal could not account for the limited dive durations of the whales. Despite the enormous size of blue whales and fin whales, the high energetic costs of lunge-feeding confine them to short durations of submergence and to areas with dense prey aggregations. As a corollary, because of their limited foraging time under water, these whales may be particularly vulnerable to perturbations in prey abundance.

  18. Global assessment of nutrient loads to the world's largest lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Gabriel; Reder, Klara; Malsy, Marcus; Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Lakes are essential resources of drinking water for a large part of mankind. Even so, most of the industrial and domestic waste water is discharged - often untreated - into rivers and streams that are finally the tributaries of these important freshwater bodies. Additionally, diffuse nutrient sources such as fertilizer and atmospheric deposition exacerbate existing algal blooms and low oxygen concentrations in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. In this tense atmosphere of competing water uses, it is necessary to analyze all sources of pollution as well as their total contributions in order to protect these water bodies against deterioration. Finally, this is a general and urgently needed basis for developing recommendations for involved stakeholders and decision makers. Therefore, the project eartH2Observe, initiated and financed by the European Commission, creates the necessary and underlying quantitative and qualitative hydrological and water use data. In this context, information for global as well as for regional water resource assessments is being prepared based on new earth observations and an ensemble of global hydrological models. As a member of this ensemble, WaterGAP3 provides global estimates of lake water quality relevant parameters on a 5 arc minutes grid, namely total phosphorus and total nitrogen. These nutrient loads to lakes from different sources such as industrial fertilizer, organic fertilizer, domestic loads, atmospheric deposition, and urban surface runoff are estimated for the period 1990 to 2010 in a monthly time step. Whereas nutrient loads and their changes into numerous lakes worldwide are calculated, a special focus is set on nutrient loads into the large and shallow Lake Peipus, which is located between Estonia and Russia and subject to blooms of harmful cyanobacteria. We present estimates, trends, as well as sources of present nutrient loads (TN and TP) to the world's largest lakes with detailed insights to the Lake Peipus situation

  19. Biogenesis of telomerase ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Emily D.; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase adds simple-sequence repeats to the ends of linear chromosomes to counteract the loss of end sequence inherent in conventional DNA replication. Catalytic activity for repeat synthesis results from the cooperation of the telomerase reverse transcriptase protein (TERT) and the template-containing telomerase RNA (TER). TERs vary widely in sequence and structure but share a set of motifs required for TERT binding and catalytic activity. Species-specific TER motifs play essential roles in RNP biogenesis, stability, trafficking, and regulation. Remarkably, the biogenesis pathways that generate mature TER differ across eukaryotes. Furthermore, the cellular processes that direct the assembly of a biologically functional telomerase holoenzyme and its engagement with telomeres are evolutionarily varied and regulated. This review highlights the diversity of strategies for telomerase RNP biogenesis, RNP assembly, and telomere recruitment among ciliates, yeasts, and vertebrates and suggests common themes in these pathways and their regulation. PMID:22875809

  20. Genome size analyses of Pucciniales reveal the largest fungal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Sílvia; Ramos, Ana Paula; Pires, Ana Sofia; Azinheira, Helena G.; Caldeirinha, Patrícia; Link, Tobias; Abranches, Rita; Silva, Maria do Céu; Voegele, Ralf T.; Loureiro, João; Talhinhas, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales) are biotrophic plant pathogens which exhibit diverse complexities in their life cycles and host ranges. The completion of genome sequencing of a few rust fungi has revealed the occurrence of large genomes. Sequencing efforts for other rust fungi have been hampered by uncertainty concerning their genome sizes. Flow cytometry was recently applied to estimate the genome size of a few rust fungi, and confirmed the occurrence of large genomes in this order (averaging 225.3 Mbp, while the average for Basidiomycota was 49.9 Mbp and was 37.7 Mbp for all fungi). In this work, we have used an innovative and simple approach to simultaneously isolate nuclei from the rust and its host plant in order to estimate the genome size of 30 rust species by flow cytometry. Genome sizes varied over 10-fold, from 70 to 893 Mbp, with an average genome size value of 380.2 Mbp. Compared to the genome sizes of over 1800 fungi, Gymnosporangium confusum possesses the largest fungal genome ever reported (893.2 Mbp). Moreover, even the smallest rust genome determined in this study is larger than the vast majority of fungal genomes (94%). The average genome size of the Pucciniales is now of 305.5 Mbp, while the average Basidiomycota genome size has shifted to 70.4 Mbp and the average for all fungi reached 44.2 Mbp. Despite the fact that no correlation could be drawn between the genome sizes, the phylogenomics or the life cycle of rust fungi, it is interesting to note that rusts with Fabaceae hosts present genomes clearly larger than those with Poaceae hosts. Although this study comprises only a small fraction of the more than 7000 rust species described, it seems already evident that the Pucciniales represent a group where genome size expansion could be a common characteristic. This is in sharp contrast to sister taxa, placing this order in a relevant position in fungal genomics research. PMID:25206357

  1. GIS learning tool for world's largest earthquakes and their causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Moumita

    The objective of this thesis is to increase awareness about earthquakes among people, especially young students by showing the five largest and two most predictable earthquake locations in the world and their plate tectonic settings. This is a geographic based interactive tool which could be used for learning about the cause of great earthquakes in the past and the safest places on the earth in order to avoid direct effect of earthquakes. This approach provides an effective way of learning for the students as it is very user friendly and more aligned to the interests of the younger generation. In this tool the user can click on the various points located on the world map which will open a picture and link to the webpage for that point, showing detailed information of the earthquake history of that place including magnitude of quake, year of past quakes and the plate tectonic settings that made this place earthquake prone. Apart from knowing the earthquake related information students will also be able to customize the tool to suit their needs or interests. Students will be able to add/remove layers, measure distance between any two points on the map, select any place on the map and know more information for that place, create a layer from this set to do a detail analysis, run a query, change display settings, etc. At the end of this tool the user has to go through the earthquake safely guidelines in order to be safe during an earthquake. This tool uses Java as programming language and uses Map Objects Java Edition (MOJO) provided by ESRI. This tool is developed for educational purpose and hence its interface has been kept simple and easy to use so that students can gain maximum knowledge through it instead of having a hard time to install it. There are lots of details to explore which can help more about what a GIS based tool is capable of. Only thing needed to run this tool is latest JAVA edition installed in their machine. This approach makes study more fun and

  2. Functional characterization of the conserved amino acids in Pop1p, the largest common protein subunit of yeast RNases P and MRP

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shaohua; Hsieh, John; Nugent, Rebecca L.; Coughlin, Daniel J.; Fierke, Carol A.; Engelke, David R.

    2006-01-01

    RNase P and RNase MRP are ribonucleoprotein enzymes required for 5′-end maturation of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs) and processing of precursor ribosomal RNAs, respectively. In yeast, RNase P and MRP holoenzymes have eight protein subunits in common, with Pop1p being the largest at >100 kDa. Little is known about the functions of Pop1p, beyond the fact that it binds specifically to the RNase P RNA subunit, RPR1 RNA. In this study, we refined the previous Pop1 phylogenetic sequence alignment and found four conserved regions. Highly conserved amino acids in yeast Pop1p were mutagenized by randomization and conditionally defective mutations were obtained. Effects of the Pop1p mutations on pre-tRNA processing, pre-rRNA processing, and stability of the RNA subunits of RNase P and MRP were examined. In most cases, functional defects in RNase P and RNase MRP in vivo were consistent with assembly defects of the holoenzymes, although moderate kinetic defects in RNase P were also observed. Most mutations affected both pre-tRNA and pre-rRNA processing, but a few mutations preferentially interfered with only RNase P or only RNase MRP. In addition, one temperature-sensitive mutation had no effect on either tRNA or rRNA processing, consistent with an additional role for RNase P, RNase MRP, or Pop1p in some other form. This study shows that the Pop1p subunit plays multiple roles in the assembly and function of of RNases P and MRP, and that the functions can be differentiated through the mutations in conserved residues. PMID:16618965

  3. Watching the Creation of Southern California's Largest Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The new Diamond Valley Lake Reservoir near the city of Hemet in Riverside County is billed as the largest earthworks construction project in U.S.history. Construction began in 1995 and involved 31 million cubic meters of foundation excavation and 84 million cubic meters of embankment construction. This set of MISR images captures the most recent phase in the reservoir's activation. At the upper left is a natural-color view acquired by the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on March 14, 2000 (Terra orbit 1273), shortly after the Metropolitan Water District began filling the reservoir with water from the Colorado River and Northern California. Water appears darker than the surrounding land. The image at the upper right was acquired nearly one year later on March 1, 2001 (Terra orbit 6399), and shows a clear increase in the reservoir's water content. When full, the lake will hold nearly a trillion liters of water.

    According to the Metropolitan Water District, the 7 kilometer x 3 kilometer reservoir nearly doubles Southern California's above-groundwater storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against drought and a six-month emergency supply in the event of earthquake damage to a major aqueduct. In the face of electrical power shortages, it is also expected to reduce dependence on the pumping of water from northern mountains during the high-demand summer months. An unexpected result of site excavation was the uncovering of mastodon and mammoth skeletons along with bones from extinct species not previously thought to have been indigenous to the area, such as the giant long-horned bison and North American lion. A museum and interpretive center is being built to protect these finds.

    The lower MISR image, from May 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view combining data from the instrument's 26-degree forward view (displayed as blue) with data from the 26-degree backward

  4. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  5. Drilling the Bushveld Complex- the world's largest layered mafic intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Webb, S. J.; Trumbull, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The fact that surprising new discoveries can be made in layered mafic intrusions (e.g., subtle 100-150 m cyclicity in apparently homogeneous cumulates over 1000s of m) means that we are still in the first-order characterization phase of understanding these objects. Accordingly, we have secured funding from ICDP for a planning workshop to be held in Johannesburg in early 2014, aimed at scientific drilling of the Bushveld Complex, the world's largest layered mafic intrusion. Science objectives include, but are not limited to: 1. Magma chamber processes & melt evolution. How many melts/magmas/mushes were involved, what were their compositions and how did they interact? What, if anything, is missing from the Complex, and where did it go? Did Bushveld magmatism have an effect upon Earth's atmosphere at 2 Ga? 2. Crust-mantle interactions & origin of Bushveld granitoids. Are Bushveld granites & rhyolites crustal melts, differentiates from the mafic magmas or products of immiscibility? How can the evolved isotopic signatures in the mafic rocks (e.g., epsilon Nd to -8) be understood? 3. Origin of ore deposits. What were the relative roles of gravity settling, magma mixing, immiscibility and hydrothermal fluid transport in producing the PGE, Cr and V deposits? We have identified 3 potential drilling targets representing a total of ~12 km of drill core. Exact locations of drill sites are to be discussed at the workshop. Target A- East-Central Bushveld Complex. We propose 3 overlapping 3 km boreholes that will provide the first roof-to-floor continuous coverage of the Rustenburg Layered Suite. These boreholes will represent a curated, internationally available reference collection of Bushveld material for present and future research. Target B- Southeastern Bushveld Complex. We propose a single borehole of ~2 km depth, collared in Rooiberg felsite, and positioned to intersect the Roof Zone, Upper Zone, Main Zone and floor of the Complex. Amongst other things, this site will

  6. Smart-Geology for the World's largest fossil oyster reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Djuricic, Ana; Rasztovits, Sascha; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    The geo-edutainment park "Fossilienwelt Weinviertel" at Stetten in Lower Austria exposes the world's largest fossil oyster biostrome. In the past decade, significant progress has been made in 3D digitizing sensor technology. To cope with the high amount of data, processing methods have been automated to a high degree. Consequently, we formulated the hypothesis that appropriate application of state-of-the-art 3D digitizing, data processing, and visualization technologies allows for a significant automation in paleontological prospection, making an evaluation of huge areas commercially feasible in both time and costs. We call the necessary processing steps "Smart Geology", being characterized by automation and large volumes of data. The Smart Geology project (FWF P 25883-N29) investigates three topics, 3D digitizing, automated geological and paleontological analysis and interpretation and finally investigating the applicability of smart devices for on-site accessibility of project data in order to support the two scientific hypotheses concerning the emerging process of the shell bed, i.e. was it formed by a tsunami or a major storm, and does it preserve pre- and post-event features. This contribution concentrates on the innovative and sophisticated 3D documentation and visualization processes being applied to virtualise approximately 15.000 fossil oysters at the approximately 25 by 17 m accessible shell bad. We decided to use a Terrestrial Laserscanner (TLS) for the determination of the geometrical 3D structures. The TLS achieves about 2 mm single point measurement accuracy. The scanning campaign provides a "raw" point cloud of approximately 1 bio. points at the respective area. Due to the scanning configuration used, the occurrence of occluded ares is minimized hence the full 3D structure of this unique site can be modelled. In addition, approximately 300 photos were taken with a nominal resolution of 0.6 mm per pixel. Sophisticated artificial lightning (close to

  7. Watching the Creation of Southern California's Largest Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The new Diamond Valley Lake Reservoir near the city of Hemet in Riverside County is billed as the largest earthworks construction project in U.S.history. Construction began in 1995 and involved 31 million cubic meters of foundation excavation and 84 million cubic meters of embankment construction. This set of MISR images captures the most recent phase in the reservoir's activation. At the upper left is a natural-color view acquired by the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on March 14, 2000 (Terra orbit 1273), shortly after the Metropolitan Water District began filling the reservoir with water from the Colorado River and Northern California. Water appears darker than the surrounding land. The image at the upper right was acquired nearly one year later on March 1, 2001 (Terra orbit 6399), and shows a clear increase in the reservoir's water content. When full, the lake will hold nearly a trillion liters of water.

    According to the Metropolitan Water District, the 7 kilometer x 3 kilometer reservoir nearly doubles Southern California's above-groundwater storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against drought and a six-month emergency supply in the event of earthquake damage to a major aqueduct. In the face of electrical power shortages, it is also expected to reduce dependence on the pumping of water from northern mountains during the high-demand summer months. An unexpected result of site excavation was the uncovering of mastodon and mammoth skeletons along with bones from extinct species not previously thought to have been indigenous to the area, such as the giant long-horned bison and North American lion. A museum and interpretive center is being built to protect these finds.

    The lower MISR image, from May 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view combining data from the instrument's 26-degree forward view (displayed as blue) with data from the 26-degree backward

  8. ALMA Partners Break Ground on World's Largest Millimeter Wavelength Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Scientists and dignitaries from North America, Europe, and Chile broke ground today (Thursday, November 6, 2003) on what will be the world's largest, most sensitive radio telescope operating at millimeter wavelengths. ALMA - the Atacama Large Millimeter Array - will be a single instrument composed of 64 high-precision antennas located on the Chajnantor plain of the Chilean Andes in the District of San Pedro de Atacama, 16,500 feet (5,000 meters) above sea level. ALMA's primary function will be to observe and image with unprecedented clarity the enigmatic cold regions of the Universe, which are optically dark, yet shine brightly in the millimeter portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. ALMA Array Artist's Conception of ALMA Array in Compact Configuration (Click on Image for Larger Version) Other Images Available: Artist's conception of the antennas for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array Moonrise over ALMA test equipment near Cerro Chajnantor, Chile VertexRSI antenna at the VLA test site The Atacama Large Millimeter Array is an international astronomy facility. ALMA is an equal partnership between Europe and North America, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile, and is funded in North America by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), and in Europe by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Spain. ALMA construction and operations are led on behalf of North America by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which is managed by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), and on behalf of Europe by ESO. "The U.S. National Science Foundation joins today with our North American partner, Canada, and with the European Southern Observatory, Spain, and Chile to prepare for a spectacular new instrument," said Dr. Rita Colwell, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation. "The Atacama Large Millimeter Array will expand our vision of the Universe with "eyes" that pierce the shrouded mantles of

  9. Vanillin inhibits translation and induces messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granule formation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: application and validation of high-content, image-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Aya; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Suga, Yohei; Izawa, Shingo; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin, generated by acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose, acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the cellular processes affected by vanillin using high-content, image-based profiling. Among 4,718 non-essential yeast deletion mutants, the morphology of those defective in the large ribosomal subunit showed significant similarity to that of vanillin-treated cells. The defects in these mutants were clustered in three domains of the ribosome: the mRNA tunnel entrance, exit and backbone required for small subunit attachment. To confirm that vanillin inhibited ribosomal function, we assessed polysome and messenger ribonucleoprotein granule formation after treatment with vanillin. Analysis of polysome profiles showed disassembly of the polysomes in the presence of vanillin. Processing bodies and stress granules, which are composed of non-translating mRNAs and various proteins, were formed after treatment with vanillin. These results suggest that vanillin represses translation in yeast cells.

  10. Purification and partial sequencing of the nuclear autoantigen RA33 shows that it is indistinguishable from the A2 protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, G; Hartmuth, K; Skriner, K; Maurer-Fogy, I; Sinski, A; Thalmann, E; Hassfeld, W; Barta, A; Smolen, J S

    1992-01-01

    RA33 is a nuclear autoantigen with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kD. Autoantibodies against RA33 are found in about 30% of sera from RA patients, but only occasionally in sera from patients with other connective tissue diseases. To characterize RA33, the antigen was purified from HeLa cell nuclear extracts to more than 90% homogeneity by affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose and by chromatofocusing. Sequence analysis of five tryptic peptides revealed that their sequences matched corresponding sequences of the A2 protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complex. Furthermore, RA33 was shown to be present in the 40S hnRNP complex and to behave indistinguishably from A2 in binding to single stranded DNA. In summary, these data strongly indicate that RA33 and A2 are the same protein, and thus identify on a molecular level a new autoantigen. Images PMID:1522214

  11. Vanillin Inhibits Translation and Induces Messenger Ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) Granule Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Application and Validation of High-Content, Image-Based Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Yohei; Izawa, Shingo; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin, generated by acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose, acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the cellular processes affected by vanillin using high-content, image-based profiling. Among 4,718 non-essential yeast deletion mutants, the morphology of those defective in the large ribosomal subunit showed significant similarity to that of vanillin-treated cells. The defects in these mutants were clustered in three domains of the ribosome: the mRNA tunnel entrance, exit and backbone required for small subunit attachment. To confirm that vanillin inhibited ribosomal function, we assessed polysome and messenger ribonucleoprotein granule formation after treatment with vanillin. Analysis of polysome profiles showed disassembly of the polysomes in the presence of vanillin. Processing bodies and stress granules, which are composed of non-translating mRNAs and various proteins, were formed after treatment with vanillin. These results suggest that vanillin represses translation in yeast cells. PMID:23637899

  12. Iceland as the largest source of natural air pollution in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Meinander, Outi; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur

    2017-04-01

    Arctic aerosols are often attributed to the Arctic Haze and long-range transport tracers. There is, however, an important dust source in the Arctic/Sub-arctic region which should receive more attention. The largest desert in the Arctic as well as in the Europe is Iceland with > 40,000 km2 of desert areas. The mean dust suspension frequency was 135 dust days annually in 1949-2012 with decreasing numbers in 2013-2015. The annual dust deposition was calculated as 31-40 million tons yr-1 affecting the area of > 500,000 km2. Satelite MODIS pictures have revealed dust plumes traveling > 1000 km at times. The physical properties of Icelandic dust showed differences in mineralogy, geochemical compositions, shapes, sizes, and colour, compared to the crustal mineral dust. Icelandic dust is of volcanic origin, dark in colour with sharp-tipped shards and large bubbles. About 80% of the particulate matter is volcanic glass rich in heavy metals, such as iron and titanium. Suspended dust measured at the glacial dust source consisted of such high number of close-to-ultrafine particles as concentrations during active eruptions. Generally, about 50% of the suspended PM10 are submicron particles in Iceland. Contrarily, suspended grains > 2 mm were captured during severe dust storm after the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption when the aeolian transport exceeded 11 t m-1 of materials and placed this storms among the most extreme wind erosion events recorded on Earth. Our reflectance measurements showed that Icelandic dust deposited on snow lowers the snow albedo and reduces the snow density as much as Black Carbon. Icelandic volcanic dust tends to act as a positive climate forcing agent, both directly and indirectly, which is different to what generally concluded for crustal dust in the 2013 IPCC report. The high frequency, severity and year-round activity of volcanic dust emissions suggest that Icelandic dust may contribute to Arctic warming.

  13. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Banas, Kelly; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M; Kmiec, Eric B

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  14. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M.; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  15. Archaeal virus with exceptional virion architecture and the largest single-stranded DNA genome

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Krupovic, Mart; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Sako, Yoshihiko; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David

    2012-01-01

    Known viruses build their particles using a restricted number of redundant structural solutions. Here, we describe the Aeropyrum coil-shaped virus (ACV), of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, with a virion architecture not previously observed in the viral world. The nonenveloped, hollow, cylindrical virion is formed from a coiling fiber, which consists of two intertwining halves of a single circular nucleoprotein. The virus ACV is also exceptional for its genomic properties. It is the only virus with a single-stranded (ss) DNA genome among the known hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses. Moreover, the size of its circular genome, 24,893 nt, is double that of the largest known ssDNA genome, suggesting an efficient solution for keeping ssDNA intact at 90–95 °C, the optimal temperature range of A. pernix growth. The genome content of ACV is in line with its unique morphology and confirms that ACV is not closely related to any known virus. PMID:22826255

  16. iCLIP reveals the function of hnRNP particles in splicing at individual nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    König, Julian; Zarnack, Kathi; Rot, Gregor; Curk, Tomaž; Kayikci, Melis; Zupan, Blaž; Turner, Daniel J.; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Ule, Jernej

    2010-01-01

    In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, nascent transcripts are associated with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles that are nucleated by hnRNP C. Despite their abundance however, it remained unclear whether these particles control pre-mRNA processing. Here, we developed individual-nucleotide resolution UV-cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to study the role of hnRNP C in splicing regulation. iCLIP data demonstrate that hnRNP C recognizes uridine tracts with a defined long-range spacing consistent with hnRNP particle organization. hnRNP particles assemble on both introns and exons, but remain generally excluded from splice sites. Integration of transcriptome-wide iCLIP data and alternative splicing profiles into an ‘RNA map’ indicates how the positioning of hnRNP particles determines their effect on inclusion of alternative exons. The ability of high-resolution iCLIP data to provide insights into the mechanism of this regulation holds promise for studies of other higher-order ribonucleoprotein complexes. PMID:20601959

  17. Morphological details in bloodstain particles.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2015-01-01

    During the commission of crimes blood can be transferred to the clothing of the offender or on other crime related objects. Bloodstain particles are sub-millimetre sized flakes that are lost from dried bloodstains. The nature of these red particles is easily confirmed using spectroscopic methods. In casework, bloodstain particles showing highly detailed morphological features were observed. These provided a rationale for a series of experiments described in this work. It was found that the "largest" particles are shed from blood deposited on polyester and polyamide woven fabrics. No particles are lost from the stains made on absorbent fabrics and from those made on knitted fabrics. The morphological features observed in bloodstain particles can provide important information on the substrates from which they were lost.

  18. Virus particles of cucumber green mottle mosaic tobamovirus move systemically in the phloem of infected cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Simón-Buela, L; García-Arenal, F

    1999-02-01

    Systemic movement through the phloem of infected host plants is a key process in the life cycle of plant viruses, knowledge of which is scant. A main point to be elucidated is the structural form in which virus infection moves within the phloem. Indirect evidence suggests that virions might be the viral structure that moves in the phloem, but data from direct analysis in phloem sap have not been reported. We have done such analysis in the system cucumber (from which phloem exudate can be collected)/cucumber green mottle mosaic tobamovirus (CGMMV). CGMMV has structurally well-characterized particles. Both CGMMV coat protein and RNA were found in phloem exudate from infected cucumbers. Analysis of the accessibility of CGMMV RNA in phloem exudate to RNase A indicates that it is protected within a ribonucleoprotein structure. The accessibility to RNase A of the RNA in these structures was as in virus particles. Centrifugation analyses showed that the ribonucleoprotein structures in the phloem exudate have the same mass and isopycnic density as virions. Virus particles indistinguishable from purified virions were detected by electron microscopy in phloem exudate. No evidence of free RNA or other CGMMV-related structure was found in phloem exudate of infected plants. These results indicate that CGMMV movement in the phloem occurs mainly, if not exclusively, in the form of virus particles.

  19. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans [Reno, NV; Chakrabarty, Rajan K [Reno, NV; Arnott, W Patrick [Reno, NV

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  20. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  1. Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cosmic connections between physics on the very largest and very smallest scales are reviewed with an emphasis on the symbiotic relation between elementary particle physics and cosmology. After a review of the early Universe as a cosmic accelerator, various cosmological and astrophysical constraints on models of particle physics are outlined. To illustrate this approach to particle physics via cosmology, reference is made to several areas of current research: baryon non-conservation and baryon asymmetry; free quarks, heavy hadrons and other exotic relics; primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino masses. In the last few years we have witnessed the birth and growth to healthy adolescence of a new collaboration between astrophysicists and particle physicists. The most notable success of this cooperative effort has been to provide the framework for understanding, within the context of GUTs and the hot big-bang cosmology, the universal baryon asymmetry. The most exciting new predictions this effort has spawned are that exotic relics may exist in detectable abundances. In particular, we may live in a neutrino-dominated Universe. In the next few years, accummulating laboratory data (for example proton decay, neutrino masses and oscillations) coupled with theoritical work in particle physics and cosmology will ensure the growth to maturity of this joint effort.

  2. Gas, Dust, and Nuclei: Cometary Types in the Largest IR Survey of Comets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, James; Kramer, Emily; Mainzer, Amy; Grav, Tommy; Masiero, Joseph; Stevenson, Rachel; Nugent, Carrie; Sonnett, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Space-based infrared (IR) surveys of objects have the potential to yield rich data sets for any particular class of small body. Thermal IR measurements often yield the most fundamental of astrophysical properties, the object’s size. When these data are synergistically combined with shorter-wavelength observations, the albedos of these bodies can be determined. The interpretation of IR observations of cometary bodies are more complicated, since their activity may obscure the bare surfaces of their nuclei. Yet space-based IR surveys provide the opportunity to observe this emitted dust and gas at wavelengths and sensitivities not possible from the ground.With the 163 comets detected during the WISE prime mission, and the more than 60 comets seen in the first year of data since the NEOWISE reactivated mission, the combined sample represents the largest survey of comets in the mid-IR. These data of over 200 comets provide dust particle size constraints and dust reflectance measurements, as well as nucleus size measurements. They are sensitive to the presence of the rarely observed gas species, CO2, directly detectable only from above the Earth’s atmosphere, and to the presence of CO emission, which is difficult to view from the ground. The data contain large samples of major cometary types (long-period and short-period comets), as well as smaller samples of Halley-type comets, Main Belt comets, and Near Earth comets, observed at multiple epochs, and so provide an unprecedentedly comprehensive view of the different comet populations.

  3. Far-field connectivity of the UK's four largest marine protected areas: Four of a kind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; New, A. L.; Popova, E. E.; Srokosz, M. A.; Yool, A.

    2017-05-01

    Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are established to conserve important ecosystems and protect marine species threatened in the wider ocean. However, even MPAs in remote areas are not wholly isolated from anthropogenic impacts. "Upstream" activities, possibly thousands of kilometers away, can influence MPAs through ocean currents that determine their connectivity. Persistent pollutants, such as plastics, can be transported from neighboring shelf regions to MPAs, or an ecosystem may be affected if larval dispersal is reduced from a seemingly remote upstream area. Thus, improved understanding of exactly where upstream is, and on what timescale it is connected, is important for protecting and monitoring MPAs. Here, we use a high-resolution (1/12°) ocean general circulation model and Lagrangian particle tracking to diagnose the connectivity of four of the UK's largest MPAs: Pitcairn; South Georgia and Sandwich Islands; Ascension; and the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT). We introduce the idea of a circulation "connectivity footprint", by which MPAs are connected to upstream areas. Annual connectivity footprints were calculated for the four MPAs, taking into account seasonal and inter-annual variability. These footprints showed that, on annual timescales, Pitcairn was not connected with land, whereas there was increasing connectivity for waters reaching South Georgia, Ascension, and, especially, BIOT. BIOT also had a high degree of both seasonal and inter-annual variability, which drastically changed its footprint, year-to-year. We advocate that such connectivity footprints are an inherent property of all MPAs, and need to be considered when MPAs are first proposed or their viability as refuges evaluated.

  4. Odorant Sensory Input Modulates DNA Secondary Structure Formation and Heterogeneous Ribonucleoprotein Recruitment on the Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 1 Promoters in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Cai, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Nana; Fones, Lilah; Brown, Elizabeth; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cave, John W

    2017-05-03

    Adaptation of neural circuits to changes in sensory input can modify several cellular processes within neurons, including neurotransmitter biosynthesis levels. For a subset of olfactory bulb interneurons, activity-dependent changes in GABA are reflected by corresponding changes in Glutamate decarboxylase 1 (Gad1) expression levels. Mechanisms regulating Gad1 promoter activity are poorly understood, but here we show that a conserved G:C-rich region in the mouse Gad1 proximal promoter region both recruits heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) that facilitate transcription and forms single-stranded DNA secondary structures associated with transcriptional repression. This promoter architecture and function is shared with Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), which is also modulated by odorant-dependent activity in the olfactory bulb. This study shows that the balance between DNA secondary structure formation and hnRNP binding on the mouse Th and Gad1 promoters in the olfactory bulb is responsive to changes in odorant-dependent sensory input. These findings reveal that Th and Gad1 share a novel transcription regulatory mechanism that facilitates sensory input-dependent regulation of dopamine and GABA expression.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Adaptation of neural circuits to changes in sensory input can modify several cellular processes within neurons, including neurotransmitter biosynthesis levels. This study shows that transcription of genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes for GABA and dopamine biosynthesis (Gad1 and Th, respectively) in the mammalian olfactory bulb is regulated by G:C-rich regions that both recruit heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) to facilitate transcription and form single-stranded DNA secondary structures associated with repression. hnRNP binding and formation of DNA secondary structure on the Th and Gad1 promoters are mutually exclusive, and odorant sensory input levels regulate the balance between these regulatory features. These findings

  5. A natural component from Euphorbia humifusa Willd displays novel, broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity by blocking nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, So Young; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Jong Seong; Min, Ji-Young

    2016-03-04

    The need to develop anti-influenza drugs with novel antiviral mechanisms is urgent because of the rapid rate of antigenic mutation and the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. We identified a novel anti-influenza molecule by screening 861 plant-derived natural components using a high-throughput image-based assay that measures inhibition of the influenza virus infection. 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (TGBG) from Euphorbia humifusa Willd showed broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity against two seasonal influenza A strains, A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) and A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2), and seasonal influenza B strain B/Florida/04/2006. We investigated the mode of action of TGBG using neuraminidase activity inhibition and time-of-addition assays, which evaluate the viral release and entry steps, respectively. We found that TGBG exhibits a novel antiviral mechanism that differs from the FDA-approved anti-influenza drugs oseltamivir which inhibits viral release, and amantadine which inhibits viral entry. Immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that TGBG significantly inhibits nuclear export of influenza nucleoproteins (NP) during the early stages of infection causing NP to accumulate in the nucleus. In addition, influenza-induced activation of the Akt signaling pathway was suppressed by TGBG in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that a putative mode of action of TGBG involves inhibition of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm consequently disrupting the assembly of progeny virions. In summary, TGBG has potential as novel anti-influenza therapeutic with a novel mechanism of action. - Highlights: • The plant-derived natural product TGBG has broad-spectrum antiviral activity against seasonal influenza A and B viruses. • TGBG has a novel anti-viral mechanism of action that from differs from the currently available anti-influenza drugs. • TGBG hinders nuclear export of the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein (v

  6. Revisiting the phylogeny of Ocellularieae, the second largest tribe within Graphidaceae (lichenized Ascomycota: Ostropales)

    Treesearch

    Ekaphan Kraichak; Sittiporn Parnmen; Robert Lücking; Eimy Rivas Plata; Andre Aptroot; Marcela E.S. Caceres; Damien Ertz; Armin Mangold; Joel A. Mercado-Diaz; Khwanruan Papong; Dries Van der Broeck; Gothamie Weerakoon; H. Thorsten. Lumbsch; NO-VALUE

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated 3-locus molecular phylogeny of tribe Ocellularieae, the second largest tribe within subfamily Graphidoideae in the Graphidaceae. Adding 165 newly generated sequences from the mitochondrial small subunit rDNA (mtSSU), the nuclear large subunit rDNA (nuLSU), and the second largest subunit of the DNA-directed RNA polymerase II (RPB2), we currently...

  7. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  8. The capacity of particles to increase allergic sensitization is predicted by particle number and surface area, not by particle mass.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Samuelsen, Mari; Aase, Audun; Løvik, Martinus

    2004-12-01

    Particle exposure has traditionally been monitored as mass concentration of PM10 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm), more recently also as PM2.5. The mass concentration is strongly influenced by the large particles. Therefore, particle mass is a poor measure for characterizing the amount of the small, possibly more biologically potent particles. We used polystyrene particles (PSP) ranging in diameter from 0.0588 to 11.14 microm, carbon black (CB), and diesel exhaust particles (DEP), to study the adjuvant effect of particles on the immune response to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA) after sc injection into the footpad of BALB/cA mice. At a given mass dose, the small particles (0.0588 and 0.202 microm PSP, CB, and DEP) increased the allergen-specific IgE serum levels to a substantially higher degree than the larger particles (1.053, 4.64, and 11.14 microm PSP). Further, in the draining lymph node during the primary response, the fine particles (0.202 microm) with OVA increased cell numbers, expression of surface markers (CD19, MHC class II, CD86, and CD23) and ex vivo production of IL-4 and IL-10, whereas the largest (11.14 microm) particles did not. Linear regression analyses indicated that the IgE response was not predicted by particle mass (R2 = 0.06), but was predicted by the total particle surface area (R2 = 0.64), number of particles (R2 = 0.62), and particle diameter (R2 = 0.58). In conclusion, we found that fine particles exerted stronger adjuvant effects on allergic responses than larger particles at equal mass doses. Consequently, the dose described as total particle surface area or particle number predicts the adjuvant effect of particles better than the currently used particle mass.

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Induces the Cytoplasmic Retention of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 by Disrupting Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Anne; Ajamian, Lara; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-opts host proteins and cellular machineries to its advantage at every step of the replication cycle. Here we show that HIV-1 enhances heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm. The latter was dependent on the nuclear export of the unspliced viral genomic RNA (vRNA) and to alterations in the abundance and localization of the FG-repeat nuclear pore glycoprotein p62. hnRNP A1 and vRNA remain colocalized in the cytoplasm supporting a post-nuclear function during the late stages of HIV-1 replication. Consistently, we show that hnRNP A1 acts as an internal ribosomal entry site trans-acting factor up-regulating internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation initiation of the HIV-1 vRNA. The up-regulation and cytoplasmic retention of hnRNP A1 by HIV-1 would ensure abundant expression of viral structural proteins in cells infected with HIV-1. PMID:19737937

  10. Opposite Dysregulation of Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein and Heteronuclear Ribonucleoprotein C Protein Associates with Enhanced APP Translation in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Borreca, Antonella; Gironi, Katia; Amadoro, Giusy; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2016-07-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is overexpressed in familiar and sporadic Alzheimer Disease (AD) patients suggesting that, in addition to abnormalities in APP cleavage, enhanced levels of APP full length might contribute to the pathology. Based on data showing that the two RNA binding proteins (RBPs), Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and heteronuclear Ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C), exert an opposite control on APP translation, we have analyzed whether expression and translation of these two RBPs vary in relation to changes in APP protein and mRNA levels in the AD brain at 1, 3, and 6 months of age. Here, we show that, as expected, human APP is overexpressed in hippocampal total extract from Tg2576 mice at all age points. APP overexpression, however, is not stable over time but reaches its maximal level in 1-month-old mutants in association with the stronger (i) reduction of FMRP and (ii) augmentation of hnRNP C. APP levels then decrease progressively as a function of age in close relationship with the gradual normalization of FMRP and hnRNP C levels. Consistent with the mouse data, expression of FMRP and hnRNP C are, respectively, decreased and increased in hippocampal synaptosomes from sporadic AD patients. Our findings identify two RBP targets that might be manipulated for reducing abnormally elevated levels of APP in the AD brain, with the hypothesis that acting upstream of amyloidogenic processing might contribute to attenuate the amyloid burden.

  11. Solution Structure of the HIV-1 Intron Splicing Silencer and Its Interactions with the UP1 Domain of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1.

    PubMed

    Jain, Niyati; Morgan, Christopher E; Rife, Brittany D; Salemi, Marco; Tolbert, Blanton S

    2016-01-29

    Splicing patterns in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are maintained through cis regulatory elements that recruit antagonistic host RNA-binding proteins. The activity of the 3' acceptor site A7 is tightly regulated through a complex network of an intronic splicing silencer (ISS), a bipartite exonic splicing silencer (ESS3a/b), and an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE3). Because HIV-1 splicing depends on protein-RNA interactions, it is important to know the tertiary structures surrounding the splice sites. Herein, we present the NMR solution structure of the phylogenetically conserved ISS stem loop. ISS adopts a stable structure consisting of conserved UG wobble pairs, a folded 2X2 (GU/UA) internal loop, a UU bulge, and a flexible AGUGA apical loop. Calorimetric and biochemical titrations indicate that the UP1 domain of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 binds the ISS apical loop site-specifically and with nanomolar affinity. Collectively, this work provides additional insights into how HIV-1 uses a conserved RNA structure to commandeer a host RNA-binding protein.

  12. Chemical Proteomics Identifies Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 as the Molecular Target of Quercetin in Its Anti-cancer Effects in PC-3 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Chia-Chen; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Chih-Ta; Liu, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Fong-Chi; Hsu, Kai-Chao; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid abundantly present in plants, is widely used as a phytotherapy in prostatitis and prostate cancer. Although quercetin has been reported to have a number of therapeutic effects, the cellular target(s) responsible for its anti-cancer action has not yet been clearly elucidated. Here, employing affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) as a direct target of quercetin. A specific interaction between quercetin and hnRNPA1 was validated by immunoblotting and in vitro binding experiments. We found that quercetin bound the C-terminal region of hnRNPA1, impairing the ability of hnRNPA1 to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and ultimately resulting in its cytoplasmic retention. In addition, hnRNPA1 was recruited to stress granules after treatment of cells with quercetin for up to 48 h, and the levels of cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis), an internal ribosome entry site translation-dependent protein, were reduced by hnRNPA1 regulation. This is the first report that anti-cancer effects of quercetin are mediated, in part, by impairing functions of hnRNPA1, insights that were obtained using a chemical proteomics strategy. PMID:24962584

  13. Heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by increasing protein translation of selected transcripts in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Elizabeth T; Parekh, Palak R; Yang, Qingyuan; Nguyen, Duc M; Carrier, France

    2016-03-01

    The heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by coordinating the translation of selected transcripts associated with proliferation and survival. hnRNP A18 binds to and stabilizes the transcripts of pro-survival genes harboring its RNA signature motif in their 3'UTRs. hnRNP A18 binds to ATR, RPA, TRX, HIF-1α and several protein translation factor mRNAs on polysomes and increases de novo protein translation under cellular stress. Most importantly, down regulation of hnRNP A18 decreases proliferation, invasion and migration in addition to significantly reducing tumor growth in two mouse xenograft models, melanoma and breast cancer. Moreover, tissue microarrays performed on human melanoma, prostate, breast and colon cancer indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in 40 to 60% of these malignant tissue as compared to normal adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemistry data indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in the stroma and hypoxic areas of human tumors. These data thus indicate that hnRNP A18 can promote tumor growth in in vivo models by coordinating the translation of pro-survival transcripts to support the demands of proliferating cells and increase survival under cellular stress. hnRNP A18 therefore represents a new target to selectively inhibit protein translation in tumor cells.

  14. Solution Structure of the HIV-1 Intron Splicing Silencer and Its Interactions with the UP1 Domain of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1*

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Niyati; Morgan, Christopher E.; Rife, Brittany D.; Salemi, Marco; Tolbert, Blanton S.

    2016-01-01

    Splicing patterns in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are maintained through cis regulatory elements that recruit antagonistic host RNA-binding proteins. The activity of the 3′ acceptor site A7 is tightly regulated through a complex network of an intronic splicing silencer (ISS), a bipartite exonic splicing silencer (ESS3a/b), and an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE3). Because HIV-1 splicing depends on protein-RNA interactions, it is important to know the tertiary structures surrounding the splice sites. Herein, we present the NMR solution structure of the phylogenetically conserved ISS stem loop. ISS adopts a stable structure consisting of conserved UG wobble pairs, a folded 2X2 (GU/UA) internal loop, a UU bulge, and a flexible AGUGA apical loop. Calorimetric and biochemical titrations indicate that the UP1 domain of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 binds the ISS apical loop site-specifically and with nanomolar affinity. Collectively, this work provides additional insights into how HIV-1 uses a conserved RNA structure to commandeer a host RNA-binding protein. PMID:26607354

  15. Sphingosine Kinase 1 Serves as a Pro-Viral Factor by Regulating Viral RNA Synthesis and Nuclear Export of Viral Ribonucleoprotein Complex upon Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young-Jin; Pritzl, Curtis J.; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Bomb, Kavita; McClain, Mariah E.; Alexander, Stephen; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2013-01-01

    Influenza continues to pose a threat to humans by causing significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is imperative to investigate mechanisms by which influenza virus manipulates the function of host factors and cellular signal pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that influenza virus increases the expression and activation of sphingosine kinase (SK) 1, which in turn regulates diverse cellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of SK suppressed virus-induced NF-κB activation and markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins. Further, SK blockade interfered with activation of Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3), a cofactor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1), to inhibit CRM1-mediated nuclear export of the influenza viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In support of this observation, SK inhibition altered the phosphorylation of ERK, p90RSK, and AKT, which is the upstream signal of RanBP3/CRM1 activation. Collectively, these results indicate that SK is a key pro-viral factor regulating multiple cellular signal pathways triggered by influenza virus infection. PMID:24137500

  16. Identification of the methylation preference region in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 and its implication in regulating nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yuan-I; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Chau, Gar-Yang; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Sung, Jung-Sung; Hua, Wei-Kai; Lin, Wey-Jinq

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Verifying by direct methylation assay the substrate sites of PRMT1 in the hnRNP K protein. {yields} Identifying the preferred PMRT1 methylation regions in hnRNP K by kinetic analysis. {yields} Linking methylation in regulating nuclear localization of hnRNP K. -- Abstract: Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles in numerous cellular processes. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein participating in a variety of cellular functions including transcription and RNA processing. HnRNP K is methylated at multiple sites in the glycine- and arginine-rich (RGG) motif. Using various RGG domain deletion mutants of hnRNP K as substrates, here we show by direct methylation assay that protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) methylated preferentially in a.a. 280-307 of the RGG motif. Kinetic analysis revealed that deletion of a.a. 280-307, but not a.a. 308-327, significantly inhibited rate of methylation. Importantly, nuclear localization of hnRNP K was significantly impaired in mutant hnRNP K lacking the PRMT1 methylation region or upon pharmacological inhibition of methylation. Together our results identify preferred PRMT1 methylation sequences of hnRNP K by direct methylation assay and implicate a role of arginine methylation in regulating intracellular distribution of hnRNP K.

  17. Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein R regulates arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase synthesis via internal ribosomal entry site-mediated translation in a circadian manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa-Rim; Kim, Tae-Don; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Youngseob; Lee, Dohyun; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2015-11-01

    Rhythmic arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) synthesis is a prominent circadian-controlled response that occurs in most mammals. AANAT is the core enzyme in melatonin production; because melatonin participates in many physiological processes, the regulation of AANAT is an important research topic. In this study, we focused on the role of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) in the translation of AANAT. A novel RNA-binding protein hnRNP R widely interacted with the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of AANAT mRNA and contributed to translation through an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Fine-tuning of AANAT protein synthesis occurred in response to knockdown and overexpression of hnRNP R. Nocturnal elevation of AANAT protein was dependent on the rhythmic changes of hnRNP R, whose levels are elevated in the pineal gland during nighttime. Increases in hnRNP R additionally improved AANAT production in rat pinealocytes under norepinephrine (NE) treatment. These results suggest that cap-independent translation of AANAT mRNA plays a role in the rhythmic synthesis of melatonin through the recruitment of translational machinery to hnRNP R-bound AANAT mRNA.

  18. The La-related protein LARP7 is a component of the 7SK ribonucleoprotein and affects transcription of cellular and viral polymerase II genes

    PubMed Central

    Markert, Andreas; Grimm, Michael; Martinez, Javier; Wiesner, Julia; Meyerhans, Andreas; Meyuhas, Oded; Sickmann, Albert; Fischer, Utz

    2008-01-01

    The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is a heterodimeric complex composed of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 and its regulator cyclin T1/2. It stimulates transcription elongation by phosphorylation of serine 2 residues in the carboxy-terminal domain of polymerase II. 7SK RNA and HEXIM proteins can antagonize transcriptional stimulation by sequestering P-TEFb in a catalytically inactive ribonucleoprotein (RNP). Here, we show that the previously uncharacterized La-related protein 7 (LARP7) has a role in 7SK-mediated regulation of transcription. LARP7 binds to the highly conserved 3′-terminal U-rich stretch of 7SK RNA and is an integral part of the 7SK RNP. On stimulation, LARP7 remains associated with 7SK RNA, whereas P-TEFb is released. Interestingly, reduction of LARP7 by RNA interference enhances transcription from cellular polymerase II promoters, as well as a TAT-dependent HIV-1 promoter. Thus, LARP7 is a negative transcriptional regulator of polymerase II genes, acting by means of the 7SK RNP system. PMID:18483487

  19. Heterogeneous Ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) Binds miR-122, a Mature Liver-Specific MicroRNA Required for Hepatitis C Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Fan, Baochang; Sutandy, F X Reymond; Syu, Guan-Da; Middleton, Stefani; Yi, Guanghui; Lu, Kuan-Yi; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) binds to the 5' untranslated region of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and is required for HCV RNA replication. The hnRNP K binding site on HCV RNA overlaps with the sequence recognized by the liver-specific microRNA, miR-122. A proteome chip containing ∼17,000 unique human proteins probed with miR-122 identified hnRNP K as one of the strong binding proteins. In vitro kinetic study showed hnRNP K binds miR-122 with a nanomolar dissociation constant, in which the short pyrimidine-rich residues in the central and 3' portion of the miR-122 were required for hnRNP K binding. In liver hepatocytes, miR-122 formed a coprecipitable complex with hnRNP K. High throughput Illumina DNA sequencing of the RNAs precipitated with hnRNP K was enriched for mature miR-122. SiRNA knockdown of hnRNP K in human hepatocytes reduced the levels of miR-122. These results show that hnRNP K is a cellular protein that binds and affects the accumulation of miR-122. Its ability to also bind HCV RNA near the miR-122 binding site suggests a role for miR-122 recognition of HCV RNA.

  20. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xiuyang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Erlong; Chen, Ni; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. - Highlights: • AtRNP1 is a widely expressed gene and its expression is slightly induced under abiotic stresses. • AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 affects plant growth. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. • AtRNP1 overexpression plants show decreased proline accumulation and stress-responsive gene expressions.

  1. The human telomerase RNA component, hTR, activates the DNA-dependent protein kinase to phosphorylate heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1.

    PubMed

    Ting, Nicholas S Y; Pohorelic, Brant; Yu, Yaping; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Beattie, Tara L

    2009-10-01

    Telomere integrity in human cells is maintained by the dynamic interplay between telomerase, telomere associated proteins, and DNA repair proteins. These interactions are vital to suppress DNA damage responses and unfavorable changes in chromosome dynamics. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is critical for this process. Cells deficient for functional DNA-PKcs show increased rates of telomere loss, accompanied by chromosomal fusions and translocations. Treatment of cells with specific DNA-PK kinase inhibitors leads to similar phenotypes. These observations indicate that the kinase activity of DNA-PK is required for its function at telomeres possibly through phosphorylation of essential proteins needed for telomere length maintenance. Here we show that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a direct substrate for DNA-PK in vitro. Phosphorylation of hnRNP A1 is stimulated not only by the presence of DNA but also by the telomerase RNA component, hTR. Furthermore, we show that hnRNP A1 is phosphorylated in vivo in a DNA-PK-dependent manner and that this phosphorylation is greatly reduced in cell lines which lack hTR. These data are the first to report that hTR stimulates the kinase activity of DNA-PK toward a known telomere-associated protein, and may provide further insights into the function of DNA-PK at telomeres.

  2. CmRBP50 Protein Phosphorylation Is Essential for Assembly of a Stable Phloem-mobile High-affinity Ribonucleoprotein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pingfang; Ham, Byung-Kook; Lucas, William J.

    2011-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that play crucial roles in RNA processing for gene regulation. The angiosperm sieve tube system contains a unique population of transcripts, some of which function as long-distance signaling agents involved in regulating organ development. These phloem-mobile mRNAs are translocated as RNP complexes. One such complex is based on a phloem RBP named Cucurbita maxima RNA-binding protein 50 (CmRBP50), a member of the polypyrimidine track binding protein family. The core of this RNP complex contains six additional phloem proteins. Here, requirements for assembly of this CmRBP50 RNP complex are reported. Phosphorylation sites on CmRBP50 were mapped, and then coimmunoprecipitation and protein overlay studies established that the phosphoserine residues, located at the C terminus of CmRBP50, are critical for RNP complex assembly. In vitro pull-down experiments revealed that three phloem proteins, C. maxima phloem protein 16, C. maxima GTP-binding protein, and C. maxima phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-like protein, bind directly with CmRBP50. This interaction required CmRBP50 phosphorylation. Gel mobility-shift assays demonstrated that assembly of the CmRBP50-based protein complex results in a system having enhanced binding affinity for phloem-mobile mRNAs carrying polypyrimidine track binding motifs. This property would be essential for effective long-distance translocation of bound mRNA to the target tissues. PMID:21572046

  3. Functional separation of pre-rRNA processing steps revealed by truncation of the U3 small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein component, Mpp10

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sarah J.; Baserga, Susan J.

    1997-01-01

    The U3 small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) is required for three cleavage events that generate the mature 18S rRNA from the pre-rRNA. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, depletion of Mpp10, a U3 snoRNP-specific protein, halts 18S rRNA production and impairs cleavage at the three U3 snoRNP-dependent sites: A0, A1, and A2. We have identified truncation mutations of Mpp10 that affect 18S rRNA synthesis and confer cold-sensitivity and slow growth. However, distinct from yeast cells depleted of Mpp10, the mutants carrying these truncated Mpp10 proteins accumulate a novel precursor, resulting from cleavage at only A0. The Mpp10 truncations do not alter association of Mpp10 with the U3 snoRNA, nor do they affect snoRNA or protein stability. Thus, the role in processing of the U3 snoRNP can be separated into cleavage at the A0 site, which occurs in the presence of truncated Mpp10, and cleavage at the A1/A2 sites, which occurs only with intact Mpp10. These results strongly argue for a role for Mpp10 in processing at the A1/A2 sites. PMID:9391061

  4. Engagement of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M with listeriolysin O induces type I interferon expression and restricts Listeria monocytogenes growth in host cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng; Li, Zhonghua; Chen, Kun; Liu, Ruochen; Li, Xiaoqi; Cao, Hong; Zheng, Shijun J

    2012-10-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a key virulence factor secreted by the Gram-positive, facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (LM). Its role in host cell response is still not very clear. Using pull-down assay, mass spectrometry analysis and immunoprecipitation approaches, we found that LLO interacted with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNPM), a member of RNA splicing complex apparatus, and the binding domain of LLO for hnRNP M was located between amino acids 26 and 176. Knockdown of hnRNP M inhibited LLO-induced activation of IFN-α, IFN-β and AP-1 promoters and enhanced LM growth in host cells. Thus, engagement of hnRNP M with LLO induces type I interferon expression and restricts LM growth in host cells, suggesting a critical role of hnRNP M in LLO-induced immune responses in host cells. These findings will contribute to further understandings of the molecular mechanisms underlying the host defense against LM infection. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. [Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding Brassica napus small nuclear ribonucleoprotein BnSmD1].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Meng; Zhou, Yun-Tao; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Xue, Hua; Zhou, Lin; Zhao, Yun

    2007-12-01

    By using substractive hybridization (SSH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR), a full-length cDNA encoding Brassica napus small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, named BnSmD1, was obtained. It had 484 base pairs in length containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 354 bp and encoding a predicted protein of 118 amino acids with a molecular weight of 13 kDa. The BnSmD1 protein shares two highly conserved Sm folds (Sm-1 and Sm-2) and a C-terminal RG dipeptide repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed that BnSmD1 was expressed in all tested organs in B. napus, but its transcript level in early floral buds was much higher than that in leaf and stem tissues. No obvious expression difference was observed in leaf and stem tissues between the apetalous line Apet33-10 petalled near-isogenic line Pet33-10. Compared with wild type, the expression of BnSmD1 in the early floral buds of apetalous mutant Apet33-10 was significantly reduced. Taken together, our results suggest that BnSmD1 may play an important role in early floral petal development in B. napus.

  6. Uncovering the stoichiometry of Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P, a multi-subunit catalytic ribonucleoprotein complex, by surface-induced dissociation and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Lai, Lien B; Lai, Stella M; Tanimoto, Akiko; Foster, Mark P; Wysocki, Vicki H; Gopalan, Venkat

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate that surface-induced dissociation (SID) coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a powerful tool for determining the stoichiometry of a multi-subunit ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex assembled in a solution containing Mg(2+). We investigated Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P, an archaeal RNP that catalyzes tRNA 5' maturation. Previous step-wise, Mg(2+)-dependent reconstitutions of Pfu RNase P with its catalytic RNA subunit and two interacting protein cofactor pairs (RPP21⋅RPP29 and POP5⋅RPP30) revealed functional RNP intermediates en route to the RNase P enzyme, but provided no information on subunit stoichiometry. Our native MS studies with the proteins showed RPP21⋅RPP29 and (POP5⋅RPP30)2 complexes, but indicated a 1:1 composition for all subunits when either one or both protein complexes bind the cognate RNA. These results highlight the utility of SID and IM-MS in resolving conformational heterogeneity and yielding insights on RNP assembly.

  7. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of mammalian heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, is an alternative splicing factor that binds to UCUAUC splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Jennifer L; Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M

    2009-10-16

    Alternative splicing is regulated by cis sequences in the pre-mRNA that serve as binding sites for trans-acting alternative splicing factors. In a previous study, we used bioinformatics and molecular biology to identify and confirm that the intronic hexamer sequence UCUAUC is a nematode alternative splicing regulatory element. In this study, we used RNA affinity chromatography to identify trans factors that bind to this sequence. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, binds to UCUAUC in the context of unc-52 intronic regulatory sequences as well as to RNAs containing tandem repeats of this sequence. The three Us in the hexamer are the most important determinants of this binding specificity. We demonstrate, using RNA interference, that HRP-2 regulates the alternative splicing of two genes, unc-52 and lin-10, both of which have cassette exons flanked by an intronic UCUAUC motif. We propose that HRP-2 is a protein responsible for regulating alternative splicing through binding interactions with the UCUAUC sequence.

  8. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a host factor required for dengue virus and Junín virus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Jesús E; Scolaro, Luis A; Castilla, Viviana

    2015-05-04

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are cellular factors involved in the replication of several viruses. In this study we analyzed the expression and intracellular localization of hnRNP A2 and hnRNP K in cell cultures infected with two viruses that cause human hemorrhagic fevers: dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) and Junín virus (JUNV). We determined that DENV-2 promoted the cytoplasmic translocation of hnRNP K and to a lesser extent of hnRNP A2, meanwhile, JUNV infection induced an increase in hnRNP K cytoplasmic localization whereas hnRNP A2 remained mainly in the nucleus of infected cells. Both hnRNP K and hnRNP A2 were localized predominantly in the nucleus of JUNV persistently-infected cells even after superinfection with JUNV indicating that persistent infection does not alter nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of these hnRNPs. Total levels of hnRNP K expression were unaffected by DENV-2 or JUNV infection. In addition we determined, using small interfering RNAs, that hnRNP K knockout inhibits DENV-2 and JUNV multiplication. Our results indicate that DENV-2 and JUNV induce hnRNP K cytoplasmic translocation to favor viral multiplication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential effect of acute and persistent Junin virus infections on the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking and expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins type A and B.

    PubMed

    Maeto, Cynthia A; Knott, María E; Linero, Florencia N; Ellenberg, Paula C; Scolaro, Luis A; Castilla, Viviana

    2011-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A and B (hnRNPs A/B), cellular RNA-binding proteins that participate in splicing, trafficking, translation and turnover of mRNAs, have been implicated in the life cycles of several cytoplasmic RNA viruses. Here, we demonstrate that silencing of hnRNPs A1 and A2 significantly reduces the replication of the arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV), the aetiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever. While acute JUNV infection did not modify total levels of expression of hnRNPs A/B in comparison with uninfected cells, non-cytopathic persistent infection exhibited low levels of these cell proteins. Furthermore, acutely infected cells showed a cytoplasmic relocalization of overexpressed hnRNP A1, probably related to the involvement of this protein in virus replicative cycle. This cytoplasmic accumulation was also observed in cells expressing viral nucleoprotein (N), and co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed the interaction between hnRNP A1 and N protein. By contrast, a predominantly nuclear distribution of overexpressed hnRNP A1 was found during persistent infection, even in the presence of endogenous or overexpressed N protein, indicating a differential modulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking in acute and persistent JUNV infections.

  10. Efficient sequence-specific isolation of DNA fragments and chromatin by in vitro enChIP technology using recombinant CRISPR ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-04-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system is widely used for various biological applications, including genome editing. We developed engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) using CRISPR to isolate target genomic regions from cells for their biochemical characterization. In this study, we developed 'in vitro enChIP' using recombinant CRISPR ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to isolate target genomic regions. in vitro enChIP has the great advantage over conventional enChIP of not requiring expression of CRISPR complexes in cells. We first showed that in vitro enChIP using recombinant CRISPR RNPs can be used to isolate target DNA from mixtures of purified DNA in a sequence-specific manner. In addition, we showed that this technology can be used to efficiently isolate target genomic regions, while retaining their intracellular molecular interactions, with negligible contamination from irrelevant genomic regions. Thus, in vitro enChIP technology is of potential use for sequence-specific isolation of DNA, as well as for identification of molecules interacting with genomic regions of interest in vivo in combination with downstream analysis.

  11. Chemical proteomics identifies heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 as the molecular target of quercetin in its anti-cancer effects in PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chia-Chen; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Chih-Ta; Liu, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Fong-Chi; Hsu, Kai-Chao; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2014-08-08

    Quercetin, a flavonoid abundantly present in plants, is widely used as a phytotherapy in prostatitis and prostate cancer. Although quercetin has been reported to have a number of therapeutic effects, the cellular target(s) responsible for its anti-cancer action has not yet been clearly elucidated. Here, employing affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) as a direct target of quercetin. A specific interaction between quercetin and hnRNPA1 was validated by immunoblotting and in vitro binding experiments. We found that quercetin bound the C-terminal region of hnRNPA1, impairing the ability of hnRNPA1 to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and ultimately resulting in its cytoplasmic retention. In addition, hnRNPA1 was recruited to stress granules after treatment of cells with quercetin for up to 48 h, and the levels of cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis), an internal ribosome entry site translation-dependent protein, were reduced by hnRNPA1 regulation. This is the first report that anti-cancer effects of quercetin are mediated, in part, by impairing functions of hnRNPA1, insights that were obtained using a chemical proteomics strategy.

  12. Modulation of exon skipping and inclusion by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 and pre-mRNA splicing factor SF2/ASF.

    PubMed Central

    Mayeda, A; Helfman, D M; Krainer, A R

    1993-01-01

    The essential splicing factor SF2/ASF and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) modulate alternative splicing in vitro of pre-mRNAs that contain 5' splice sites of comparable strengths competing for a common 3' splice site. Using natural and model pre-mRNAs, we have examined whether the ratio of SF2/ASF to hnRNP A1 also regulates other modes of alternative splicing in vitro. We found that an excess of SF2/ASF effectively prevents inappropriate exon skipping and also influences the selection of mutually exclusive tissue-specific exons in natural beta-tropomyosin pre-mRNA. In contrast, an excess of hnRNP A1 does not cause inappropriate exon skipping in natural constitutively or alternatively spliced pre-mRNAs. Although hnRNP A1 can promote alternative exon skipping, this effect is not universal and is dependent, e.g., on the size of the internal alternative exon and on the strength of the polypyrimidine tract in the preceding intron. With appropriate alternative exons, an excess of SF2/ASF promotes exon inclusion, whereas an excess of hnRNP A1 causes exon skipping. We propose that in some cases the ratio of SF2/ASF to hnRNP A1 may play a role in regulating alternative splicing by exon inclusion or skipping through the antagonistic effects of these proteins on alternative splice site selection. Images PMID:8474457

  13. tRNA is entrapped in similar, but distinct, nuclear and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes, both of which contain vigilin and elongation factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, C; Grünweller, A; Willkomm, D K; Pfeiffer, T; Hartmann, R K; Müller, P K

    1998-01-01

    Vigilin, which is found predominantly in cells and tissues with high levels of protein biosynthesis, was isolated in its native form from human HEp-2 cells (A.T.C.C. CCL23) by immunoaffinity chromatography. Here we demonstrate that vigilin is part of a novel large tRNA-binding ribonucleoprotein complex (tRNP), found not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nuclei of human cells. Compositional differences in the protein pattern were detected between the nuclear and cytoplasmic tRNPs, although some properties of the purified nuclear tRNP, such as tRNA protection against nuclease attack, were identical with those of the cytoplasmic tRNP. By using either a pool of total human nuclear RNA or radioactively labelled yeast tRNAAsp in rebinding experiments, we could show that tRNA is specifically recaptured by the RNA-depleted, vigilin-containing nuclear complex. We could also show that vigilin is capable of binding tRNA in vitro. Another tRNA-binding protein is elongation factor 1 alpha, which appears to be enriched in the cytoplasmic and nuclear tRNP complexes. This suggests that the cytoplasmic tRNP may be involved in the channelled tRNA cycle in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Our results also suggest that the nuclear vigilin-containing tRNP may be related to the nuclear export of tRNA. PMID:9445390

  14. Heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by increasing protein translation of selected transcripts in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Elizabeth T.; Parekh, Palak R.; Yang, Qingyuan; Nguyen, Duc M.; Carrier, France

    2016-01-01

    The heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by coordinating the translation of selected transcripts associated with proliferation and survival. hnRNP A18 binds to and stabilizes the transcripts of pro-survival genes harboring its RNA signature motif in their 3′UTRs. hnRNP A18 binds to ATR, RPA, TRX, HIF-1α and several protein translation factor mRNAs on polysomes and increases de novo protein translation under cellular stress. Most importantly, down regulation of hnRNP A18 decreases proliferation, invasion and migration in addition to significantly reducing tumor growth in two mouse xenograft models, melanoma and breast cancer. Moreover, tissue microarrays performed on human melanoma, prostate, breast and colon cancer indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in 40 to 60% of these malignant tissue as compared to normal adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemistry data indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in the stroma and hypoxic areas of human tumors. These data thus indicate that hnRNP A18 can promote tumor growth in in vivo models by coordinating the translation of pro-survival transcripts to support the demands of proliferating cells and increase survival under cellular stress. hnRNP A18 therefore represents a new target to selectively inhibit protein translation in tumor cells. PMID:26824423

  15. Trajectory Studies of Large HNO3-Containing PSC Particles in the Arctic: Evidence for the Role of NAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinney, K. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Dhaniyala, S.; Fahey, D. W.; Northway, M. J.; Kuenzi, K. F.; Kleinboehl, A.; Sinnhuber, M.; Kuellmann, H.; Bremer, H.; Mahoney, M. J.; Bui, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    Large (5 to >20 micron diameter) nitric-acid-containing polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles were observed in the Arctic stratosphere during the winter of 1999-2000. We use a particle growth and sedimentation model to investigate the environment in which these particles grew and the likely phase of the largest particles. Particle trajectory calculations show that, while simulated nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) particle sizes are significantly smaller than the observed maximum particle sizes, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particle trajectories are consistent with the largest observed particle sizes.

  16. Particulate air pollution and mortality in 38 of China's largest cities: time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; He, Guojun; Fan, Maoyong; Chiu, Kowk Yan; Fan, Maorong; Liu, Chang; Xue, An; Liu, Tong; Pan, Yuhang; Mu, Quan; Zhou, Maigeng

    2017-03-14

    Objectives To estimate the short term effect of particulate air pollution (particle diameter <10 μm, or PM10) on mortality and explore the heterogeneity of particulate air pollution effects in major cities in China.Design Generalised linear models with different lag structures using time series data.Setting 38 of the largest cities in 27 provinces of China (combined population >200 million).Participants 350 638 deaths (200 912 in males, 149 726 in females) recorded in 38 city districts by the Disease Surveillance Point System of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention from 1 January 2010 to 29 June 2013.Main outcome measure Daily numbers of deaths from all causes, cardiorespiratory diseases, and non-cardiorespiratory diseases and among different demographic groups were used to estimate the associations between particulate air pollution and mortality.Results A 10 µg/m(3) change in concurrent day PM10 concentrations was associated with a 0.44% (95% confidence interval 0.30% to 0.58%) increase in daily number of deaths. Previous day and two day lagged PM10 levels decreased in magnitude by one third and two thirds but remained statistically significantly associated with increased mortality. The estimate for the effect of PM10 on deaths from cardiorespiratory diseases was 0.62% (0.43% to 0.81%) per 10 µg/m(3) compared with 0.26% (0.09% to 0.42%) for other cause mortality. Exposure to PM10 had a greater impact on females than on males. Adults aged 60 and over were more vulnerable to particulate air pollution at high levels than those aged less than 60. The PM10 effect varied across different cities and marginally decreased in cities with higher PM10 concentrations.Conclusion Particulate air pollution has a greater impact on deaths from cardiorespiratory diseases than it does on other cause mortality. People aged 60 or more have a higher risk of death from particulate air pollution than people aged less than 60. The estimates of the effect

  17. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  18. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  19. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  20. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  1. Managing consumptive and nonconsumptive use in the United States largest wilderness

    Treesearch

    Vicki Snitzler; Barbara Cellarius

    2007-01-01

    With more than 13 million acres (5,260,913 ha) of land and in excess of 9 million acres (3,642,171 ha) of designated Wilderness, Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve is the largest national park in the United States and includes the country’s largest single-name wilderness area. Park managers face a variety of challenges in managing consumptive and...

  2. Solar Energetic Particle Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    2003-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic-particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In fact, the highest proton intensities directly measured near Earth at energies up to approximately 1 GeV occur at the time of passage of shocks, which arrive about a day after the CMEs leave the Sun. CME-driven shocks expanding across magnetic fields can fill over half of the heliosphere with SEPs. Proton-generated Alfven waves trap particles near the shock for efficient acceleration but also throttle the intensities at Earth to the streaming limit early in the events. At high energies, particles begin to leak from the shock and the spectrum rolls downward to form an energy-spectral 'knee' that can vary in energy from approximately 1 MeV to approximately 1 GeV in different events. All of these factors affect the radiation dose as a function of depth and latitude in the Earth's atmosphere and the risk to astronauts and equipment in space. SEP ionization of the polar atmosphere produces nitrates that precipitate to become trapped in the polar ice. Observations of nitrate deposits in ice cores reveal individual large SEP events and extend back approximately 400 years. Unlike sunspots, SEP events follow the approximately 80-100-year Gleissberg cycle rather faithfully and are now at a minimum in that cycle. The largest SEP event in the last 400 years appears to be related to the flare observed by Carrington in 1859, but the probability of SEP events with such large fluences falls off sharply because of the streaming limit.

  3. Particle transport in 3 He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Zhang, L. D.; Mason, G. L.; Lakhina, G. S.; Hada, T.; Arballo, J. K.; Zwickl, R. D.

    2002-04-01

    Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths l

  4. Application of largest Lyapunov exponent analysis on the studies of dynamics under external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odavić, Jovan; Mali, Petar; Tekić, Jasmina; Pantić, Milan; Pavkov-Hrvojević, Milica

    2017-06-01

    Dynamics of driven dissipative Frenkel-Kontorova model is examined by using largest Lyapunov exponent computational technique. Obtained results show that besides the usual way where behavior of the system in the presence of external forces is studied by analyzing its dynamical response function, the largest Lyapunov exponent analysis can represent a very convenient tool to examine system dynamics. In the dc driven systems, the critical depinning force for particular structure could be estimated by computing the largest Lyapunov exponent. In the dc+ac driven systems, if the substrate potential is the standard sinusoidal one, calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent offers a more sensitive way to detect the presence of Shapiro steps. When the amplitude of the ac force is varied the behavior of the largest Lyapunov exponent in the pinned regime completely reflects the behavior of Shapiro steps and the critical depinning force, in particular, it represents the mirror image of the amplitude dependence of critical depinning force. This points out an advantage of this technique since by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent in the pinned regime we can get an insight into the dynamics of the system when driving forces are applied. Additionally, the system is shown to be not chaotic even in the case of incommensurate structures and large amplitudes of external force, which is a consequence of overdampness of the model and the Middleton's no passing rule.

  5. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  6. The structure of Escherichia coli signal recognition particle revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mainprize, Iain L; Beniac, Daniel R; Falkovskaia, Elena; Cleverley, Robert M; Gierasch, Lila M; Ottensmeyer, F Peter; Andrews, David W

    2006-12-01

    Structural studies on various domains of the ribonucleoprotein signal recognition particle (SRP) have not converged on a single complete structure of bacterial SRP consistent with the biochemistry of the particle. We obtained a three-dimensional structure for Escherichia coli SRP by cryoscanning transmission electron microscopy and mapped the internal RNA by electron spectroscopic imaging. Crystallographic data were fit into the SRP reconstruction, and although the resulting model differed from previous models, they could be rationalized by movement through an interdomain linker of Ffh, the protein component of SRP. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments determined interdomain distances that were consistent with our model of SRP. Docking our model onto the bacterial ribosome suggests a mechanism for signal recognition involving interdomain movement of Ffh into and out of the nascent chain exit site and suggests how SRP could interact and/or compete with the ribosome-bound chaperone, trigger factor, for a nascent chain during translation.

  7. [Studies on the largest Lyapunov exponents of the standing posture in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Keisuke; Tokita, Takashi; Ito, Yatsuji; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kuze, Bunya

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the body sway in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction by the largest Lyapunov exponents using a chaotic time series analysis. The largest Lyapunov exponent is regarded as a parameter indexing an orbital instability. Subjects consisted of 55 normal healthy subjects, 11 patients diagnosed as having vestibular neuritis (VN), 6 patients diagnosed as having sudden deafness (SD) with vertigo, 23 patients diagnosed as having Meniere disease (MD), 11 patients diagnosed as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and 14 patients diagnosed as having other vestibular disorders. Using a stabilometer, the sway of the body center of gravity in an upright standing position was recorded with eyes open and closed for 60 seconds under each condition. From the time series data obtained, the largest Lyapunov exponents were calculated using a chaos analysis program. In normal healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction, the largest Lyapunov exponents on right-left sway were larger than those on forward-backward sway with eyes open and closed. The largest Lyapunov exponents in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction on forward-backward sway with eyes closed were significantly larger than those in normal healthy subjects. A few patients with the instability of standing posture judged from conventional analysis (area of sway, locus length per time) showed higher values of the LLE. We investigated the variation of the values of the largest Lyapunov exponents in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction at each stage during recovery from their vestibular damage. The largest Lyapunov exponents at the early stage with stable standing posture were significantly higher than those at the late stable stage with stable standing posture. Some patients at the very early stage had lower values of the largest Lyapunov exponents. We speculate that the orbital instability indicated by the values of the

  8. Release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) activates hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein (HEXIM1) transcription.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Nilson, Kyle A; Price, David H; Peterlin, B Matija

    2014-04-04

    By phosphorylating negative elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is composed of CycT1 or CycT2 and CDK9, activates eukaryotic transcription elongation. In growing cells, it is found in active and inactive forms. In the former, free P-TEFb is a potent transcriptional coactivator. In the latter, it is inhibited by HEXIM1 or HEXIM2 in the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), which contains, additionally, 7SK snRNA, methyl phosphate-capping enzyme (MePCE), and La-related protein 7 (LARP7). This P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of growth and proliferation of the cell. In this study, the release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP led to increased synthesis of HEXIM1 but not HEXIM2 in HeLa cells, and this occurred only from an unannotated, proximal promoter. ChIP with sequencing revealed P-TEFb-sensitive poised RNA polymerase II at this proximal but not the previously annotated distal HEXIM1 promoter. Its immediate upstream sequences were fused to luciferase reporters and were found to be responsive to many P-TEFb-releasing compounds. The superelongation complex subunits AF4/FMR2 family member 4 (AFF4) and elongation factor RNA polymerase II 2 (ELL2) were recruited to this proximal promoter after P-TEFb release and were required for its transcriptional effects. Thus, P-TEFb regulates its own equilibrium in cells, most likely to maintain optimal cellular homeostasis.

  9. Primary structures of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2, B1, and C2 proteins: a diversity of RNA binding proteins is generated by small peptide inserts.

    PubMed Central

    Burd, C G; Swanson, M S; Görlach, M; Dreyfuss, G

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs for the major heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2, B1, and C2 proteins and determined their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences. The A2 and B1 cDNAs are identical except for a 36-nucleotide in-frame insert in B1. Similarly, the sequence of the C2 protein cDNA is related to that of C1 in that C2 contains an extra 39 in-frame nucleotides. Therefore, the B1 amino acid sequence is identical to A2 except for the insertion of 12 amino acids near its amino terminus, and C1 and C2 are also identical to each other except for an extra 13 amino acids near the middle of C2. All three proteins are members of a large family of RNA binding proteins that contain the consensus sequence-type RNA binding domain (CS-RBD). The A2 and B1 proteins have a modular structure similar to that of the hnRNP protein A1: they contain two CS-RBDs and a glycine-rich auxiliary domain at the carboxyl terminus. The CS-RBDs of A2 and B1 have approximately 80% amino acid identity with those of A1, whereas the glycine-rich auxiliary domain is considerably more divergent with less than 30% of the amino acids being identical. These findings indicate that the addition of small peptides, probably by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, generates some of the diversity apparent among hnRNP proteins. Images PMID:2557628

  10. Preferential binding of a stable G3BP ribonucleoprotein complex to intron-retaining transcripts in mouse brain and modulation of their expression in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sophie; Bellora, Nicolas; González-Vallinas, Juan; Irimia, Manuel; Chebli, Karim; de Toledo, Marion; Raabe, Monika; Eyras, Eduardo; Urlaub, Henning; Blencowe, Ben J; Tazi, Jamal

    2016-11-01

    Neuronal granules play an important role in the localization and transport of translationally silenced messenger ribonucleoproteins in neurons. Among the factors associated with these granules, the RNA-binding protein G3BP1 (stress-granules assembly factor) is involved in neuronal plasticity and is induced in Alzheimer's disease. We immunopurified a stable complex containing G3BP1 from mouse brain and performed high-throughput sequencing and cross-linking immunoprecipitation to identify the associated RNAs. The G3BP-complex contained the deubiquitinating protease USP10, CtBP1 and the RNA-binding proteins Caprin-1, G3BP2a and splicing factor proline and glutamine rich, or PSF. The G3BP-complex binds preferentially to transcripts that retain introns, and to non-coding sequences like 3'-untranslated region and long non-coding RNAs. Specific transcripts with retained introns appear to be enriched in the cerebellum compared to the rest of the brain and G3BP1 depletion decreased this intron retention in the cerebellum of G3BP1 knockout mice. Among the enriched transcripts, we found an overrepresentation of genes involved in synaptic transmission, especially glutamate-related neuronal transmission. Notably, G3BP1 seems to repress the expression of the mature Grm5 (metabotropic glutamate receptor 5) transcript, by promoting the retention of an intron in the immature transcript in the cerebellum. Our results suggest that G3BP is involved in a new functional mechanism to regulate non-coding RNAs including intron-retaining transcripts, and thus have broad implications for neuronal gene regulation, where intron retention is widespread. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Easi-CRISPR: a robust method for one-step generation of mice carrying conditional and insertion alleles using long ssDNA donors and CRISPR ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Quadros, Rolen M; Miura, Hiromi; Harms, Donald W; Akatsuka, Hisako; Sato, Takehito; Aida, Tomomi; Redder, Ronald; Richardson, Guy P; Inagaki, Yutaka; Sakai, Daisuke; Buckley, Shannon M; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Batra, Surinder K; Behlke, Mark A; Zeiner, Sarah A; Jacobi, Ashley M; Izu, Yayoi; Thoreson, Wallace B; Urness, Lisa D; Mansour, Suzanne L; Ohtsuka, Masato; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B

    2017-05-17

    Conditional knockout mice and transgenic mice expressing recombinases, reporters, and inducible transcriptional activators are key for many genetic studies and comprise over 90% of mouse models created. Conditional knockout mice are generated using labor-intensive methods of homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells and are available for only ~25% of all mouse genes. Transgenic mice generated by random genomic insertion approaches pose problems of unreliable expression, and thus there is a need for targeted-insertion models. Although CRISPR-based strategies were reported to create conditional and targeted-insertion alleles via one-step delivery of targeting components directly to zygotes, these strategies are quite inefficient. Here we describe Easi-CRISPR (Efficient additions with ssDNA inserts-CRISPR), a targeting strategy in which long single-stranded DNA donors are injected with pre-assembled crRNA + tracrRNA + Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (ctRNP) complexes into mouse zygotes. We show for over a dozen loci that Easi-CRISPR generates correctly targeted conditional and insertion alleles in 8.5-100% of the resulting live offspring. Easi-CRISPR solves the major problem of animal genome engineering, namely the inefficiency of targeted DNA cassette insertion. The approach is robust, succeeding for all tested loci. It is versatile, generating both conditional and targeted insertion alleles. Finally, it is highly efficient, as treating an average of only 50 zygotes is sufficient to produce a correctly targeted allele in up to 100% of live offspring. Thus, Easi-CRISPR offers a comprehensive means of building large-scale Cre-LoxP animal resources.

  12. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F.; Lisse, Thomas S.; Garcia, Alejandro J.; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L.; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S.; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH)2D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH)2D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH)2D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of transcription. PMID:27672039

  13. Radiosensitization and downregulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) upon inhibition of mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) in malignant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stefan; Lamkowski, Andreas; Priller, Markus; Port, Matthias; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is an important cofactor in the p53-mediated DNA damage response pathway upon ionizing radiation (IR) and exerts anti-apoptotic effects also independent of p53 pathway activation. Furthermore, hnRNP K is overexpressed in various neoplasms including malignant melanoma (MM). Here, we investigate the role of hnRNP K in the radioresistance of MM cells. Methods and results Our results show cytoplasmic expression of hnRNP K in human MM surgical specimens, but not in benign nevi, and a quick dose- and time-dependent upregulation in response to IR accompanied by cytoplasmic redistribution of the protein in the IPC-298 cellular tumor model carrying an activating NRAS mutation (p.Q61L). SiRNA-based knockdown of hnRNP K induced a delayed decline in γH2AX/53BP1-positive DNA repair foci upon IR. Pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling abrogated ERK phosphorylation, diminished cellular hnRNP K levels, impaired γH2AX/53BP1-foci repair and proliferative capability and increased apoptosis comparable to the observed hnRNP K knockdown phenotype in IPC-298 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling increases vulnerability of NRAS-mutant malignant melanoma cells to ionizing radiation along with downregulation of endogenous hnRNP K and point towards a possible use for combined MEK inhibition and localized radiation therapy of MM in the NRAS-mutant setting where BRAF inhibitors offer no clinical benefit. PMID:26136337

  14. A comprehensive analysis of 3′ end sequencing data sets reveals novel polyadenylation signals and the repressive role of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C on cleavage and polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Andreas J.; Schmidt, Ralf; Gruber, Andreas R.; Martin, Georges; Ghosh, Souvik; Belmadani, Manuel; Keller, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a general mechanism of transcript diversification in mammals, which has been recently linked to proliferative states and cancer. Different 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) isoforms interact with different RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), which modify the stability, translation, and subcellular localization of the corresponding transcripts. Although the heterogeneity of pre-mRNA 3′ end processing has been established with high-throughput approaches, the mechanisms that underlie systematic changes in 3′ UTR lengths remain to be characterized. Through a uniform analysis of a large number of 3′ end sequencing data sets, we have uncovered 18 signals, six of which are novel, whose positioning with respect to pre-mRNA cleavage sites indicates a role in pre-mRNA 3′ end processing in both mouse and human. With 3′ end sequencing we have demonstrated that the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C (HNRNPC), which binds the poly(U) motif whose frequency also peaks in the vicinity of polyadenylation (poly(A)) sites, has a genome-wide effect on poly(A) site usage. HNRNPC-regulated 3′ UTRs are enriched in ELAV-like RBP 1 (ELAVL1) binding sites and include those of the CD47 gene, which participate in the recently discovered mechanism of 3′ UTR–dependent protein localization (UDPL). Our study thus establishes an up-to-date, high-confidence catalog of 3′ end processing sites and poly(A) signals, and it uncovers an important role of HNRNPC in regulating 3′ end processing. It further suggests that U-rich elements mediate interactions with multiple RBPs that regulate different stages in a transcript's life cycle. PMID:27382025

  15. Amaryllidaceae alkaloids inhibit nuclear-to-cytoplasmic export of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Qi, Wen-Bao; Wang, Lei; Tian, Jin; Jiao, Pei-Rong; Liu, Guo-Qian; Ye, Wen-Cai; Liao, Ming

    2013-11-01

    Few drugs are currently licensed to treat influenza A infection, and new therapies are needed, especially for highly pathogenic strains. Traditional medicinal plants, such as Lycoris radiata, are a potential source of new antiviral agents. To test 15 Amaryllidaceae alkaloids isolated from the bulbs of L. radiata in vitro for antiviral activities against influenza virus type A, A/Chicken/GuangDong/178/2004 (H5N1, 178). Antiviral activities of the compounds were tested in time-of-addition assays, hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays, neuraminidase (NA) activity assays, and viral entry inhibition assays using H5N1-HIV pseudoviruses. Effects of the compounds on localization and activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) were determined by immunofluorescence and an RNP minigenome assay, respectively. Among the alkaloids, lycorine (AA1), hippeastrine (AA2), hemanthamine (AA3) and 11-hydroxy vittatine (AA4) exhibited antiviral activities, with EC90 values of 0·52, 82·07, 4·15, and 13·45 μm, respectively. These compounds did not affect the function of the outer membrane proteins or the viral entry process and viral RNP activity. As AA1 and AA3 exhibited stronger antiviral activities, they were further analyzed. Intracellular nucleoprotein (NP) localization showed that AA1 and AA3 inhibited the RNP complex in the nucleus at an early stage of a single-round and multi-round of replication. Four Amaryllidaceae alkaloids were first determined that could exert anti-influenza activities after virus entry into cells. Furthermore, AA1 and AA3 could inhibit nuclear-to-cytoplasmic export of the RNP complex of virus replication. Thus, these compounds may be developed further as anti-influenza drug candidates. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Novel Pathological Role of hnRNPA1 (Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1) in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function and Neointima Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Qishan; An, Weiwei; Yang, Feng; Maguire, Eithne Margaret; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Cheng; Wen, Guanmei; Yang, Mei; Dai, Bin; Luong, Le Anh; Zhu, Jianhua; Xu, Qingbo; Xiao, Qingzhong

    2017-09-14

    hnRNPA1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1) plays a variety of roles in gene expression. However, little is known about the functional involvement of hnRNPA1 in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function and neointima hyperplasia. In this study, we have attempted to investigate the functional roles of hnRNPA1 in the contexts of VSMC function, injury-induced vessel remodeling, and human atherosclerotic lesions, as well as discern the molecular mechanisms involved. APPROACH AND RESULTS: hnRNPA1 expression levels were consistently modulated during VSMC phenotype switching and neointimal lesion formation induced by wire injury. Functional studies showed that VSMC-specific gene expression, proliferation, and migration were regulated by hnRNPA1. Our data show that hnRNPA1 exerts its effects on VSMC functions through modulation of IQGAP1 (IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein 1). Mechanistically, hnRNPA1 regulates IQGAP1 mRNA degradation through 2 mechanisms: upregulating microRNA-124 (miR-124) and binding to AU-rich element of IQGAP1 gene. Further evidence suggests that hnRNPA1 upregulates miR-124 by modulating miR-124 biogenesis and that IQGAP1 is the authentic target gene of miR-124. Importantly, ectopic overexpression of hnRNPA1 greatly reduced VSMC proliferation and inhibited neointima formation in wire-injured carotid arteries. Finally, lower expression levels of hnRNPA1 and miR-124, while higher expression levels of IQGAP1, were observed in human atherosclerotic lesions. Our data show that hnRNPA1 is a critical regulator of VSMC function and behavior in the context of neointima hyperplasia, and the hnRNPA1/miR-124/IQGAP1 regulatory axis represents a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 The Authors.

  17. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L; Lu, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-25

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH)2D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH)2D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH)2D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of transcription. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibition activate transcription via transient release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B Matija

    2012-10-19

    By phosphorylating elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is the critical kinase for transcription elongation and co-transcriptional processing of eukaryotic genes. It exists in inactive small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (7SK snRNP) and active (free P-TEFb) complexes in cells. The P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of cellular activation, proliferation, and differentiation. Free P-TEFb, which is required for growth, can be recruited to RNA polymerase II via transcription factors, BRD4, or the super elongation complex (SEC). UV light, various signaling cascades, transcriptional blockade, or compounds such as hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), and other histone deacetylase inhibitors lead to a rapid release of free P-TEFb, followed by its reassembly into the 7SK snRNP. As a consequence, transcription of HEXIM1, a critical 7SK snRNP subunit, and HIV is induced. In this study, we found that a bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitor, JQ1, which inhibits BRD4 by blocking its association with chromatin, also leads to the rapid release of free P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP. Indeed, JQ1 transiently increased levels of free P-TEFb and BRD4·P-TEFb and SEC·P-TEFb complexes in cells. As a consequence, the levels of HEXIM1 and HIV proteins rose. Importantly, the knockdown of ELL2, a subunit of the SEC, blocked the ability of JQ1 to increase HIV transcription. Finally, the effects of JQ1 and HMBA or SAHA on the P-TEFb equilibrium were cooperative. We conclude that HMBA, SAHA, and JQ1 affect transcription elongation by a similar and convergent mechanism.

  19. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a tissue biomarker for detection of early hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yantong; Zhao, Jingming; Bi, Jingtao; Wu, Quan; Wang, Xin; Lai, Quanyou

    2012-07-03

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors occurring mainly in patients with chronic liver disease. Detection of early HCC is critically important for treatment of these patients. We employed a proteomic profiling approach to identify potential biomarker for early HCC detection. Based on Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging classification, 15 early HCC and 25 late HCC tissue samples from post-operative HCC patients and their clinicopathological data were used for the discovery of biomarkers specific for the detection of early HCC. Differential proteins among cirrhotic, early, and late tissue samples were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and subsequently identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves analysis were performed to find potential biomarkers associated with early HCC. Diagnosis performance of the biomarker was obtained from diagnosis test. Protein spot SSP2215 was found to be significantly overexpressed in HCC, particularly in early HCC, and identified as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) by tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF). The overexpression in HCC was subsequently validated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. ROC curve analysis showed that hnRNP K intensity could detect early HCC at 66.67 % sensitivity and 84 % specificity, which was superior to serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) in detection of early HCC. Furthermore, the diagnosis test demonstrated, when combined with hnRNP K and serum AFP as biomarker panel to detect early HCC at different cut-off value, the sensitivity and specificity could be enhanced to 93.33 % and 96 %, respectively. hnRNP K is a potential tissue biomarker, either alone or in combination with serum AFP, for detection of early HCC. High expression of hnRNP K could be helpful to discriminate early HCC from a nonmalignant nodule, especially for patients with liver cirrhosis.

  20. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  1. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  2. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  3. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  4. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  5. The Multivariate Largest Lyapunov Exponent as an Age-Related Metric of Quiet Standing Balance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang

    2015-01-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent has been researched as a metric of the balance ability during human quiet standing. However, the sensitivity and accuracy of this measurement method are not good enough for clinical use. The present research proposes a metric of the human body's standing balance ability based on the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent which can quantify the human standing balance. The dynamic multivariate time series of ankle, knee, and hip were measured by multiple electrical goniometers. Thirty-six normal people of different ages participated in the test. With acquired data, the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent was calculated. Finally, the results of the proposed approach were analysed and compared with the traditional method, for which the largest Lyapunov exponent and power spectral density from the centre of pressure were also calculated. The following conclusions can be obtained. The multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent has a higher degree of differentiation in differentiating balance in eyes-closed conditions. The MLLE value reflects the overall coordination between multisegment movements. Individuals of different ages can be distinguished by their MLLE values. The standing stability of human is reduced with the increment of age.

  6. The Multivariate Largest Lyapunov Exponent as an Age-Related Metric of Quiet Standing Balance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang

    2015-01-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent has been researched as a metric of the balance ability during human quiet standing. However, the sensitivity and accuracy of this measurement method are not good enough for clinical use. The present research proposes a metric of the human body's standing balance ability based on the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent which can quantify the human standing balance. The dynamic multivariate time series of ankle, knee, and hip were measured by multiple electrical goniometers. Thirty-six normal people of different ages participated in the test. With acquired data, the multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent was calculated. Finally, the results of the proposed approach were analysed and compared with the traditional method, for which the largest Lyapunov exponent and power spectral density from the centre of pressure were also calculated. The following conclusions can be obtained. The multivariate largest Lyapunov exponent has a higher degree of differentiation in differentiating balance in eyes-closed conditions. The MLLE value reflects the overall coordination between multisegment movements. Individuals of different ages can be distinguished by their MLLE values. The standing stability of human is reduced with the increment of age. PMID:26064182

  7. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS AND JACOBI ENSEMBLES: LARGEST EIGENVALUE, TRACY–WIDOM LIMITS AND RATES OF CONVERGENCE1

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Iain M.

    2009-01-01

    Let A and B be independent, central Wishart matrices in p variables with common covariance and having m and n degrees of freedom, respectively. The distribution of the largest eigenvalue of (A + B)−1 B has numerous applications in multivariate statistics, but is difficult to calculate exactly. Suppose that m and n grow in proportion to p. We show that after centering and, scaling, the distribution is approximated to second-order, O(p−2/3), by the Tracy–Widom law. The results are obtained for both complex and then real-valued data by using methods of random matrix theory to study the largest eigenvalue of the Jacobi unitary and orthogonal ensembles. Asymptotic approximations of Jacobi polynomials near the largest zero play a central role. PMID:20157626

  8. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS AND JACOBI ENSEMBLES: LARGEST EIGENVALUE, TRACY-WIDOM LIMITS AND RATES OF CONVERGENCE.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Iain M

    2008-12-01

    Let A and B be independent, central Wishart matrices in p variables with common covariance and having m and n degrees of freedom, respectively. The distribution of the largest eigenvalue of (A + B)(-1)B has numerous applications in multivariate statistics, but is difficult to calculate exactly. Suppose that m and n grow in proportion to p. We show that after centering and, scaling, the distribution is approximated to second-order, O(p(-2/3)), by the Tracy-Widom law. The results are obtained for both complex and then real-valued data by using methods of random matrix theory to study the largest eigenvalue of the Jacobi unitary and orthogonal ensembles. Asymptotic approximations of Jacobi polynomials near the largest zero play a central role.

  9. Deletion of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) in Prader-Willi syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Two sibs with the typical phenotype without a cytogenetic deletion in chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kibe, Tetsuya; Wada, Yoshiro

    1996-04-24

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene is regarded as one of the candidates for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We describe two sibs with typical PWS presenting deletion of SNRPN detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Neither a cytogenetically detectable 15q12 deletion nor a deletion for the D15S11, D15S10, and GABRB3 cosmid probes were found in either patient. This implies a smaller deletion limited to the PWS critical region. FISH with a SNRPN probe will permit analysis of PWS patients with limited deletions not detectable with other probes. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Transit profiles: The thirty largest agencies for the 1992 section 15 report year. Statistical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This publication consists of consolidated profiles for the thirty (30) largest transit agencies in the United States. The criteria used to determine the thirty (30) largest transit agencies is operating expense reported for the 1992 report year. The data contained in each profile consists of general and summary reports, as well as modal, performance, and trend indicators for the 1992 report year. The 1992 Report Year is defined as a transit reporting agency with a fiscal year ending on or between January 1 and December 31.

  11. Elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Heusch, Karin

    Introduction -- Electrons and atomic nuclei -- Quantum properties of atoms and particles -- The knives of Democritus -- Quarks inside atomic nuclei -- Quantum electrodynamics -- Quantum chromodynamics -- Mesons, baryons, and quarks -- Electroweak interactions -- Grand unification -- Conclusion.

  12. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  13. Auroral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-06-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  14. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  15. 360 Video Tour of the World’s Largest Laser

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-08-24

    Welcome to the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the world’s largest and most energetic laser system. It draws researchers from around the globe for experiments that can’t be conducted anywhere else on Earth. Let’s take a closer look.

  16. Phase space reconstruction and estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent for gait kinematic data

    SciTech Connect

    Josiński, Henryk; Świtoński, Adam; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2015-03-10

    The authors describe an example of application of nonlinear time series analysis directed at identifying the presence of deterministic chaos in human motion data by means of the largest Lyapunov exponent. The method was previously verified on the basis of a time series constructed from the numerical solutions of both the Lorenz and the Rössler nonlinear dynamical systems.

  17. Enrollment Trends: The Nation's 50 Largest School Districts. ERS Trends Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spectrum, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This table ranks Fall 1986 enrollments in the nation's 50 largest school districts and compares the percentage of enrollment changes for Fall 1986 and 1985, Fall 1985 and 1984, and Fall 1986 and 1971. New York City schools head the list with over 940,000 students enrolled in Fall 1986. (MLH)

  18. Enrollment Trends: The Nation's 50 Largest School Districts. ERS Trends Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spectrum, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A table presents data on the fall 1984 enrollments in the 50 largest school districts in the United States and on the percentages of change in enrollment in these districts from 1983 to 1984, from 1982 to 1983, and from 1971 to 1984. (PGD)

  19. The Wide Variations in the Black-White Higher Education Gap in America's Largest Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Compares black-white performances in educational attainment among adults who reside in the 15 most populous U.S. cities or metropolitan areas, focusing on: the best-performing cities for African American high school completions; racial differences in African American college completions in the nation's largest cities; cities with high percentages…

  20. EPA Administrator and San Francisco Bay Area government agencies celebrate nations largest solar energy partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy joined Bay Area agencies to celebrate the Regional Renewable Energy Procurement Project (R-REP), the nation's largest solar energy government collaboration and the launch of the Federal Agg

  1. New Observational Evidence of Active Asteroid P/2010 A2: Slow Rotation of the Largest Fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoonyoung; Ishiguro, Masateru; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2017-06-01

    We report new observations of the active asteroid P/2010 A2 taken when it made its closest approach to Earth (1.06 au in 2017 January) after its first discovery in 2010. Despite a crucial role of the rotational period in clarifying its ejection mechanism, the rotational property of P/2010 A2 has not yet been studied due to the extreme faintness of this tiny object (∼120 m in diameter). Taking advantage of the best observing geometry since the discovery, we succeed in obtaining the rotational light curve of the largest fragment with Gemini/GMOS-N. We find that (1) the largest fragment has a double-peaked period of 11.36 ± 0.02 hr spinning much slower than its critical spin period; (2) the largest fragment is a highly elongated object (a/b ≥ 1.94) with an effective radius of {61.9}-9.2+16.8 m; (3) the size distribution of the ejecta follows a broken power law (the power indices of the cumulative size distributions of the dust and fragments are 2.5 ± 0.1 and 5.2 ± 0.1, respectively); (4) the mass ratio of the largest fragment to the total ejecta is around 0.8; and (5) the dust cloud morphology is in agreement with the anisotropic ejection model in Kim et al. These new characteristics of the ejecta obtained in this work are favorable to the impact shattering hypothesis.

  2. Coordinated observations using the world largest low-frequency radio telescopes and space misiions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Zarka, Ph.; Kolyadin, V. L.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Stepkin, S. V.; Panchenko, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Fischer, G.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Melnik, V. N.; Litvinenko, G. V.; Sidorchuk, M. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Vasilyeva, Ya. Yu.; Bojko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Mann, G.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Koval, A. A.; Mylostna, K.; Pylaev, O. S.; Shepelev, V. A.; Reznik, A. P.

    2013-09-01

    The positive possibilities of astrophysical objects studies(including the Solar system investigations) using coordinated observations with the largest existing and coming low frequency radio telescopes are shown. The observations of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn, ant others with UTR-2, URAN, NDA radio telescopes, and WIND, Cassini and STEREO space missions at frequencies lower than 40 MHz have been carried out.

  3. Solar system radio emissions studies with the largest low-frequency radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Litvinenko, G.; Kolyadin, V.; Zarka, P.; Mylostna, K.; Vasylieva, I.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Sidorchuk, M.; Rucker, H.; Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the trends and tasks in the field of lowfrequency studies of radio emission from the Solar system's objects. The world's largest decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN have a unique combination of sensitivity and time/frequency resolution parameters, providing the capability of the most detailed studies of various types of solar and planetary emissions.

  4. The 2003 Music in Our School's Month and World's Largest Concert Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    On March 13, 2003 millions of school children, teachers, and citizens from around the world participate simultaneously in the "World's Largest Concert" (WLC). This concert, a sing-along program, is broadcast on PBS and the Armed Forces Radio and Television Network overseas. Participating in the WLC is a way to celebrate Music in Our…

  5. Is Bigger Easier? John Forte: Administrating One of the Largest Districts in the Country.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    In this interview, John Forte, Fairfax County (Virginia) Public Schools' assistant superintendent for general services, explains how he uses his training and professional experience to oversee a smoothly running operation in one of the nation's largest school districts. His real challenge is providing extra support to students in low-income areas.…

  6. 45. FINISHING STANDS, 98INCH CONTINUOUS HOT STRIP MILL, WORLD'S LARGEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. FINISHING STANDS, 98-INCH CONTINUOUS HOT STRIP MILL, WORLD'S LARGEST AT THE TIME OF INSTALLATION IN 1937. THE MILL WAS REPLACED BY A NEW 84-INCH MILL IN 1971 AND IS SEEN HERE PARTIALLY DISMANTLED IN PREPARATION FOR DEMOLITION. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  7. Profile of a Woman Officer; Findings of a Study of Executives in America's 1300 Largest Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    The typical woman officer from the nation's largest industrial, banking, retail and utility companies is married, at least 50 years of age, has had some college, was born into a family of low or lower middle class income, and has a work salary of less than $30,000. While the number of women officers in leading business organizations is small, the…

  8. Discovery of the largest orbweaving spider species: the evolution of gigantism in Nephila.

    PubMed

    Kuntner, Matjaz; Coddington, Jonathan A

    2009-10-21

    More than 41,000 spider species are known with about 400-500 added each year, but for some well-known groups, such as the giant golden orbweavers, Nephila, the last valid described species dates from the 19(th) century. Nephila are renowned for being the largest web-spinning spiders, making the largest orb webs, and are model organisms for the study of extreme sexual size dimorphism (SSD) and sexual biology. Here, we report on the discovery of a new, giant Nephila species from Africa and Madagascar, and review size evolution and SSD in Nephilidae. We formally describe N. komaci sp. nov., the largest web spinning species known, and place the species in phylogenetic context to reconstruct the evolution of mean size (via squared change parsimony). We then test female and male mean size correlation using phylogenetically independent contrasts, and simulate nephilid body size evolution using Monte Carlo statistics. Nephila females increased in size almost monotonically to establish a mostly African clade of true giants. In contrast, Nephila male size is effectively decoupled and hovers around values roughly one fifth of female size. Although N. komaci females are the largest Nephila yet discovered, the males are also large and thus their SSD is not exceptional.

  9. Pterosaur from the latest cretaceous of west Texas: discovery of the largest flying creature.

    PubMed

    Lawson, D A

    1975-03-14

    Three partial skeletons of a large pterosaur have been found in the latest Cretaceous nonmarine rock of West Texas. This flying reptile had thin, elongate, perhaps toothless jaws and a long neck similar to Pterodaustro and Pterodactylus. With an estimated wingspan of 15.5 meters, it is undoutbtedly the largest flying creature presently known.

  10. Profile of a Woman Officer; Findings of a Study of Executives in America's 1300 Largest Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    The typical woman officer from the nation's largest industrial, banking, retail and utility companies is married, at least 50 years of age, has had some college, was born into a family of low or lower middle class income, and has a work salary of less than $30,000. While the number of women officers in leading business organizations is small, the…

  11. The 2003 Music in Our School's Month and World's Largest Concert Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    On March 13, 2003 millions of school children, teachers, and citizens from around the world participate simultaneously in the "World's Largest Concert" (WLC). This concert, a sing-along program, is broadcast on PBS and the Armed Forces Radio and Television Network overseas. Participating in the WLC is a way to celebrate Music in Our…

  12. Evolution of influenza A virus PB2 genes: implications for evolution of the ribonucleoprotein complex and origin of human influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Gorman, O T; Donis, R O; Kawaoka, Y; Webster, R G

    1990-10-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 20 influenza A virus PB2 genes showed that PB2 genes have evolved into the following four major lineages: (i) equine/Prague/56 (EQPR56); (ii and iii) two distinct avian PB2 lineages, one containing FPV/34 and H13 gull virus strains and the other containing North American avian and recent equine strains; and (iv) human virus strains joined with classic swine virus strains (i.e., H1N1 swine virus strains related to swine/Iowa/15/30). The human virus lineage showed the greatest divergence from its root relative to other lineages. The estimated nucleotide evolutionary rate for the human PB2 lineage was 1.82 x 10(-3) changes per nucleotide per year, which is within the range of published estimates for NP and NS genes of human influenza A viruses. At the amino acid level, PB2s of human viruses have accumulated 34 amino acid changes over the past 55 years. In contrast, the avian PB2 lineages showed much less evolution, e.g., recent avian PB2s showed as few as three amino acid changes relative to the avian root. The completion of evolutionary analyses of the PB1, PB2, PA and NP genes of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex permits comparison of evolutionary pathways. Different patterns of evolution among the RNP genes indicate that the genes of the complex are not coevolving as a unit. Evolution of the PB1 and PB2 genes is less correlated with host-specific factors, and their proteins appear to be evolving more slowly than NP and PA. This suggests that protein functional constraints are limiting the evolutionary divergence of PB1 and PB2 genes. The parallel host-specific evolutionary pathways of the NP and PA genes suggest that these proteins are coevolving in response to host-specific factors. PB2s of human influenza A viruses share a common ancestor with classic swine virus PB2s, and the pattern of evolution suggests that the ancestor was an avian virus PB2. This same pattern of evolution appears in the other genes of the RNP complex. Antigenic

  13. The strongest gravitational lenses. III. The order statistics of the largest Einstein radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waizmann, J.-C.; Redlich, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Bartelmann, M.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The Einstein radius of a gravitational lens is a key characteristic. It encodes information about decisive quantities such as halo mass, concentration, triaxiality, and orientation with respect to the observer. Therefore, the largest Einstein radii can potentially be utilised to test the predictions of the ΛCDM model. Aims: Hitherto, studies have focussed on the single largest observed Einstein radius. We extend those studies by employing order statistics to formulate exclusion criteria based on the n largest Einstein radii and apply these criteria to the strong lensing analysis of 12 MACS clusters at z> 0.5. Methods: We obtain the order statistics of Einstein radii by a Monte Carlo approach, based on the semi-analytic modelling of the halo population on the past lightcone. After sampling the order statistics, we fit a general extreme value distribution to the first-order distribution, which allows us to derive analytic relations for the order statistics of the Einstein radii. Results: We find that the Einstein radii of the 12 MACS clusters are not in conflict with the ΛCDM expectations. Our exclusion criteria indicate that, in order to exhibit tension with the concordance model, one would need to observe approximately twenty Einstein radii with θeff ≳ 30″, ten with θeff ≳ 35″, five with θeff ≳ 42″, or one with θeff ≳ 74″ in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.0 on the full sky (assuming a source redshift of zs = 2). Furthermore, we find that, with increasing order, the haloes with the largest Einstein radii are on average less aligned along the line-of-sight and less triaxial. In general, the cumulative distribution functions steepen for higher orders, giving them better constraining power. Conclusions: A framework that allows the individual and joint order distributions of the n-largest Einstein radii to be derived is presented. From a statistical point of view, we do not see any evidence of an Einstein ring problem even for the

  14. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  15. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  16. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  17. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  18. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  19. Experimental Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Carl; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Purohit, Milind V.

    2014-08-31

    , which collected data at SLAC until 2008. They continued to analyze the voluminous BaBar data with an emphasis on precision tests of Quantum Chromodynamics and on properties of the "eta_B," a bottom quark paired in a meson with a strange quark. The ATLAS experiment became the principal research focus for Purohit. One of the world's largest pieces of scientific equipment, ATLAS observes particle collisions at the highest-energy particle accelerator ever built, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Our efforts on ATLAS included participation in the commissioning, calibration, and installation of components called "CSCs". The unprecedented energy of 14 TeV enabled the ATLAS and CMS collaborations to declare discovery of the famous Higgs particle in 2012.

  20. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  1. Stable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-12-31

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc.

  2. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  3. Particle Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2014-05-01

    Geophysics research has long been dominated by classical mechanics, largely disregarding the potential of particle physics to augment existing techniques. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in probing Earth's interior with muons and neutrinos. Existing results for various volcanological targets are reviewed. Geoneutrinos are also highlighted as examples in which the neutrino probes elucidate the composition of Earth's deep interior. Particle geophysics has the potential to serve as a useful paradigm to transform our understanding of Earth as dramatically as the X-ray transformed our understanding of medicine and the body.

  4. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  5. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  7. A method for reducing the largest relative errors in Monte Carlo iterated-fission-source calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J. L.; Sutton, T. M.

    2013-07-01

    In Monte Carlo iterated-fission-source calculations relative uncertainties on local tallies tend to be larger in lower-power regions and smaller in higher-power regions. Reducing the largest uncertainties to an acceptable level simply by running a larger number of neutron histories is often prohibitively expensive. The uniform fission site method has been developed to yield a more spatially-uniform distribution of relative uncertainties. This is accomplished by biasing the density of fission neutron source sites while not biasing the solution. The method is integrated into the source iteration process, and does not require any auxiliary forward or adjoint calculations. For a given amount of computational effort, the use of the method results in a reduction of the largest uncertainties relative to the standard algorithm. Two variants of the method have been implemented and tested. Both have been shown to be effective. (authors)

  8. Polynomial potentials determined from the energy spectrum and transition dipole moments that give the largest hyperpolarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Nathan J.; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2016-12-01

    We attempt to get a polynomial solution to the inverse problem, that is, to determine the form of the mechanical Hamiltonian when given the energy spectrum and transition dipole moment matrix. Our approach is to determine the potential in the form of a polynomial by finding an approximate solution to the inverse problem, then to determine the hyperpolarizability for that system's Hamiltonian. We find that the largest hyperpolarizabilities approach the apparent limit of previous potential optimization studies, but we do not find real potentials for the parameter values necessary to exceed this apparent limit. We also explore half potentials with positive exponent, which cannot be expressed as a polynomial except for integer powers. This yields a simple closed potential with only one parameter that scans nearly the full range of the intrinsic hyperpolarizability. The limiting case of vanishing exponent yields the largest intrinsic hyperpolarizability.

  9. THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY IN A85: THE LARGEST CORE KNOWN SO FAR

    SciTech Connect

    López-Cruz, O.; Añorve, C.; Ibarra-Medel, H. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.

    2014-11-10

    We have found that the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in A85, Holm 15A, displays the largest core known so far. Its cusp radius, r {sub γ} = 4.57 ± 0.06 kpc (4.''26 ± 0.''06), is more than 18 times larger than the mean for BCGs and ≳ 1 kpc larger than A2261-BCG, hitherto the largest-cored BCG. Holm 15A hosts the luminous amorphous radio source 0039-095B and has the optical signature of a LINER. Scaling laws indicate that this core could host a supermassive black hole (SMBH) of mass M {sub •} ∼ (10{sup 9}-10{sup 11}) M {sub ☉}. We suggest that cores this large represent a relatively short phase in the evolution of BCGs, whereas the masses of their associated SBMH might be set by initial conditions.

  10. Public health aspects of the world's largest mass gathering: The 2013 Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, India.

    PubMed

    Balsari, Satchit; Greenough, P Gregg; Kazi, Dhruv; Heerboth, Aaron; Dwivedi, Shraddha; Leaning, Jennifer

    2016-09-08

    India's Kumbh Mela remains the world's largest and longest mass gathering. The 2013 event, where participants undertook a ritual bath, hosted over 70 million Hindu pilgrims during 55 days on a 1936 hectare flood plain at the confluence of the Yamuna and Ganga Rivers. On the holiest bathing days, the population surged. Unlike other religious, cultural, and sports mass gatherings, the Kumbh Mela's administration cannot estimate or limit the participant number. The event created serious and uncommon public health challenges: initiating crowd safety measures where population density and mobility directly contact flowing bodies of water; providing water, sanitation, and hygiene to a population that frequently defecates in the open; and establishing disease surveillance and resource use measures within a temporary health delivery system. We review the world's largest gathering by observing first-hand the public health challenges, plus the preparations for and responses to them. We recommend ways to improve preparedness.

  11. Largest lyapunov-exponent estimation and selective prediction by means of simplex forecast algorithms

    PubMed

    Dunki

    2000-11-01

    Limited predictability is one of the remarkable features of deterministic chaos and this feature may be quantized in terms of Lyapunov exponents. Accordingly, Lyapunov-exponent estimates may be expected to follow in a natural way from forecast algorithms. Exploring this idea, we propose a method estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent from a time series which uses the behavior of so-called simplex forecasts. The method considers the estimation of properties of the distribution of local simplex expansion coefficients. These are also used for the definition of error bars for the Lyapunov-exponent estimates and allows for selective forecasts with improved prediction accuracy. We demonstrate these concepts on standard test examples and three realistic applications to time series concerning largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation of an experimentally obtained hyperchaotic NMR signal, brain state differentiation, and stock-market prediction.

  12. Largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation and selective prediction by means of simplex forecast algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünki, Rudolf M.

    2000-11-01

    Limited predictability is one of the remarkable features of deterministic chaos and this feature may be quantized in terms of Lyapunov exponents. Accordingly, Lyapunov-exponent estimates may be expected to follow in a natural way from forecast algorithms. Exploring this idea, we propose a method estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent from a time series which uses the behavior of so-called simplex forecasts. The method considers the estimation of properties of the distribution of local simplex expansion coefficients. These are also used for the definition of error bars for the Lyapunov-exponent estimates and allows for selective forecasts with improved prediction accuracy. We demonstrate these concepts on standard test examples and three realistic applications to time series concerning largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation of an experimentally obtained hyperchaotic NMR signal, brain state differentiation, and stock-market prediction.

  13. Limiting statistics of the largest and smallest eigenvalues in the correlated Wishart model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Tim; Kieburg, Mario; Guhr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The correlated Wishart model provides a standard tool for the analysis of correlations in a rich variety of systems. Although much is known for complex correlation matrices, the empirically much more important real case still poses substantial challenges. We put forward a new approach, which maps arbitrary statistical quantities, depending on invariants only, to invariant Hermitian matrix models. For completeness we also include the quaternion case and deal with all three cases in a unified way. As an important application, we study the statistics of the largest eigenvalue and its limiting distributions in the correlated Wishart model, because they help to estimate the behavior of large complex systems. We show that even for fully correlated Wishart ensembles, the Tracy-Widom distribution can be the limiting distribution of the largest as well as the smallest eigenvalue, provided that a certain scaling of the empirical eigenvalues holds.

  14. Public health aspects of the world's largest mass gathering: The 2013 Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, India.

    PubMed

    Balsari, Satchit; Greenough, P Gregg; Kazi, Dhruv; Heerboth, Aaron; Dwivedi, Shraddha; Leaning, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    India's Kumbh Mela remains the world's largest and longest mass gathering. The 2013 event, where participants undertook a ritual bath, hosted over 70 million Hindu pilgrims during 55 days on a 1936 hectare flood plain at the confluence of the Yamuna and Ganga Rivers. On the holiest bathing days, the population surged. Unlike other religious, cultural, and sports mass gatherings, the Kumbh Mela's administration cannot estimate or limit the participant number. The event created serious and uncommon public health challenges: initiating crowd safety measures where population density and mobility directly contact flowing bodies of water; providing water, sanitation, and hygiene to a population that frequently defecates in the open; and establishing disease surveillance and resource use measures within a temporary health delivery system. We review the world's largest gathering by observing first-hand the public health challenges, plus the preparations for and responses to them. We recommend ways to improve preparedness.

  15. Rapid Deposition Technology Holds the Key for the World's Largest Solar Manufacturer (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    Thanks in part to years of collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a manufacturer of thin-film solar modules has grown from a small garage-type operation to become the world's largest manufacturer of solar modules. First Solar, Inc. now manufactures cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar modules throughout the world, but it began in Ohio as a small company called Solar Cells, Inc.

  16. Distribution of the largest event in the critical epidemic-type aftershock-sequence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vere-Jones, David; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2008-10-01

    This Brief Report corrects and extends the results of Zhuang and Ogata [Phys. Rev. E 73, 046134 (2006)] on the asymptotic behavior of the largest event in the epidemic-type aftershock-sequence model for earthquake occurrence. We show that, in the special case that the underlying branching process is critical, there exists a previously unnoticed mode of behavior, which occurs when the expected family size grows relatively slowly.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, the Largest Genome of a Human-Associated Archaea Species

    PubMed Central

    Gorlas, Aurore; Robert, Catherine; Gimenez, Gregory; Drancourt, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the complete and annotated genome sequence of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis strain B10 (DSM 24529T, CSUR P135), which was isolated from human feces. The 2.6-Mb genome represents the largest genome of a methanogenic euryarchaeon isolated from humans. The genome data of M. luminyensis reveal unique features and horizontal gene transfer events, which might have occurred during its adaptation and/or evolution in the human ecosystem. PMID:22887657

  18. Complete genome sequence of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, the largest genome of a human-associated Archaea species.

    PubMed

    Gorlas, Aurore; Robert, Catherine; Gimenez, Gregory; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2012-09-01

    The present study describes the complete and annotated genome sequence of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis strain B10 (DSM 24529(T), CSUR P135), which was isolated from human feces. The 2.6-Mb genome represents the largest genome of a methanogenic euryarchaeon isolated from humans. The genome data of M. luminyensis reveal unique features and horizontal gene transfer events, which might have occurred during its adaptation and/or evolution in the human ecosystem.

  19. Largest impact features on Venus: Non-preserved or non-recognizable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Olga V.

    1993-03-01

    Conventional explanation of a lack of impact craters with diameters greater than 300 km on Venus is that they formed during the intense bombardment era and had lunar-like morphology, but they are not preserved now because of rapid viscous relaxation of their topograpy and/or high endogenous reworking of surface. Other explanation invokes failure to recognize these larger craters because of their non-lunar-like morphology from the moment of formation, since larger gravity of Venus relatively to the Moon results in that largest craters on Venus may form within the mass of shock melted material while comparably sized lunar craters would be still almost 'dry'. To test this hypothesis, morphologies and rim-crest diameters of the largest peak-ring and Orientale-type basins and all larger impact features on Moon, Mercury, Mars, and Venus were compiled and compared to rim crest diameters of model craters with different melt volume/transient-cavity volume ratios. Results show that the final diameters of model craters formed at depth of melting about twice of transient cavity depth correspond to changeover from a planet-similar morphology of all the smaller basins on any terrestrial planet to a planet-specific morphology of all the larger basins on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars. On Venus, these largest impact features are not found and instead, a Venus-specific morphology of the largest concentric coronae appears in this size range. The coronae were suggested to form over sites of mantle upwelling and modified by subsequent volcanism and gravitational relaxation. The results here suggest that mantle upwelling - the first and necessary step of the corona formation models - may be induced by impact event (as a result of transient cavity collapse) and operated under cover of hot, slowly cooled impact melt in the areas of thinned crust and/or thermally active regions.

  20. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  1. Hospital Prices Increase in California, Especially Among Hospitals in the Largest Multi-hospital Systems.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Glenn A; Fonkych, Katya

    2016-01-01

    A surge in hospital consolidation is fueling formation of ever larger multi-hospital systems throughout the United States. This article examines hospital prices in California over time with a focus on hospitals in the largest multi-hospital systems. Our data show that hospital prices in California grew substantially (+76% per hospital admission) across all hospitals and all services between 2004 and 2013 and that prices at hospitals that are members of the largest, multi-hospital systems grew substantially more (113%) than prices paid to all other California hospitals (70%). Prices were similar in both groups at the start of the period (approximately $9200 per admission). By the end of the period, prices at hospitals in the largest systems exceeded prices at other California hospitals by almost $4000 per patient admission. Our study findings are potentially useful to policy makers across the country for several reasons. Our data measure actual prices for a large sample of hospitals over a long period of time in California. California experienced its wave of consolidation much earlier than the rest of the country and as such our findings may provide some insights into what may happen across the United States from hospital consolidation including growth of large, multi-hospital systems now forming in the rest of the rest of the country. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. The global diversion of pharmaceutical drugs. India: the third largest illicit opium producer?

    PubMed

    Paoli, Letizia; Greenfield, Victoria A; Charles, Molly; Reuter, Peter

    2009-03-01

    This paper explores India's role in the world illicit opiate market, particularly its role as a producer. India, a major illicit opiate consumer, is also the sole licensed exporter of raw opium: this unique status may be enabling substantial diversion to the illicit market. Participant observation and interviews were carried out at eight different sites. Information was also drawn from all standard secondary sources and the analysis of about 180 drug-related criminal proceedings reviewed by Indian High Courts and the Supreme Court from 1985 to 2001. Diversion from licit opium production takes place on such a large scale that India may be the third largest illicit opium producer after Afghanistan and Burma. With the possible exceptions of 2005 and 2006, 200-300 tons of India's opium may be diverted yearly. After estimating India's opiate consumption on the basis of UN-reported prevalence estimates, we find that diversion from licit production might have satisfied a quarter to more than a third of India's illicit opiate demand to 2004. India is not only among the world's largest consumer of illicit opiates but also one of the largest illicit opium producers. In contrast to all other illicit producers, India owes the latter distinction not to blatantly illicit cultivation but to diversion from licit cultivation. India's experience suggests the difficulty of preventing substantial leakage, even in a relatively well-governed nation.

  3. Single particle imaging of mRNAs crossing the nuclear pore: Surfing on the edge.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Truong, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Six years ago, the Singer lab published a landmark paper which described how individual mRNA particles cross the nuclear pore complex in mammalian tissue culture cells. This involved the simultaneous imaging of mRNAs, each labeled by a large number of tethered fluorescent proteins and fluorescently tagged nuclear pore components. Now two groups have applied this technique to the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Their results indicate that in the course of nuclear export, mRNAs likely engage complexes that are present on either side of the pore and that these interactions are modulated by proteins present in the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex. These findings lend support to the notion that just before and/or after the completion of nuclear export, mRNPs undergo one or more maturation steps that prepare the packaged mRNAs for translation. These results represent new and exciting insights into the mechanism of mRNA nuclear export.

  4. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  5. Health benefits of particle filtration.

    PubMed

    Fisk, W J

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  6. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  7. Deep, diverse and definitely different: unique attributes of the world's largest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Brandt, A.; Danovaro, R.; de Mol, B.; Escobar, E.; German, C. R.; Levin, L. A.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Menot, L.; Buhl-Mortensen, P.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Smith, C. R.; Tittensor, D. P.; Tyler, P. A.; Vanreusel, A.; Vecchione, M.

    2010-09-01

    The deep sea, the largest biome on Earth, has a series of characteristics that make this environment both distinct from other marine and land ecosystems and unique for the entire planet. This review describes these patterns and processes, from geological settings to biological processes, biodiversity and biogeographical patterns. It concludes with a brief discussion of current threats from anthropogenic activities to deep-sea habitats and their fauna. Investigations of deep-sea habitats and their fauna began in the late 19th century. In the intervening years, technological developments and stimulating discoveries have promoted deep-sea research and changed our way of understanding life on the planet. Nevertheless, the deep sea is still mostly unknown and current discovery rates of both habitats and species remain high. The geological, physical and geochemical settings of the deep-sea floor and the water column form a series of different habitats with unique characteristics that support specific faunal communities. Since 1840, 28 new habitats/ecosystems have been discovered from the shelf break to the deep trenches and discoveries of new habitats are still happening in the early 21st century. However, for most of these habitats the global area covered is unknown or has been only very roughly estimated; an even smaller - indeed, minimal - proportion has actually been sampled and investigated. We currently perceive most of the deep-sea ecosystems as heterotrophic, depending ultimately on the flux on organic matter produced in the overlying surface ocean through photosynthesis. The resulting strong food limitation thus shapes deep-sea biota and communities, with exceptions only in reducing ecosystems such as inter alia hydrothermal vents or cold seeps. Here, chemoautolithotrophic bacteria play the role of primary producers fuelled by chemical energy sources rather than sunlight. Other ecosystems, such as seamounts, canyons or cold-water corals have an increased

  8. Deep, diverse and definitely different: unique attributes of the world's largest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Brandt, A.; Danovaro, R.; Escobar, E.; German, C. R.; Levin, L. A.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Menot, L.; Buhl-Mortensen, P.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Smith, C. R.; Tittensor, D. P.; Tyler, P. A.; Vanreusel, A.; Vecchione, M.

    2010-04-01

    The deep sea, the largest biome on Earth, has a series of characteristics that make this environment both distinct from other marine and land ecosystems and unique for the entire planet. This review describes these patterns and processes, from geological settings to biological processes, biodiversity and biogeographical patterns. It concludes with a brief discussion of current threats from anthropogenic activities to deep-sea habitats and their fauna. Investigations of deep-sea habitats and their fauna began in the late 19th Century. In the intervening years, technological developments and stimulating discoveries have promoted deep-sea research and changed our way of understanding life on the planet. Nevertheless, the deep sea is still mostly unknown and current discovery rates of both habitats and species remain high. The geological, physical and geochemical settings of the deep-sea floor and the water column form a series of different habitats with unique characteristics that support specific faunal communities. Since 1840, 27 new habitats/ecosystems have been discovered from the shelf break to the deep trenches and discoveries of new habitats are still happening in the early 21st Century. However, for most of these habitats, the global area covered is unknown or has been only very roughly estimated; an even smaller - indeed, minimal - proportion has actually been sampled and investigated. We currently perceive most of the deep-sea ecosystems as heterotrophic, depending ultimately on the flux on organic matter produced in the overlying surface ocean through photosynthesis. The resulting strong food limitation, thus, shapes deep-sea biota and communities, with exceptions only in reducing ecosystems such as inter alia hydrothermal vents or cold seeps, where chemoautolithotrophic bacteria play the role of primary producers fuelled by chemical energy sources rather than sunlight. Other ecosystems, such as seamounts, canyons or cold-water corals have an increased

  9. Reduced IgG anti-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with positive IgM anti-cytomegalovirus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Palafox Sánchez, Claudia Azucena; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward Kl; Carcamo, Wendy C; Muñoz Valle, José Francisco; Orozco Barocio, Gerardo; Oregon Romero, Edith; Navarro Hernández, Rosa Elena; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio; Vázquez Del Mercado, Mónica

    2009-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by production of autoantibodies to RNA or DNA-protein complexes such as small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). A role of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis has been suggested. Similar to Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects the majority of individuals at a young age and establishes latency with a potential for reactivation. Homology of CMV glycoprotein B (UL55) with the U1snRNP-70 kDa protein (U1-70 k) has been described; however, the role of CMV infection in production of anti-snRNPs is controversial. We investigated the association of CMV serology and autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Sixty-one Mexican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were tested for CMV and Epstein-Barr virus serology (viral capsid antigen, IgG, IgM) and autoantibodies by immunoprecipitation and ELISA (IgG and IgM class, U1RNP/Sm, U1-70 k, P peptide, rheumatoid factor, dsDNA, beta2-glycoprotein I). IgG anti-CMV and IgM anti-CMV were positive in 95% (58/61) and 33% (20/61), respectively, and two cases were negative for both. Clinical manifestation and autoantibodies in the IgM anti-CMV+ group (n = 20) versus the IgM anti-CMV(-)IgG+ (n = 39) group were compared. Most (19/20) of the IgM anti-CMV+ cases were IgG anti-CMV+, consistent with reactivation or reinfection. IgM anti-CMV was unrelated to rheumatoid factor or IgM class autoantibodies and none was positive for IgM anti-Epstein-Barr virus-viral capsid antigen, indicating that this is not simply due to false positive results caused by rheumatoid factor or nonspecific binding by certain IgM. The IgM anti-CMV+ group has significantly lower levels of IgG anti-U1RNP/Sm and IgG anti-U1-70 k (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0046, respectively). This finding was also confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Among the IgM anti-CMV(-) subset, anti-Su was associated with anti-U1RNP and anti-Ro (P < 0.05). High levels of IgG anti-CMV were associated with production of lupus

  10. Reduced IgG anti-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with positive IgM anti-cytomegalovirus antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Palafox Sánchez, Claudia Azucena; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward KL; Carcamo, Wendy C; Muñoz Valle, José Francisco; Orozco Barocio, Gerardo; Oregon Romero, Edith; Navarro Hernández, Rosa Elena; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio; Vázquez del Mercado, Mónica

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by production of autoantibodies to RNA or DNA–protein complexes such as small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). A role of Epstein–Barr virus in the pathogenesis has been suggested. Similar to Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects the majority of individuals at a young age and establishes latency with a potential for reactivation. Homology of CMV glycoprotein B (UL55) with the U1snRNP-70 kDa protein (U1–70 k) has been described; however, the role of CMV infection in production of anti-snRNPs is controversial. We investigated the association of CMV serology and autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Sixty-one Mexican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were tested for CMV and Epstein–Barr virus serology (viral capsid antigen, IgG, IgM) and autoantibodies by immunoprecipitation and ELISA (IgG and IgM class, U1RNP/Sm, U1–70 k, P peptide, rheumatoid factor, dsDNA, β2-glycoprotein I). Results IgG anti-CMV and IgM anti-CMV were positive in 95% (58/61) and 33% (20/61), respectively, and two cases were negative for both. Clinical manifestation and autoantibodies in the IgM anti-CMV(+) group (n = 20) versus the IgM anti-CMV(-)IgG (+) (n = 39) group were compared. Most (19/20) of the IgM anti-CMV(+) cases were IgG anti-CMV(+), consistent with reactivation or reinfection. IgM anti-CMV was unrelated to rheumatoid factor or IgM class autoantibodies and none was positive for IgM anti-Epstein–Barr virus–viral capsid antigen, indicating that this is not simply due to false positive results caused by rheumatoid factor or nonspecific binding by certain IgM. The IgM anti-CMV(+) group has significantly lower levels of IgG anti-U1RNP/Sm and IgG anti-U1–70 k (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0046, respectively). This finding was also confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Among the IgM anti-CMV(-) subset, anti-Su was associated with anti-U1RNP and anti-Ro (P < 0.05). High levels of Ig

  11. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  12. Particle classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, B.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a classifier for particulate material comprising a housing having an inlet to receive a classifying air flow flowing in a given direction, collection means downstream of the inlet to receive material classified by the air flow, and material introduction means intermediate the inlet and the collection means to introduce particles entrained in a secondary air stream into the housing in a direction other than the given direction. The material introduction means includes a material outlet aperture in a wall of the housing extending generally perpendicular to the given direction, conveying means to convey material and the secondary air stream to the material outlet and diverting means to divert the secondary air stream to a direction generally parallel to the classifying air flow flowing in the given direction. The diverting means includes a surface extending downstream from the outlet and adjacent thereto and being dimensioned to divert the secondary airstream by a Coanda effect generally parallel to the given direction and thereby segregate the secondary air/stream from the particles and permit continued movement of the particles along predictable trajectories.

  13. Analysis of the largest tandemly repeated DNA families in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Peter E; Hasson, Dan; Guillem, Flavia; Lescale, Chloe; Jin, Xiaoping; Abrusan, Gyorgy

    2008-01-01

    Background Tandemly Repeated DNA represents a large portion of the human genome, and accounts for a significant amount of copy number variation. Here we present a genome wide analysis of the largest tandem repeats found in the human genome sequence. Results Using Tandem Repeats Finder (TRF), tandem repeat arrays greater than 10 kb in total size were identified, and classified into simple sequence e.g. GAATG, classical satellites e.g. alpha satellite DNA, and locus specific VNTR arrays. Analysis of these large sequenced regions revealed that several "simple sequence" arrays actually showed complex domain and/or higher order repeat organization. Using additional methods, we further identified a total of 96 additional arrays with tandem repeat units greater than 2 kb (the detection limit of TRF), 53 of which contained genes or repeated exons. The overall size of an array of tandem 12 kb repeats which spanned a gap on chromosome 8 was found to be 600 kb to 1.7 Mbp in size, representing one of the largest non-centromeric arrays characterized. Several novel megasatellite tandem DNA families were observed that are characterized by repeating patterns of interspersed transposable elements that have expanded presumably by unequal crossing over. One of these families is found on 11 different chromosomes in >25 arrays, and represents one of the largest most widespread megasatellite DNA families. Conclusion This study represents the most comprehensive genome wide analysis of large tandem repeats in the human genome, and will serve as an important resource towards understanding the organization and copy number variation of these complex DNA families. PMID:18992157

  14. Comprehensive smoke-free laws--50 largest U.S. cities, 2000 and 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-11-16

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure causes heart disease and lung cancer in nonsmoking adults and several health conditions in children. Only completely eliminating smoking in indoor spaces fully protects nonsmokers from SHS. State and local laws can provide this protection in enclosed workplaces and public places by completely eliminating smoking in these settings. CDC considers a smoke-free law to be comprehensive if it prohibits smoking in all indoor areas of private workplaces, restaurants, and bars, with no exceptions. In response to growing evidence on the health effects of SHS, communities and states have increasingly adopted comprehensive smoke-free (CSF) laws in recent years. To assess trends in protecting the population from SHS exposure, CDC and the American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation (ANRF) compared coverage by local or state CSF laws in the 50 largest U.S. cities as of December 31, 2000, and October 5, 2012. The analysis focused on smoking restrictions in the 50 largest cities because these cities represent an important indicator of nationwide trends in local and state policy and because they are home to an estimated 47 million persons, or nearly 15% of the U.S. population. The analysis found that the number of these cities covered by local and/or state CSF laws increased from one city (2%) in 2000 to 30 cities (60%) in 2012. A total of 20 cities (40%) were not covered by a CSF law at either the local or state level in 2012, although 14 of these cities had 100% smoke-free provisions in place at the local or state level in at least one of the three settings considered. The results of this analysis indicate that substantial progress has been achieved during 2000-2012 in implementing CSF laws in the 50 largest U.S. cities. However, gaps in coverage, especially in the southern United States and in states with laws that preempt local smoking restrictions, are contributing to disparities in SHS protections.

  15. Mitochondrial genome of Micrura bella (Nemertea: Heteronemertea), the largest mitochondrial genome known to phylum Nemertea.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chunyang; Shi-Chun, Sun

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Micrura bella was sequenced and analyzed. Being the largest mitogenome known to phylum Nemertea, the genome is 16 847 bp in length. It encodes 37 genes typical to metazoan mitogenomes and has the same gene arrangement with the other Heteronemertea mitogenomes sequenced to date. The genome has the maximal number of non-coding nucleotides (2037 bp at 25 sites) in Nemertea mitogenomes, among which two large non-coding regions were found (507 and 508 bp, respectively).

  16. Female urethral diverticulum presenting with acute urinary retention: Reporting the largest diverticulum with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Manas Ranjan; Ranjan, Priyadarshi; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2012-04-01

    Female urethral diverticulum is a rare entity with diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations. It is a very rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in females presenting with acute urinary retention associated with a vaginal mass. Strong clinical suspicion combined with thorough physical examination and focused radiological investigations are vital for its diagnosis. Herein we report a case of giant urethral diverticulum presenting with acute urinary retention in a young female. It was managed by excision and urethral closure, and is the largest urethral diverticulum reported till date in the literature.

  17. Cluster-Void Degeneracy Breaking: Dark Energy, Planck, and the Largest Cluster and Void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlén, Martin; Zubeldía, Íñigo; Silk, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Combining galaxy cluster and void abundances breaks the degeneracy between mean matter density {{{Ω }}}{{m}} and power-spectrum normalization {σ }8. For the first time for voids, we constrain {{{Ω }}}{{m}}=0.21+/- 0.10 and {σ }8=0.95+/- 0.21 for a flat Λ CDM universe, using extreme-value statistics on the claimed largest cluster and void. The Planck-consistent results detect dark energy with two objects, independently of other dark energy probes. Cluster-void studies are also complementary in scale, density, and nonlinearity, and are of particular interest for testing modified-gravity models.

  18. Venezuelan projects advance to develop world`s largest heavy oil reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, G.; Stauffer, K.

    1996-07-08

    A number of joint venture projects at varying stages of progress promise to greatly increase Venezuela`s production of extra heavy oil. Units of Conoco, Chevron, Total, Arco, and Mobil have either signed agreements or are pursuing negotiations with affiliates of state-owned Petroleos de Venezuela SA on the development of huge reserves of 8--10{degree} gravity crude. Large heavy oil resources are present in the oil producing areas of eastern and western Venezuela, and the largest are in eastern Venezuela`s Orinoco heavy oil belt. The paper discusses the Orinoco heavy oil belt geology and several joint ventures being implemented.

  19. A Very Simple Method to Calculate the (Positive) Largest Lyapunov Exponent Using Interval Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Eduardo M. A. M.; Nepomuceno, Erivelton G.

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, a very simple method to calculate the positive Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE) based on the concept of interval extensions and using the original equations of motion is presented. The exponent is estimated from the slope of the line derived from the lower bound error when considering two interval extensions of the original system. It is shown that the algorithm is robust, fast and easy to implement and can be considered as alternative to other algorithms available in the literature. The method has been successfully tested in five well-known systems: Logistic, Hénon, Lorenz and Rössler equations and the Mackey-Glass system.

  20. Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3-D Printed Object

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-29

    Researchers at the MDF have 3D-printed a large-scale trim tool for a Boeing 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet airliner. The additively manufactured tool was printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine over a 30-hour period. The team used a thermoplastic pellet comprised of 80% ABS plastic and 20% carbon fiber from local material supplier. The tool has proven to decrease time, labor, cost and errors associated with traditional manufacturing techniques and increased energy savings in preliminary testing and will undergo further, long term testing.