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Sample records for largest ribonucleoprotein particle

  1. Structural Dynamics of the Vault Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casañas, Arnau; Querol, Jordi; Fita, Ignasi; Verdaguer, Núria

    Vaults are ubiquitous, highly conserved, 13 MDa ribonucleoprotein particles, involved in a diversity of cellular processes, including multidrug resistance, transport mechanisms and signal transmission. There are between 104 and 106 vault particles per mammalian cell and they do not trigger autoimmunity. The vault particle shows a hollow barrel-shaped structure organized in two identical moieties, each consisting of 39 copies of the major vault protein (MVP). Other data indicated that vault halves can dissociate at acidic pH. The high resolution, crystal structure of the of the seven N-terminal domains (R1-R7) of MVP, forming the central vault barrel, together with that of the native vault particle (solved at 8 Å resolution), revealed the interactions governing vault association and suggested a pH-dependent mechanism for a reversible dissociation induced by low pH. Vault particles posses many features making them very promising vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic agents including self-assembly, 100 nm size range, emerging atomic-level structural information, natural presence in humans ensuring biocompability, recombinant production system, existing features for targeting species to the large lumen and a dynamic structure that may be controlled for manipulation of drug release kinetics. All these attributes provide vaults with enormous potential as a drug/gene delivery platform.

  2. Characterization of L1-Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Martin S.; LaCava, John; Dai, Lixin; Mita, Paolo; Burns, Kathleen H.; Rout, Michael P.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2016-01-01

    The LINE-1 retrotransposon (L1) encodes two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p, which bind to the L1 RNA in cis, forming a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is critical for retrotransposition. Interactions with both permissive and repressive host factors pervade every step of the L1 life cycle. Until recently, limitations in detection and production precluded in-depth characterization of L1 RNPs. Inducible expression and recombinant engineering of epitope tags have made detection of both L1 ORFs routine. Here, we describe large-scale production of L1-expressing HEK-293T cells in suspension cell culture, cryomilling and affinity capture of L1 RNP complexes, sample preparation for analysis by mass spectrometry, and assay using the L1 element amplification protocol (LEAP) and qRT-PCR. PMID:26895062

  3. Characterization of L1-Ribonucleoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Martin S; LaCava, John; Dai, Lixin; Mita, Paolo; Burns, Kathleen H; Rout, Michael P; Boeke, Jef D

    2016-01-01

    The LINE-1 retrotransposon (L1) encodes two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p, which bind to the L1 RNA in cis, forming a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is critical for retrotransposition. Interactions with both permissive and repressive host factors pervade every step of the L1 life cycle. Until recently, limitations in detection and production precluded in-depth characterization of L1 RNPs. Inducible expression and recombinant engineering of epitope tags have made detection of both L1 ORFs routine. Here, we describe large-scale production of L1-expressing HEK-293T cells in suspension cell culture, cryomilling and affinity capture of L1 RNP complexes, sample preparation for analysis by mass spectrometry, and assay using the L1 element amplification protocol (LEAP) and qRT-PCR.

  4. Purification of Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particles via a Tagged Nascent Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Inchaustegui Gil, Diana P.; Clayton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic fates of mRNAs are influenced by interactions between RNA-binding proteins and cis regulatory motifs. In the cytoplasm, mRNAs are present as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles, which include not only proteins that bind directly to the mRNA, but also additional proteins that are recruited via protein-protein interactions. Many labs have sought to purify such particles from cells, with limited success. We here describe a simple two-step procedure to purify actively translated mRNAs, with their associated proteins, from polysomes. We use a reporter mRNA that encodes a protein with three streptavidin binding peptides at the N-terminus. The polysomal reporter mRNA, with associated proteins, is purified via binding to a streptavidin matrix. The method takes four days, and can be applied in any cell that can be genetically manipulated. Using Trypanosoma brucei as a model system, we routinely purified 8% of the input reporter mRNA, with roughly 22-fold enrichment relative to un-tagged mRNAs, a final reporter-mRNA:total-mRNA ratio of about 1:10, and a protein purification factor of slightly over 1000-fold. Although the overall reporter mRNP composition is masked by the presence of proteins that are associated with many polysomal mRNAs, our method can be used to detect association of an RNA-binding protein that binds to specifically to a reporter mRNA. PMID:26808308

  5. Spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles repeatedly cycle through Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Stanek, David; Pridalová-Hnilicová, Jarmila; Novotný, Ivan; Huranová, Martina; Blazíková, Michaela; Wen, Xin; Sapra, Aparna K; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2008-06-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear structure closely associated with import and biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). Here, we tested whether CBs also contain mature snRNPs and whether CB integrity depends on the ongoing snRNP splicing cycle. Sm proteins tagged with photoactivatable and color-maturing variants of fluorescent proteins were used to monitor snRNP behavior in living cells over time; mature snRNPs accumulated in CBs, traveled from one CB to another, and they were not preferentially replaced by newly imported snRNPs. To test whether CB integrity depends on the snRNP splicing cycle, two human orthologues of yeast proteins involved in distinct steps in spliceosome disassembly after splicing, hPrp22 and hNtr1, were depleted by small interfering RNA treatment. Surprisingly, depletion of either protein led to the accumulation of U4/U6 snRNPs in CBs, suggesting that reassembly of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP was delayed. Accordingly, a relative decrease in U5 snRNPs compared with U4/U6 snRNPs was observed in CBs, as well as in nuclear extracts of treated cells. Together, the data show that particular phases of the spliceosome cycle are compartmentalized in living cells, with reassembly of the tri-snRNP occurring in CBs.

  6. Properties of a ribonucleoprotein particle isolated from Nonidet P-40-treated Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Davis, N L; Rueckert, R R

    1972-11-01

    A ribonucleoprotein particle containing about 20% ribonucleic acid (RNA), and containing little if any phospholipid or glucosamine, was recovered in high yield after treatment of Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus and B77 virus with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. This structure, which probably derives from the internal ribonucleoprotein filament described in electron microscopy studies, contained 80 to 90% of the viral 60 to 70S RNA and only about 10% of the protein present in intact virions. It sedimented in glycerol density gradients at approximately 130S and had a buoyant density in sucrose of about 1.34 g/ml. Studies with (32)P-labeled virus indicated that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained approximately 30 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight viral RNA. Intact virions contained about 70 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight RNA. Electrophoretic studies in dodecyl sulfate-containing polyacrylamide gels showed that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained only 5 of the 11 polypeptides found in the virion; of these the major component was a polypeptide weighing 14,000 daltons.

  7. Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles.

    PubMed

    Noda, Takeshi; Sagara, Hiroshi; Yen, Albert; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi; Cheng, R Holland; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-26

    In viruses, as in eukaryotes, elaborate mechanisms have evolved to protect the genome and to ensure its timely replication and reliable transmission to progeny. Influenza A viruses are enveloped, spherical or filamentous structures, ranging from 80 to 120 nm in diameter. Inside each envelope is a viral genome consisting of eight single-stranded negative-sense RNA segments of 890 to 2,341 nucleotides each. These segments are associated with nucleoprotein and three polymerase subunits, designated PA, PB1 and PB2; the resultant ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) resemble a twisted rod (10-15 nm in width and 30-120 nm in length) that is folded back and coiled on itself. Late in viral infection, newly synthesized RNPs are transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, where they are incorporated into progeny virions capable of infecting other cells. Here we show, by transmission electron microscopy of serially sectioned virions, that the RNPs of influenza A virus are organized in a distinct pattern (seven segments of different lengths surrounding a central segment). The individual RNPs are suspended from the interior of the viral envelope at the distal end of the budding virion and are oriented perpendicular to the budding tip. This finding argues against random incorporation of RNPs into virions, supporting instead a model in which each segment contains specific incorporation signals that enable the RNPs to be recruited and packaged as a complete set. A selective mechanism of RNP incorporation into virions and the unique organization of the eight RNP segments may be crucial to maintaining the integrity of the viral genome during repeated cycles of replication.

  8. Modeling large RNAs and ribonucleoprotein particles using molecular mechanics techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, A; Tan, R K; Harvey, S C

    1994-01-01

    There is a growing body of low-resolution structural data that can be utilized to devise structural models for large RNAs and ribonucleoproteins. These models are routinely built manually. We introduce an automated refinement protocol to utilize such data for building low-resolution three-dimensional models using the tools of molecular mechanics. In addition to specifying the positions of each nucleotide, the protocol provides quantitative estimates of the uncertainties in those positions, i.e., the resolution of the model. In typical applications, the resolution of the models is about 10-20 A. Our method uses reduced representations and allows us to refine three-dimensional structures of systems as big as the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs, which are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than nucleic acids that can be examined by traditional all-atom modeling methods. Nonatomic resolution structural data--secondary structure, chemical cross-links, chemical and enzymatic footprinting patterns, protein positions, solvent accessibility, and so on--are combined with known motifs in RNA structure to predict low-resolution models of large RNAs. These structural constraints are imposed on the RNA chain using molecular mechanics-type potential functions with parameters based on the quality of experimental data. Surface potential functions are used to incorporate shape and positional data from electron microscopy image reconstruction experiments into our models. The structures are optimized using techniques of energy refinement to get RNA folding patterns. In addition to providing a consensus model, the method finds the range of models consistent with the data, which allows quantitative evaluation of the resolution of the model. The method also identifies conflicts in the experimental data. Although our protocol is aimed at much larger RNAs, we illustrate these techniques using the tRNA structure as an example and test-bed. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7521223

  9. Functionality of In vitro Reconstituted Group II Intron RmInt1-Derived Ribonucleoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Molina-Sánchez, Maria D; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En) and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3' end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods.

  10. Functionality of In vitro Reconstituted Group II Intron RmInt1-Derived Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Sánchez, Maria D.; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M.; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En) and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3′ end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods. PMID:27730127

  11. Active transport of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in a reconstituted cell-free system.

    PubMed

    French, B T; Schumm, D E; Webb, T E

    1987-08-01

    The ability of a reconstituted cell-free system to transport mRNA as a ribonucleoprotein particle has been examined. Poly(A) messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs), UV cross-linked after release from isolated liver nuclei in a cell-free system, exhibited a buoyant density of 1.33 g/cm3 in cesium sulfate and 1.47 g/cm3 in cesium chloride, values identical to those of poly(A) mRNP isolated directly from liver polysomes. Furthermore, the in vivo and in vitro transported mRNP showed a similar degree of resistance to RNase digestion and had sedimentation coefficients approximately 2.5 times that of the isolated mRNA. Release of both total mRNA and alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was proportional to the concentration of a specific cytoplasmic protein. Removal of the transport proteins from the cytosol with streptomycin sulfate provided a basal system incapable of supporting the active transport of alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA. Hybridization of released RNA with a recombinant probe specific for intron 6 of alpha 2 mu-globulin showed that intron sequences were retained within the nucleus under optimal alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA transport conditions and that the transported alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was of mature size.

  12. The ribonucleoprotein nature of large particles in the meiosporangia of Allomyces.

    PubMed

    ROREM, E S; MACHLIS, L

    1957-11-25

    Particles averaging 3 to 4 micro in diameter, which are called chromospheres and fill the immature meiosporangia of the watermold Allomyces, were isolated and analyzed. The preparations were obtained by repeated centrifugations or by passage of the homogenate into a column of sand saturated with oleic acid, followed by selective elution of the chromospheres with alternate layers of oleic acid and an aqueous solution. The chromospheres contain approximately 12 per cent RNA, no DNA, and 60 per cent protein. It was concluded that they are pure or nearly pure ribonucleoprotein. Analysis of meiosporangia with chromospheres and after the chromospheres have disappeared showed no significant change in RNA or free amino acids. It was concluded that chromosphere disappearance is a fragmentation into small granules. The relation of chromospheres to postmeiotic chromospheres and nuclear caps is discussed. Speculation as to the function of these bodies is presented.

  13. The 3.2 Angstrom Resolution Structure of the Polymorphic Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speir, Jeffrey Alan

    Structural studies of the polymorphic cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have resulted in high resolution structures for two distinct icosahedral ribonucleoprotein particle conformations dependent upon whether acidic or basic pH conditions prevail. CCMV is stable below pH 6.5, however metal-free particles maintain a 10% increase in hydrodynamic volume at pH >=q 7.5. Identification of this swollen' form of CCMV, which can easily be disrupted with 1M NaCl, led to the first reassembly of an icosahedral virus in vitro from purified viral protein and RNA to form infectious particles, and its assembly has been the subject of biochemical and biophysical investigations for over twenty-five years. Under well defined conditions of pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration, CCMV capsid protein or capsid protein and RNA will reassemble to form icosahedral particles of various sizes, sheets, tubes, rosettes, and a variety of laminar structures which resemble virion structures from non-related virus families. Analysis of native particles at 3.2A resolution and swollen particles at 28A resolution has suggested that the chemical basis for the formation of polymorphic icosahedral and anisometric structures is: (i) hexamers formed of beta-barrel subunits stabilized by an unusual hexameric parallel beta structure made up of their N-termini, (ii) the location of protein-RNA interactions, (iii) divalent metal cation binding sites that regulate quasi-symmetrical subunit associations, (iv) charge repulsion across the same interfaces when lacking divalent metal ions at basic pH, which induces the formation of sixty 20A diameter portals for RNA release, and (v) a novel, C-terminal-based, subunit dimer assembly unit. The use of C- and N-terminal arms in CCMV has not been observed in other icosahedral RNA virus structures determined at near atomic resolution, however, their detailed interactions and roles in stabilizing the quaternary organization of CCMV are related to that found

  14. Translational control of the oogenic program by components of OMA ribonucleoprotein particles in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Spike, Caroline A; Coetzee, Donna; Nishi, Yuichi; Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Yamamoto, Ikuko; Lin, Rueyling; Greenstein, David

    2014-12-01

    The oocytes of most sexually reproducing animals arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this period of arrest, enables oocytes to acquire the cytoplasmic components needed to produce healthy progeny and to gain competence to complete meiosis. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the major sperm protein hormone promotes meiotic resumption (also called meiotic maturation) and the cytoplasmic flows that drive oocyte growth. Prior work established that two related TIS11 zinc-finger RNA-binding proteins, OMA-1 and OMA-2, are redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. We affinity purified OMA-1 and identified associated mRNAs and proteins using genome-wide expression data and mass spectrometry, respectively. As a class, mRNAs enriched in OMA-1 ribonucleoprotein particles (OMA RNPs) have reproductive functions. Several of these mRNAs were tested and found to be targets of OMA-1/2-mediated translational repression, dependent on sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs). Consistent with a major role for OMA-1 and OMA-2 in regulating translation, OMA-1-associated proteins include translational repressors and activators, and some of these proteins bind directly to OMA-1 in yeast two-hybrid assays, including OMA-2. We show that the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 is an OMA-1-associated protein, which also represses the translation of several OMA-1/2 target mRNAs. In the accompanying article in this issue, we show that LIN-41 prevents meiotic maturation and promotes oocyte growth in opposition to OMA-1/2. Taken together, these data support a model in which the conserved regulators of mRNA translation LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 coordinately control oocyte growth and the proper spatial and temporal execution of the meiotic maturation decision.

  15. Translational Control of the Oogenic Program by Components of OMA Ribonucleoprotein Particles in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Caroline A.; Coetzee, Donna; Nishi, Yuichi; Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Yamamoto, Ikuko; Lin, Rueyling; Greenstein, David

    2014-01-01

    The oocytes of most sexually reproducing animals arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this period of arrest, enables oocytes to acquire the cytoplasmic components needed to produce healthy progeny and to gain competence to complete meiosis. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the major sperm protein hormone promotes meiotic resumption (also called meiotic maturation) and the cytoplasmic flows that drive oocyte growth. Prior work established that two related TIS11 zinc-finger RNA-binding proteins, OMA-1 and OMA-2, are redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. We affinity purified OMA-1 and identified associated mRNAs and proteins using genome-wide expression data and mass spectrometry, respectively. As a class, mRNAs enriched in OMA-1 ribonucleoprotein particles (OMA RNPs) have reproductive functions. Several of these mRNAs were tested and found to be targets of OMA-1/2-mediated translational repression, dependent on sequences in their 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs). Consistent with a major role for OMA-1 and OMA-2 in regulating translation, OMA-1-associated proteins include translational repressors and activators, and some of these proteins bind directly to OMA-1 in yeast two-hybrid assays, including OMA-2. We show that the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 is an OMA-1-associated protein, which also represses the translation of several OMA-1/2 target mRNAs. In the accompanying article in this issue, we show that LIN-41 prevents meiotic maturation and promotes oocyte growth in opposition to OMA-1/2. Taken together, these data support a model in which the conserved regulators of mRNA translation LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 coordinately control oocyte growth and the proper spatial and temporal execution of the meiotic maturation decision. PMID:25261697

  16. Structure and expression of the Drosophila melanogaster gene for the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mancebo, R; Lo, P C; Mount, S M

    1990-01-01

    A genomic clone encoding the Drosophila U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein was isolated by hybridization with a human U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein cDNA. Southern blot and in situ hybridizations showed that this U1 70K gene is unique in the Drosophila genome, residing at cytological position 27D1,2. Polyadenylated transcripts of 1.9 and 3.1 kilobases were observed. While the 1.9-kilobase mRNA is always more abundant, the ratio of these two transcripts is developmentally regulated. Analysis of cDNA and genomic sequences indicated that these two RNAs encode an identical protein with a predicted molecular weight of 52,879. Comparison of the U1 70K proteins predicted from Drosophila, human, and Xenopus cDNAs revealed 68% amino acid identity in the most amino-terminal 214 amino acids, which include a sequence motif common to many proteins which bind RNA. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but is highly charged and contains distinctive arginine-rich regions in all three species. These arginine-rich regions contain stretches of arginine-serine dipeptides like those found in transformer, transformer-2, and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins, all of which have been identified as regulators of mRNA splicing in Drosophila melanogaster. Images PMID:1692955

  17. Complete MALDI-ToF MS analysis of cross-linked peptide–RNA oligonucleotides derived from nonlabeled UV-irradiated ribonucleoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    KÜHN-HÖLSKEN, EVA; LENZ, CHRISTOF; SANDER, BJÖRN; LÜHRMANN, REINHARD; URLAUB, HENNING

    2005-01-01

    Protein–RNA cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to elucidate hitherto noncharacterized protein–RNA contacts in ribonucleoprotein particles, as, for example, within spliceosomes. Here, we describe an improved methodology for the sequence analysis of purified peptide–RNA oligonucleotide cross-links that is based solely on MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The utility of this methodology is demonstrated on cross-links isolated from UV-irradiated spliceosomal particles; these were (1) [15.5K–61K–U4atac] small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles prepared by reconstitution in vitro, and (2) U1 snRNP particles purified from HeLa cells. We show that the use of 2′,4′,6′-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) as MALDI matrix allows analysis of cross-linked peptide–RNA oligonucleotides in the reflectron mode at high resolution, enabling sufficient accuracy to assign unambiguously cross-linked RNA sequences. Most important, post-source decay (PSD) analysis under these conditions was successfully applied to obtain sequence information about the cross-linked peptide and RNA moieties within a single spectrum, including the identification of the actual cross-linking site. Thus, in U4atac snRNA we identified His270 in the spliceosomal U4/U6 snRNP-specific protein 61K (hPrp31p) cross-linked to U44; in the U1 snRNP we show that Leu175 of the U1 snRNP-specific 70K protein is cross-linked to U30 of U1 snRNA. This type of analysis is applicable to any type of RNP complex and may be expected to pave the way for the further analysis of protein–RNA complexes in much lower abundance and/or of cross-links that are obtained in low yield. PMID:16314460

  18. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below.

  19. Cloning of the cDNA for U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Czernik, A. J.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a plant cDNA that encodes U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) 70K protein. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein cDNA is not full length and lacks the coding region for 68 amino acids in the amino-terminal region as compared to human U1 snRNP 70K protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the plant U1 snRNP 70K protein with the amino acid sequence of animal and yeast U1 snRNP 70K protein showed a high degree of homology. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein is more closely related to the human counter part than to the yeast 70K protein. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but, like the vertebrate 70K proteins, is rich in charged amino acids. Northern analysis with the RNA isolated from different parts of the plant indicates that the snRNP 70K gene is expressed in all of the parts tested. Southern blotting of genomic DNA using the cDNA indicates that the U1 snRNP 70K protein is coded by a single gene.

  20. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    On August 9–11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  1. Leucine periodicity of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) A' protein is implicated in snRNP assembly via protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Fresco, L D; Harper, D S; Keene, J D

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant A' protein could be reconstituted into U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) upon addition to HeLa cell extracts as determined by coimmunoprecipitation and particle density; however, direct binding to U2 RNA could not be demonstrated except in the presence of the U2 snRNP B" protein. Mutational analysis indicated that a central core region of A' was required for particle reconstitution. This region consists of five tandem repeats of approximately 24 amino acids each that exhibit a periodicity of leucine and asparagine residues that is distinct from the leucine zipper. Similar leucine-rich (Leu-Leu motif) repeats are characteristic of a diverse array of soluble and membrane-associated proteins from yeasts to humans but have not been reported previously to reside in nuclear proteins. Several of these proteins, including Toll, chaoptin, RNase/angiogenin inhibitors, lutropin-choriogonadotropin receptor, carboxypeptidase N, adenylyl cyclase, CD14, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev, may be involved in protein-protein interactions. Our findings suggest that in cell extracts the Leu-Leu motif of A' is required for reconstitution with U2 snRNPs and perhaps with other components involved in splicing through protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1825347

  2. Purification of the spliced leader ribonucleoprotein particle from Leptomonas collosoma revealed the existence of an Sm protein in trypanosomes. Cloning the SmE homologue.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, I; Palfi, Z; Bindereif, A; Michaeli, S

    1999-04-30

    Trans-splicing in trypanosomes involves the addition of a common spliced leader (SL) sequence, which is derived from a small RNA, the SL RNA, to all mRNA precursors. The SL RNA is present in the cell in the form of a ribonucleoprotein, the SL RNP. Using conventional chromatography and affinity selection with 2'-O-methylated RNA oligonucleotides at high ionic strength, five proteins of 70, 16, 13, 12, and 8 kDa were co-selected with the SL RNA from Leptomonas collosoma, representing the SL RNP core particle. Under conditions of lower ionic strength, additional proteins of 28 and 20 kDa were revealed. On the basis of peptide sequences, the gene coding for a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 11.9 kDa was cloned and identified as homologue of the cis-spliceosomal SmE. The protein carries the Sm motifs 1 and 2 characteristic of Sm antigens that bind to all known cis-spliceosomal uridylic acid-rich small nuclear RNAs (U snRNAs), suggesting the existence of Sm proteins in trypanosomes. This finding is of special interest because trypanosome snRNPs are the only snRNPs examined to date that are not recognized by anti-Sm antibodies. Because of the early divergence of trypanosomes from the eukaryotic lineage, the trypanosome SmE protein represents one of the primordial Sm proteins in nature.

  3. The C-protein tetramer binds 230 to 240 nucleotides of pre-mRNA and nucleates the assembly of 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, M; Rech, J E; Northington, S J; Flicker, P F; Mayeda, A; Krainer, A R; LeStourgeon, W M

    1994-01-01

    A series of in vitro protein-RNA binding studies using purified native (C1)3C2 and (A2)3B1 tetramers, total soluble heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), and pre-mRNA molecules differing in length and sequence have revealed that a single C-protein tetramer has an RNA site size of 230 to 240 nucleotides (nt). Two tetramers bind twice this RNA length, and three tetramers fold monoparticle lengths of RNA (700 nt) into a unique 19S triangular complex. In the absence of this unique structure, the basic A- and B-group proteins bind RNA to form several different artifactual structures which are not present in preparations of native hnRNP and which do not function in hnRNP assembly. Three (A2)3B1 tetramers bind the 19S complex to form a 35S assembly intermediate. Following UV irradiation to immobilize the C proteins on the packaged RNA, the 19S triangular complex is recovered as a remnant structure from both native and reconstituted hnRNP particles. C protein-RNA complexes composed of three, six, or nine tetramers (one, two, or three triangular complexes) nucleate the stoichiometric assembly of monomer, dimer, and trimer hnRNP particles. The binding of C-protein tetramers to RNAs longer than 230 nt is through a self-cooperative combinatorial mode. RNA packaged in the 19S complex and in 40S hnRNP particles is efficiently spliced in vitro. These findings demonstrate that formation of the triangular C protein-RNA complex is an obligate first event in the in vitro and probably the in vivo assembly the 40S hnRNP core particle, and they provide insight into the mechanism through which the core proteins package 700-nt increments of RNA. These findings also demonstrate that unless excluded by other factors, the C proteins are likely to be located along the length of nascent transcripts. Images PMID:8264621

  4. The immunolocalization of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in testicular cells during the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Moussa, F; Oko, R; Hermo, L

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cellular and subcellular distribution of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) in the adult rat testis in relation to the different cell types at the various stages of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. The distribution of snRNPs in the nucleus and cytoplasm of germ cells was quantitated in an attempt to correlate RNA processing with morphological and functional changes occurring during the development of these cells. Light-microscopic immunoperoxidase staining of rat testes with polyclonal anti-Sm and monoclonal anti-Y12 antibodies localized spliceosome snRNPs in the nuclei and cytoplasm of germ cells up to step 10 spermatids. Nuclear staining was intense in Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and in the early steps of round spermatid development. Although comparatively weaker, cytoplasmic staining for snRNPs was strongest in mid and late pachytene spermatocytes and early round spermatids. Quantitative electron-microscopic immunogold labeling of Lowicryl embedded testicular sections confirmed the light-microscopic observations but additionally showed that the snRNP content peaked in the cytoplasm of midpachytene spermatocytes and in the nuclei of late pachytene spermatocytes. The immunogold label tended to aggregate into distinct loci over the nuclear chromatin. The chromatoid body of spermatids and spermatocytes and the finely granular material in the interstices of mitochondrial aggregates of spermatocytes were found to be additional sites of snRNP localization and were intensely labeled. This colocalization suggests that these dense cytoplasmic structures may be functionally related. Anti-U1 snRNP antibodies applied to frozen sections showed the same LM localization pattern as spliceosome snRNPs. Anti-U3 snRNP antibodies applied to frozen sections stained nucleoli of germ cells where pre-rRNA is spliced.

  5. The ribonucleoprotein Csr network.

    PubMed

    Seyll, Ethel; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2013-11-08

    Ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential regulatory components in bacteria. In this review, we focus on the carbon storage regulator (Csr) network, which is well conserved in the bacterial world. This regulatory network is composed of the CsrA master regulator, its targets and regulators. CsrA binds to mRNA targets and regulates translation either negatively or positively. Binding to small non-coding RNAs controls activity of this protein. Expression of these regulators is tightly regulated at the level of transcription and stability by various global regulators (RNAses, two-component systems, alarmone). We discuss the implications of these complex regulations in bacterial adaptation.

  6. Ribonucleoprotein of avian infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Davies, H A; Dourmashkin, R R; Macnaughton, M R

    1981-03-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was examined by electron microscopy after shadowing with carbon/platinum. Linear RNP strands up to 6.7 microns in length, from three IVB strains, were sensitive to both pancreatic RNase and to proteases. These strands were obtained from spontaneously disrupted complete particles but not from disrupted incomplete particles that lacked RNP. They were also released from Nonidet P40-disrupted particles and could be isolated on sucrose density gradients at a density of 1.27 g/ml. In some cases, helical RNP complexes associated with virus particles were observed that were similar to RNPs of human coronavirus strain 229E and mouse hepatitis virus strain 3.

  7. Current and future emission estimates of exhaust gases and particles from shipping at the largest port in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Keun; Shon, Zang-Ho

    2014-05-01

    The emissions of exhaust gases (NOx , SO2, VOCs, and CO2) and particles (e.g., PM) from ships traversing Busan Port in Korea were estimated over three different years (the years 2006, 2008, and 2009). This analysis was performed according to the ship operational modes ("at sea," "maneuvering," and "in port") and ship types based on an activity-based method. The ship emissions for current (base year 2009) and future scenarios (years 2020 and 2050) were also compared. The annual emissions of SO2, VOCs, PM, and CO2 were highest (9.6 × 10(3), 374, 1.2 × 10(3), and 5.6 × 10(5) ton year(-1), respectively) in 2008. In contrast, the annual NO x emissions were highest (11.7 × 10(3) ton year(-1)) in 2006 due mainly to the high NO x emission factor. The emissions of air pollutants for each ship operational mode differed considerably, with the largest emission observed in "in port" mode. In addition, the largest fraction (approximately 45-67%) of the emissions of all air pollutants during the study period was emitted from container ships. The future ship emissions of most pollutants (except for SO2 and PM) in 2020 and 2050 are estimated to be 1.4-1.8 and 4.7-6.1 times higher than those in 2009 (base year), respectively.

  8. Ribonucleoprotein particles of bacterial small non-coding RNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) and its interaction with RNA polymerase core may link transcription to mRNA fate

    PubMed Central

    van Nues, Rob W.; Castro-Roa, Daniel; Yuzenkova, Yulia; Zenkin, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Coupled transcription and translation in bacteria are tightly regulated. Some small RNAs (sRNAs) control aspects of this coupling by modifying ribosome access or inducing degradation of the message. Here, we show that sRNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) specifically associates with core enzyme of RNAP in vivo and in vitro, independently of σ factor and away from the main nucleic-acids-binding channel of RNAP. We also show that, in the cells, IsrA exists as ribonucleoprotein particles (sRNPs), which involve a defined set of proteins including Hfq, S1, CsrA, ProQ and PNPase. Our findings suggest that IsrA might be directly involved in transcription or can participate in regulation of gene expression by delivering proteins associated with it to target mRNAs through its interactions with transcribing RNAP and through regions of sequence-complementarity with the target. In this eukaryotic-like model only in the context of a complex with its target, IsrA and its associated proteins become active. In this manner, in the form of sRNPs, bacterial sRNAs could regulate a number of targets with various outcomes, depending on the set of associated proteins. PMID:26609136

  9. A nuclear cap-binding complex binds Balbiani ring pre-mRNA cotranscriptionally and accompanies the ribonucleoprotein particle during nuclear export

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In vertebrates, a nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) formed by two cap- binding proteins, CBP20 and CBP80, is involved in several steps of RNA metabolism, including pre-mRNA splicing and nuclear export of some RNA polymerase II-transcribed U snRNAs. The CBC is highly conserved, and antibodies against human CBP20 cross-react with the CBP20 counterpart in the dipteran Chironomus tentans. Using immunoelectron microscopy, the in situ association of CBP20 with a specific pre-mRNP particle, the Balbiani ring particle, has been analyzed at different stages of pre- mRNA synthesis, maturation, and nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. We demonstrate that CBP20 binds to the nascent pre-mRNA shortly after transcription initiation, stays in the RNP particles after splicing has been completed, and remains attached to the 5' domain during translocation of the RNP through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The rapid association of CBP20 with nascent RNA transcripts in situ is consistent with the role of CBC in splicing, and the retention of CBC on the RNP during translocation through the NPC supports its proposed involvement in RNA export. PMID:8601613

  10. Modeling the largest inflow of Changjiang freshwater into the Yellow Sea in 2012 with particle-tracking experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ji-Seok; Moon, Jae-Hong; Lee, Joon-Ho; Pang, Ig-Chan

    2016-12-01

    Abnormally low-salinity water originating from the Changjiang River (CR) was observed at the central Yellow Sea (YS) in 2012, which was quite unique compared to other years. In this study, the intrusion process of the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW) into the YS interior was examined using a hindcast simulation (2003-2012) with particle-tracking experiments. The particles representing the behavior of the CDW were released at the CR mouth from May to August, and then tracked. The simulated salinity patterns coincide fairly well with those derived from observations, particularly showing a large low-salinity structure around the central YS in 2012. A substantial intrusion of freshwater into the YS occurred in 2012, and this accounted for approximately 16% of all the released particles in 2012 which is twice as high as the mean average covering the 10 years. According to the trajectories in 2012, the particles took less than 50 days to travel from the mouth to the YS interior and followed mainly two paths toward the YS. One pathway traveled northward to the central entrance of the YS and then reached the western coast of Korea. This pathway was attributed to the strong easterly winds in late June and early August when three consecutive typhoons passed through the YS, which was a unique pattern that is rarely found in other years. The other pathway involved particles trapped along the Jiangsu coast drifting farther to the north up to the Shandon Peninsula against the anticyclonic tidal residual circulations during the passage of typhoons.

  11. Phosphorylation of the C proteins in heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles in HeLa cells: Characterization of in vivo phosphorylation, comparison with in vitro phosphorylation using casein kinase II, and preliminary studies on the effects of phosphorylation on particle structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Newly formed pre-messenger RNA associates with protein to form heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles. In HeLa cells, hnRNP particles contain six core proteins. Two proteins, termed C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}, are phosphorylated in vitro by casein kinase 11 (CKII). C{sub 1} protein became {sup 32}P-labeled after HeLa cells were incubated with ({sup 32}P)-orthophosphate in vivo (ibid). Because phosphorylation is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism, C protein phosphorylation was studied in greater detail. C protein phosphorylation in hnRNP particles was investigated in HeLa cells incubated with ({sup 32}P)-orthophosphate in vivo. Immunoblotting in pH 3.5-10 isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels indicated that C proteins focus only at pH 5.0. In pH 4.5-5.5 IEF gels, individually purified C, and 2 proteins resolve into the same four closely spaced, {sup 32}P-labeled bands. A fifth, unlabeled, more basic species was detached when hnRNP particles were purified without NaF. All {sup 32}P-labeled species contained identical amounts of {sup 32}P per unit protein suggesting that charge heterogeneity is not due to differential phosphorylation. Attempts to detect bound carbohydrate were unsuccessful. {sup 32}P-labeled phosphate was readily removed by potato acid phosphatase. E. coli alkaline phosphatase and snake venom phosphodiesterase were ineffective. {sup 32}P-label was found exclusively in phosphoserine. One-dimensional peptide mapping with chymotrypsin and S. aureus protease detected two phosphorylated peptides. C protein phosphorylation was also investigated in vitro. Incubation of hnRNP particles with rabbit liver CKII and {sup 32}P-ATP followed by IEF in pH 4.5-5.5 gels indicated that all four C protein species were {sup 32}P-labeled. {sup 32}P-label was found exclusively in phosphoserine.

  12. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines.

    PubMed

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-02-01

    Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA-dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of post-translational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates.

  13. Molecular cloning of Xenopus fibrillarin, a conserved U3 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein recognized by antisera from humans with autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lapeyre, B; Mariottini, P; Mathieu, C; Ferrer, P; Amaldi, F; Amalric, F; Caizergues-Ferrer, M

    1990-01-01

    Autoantibodies against U3 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein are associated with scleroderma autoimmune disease. They were shown to react with fibrillarin, a 34- to 36-kilodalton protein that has been detected in all eukaryotes tested from humans to yeasts. We isolated a 1.6-kilobase cDNA encoding fibrillarin from a Xenopus laevis cDNA library. The protein contains a 79-residue-long Gly-Arg-rich domain in its N-terminal region and a putative RNA-binding domain with ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence in its central portion. This is the first report of cloning of fibrillarin, and the deduced protein sequence is in agreement with the involvement of the protein in a ribonucleoprotein particle. Images PMID:2136767

  14. Recognition of U1 and U2 small nuclear RNAs can be altered by a 5-amino-acid segment in the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) B" protein and through interactions with U2 snRNP-A' protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, R C; Keene, J D

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the sequence elements influencing RNA recognition in two closely related small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) proteins, U1 snRNP-A and U2 snRNP-B". A 5-amino-acid segment in the RNA-binding domain of the U2 snRNP-B" protein was found to confer U2 RNA recognition when substituted into the corresponding position in the U1 snRNP-A protein. In addition, B", but not A, was found to require the U2 snRNP-A' protein as an accessory factor for high-affinity binding to U2 RNA. The pentamer segment in B" that conferred U2 RNA recognition was not sufficient to allow the A' enhancement of U2 RNA binding by B", thus implicating other sequences in this protein-protein interaction. Sequence elements involved in these interactions have been localized to variable loops of the RNA-binding domain as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (D. Hoffman, C.C. Query, B. Golden, S.W. White, and J.D. Keene, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, in press). These findings suggest a role for accessory proteins in the formation of RNP complexes and pinpoint amino acid sequences that affect the specificity of RNA recognition in two members of a large family of proteins involved in RNA processing. Images PMID:1826042

  15. Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in the amphibian germinal vesicle: loops, spheres, and snurposomes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of snRNPs in the germinal vesicle (GV) of frogs and salamanders by immunofluorescent staining and in situ nucleic acid hybridization. The major snRNAs involved in pre-mRNA splicing (U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6) occur together in nearly all loops of the lampbrush chromosomes, and in hundreds to thousands of small granules (1-4 microns diameter) suspended in the nucleoplasm. The loops and granules also contain several antigens that are regularly associated with snRNAs or spliceosomes (the Sm antigen, U1- and U2- specific antigens, and the splicing factor SC35). A second type of granule, often distinguishable by morphology, contains only U1 snRNA and associated antigens. We propose the term "snurposome" to describe the granules that contain snRNPs ("snurps"). Those that contain only U1 snRNA are A snurposomes, whereas those that contain all the splicing snRNAs are B snurposomes. GVs contain a third type of snRNP granule, which we call the C snurposome. C snurposomes range in size from less than 1 micron to giant structures greater than 20 microns in diameter. Usually, although not invariably, they have B snurposomes on their surface. They may also contain from one to hundreds of inclusions. Because of their remarkably spherical shape, C snurposomes with their associated B snurposomes have long been referred to as spheres or sphere organelles. Most spheres are free in the nucleoplasm, but a few are attached to chromosomes at specific chromosome loci, the sphere organizers (SOs). The relationship of sphere organelles to other snRNP- containing structures in the GV is obscure. We show by immunofluorescent staining that the lampbrush loops and B snurposomes also react with antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Transcription units on the loops are uniformly stained by anti-hnRNP and anti-snRNP antibodies, suggesting that nascent transcripts are associated with hnRNPs and snRNPs along their entire length, perhaps

  16. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  17. Ribonucleoprotein complexes that control circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongni; Liang, Xiaodi; Chen, Xianyun; Guo, Jinhu

    2013-04-25

    Circadian clocks are internal molecular time-keeping mechanisms that enable organisms to adjust their physiology and behavior to the daily surroundings. Misalignment of circadian clocks leads to both physiological and health impairment. Post-transcriptional regulation and translational regulation of circadian clocks have been extensively investigated. In addition, accumulating evidence has shed new light on the involvement of ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) in the post-transcriptional regulation of circadian clocks. Numerous RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and RNPs have been implicated in the post-transcriptional modification of circadian clock proteins in different model organisms. Herein, we summarize the advances in the current knowledge on the role of RNP complexes in circadian clock regulation.

  18. Cotranscriptional Recruitment of RNA Exosome Cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and Two Distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) Complexes Assists the Exonuclease Rrp6p in the Targeting and Degradation of an Aberrant Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particle (mRNP) in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs. PMID:24047896

  19. The elemental composition and origin of fine ambient particles in the largest Polish conurbation: first results from the short-term winter campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Grzegorz; Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta

    2016-07-01

    Diurnal (24-h) samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5, ambient particles with an aerodynamic diameter not greater than 2.5 μm) and soil samples were collected in an urban area in Warsaw, in winter. The samples were analysed for 24 elements with an Epsilon 5 spectrometer (PANalytical). The results were then arranged and compared with the results of research conducted earlier in Poland and other parts of the world. Afterwards, sources of ambient PM2.5 were identified and the share of each in the concentration of PM2.5 was evaluated by means of enrichment factor (EF) analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and multi-linear regression analysis (MLRA). The results were interpreted using a detailed analysis of correlations between diurnal concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5-elements, and of changes in meteorological conditions. The winter average ambient concentration of PM2.5 in Warsaw, was 10.7 ± 7.5 μg/m3 and was much lower than in the other sites in Poland. In Warsaw, regardless of the concentration of PM2.5, the concentrations of certain PM2.5-bound elements, mainly toxic, were high, e.g. the average ambient concentrations of PM2.5-bound Se, As, Co, V, Cd and Ni were 12.7 ± 30.5, 10.6 ± 34.4, 9.4 ± 13.7, 15.1 ± 32.7, 9.6 ± 22.2 and 3.5 ± 5.0 ng/m3, respectively. The elemental composition and concentrations of PM2.5 appeared to be influenced mainly by the anthropogenic emissions (energy production based on coal and biomass combustion, whose mean contribution to the concentration of PM2.5 was 18.4 %, and energy production based on oil combustion with a contribution of 9.9 % in PM2.5). A mixture of soil matter and road dust was also identified in PM2.5 (8 %). The mean contribution of traffic (exhaust) emissions to the concentration of PM2.5 in an urban area, selected as representative of the Warsaw conurbation, was assessed at 15.4 %.

  20. World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    NASA's National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex, which houses two of the world's largest wind tunnels and has been used for testing experimental aircraft since 1944, is presented. This video highlights the structure and instrumentation of the 40 x 80 foot and 80 x 120 foot wind tunnels and documents their use in testing full scale aircraft, NASA's Space Shuttle and the XV-15 Tiltrotor aircraft.

  1. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  2. The largest fossil rodent

    PubMed Central

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R. Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000 kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene–Pleistocene (4–2 Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities. PMID:18198140

  3. The largest fossil rodent.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R Ernesto

    2008-04-22

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene-Pleistocene (4-2Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities.

  4. Mechanical Stability and Reversible Fracture of Vault Particles

    PubMed Central

    Llauró, Aida; Guerra, Pablo; Irigoyen, Nerea; Rodríguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Vaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells, with an unclear cellular function and promising applications as vehicles for drug delivery. In this article, we examine the local stiffness of individual vaults and probe their structural stability with atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions. Our data show that the barrel, the central part of the vault, governs both the stiffness and mechanical strength of these particles. In addition, we induce single-protein fractures in the barrel shell and monitor their temporal evolution. Our high-resolution atomic force microscopy topographies show that these fractures occur along the contacts between two major vault proteins and disappear over time. This unprecedented systematic self-healing mechanism, which enables these particles to reversibly adapt to certain geometric constraints, might help vaults safely pass through the nuclear pore complex and potentiate their role as self-reparable nanocontainers. PMID:24507609

  5. Phosphorylation of rat liver heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2 and C can be modulated by calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bosser, R; Faura, M; Serratosa, J; Renau-Piqueras, J; Pruschy, M; Bachs, O

    1995-01-01

    It was previously reported that the phosphorylation of three proteins of 36, 40 to 42, and 50 kDa by casein kinase 2 is inhibited by calmodulin in nuclear extracts from rat liver cells (R. Bosser, R. Aligué, D. Guerini, N. Agell, E. Carafoli, and O. Bachs, J. Biol. Chem. 268:15477-15483, 1993). By immunoblotting, peptide mapping, and endogenous phosphorylation experiments, the 36- and 40- to 42-kDa proteins have been identified as the A2 and C proteins, respectively, of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. To better understand the mechanism by which calmodulin inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins, they were purified by using single-stranded DNA chromatography, and the effect of calmodulin on their phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 was analyzed. Results revealed that whereas calmodulin inhibited the phosphorylation of purified A2 and C proteins in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, it did not affect the casein kinase 2 phosphorylation of a different protein substrate, i.e., beta-casein. These results indicate that the effect of calmodulin was not on casein kinase 2 activity but on specific protein substrates. The finding that the A2 and C proteins can bind to a calmodulin-Sepharose column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner suggests that this association could prevent the phosphorylation of the proteins by casein kinase 2. Immunoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that such interactions could also occur in vivo, since calmodulin and A2 and C proteins colocalize on the ribonucleoprotein particles in rat liver cell nuclei. PMID:7823935

  6. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  7. The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate Cancer Treatment Assignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer, biomarker, active surveillance, prognostic indicator, tissue microarray, immunostaining, ribonucleoprotein 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...prognostic indicator, tissue microarray, immunostaining, ribonucleoprotein 3. Accomplishments The Year 1 Tasks for the Mohler laboratory were...construction of 1146 patient TMAs The construction of the new RPCI tissue microarray (TMA) set that will contain tissue from approximately 1000 radical

  8. Structure of a functional ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine synthase bound to a substrate RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Bo; Zhou, Jing; Kahen, Elliot; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong

    2009-09-29

    Box H/ACA small nucleolar and Cajal body ribonucleoprotein particles comprise the most complex pseudouridine synthases and are essential for ribosome and spliceosome maturation. The multistep and multicomponent-mediated enzyme mechanism remains only partially understood. Here we report a crystal structure at 2.35 {angstrom} of a substrate-bound functional archaeal enzyme containing three of the four proteins, Cbf5, Nop10 and L7Ae, and a box H/ACA RNA that reveals detailed information about the protein-only active site. The substrate RNA, containing 5-fluorouridine at the modification position, is fully docked and catalytically rearranged by the enzyme in a manner similar to that seen in two stand-alone pseudouridine synthases. Structural analysis provides a mechanism for plasticity in the diversity of guide RNA sequences used and identifies a substrate-anchoring loop of Cbf5 that also interacts with Gar1 in unliganded structures. Activity analyses of mutated proteins and RNAs support the structural findings and further suggest a role of the Cbf5 loop in regulation of enzyme activity.

  9. N-methylation of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rieker, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Several of the core proteins on the 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (hnRNP) from HeLa cells contain N/sup G/,N/sup G/-dimethyl-L-arginine (uDMA). 3-deazaadenosine (c/sup 3/Ado), an inhibitor of and substrate for s-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, has been used to study the methylation patterns of the individual polypeptides. Trimethyllysine and uDMA formation in total cellular protein were inhibited in the presence of the drug while other methylated basic amino acids were unaffected. This inhibition was reversed within 60 min after removal of the drug from the medium. Monolayer HeLa cultures were incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/H)-L-methoinine for 12 hours in the presence of 50 uM c/sup 3/Ado. Purified particles were obtained by centrifugation of nuclear extracts on sucrose density gradients. The core proteins were isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, acid hydrolyzed and analyzed for radioactivity incorporated into methionine and methylated basic amino acids. The ratio of radioactivity incorporated into uDMA relative to that into methionine for the two major particle proteins with molecular weights of 31,000 (A/sub 1/) and 43,000 (A/sub 2/) was about 2.0 and 0.2 in control cultures. In the presence of c/sup 3/Ado, these ratios were depressed 60 to 80%. Results of pulse-chase experiments suggested that A/sub 1/ and A/sub 2/ are metabolically stable proteins (t/sub 0.5/ > 75 hr), whether or not the proteins were undermethylated. Monomethyl-L-arginine may be a precursor in the formation of u-DMA.

  10. Nucleoplasmic organization of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins in cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The organization of eight small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (the U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6 RNAs previously studied by others and three additional snRNAs, U11, U12, and 7SK) has been investigated in cultured human cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization with antisense DNA and 2'-O- Me RNA oligonucleotides. Using highly sensitive digital imaging microscopy we demonstrate that all of these snRNAs are widespread throughout the nucleoplasm, but they are excluded from the nucleoli. In addition, the U2, U4, U5, U6, and U12 snRNAs are concentrated in discrete nuclear foci, known as coiled bodies, but U1 and 7SK are not. In addition to coiled bodies, a classic speckled pattern was observed in the nucleoplasm of monolayer-grown HeLa cells, whereas suspension- grown HeLa cells revealed a more diffuse nucleoplasmic labeling. Immunofluorescence staining using various snRNP-specific antisera shows complete agreement with that of their antisense snRNA oligonucleotide counterparts. Although U2 RNA is concentrated in coiled bodies, quantitation of the fluorescence signals from the U2 antisense probe reveals that the bulk of the U2 snRNP is located in the nucleoplasm. Furthermore, simultaneous visualization of the U2 snRNAs and the tandemly repeated U2 genes demonstrates that coiled bodies are not the sites of U2 transcription. PMID:8491767

  11. The human hnRNP M proteins: identification of a methionine/arginine-rich repeat motif in ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Datar, K V; Dreyfuss, G; Swanson, M S

    1993-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that proteins which directly bind to nascent RNA polymerase II transcripts, the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), play an important role in both transcript-specific packaging and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a group of abundant hnRNPs, the M1-M4 proteins, which appear as a cluster of four proteins of 64,000-68,000 daltons by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The M proteins are pre-mRNA binding proteins in vivo, and they bind avidly to poly(G) and poly(U) RNA homopolymers in vitro. Covalently associated polyadenylated RNA-protein complexes, generated by irradiating living HeLa cells with UV light, were purified and used to elicit antibodies in mice. The resulting antisera were then employed to isolate cDNA clones for the largest M protein, M4, by immunological screening. The deduced amino acid sequence of M4 indicates that the M proteins are members of the ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence family of RNA-binding proteins with greatest similarity to a hypothetical RNA-binding protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The M proteins also possess an unusual hexapeptide-repeat region rich in methionine and arginine residues (MR repeat motif) that resembles a repeat in the 64,000 dalton subunit of cleavage stimulation factor, which is involved in 3'-end maturation of pre-mRNAs. Proteins immunologically related to M exist in divergent eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Images PMID:8441656

  12. Largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Weitz, C. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution radar images from the Magellan spacecraft have allowed us to perform a detailed study on 25 large impact craters on Venus with diameters from 70 to 280 km. The dimension of these large craters is comparable with the characteristic thickness of the venusian lithosphere and the atmospheric scale height. Some physical parameters for the largest impact craters on Venus (LICV), such as depth, ring/diameter ratio, and range of ballistic ejecta deposits, have been obtained from the SAR images and the altimetry dataset produced by MIT. Data related to each of these parameters is discussed.

  13. Tobacco nuclear gene for the 31 kd chloroplast ribonucleoprotein: genomic organization, sequence analysis and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y Q; Ye, L Z; Sugita, M; Sugiura, M

    1991-01-01

    We have previously identified three chloroplast ribonucleoproteins and characterized their cDNAs. Here we present the genomic organization, sequence and expression of one of their genes. The 31 kd ribonucleoprotein (cp31) from tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) chloroplasts is coded for by a single-copy nuclear gene. This gene was isolated and its sequence was determined. The gene contains four exons and three introns. The position of its first intron is conserved among the genes for the maize abscisic acid-induced glycine-rich protein, the human hnRNP A1 protein and cp31. The transcription start site was determined to be 168 bp upstream from the translational initiation codon in both leaf and root tissues. No alternatively spliced transcripts was detected, suggesting that a diversity of chloroplast ribonucleoproteins is generated probably by gene amplification rather than alternative splicing. Images PMID:2057356

  14. Human telomerase and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins share a unique specificity of Sm protein association.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dragony; Collins, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear structures that host RNA modification and assembly reactions. Some RNAs transit Cajal bodies, while others must concentrate in Cajal bodies to function. Here we report that at least a subfraction of human telomerase RNA and individual resident Cajal body RNAs is associated with Sm proteins. Surprisingly, of seven Sm proteins assembled into a heteroheptameric ring, only a subset copurifies telomerase and Cajal body ribonucleoproteins. We show that a Cajal body RNA localization motif determines this specificity. These discoveries expand the cellular repertoire of Sm protein assemblies and their involvement in ribonucleoprotein localization and function.

  15. Rehabilitating China's largest inland river.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqing; Chen, Yaning; Zhang, Yaoqi; Xia, Yang

    2009-06-01

    Wetlands are particularly important for conserving China's biodiversity but riparian wetlands in the Tarim River basin in western China have been reduced by 46% during the last 3 decades. The world's largest habitat for Populus euphratica, which is in the Tarim River basin, significantly shrank. To protect and restore the deteriorated ecosystems along the Tarim River and its associated wetlands, China's government initiated a multimillion dollar river restoration project to release water from upper dams to the dried-up lower reaches of the Tarim River starting in 2000. We monitored the responses of groundwater and vegetation to water recharge in the lower reaches of the river from 2000 to 2006 by establishing nine 1000-m-long transects perpendicular to the river at intervals of 20-45 km along the 320-km river course below the Daxihaizi Reservoir, the source of water conveyance, to Lake Taitema, the terminus of the Tarim River. Water recharges from the Daxihaizi Reservoir to the lower reaches of the Tarim River significantly increased groundwater levels and vegetation coverage at all monitoring sites along the river. The mean canopy size of the endangered plant species P. euphratica doubled after 6 years of water recharge. Some rare migrating birds returned to rest on the restored wetlands in summer along the lower reaches of the Tarim River. The biggest challenge facing decision makers, however, is to balance water allocation and water rights between agricultural and natural ecosystems in a sustainable way. A large number of inhabitants in the Tarim Basin depend on these limited water resources for a living. At the same time, the endangered ecosystems need to be protected. Given the ecological, socioeconomic, and sociopolitical realities in the Tarim Basin, adaptive water policies and strategies are needed for water allocation in these areas of limited water resources.

  16. Anthracite firing -- Largest steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, P.; Winkin, J.; Changqin, G.

    1998-07-01

    The size and scope of the Hanfeng Power Plant is a large undertaking by any definition. It is progressing very well with good coordination and cooperation of all those involved. Start-up is scheduled for the first unit in the year 2000 with the second unit following by eight months. The boiler island scope covers all equipment and structural steel from the bunkers to the stack. This includes the world's two largest anthracite fired boilers burning a blend of very low volatile Chinese anthracite and lean coal (bituminous). The coal blending is designed to maximize the use of the local anthracite coal. This is done by controlled blending at the entrance to the large FW D12D ball mills. Scaling up from earlier extensive experience with arch fired boilers is reviewed as well as key features of the Hanfeng boilers each of which are capable of generating 563 kg/s of steam at 540.8 C and 175 bar (equivalent to 717 MW of turbine/generator output). The design of the boiler and related equipment for the Hanfeng project has been the subject of in-depth reviews by independent engineers representing the banks to assure reliability of the boiler to support the economic model. It has been shown that FW's extensive experience burning anthracite coals has justified the scaling up of the various components to meet the requirements of the specification. This experience is based on operating similar type anthracite arch fired boilers with fuel blends that are comparable to the coals to be supplied for the Hanfeng project. The materials and equipment for the Hanfeng boiler island are being supplied on a multi-national basis in support of the various requirements of the financing institutions involved. The overall design has been finalized and the detail design is well underway. Most of the large critical components are already in manufacturing.

  17. A Seasonal Trend of Single Scattering Albedo in Southern African Biomass-burning Particles: Implications for Satellite Products and Estimates of Emissions for the World's Largest Biomass-burning Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S. J.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Hyer, E. J.; Ward, D. E.; Dubovik, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Sorokin, M.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-01-01

    As a representative site of the southern African biomass-burning region, sun-sky data from the 15 year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) deployment at Mongu, Zambia, was analyzed. For the biomass-burning season months (July-November), we investigate seasonal trends in aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals. The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from approx.. 0.84 in July to approx. 0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Angstrom exponent (440-870 nm; r(exp 2) = 0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r(exp 2) = 0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, burning season SSA retrievals for the Etosha Pan, Namibia AERONET site also show very similar increasing single scattering albedo values and decreasing imaginary refractive index as the season progresses. Furthermore, retrievals of SSA at 388 nm from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument satellite sensor show similar seasonal trends as observed by AERONET and suggest that this seasonal shift is widespread throughout much of southern Africa. A seasonal shift in the satellite retrieval bias of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer collection 5 dark target algorithm is consistent with this seasonal SSA trend since the algorithm assumes a constant value of SSA. Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, however, appears less sensitive to the absorption-induced bias.

  18. A seasonal trend of single scattering albedo in southern African biomass-burning particles: Implications for satellite products and estimates of emissions for the world's largest biomass-burning source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S. J.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Hyer, E. J.; Ward, D. E.; Dubovik, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Sorokin, M.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-06-01

    As a representative site of the southern African biomass-burning region, sun-sky data from the 15 year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) deployment at Mongu, Zambia, was analyzed. For the biomass-burning season months (July-November), we investigate seasonal trends in aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals. The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from ~0.84 in July to ~0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Ångström exponent (440-870 nm; r2 = 0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r2 = 0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, burning season SSA retrievals for the Etosha Pan, Namibia AERONET site also show very similar increasing single scattering albedo values and decreasing imaginary refractive index as the season progresses. Furthermore, retrievals of SSA at 388 nm from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument satellite sensor show similar seasonal trends as observed by AERONET and suggest that this seasonal shift is widespread throughout much of southern Africa. A seasonal shift in the satellite retrieval bias of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer collection 5 dark target algorithm is consistent with this seasonal SSA trend since the algorithm assumes a constant value of SSA. Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, however, appears less sensitive to the absorption-induced bias.

  19. Conserved residues in Lassa fever virus Z protein modulate viral infectivity at the level of the ribonucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles.

  20. Tissue-specific expression and cDNA cloning of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, G.; Amara, S.G.; Lerner, M.R. )

    1988-07-01

    Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases have antibodies against nuclear antigens. An example is anti-Sm sera, which recognize proteins associated with small nuclear RNA molecules (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles). In this paper anti-Sm sera were used to probe immunoblots of various rat tissues. A previously unidentified M{sub r} 28,000 polypeptide was recognized by these anti-Sm sera. This polypeptide, referred to as N, is expressed in a tissue-specific manner, being most abundant in rat brain, less so in heart, and undetectable in the other tissues examined. Immunoprecipitation experiments using antibodies directed against the cap structure of small nuclear RNAs have demonstrated that N is a snRNP-associated polypeptide. Anti-Sm serum was also used to isolate a partial cDNA clone ({lambda}rb91) from a rat brain phage {lambda}gt11 cDNA expression library. A longer cDNA clone was obtained by rescreening the library with {lambda}rb91. In vitro transcription and subsequent translation of this subcloned, longer insert (pGMA2) resulted in a protein product with the same electrophoretic and immunological properties as N, confirming that pGMA2 encodes N. The tissue distribution of N and the involvement of snRNP particles in nuclear pre-mRNA processing may imply a role for N in tissue-specific pre-mRNA splicing.

  1. Monoclonal autoantibody recognizing a unique set of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Winkler, A; Watson-McKown, R; Wise, K S

    1988-01-01

    A murine IgG2a, kappa-monoclonal autoantibody (mAb) F78 is described that recognizes a novel epitope associated with small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes (snRNP). F78 selectively immunoprecipitated a unique pattern of small nuclear RNA (U1, U2, and U4 to U6) characterized by a marked depletion of U1 and an elevated proportion of U2 compared with known patterns immunoprecipitated by previously described anti-RNP (2.73) and anti-Sm (7.13, Y12) mAb. Analysis of immunoprecipitated RNA from extracts previously cleared with mAb F78 and probed with anti-RNP mAb 2.73 further indicated the presence of two distinct subsets of U1. Immunoblots of whole cell extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) without heating showed that F78 selectively bound to a trypsin-sensitive component of apparent m.w. greater than 120,000 which was decreased in size following RNase A treatment. The anti-Sm mAb, but not the anti-RNP mAb, also recognized this component in unheated samples. Heating before SDS-PAGE resulted in abrogation of binding to the F78 epitope. Immunoprecipitation of unlabeled or [35S]methionine-labeled cell extracts with F78 revealed the presence of most snRNP peptides, but the absence of peptide C and the 68,000 m.w. component, known to be selectively associated with U1-specific snRNP. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE analysis of F78 immunoprecipitates confirmed that the epitope recognized by this mAb resides on a heat-dissociable complex containing snRNP-related peptides B, B', D, E, F, and G, but lacking U1-associated peptides. F78 mAb therefore defines a subset of snRNP which lack anti-RNP associated U1 RNA as well as peptides known to be selectively associated with this RNA species. It apparently recognizes an epitope associated with an assembled form of these particles and may be useful in examining structures involved in RNA processing.

  2. Knocking out consumer concerns and regulator's rules: efficient use of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoprotein complexes for genome editing in cereals.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Felix; Puchta, Holger

    2017-02-28

    Selection-free genome editing using Cas9 ribonucleoprotein embryo bombardment has been achieved for maize and wheat. This is a breakthrough that should make new breeding technologies more acceptable for worldwide use.

  3. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 in health and neurodegenerative disease: from structural insights to post-transcriptional regulatory roles.

    PubMed

    Bekenstein, Uriya; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are a family of conserved nuclear proteins that associate with nascent RNA polymerase II transcripts to yield hnRNP particles, playing key roles in mRNA metabolism, DNA-related functions and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNPs accompany transcripts from stages of transcriptional regulation through splicing and post-transcriptional regulation, and are believed to affect the majority of expressed genes in mammals. Most hnRNP mRNA transcripts undergo alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, to yield a remarkable diversity of proteins with numerous functional elements that work in concert in their multiple functions. Therefore, mis-regulation of hnRNPs leads to different maladies. Here, we focus on the role of one of the best-known members of this protein family, hnRNP A1 in RNA metabolism, and address recent works that note its multileveled involvement in several neurodegenerative disorders. Initially discovered as a DNA binding protein, hnRNP A1 includes two RNA recognition motifs, and post-translational modifications of these and other regions in this multifunctional protein alter both its nuclear pore shuttling properties and its RNA interactions and affect transcription, mRNA splicing and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNP A1 plays several key roles in neuronal functioning and its depletion, either due to debilitated cholinergic neurotransmission or under autoimmune reactions causes drastic changes in RNA metabolism. Consequently, hnRNP A1 decline contributes to the severity of symptoms in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) and HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). At the translational level, these properties of hnRNP A1 led to massive research efforts aimed at developing RNA

  4. Efficient genome editing in the mouse brain by local delivery of engineered Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Staahl, Brett T; Benekareddy, Madhurima; Coulon-Bainier, Claire; Banfal, Ashwin A; Floor, Stephen N; Sabo, Jennifer K; Urnes, Cole; Munares, Gabriela Acevedo; Ghosh, Anirvan; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-02-13

    We demonstrate editing of post-mitotic neurons in the adult mouse brain following injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes in the hippocampus, striatum and cortex. Engineered variants of Cas9 with multiple SV40 nuclear localization sequences enabled a tenfold increase in the efficiency of neuronal editing in vivo. These advances indicate the potential of genome editing in the brain to correct or inactivate the underlying genetic causes of neurological diseases.

  5. The influenza virus NEP (NS2 protein) mediates the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, R E; Talon, J; Palese, P

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear import and export of viral nucleic acids is crucial for the replication cycle of many viruses, and elucidation of the mechanism of these steps may provide a paradigm for understanding general biological processes. Influenza virus replicates its RNA genome in the nucleus of infected cells. The influenza virus NS2 protein, which had no previously assigned function, was shown to mediate the nuclear export of virion RNAs by acting as an adaptor between viral ribonucleoprotein complexes and the nuclear export machinery of the cell. A functional domain on the NS2 with characteristics of a nuclear export signal was mapped: it interacts with cellular nucleoporins, can functionally replace the effector domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein and mediates rapid nuclear export when cross-linked to a reporter protein. Microinjection of anti-NS2 antibodies into infected cells inhibited nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins, suggesting that the Rev-like NS2 mediates this process. Therefore, we have renamed this Rev-like factor the influenza virus nuclear export protein or NEP. We propose a model by which NEP acts as a protein adaptor molecule bridging viral ribonucleoproteins and the nuclear pore complex. PMID:9427762

  6. Autoantibody to Th ribonucleoprotein (nucleolar 7-2 RNA protein particle) in patients with systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Y.; Medsger, T.A. Jr. )

    1990-12-01

    We studied sera of 371 consecutive new patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) who were first evaluated during 1984-1988. All sera were tested for antinuclear antibodies by immunofluorescence staining using HEp-2 cells as substrate. We excluded 219 sera showing dark nucleoli and screened for antibodies to Th in the remaining 152 sera by immunoprecipitation of a 32P-labeled HeLa cell extract. Fifteen (4.0%) of 371 sera were anti-Th+. Anti-Th antibodies were present in 14 (8.4%) of 167 SSc patients with limited cutaneous involvement, in 1 of 167 with diffuse cutaneous involvement, and in 0 of 37 with SSc overlap syndrome. Among 244 controls with other connective tissue diseases, anti-Th was detected in only 3 patients, all having primary Raynaud's phenomenon of less than 2 years duration. In the subgroup with SSc with limited cutaneous involvement, the 14 anti-Th+ patients had a significantly greater frequency of puffy fingers, small bowel involvement, and hypothyroidism, and a significantly lower frequency of arthralgia and/or arthritis. Their cumulative survival rate from the time of onset of symptoms was lower than that for anti-Th- patients (78% versus 91% at 10 years), primarily due to 3 deaths from pulmonary arterial hypertension (2 from primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 from pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary interstitial fibrosis). Serum anti-Th antibodies are present almost exclusively in patients with SSc with limited cutaneous involvement or in those with primary Raynaud's phenomenon whose disease may evolve to SSc with limited cutaneous involvement, and these antibodies may identify those patients who are at greater risk for reduced survival.

  7. Direct Cytosolic Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-Ribonucleoprotein for Efficient Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Mout, Rubul; Ray, Moumita; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Lee, Yi-Wei; Tay, Tristan; Sasaki, Kanae; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-03-28

    Genome editing through the delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-ribonucleoprotein (Cas9-RNP) reduces unwanted gene targeting and avoids integrational mutagenesis that can occur through gene delivery strategies. Direct and efficient delivery of Cas9-RNP into the cytosol followed by translocation to the nucleus remains a challenge. Here, we report a remarkably highly efficient (∼90%) direct cytoplasmic/nuclear delivery of Cas9 protein complexed with a guide RNA (sgRNA) through the coengineering of Cas9 protein and carrier nanoparticles. This construct provides effective (∼30%) gene editing efficiency and opens up opportunities in studying genome dynamics.

  8. Rabies Group-Specific Ribonucleoprotein Antigen and a Test System for Grouping and Typing of Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, L. G.; Dietzschold, B.; Dierks, R. E.; Matthaeus, W.; Enzmann, P.-J.; Strohmaier, K.

    1973-01-01

    Cell-associated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) was isolated from BHK-21 cells infected with several strains of rabies and rabies-related viruses. The RNP-antigen from rabies and related viruses induced the formation of complement-fixing, precipitating, and immunofluorescent antibodies, and proved to be the group-specific antigen common to all rabies viruses. Antigens of the envelope which induce virus-neutralizing antibodies are apparently determinative for the serotype of a virus as evidenced by two-way neutralization tests. A combination of these methods seems to be a useful approach to the serological grouping and typing of rhabdoviruses. Images PMID:4196634

  9. Uranus - Montage of Uranus' five largest satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Montage of Uranus' five largest satellites. From top to bottom in order of decreasing distance from Uranus are Oberon, Titania, Umbriel, Ariel, and Miranda. Images are presented to show correct relative sizes and brightness. Coverage is incomplete for Miranda and Ariel; gray circles depict missing areas.

  10. World's largest sapphire for many applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattak, Chandra P.; Shetty, Raj; Schwerdtfeger, C. Richard; Ullal, Saurabh

    2016-10-01

    Sapphire has been used for many high technology applications because of its excellent optical, mechanical, high temperature, abrasion resistance and dielectric properties. However, it is expensive and the volume of sapphire used has been limited. The potential sapphire requirements for LED and consumer electronic applications are very high. Emphasis has been on producing larger sapphire boules to achieve significant cost reductions so these applications are realized. World's largest sapphire boules, 500 mm diameter 300+kg, have been grown to address these markets.

  11. Saga is largest commercial submarine ever

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    The long-range autonomous submarine, Saga, went nuclear last year with an agreement between the French and two Canadian companies. The agreement to convert the prototype from Swedish Stirling closed-cycle combustion engines to a nuclear power supply will make Saga the first non-defense nuclear submarine. With an external hull displacement of 500 tons, Saga will be the largest commercial submarine ever built.

  12. Efficient in vivo gene editing using ribonucleoproteins in skin stem cells of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbo; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Wang, Wenjie; Qian, Nannan; Duan, Jinzhi; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Ting

    2017-02-14

    The prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in mammalian cells with the potential to bring curative therapies to patients with genetic diseases. However, efficient in vivo delivery of this genome editing machinery and indeed the very feasibility of using these techniques in vivo remain challenging for most tissue types. Here, we show that nonreplicable Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins can be used to correct genetic defects in skin stem cells of postnatal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mice. We developed a method to locally deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into the skin of postnatal mice. This method results in rapid gene editing in epidermal stem cells. Using this method, we show that Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins efficiently excise exon80, which covers the point mutation in our RDEB mouse model, and thus restores the correct localization of the collagen VII protein in vivo. The skin blistering phenotype is also significantly ameliorated after treatment. This study provides an in vivo gene correction strategy using ribonucleoproteins as curative treatment for genetic diseases in skin and potentially in other somatic tissues.

  13. Efficient in vivo gene editing using ribonucleoproteins in skin stem cells of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenbo; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Wang, Wenjie; Qian, Nannan; Duan, Jinzhi; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Ting

    2017-01-01

    The prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in mammalian cells with the potential to bring curative therapies to patients with genetic diseases. However, efficient in vivo delivery of this genome editing machinery and indeed the very feasibility of using these techniques in vivo remain challenging for most tissue types. Here, we show that nonreplicable Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins can be used to correct genetic defects in skin stem cells of postnatal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mice. We developed a method to locally deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into the skin of postnatal mice. This method results in rapid gene editing in epidermal stem cells. Using this method, we show that Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins efficiently excise exon80, which covers the point mutation in our RDEB mouse model, and thus restores the correct localization of the collagen VII protein in vivo. The skin blistering phenotype is also significantly ameliorated after treatment. This study provides an in vivo gene correction strategy using ribonucleoproteins as curative treatment for genetic diseases in skin and potentially in other somatic tissues. PMID:28137859

  14. tRNA Core Hypothesis for the Transition from the RNA World to the Ribonucleoprotein World

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Savio T.; Rêgo, Thais G.; José, Marco V.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the tRNA core hypothesis, which emphasizes the central role of tRNAs molecules in the origin and evolution of fundamental biological processes. tRNAs gave origin to the first genes (mRNA) and the peptidyl transferase center (rRNA), proto-tRNAs were at the core of a proto-translation system, and the anticodon and operational codes then arose in tRNAs molecules. Metabolic pathways emerged from evolutionary pressures of the decoding systems. The transitions from the RNA world to the ribonucleoprotein world to modern biological systems were driven by three kinds of tRNAs transitions, to wit, tRNAs leading to both mRNA and rRNA. PMID:27023615

  15. Nuclear dynamics of influenza A virus ribonucleoproteins revealed by live-cell imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Loucaides, Eva M.; Kirchbach, Johann C. von; Foeglein, Agnes; Sharps, Jane; Fodor, Ervin; Digard, Paul

    2009-11-10

    The negative sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by the viral RNA polymerase. Only four viral polypeptides are required but multiple cellular components are potentially involved. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterise the dynamics of GFP-tagged viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components in living cells. The nucleoprotein (NP) displayed very slow mobility that significantly increased on formation of transcriptionally active RNPs. Conversely, single or dimeric polymerase subunits showed fast nuclear dynamics that decreased upon formation of heterotrimers, suggesting increased interaction of the full polymerase complex with a relatively immobile cellular component(s). Treatment with inhibitors of cellular transcription indicated that in part, this reflected an interaction with cellular RNA polymerase II. Analysis of mutated influenza virus polymerase complexes further suggested that this was through an interaction between PB2 and RNA Pol II separate from PB2 cap-binding activity.

  16. Cytoplasmic Ribonucleoprotein Foci in Eukaryotes: Hotspots of Bio(chemical)Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Layana, Carla; Ferrero, Paola; Rivera-Pomar, Rolando

    2012-01-01

    The life of an mRNA from transcription to degradation offers multiple control check points that regulate gene expression. Transcription, splicing, and translation have been widely studied for many years; however, in recent years, new layers of posttranscriptional and posttranslational control have been uncovered. They involve the regulation of the metabolism of mRNA in cytoplasmic foci. They are collections of ribonucleoprotein complexes that, in most cases, remain still uncharacterized, except the processing bodies (PBs) and stress granules (SGs), which have been studied (and reviewed) in detail. A challenging prospective is to know how many different classes of foci exist, which functions they support, how are they formed, and how do they relate one to each other. Here, we present an update of the component of the different granules, a possible function, and hypothesis on their in vivo dynamics related to translational control. PMID:22693427

  17. Genome editing in maize directed by CRISPR–Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Svitashev, Sergei; Schwartz, Christine; Lenderts, Brian; Young, Joshua K.; Mark Cigan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA double-strand breaks have been shown to significantly increase the frequency and precision of genome editing. In the past two decades, several double-strand break technologies have been developed. CRISPR–Cas9 has quickly become the technology of choice for genome editing due to its simplicity, efficiency and versatility. Currently, genome editing in plants primarily relies on delivering double-strand break reagents in the form of DNA vectors. Here we report biolistic delivery of pre-assembled Cas9–gRNA ribonucleoproteins into maize embryo cells and regeneration of plants with both mutated and edited alleles. Using this method of delivery, we also demonstrate DNA- and selectable marker-free gene mutagenesis in maize and recovery of plants with mutated alleles at high frequencies. These results open new opportunities to accelerate breeding practices in a wide variety of crop species. PMID:27848933

  18. Conserved regions of ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP are involved in interactions with its substrate.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2013-08-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a ubiquitous and essential site-specific eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein with a large catalytic RNA moiety that is closely related to the RNA component of RNase P, and multiple proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. Here, we report the results of an ultraviolet-cross-linking analysis of interactions between a photoreactive RNase MRP substrate and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP holoenzyme. The results show that the substrate interacts with phylogenetically conserved RNA elements universally found in all enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family, as well as with a phylogenetically conserved RNA region that is unique to RNase MRP, and demonstrate that four RNase MRP protein components, all shared with RNase P, interact with the substrate. Implications for the structural organization of RNase MRP and the roles of its components are discussed.

  19. [Stimulating effect of cellular RNA on the in vitro polymerizing activity of influenza virus ribonucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Tentsov, Iu Iu; Bukrinskaia, A G

    1981-01-01

    The stimulating effect of RNAs isolated from noninfected and influenza virus-infected chick fibroblasts on the polymerase activity of influenza virus intracellular ribonucleoprotein (RNP) was studied in vitro. The infected cells were shown to contain two classes of RNAs which stimulated well the polymerase activity of influenza virus RNP. One class seemed to be represented by a heterogenous cellular 10-20 S mRNA since it contained poly (A)-sequences and was present in noninfected cells. The other RNA class was induced during the infection and differed in number of properties from the RNA isolated from noninfected cells. This class RNA was smaller (4-10 S) and appeared not to contain poly(A)-sequences. Treatment of both noninfected and infected cells with actinomycin D resulted in inhibition of synthesis of both classes of RNA-primers.

  20. Fiji's largest marine reserve benefits reef sharks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, J. S.; Fullwood, L. A. F.

    2013-03-01

    To provide more information about whether sharks benefit from no-take marine reserves, we quantified the relative abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside and outside of Namena, Fiji's largest reserve (60.6 km2). Using stereo baited remote underwater video systems (stereo-BRUVs), we found that the abundance and biomass of sharks was approximately two and four times greater in shallow and deep locations, respectively, within the Namena reserve compared to adjacent fished areas. The greater abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside Namena is likely a result of greater prey availability rather than protection from fishing. This study demonstrates that marine reserves can benefit sharks.

  1. Flight performance of the largest volant bird.

    PubMed

    Ksepka, Daniel T

    2014-07-22

    Pelagornithidae is an extinct clade of birds characterized by bizarre tooth-like bony projections of the jaws. Here, the flight capabilities of pelagornithids are explored based on data from a species with the largest reported wingspan among birds. Pelagornis sandersi sp. nov. is represented by a skull and substantial postcranial material. Conservative wingspan estimates (∼6.4 m) exceed theoretical maximums based on extant soaring birds. Modeled flight properties indicate that lift:drag ratios and glide ratios for P. sandersi were near the upper limit observed in extant birds and suggest that pelagornithids were highly efficient gliders, exploiting a long-range soaring ecology.

  2. Flight performance of the largest volant bird

    PubMed Central

    Ksepka, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Pelagornithidae is an extinct clade of birds characterized by bizarre tooth-like bony projections of the jaws. Here, the flight capabilities of pelagornithids are explored based on data from a species with the largest reported wingspan among birds. Pelagornis sandersi sp. nov. is represented by a skull and substantial postcranial material. Conservative wingspan estimates (∼6.4 m) exceed theoretical maximums based on extant soaring birds. Modeled flight properties indicate that lift:drag ratios and glide ratios for P. sandersi were near the upper limit observed in extant birds and suggest that pelagornithids were highly efficient gliders, exploiting a long-range soaring ecology. PMID:25002475

  3. Structure and conformational plasticity of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein core.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Eric J; Didychuk, Allison L; Liao, Honghong; Hu, Panzhou; Brow, David A; Butcher, Samuel E

    2017-01-01

    U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is a key component of the active site of the spliceosome, a large ribonucleoprotein complex that catalyzes the splicing of precursor messenger RNA. Prior to its incorporation into the spliceosome, U6 is bound by the protein Prp24, which facilitates unwinding of the U6 internal stem-loop (ISL) so that it can pair with U4 snRNA. A previously reported crystal structure of the `core' of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) contained an ISL-stabilized A62G mutant of U6 bound to all four RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domains of Prp24 [Montemayor et al. (2014), Nature Struct. Mol. Biol. 21, 544-551]. The structure revealed a novel topology containing interlocked rings of protein and RNA that was not predicted by prior biochemical and genetic data. Here, the crystal structure of the U6 snRNP core with a wild-type ISL is reported. This complex crystallized in a new space group, apparently owing in part to the presence of an intramolecular cross-link in RRM1 that was not observed in the previously reported U6-A62G structure. The structure exhibits the same protein-RNA interface and maintains the unique interlocked topology. However, the orientation of the wild-type ISL is altered relative to the A62G mutant structure, suggesting inherent structural dynamics that may facilitate its pairing with U4. Consistent with their similar architectures in the crystalline state, the wild-type and A62G variants of U6 exhibit similar Prp24-binding affinities and electrophoretic mobilities when analyzed by gel-shift assay.

  4. Diversity of a ribonucleoprotein family in tobacco chloroplasts: two new chloroplast ribonucleoproteins and a phylogenetic tree of ten chloroplast RNA-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L H; Li, Y Q; Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Go, M; Konishi, T; Watanabe, A; Sugiura, M

    1991-01-01

    Two new ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) have been identified from a tobacco chloroplast lysate. These two proteins (cp29A and cp29B) are nuclear-encoded and have a less affinity to single-stranded DNA as compared with three other chloroplast RNPs (cp28, cp31 and cp33) previously isolated. DNA sequencing revealed that both contain two consensus sequence-type homologous RNA-binding domains (CS-RBDs) and a very acidic amino-terminal domain but shorter than that of cp28, cp31 and cp33. Comparison of cp29A and cp29B showed a 19 amino acid insertion in the region separating the two CS-RBDs in cp29B. This insertion results in three tandem repeats of a glycine-rich sequence of 10 amino acids, which is a novel feature in RNPs. The two proteins are encoded by different single nuclear genes and no alternatively spliced transcripts could be identified. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the ten chloroplast CS-RBDs. These results suggest that there is a sizable RNP family in chloroplasts and the diversity was mainly generated through a series of gene duplications rather than through alternative pre-mRNA splicing. The gene for cp29B contains three introns. The first and second introns interrupt the first CS-RBD and the third intron does the second CS-RBD. The position of the first intron site is the same as that in the human hnRNP A1 protein gene. Images PMID:1721701

  5. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Scott; Peate, David; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid; Self, Stephen; Mawby, Michael; Jerram, Dougal; Marsh, Goonie

    2010-05-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are sites of the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic and silicic eruptions in Earth history. The magma volumes, eruptive mechanisms, frequency and associated aerosol emissions of these eruptions are critical for understanding any interpreted climate forcing and environmental change by LIPs. The largest volume (>1000 km3 dense rock equivalent) and magnitude (>M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (104-105 km2) basaltic lava flow fields and silicic ignimbrites and are the main building blocks of LIPs. Available information on the largest eruptive units are primarily from the Columbia River and Deccan provinces for the dimensions of flood basalt eruptions, and the Paraná-Etendeka and Afro-Arabian provinces for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions. In addition, three large-volume (675- 2,000 km3) silicic lava flows have also been mapped out in the Mesoproterozoic Gawler Range province (Australia), an interpreted LIP remnant. Magma volumes of >1000 km3 have also been emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs, and may contribute substantial aerosol emissions through shallow degassing and crystallisation. The data sets indicate comparable eruption magnitudes between the basaltic and silicic eruptions, but due to considerable volumes residing as co-ignimbrite ash deposits, the current volume constraints for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions may be considerably underestimated. Magma composition thus appears to be no barrier to the volume of magma emitted during an individual eruption. Despite this general similarity in magnitude, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in terms of eruption style, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basaltic eruptions are dominantly effusive and Hawaiian-Strombolian in style, with magma discharge rates of ~107-108 kg s-1 producing dominantly compound pahoehoe lava flow fields. The major flood basalt eruption durations are most

  6. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukstins Peate, I.; Bryan, S. E.; Peate, D. W.; Self, S.; Mawby, M.; Jerram, D. A.; Marsh, J.

    2010-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) host the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic & silicic eruptions on Earth. Understanding magma volumes, eruptive mechanisms, frequency and aerosol emissions are critical to interpret climate forcing and environmental change. The largest volume (>1000 km3 dre) and magnitude (>M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (104-105 km2) basaltic flow fields and silicic ignimbrites that are the main building blocks of LIPs. Magma volumes >1000 km3 are also emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs, and may contribute substantial aerosol emissions through shallow degassing and crystallization. Basaltic and silicic eruptions have comparable magnitudes, but silicic ignimbrite volumes may be significantly underestimated due to unrecognized and correlated, but voluminous co-ignimbrite ash deposits. Magma composition appears to be no barrier to individual eruption volume. Despite similar magnitudes, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in eruption mechanism, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basalts are dominantly effusive Hawaiian-Strombolian, with magma discharge rates of ~107-108 kg/s, and produce dominantly compound pahoehoe flow fields over eruption durations most likely >10 yrs. Some large-volume silicic lavas were emplaced by effusive and fissure eruptions, but discharge rates are unknown and may be up to an order of magnitude greater than those of flood basalt lavas for emplacement to be on realistic time scales (<10 years). Most silicic eruptions are moderately to highly explosive, producing co-current pyroclastic fountains (rarely Plinian) with discharge rates of 109-1011 kg/s that emplace welded to rheomorphic ignimbrites. Stratospheric ash and aerosol injections may be greater from co-ignimbrite ash clouds than eruption plumes. At present, durations for large-magnitude silicic eruptions are unconstrained. At discharge rates of 109 kg/s, equivalent to

  7. Scientists conduct largest coastal experiment on record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, Julie

    Duck, N.C.—Something out of the ordinary has been happening near this quiet, resort town on the Outer Banks. More than 100 coastal scientists, students, and technicians have descended on the Army Corps of Engineer's Waterways Experiment Station primarily to study movement of sediment in the surf zone. In fact, a large percentage of the U.S. near-shore research community has flooded the Duck area to execute the largest coastal experiment ever undertaken. The researchers have brought with them more than 80 computers and an array of exotic gadgets to carry out “DUCK94,” an unprecedented project that has been three years in the making.

  8. Collapse of the world's largest herbivores.

    PubMed

    Ripple, William J; Newsome, Thomas M; Wolf, Christopher; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Everatt, Kristoffer T; Galetti, Mauro; Hayward, Matt W; Kerley, Graham I H; Levi, Taal; Lindsey, Peter A; Macdonald, David W; Malhi, Yadvinder; Painter, Luke E; Sandom, Christopher J; Terborgh, John; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2015-05-01

    Large wild herbivores are crucial to ecosystems and human societies. We highlight the 74 largest terrestrial herbivore species on Earth (body mass ≥100 kg), the threats they face, their important and often overlooked ecosystem effects, and the conservation efforts needed to save them and their predators from extinction. Large herbivores are generally facing dramatic population declines and range contractions, such that ~60% are threatened with extinction. Nearly all threatened species are in developing countries, where major threats include hunting, land-use change, and resource depression by livestock. Loss of large herbivores can have cascading effects on other species including large carnivores, scavengers, mesoherbivores, small mammals, and ecological processes involving vegetation, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and fire regimes. The rate of large herbivore decline suggests that ever-larger swaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs.

  9. The nuclear export protein of H5N1 influenza A viruses recruits Matrix 1 (M1) protein to the viral ribonucleoprotein to mediate nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Flies, Joe; Bolte, Hardin; Reuther, Peter; Vreede, Frank; Schwemmle, Martin

    2014-07-18

    In influenza A virus-infected cells, replication and transcription of the viral genome occurs in the nucleus. To be packaged into viral particles at the plasma membrane, encapsidated viral genomes must be exported from the nucleus. Intriguingly, the nuclear export protein (NEP) is involved in both processes. Although NEP stimulates viral RNA synthesis by binding to the viral polymerase, its function during nuclear export implicates interaction with viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP)-associated M1. The observation that both interactions are mediated by the C-terminal moiety of NEP raised the question whether these two features of NEP are linked functionally. Here we provide evidence that the interaction between M1 and the vRNP depends on the NEP C terminus and its polymerase activity-enhancing property for the nuclear export of vRNPs. This suggests that these features of NEP are linked functionally. Furthermore, our data suggest that the N-terminal domain of NEP interferes with the stability of the vRNP-M1-NEP nuclear export complex, probably mediated by its highly flexible intramolecular interaction with the NEP C terminus. On the basis of our data, we propose a new model for the assembly of the nuclear export complex of Influenza A vRNPs.

  10. An association between RBMX, a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and ARTS-1 regulates extracellular TNFR1 release

    SciTech Connect

    Adamik, Barbara; Islam, Aminul; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Hawari, Feras I.; Zhang Jing; Levine, Stewart J.

    2008-07-04

    The type I, 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1) is released to the extracellular space by two mechanisms, the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains. Both pathways appear to be regulated by an interaction between TNFR1 and ARTS-1 (aminopeptidase regulator of TNFR1 shedding). Here, we sought to identify ARTS-1-interacting proteins that modulate TNFR1 release. Co-immunoprecipitation identified an association between ARTS-1 and RBMX (RNA-binding motif gene, X chromosome), a 43-kDa heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein. RNA interference attenuated RBMX expression, which reduced both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the IL-1{beta}-mediated inducible proteolytic cleavage of soluble TNFR1 ectodomains. Reciprocally, over-expression of RBMX increased TNFR1 exosome-like vesicle release and the IL-1{beta}-mediated inducible shedding of TNFR1 ectodomains. This identifies RBMX as an ARTS-1-associated protein that regulates both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains.

  11. Role and molecular mechanism of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in tumor development and progression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a member of the hnRNP family, which exists in the nucleus and the cytoplasm simultaneously. It is a multifunctional protein that can participate in a variety of regulatory progressions of gene expression and signal transduction, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription, RNA alternative splicing and translation. hnRNP K not only directly binds to the kinases, but also recruits the associated factors regarding transcription, splicing and translation to control gene expression, and therefore, it serves as a docking platform for integrating transduction pathways to nucleic acid-directed processes. Numerous studies also show that abnormal expression of hnRNP K is closely associated with the tumor formation. This protein is overexpressed in numerous types of cancer and its aberrant cytoplasmic localization is also associated with a worse prognosis for patients. These results consistently indicate that hnRNP K has a key role in cancer progression. To understand the hnRNP K pathophysiological process in tumor disease, the previous research results regarding the association between hnRNP K and tumors were reviewed.

  12. Targeted Gene Knockin in Porcine Somatic Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Eun; Park, Chi-Hun; Powell, Anne; Martin, Jessica; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-05-26

    The pig is an ideal large animal model for genetic engineering applications. A relatively short gestation interval and large litter size makes the pig a conducive model for generating and propagating genetic modifications. The domestic pig also shares close similarity in anatomy, physiology, size, and life expectancy, making it an ideal animal for modeling human diseases. Often, however, the technical difficulties in generating desired genetic modifications such as targeted knockin of short stretches of sequences or transgenes have impeded progress in this field. In this study, we have investigated and compared the relative efficiency of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in engineering targeted knockin of pseudo attP sites downstream of a ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene in porcine somatic cells and generated live fetuses by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). By leveraging these knockin pseudo attP sites, we have demonstrated subsequent phiC31 integrase mediated integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene into the site. This work for the first time created an optimized protocol for CRISPR/Cas mediated knockin in porcine somatic cells, while simultaneously creating a stable platform for future transgene integration and generating transgenic animals.

  13. Poly-sgRNA/siRNA ribonucleoprotein nanoparticles for targeted gene disruption.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jong Seong; Lee, Jae Sung; Jeong, Jaepil; Kim, Hejin; Byun, Juyoung; Kim, Sang Ah; Lee, Hee Jae; Chung, Hak Suk; Lee, Jong Bum; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2017-02-04

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) can be used for the specific disruption of a target gene to permanently suppress the expression of the protein encoded by the target gene. Efficient delivery of the system to an intracellular target site should be achieved to utilize the tremendous potential of the genome-editing tool in biomedical applications such as the knock-out of disease-related genes and the correction of defect genes. Here, we devise polymeric CRISPR/Cas9 system based on poly-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) nanoparticles consisting of polymeric sgRNA, siRNA, and Cas9 endonuclease in order to improve the delivery efficiency. When delivered by cationic lipids, the RNP nanoparticles built with chimeric poly-sgRNA/siRNA sequences generate multiple sgRNA-Cas9 RNP complexes upon the Dicer-mediated digestion of the siRNA parts, leading to more efficient disruption of the target gene in cells and animal models, compared with the monomeric sgRNA-Cas9 RNP complex.

  14. A high-throughput pipeline for the production of synthetic antibodies for analysis of ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hong; Laver, John D; Jeon, Jouhyun; Singh, Fateh; Ancevicius, Kristin; Fan, Yujie; Cao, Wen Xi; Nie, Kun; Yang, Zhenglin; Luo, Hua; Wang, Miranda; Rissland, Olivia; Westwood, J Timothy; Kim, Philip M; Smibert, Craig A; Lipshitz, Howard D; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-04-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs plays an essential role in the control of gene expression. mRNAs are regulated in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) along with associated protein and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) cofactors. A global understanding of post-transcriptional control in any cell type requires identification of the components of all of its RNP complexes. We have previously shown that these complexes can be purified by immunoprecipitation using anti-RBP synthetic antibodies produced by phage display. To develop the large number of synthetic antibodies required for a global analysis of RNP complex composition, we have established a pipeline that combines (i) a computationally aided strategy for design of antigens located outside of annotated domains, (ii) high-throughput antigen expression and purification in Escherichia coli, and (iii) high-throughput antibody selection and screening. Using this pipeline, we have produced 279 antibodies against 61 different protein components of Drosophila melanogaster RNPs. Together with those produced in our low-throughput efforts, we have a panel of 311 antibodies for 67 RNP complex proteins. Tests of a subset of our antibodies demonstrated that 89% immunoprecipitate their endogenous target from embryo lysate. This panel of antibodies will serve as a resource for global studies of RNP complexes in Drosophila. Furthermore, our high-throughput pipeline permits efficient production of synthetic antibodies against any large set of proteins.

  15. Effects of stress and aging on ribonucleoprotein assembly and function in the germ line

    PubMed Central

    Schisa, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of cell types, ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes play critical roles in regulating RNA metabolism. The germ line contains RNPs found also in somatic cells, such as processing (P) bodies and stress granules, as well as several RNPs unique to the germ line, including germ granules, nuage, Balbiani bodies, P granules, U bodies, and sponge bodies. Recent advances have identified a conserved response of germ line RNPs to environmental stresses such as nutritional stress and heat shock. The RNPs increase significantly in size based on cytology; their morphology and subcellular localization changes, and their composition changes. These dynamic changes are reversible when stresses diminish, and similar changes occur in response to aging or extended meiotic arrest prior to fertilization of oocytes. Intriguing correlations exist between the dynamics of the RNPs and the microtubule cytoskeleton and its motor proteins, suggesting a possible mechanism for the assembly and dissociation of the large RNP granules. Similarly, coordinated changes of the nuclear membrane and endoplasmic reticulum may also help unravel the regulatory mechanisms of RNP dynamics. Based on their composition, the RNPs are thought to regulate mRNA decay and/or translation, and initial support for some of these roles is now at hand. Ultimately, the question of why RNP remodeling occurs to such a large extent during a variety of stresses and aging remains to be fully answered, but a current attractive hypothesis is that the plasticity promotes the maintenance of oocyte quality. PMID:24523207

  16. DNA-Free Genetically Edited Grapevine and Apple Protoplast Using CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Malnoy, Mickael; Viola, Roberto; Jung, Min-Hee; Koo, Ok-Jae; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Velasco, Riccardo; Nagamangala Kanchiswamy, Chidananda

    2016-01-01

    The combined availability of whole genome sequences and genome editing tools is set to revolutionize the field of fruit biotechnology by enabling the introduction of targeted genetic changes with unprecedented control and accuracy, both to explore emergent phenotypes and to introduce new functionalities. Although plasmid-mediated delivery of genome editing components to plant cells is very efficient, it also presents some drawbacks, such as possible random integration of plasmid sequences in the host genome. Additionally, it may well be intercepted by current process-based GMO regulations, complicating the path to commercialization of improved varieties. Here, we explore direct delivery of purified CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to the protoplast of grape cultivar Chardonnay and apple cultivar such as Golden delicious fruit crop plants for efficient targeted mutagenesis. We targeted MLO-7, a susceptible gene in order to increase resistance to powdery mildew in grape cultivar and DIPM-1, DIPM-2, and DIPM-4 in the apple to increase resistance to fire blight disease. Furthermore, efficient protoplast transformation, the molar ratio of Cas9 and sgRNAs were optimized for each grape and apple cultivar. The targeted mutagenesis insertion and deletion rate was analyzed using targeted deep sequencing. Our results demonstrate that direct delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 RNPs to the protoplast system enables targeted gene editing and paves the way to the generation of DNA-free genome edited grapevine and apple plants. PMID:28066464

  17. Efficient DNA-free genome editing of bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhen; Chen, Kunling; Li, Tingdong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yanpeng; Zhao, Qian; Liu, Jinxing; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Cuimin; Ran, Yidong; Gao, Caixia

    2017-01-01

    Substantial efforts are being made to optimize the CRISPR/Cas9 system for precision crop breeding. The avoidance of transgene integration and reduction of off-target mutations are the most important targets for optimization. Here, we describe an efficient genome editing method for bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Starting from RNP preparation, the whole protocol takes only seven to nine weeks, with four to five independent mutants produced from 100 immature wheat embryos. Deep sequencing reveals that the chance of off-target mutations in wheat cells is much lower in RNP mediated genome editing than in editing with CRISPR/Cas9 DNA. Consistent with this finding, no off-target mutations are detected in the mutant plants. Because no foreign DNA is used in CRISPR/Cas9 RNP mediated genome editing, the mutants obtained are completely transgene free. This method may be widely applicable for producing genome edited crop plants and has a good prospect of being commercialized. PMID:28098143

  18. Efficient DNA-free genome editing of bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhen; Chen, Kunling; Li, Tingdong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yanpeng; Zhao, Qian; Liu, Jinxing; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Cuimin; Ran, Yidong; Gao, Caixia

    2017-01-18

    Substantial efforts are being made to optimize the CRISPR/Cas9 system for precision crop breeding. The avoidance of transgene integration and reduction of off-target mutations are the most important targets for optimization. Here, we describe an efficient genome editing method for bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Starting from RNP preparation, the whole protocol takes only seven to nine weeks, with four to five independent mutants produced from 100 immature wheat embryos. Deep sequencing reveals that the chance of off-target mutations in wheat cells is much lower in RNP mediated genome editing than in editing with CRISPR/Cas9 DNA. Consistent with this finding, no off-target mutations are detected in the mutant plants. Because no foreign DNA is used in CRISPR/Cas9 RNP mediated genome editing, the mutants obtained are completely transgene free. This method may be widely applicable for producing genome edited crop plants and has a good prospect of being commercialized.

  19. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Sandmaier, Shelley E S; Kim, Chan-Mi; Mileham, Alan; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2017-02-14

    The domestic pig is an important "dual purpose" animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community for the use of large animal models such as pigs to either serve as an alternative, or complement investigations from the mouse. However, the use of pig has not proven popular due to technical difficulties and time required in generating models with desired genetic modifications. In this regard, the ability to directly modify the genome in the zygote and generate edited animals is highly desirable. This report demonstrates for the first time, the generation of gene targeted animals by direct injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complex and short stretches of DNA sequences into porcine zygotes. The Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was pre-complexed with a single guide RNA targeting downstream of the ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene, and co-injected with a single-stranded repair template into porcine zygotes. Using this approach a line of pigs that carry pseudo attP sites within the COL1A locus to enable phiC31 integrase mediated introduction of transgenes has been generated. This new route for genome engineering in pigs via zygote injection should greatly enhance applications in both agriculture and biomedicine.

  20. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  1. Genome surgery using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Daesik; Koo, Taeyoung; Kim, Kwang-eun; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2017-01-01

    RNA-guided genome surgery using CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases has shown promise for the treatment of diverse genetic diseases. Yet, the potential of such nucleases for therapeutic applications in nongenetic diseases is largely unexplored. Here, we focus on age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in adults, which is associated with retinal overexpression of, rather than mutations in, the VEGFA gene. Subretinal injection of preassembled, Vegfa gene–specific Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) into the adult mouse eye gave rise to mutagenesis at the target site in the retinal pigment epithelium. Furthermore, Cas9 RNPs effectively reduced the area of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a mouse model of AMD. Genome-wide profiling of Cas9 off-target effects via Digenome-seq showed that off-target mutations were rarely induced in the human genome. Because Cas9 RNPs can function immediately after in vivo delivery and are rapidly degraded by endogenous proteases, their activities are unlikely to be hampered by antibody- and cell-mediated adaptive immune systems. Our results demonstrate that in vivo genome editing with Cas9 RNPs has the potential for the local treatment for nongenetic degenerative diseases, expanding the scope of RNA-guided genome surgery to a new dimension. PMID:28209587

  2. Active Yeast Telomerase Shares Subunits with Ribonucleoproteins RNase P and RNase MRP.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Bruno; Laterreur, Nancy; Perederina, Anna; Noël, Jean-François; Dubois, Marie-Line; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2016-05-19

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that replenishes telomeric DNA and maintains genome integrity. Minimally, telomerase activity requires a templating RNA and a catalytic protein. Additional proteins are required for activity on telomeres in vivo. Here, we report that the Pop1, Pop6, and Pop7 proteins, known components of RNase P and RNase MRP, bind to yeast telomerase RNA and are essential constituents of the telomerase holoenzyme. Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 binding is specific and involves an RNA domain highly similar to a protein-binding domain in the RNAs of RNase P/MRP. The results also show that Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 function to maintain the essential components Est1 and Est2 on the RNA in vivo. Consistently, addition of Pop1 allows for telomerase activity reconstitution with wild-type telomerase RNA in vitro. Thus, the same chaperoning module has allowed the evolution of functionally and, remarkably, structurally distinct RNPs, telomerase, and RNases P/MRP from unrelated progenitor RNAs.

  3. Crystal structure of the human heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 RNA-recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Katherine; Melville, Zephan; Aligholizadeh, Ehson; Roth, Braden M; Varney, Kristen M; Carrier, France; Pozharski, Edwin; Weber, David J

    2017-04-01

    The heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) is upregulated in hypoxic regions of various solid tumors and promotes tumor growth via the coordination of mRNA transcripts associated with pro-survival genes. Thus, hnRNP A18 represents an important therapeutic target in tumor cells. Presented here is the first X-ray crystal structure to be reported for the RNA-recognition motif of hnRNP A18. By comparing this structure with those of homologous RNA-binding proteins (i.e. hnRNP A1), three residues on one face of an antiparallel β-sheet (Arg48, Phe50 and Phe52) and one residue in an unstructured loop (Arg41) were identified as likely to be involved in protein-nucleic acid interactions. This structure helps to serve as a foundation for biophysical studies of this RNA-binding protein and structure-based drug-design efforts for targeting hnRNP A18 in cancer, such as malignant melanoma, where hnRNP A18 levels are elevated and contribute to disease progression.

  4. Highly Efficient Mouse Genome Editing by CRISPR Ribonucleoprotein Electroporation of Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sean; Lee, Benjamin; Lee, Angus Yiu-Fai; Modzelewski, Andrew J; He, Lin

    2016-07-08

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been employed to efficiently edit the genomes of diverse model organisms. CRISPR-mediated mouse genome editing is typically accomplished by microinjection of Cas9 DNA/RNA and single guide RNA (sgRNA) into zygotes to generate modified animals in one step. However, microinjection is a technically demanding, labor-intensive, and costly procedure with poor embryo viability. Here, we describe a simple and economic electroporation-based strategy to deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into mouse zygotes with 100% efficiency for in vivo genome editing. Our methodology, designated as CRISPR RNP Electroporation of Zygotes (CRISPR-EZ), enables highly efficient and high-throughput genome editing in vivo, with a significant improvement in embryo viability compared with microinjection. Using CRISPR-EZ, we generated a variety of editing schemes in mouse embryos, including indel (insertion/deletion) mutations, point mutations, large deletions, and small insertions. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we used CRISPR-EZ to target the tyrosinase (Tyr) gene, achieving 88% bi-allelic editing and 42% homology-directed repair-mediated precise sequence modification in live mice. Taken together, CRISPR-EZ is simple, economic, high throughput, and highly efficient with the potential to replace microinjection for in vivo genome editing in mice and possibly in other mammals.

  5. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Sandmaier, Shelley E. S.; Kim, Chan-Mi; Mileham, Alan; Donovan, David M.; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2017-01-01

    The domestic pig is an important “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community for the use of large animal models such as pigs to either serve as an alternative, or complement investigations from the mouse. However, the use of pig has not proven popular due to technical difficulties and time required in generating models with desired genetic modifications. In this regard, the ability to directly modify the genome in the zygote and generate edited animals is highly desirable. This report demonstrates for the first time, the generation of gene targeted animals by direct injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complex and short stretches of DNA sequences into porcine zygotes. The Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was pre-complexed with a single guide RNA targeting downstream of the ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene, and co-injected with a single-stranded repair template into porcine zygotes. Using this approach a line of pigs that carry pseudo attP sites within the COL1A locus to enable phiC31 integrase mediated introduction of transgenes has been generated. This new route for genome engineering in pigs via zygote injection should greatly enhance applications in both agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:28195163

  6. Fragile X mental retardation protein stimulates ribonucleoprotein assembly of influenza A virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuo; Cao, Mengmeng; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Xue; Li, Jianguo; Wang, Conghui; Gabriel, Gülsah; Xue, Qinghua; Yi, Yonghong; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Deng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of the influenza A virus is responsible for the transcription and replication of viral RNA in the nucleus. These processes require interplay between host factors and RNP components. Here, we report that the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) targets influenza virus RNA synthesis machinery and facilitates virus replication both in cell culture and in mice. We demonstrate that FMRP transiently associates with viral RNP and stimulates viral RNP assembly through RNA-mediated interaction with the nucleoprotein. Furthermore, the KH2 domain of FMRP mediates its association with the nucleoprotein. A point mutation (I304N) in the KH2 domain, identified from a Fragile X syndrome patient, disrupts the FMRP-nucleoprotein association and abolishes the ability of FMRP to participate in viral RNP assembly. We conclude that FMRP is a critical host factor used by influenza viruses to facilitate viral RNP assembly. Our observation reveals a mechanism of influenza virus RNA synthesis and provides insights into FMRP functions.

  7. Fragile X mental retardation protein stimulates ribonucleoprotein assembly of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuo; Cao, Mengmeng; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Xue; Li, Jianguo; Wang, Conghui; Gabriel, Gülsah; Xue, Qinghua; Yi, Yonghong; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Deng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of the influenza A virus is responsible for the transcription and replication of viral RNA in the nucleus. These processes require interplay between host factors and RNP components. Here, we report that the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) targets influenza virus RNA synthesis machinery and facilitates virus replication both in cell culture and in mice. We demonstrate that FMRP transiently associates with viral RNP and stimulates viral RNP assembly through RNA-mediated interaction with the nucleoprotein. Furthermore, the KH2 domain of FMRP mediates its association with the nucleoprotein. A point mutation (I304N) in the KH2 domain, identified from a Fragile X syndrome patient, disrupts the FMRP-nucleoprotein association and abolishes the ability of FMRP to participate in viral RNP assembly. We conclude that FMRP is a critical host factor used by influenza viruses to facilitate viral RNP assembly. Our observation reveals a mechanism of influenza virus RNA synthesis and provides insights into FMRP functions.

  8. A high-throughput pipeline for the production of synthetic antibodies for analysis of ribonucleoprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hong; Laver, John D.; Jeon, Jouhyun; Singh, Fateh; Ancevicius, Kristin; Fan, Yujie; Cao, Wen Xi; Nie, Kun; Yang, Zhenglin; Luo, Hua; Wang, Miranda; Rissland, Olivia; Westwood, J. Timothy; Kim, Philip M.; Smibert, Craig A.; Lipshitz, Howard D.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs plays an essential role in the control of gene expression. mRNAs are regulated in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) along with associated protein and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) cofactors. A global understanding of post-transcriptional control in any cell type requires identification of the components of all of its RNP complexes. We have previously shown that these complexes can be purified by immunoprecipitation using anti-RBP synthetic antibodies produced by phage display. To develop the large number of synthetic antibodies required for a global analysis of RNP complex composition, we have established a pipeline that combines (i) a computationally aided strategy for design of antigens located outside of annotated domains, (ii) high-throughput antigen expression and purification in Escherichia coli, and (iii) high-throughput antibody selection and screening. Using this pipeline, we have produced 279 antibodies against 61 different protein components of Drosophila melanogaster RNPs. Together with those produced in our low-throughput efforts, we have a panel of 311 antibodies for 67 RNP complex proteins. Tests of a subset of our antibodies demonstrated that 89% immunoprecipitate their endogenous target from embryo lysate. This panel of antibodies will serve as a resource for global studies of RNP complexes in Drosophila. Furthermore, our high-throughput pipeline permits efficient production of synthetic antibodies against any large set of proteins. PMID:26847261

  9. DNA-Free Genetically Edited Grapevine and Apple Protoplast Using CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Malnoy, Mickael; Viola, Roberto; Jung, Min-Hee; Koo, Ok-Jae; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Velasco, Riccardo; Nagamangala Kanchiswamy, Chidananda

    2016-01-01

    The combined availability of whole genome sequences and genome editing tools is set to revolutionize the field of fruit biotechnology by enabling the introduction of targeted genetic changes with unprecedented control and accuracy, both to explore emergent phenotypes and to introduce new functionalities. Although plasmid-mediated delivery of genome editing components to plant cells is very efficient, it also presents some drawbacks, such as possible random integration of plasmid sequences in the host genome. Additionally, it may well be intercepted by current process-based GMO regulations, complicating the path to commercialization of improved varieties. Here, we explore direct delivery of purified CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to the protoplast of grape cultivar Chardonnay and apple cultivar such as Golden delicious fruit crop plants for efficient targeted mutagenesis. We targeted MLO-7, a susceptible gene in order to increase resistance to powdery mildew in grape cultivar and DIPM-1, DIPM-2, and DIPM-4 in the apple to increase resistance to fire blight disease. Furthermore, efficient protoplast transformation, the molar ratio of Cas9 and sgRNAs were optimized for each grape and apple cultivar. The targeted mutagenesis insertion and deletion rate was analyzed using targeted deep sequencing. Our results demonstrate that direct delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 RNPs to the protoplast system enables targeted gene editing and paves the way to the generation of DNA-free genome edited grapevine and apple plants.

  10. K-homology nuclear ribonucleoproteins regulate floral organ identity and determinacy in arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cazorla, Encarnación; Ripoll, Juan José; Andújar, Alfonso; Bailey, Lindsay J; Martínez-Laborda, Antonio; Yanofsky, Martin F; Vera, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Post-transcriptional control is nowadays considered a main checking point for correct gene regulation during development, and RNA binding proteins actively participate in this process. Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS WITH KH DOMAINS (FLK) and PEPPER (PEP) genes encode RNA-binding proteins that contain three K-homology (KH)-domain, the typical configuration of Poly(C)-binding ribonucleoproteins (PCBPs). We previously demonstrated that FLK and PEP interact to regulate FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a central repressor of flowering time. Now we show that FLK and PEP also play an important role in the maintenance of the C-function during floral organ identity by post-transcriptionally regulating the MADS-box floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG). Previous studies have indicated that the KH-domain containing protein HEN4, in concert with the CCCH-type RNA binding protein HUA1 and the RPR-type protein HUA2, facilitates maturation of the AG pre-mRNA. In this report we show that FLK and PEP genetically interact with HEN4, HUA1, and HUA2, and that the FLK and PEP proteins physically associate with HUA1 and HEN4. Taken together, these data suggest that HUA1, HEN4, PEP and FLK are components of the same post-transcriptional regulatory module that ensures normal processing of the AG pre-mRNA. Our data better delineates the roles of PEP in plant development and, for the first time, links FLK to a morphogenetic process.

  11. Biogenesis, assembly, and export of viral messenger ribonucleoproteins in the influenza A virus infected cell.

    PubMed

    York, Ashley; Fodor, Ervin

    2013-08-01

    The flow of genetic information from sites of transcription within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translational machinery of eukaryotic cells is obstructed by a physical blockade, the nuclear double membrane, which must be overcome in order to adhere to the central dogma of molecular biology, DNA makes RNA makes protein. Advancement in the field of cellular and molecular biology has painted a detailed picture of the molecular mechanisms from transcription of genes to mRNAs and their processing that is closely coupled to export from the nucleus. The rules that govern delivering messenger transcripts from the nucleus must be obeyed by influenza A virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae that has adopted a nuclear replication cycle. The negative-sense genome of influenza A virus is segmented into eight individual viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and single-stranded RNA encapsidated in viral nucleoprotein. Influenza A virus mRNAs fall into three major categories, intronless, intron-containing unspliced and spliced. During evolutionary history, influenza A virus has conceived a way of negotiating the passage of viral transcripts from the nucleus to cytoplasmic sites of protein synthesis. The major mRNA nuclear export NXF1 pathway is increasingly implicated in viral mRNA export and this review considers and discusses the current understanding of how influenza A virus exploits the host mRNA export pathway for replication.

  12. 3' UTR length and messenger ribonucleoprotein composition determine endocleavage efficiencies at termination codons.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Volker; Haberman, Nejc; Ottens, Franziska; Ule, Jernej; Gehring, Niels H

    2014-10-23

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) degrades different classes of mRNAs, including transcripts with premature termination codons (PTCs). The NMD factor SMG6 initiates degradation of substrate mRNAs by endonucleolytic cleavage. Here, we aim to delineate the cascade of NMD-activating events that culminate in endocleavage. We report that long 3' UTRs elicit SMG6-mediated endonucleolytic degradation. The presence of an exon-junction complex (EJC) within the 3' UTR strongly stimulates endocleavage in a distance-independent manner. The interaction of SMG6 with EJCs is not required for endocleavage. Whereas the core NMD component UPF2 supports endonucleolytic decay of long 3' UTR mRNAs, it is mostly dispensable during EJC-stimulated endocleavage. Using high-throughput sequencing, we map endocleavage positions of different PTC-containing reporter mRNAs and an endogenous NMD substrate to regions directly at and downstream of the termination codon. These results reveal how messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) parameters differentially influence SMG6-executed endonucleolysis and uncover central characteristics of this phenomenon associated with translation termination.

  13. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism.

  14. Core structure of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein at 1.7-Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Eric J; Curran, Elizabeth C; Liao, Hong Hong; Andrews, Kristie L; Treba, Christine N; Butcher, Samuel E; Brow, David A

    2014-06-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic assembly of five small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that removes introns from eukaryotic pre-mRNA. U6, the most conserved of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), participates directly in catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae U6 snRNP core containing most of the U6 snRNA and all four RRM domains of the Prp24 protein. It reveals a unique interlocked RNP architecture that sequesters the 5' splice site-binding bases of U6 snRNA. RRMs 1, 2 and 4 of Prp24 form an electropositive groove that binds double-stranded RNA and may nucleate annealing of U4 and U6 snRNAs. Substitutions in Prp24 that suppress a mutation in U6 localize to direct RNA-protein contacts. Our results provide the most comprehensive view to date of a multi-RRM protein bound to RNA and reveal striking coevolution of protein and RNA structure.

  15. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J; Walter, Cheryl T; Dent, Kyle C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V; Hiscox, Julian A; Green, Todd J; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M; Fooks, Anthony R; Ashcroft, Alison E; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ranson, Neil A; Barr, John N; Edwards, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N-RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses.

  16. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex and RNA splicing alterations in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Hales, Chadwick M.; Chen, Ping-Chung; Gozal, Yair; Dammer, Eric B.; Fritz, Jason J.; Wang, Xusheng; Xia, Qiangwei; Duong, Duc M.; Street, Craig; Cantero, Gloria; Cheng, Dongmei; Jones, Drew R.; Wu, Zhiping; Li, Yuxin; Diner, Ian; Heilman, Craig J.; Rees, Howard D.; Wu, Hao; Lin, Li; Szulwach, Keith E.; Gearing, Marla; Mufson, Elliott J.; Bennett, David A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Wingo, Thomas S.; Sun, Yi E.; Jin, Peng; Hanfelt, John; Willcock, Donna M.; Levey, Allan; Lah, James J.; Peng, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of insoluble protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. The universal presence of β-amyloid and tau in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has facilitated advancement of the amyloid cascade and tau hypotheses that have dominated AD pathogenesis research and therapeutic development. However, the underlying etiology of the disease remains to be fully elucidated. Here we report a comprehensive study of the human brain-insoluble proteome in AD by mass spectrometry. We identify 4,216 proteins, among which 36 proteins accumulate in the disease, including U1-70K and other U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) spliceosome components. Similar accumulations in mild cognitive impairment cases indicate that spliceosome changes occur in early stages of AD. Multiple U1 snRNP subunits form cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in AD but not in other examined neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Comparison of RNA from AD and control brains reveals dysregulated RNA processing with accumulation of unspliced RNA species in AD, including myc box-dependent-interacting protein 1, clusterin, and presenilin-1. U1-70K knockdown or antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of U1 snRNP increases the protein level of amyloid precursor protein. Thus, our results demonstrate unique U1 snRNP pathology and implicate abnormal RNA splicing in AD pathogenesis. PMID:24023061

  17. Targeted Gene Knockin in Porcine Somatic Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Eun; Park, Chi-Hun; Powell, Anne; Martin, Jessica; Donovan, David M.; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2016-01-01

    The pig is an ideal large animal model for genetic engineering applications. A relatively short gestation interval and large litter size makes the pig a conducive model for generating and propagating genetic modifications. The domestic pig also shares close similarity in anatomy, physiology, size, and life expectancy, making it an ideal animal for modeling human diseases. Often, however, the technical difficulties in generating desired genetic modifications such as targeted knockin of short stretches of sequences or transgenes have impeded progress in this field. In this study, we have investigated and compared the relative efficiency of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in engineering targeted knockin of pseudo attP sites downstream of a ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene in porcine somatic cells and generated live fetuses by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). By leveraging these knockin pseudo attP sites, we have demonstrated subsequent phiC31 integrase mediated integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene into the site. This work for the first time created an optimized protocol for CRISPR/Cas mediated knockin in porcine somatic cells, while simultaneously creating a stable platform for future transgene integration and generating transgenic animals. PMID:27240344

  18. Rethinking how to address the world's largest infectious killer in the world's largest country.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Barry R

    2016-05-06

    India has the largest number of people suffering from tuberculosis (TB) of any country in the world. Analysis of the increasing Multi-Drug Resistant TB problem has revealed multiple challenges to the health system that must be addressed in order to control the TB epidemic there.Journal of Public Health Policy advance online publication, 6 May 2016 doi:10.1057/jphp.2016.16.

  19. Spitzer/IRAC Photometry Of The Four Largest Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Richard; Emery, J.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.

    2012-10-01

    The surfaces of the four largest Uranian satellites are dominated by water ice and a spectrally neutral constituent that is likely carbonaceous in composition. CO2 ice has been detected on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania, with no detection on the furthest regular Uranian satellite, Oberon (Grundy et al., 2003, 2006). Whether CO2 ice is primordial or is actively produced in the Uranian system is unclear; however, it seems unlikely that primordial CO2 ice would remain exposed on an icy satellite surface over the age of the Solar System. One possible mechanism for producing CO2 ice is bombardment of water ice and carbonaceous material by charged particles caught in Uranus’ magnetic field. Unlike the other large Uranian satellites, Oberon spends part of its orbit outside the confines of Uranus’ magnetic field, which might help explain why CO2 ice has yet to be detected on Oberon. We are using photometric data gathered by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), in order to search for the signature of CO2 ice on Oberon, and confirm its presence on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania at longer wavelengths than previous studies. IRAC collects data in four different channels, which are centered roughly at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 µm. Additionally, we are gathering spectroscopic data using SpeX on IRTF, at similar longitudes to the IRAC observations, in order to characterize the distribution of CO2 ice on these icy satellites over a wide range of near-infrared wavelengths. Our preliminary photometry results for Oberon indicate that there is a steep reduction in reflected solar flux from channel 1 to channel 2, suggesting that surface materials are absorbing photons at wavelengths within the bandpass of channel 2. We will present the results of our photometric analysis of the four largest Uranian moons.

  20. Largest-ever Ozone Hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA instrument has detected an Antarctic ozone 'hole' (what scientists call an 'ozone depletion area') that is three times larger than the entire land mass of the United States-the largest such area ever observed. The 'hole' expanded to a record size of approximately 11 million square miles (28.3 million square kilometers) on Sept. 3, 2000. The previous record was approximately 10.5 million square miles (27.2 million square km) on Sept. 19, 1998. The ozone hole's size currently has stabilized, but the low levels in its interior continue to fall. The lowest readings in the ozone hole are typically observed in late September or early October each year. 'These observations reinforce concerns about the frailty of Earth's ozone layer. Although production of ozone-destroying gases has been curtailed under international agreements, concentrations of the gases in the stratosphere are only now reaching their peak. Due to their long persistence in the atmosphere, it will be many decades before the ozone hole is no longer an annual occurrence,' said Dr. Michael J. Kurylo, manager of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. Ozone molecules, made up of three atoms of oxygen, comprise a thin layer of the atmosphere that absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Most atmospheric ozone is found between approximately six miles (9.5 km) and 18 miles (29 km) above the Earth's surface. Scientists continuing to investigate this enormous hole are somewhat surprised by its size. The reasons behind the dimensions involve both early-spring conditions, and an extremely intense Antarctic vortex. The Antarctic vortex is an upper-altitude stratospheric air current that sweeps around the Antarctic continent, confining the Antarctic ozone hole. 'Variations in the size of the ozone hole and of ozone depletion accompanying it from one year to the next are not unexpected,' said Dr. Jack Kaye, Office of Earth Sciences Research Director, NASA Headquarters

  1. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding the 60-kD component of the human SS-A/Ro ribonucleoprotein autoantigen.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chetrit, E; Gandy, B J; Tan, E M; Sullivan, K F

    1989-01-01

    SS-A/Ro is a nucleocytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particle that is a common target of autoimmune response in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Previously, SS-A/Ro has been shown to be composed of at least two polypeptide antigens of 60 and 52 kD noncovalently associated with a set of small RNAs, designated Y1-Y5. A serum from an SS patient was selected to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA library constructed from human T cell lymphoblastic leukemia (MOLT-4) mRNA. An immunoreactive clone was isolated that possessed a 1.8-kb cDNA insert. In vitro transcription and translation of the cDNA resulted in the synthesis of a 57.5-kD polypeptide which was specifically immunoprecipitated by SS-A/Ro antisera. The identity of the cDNA encoded protein as the 60-kD SS-A/Ro antigen was established by proteolytic peptide mapping of the cDNA-encoded protein and the 60-kD HeLa cell antigen. The sequence of the cDNA shows that the 60-kD SS-A/Ro protein possesses both RNA binding protein consensus sequences and a single zinc-finger motif. Recombinant SS-A/Ro antigen produced in bacteria proved to be a sensitive and specific reagent for detection of anti-SS-A/Ro antibodies in patient sera. The availability of the 60-kD SS-A/Ro cDNA will enable detailed analysis of the molecular structure and function of the SS-A/Ro RNP particle and its role in autoimmune pathology. Images PMID:2649513

  2. Antiviral activity of KR-23502 targeting nuclear export of influenza B virus ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yejin; Lee, Hye Won; Shin, Jin Soo; Go, Yun Young; Kim, Chonsaeng; Shin, Daeho; Malpani, Yashwardhan; Han, Soo Bong; Jung, Young-Sik; Kim, Meehyein

    2016-10-01

    The spiro compound 5,6-dimethyl-3H,3'H-spiro(benzofuran-2,1'-isobenzofuran)-3,3'-dione (KR-23502) has antiviral activity against influenza A and more potently B viruses. The aim of this study is to elucidate its mechanism of action. Subcellular localization and time-course expression of influenza B viral proteins, nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein 1 (M1), showed that KR-23502 reduced their amounts within 5 h post-infection. Early steps of virus life cycle, including virus entry, nuclear localization of NP and viral RNA-dependent RNA replication, were not affected by KR-23502. Instead it interrupted a later event corresponding to nuclear export of NP and M1 proteins. Delivery of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP)-M1 complex has been known to be mediated by the viral nuclear export protein (NEP) through interaction with cellular chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein. In this study, we experimentally demonstrated that the compound targets the nuclear export of vRNP. Moreover, a single mutation (aspartate to glycine) at amino acid position 54 in M1 [M1(D54G)] was detected after 18 passages in the presence of KR-23502 with a 2-fold increase in 50% effective concentration indicating that this compound has a relatively high genetic barrier to resistance. Interestingly, it was observed that proteasome-mediated degradation of M1(D54G) was attenuated by KR-23502. In conclusion, we suggest that KR-23502 shows its anti-influenza activity by downregulating NEP/CRM1-mediated nuclear export of influenza vRNP and M1. KR-23502 provides a core chemical skeleton for further structure-based design of novel antivirals against influenza viruses.

  3. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K is a Novel Regulator of Androgen Receptor Translation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Nishit K; Kim, Jayoung; Cinar, Bekir; Ramachandran, Aruna; Hager, Martin H; Di Vizio, Dolores; Adam, Rosalyn M; Rubin, Mark A; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Freeman, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression in prostate cancer (PCa) is still poorly understood. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in PCa cells was previously shown to lower AR expression by a rapamycin-sensitive, post-transcriptional mechanism involving the AR mRNA 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR). In a search for an intermediate within the EGFR/PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway that regulates AR at this site, we identified the nucleic acid binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K), by mass spectrometric analysis of Akt immune complexes from lipid raft-enriched subcellular fractions. We show here that hnRNP-K is a novel inhibitor of AR mRNA translation that regulates androgen-responsive gene expression and PCa cell proliferation. A functional hnRNP-K binding site involved in down-regulating AR protein levels was identified in the AR mRNA 5′-UTR. Further analysis revealed that hnRNP-K is also able to inhibit AR translation in the absence of the 5′-UTR, consistent with the presence of additional predicted hnRNP-K binding sites within the AR open reading frame and in the 3′-UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of a human PCa tissue microarray revealed an inverse correlation between hnRNP-K expression and AR protein levels in organ-confined PCa tumors and a substantial decline in cytoplasmic hnRNP-K in metastases, despite an overall increase in hnRNP-K levels in metastatic tumors. These data suggest that translational inhibition of AR by hnRNP-K may occur in organ-confined tumors but possibly at a reduced level in metastases. HnRNP-K is the first protein identified that directly interacts with and regulates the AR translational apparatus. PMID:19258514

  4. In vitro reconstitution and activity of a C/D box methylation guide ribonucleoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Arina D.; Ziesche, Sonia; Ebhardt, Holger; Dennis, Patrick P.

    2002-01-01

    The genomes of hyperthermophilic Archaea encode dozens of methylation guide, C/D box small RNAs that guide 2′-O-methylation of ribose to specific sites in rRNA and various tRNAs. The genes encoding the Sulfolobus homologues of eukaryotic proteins that are known to be present in C/D box small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) complexes were cloned, and the proteins (aFIB, aNOP56, and aL7a) were expressed and purified. The purified proteins along with an in vitro transcript of the Sulfolobus sR1 small RNA were reconstituted in vitro, into an RNP complex. The order of assembly of the three proteins onto the RNA was aL7a, aNOP56, and aFIB. The complex was active in targeting S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-dependent, site-specific 2′-O-methylation of ribose to a short fragment of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) that was complementary to the D box guide region of the sR1 small RNA. The presence of aFIB was essential for methylation; mutant proteins having amino acid replacements in the SAM-binding motif of aFIB were able to assemble into an RNP complex, but the resulting complexes were defective in methylation activity. These experiments define the minimal number of components and the conditions required to achieve in vitro RNA guide-directed 2′-O-methylation of ribose in a target RNA. PMID:11959980

  5. High specificity of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribonucleoprotein as antigen in serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Solana, M E; Katzin, A M; Umezawa, E S; Miatello, C S

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the performance of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribosomal fraction (Tulahuen and Y strains) in order to improve the diagnostic specificity of the test. A total of 100 serum samples from patients with chronic Chagas' disease from Brazil and Argentina were studied. Sera from 116 patients, without Chagas' disease, including 10 with active mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and 20 with visceral leishmaniasis, were used as controls. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the ribosomal fraction (ribonucleoproteins [RNPs]) in the ELISA were found in 97% of samples from patients with Chagas' disease. A total of 99% of the sera from patients without the disease were negative, including sera from patients with mucocutaneous and visceral leishmaniases. The distribution of IgG isotypes in randomly chosen serum samples was determined by ELISA; IgG1 and IgG3 were predominant (100% exhibited IgG1 and 85% exhibited IgG3, and 50% also presented the IgG2 isotype. The distribution of the IgG subclasses was confirmed by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. When total IgG was assayed by Western blot assay, no correlation was found between the pattern of serum reactivity and the clinical features of the patients with Chagas' disease. Therefore, no typical profile of polypeptide recognition could be associated with any clinical form of Chagas' disease (cardiomyopathy or megaviscera). Our results showed that sera from patients with Chagas' disease react with ribosomal antigens and display a typical profile of IgG isotypes (IgG1 plus IgG3).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7650167

  6. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E; Haliburton, Genevieve E; Ye, Chun J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marson, Alexander

    2015-08-18

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently "knock out" genes and "knock in" targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4(+) T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  7. An RNA Hybridization Assay for Screening Influenza A Virus Polymerase Inhibitors Using the Entire Ribonucleoprotein Complex.

    PubMed

    Roch, Franz-Ferdinand; Hinterkörner, Georg; Menke, John; Tang, Guo-Qing; Cusack, Stephen; Butzendobler, Barbara; Buschmann, Helmut; Datta, Kausiki; Wolkerstorfer, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Novel antiviral drugs, which are less prone to resistance development, are desirable alternatives to the currently approved drugs for the treatment of potentially serious influenza virus infections. The viral polymerase is highly conserved and serves as an attractive target for antiviral drugs since potent inhibitors would directly stop viral replication at an early stage. Recent structural studies on the functional domains of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase, which comprises subunits PA, PB1, and PB2, opened the way to a structure-based approach for optimizing inhibitors of viral replication. These strategies, however, are limited by the use of isolated protein fragments instead of employing the entire ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), which represents the functional form of the influenza polymerase in infected cells. In this study, we have established a screening assay for efficient and reliable analysis of potential influenza polymerase inhibitors of various molecular targets such as monoselective polymerase inhibitors targeting the endonuclease site, the cap-binding domain, and the polymerase active site, respectively. By utilizing whole viral RNPs and a radioactivity-free endpoint detection with the capability for efficient compound screening while offering high-content information on potential inhibitors to drive medicinal chemistry program in a reliable manner, this biochemical assay provides significant advantages over the currently available conventional assays. We propose that this assay can eventually be adapted for coinstantaneous analysis and subsequent optimization of two or more different chemical scaffold classes targeting multiple active sites within the polymerase complex, thus enabling the evaluation of drug combinations and characterization of molecules with dual functionality.

  8. Coilin Can Form a Complex with the U7 Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Michel; Gall, Joseph G.

    1998-01-01

    Coiled bodies (CBs) in the amphibian oocyte nucleus are spherical structures up to 10 μm or more in diameter, much larger than their somatic counterparts, which rarely exceed 1 μm. Oocyte CBs may have smaller granules attached to their surface or embedded within them, which are identical in structure and composition to the many hundreds of B-snurposomes found free in the nucleoplasm. The matrix of the CBs contains the diagnostic protein p80-coilin, which is colocalized with the U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), whereas the attached and embedded B-snurposomes contain splicing snRNPs. A few of the 50–100 CBs in the oocyte nucleus are attached to lampbrush chromosomes at the histone gene loci. By coimmunoprecipitation we show that coilin and the U7 snRNP can form a weak but specific complex in the nucleoplasm, which is dependent on the special U7 Sm-binding site. Under the same conditions coilin does not associate with the U1 and U2 snRNPs. Coilin is a nucleic acid-binding protein, as shown by its interaction with single-stranded DNA and with poly r(U) and poly r(G). We suggest that an important function of coilin is to form a transient complex with the U7 snRNP and accompany it to the CBs. In the case of CBs attached to chromosomes at the histone gene loci, the U7 snRNP is thus brought close to the actual site of histone pre-mRNA transcription. PMID:9763457

  9. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation.

  10. Arabidopsis CML38, a Calcium Sensor That Localizes to Ribonucleoprotein Complexes under Hypoxia Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Carlee; Li, Tian

    2016-01-01

    During waterlogging and the associated oxygen deprivation stress, plants respond by the induction of adaptive programs, including the redirected expression of gene networks toward the synthesis of core hypoxia-response proteins. Among these core response proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is the calcium sensor CML38, a protein related to regulator of gene silencing calmodulin-like proteins (rgsCaMs). CML38 transcripts are up-regulated more than 300-fold in roots within 6 h of hypoxia treatment. Transfer DNA insertional mutants of CML38 show an enhanced sensitivity to hypoxia stress, with lowered survival and more severe inhibition of root and shoot growth. By using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) translational fusions, CML38 protein was found to be localized to cytosolic granule structures similar in morphology to hypoxia-induced stress granules. Immunoprecipitation of CML38 from the roots of hypoxia-challenged transgenic plants harboring CML38pro::CML38:YFP followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of protein targets associated with messenger RNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes including stress granules, which are known to accumulate as messenger RNA storage and triage centers during hypoxia. This finding is further supported by the colocalization of CML38 with the mRNP stress granule marker RNA Binding Protein 47 (RBP47) upon cotransfection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Ruthenium Red treatment results in the loss of CML38 signal in cytosolic granules, suggesting that calcium is necessary for stress granule association. These results confirm that CML38 is a core hypoxia response calcium sensor protein and suggest that it serves as a potential calcium signaling target within stress granules and other mRNPs that accumulate during flooding stress responses. PMID:26634999

  11. Ribonomic analysis of human DZIP1 reveals its involvement in ribonucleoprotein complexes and stress granules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background DZIP1 (DAZ-interacting protein 1) has been described as a component of the Hh signaling pathway with a putative regulatory role in ciliogenesis. DZIP1 interacts with DAZ RNA binding proteins in embryonic stem cells and human germ cells suggesting a role in mRNA regulation. Results We investigated DZIP1 function in HeLa cells and its involvement in ribonucleoprotein complexes. DZIP1 was predominantly located in granules in the cytoplasm. Under oxidative stress conditions, DZIP1 re-localized to stress granules. DZIP appears to be important for the formation of stress granules during the stress response. We used immunoprecipitation assays with antibodies against DZIP1 and microarray hybridization to identify mRNAs associated with DZIP1. The genetic networks formed by the DZIP1-associated mRNAs were involved in cell cycle and gene expression regulation. DZIP1 is involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We used cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of this pathway, to analyze the expression of DZIP1 and its associated mRNAs. The abundance of DZIP1-associated mRNAs increased with treatment; however, the silencing or overexpression of DZIP1 in HeLa cells had no effect on the accumulation of the associated mRNAs. Polysomal profile analysis by sucrose gradient centrifugation demonstrated the presence of DZIP1 in the polysomal fraction. Conclusions Our results suggest that DZIP1 is part of an RNP complex that occupies various subcellular locations. The diversity of the mRNAs associated with DZIP1 suggests that this protein is a component of different RNPs associated with translating polysomes and with RNA granules. PMID:24993635

  12. Muscle developmental defects in heterogeneous nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Chia; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Lee, Chien-Chin; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is crucial for regulating alternative splicing. Its integrated function within an organism has not, however, been identified. We generated hnRNP A1 knockout mice to study the role of hnRNP A1 in vivo. The knockout mice, hnRNP A1−/−, showed embryonic lethality because of muscle developmental defects. The blood pressure and heart rate of the heterozygous mice were higher than those of the wild-type mice, indicating heart function defects. We performed mouse exon arrays to study the muscle development mechanism. The processes regulated by hnRNP A1 included cell adhesion and muscle contraction. The expression levels of muscle development-related genes in hnRNP A1+/− mice were significantly different from those in wild-type mice, as detected using qRT-PCR. We further confirmed the alternative splicing patterns of muscle development-related genes including mef2c, lrrfip1, usp28 and abcc9. Alternative mRNA isoforms of these genes were increased in hnRNP A1+/− mice compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, we revealed that the functionally similar hnRNP A2/B1 did not compensate for the expression of hnRNP A1 in organisms. In summary, our study demonstrated that hnRNP A1 plays a critical and irreplaceable role in embryonic muscle development by regulating the expression and alternative splicing of muscle-related genes. PMID:28077597

  13. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation. PMID:28106162

  14. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    DOE PAGES

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; ...

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9more » RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.« less

  15. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  16. Insulin Inhibits Nrf2 Gene Expression via Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein F/K in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anindya; Abdo, Shaaban; Zhao, Shuiling; Wu, Chin-Han; Shi, Yixuan; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Chenier, Isabelle; Alquier, Thierry; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2017-01-23

    Oxidative stress induces endogenous antioxidants via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), potentially preventing tissue injury. We investigated whether insulin affects renal Nrf2 expression in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and studied its underlying mechanism. Insulin normalized hyperglycemia, hypertension, oxidative stress and renal injury, inhibited renal Nrf2 and angiotensinogen (Agt) gene expression and up-regulated heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) and hnRNP K expression in Akita mice with T1D. In immortalized rat renal proximal tubular cells, insulin suppressed Nrf2 and Agt but stimulated hnRNP F and hnRNP K gene transcription in high glucose via p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. Transfection with small interfering RNAs of p44/42 MAPK, hnRNP F or hnRNP K blocked insulin inhibition of Nrf2 gene transcription. Insulin curbed Nrf2 promoter activity via a specific DNA-responsive element that binds hnRNP F/K, and hnRNP F/K overexpression curtailed Nrf2 promoter activity. In hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic mice, renal Nrf2 and Agt expression was down-regulated, whereas hnRNP F/K expression was up-regulated. Thus, the beneficial actions of insulin in diabetic nephropathy appear to be mediated, in part, by suppressing renal Nrf2 and Agt gene transcription and preventing Nrf2 stimulation of Agt expression via hnRNP F/K. These findings identify hnRNP F/K and Nrf2 as potential therapeutic targets in diabetes.

  17. Protein and gene expression characteristics of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Lin; Liu, Fei; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Xiao-Hang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression characteristics of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRNPH1) mRNA and protein in cell lines and tissues of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS Western blotting was used to assess the expression of HNRNPH1 protein in seven ESCC cell lines and 30 paired fresh tissue specimens. The subcellular localization of HNRNPH1 was determined by immunofluorescence in ESCC cells. The RNA sequencing data from 87 patients with ESCC were obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA), and the expression and clinical characteristics analysis of different transcript variants of HNRNPH1 were evaluated in this dataset. In addition, immunohistochemistry was carried out to detect the expression of HNRNPH1 protein in 125 patients. RESULTS The expression of HNRNPH1 protein varied across different ESCC cell lines. It was exclusively restricted to the nucleus of the ESCC cells. There are two transcript variants of the HNRNPH1 gene. Variant 1 was constitutively expressed, and its expression did not change during tumorigenesis. In contrast, levels of variant 2 were low in non-tumorous tissues and were dramatically increased in ESCC (P = 0.0026). The high levels of variant 2 were associated with poorer differentiated tumors (P = 0.0287). Furthermore, in paired fresh tissue specimens, HNRNPH1 protein was overexpressed in 73.3% (22/30) of neoplastic tissues. HNRNPH1 was significantly upregulated in ESCC, with strong staining in 43.2% (54/125) of tumor tissues and 22.4% (28/125) of matched non-cancerous tissues (P = 0.0005). Positive HNRNPH1 expression was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation degree (P = 0.0337). CONCLUSION The different alternative transcript variants of HNRNPH1 exhibited different expression changes during tumorigenesis. Its mRNA and protein were overexpressed in ESCC and associated with poorer differentiation of tumor cells. These findings highlight the potential of HNRNPH1 in the therapy and diagnosis

  18. Large-Scale Analysis of Kinase Signaling in Yeast Pseudohyphal Development Identifies Regulation of Ribonucleoprotein Granules.

    PubMed

    Shively, Christian A; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Norman, Kaitlyn L; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Xu, Tao; Sheidy, Daniel T; Dobry, Craig J; Sabath, Ivan; Cosky, Eric E P; Tran, Elizabeth J; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Andrews, Philip C; Kumar, Anuj

    2015-10-01

    Yeast pseudohyphal filamentation is a stress-responsive growth transition relevant to processes required for virulence in pathogenic fungi. Pseudohyphal growth is controlled through a regulatory network encompassing conserved MAPK (Ste20p, Ste11p, Ste7p, Kss1p, and Fus3p), protein kinase A (Tpk2p), Elm1p, and Snf1p kinase pathways; however, the scope of these pathways is not fully understood. Here, we implemented quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify each of these signaling networks, generating a kinase-dead mutant in filamentous S. cerevisiae and surveying for differential phosphorylation. By this approach, we identified 439 phosphoproteins dependent upon pseudohyphal growth kinases. We report novel phosphorylation sites in 543 peptides, including phosphorylated residues in Ras2p and Flo8p required for wild-type filamentous growth. Phosphoproteins in these kinase signaling networks were enriched for ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components, and we observe co-localization of Kss1p, Fus3p, Ste20p, and Tpk2p with the RNP component Igo1p. These kinases localize in puncta with GFP-visualized mRNA, and KSS1 is required for wild-type levels of mRNA localization in RNPs. Kss1p pathway activity is reduced in lsm1Δ/Δ and pat1Δ/Δ strains, and these genes encoding P-body proteins are epistatic to STE7. The P-body protein Dhh1p is also required for hyphal development in Candida albicans. Collectively, this study presents a wealth of data identifying the yeast phosphoproteome in pseudohyphal growth and regulatory interrelationships between pseudohyphal growth kinases and RNPs.

  19. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells. PMID:26216948

  20. Eubacterial components similar to small nuclear ribonucleoproteins: identification of immunoprecipitable proteins and capped RNAs in a cyanobacterium and a gram-positive eubacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, S A; O'Neil, J; Watcharapijarn, J; Moe-Kirvan, C; Vijay, S; Silva, V

    1993-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles play an important role in the processing of pre-mRNA. snRNPs have been identified immunologically in a variety of cells, but none have ever been observed in prokaryotic systems. This report provides the first evidence for the presence of snRNP-like components in two types of prokaryotic cells: those of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis and those of the gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus subtilis. These components consist of snRNP-immunoreactive proteins and RNAs, including some with the snRNP-unique 5' m2,2,7G (m3G) cap. Immunoreactivity was determined by immunoprecipitation procedures, with either antinuclear-antibody-positive (RNP- and Sm-monospecific) patient sera or a m3G monoclonal antibody, with radiolabelled cell extracts that were preadsorbed with antinuclear-antibody-negative sera. S. leopoliensis immunoprecipitates showed the presence of high-molecular-mass proteins (14 to 70 kDa) and RNAs (138 to 243 nucleotides) that are analogous in size to proteins and RNAs found in human (HEp-2) cell immunoprecipitates but absent in Escherichia coli immunoprecipitates. Thin-layer chromatography of S. leopoliensis immunoprecipitates confirmed the presence of a capped nucleotide similar to a capped nucleotide in HEp-2 immunoprecipitates; no such nucleotide was observed in E. coli immunoprecipitates. Immunoreactive RNAs (117-170 nucleotides) were identified in a second eubacterium, B. subtilis, as well. This work suggests that snRNPs or their evolutionary predecessors predate the emergence of eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:8458830

  1. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and G inhibits the transcription of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sheng; Korzan, Wayne J.; Chen, Chun-Chun; Fernald, Russell D.

    2008-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) causes the release of gonadotropins from the pituitary to control reproduction. Here we report that two heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP-A/B and hnRNP-G) bind to the GnRH-I upstream promoter region in a cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni. We identified these binding proteins using a newly developed homology based method of mass spectrometric peptide mapping. We show that both hnRNP-A/B and hnRNP-G co-localize with GnRH1 in the pre-optic area of the hypothalamus in the brain. We also demonstrated that these ribonucleoproteins exhibit similar binding capacity in vivo, using immortalized mouse GT1-7 cells where overexpression of either hnRNP-A/B or hnRNP-G significantly down-regulate GnRH1 mRNA levels in GT1-7 cells, suggesting that both act as repressors in GnRH1 transcriptional regulation. PMID:17920292

  2. Affinity purification of influenza virus ribonucleoprotein complexes from the chromatin of infected cells.

    PubMed

    Chase, Geoffrey P; Schwemmle, Martin

    2012-06-03

    Like all negative-strand RNA viruses, the genome of influenza viruses is packaged in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNP), in which the single-stranded genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (NP), and associated with the trimeric polymerase complex consisting of the PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits. However, in contrast to most RNA viruses, influenza viruses perform viral RNA synthesis in the nuclei of infected cells. Interestingly, viral mRNA synthesis uses cellular pre-mRNAs as primers, and it has been proposed that this process takes place on chromatin. Interactions between the viral polymerase and the host RNA polymerase II, as well as between NP and host nucleosomes have also been characterized. Recently, the generation of recombinant influenza viruses encoding a One-Strep-Tag genetically fused to the C-terminus of the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase (rWSN-PB2-Strep) has been described. These recombinant viruses allow the purification of PB2-containing complexes, including vRNPs, from infected cells. To obtain purified vRNPs, cell cultures are infected, and vRNPs are affinity purified from lysates derived from these cells. However, the lysis procedures used to date have been based on one-step detergent lysis, which, despite the presence of a general nuclease, often extract chromatin-bound material only inefficiently. Our preliminary work suggested that a large portion of nuclear vRNPs were not extracted during traditional cell lysis, and therefore could not be affinity purified. To increase this extraction efficiency, and to separate chromatin-bound from non-chromatin-bound nuclear vRNPs, we adapted a step-wise subcellular extraction protocol to influenza virus-infected cells. Briefly, this procedure first separates the nuclei from the cell and then extracts soluble nuclear proteins (here termed the "nucleoplasmic" fraction). The remaining insoluble nuclear material is then digested with Benzonase, an unspecific DNA/RNA nuclease, followed by

  3. Comparative study of two box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine-synthases: relation between conformational dynamics of the guide RNA, enzyme assembly and activity.

    PubMed

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Tillault, Anne-Sophie; Blaud, Magali; Leclerc, Fabrice; Branlant, Christiane; Charpentier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA) is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10-L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21.

  4. Nuclear export of the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein complex: Interaction of Hsc70 with viral proteins M1 and NS2.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ken; Shimizu, Teppei; Noda, Saiko; Tsukahara, Fujiko; Maru, Yoshiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The influenza virus replicates in the host cell nucleus, and the progeny viral ribonucleoprotein complex (vRNP) is exported to the cytoplasm prior to maturation. NS2 has a nuclear export signal that mediates the nuclear export of vRNP by the vRNP-M1-NS2 complex. We previously reported that the heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) protein binds to M1 protein and mediates vRNP export. However, the interactions among M1, NS2, and Hsc70 are poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that Hsc70 interacts with M1 more strongly than with NS2 and competes with NS2 for M1 binding, suggesting an important role of Hsc70 in the nuclear export of vRNP.

  5. High Efficiency, Homology-Directed Genome Editing in Caenorhabditis elegans Using CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Paix, Alexandre; Folkmann, Andrew; Rasoloson, Dominique; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of breaks induced by the RNA-programmed nuclease Cas9 has become a popular method for genome editing in several organisms. Most HDR protocols rely on plasmid-based expression of Cas9 and the gene-specific guide RNAs. Here we report that direct injection of in vitro–assembled Cas9-CRISPR RNA (crRNA) trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) ribonucleoprotein complexes into the gonad of Caenorhabditis elegans yields HDR edits at a high frequency. Building on our earlier finding that PCR fragments with 35-base homology are efficient repair templates, we developed an entirely cloning-free protocol for the generation of seamless HDR edits without selection. Combined with the co-CRISPR method, this protocol is sufficiently robust for use with low-efficiency guide RNAs and to generate complex edits, including ORF replacement and simultaneous tagging of two genes with fluorescent proteins. PMID:26187122

  6. High Efficiency, Homology-Directed Genome Editing in Caenorhabditis elegans Using CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Paix, Alexandre; Folkmann, Andrew; Rasoloson, Dominique; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2015-09-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of breaks induced by the RNA-programmed nuclease Cas9 has become a popular method for genome editing in several organisms. Most HDR protocols rely on plasmid-based expression of Cas9 and the gene-specific guide RNAs. Here we report that direct injection of in vitro-assembled Cas9-CRISPR RNA (crRNA) trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) ribonucleoprotein complexes into the gonad of Caenorhabditis elegans yields HDR edits at a high frequency. Building on our earlier finding that PCR fragments with 35-base homology are efficient repair templates, we developed an entirely cloning-free protocol for the generation of seamless HDR edits without selection. Combined with the co-CRISPR method, this protocol is sufficiently robust for use with low-efficiency guide RNAs and to generate complex edits, including ORF replacement and simultaneous tagging of two genes with fluorescent proteins.

  7. Physical and Functional Interaction between Heterochromatin Protein 1α and the RNA-binding Protein Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein U*

    PubMed Central

    Ameyar-Zazoua, Maya; Souidi, Mouloud; Fritsch, Lauriane; Robin, Philippe; Thomas, Audrey; Hamiche, Ali; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Harel-Bellan, Annick

    2009-01-01

    By combining biochemical purification and mass spectrometry, we identified proteins associated with human heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α) both in the nucleoplasm and in chromatin. Some of these are RNA-binding proteins, and among them is the protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U)/SAF-A, which is linked to chromatin organization and transcriptional regulation. Here, we demonstrate that hnRNP U is a bona fide HP1α-interacting molecule. More importantly, hnRNP U depletion reduces HP1α-dependent gene silencing and disturbs HP1α subcellular localization. Thus, our data demonstrate that hnRNP U is involved in HP1α function, shedding new light on the mode of action of HP1α and on the function of hnRNP U. PMID:19617346

  8. Direct Recruitment of ERK Cascade Components to Inducible Genes Is Regulated by Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K*

    PubMed Central

    Mikula, Michal; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2011-01-01

    Components of the ERK cascade are recruited to genes, but it remains unknown how they are regulated at these sites. The RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K interacts with kinases and is found along genes including the mitogen-inducible early response gene EGR-1. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitations to study co-recruitment of hnRNP K and ERK cascade activity along the EGR-1 gene. These measurements revealed that the spatiotemporal binding patterns of ERK cascade transducers (GRB2, SOS, B-Raf, MEK, and ERK) at the EGR-1 locus resemble both hnRNP K and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Inhibition of EGR-1 transcription with either serum-responsive factor knockdown or 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole altered recruitment of all of the above ERK cascade components along this locus that mirrored the changes in Pol II and hnRNP K profiles. siRNA knockdown of hnRNP K decreased the levels of active MEK and ERK at the EGR-1, changes associated with decreased levels of elongating pre-mRNA and less efficient splicing. The hnRNP K dependence and pattern of ERK cascade activation at the c-MYC locus were different from at EGR-1. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitations revealed that hnRNP K was associated with the EGR-1 but not c-MYC mRNAs. These data suggest a model where Pol II transcription-driven recruitment of hnRNP K along the EGR-1 locus compartmentalizes activation of the ERK cascade at these genes, events that regulate synthesis of mature mRNA. PMID:21233203

  9. Molecular definition of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) using autoimmune antibody: immunological relationship with hnRNP P.

    PubMed

    Hassfeld, W; Chan, E K; Mathison, D A; Portman, D; Dreyfuss, G; Steiner, G; Tan, E M

    1998-01-15

    Serum from a patient showing symptoms related to autoimmunity was found to contain autoantibodies to the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and to several novel nuclear antigens with estimated molecular weights of 40, 43, 72, 74 and 82 kDa. Using this serum for screening a human cDNA expression library a 2.5 kb cDNA clone was isolated which encoded the complete sequence of a protein of 633 amino acids. Sequence analysis revealed a modular structure of the protein: an acidic N-terminal region of approximately 150 amino acids was followed by three adjacent consensus sequence RNA binding domains located in the central part of the protein. In the C-terminal portion a nuclear localization signal and an octapeptide (PPPRMPPP) with similarity to a major B cell epitope of the snRNP core protein B were identified. This was followed by a glycine- and arginine-rich section of approximately 120 amino acids forming another type of RNA binding motif, a RGG box. Interestingly, three copies of a tyrosine-rich decapeptide were found interspersed in the RGG box region. The major in vitro translation product of the cDNA co-migrated in SDS-PAGE with the 82 kDa polypeptide that was recognized by autoantibodies. The structural motifs as well as the immunofluorescence pattern generated by anti-82 kDa antibodies suggested that the antigen was one of the proteins of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complex. Subsequently the 82 kDa antigen was identified as hnRNP R protein by its presence in immunoprecipitated hnRNP complexes and co-migration of the recombinant protein with this hitherto uncharacterized hnRNP constituent in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The concomitant autoimmune response to a hnRNP component of the pre-mRNA processing machinery and to NuMA, a protein engaged in mitotic events and reported to be associated with mRNA splicing complexes in interphase, may indicate physical and functional association of these antigens. Support for this notion

  10. NAFTA: The World's Largest Trading Zone Turns 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrarini, Tawni Hunt; Day, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Everyone under the age of 20 who has grown up in North America has lived in the common market created by NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement. In a zone linking the United States, Canada, and Mexico, most goods and investments flow freely across borders to users, consumers, and investors. In 1994, NAFTA created the largest relatively…

  11. 360 Video Tour of the World’s Largest Laser

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-15

    Welcome to the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the world’s largest and most energetic laser system. It draws researchers from around the globe for experiments that can’t be conducted anywhere else on Earth. Let’s take a closer look.

  12. Afterglows from the largest explosions in the universe

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1999-01-01

    The distinction of “largest explosions in the universe” has been bestowed on cosmic gamma-ray bursts. Their afterglows are brighter than supernovae and therefore are called hypernovae. Photometry and spectroscopy of these afterglows have provided major breakthroughs in our understanding of this mysterious phenomenon. PMID:10220364

  13. The Single Largest Education Donor Comes with Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    For the last decade, in districts big and small, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has emerged as the largest private funder of educational efforts. This began with an initiative around small schools in the early to mid-2000s, mostly abandoned now, and has gained traction in the past few years in areas such as teacher evaluation, the Common…

  14. Cassini sheds light on Titan's second largest lake, Ligeia Mare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is known for its dense, planet-like atmosphere and large lakes most likely made of methane and ethane. It has been suggested that Titan's atmosphere and surface are a model of early Earth. Since the early 2000s, NASA's Cassini space probe has been unlocking secrets of the distant moon.

  15. A Novel Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein-Like Protein Interacts with NS1 of the Minute Virus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Colin E.; Boden, Richard A.; Astell, Caroline R.

    1999-01-01

    NS1, the major nonstructural parvovirus protein of the minute virus of mice, is a multifunctional protein responsible for several aspects of viral replication. NS1 transactivates the P38 promoter (used to express the structural proteins), as well as its own strong promoter, P4. To study the mechanism of activation and to map regions of NS1 responsible for transactivation, NS1 and various deletions of NS1 were cloned in frame with the GAL4DB and cotransfected into COS-7 and LA9 cells with a synthetic GAL4-responsive reporter plasmid. These studies showed NS1 can directly activate transcription through its 129 carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues. Any deletion from this region of the C terminus, even as few as 8 amino acids, completely abolishes transactivation. A yeast two-hybrid system used to identify protein-protein interactions demonstrated that NS1 is able to dimerize when expressed in yeast cells. However, only an almost complete NS11–638 bait was able to interact with the full-length NS1. A two-hybrid screen identified a HeLa cell cDNA clone (NS1-associated protein 1 [NSAP1]) that interacts with NS11–276 and NS11–638. An additional sequence was predicted from human EST (expressed sequence tag) data, and the cDNA was estimated to be at least 2,221 bp long, potentially encoding a 562-amino-acid protein product. A polyclonal antibody raised to a synthetic peptide within NSAP1 recognizes an ∼65-kDa cellular protein. This NSAP1 cDNA has not previously been characterized, but the predicted protein sequence is 80% identical to the recently identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) R (W. Hassfeld et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 26:439–445, 1998). NSAP1 contains four ribonucleoprotein domains, as well as a highly repetitive C-terminal region. A closely related mouse cDNA (deduced from murine EST data) encodes a protein with only a single amino acid residue change from the human protein. NSAP1 is predicted to be a 65-kDa polynucleotide binding

  16. Method for the isolation and identification of mRNAs, microRNAs and protein components of ribonucleoprotein complexes from cell extracts using RIP-Chip.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Garrett M; Gubin, Matthew M; Magee, Joseph D; Techasintana, Patsharaporn; Calaluce, Robert; Atasoy, Ulus

    2012-09-29

    As a result of the development of high-throughput sequencing and efficient microarray analysis, global gene expression analysis has become an easy and readily available form of data collection. In many research and disease models however, steady state levels of target gene mRNA does not always directly correlate with steady state protein levels. Post-transcriptional gene regulation is a likely explanation of the divergence between the two. Driven by the binding of RNA Binding Proteins (RBP), post-transcriptional regulation affects mRNA localization, stability and translation by forming a Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex with target mRNAs. Identifying these unknown de novo mRNA targets from cellular extracts in the RNP complex is pivotal to understanding mechanisms and functions of the RBP and their resulting effect on protein output. This protocol outlines a method termed RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray (RIP-Chip), which allows for the identification of specific mRNAs associated in the ribonucleoprotein complex, under changing experimental conditions, along with options to further optimize an experiment for the individual researcher. With this important experimental tool, researchers can explore the intricate mechanisms associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation as well as other ribonucleoprotein interactions.

  17. Bayesian Predictive Distribution for the Magnitude of the Largest Aftershock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock sequences, which follow large earthquakes, last hundreds of days and are characterized by well defined frequency-magnitude and spatio-temporal distributions. The largest aftershocks in a sequence constitute significant hazard and can inflict additional damage to infrastructure. Therefore, the estimation of the magnitude of possible largest aftershocks in a sequence is of high importance. In this work, we propose a statistical model based on Bayesian analysis and extreme value statistics to describe the distribution of magnitudes of the largest aftershocks in a sequence. We derive an analytical expression for a Bayesian predictive distribution function for the magnitude of the largest expected aftershock and compute the corresponding confidence intervals. We assume that the occurrence of aftershocks can be modeled, to a good approximation, by a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a temporal event rate given by the modified Omori law. We also assume that the frequency-magnitude statistics of aftershocks can be approximated by Gutenberg-Richter scaling. We apply our analysis to 19 prominent aftershock sequences, which occurred in the last 30 years, in order to compute the Bayesian predictive distributions and the corresponding confidence intervals. In the analysis, we use the information of the early aftershocks in the sequences (in the first 1, 10, and 30 days after the main shock) to estimate retrospectively the confidence intervals for the magnitude of the expected largest aftershocks. We demonstrate by analysing 19 past sequences that in many cases we are able to constrain the magnitudes of the largest aftershocks. For example, this includes the analysis of the Darfield (Christchurch) aftershock sequence. The proposed analysis can be used for the earthquake hazard assessment and forecasting associated with the occurrence of large aftershocks. The improvement in instrumental data associated with early aftershocks can greatly enhance the analysis and

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 regulates rhythmic synthesis of mouse Nfil3 protein via IRES-mediated translation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2017-02-21

    Nuclear factor, interleukin 3, regulated (Nfil3, also known as E4 Promoter-Binding Protein 4 (E4BP4)) protein is a transcription factor that binds to DNA and generally represses target gene expression. In the circadian clock system, Nfil3 binds to a D-box element residing in the promoter of clock genes and contributes to their robust oscillation. Here, we show that the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of Nfil3 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and that IRES-mediated translation occurs in a phase-dependent manner. We demonstrate that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) binds to a specific region of Nfil3 mRNA and regulates IRES-mediated translation. Knockdown of hnRNP A1 almost completely abolishes protein oscillation without affecting mRNA oscillation. Moreover, we observe that intracellular calcium levels, which are closely related to bone formation, depend on Nfil3 levels in osteoblast cell lines. We suggest that the 5'-UTR mediated cap-independent translation of Nfil3 mRNA contributes to the rhythmic expression of Nfil3 by interacting with the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1. These data provide new evidence that the posttranscriptional regulation of clock gene expression is important during bone metabolism.

  19. A Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Platform for Functional Genetic Studies of HIV-Host Interactions in Primary Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hultquist, Judd F; Schumann, Kathrin; Woo, Jonathan M; Manganaro, Lara; McGregor, Michael J; Doudna, Jennifer; Simon, Viviana; Krogan, Nevan J; Marson, Alexander

    2016-10-25

    New genetic tools are needed to understand the functional interactions between HIV and human host factors in primary cells. We recently developed a method to edit the genome of primary CD4(+) T cells by electroporation of CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Here, we adapted this methodology to a high-throughput platform for the efficient, arrayed editing of candidate host factors. CXCR4 or CCR5 knockout cells generated with this method are resistant to HIV infection in a tropism-dependent manner, whereas knockout of LEDGF or TNPO3 results in a tropism-independent reduction in infection. CRISPR/Cas9 RNPs can furthermore edit multiple genes simultaneously, enabling studies of interactions among multiple host and viral factors. Finally, in an arrayed screen of 45 genes associated with HIV integrase, we identified several candidate dependency/restriction factors, demonstrating the power of this approach as a discovery platform. This technology should accelerate target validation for pharmaceutical and cell-based therapies to cure HIV infection.

  20. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity associated with the yeast viral p91/20S RNA ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, M P; Esteban, R; Fujimura, T

    1997-01-01

    20S RNA is a noninfectious viral single-stranded RNA found in most laboratory strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 20S RNA encodes a protein of 91 kDa (p91) that contains the common motifs found among RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from RNA viruses. p91 and 20S RNA are noncovalently associated in vivo, forming a ribonucleoprotein complex. We detected an RNA polymerase activity in p91/20S RNA complexes isolated by high-speed centrifugation. The activity was not inhibited by actinomycin D nor alpha-amanitin. The majority of the in vitro products was 20S RNA and the rest was the complementary strands of 20S RNA. Because the extracts were prepared from cells accumulating 20S RNA over its complementary strands, these in vitro products reflect the corresponding activities in vivo. When the p91/20S RNA complexes were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the polymerase activity cosedimented with the complexes. Furthermore, an RNA polymerase activity was detected in the complex by an antibody-linked polymerase assay using anti-p91 antiserum, suggesting that p91 is present in the active RNA polymerase machinery. These results together indicate that p91 is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or a subunit thereof responsible for 20S RNA replication. PMID:8990396

  1. Systemic delivery of siRNA in pumpkin by a plant PHLOEM SMALL RNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1-ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie A; Lucas, William J

    2014-11-01

    In plants, the vascular system, specifically the phloem, functions in delivery of small RNA (sRNA) to exert epigenetic control over developmental and defense-related processes. Although the importance of systemic sRNA delivery has been established, information is currently lacking concerning the nature of the protein machinery involved in this process. Here, we show that a PHLOEM SMALL-RNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) serves as the basis for formation of an sRNA ribonucleoprotein complex (sRNPC) that delivers sRNA (primarily 24 nt) to sink organs. Assembly of this complex is facilitated through PSRP1 phosphorylation by a phloem-localized protein kinase, PSRPK1. During long-distance transport, PSRP1-sRNPC is stable against phloem phosphatase activity. Within target tissues, phosphatase activity results in disassembly of PSRP1-sRNPC, a process that is probably required for unloading cargo sRNA into surrounding cells. These findings provide an insight into the mechanism involved in delivery of sRNA associated with systemic gene silencing in plants.

  2. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein L is required for the survival and functional integrity of murine hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreau, Marie-Claude; Grapton, Damien; Helness, Anne; Vadnais, Charles; Fraszczak, Jennifer; Shooshtarizadeh, Peiman; Wilhelm, Brian; Robert, François; Heyd, Florian; Möröy, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation and survival of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has to be strictly coordinated to ensure the timely production of all blood cells. Here we report that the splice factor and RNA binding protein hnRNP L (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L) is required for hematopoiesis, since its genetic ablation in mice reduces almost all blood cell lineages and causes premature death of the animals. In agreement with this, we observed that hnRNP L deficient HSCs lack both the ability to self-renew and foster hematopoietic differentiation in transplanted hosts. They also display mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated levels of γH2AX, are Annexin V positive and incorporate propidium iodide indicating that they undergo cell death. Lin-c-Kit+ fetal liver cells from hnRNP L deficient mice show high p53 protein levels and up-regulation of p53 target genes. In addition, cells lacking hnRNP L up-regulated the expression of the death receptors TrailR2 and CD95/Fas and show Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Parp cleavage. Treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk, but not the deletion of p53, restored cell survival in hnRNP L deficient cells. Our data suggest that hnRNP L is critical for the survival and functional integrity of HSCs by restricting the activation of caspase-dependent death receptor pathways. PMID:27271479

  3. Definition of a discontinuous immunodominant epitope at the NH2 terminus of the La/SS-B ribonucleoprotein autoantigen.

    PubMed Central

    McNeilage, L J; Umapathysivam, K; Macmillan, E; Guidolin, A; Whittingham, S; Gordon, T

    1992-01-01

    High-titer IgG autoantibodies to the La/SS-B ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are a hallmark of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome. Anti-La/SS-B-positive human sera bind to multiple epitopes on recombinant La/SS-B, although the initial response is against an immunodominant epitope within the first 107 NH2-terminal amino acids (aa). Sequence analysis has identified a striking homology between aa 88-101 in this NH2-terminal region of La/SS-B and a feline retroviral gag polypeptide suggesting the anti-La/SS-B response may be initiated by cross-reactivity with an exogenous agent. In the present study, detailed mapping of this NH2-terminal epitope, using recombinant La/SS-B purified from the expression of overlapping DNA fragments spanning aa 1-107, has shown that this immunodominant epitope is a complex conformational or discontinuous epitope dependent upon both aa 12-28 and 82-99 for expression, even though these regions share no homology with each other. This requirement questions the significance of the homology between La/SS-B and a retroviral gag polypeptide in the generation of the B cell response to La/SS-B and is in accord with the general concept that B cells recognize conformational epitopes on antigens rather than small linear peptide sequences. The finding also reinforces the notion that native autoantigen could be the initiator of the autoimmune response. Images PMID:1373741

  4. RIP-seq analysis of eukaryotic Sm proteins identifies three major categories of Sm-containing ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sm proteins are multimeric RNA-binding factors, found in all three domains of life. Eukaryotic Sm proteins, together with their associated RNAs, form small ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes important in multiple aspects of gene regulation. Comprehensive knowledge of the RNA components of Sm RNPs is critical for understanding their functions. Results We developed a multi-targeting RNA-immunoprecipitation sequencing (RIP-seq) strategy to reliably identify Sm-associated RNAs from Drosophila ovaries and cultured human cells. Using this method, we discovered three major categories of Sm-associated transcripts: small nuclear (sn)RNAs, small Cajal body (sca)RNAs and mRNAs. Additional RIP-PCR analysis showed both ubiquitous and tissue-specific interactions. We provide evidence that the mRNA-Sm interactions are mediated by snRNPs, and that one of the mechanisms of interaction is via base pairing. Moreover, the Sm-associated mRNAs are mature, indicating a splicing-independent function for Sm RNPs. Conclusions This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of eukaryotic Sm-containing RNPs, and provides a basis for additional functional analyses of Sm proteins and their associated snRNPs outside of the context of pre-mRNA splicing. Our findings expand the repertoire of eukaryotic Sm-containing RNPs and suggest new functions for snRNPs in mRNA metabolism. PMID:24393626

  5. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 regulates rhythmic synthesis of mouse Nfil3 protein via IRES-mediated translation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor, interleukin 3, regulated (Nfil3, also known as E4 Promoter-Binding Protein 4 (E4BP4)) protein is a transcription factor that binds to DNA and generally represses target gene expression. In the circadian clock system, Nfil3 binds to a D-box element residing in the promoter of clock genes and contributes to their robust oscillation. Here, we show that the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of Nfil3 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and that IRES-mediated translation occurs in a phase-dependent manner. We demonstrate that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) binds to a specific region of Nfil3 mRNA and regulates IRES-mediated translation. Knockdown of hnRNP A1 almost completely abolishes protein oscillation without affecting mRNA oscillation. Moreover, we observe that intracellular calcium levels, which are closely related to bone formation, depend on Nfil3 levels in osteoblast cell lines. We suggest that the 5′-UTR mediated cap-independent translation of Nfil3 mRNA contributes to the rhythmic expression of Nfil3 by interacting with the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1. These data provide new evidence that the posttranscriptional regulation of clock gene expression is important during bone metabolism. PMID:28220845

  6. Rapid isolation and single-molecule analysis of ribonucleoproteins from cell lysate by SNAP-SiMPull

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Margaret L.; Paulson, Joshua; Hoskins, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Large macromolecular complexes such as the spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) play a variety of roles within the cell. Despite their biological importance, biochemical studies of snRNPs and other machines are often thwarted by practical difficulties in the isolation of sufficient amounts of material. Studies of the snRNPs as well as other macromolecular machines would be greatly facilitated by new approaches that enable their isolation and biochemical characterization. One such approach is single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) that combines in situ immunopurification of complexes from cell lysates with subsequent single-molecule fluorescence microscopy experiments. We report the development of a new method, called SNAP-SiMPull, that can readily be applied to studies of splicing factors and snRNPs isolated from whole-cell lysates. SNAP-SiMPull overcomes many of the limitations imposed by conventional SiMPull strategies that rely on fluorescent proteins. We have used SNAP-SiMPull to study the yeast branchpoint bridging protein (BBP) as well as the U1 and U6 snRNPs. SNAP-SiMPull will likely find broad use for rapidly isolating complex cellular machines for single-molecule fluorescence colocalization experiments. PMID:25805862

  7. Recognition of subsets of the mammalian A/B-type core heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides by novel autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Dangli, A; Plomaritoglou, A; Boutou, E; Vassiliadou, N; Moutsopoulos, H M; Guialis, A

    1996-01-01

    The structurally related A/B-type core heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) polypeptides of 34-39 kDa (A1, A2, B1 and B2) belong to a family of RNA-binding proteins that are major components of 40 S hnRNP complexes. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mapping analysis we compared each member of the A/B-type core proteins in the human and rat liver cells. This comparison revealed the unique presence in rat cells of major protein species, referred to as mBx polypeptides, that appeared as three charge isoforms at a position corresponding to the minor HeLa B1b protein spot. In addition, clear differences in the ratios of the A1 polypeptide to the A1b isoform were observed. The detection, in sera of patients with rheumatic autoimmune diseases, of two novel autoantibody specificities, one recognizing solely B2 protein and the second both the B2 and mBx polypeptides, helped to identify mBx proteins as new A/B-type hnRNP components, immunologically related to B2 protein. A common immunoreactive V8 protease peptide of approx. 17 kDa has been identified in B2 and mBx hnRNP polypeptides. mBx protein species are identified in cells of murine origin, and have a ubiquitous tissue distribution and developmental appearance. PMID:9003360

  8. Status and ecological effects of the world's largest carnivores.

    PubMed

    Ripple, William J; Estes, James A; Beschta, Robert L; Wilmers, Christopher C; Ritchie, Euan G; Hebblewhite, Mark; Berger, Joel; Elmhagen, Bodil; Letnic, Mike; Nelson, Michael P; Schmitz, Oswald J; Smith, Douglas W; Wallach, Arian D; Wirsing, Aaron J

    2014-01-10

    Large carnivores face serious threats and are experiencing massive declines in their populations and geographic ranges around the world. We highlight how these threats have affected the conservation status and ecological functioning of the 31 largest mammalian carnivores on Earth. Consistent with theory, empirical studies increasingly show that large carnivores have substantial effects on the structure and function of diverse ecosystems. Significant cascading trophic interactions, mediated by their prey or sympatric mesopredators, arise when some of these carnivores are extirpated from or repatriated to ecosystems. Unexpected effects of trophic cascades on various taxa and processes include changes to bird, mammal, invertebrate, and herpetofauna abundance or richness; subsidies to scavengers; altered disease dynamics; carbon sequestration; modified stream morphology; and crop damage. Promoting tolerance and coexistence with large carnivores is a crucial societal challenge that will ultimately determine the fate of Earth's largest carnivores and all that depends upon them, including humans.

  9. Rare gas record in the largest Apollo 15 rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Lightner, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results obtained from mass-spectrometry analyses of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in a 182-mg chip of the largest Apollo 15 rock 15555 are presented. The spallation krypton data indicate a well-shielded location through most of the time during which the rock was exposed to cosmic rays. Gas retention ages are estimated. No evidence for the presence of products from plutonium-244 or iodine-129 was found.

  10. Blueprint of the world`s largest uranium markets

    SciTech Connect

    Bizal, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    This article is a review of two recently released reports: (1) the EURATOM Supply Agency Annual Report for 1995, and (2) the US Energy Information Administration Uranium Industry Annual for 1995. These reports provide myraid information on uranium production, deliveries, contracts, and prices, as well as enrichment market activity during 1995 in the world`s largest nuclear fuel markets: the European Union and the United States.

  11. World's largest TLP moves onto deepwater Norwegian location

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1992-05-04

    This paper reports that the world's largest and most sophisticated tension leg platform (TLP) was floated out to Snorre oil field in the Norwegian North Sea last month. The 78,000 ton unit built by Norwegian independent, Sega Petroleum AS, Oslo, was installed in the southern part of block 34/7 and should produce first oil in August, about a month ahead of schedule.

  12. Footprinting analysis of interactions between the largest eukaryotic RNase P/MRP protein Pop1 and RNase P/MRP RNA components.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Robert D; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2015-09-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related catalytic ribonucleoproteins involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules, including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. The catalytic RNA component of eukaryotic RNase P retains the core elements of the bacterial RNase P ribozyme; however, the peripheral RNA elements responsible for the stabilization of the global architecture are largely absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. At the same time, the protein makeup of eukaryotic RNase P is considerably more complex than that of the bacterial RNase P. RNase MRP, an essential and ubiquitous eukaryotic enzyme, has a structural organization resembling that of eukaryotic RNase P, and the two enzymes share most of their protein components. Here, we present the results of the analysis of interactions between the largest protein component of yeast RNases P/MRP, Pop1, and the RNA moieties of the enzymes, discuss structural implications of the results, and suggest that Pop1 plays the role of a scaffold for the stabilization of the global architecture of eukaryotic RNase P RNA, substituting for the network of RNA-RNA tertiary interactions that maintain the global RNA structure in bacterial RNase P.

  13. Footprinting analysis of interactions between the largest eukaryotic RNase P/MRP protein Pop1 and RNase P/MRP RNA components

    PubMed Central

    Fagerlund, Robert D.; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related catalytic ribonucleoproteins involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules, including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. The catalytic RNA component of eukaryotic RNase P retains the core elements of the bacterial RNase P ribozyme; however, the peripheral RNA elements responsible for the stabilization of the global architecture are largely absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. At the same time, the protein makeup of eukaryotic RNase P is considerably more complex than that of the bacterial RNase P. RNase MRP, an essential and ubiquitous eukaryotic enzyme, has a structural organization resembling that of eukaryotic RNase P, and the two enzymes share most of their protein components. Here, we present the results of the analysis of interactions between the largest protein component of yeast RNases P/MRP, Pop1, and the RNA moieties of the enzymes, discuss structural implications of the results, and suggest that Pop1 plays the role of a scaffold for the stabilization of the global architecture of eukaryotic RNase P RNA, substituting for the network of RNA–RNA tertiary interactions that maintain the global RNA structure in bacterial RNase P. PMID:26135751

  14. What Is the Largest Einstein Radius in the Universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Blandford, Roger D.

    2008-08-05

    The Einstein radius plays a central role in lens studies as it characterizes the strength of gravitational lensing. In particular, the distribution of Einstein radii near the upper cutoff should probe the probability distribution of the largest mass concentrations in the universe. Adopting a triaxial halo model, we compute expected distributions of large Einstein radii. To assess the cosmic variance, we generate a number of Monte-Carlo realizations of all-sky catalogues of massive clusters. We find that the expected largest Einstein radius in the universe is sensitive to parameters characterizing the cosmological model, especially {sigma}{sub s}: for a source redshift of unity, they are 42{sub -7}{sup +9}, 35{sub -6}{sup +8}, and 54{sub -7}{sup +12} arcseconds (errors denote 1{sigma} cosmic variance), assuming best-fit cosmological parameters of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year (WMAP5), three-year (WMAP3) and one-year (WMAP1) data, respectively. These values are broadly consistent with current observations given their incompleteness. The mass of the largest lens cluster can be as small as {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub {circle_dot}}. For the same source redshift, we expect in all-sky {approx} 35 (WMAP5), {approx} 15 (WMAP3), and {approx} 150 (WMAP1) clusters that have Einstein radii larger than 2000. For a larger source redshift of 7, the largest Einstein radii grow approximately twice as large. While the values of the largest Einstein radii are almost unaffected by the level of the primordial non-Gaussianity currently of interest, the measurement of the abundance of moderately large lens clusters should probe non-Gaussianity competitively with cosmic microwave background experiments, but only if other cosmological parameters are well-measured. These semi-analytic predictions are based on a rather simple representation of clusters, and hence calibrating them with N-body simulations will help to improve the accuracy. We also find that these 'superlens

  15. Isolation and characterization of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA-ribonucleoprotein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y.D.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure of cells to UV light of sufficient intensity brings about crosslinking of RNA to proteins which are in direct contact with it in vivo. The major (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins which become crosslinked to poly(A)/sup +/hnRNA in HeLa cells are of 120K, 68K, 53K, 43K, 41K, 38K, and 36K (K = kilodaltons). By immunizing mice with UV crosslinked complexes two monoclonal antibodies (2B12 and 4F4) against the C proteins (41K and 43K) and one (3G6) against the 120K protein of the hnRNP complex were obtained. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates that the C proteins and 120K are segregated to the nucleus and are not associated with nucleoli or chromatin. The two C proteins are highly related to each other antigenically. Monoclonal antibody 4F4 identifies the C proteins of the hnRNP complex in widely divergent species from human to lizard. The C proteins are phosphorylated and are in contact with hnRNA in vivo. The hnRNP complex was isolated from vertebrate cell nuclei by immunoprecipitation with these monoclonal antibodies. This complex contains proteins and hnRNA of up to approx.10 kb. The major steady state labeled (/sup 35/S)methionine labeled proteins of the isolated complex from HeLa cells are of 34K, 36K, 36K (A1 and A2), 37K, 38K (B1 and B2), 41K, 43K (C1 and C2) and doublets at 68K and at 120K. These proteins are organized into a 30S particle. Large hnRNP complexes are composed of multiples of 30S particles which are connected by highly nuclease sensitive stretches of hnRNA. It it concluded that the hnRNP structure is an integral component of the mRNA formation pathway in the eukaryotic cell.

  16. Factors involved in the generation and replication of rhabdovirus defective T particles.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J J; Villarreal, L P; Breindl, M

    1976-01-01

    Previous indications that cloned B virions might be genetically predisposed to generate a particular defective T particle are shown to be inaccurate. T particle generation was found to be a much more random process than was previously believed. We show that the previously observed generation of particular sizes of T particles by B virion pools is due to the random generation of T particles during preparation of first-passage pools of cloned B virions, and these breed true during the additional passages needed to produce visible quantities of T particles. It is also shown that different host cell lines selectively amplify different T particles, suggesting a strong role of host cell factors in T particle replication. Surprisingly, our line of HeLa cells did not generate or replicate detectable T particles of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) Indiana after either serial undiluted passage or direct addition of T particles, even though the added T particles strongly interfered with B virion replication. In contrast to VSV, rabies virus generates large amounts of T particles during the first passage of cloned B virions, and every rabies-infected baby hamster kidney-21 cell culture evolves into a persistent carrier state. We find that T particle RNA is biologically inactive although T particle nucleocapsid ribonucleoprotein replicates and interferes in cells coinfected with B virions. Efforts to study the mechanism of T particle generation by in vitro attempts to generate T particles or modify their size (using sheared ribonucleoprotein or chemical or UV mutagenesis) were unsuccessful. The kinetics of UV and nitrous acid inactivation of T particles indicate a smaller target size relative to B virions, even after correcting for lengths of RNA molecules. The intercalating dye proflavine does not photosensitize VSV B virions or T particles when present during replication, indicating that there is little or no RNA base pairing in the helical nucleocapsids of either. PMID

  17. Longevity in Calumma parsonii, the World's largest chameleon.

    PubMed

    Tessa, Giulia; Glaw, Frank; Andreone, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Large body size of ectothermic species can be correlated with high life expectancy. We assessed the longevity of the World's largest chameleon, the Parson's chameleon Calumma parsonii from Madagascar by using skeletochronology of phalanges taken from preserved specimens held in European natural history museums. Due to the high bone resorption we can provide only the minimum age of each specimen. The highest minimum age detected was nine years for a male and eight years for a female, confirming that this species is considerably long living among chameleons. Our data also show a strong correlation between snout-vent length and estimated age.

  18. JET, the largest tokamak on the eve of DT operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, L. D.

    2016-11-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) is the world's largest operating tokamak and the only such machine capable of operating with the fuel mixture (deuterium-tritium) foreseen for a fusion reactor. Since it came into operation in 1983, JET has explored fusion plasmas "in conditions and dimensions approaching those of a fusion reactor" [1]. JET has demonstrated world-record levels of fusion power and energy production, in conditions where the ratio of the fusion power generated to the input power to the plasma, Q, approaches unity.

  19. Largest separable balls around the maximally mixed bipartite quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Barnum, Howard

    2002-12-01

    For finite-dimensional bipartite quantum systems, we find the exact size of the largest balls, in spectral lp norms for 1<=p<=∞, of separable (unentangled) matrices around the identity matrix. This implies a simple and intuitively meaningful geometrical sufficient condition for separability of bipartite density matrices: that their purity tr ρ2 not be too large. Theoretical and experimental applications of these results include algorithmic problems such as computing whether or not a state is entangled, and practical ones such as obtaining information about the existence or nature of entanglement in states reached by nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computation implementations or other experimental situations.

  20. The Largest Fragment of a Homogeneous Fragmentation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyprianou, Andreas; Lane, Francis; Mörters, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show that in homogeneous fragmentation processes the largest fragment at time t has size e^{-t Φ '(overline{p})}t^{-3/2 (log Φ )'(overline{p})+o(1)}, where Φ is the Lévy exponent of the fragmentation process, and overline{p} is the unique solution of the equation (log Φ )'(bar{p})=1/1+bar{p}. We argue that this result is in line with predictions arising from the classification of homogeneous fragmentation processes as logarithmically correlated random fields.

  1. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  2. Alterations in polyribosome and messenger ribonucleic acid metabolism and messenger ribonucleoprotein utilization in osmotically stressed plant seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Polyribosome aggregation state in growing tissues of barley and wheat leaf of stems of pea and squash was studied in relation to seedling growth and water status of the growing tissue in plants at various levels of osmotic stress. It was found to be highly correlated with water potential and osmotic potential of the growing tissue and with leaf of stem elongation rate. Stress rapidly reduced polyribosome content and water status in growing tissues of barley leaves; changes were slow and slight in the non-growing leaf blade. Membrane-bound and free polyribosomes were equally sensitive to stress-induced disaggregation. Incorporation of /sup 32/PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ into ribosomal RNA was rapidly inhibited by stress, but stability of poly(A)/sup +/RNA relative to ribosomal RNA was similar in stressed and unstressed tissues, with a half-life of about 12 hours. Stress also caused progressive loss of poly(A)/sup +/RNA from these tissues. Quantitation of poly(A) and in vitro messenger template activity in polysome gradient fractions showed a shift of activity from the polysomal region to the region of 20-60 S in stressed plants. Messenger RNA in the 20-60 S region coded for the same peptides as mRNA found in the polysomal fraction. Nonpolysomal and polysome-derived messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes (mRNP) were isolated, and characteristic proteins were found associated with either fraction. Polysomal mRNP from stressed or unstressed plants were translated with similar efficiency in a wheat germ cell-free system. It was concluded that no translational inhibitory activity was associated with nonpolysomal mRNP from barley prepared as described.

  3. Endothelial cell-binding activity of anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein antibodies in patients with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okawa-Takatsuji, M; Aotsuka, S; Uwatoko, S; Takaono, M; Iwasaki, K; Kinoshita, M; Sumiya, M

    2001-01-01

    In order to elucidate the immunological properties of anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) antibody, one of the autoantibodies detected in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTDs), we tested the endothelial cell-binding by anti-U1-RNP antibodies and epitopes on human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to which the autoantibody bound. IgG fractions positive for anti-U1-RNP from patients with CTDs bound to the HPAECs. Furthermore, intact and F(ab′)2 IgG anti-U1-RNP purified by affinity chromatography also bound to endothelial cells. The binding activity of IgG fractions positive for anti-U1-RNP to the endothelial cells could be effectively absorbed by U1-RNP-Sepharose. An immunoblotting assay of purified IgG anti-U1-RNP antibodies showed that these antibodies could bind to various membrane proteins of NP40-treated HPAECs such as 68, 48, 43, 38, 33, 29, 28 and 24 kDa. Some bands, 68, 33, 28 and 24 kDa, seemed to correspond to components of U1-RNP, i.e. 68 kDa, A, B′ and C peptides, respectively. We confirmed that the anti-U1-RNP antibody from patients with CTDs can directly recognize a variety of antigens on the endothelial surface of the pulmonary artery, including the components of U1-RNP or other unknown polypeptides. These results suggest that binding to pulmonary artery endothelial cells of this autoantibody may be one of the triggers of endothelial cell inflammation in CTDs. PMID:11703381

  4. A novel SDS-stable dimer of a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein at presynaptic terminals of squid neurons.

    PubMed

    Lico, D T P; Lopes, G S; Brusco, J; Rosa, J C; Gould, R M; De Giorgis, J A; Larson, R E

    2015-08-06

    The presence of mRNAs in synaptic terminals and their regulated translation are important factors in neuronal communication and plasticity. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complexes are involved in the translocation, stability, and subcellular localization of mRNA and the regulation of its translation. Defects in these processes and mutations in components of the hnRNP complexes have been related to the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite much data on mRNA localization and evidence for protein synthesis, as well as the presence of translation machinery, in axons and presynaptic terminals, the identity of RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA transport and function in presynaptic regions is lacking. We previously characterized a strongly basic RNA-binding protein (p65), member of the hnRNPA/B subfamily, in squid presynaptic terminals. Intriguingly, in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), p65 migrated as a 65-kDa protein, whereas members of the hnRNPA/B family typically have molecular masses ranging from 35 to 42kDa. In this report we present further biochemical and molecular characterization that shows endogenous p65 to be an SDS-stable dimer composed of ∼37-kDa hnRNPA/B-like subunits. We cloned and expressed a recombinant protein corresponding to squid hnRNPA/B-like protein and showed its propensity to aggregate and form SDS-stable dimers in vitro. Our data suggest that this unique hnRNPA/B-like protein co-localizes with synaptic vesicle protein 2 and RNA-binding protein ELAV and thus may serve as a link between local mRNA processing and presynaptic function and regulation.

  5. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui; Kurimoto, Akiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  6. Genetic analysis of the structure and function of 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) in cells.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Koh; Luo, Zeping; Peterlin, B Matija

    2014-07-25

    The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), comprised of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and cyclins T1 (CycT1) or T2 (CycT2), activates eukaryotic transcription elongation. In growing cells, P-TEFb exists in active and inactive forms. In the latter, it is incorporated into the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, which contains hexamethylene bisacetamide-induced proteins (HEXIM) 1 or 2, La-related protein 7 (LaRP7), methyl phosphate capping enzyme, and 7SK small nuclear RNA (7SK). HEXIM1 inhibits the kinase activity of CDK9 via interactions between 7SK, HEXIM1, and CycT1. LaRP7 and methyl phosphate capping enzyme interact with 7SK independently of HEXIM1 and P-TEFb. To analyze genetic interactions between HEXIM1 and/or LaRP7 and 7SK using a cell-based system, we established artificial heterologous RNA tethering assays in which reporter gene expression depended on interactions between selected regions of 7SK and its cognate binding partners fused to a strong activator. This system enabled us to map the HEXIM1- and LaRP7- binding regions of 7SK. Assays with various mutant 7SK plasmid targets revealed that the 5'U-Ubulge and central loop of stem-loop I or RNA motif 3 of 7SK are required for transactivation, suggesting that HEXIM1 and CycT1 form a combinatorial binding surface for 7SK. Moreover, a region in HEXIM1 C-terminal to its previously mapped RNA-binding motif was also required for interactions between HEXIM1 and 7SK. Finally, a tyrosine-to-alanine mutation in HEXIM1, which is critical for its inhibitory effect on CDK9, changed HEXIM1 into an activator. These cell-based assays elucidate this important aspect of transcription elongation in vivo.

  7. Ribonucleoprotein assembly defects correlate with spinal muscular atrophy severity and preferentially affect a subset of spliceosomal snRNPs.

    PubMed

    Gabanella, Francesca; Butchbach, Matthew E R; Saieva, Luciano; Carissimi, Claudia; Burghes, Arthur H M; Pellizzoni, Livio

    2007-09-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by reduced levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMN together with Gemins2-8 and unrip proteins form a macromolecular complex that functions in the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) of both the major and the minor splicing pathways. It is not known whether the levels of spliceosomal snRNPs are decreased in SMA. Here we analyzed the consequence of SMN deficiency on snRNP metabolism in the spinal cord of mouse models of SMA with differing phenotypic severities. We demonstrate that the expression of a subset of Gemin proteins and snRNP assembly activity are dramatically reduced in the spinal cord of severe SMA mice. Comparative analysis of different tissues highlights a similar decrease in SMN levels and a strong impairment of snRNP assembly in tissues of severe SMA mice, although the defect appears smaller in kidney than in neural tissue. We further show that the extent of reduction in both Gemin proteins expression and snRNP assembly activity in the spinal cord of SMA mice correlates with disease severity. Remarkably, defective SMN complex function in snRNP assembly causes a significant decrease in the levels of a subset of snRNPs and preferentially affects the accumulation of U11 snRNP--a component of the minor spliceosome--in tissues of severe SMA mice. Thus, impairment of a ubiquitous function of SMN changes the snRNP profile of SMA tissues by unevenly altering the normal proportion of endogenous snRNPs. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that SMN deficiency affects the splicing machinery and in particular the minor splicing pathway of a rare class of introns in SMA.

  8. Testing a Parachute for Mars in World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    In this image, two engineers are dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

    The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

    The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  9. Orion: The Largest Infrared Hybrid Focal Plane in Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Albert M.; Merrill, Michael; Ball, William J.; Henden, Arne A.; Vrba, Frederick J.; McCreight, Craig R.

    2003-03-01

    Orion is a program to develop a 2048x2048 infrared focal plane using InSb PV detectors. It is the natural follow-on to the successful Aladdin 1024x1024 program, which was the largest IR focal plane of the 90's. Although the pixels are somewhat smaller than Aladdin, the overall focal plane is over 50mm in size and for the present is the largest IR focal plane of the 21st century. The work is being done by Raytheon Infrared Operations (RIO but better known as SBRC) by many of the same people who created the Aladdin focal plane. The design is very similar to the successful Aladdin design with the addition of reference pixels to lower noise and drift effects in long integrations. So far we have made five focal plane modules with hybridized InSb detectors. In this paper we will discuss the unique design features of this device as well as present test data taken from these devices.

  10. Fishing down the largest coral reef fish species.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Douglas

    2014-07-15

    Studies on remote, uninhabited, near-pristine reefs have revealed surprisingly large populations of large reef fish. Locations such as the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, northern Marianas Islands, Line Islands, U.S. remote Pacific Islands, Cocos-Keeling Atoll and Chagos archipelago have much higher reef fish biomass than islands and reefs near people. Much of the high biomass of most remote reef fish communities lies in the largest species, such as sharks, bumphead parrots, giant trevally, and humphead wrasse. Some, such as sharks and giant trevally, are apex predators, but others such as bumphead parrots and humphead wrasse, are not. At many locations, decreases in large reef fish species have been attributed to fishing. Fishing is well known to remove the largest fish first, and a quantitative measure of vulnerability to fishing indicates that large reef fish species are much more vulnerable to fishing than small fish. The removal of large reef fish by fishing parallels the extinction of terrestrial megafauna by early humans. However large reef fish have great value for various ecological roles and for reef tourism.

  11. Earth's Largest Meteorite Impact Craters discovered in South America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellndorfer, J. M.; Schmidt-Falkenberg, H.

    2014-12-01

    Novel analysis of high resolution InSAR-based digital elevation data from the year 2001 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission combined with a recently produced dataset of pan-tropical vegetation height from ALOS-1 SAR and IceSAT/GLAS Lidar estimates led to the quasi-bald-Earth discovery of four sizable near-perfect circle arcs in South America under dense tropical forests ranging in length from 216 km to 441 km. Terrain elevation profiles of cross-sections across the arcs show a distinct vertical rising and falling in elevations of hundreds of meters over a horizontal distance of tens of kilometers. It is hypothesized that these sizable arcs and associated rim-like topographic terrain features are remnants of huge meteorite impact craters with diameters ranging from 770 km to 1,310 km, thus forming potentially the largest known impact carter structures discovered on Earth today. The potential impact crater rim structures are located north of the eastern Amazon River, in the coastal region of Recife and Natal, and in the Brazilian, Bolivian and Paraguayan border region encompassing the Pantanal. Elevation profiles, hillshades and gray-shaded elevation maps were produced to support the geomorphologic analysis. It is also speculated whether in three of the four potential impact craters, central uplift domes or peaks, which are typical for complex impact crater structures can be identified. The worlds largest iron ore mining area of Carajás in Para, Brazil, falls exactly in the center of the largest hypothesized circular impact crater showing topographic elevations similar to the rim structure discovered 655 km to the north-north-west. Based on the topographic/geomorphologic driven hypothesis, geologic exploration of these topographic features is needed to test whether indeed meteorite impact craters could be verified, what the more exact ellipsoidal shapes of the potential impact craters might be, and to determine when during geologic times the impacts would have taken

  12. 1. Photocopy of undated wash drawing. The largest building is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of undated wash drawing. The largest building is the Hotel Williams. Next to it is the Williams House (Williams Hotel Annex), HABS No. MI-258 A. Below them are the log cabins built by the American Fur Company (from left to right): Log Building No. 1 (MI-258 C), Log Building No. 2 (MI-258 D), Log Building No. 3 (not documented), Log Building No. 4 (MI-258 E), and Log Building No. 5 (MI-258 F). (Williams Log House, MI-258 B, and Log Building No. 8, MI-258 G, are not shown). The drawing is in the collection of the Michigan Historical Commission. Although it does not have a date, it was painted in the early 20th century after the main building was constructed. - Hotel Williams, Murray Bay, Munising, Alger County, MI

  13. The depths of the largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Ford, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    The largest impact craters on Venus may be used as evidence of various geological processes within the Venusian crust. We are continuing to construct a data base for the further investigation of large craters on Venus (LCV). We hope to find evidence of crater relaxation that might constrain the thickness and thermal gradient of the crust, as was proposed in an earlier work. The current work concentrates on 27 impact craters with diameters (d) larger than 70 km, i.e., large enough that the footprint of the Magellan altimeter has a good chance of sampling the true crater bottom. All altimeter echoes from points located within (d/2)+70 km from the crater center have been inspected.

  14. Giant fibroepithelial stromal polyp of the vulva: largest case reported

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibroepithelial stromal polyps are site-specific mesenchymal lesions that are commonly found in the vulvovaginal region in premenopausal females. These polyps usually are less than 5 cm in diameter and are most commonly identified during routine gynecological examination. Although the stromal polyp is benign, its differential diagnosis includes some malignant vulva lesions making it critical to ensure that an accurate pathologic diagnosis is made. Case We present a case of a 21 year old female with a giant fibroepithelial stromal polyp of the vulva. Upon review of the literature this is the largest reported fibroepithelial stromal polyp to date. Conclusion Fibroepithelial stromal polyps can grow as large as 390 grams and can be 18.5-cm in diameter. Microscopic evaluation of the polyp is critical in the exclusion of malignancy with this diagnosis. PMID:23842282

  15. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene at the World's Largest Mass Gathering.

    PubMed

    Vortmann, Michael; Balsari, Satchit; Holman, Susan R; Greenough, P Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The 2013 Kumbh Mela, a Hindu religious festival and the largest human gathering on earth, drew an estimated 120 million pilgrims to bathe at the holy confluence of the Ganga (Ganges) and Yamuna rivers. To accommodate the massive numbers, the Indian government constructed a temporary city on the flood plains of the two rivers and provided it with roads, electricity, water and sanitation facilities, police stations, and a tiered healthcare system. This phenomenal operation and its impacts have gone largely undocumented. To address this gap, the authors undertook an evaluation and systematic monitoring initiative to study preparedness and response to public health emergencies at the event. This paper describes the water, sanitation, and hygiene components, with particular emphasis on preventive and mitigation strategies; the capacity for surveillance and response to diarrheal disease outbreaks; and the implications of lessons learned for other mass gatherings.

  16. Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, William J.; Newsome, Thomas M.; Wolf, Christopher; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Everatt, Kristoffer T.; Galetti, Mauro; Hayward, Matt W.; Kerley, Graham I. H.; Levi, Taal; Lindsey, Peter A.; Macdonald, David W.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Painter, Luke E.; Sandom, Christopher J.; Terborgh, John; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2015-01-01

    Large wild herbivores are crucial to ecosystems and human societies. We highlight the 74 largest terrestrial herbivore species on Earth (body mass ≥100 kg), the threats they face, their important and often overlooked ecosystem effects, and the conservation efforts needed to save them and their predators from extinction. Large herbivores are generally facing dramatic population declines and range contractions, such that ~60% are threatened with extinction. Nearly all threatened species are in developing countries, where major threats include hunting, land-use change, and resource depression by livestock. Loss of large herbivores can have cascading effects on other species including large carnivores, scavengers, mesoherbivores, small mammals, and ecological processes involving vegetation, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and fire regimes. The rate of large herbivore decline suggests that ever-larger swaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs. PMID:26601172

  17. The 260: The Largest Solid Rocket Motor Ever Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimmins, P.; Cousineau, M.; Rogers, C.; Shell, V.

    1999-01-01

    Aerojet in the mid 1960s, under contract to NASA, built and static hot fire tested the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) in history for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of utilizing large SRMs for space exploration. This program successfully fabricated two high strength steel chambers, loaded each with approximately 1,68 million pounds of propellant, and static test fired these giants with their nozzles up from an underground silo located adjacent to the Florida everglades. Maximum thrust and total impulse in excess of 5,000,000 lbf and 3,470,000,000 lbf-sec were achieved. Flames from the second firing, conducted at night, were seen over eighty miles away. For comparative purposes: the thrust developed was nearly 100 times that of a Minuteman III second stage and the 260 in.-dia cross-section was over 3 times that of the Space Shuttle SRM.

  18. Correlates of species richness in the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Voyer, A; Padial, J M; Castroviejo-Fisher, S; De La Riva, I; Vilà, C

    2011-01-01

    Although tropical environments are often considered biodiversity hotspots, it is precisely in such environments where least is known about the factors that drive species richness. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative analyses to study correlates of species richness for the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation: New World direct-developing frogs. Clade-age and species richness were nonsignficantly, negatively correlated, suggesting that clade age alone does not explain among-clade variation in species richness. A combination of ecological and morphological traits explained 65% of the variance in species richness. A more vascularized ventral skin, the ability to colonize high-altitude ranges, encompassing a large variety of vegetation types, correlated significantly with species richness, whereas larger body size was marginally correlated with species richness. Hence, whereas high-altitude ranges play a role in shaping clade diversity in the Neotropics, intrinsic factors, such as skin structures and possibly body size, might ultimately determine which clades are more speciose than others. PMID:21401771

  19. Opportunities for biodiversity gains under the world's largest reforestation programme

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Fangyuan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xinlei; Fisher, Brendan; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Jianguo; Tang, Ya; Yu, Douglas W.; Wilcove, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Reforestation is a critical means of addressing the environmental and social problems of deforestation. China's Grain-for-Green Program (GFGP) is the world's largest reforestation scheme. Here we provide the first nationwide assessment of the tree composition of GFGP forests and the first combined ecological and economic study aimed at understanding GFGP's biodiversity implications. Across China, GFGP forests are overwhelmingly monocultures or compositionally simple mixed forests. Focusing on birds and bees in Sichuan Province, we find that GFGP reforestation results in modest gains (via mixed forest) and losses (via monocultures) of bird diversity, along with major losses of bee diversity. Moreover, all current modes of GFGP reforestation fall short of restoring biodiversity to levels approximating native forests. However, even within existing modes of reforestation, GFGP can achieve greater biodiversity gains by promoting mixed forests over monocultures; doing so is unlikely to entail major opportunity costs or pose unforeseen economic risks to households. PMID:27598524

  20. Supergranulation as the Sun's largest buoyantly driven mode of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Solar supergranulation has been characterized as horizontally divergent flow motions having a typical scale of 32 Mm using Doppler imaging, granule tracking and helioseismology. Unlike granules, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale height at the photosphere, supergranules do not appear to correspond to any particular length scale of the flow. Possible explanations ranging from convection theories involving Helium ionization to spatial correlation or self-organization of granular flows have been proposed as physical mechanisms to explain solar supergranulation. However, its existence remains largely a mystery. Remarkably, horizontal velocity power spectra obtained from Doppler imaging and correlation tracking of flow features at the solar surface reveal the presence of peaks corresponding to granular and supergranular scales, followed by a monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation, which suggests that large-scale modes in the deep layers of the convection zone may be suppressed. Using 3D anelastic simulations of solar convection we investigate whether supergranulation may reflect the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection inside the Sun. Results show that the amount of kinetic energy contained in the largest flow scales relative to that associated with supergranular motions is a function of the depth of the transition from a convectively unstable to convectively stable mean stratification inside the simulation. This suggests that the observed monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation may be explained by rapid cooling in the subphotospheric layers and an essentially isentropic solar interior, wherein convective driving is effectively suppressed.

  1. Scaling laws for the largest Lyapunov exponent in long-range systems: A random matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Anteneodo, Celia; Vallejos, Raúl O

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the laws that rule the behavior of the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) in many particle systems with long-range interactions. We consider as a representative system the so-called Hamiltonian alpha-XY model where the adjustable parameter alpha controls the range of the interactions of N ferromagnetic spins in a lattice of dimension d. In previous work the dependence of the LLE with the system size N, for sufficiently high energies, was established through numerical simulations. In the thermodynamic limit, the LLE becomes constant for alpha>d whereas it decays as an inverse power law of N for alpha

  2. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  3. Largest Aftershocks of Megathrust Earthquakes in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, J.; Tsuzuki, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake of Mw9.0 induced the earthquake activity in high level all over Japan. It included not only earthquakes near active faults but also volcanic earthquakes. Although we have observed tens of thousands of aftershocks, yet we do not know which is the largest aftershock of the 2011 megathrust. There occurred several megathrust earthquakes worldwide in the last one hundred years, which are almost the same size or larger than the 2011 megathrust. We have studied their largest aftershocks based on our new hypothesis of along-dip double segmentation (ADDS) and along-strike single segmentation (ASSS). ADDS in the Tohoku-oki region along the Japan trench is characterized by the apparent absence of earthquakes in the trench-ward segments as opposed to the Japan Island-ward segments that have repeated small earthquakes of up to Mw8 class. In contrast, the 1960 Chile and the 2010 Maule megathrusts are characterized by ASSS with the weak seismic activity before the main event everywhere in the subduction zone. The difference between these two types of seismic segmentations would be that strongly coupled areas of trench-ward segments give rise to ADDS, whereas almost 100% coupled areas of shallow-parts of subduction zones give rise to ASSS. In other words, the phenomenon of a seismic gap can be identified for an ASSS megathrust, where as a doughnut pattern of seismic activity appears prior to a main ADDS event. In summary, most of the largest aftershocks of ADDS megathrusts are earthquakes of outer-rise(outer trench-slope) normal faultings, where there occur two types, dip-slip and strike-slip, depending on the structure of subducting oceanic plates. The 1933 Sanriku-oki Mw8.6 (the 1896 Meiji-Sanriku M~8.5) and the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw7.7 (the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw9.0) are the former and the 1987 Off Alaska Mw7.8 (the 1964 Alaska Mw9.2) and the 2012 Sumatra Mw8.6 (the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Mw9.3) are the latter. Those of ASSS megathrusts occurred

  4. Spectral properties of the largest asteroids associated with Taurid Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M.; Birlan, M.; Nedelcu, D. A.; Vaubaillon, J.; Cristescu, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The Taurid Complex is a massive stream of material in the inner part of the Solar System. It contains objects spanning the range of 10-6-103 m, considered by some authors to have a common cometary origin. The asteroids belonging to Taurid Complex are on Apollo type orbit, with most of them being flagged as potentially hazardous asteroids. In this context, understanding the nature and the origin of this asteroidal population is not only of scientific interest but also of practical importance. Aims: We aim to investigate the surface mineralogy of the asteroids associated with Taurid Complex using visible and near-infrared spectral data. Compositional linking between these asteroids and meteorites can be derived based on the obtained spectra. Methods: We obtained spectra of six of the largest asteroids (2201, 4183, 4486, 5143, 6063, and 269690) associated with Taurid complex. The observations were made with the IRTF telescope equipped with the spectro-imager SpeX. Their taxonomic classification is made using Bus-DeMeo taxonomy. The asteroid spectra are compared with the meteorite spectra from the Relab database. Mineralogical models were applied to determine their surface composition. All the spectral analysis is made in the context of the already published physical data. Results: Five of the objects studied in this paper present spectral characteristics similar to the S taxonomic complex. The spectra of ordinary chondrites (spanning H, L, and LL subtypes) are the best matches for these asteroid spectra. The asteroid (269690) 1996 RG3 presents a flat featureless spectrum which could be associated to a primitive C-type object. The increased reflectance above 2.1 microns constrains its geometrical albedo to a value around 0.03. Conclusions: While there is an important dynamical grouping among the Taurid Complex asteroids, the spectral data of the largest objects do not support a common cometary origin. Furthermore, there are significant variations between the

  5. A second CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal in the influenza A virus NS2 protein contributes to the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengping; Chen, Jingjing; Chen, Quanjiao; Wang, Huadong; Yao, Yanfeng; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus NS2 protein, also called nuclear export protein (NEP), is crucial for the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins. However, the molecular mechanisms of NEP mediation in this process remain incompletely understood. A leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES2) in NEP, located at the predicted N2 helix of the N-terminal domain, was identified in the present study. NES2 was demonstrated to be a transferable NES, with its nuclear export activity depending on the nuclear export receptor chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-mediated pathway. The interaction between NEP and CRM1 is coordinately regulated by both the previously reported NES (NES1) and now the new NES2. Deletion of the NES1 enhances the interaction between NEP and CRM1, and deletion of the NES1 and NES2 motifs completely abolishes this interaction. Moreover, NES2 interacts with CRM1 in the mammalian two-hybrid system. Mutant viruses containing NES2 alterations generated by reversed genetics exhibit reduced viral growth and delay in the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). The NES2 motif is highly conserved in the influenza A and B viruses. The results demonstrate that leucine-rich NES2 is involved in the nuclear export of vRNPs and contributes to the understanding of nucleocytoplasmic transport of influenza virus vRNPs.

  6. Mechanistic and Structural Studies of Protein-Only RNase P Compared to Ribonucleoproteins Reveal the Two Faces of the Same Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schelcher, Cédric; Sauter, Claude; Giegé, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    RNase P, the essential activity that performs the 5′ maturation of tRNA precursors, can be achieved either by ribonucleoproteins containing a ribozyme present in the three domains of life or by protein-only enzymes called protein-only RNase P (PRORP) that occur in eukaryote nuclei and organelles. A fast growing list of studies has investigated three-dimensional structures and mode of action of PRORP proteins. Results suggest that similar to ribozymes, PRORP proteins have two main domains. A clear functional analogy can be drawn between the specificity domain of the RNase P ribozyme and PRORP pentatricopeptide repeat domain, and between the ribozyme catalytic domain and PRORP N4BP1, YacP-like Nuclease domain. Moreover, both types of enzymes appear to dock with the acceptor arm of tRNA precursors and make specific contacts with the corner of pre-tRNAs. While some clear differences can still be delineated between PRORP and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) RNase P, the two types of enzymes seem to use, fundamentally, the same catalytic mechanism involving two metal ions. The occurrence of PRORP and RNP RNase P represents a remarkable example of convergent evolution. It might be the unique witness of an ongoing replacement of catalytic RNAs by proteins for enzymatic activities. PMID:27348014

  7. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F

    2011-11-22

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century.

  8. Elephants have relatively the largest cerebellum size of mammals.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Busisiwe C; Spocter, Muhammad A; Haagensen, Mark; Manger, Paul R

    2012-04-01

    The current study used MR imaging to determine the volume of the cerebellum and its component parts in the brain of three adult male African elephants (Loxodonta africana) and compared this with published data from Asian elephants and other mammalian species including odontocete cetaceans, primates, chiropterans, insectivores, carnivores, and artiodactyls. The cerebellum of the adult elephant has a volume of ∼925 mL (average of both African and Asian species). Allometric analysis indicates that the elephant has the largest relative cerebellum size of all mammals studied to date. In addition, both odontocete cetaceans and microchiropterans appear to have large relative cerebellar sizes. The vermal and hemispheric components of the African elephant cerebellum are both large relative to other mammals of similar brain size, however, for odontocete cetaceans the vermal component is small and the hemispheric component is large. These volumetric observations are related to life-histories and anatomies of the species investigated. The current study provides context for one aspect of the elephant brain in the broader picture of mammalian brain evolution.

  9. Benchmark Testing of the Largest Titanium Aluminide Sheet Subelement Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Krause, David L.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate wrought titanium aluminide (gamma TiAl) as a viable candidate material for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) exhaust nozzle, an international team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field successfully fabricated and tested the largest gamma TiAl sheet structure ever manufactured. The gamma TiAl sheet structure, a 56-percent subscale divergent flap subelement, was fabricated for benchmark testing in three-point bending. Overall, the subelement was 84-cm (33-in.) long by 13-cm (5-in.) wide by 8-cm (3-in.) deep. Incorporated into the subelement were features that might be used in the fabrication of a full-scale divergent flap. These features include the use of: (1) gamma TiAl shear clips to join together sections of corrugations, (2) multiple gamma TiAl face sheets, (3) double hot-formed gamma TiAl corrugations, and (4) brazed joints. The structural integrity of the gamma TiAl sheet subelement was evaluated by conducting a room-temperature three-point static bend test.

  10. Largest US oil and gas fields, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-06

    The Largest US Oil and Gas Fields is a technical report and part of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) series presenting distributions of US crude oil and natural gas resources, developed using field-level data collected by EIA`s annual survey of oil and gas proved reserves. The series` objective is to provide useful information beyond that routinely presented in the EIA annual report on crude oil and natural gas reserves. These special reports also will provide oil and gas resource analysts with a fuller understanding of the nature of US crude oil and natural gas occurrence, both at the macro level and with respect to the specific subjects addressed. The series` approach is to integrate EIA`s crude oil and natural gas survey data with related data obtained from other authoritative sources, and then to present illustrations and analyses of interest to a broad spectrum of energy information users ranging from the general public to oil and gas industry personnel.

  11. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2016-07-12

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  12. Largest meteor since Tunguska event explodes above Russian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-02-01

    The meteor that disintegrated in the atmosphere above Chelyabinsk, Russia, on 15 February, injuring more than 1000 people and causing widespread property damage from the shock wave, is the largest such incident since the 1908 Tunguska event in Siberia, according to Paul Chodas, research scientist in the Near-Earth Object (NEO) program office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. During a 15 February teleconference, Chodas said it was an "incredible coincidence" that asteroid DA14 passed safely by Earth on the same day as the Chelyabinsk meteor; the 45-meter-wide asteroid sped by the planet at a distance of just 27,700 kilometers away on its closest approach. He stressed that the meteor was not related to DA14. The meteor "was coming from the wrong direction and at a completely different velocity," he said, noting that the orbit of the meteor went out to the asteroid belt while the orbit of DA14 "is very Earth-like, it does not go out so far."

  13. Developmental origins of the world’s largest flowers, Rafflesiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Nikolov, Lachezar A.; Endress, Peter K.; Sugumaran, M.; Sasirat, Sawitree; Vessabutr, Suyanee; Kramer, Elena M.; Davis, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Rafflesiaceae, which produce the world’s largest flowers, have captivated the attention of biologists for nearly two centuries. Despite their fame, however, the developmental nature of the floral organs in these giants has remained a mystery. Most members of the family have a large floral chamber defined by a diaphragm. The diaphragm encloses the reproductive organs where pollination by carrion flies occurs. In lieu of a functional genetic system to investigate floral development in these highly specialized holoparasites, we used comparative studies of structure, development, and gene-expression patterns to investigate the homology of their floral organs. Our results surprisingly demonstrate that the otherwise similar floral chambers in two Rafflesiaceae subclades, Rafflesia and Sapria, are constructed very differently. In Rafflesia, the diaphragm is derived from the petal whorl. In contrast, in Sapria it is derived from elaboration of a unique ring structure located between the perianth and the stamen whorl, which, although developed to varying degrees among the genera, appears to be a synapomorphy of the Rafflesiaceae. Thus, the characteristic features that define the floral chamber in these closely related genera are not homologous. These differences refute the prevailing hypothesis that similarities between Sapria and Rafflesia are ancestral in the family. Instead, our data indicate that Rafflesia-like and Sapria-like floral chambers represent two distinct derivations of this morphology. The developmental repatterning we identified in Rafflesia, in particular, may have provided architectural reinforcement, which permitted the explosive growth in floral diameter that has arisen secondarily within this subclade. PMID:24167265

  14. Characterization of the Largest Effector Gene Cluster of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Vincon, Volker; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-01-01

    In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function. PMID:24992561

  15. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2011-01-01

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century. PMID:22025693

  16. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2014-04-03

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  17. Four corners: The largest US methane anomaly viewed from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kort, Eric A.; Frankenberg, Christian; Costigan, Keeley R.; Lindenmaier, Rodica; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Wunch, Debra

    2014-10-01

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas and ozone precursor. Quantifying methane emissions is critical for projecting and mitigating changes to climate and air quality. Here we present CH4 observations made from space combined with Earth-based remote sensing column measurements. Results indicate the largest anomalous CH4 levels viewable from space over the conterminous U.S. are located at the Four Corners region in the Southwest U.S. Emissions exceeding inventory estimates, totaling 0.59 Tg CH4/yr [0.50-0.67; 2σ], are necessary to bring high-resolution simulations and observations into agreement. This underestimated source approaches 10% of the EPA estimate of total U.S. CH4 emissions from natural gas. The persistence of this CH4 signal from 2003 onward indicates that the source is likely from established gas, coal, and coalbed methane mining and processing. This work demonstrates that space-based observations can identify anomalous CH4 emission source regions and quantify their emissions with the use of a transport model.

  18. Solar particle events and their radiation threats

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    Energetic particles from the Sun have only been studied in detail during the last three decades. The modern record is good, although the number of the largest solar particle events are very few. The nuclides made by solar energetic particles in lunar rocks have been used to extend the record of these particles {approximately} 10{sup 7} years. The modern and ancient records are similar. By combining both sets of data, it has been inferred that solar particle events much larger than the largest events observed during the last four solar cycles are very rare.

  19. New surprises in the largest magnetosphere of our solar system.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Norbert

    2007-10-12

    En route to its ultimate rendezvous with Pluto, the New Horizons spacecraft passed through the magnetic and plasma environment of Jupiter in February 2007. Onboard instruments collected high-resolution images, spectroscopic data, and information about charged particles. The results have revealed unusual structure and variation in Jupiter's plasma and large plasmoids that travel down the magnetotail. Data on Jupiter's aurora provide details of the interaction with the solar wind, and a major volcanic eruption from the moon Io was observed during the encounter.

  20. Cassini RADAR Observes Titan's Kraken Mare, The Largest Extraterrestrial Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging by Cassini's RADAR instrument beginning in 2006 revealed the presence of hundreds of hydrocarbon lakes and three large seas in Titan's north polar region [1,2]. Kraken Mare appeared to be the largest sea in IR images [3] but only the northern end was imaged by RADAR prior to 2012. High altitude SAR (HiSAR) observations on recent Titan flybys T84, T91, and T92 now provide complete coverage of Kraken and environs to ~50°N, at resolutions of 2-10 km. Backscatter statistics of the sea are 0.002 × 0.04, i.e., any return is substantially less than the noise and much less than typical dry land cross sections of 0.1-1.5. We conclude that Kraken is liquid filled to substantial depth over its entire extent. A surprising result is that the major seas all lie within a 1800 x 900 km 'box' (Fig.1). A third of the area inside this box (0.6 M km2) is sea, whereas the largest lake outside the box is only 0.005 M km2. Kraken's overall shape is complex (lobateness 4.4 vs 2.1 for Ligeia) but its 0.44 M km2 is divided by 20 to 160 km wide straits into 5 sub-basins that are elongated E-W across the box. Numerous straight shoreline segments parallel the edges of the box. Others parallel the 10°, 80°, and 170°W meridians, as do the rectangular drainage patterns mapped by [4]. These alignments suggest a key role for tectonics in creating the depressions occupied by the northern seas. Fensal and Aztlan (the 'lazy H' of dune-filled lows straddling the equator at longitudes 0°-70°W) form a similar pattern of elongated depressions connected by a narrow strait within a rectangular box. In contrast, Titan's small lakes are widely distributed. Multiple depressions with radar-dark floors have been identified near the south pole and hypothesized as former seabeds [5], but though similar in size to the northern seas, they are not aligned with one another or tightly clustered. Thus, the geography of the north and south poles will remain distinct even if

  1. Stratification at the Earth's largest hyperacidic lake and its consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudron, Corentin; Campion, Robin; Rouwet, Dmitri; Lecocq, Thomas; Capaccioni, Bruno; Syahbana, Devy; Suparjan; Purwanto, Bambang Heri; Bernard, Alain

    2017-02-01

    Volcanic lakes provide windows into the interior of volcanoes as they integrate the heat flux discharged by a magma body and condense volcanic gases. Volcanic lake temperatures and geochemical compositions therefore typically serve as warnings for resumed unrest or prior to eruptions. If acidic and hot, these lakes are usually considered to be too convective to allow any stratification within their waters. Kawah Ijen volcano, featuring the largest hyperacidic lake on Earth (volume of 27 million m3), is less homogeneous than previously thought. Hourly temperature measurements reveal the development of a stagnant layer of cold waters (<30 °C), overlying warmer and denser water (generally above 30 °C and density ∼1.083 kg/m3). Examination of 20 yrs of historical records and temporary measurements show a systematic thermal stratification during rainy seasons. The yearly rupture of stratification at the end of the rainy season causes a sudden release of dissolved gases below the cold water layer which appears to generate a lake overturn, i.e. limnic eruption, and a resonance of the lake, i.e. a seiche, highlighting a new hazard for these extreme reservoirs. A minor non-volcanic event, such as a heavy rainfall or an earthquake, may act as a trigger. The density driven overturn requires specific salinity-temperature conditions for the colder and less saline top water layer to sink into the hot saline water. Spectacular degassing occurs when the dissolved gases, progressively stored during the rainy season due to a weakened diffusion of carbon dioxide in the top layer, are suddenly released. These findings challenge the homogenization assumption at acidic lakes and stress the need to develop appropriate monitoring setups.

  2. High feeding costs limit dive time in the largest whales.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Gutiérrez, A; Croll, D A; Tershy, B R

    2002-06-01

    Large body size usually extends dive duration in air-breathing vertebrates. However, the two largest predators on earth, the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) and the fin whale (B. physalus), perform short dives for their size. Here, we test the hypothesis that the foraging behavior of these two species (lunge-feeding) is energetically expensive and limits their dive duration. We estimated the cost of lunge-feeding in both species using an approach that combined attaching time/depth recorders to seven blue whales and eight fin whales and comparing the collected dive information with predictions made by optimality models of dive behavior. We show that the rate at which whales recovered from a foraging dive was twice that of a non-foraging dive and that the cost of foraging relative to the cost of travel to and from the prey patch was 3.15 in blue whales (95 % CI 2.58-3.72) and 3.60 in fin whales (95 % CI 2.35-4.85). Whales foraged in small areas (<1 km(2)) and foraging bouts lasted more than one dive, indicating that prey did not disperse and thus that prey dispersal could not account for the limited dive durations of the whales. Despite the enormous size of blue whales and fin whales, the high energetic costs of lunge-feeding confine them to short durations of submergence and to areas with dense prey aggregations. As a corollary, because of their limited foraging time under water, these whales may be particularly vulnerable to perturbations in prey abundance.

  3. Global assessment of nutrient loads to the world's largest lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Gabriel; Reder, Klara; Malsy, Marcus; Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Lakes are essential resources of drinking water for a large part of mankind. Even so, most of the industrial and domestic waste water is discharged - often untreated - into rivers and streams that are finally the tributaries of these important freshwater bodies. Additionally, diffuse nutrient sources such as fertilizer and atmospheric deposition exacerbate existing algal blooms and low oxygen concentrations in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. In this tense atmosphere of competing water uses, it is necessary to analyze all sources of pollution as well as their total contributions in order to protect these water bodies against deterioration. Finally, this is a general and urgently needed basis for developing recommendations for involved stakeholders and decision makers. Therefore, the project eartH2Observe, initiated and financed by the European Commission, creates the necessary and underlying quantitative and qualitative hydrological and water use data. In this context, information for global as well as for regional water resource assessments is being prepared based on new earth observations and an ensemble of global hydrological models. As a member of this ensemble, WaterGAP3 provides global estimates of lake water quality relevant parameters on a 5 arc minutes grid, namely total phosphorus and total nitrogen. These nutrient loads to lakes from different sources such as industrial fertilizer, organic fertilizer, domestic loads, atmospheric deposition, and urban surface runoff are estimated for the period 1990 to 2010 in a monthly time step. Whereas nutrient loads and their changes into numerous lakes worldwide are calculated, a special focus is set on nutrient loads into the large and shallow Lake Peipus, which is located between Estonia and Russia and subject to blooms of harmful cyanobacteria. We present estimates, trends, as well as sources of present nutrient loads (TN and TP) to the world's largest lakes with detailed insights to the Lake Peipus situation

  4. Functional characterization of the conserved amino acids in Pop1p, the largest common protein subunit of yeast RNases P and MRP

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shaohua; Hsieh, John; Nugent, Rebecca L.; Coughlin, Daniel J.; Fierke, Carol A.; Engelke, David R.

    2006-01-01

    RNase P and RNase MRP are ribonucleoprotein enzymes required for 5′-end maturation of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs) and processing of precursor ribosomal RNAs, respectively. In yeast, RNase P and MRP holoenzymes have eight protein subunits in common, with Pop1p being the largest at >100 kDa. Little is known about the functions of Pop1p, beyond the fact that it binds specifically to the RNase P RNA subunit, RPR1 RNA. In this study, we refined the previous Pop1 phylogenetic sequence alignment and found four conserved regions. Highly conserved amino acids in yeast Pop1p were mutagenized by randomization and conditionally defective mutations were obtained. Effects of the Pop1p mutations on pre-tRNA processing, pre-rRNA processing, and stability of the RNA subunits of RNase P and MRP were examined. In most cases, functional defects in RNase P and RNase MRP in vivo were consistent with assembly defects of the holoenzymes, although moderate kinetic defects in RNase P were also observed. Most mutations affected both pre-tRNA and pre-rRNA processing, but a few mutations preferentially interfered with only RNase P or only RNase MRP. In addition, one temperature-sensitive mutation had no effect on either tRNA or rRNA processing, consistent with an additional role for RNase P, RNase MRP, or Pop1p in some other form. This study shows that the Pop1p subunit plays multiple roles in the assembly and function of of RNases P and MRP, and that the functions can be differentiated through the mutations in conserved residues. PMID:16618965

  5. GIS learning tool for world's largest earthquakes and their causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Moumita

    The objective of this thesis is to increase awareness about earthquakes among people, especially young students by showing the five largest and two most predictable earthquake locations in the world and their plate tectonic settings. This is a geographic based interactive tool which could be used for learning about the cause of great earthquakes in the past and the safest places on the earth in order to avoid direct effect of earthquakes. This approach provides an effective way of learning for the students as it is very user friendly and more aligned to the interests of the younger generation. In this tool the user can click on the various points located on the world map which will open a picture and link to the webpage for that point, showing detailed information of the earthquake history of that place including magnitude of quake, year of past quakes and the plate tectonic settings that made this place earthquake prone. Apart from knowing the earthquake related information students will also be able to customize the tool to suit their needs or interests. Students will be able to add/remove layers, measure distance between any two points on the map, select any place on the map and know more information for that place, create a layer from this set to do a detail analysis, run a query, change display settings, etc. At the end of this tool the user has to go through the earthquake safely guidelines in order to be safe during an earthquake. This tool uses Java as programming language and uses Map Objects Java Edition (MOJO) provided by ESRI. This tool is developed for educational purpose and hence its interface has been kept simple and easy to use so that students can gain maximum knowledge through it instead of having a hard time to install it. There are lots of details to explore which can help more about what a GIS based tool is capable of. Only thing needed to run this tool is latest JAVA edition installed in their machine. This approach makes study more fun and

  6. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5' splice site recognition.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-02

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5' exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5' splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5'-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5'-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5'-splice sites.

  7. Smart-Geology for the World's largest fossil oyster reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Djuricic, Ana; Rasztovits, Sascha; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    The geo-edutainment park "Fossilienwelt Weinviertel" at Stetten in Lower Austria exposes the world's largest fossil oyster biostrome. In the past decade, significant progress has been made in 3D digitizing sensor technology. To cope with the high amount of data, processing methods have been automated to a high degree. Consequently, we formulated the hypothesis that appropriate application of state-of-the-art 3D digitizing, data processing, and visualization technologies allows for a significant automation in paleontological prospection, making an evaluation of huge areas commercially feasible in both time and costs. We call the necessary processing steps "Smart Geology", being characterized by automation and large volumes of data. The Smart Geology project (FWF P 25883-N29) investigates three topics, 3D digitizing, automated geological and paleontological analysis and interpretation and finally investigating the applicability of smart devices for on-site accessibility of project data in order to support the two scientific hypotheses concerning the emerging process of the shell bed, i.e. was it formed by a tsunami or a major storm, and does it preserve pre- and post-event features. This contribution concentrates on the innovative and sophisticated 3D documentation and visualization processes being applied to virtualise approximately 15.000 fossil oysters at the approximately 25 by 17 m accessible shell bad. We decided to use a Terrestrial Laserscanner (TLS) for the determination of the geometrical 3D structures. The TLS achieves about 2 mm single point measurement accuracy. The scanning campaign provides a "raw" point cloud of approximately 1 bio. points at the respective area. Due to the scanning configuration used, the occurrence of occluded ares is minimized hence the full 3D structure of this unique site can be modelled. In addition, approximately 300 photos were taken with a nominal resolution of 0.6 mm per pixel. Sophisticated artificial lightning (close to

  8. Drilling the Bushveld Complex- the world's largest layered mafic intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Webb, S. J.; Trumbull, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The fact that surprising new discoveries can be made in layered mafic intrusions (e.g., subtle 100-150 m cyclicity in apparently homogeneous cumulates over 1000s of m) means that we are still in the first-order characterization phase of understanding these objects. Accordingly, we have secured funding from ICDP for a planning workshop to be held in Johannesburg in early 2014, aimed at scientific drilling of the Bushveld Complex, the world's largest layered mafic intrusion. Science objectives include, but are not limited to: 1. Magma chamber processes & melt evolution. How many melts/magmas/mushes were involved, what were their compositions and how did they interact? What, if anything, is missing from the Complex, and where did it go? Did Bushveld magmatism have an effect upon Earth's atmosphere at 2 Ga? 2. Crust-mantle interactions & origin of Bushveld granitoids. Are Bushveld granites & rhyolites crustal melts, differentiates from the mafic magmas or products of immiscibility? How can the evolved isotopic signatures in the mafic rocks (e.g., epsilon Nd to -8) be understood? 3. Origin of ore deposits. What were the relative roles of gravity settling, magma mixing, immiscibility and hydrothermal fluid transport in producing the PGE, Cr and V deposits? We have identified 3 potential drilling targets representing a total of ~12 km of drill core. Exact locations of drill sites are to be discussed at the workshop. Target A- East-Central Bushveld Complex. We propose 3 overlapping 3 km boreholes that will provide the first roof-to-floor continuous coverage of the Rustenburg Layered Suite. These boreholes will represent a curated, internationally available reference collection of Bushveld material for present and future research. Target B- Southeastern Bushveld Complex. We propose a single borehole of ~2 km depth, collared in Rooiberg felsite, and positioned to intersect the Roof Zone, Upper Zone, Main Zone and floor of the Complex. Amongst other things, this site will

  9. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  10. Watching the Creation of Southern California's Largest Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The new Diamond Valley Lake Reservoir near the city of Hemet in Riverside County is billed as the largest earthworks construction project in U.S.history. Construction began in 1995 and involved 31 million cubic meters of foundation excavation and 84 million cubic meters of embankment construction. This set of MISR images captures the most recent phase in the reservoir's activation. At the upper left is a natural-color view acquired by the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on March 14, 2000 (Terra orbit 1273), shortly after the Metropolitan Water District began filling the reservoir with water from the Colorado River and Northern California. Water appears darker than the surrounding land. The image at the upper right was acquired nearly one year later on March 1, 2001 (Terra orbit 6399), and shows a clear increase in the reservoir's water content. When full, the lake will hold nearly a trillion liters of water.

    According to the Metropolitan Water District, the 7 kilometer x 3 kilometer reservoir nearly doubles Southern California's above-groundwater storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against drought and a six-month emergency supply in the event of earthquake damage to a major aqueduct. In the face of electrical power shortages, it is also expected to reduce dependence on the pumping of water from northern mountains during the high-demand summer months. An unexpected result of site excavation was the uncovering of mastodon and mammoth skeletons along with bones from extinct species not previously thought to have been indigenous to the area, such as the giant long-horned bison and North American lion. A museum and interpretive center is being built to protect these finds.

    The lower MISR image, from May 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view combining data from the instrument's 26-degree forward view (displayed as blue) with data from the 26-degree backward

  11. ALMA Partners Break Ground on World's Largest Millimeter Wavelength Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Scientists and dignitaries from North America, Europe, and Chile broke ground today (Thursday, November 6, 2003) on what will be the world's largest, most sensitive radio telescope operating at millimeter wavelengths. ALMA - the Atacama Large Millimeter Array - will be a single instrument composed of 64 high-precision antennas located on the Chajnantor plain of the Chilean Andes in the District of San Pedro de Atacama, 16,500 feet (5,000 meters) above sea level. ALMA's primary function will be to observe and image with unprecedented clarity the enigmatic cold regions of the Universe, which are optically dark, yet shine brightly in the millimeter portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. ALMA Array Artist's Conception of ALMA Array in Compact Configuration (Click on Image for Larger Version) Other Images Available: Artist's conception of the antennas for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array Moonrise over ALMA test equipment near Cerro Chajnantor, Chile VertexRSI antenna at the VLA test site The Atacama Large Millimeter Array is an international astronomy facility. ALMA is an equal partnership between Europe and North America, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile, and is funded in North America by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), and in Europe by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Spain. ALMA construction and operations are led on behalf of North America by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which is managed by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), and on behalf of Europe by ESO. "The U.S. National Science Foundation joins today with our North American partner, Canada, and with the European Southern Observatory, Spain, and Chile to prepare for a spectacular new instrument," said Dr. Rita Colwell, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation. "The Atacama Large Millimeter Array will expand our vision of the Universe with "eyes" that pierce the shrouded mantles of

  12. Vanillin inhibits translation and induces messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granule formation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: application and validation of high-content, image-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Aya; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Suga, Yohei; Izawa, Shingo; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin, generated by acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose, acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the cellular processes affected by vanillin using high-content, image-based profiling. Among 4,718 non-essential yeast deletion mutants, the morphology of those defective in the large ribosomal subunit showed significant similarity to that of vanillin-treated cells. The defects in these mutants were clustered in three domains of the ribosome: the mRNA tunnel entrance, exit and backbone required for small subunit attachment. To confirm that vanillin inhibited ribosomal function, we assessed polysome and messenger ribonucleoprotein granule formation after treatment with vanillin. Analysis of polysome profiles showed disassembly of the polysomes in the presence of vanillin. Processing bodies and stress granules, which are composed of non-translating mRNAs and various proteins, were formed after treatment with vanillin. These results suggest that vanillin represses translation in yeast cells.

  13. Purification and partial sequencing of the nuclear autoantigen RA33 shows that it is indistinguishable from the A2 protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, G; Hartmuth, K; Skriner, K; Maurer-Fogy, I; Sinski, A; Thalmann, E; Hassfeld, W; Barta, A; Smolen, J S

    1992-01-01

    RA33 is a nuclear autoantigen with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kD. Autoantibodies against RA33 are found in about 30% of sera from RA patients, but only occasionally in sera from patients with other connective tissue diseases. To characterize RA33, the antigen was purified from HeLa cell nuclear extracts to more than 90% homogeneity by affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose and by chromatofocusing. Sequence analysis of five tryptic peptides revealed that their sequences matched corresponding sequences of the A2 protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complex. Furthermore, RA33 was shown to be present in the 40S hnRNP complex and to behave indistinguishably from A2 in binding to single stranded DNA. In summary, these data strongly indicate that RA33 and A2 are the same protein, and thus identify on a molecular level a new autoantigen. Images PMID:1522214

  14. Vanillin Inhibits Translation and Induces Messenger Ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) Granule Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Application and Validation of High-Content, Image-Based Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Yohei; Izawa, Shingo; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin, generated by acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose, acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the cellular processes affected by vanillin using high-content, image-based profiling. Among 4,718 non-essential yeast deletion mutants, the morphology of those defective in the large ribosomal subunit showed significant similarity to that of vanillin-treated cells. The defects in these mutants were clustered in three domains of the ribosome: the mRNA tunnel entrance, exit and backbone required for small subunit attachment. To confirm that vanillin inhibited ribosomal function, we assessed polysome and messenger ribonucleoprotein granule formation after treatment with vanillin. Analysis of polysome profiles showed disassembly of the polysomes in the presence of vanillin. Processing bodies and stress granules, which are composed of non-translating mRNAs and various proteins, were formed after treatment with vanillin. These results suggest that vanillin represses translation in yeast cells. PMID:23637899

  15. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M.; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  16. Insertional Mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Gene Editing in Cells Targeted for Point Mutation Repair Directed by Short Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Banas, Kelly; Bialk, Pawel; Bloh, Kevin M; Kmiec, Eric B

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) have been used to direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. Here, we examine a method designed to increase the precision of RNA guided genome editing in human cells by utilizing a CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex to initiate DNA cleavage. The RNP is assembled in vitro and induces a double stranded break at a specific site surrounding the mutant base designated for correction by the ssODN. We use an integrated mutant eGFP gene, bearing a single base change rendering the expressed protein nonfunctional, as a single copy target in HCT 116 cells. We observe significant gene correction activity of the mutant base, promoted by the RNP and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide with validation through genotypic and phenotypic readout. We demonstrate that all individual components must be present to obtain successful gene editing. Importantly, we examine the genotype of individually sorted corrected and uncorrected clonally expanded cell populations for the mutagenic footprint left by the action of these gene editing tools. While the DNA sequence of the corrected population is exact with no adjacent sequence modification, the uncorrected population exhibits heterogeneous mutagenicity with a wide variety of deletions and insertions surrounding the target site. We designate this type of DNA aberration as on-site mutagenicity. Analyses of two clonal populations bearing specific DNA insertions surrounding the target site, indicate that point mutation repair has occurred at the level of the gene. The phenotype, however, is not rescued because a section of the single-stranded oligonucleotide has been inserted altering the reading frame and generating truncated proteins. These data illustrate the importance of analysing mutagenicity in uncorrected cells. Our results also form the basis of a simple model for point mutation repair directed by a short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and

  17. iCLIP reveals the function of hnRNP particles in splicing at individual nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    König, Julian; Zarnack, Kathi; Rot, Gregor; Curk, Tomaž; Kayikci, Melis; Zupan, Blaž; Turner, Daniel J.; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Ule, Jernej

    2010-01-01

    In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, nascent transcripts are associated with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles that are nucleated by hnRNP C. Despite their abundance however, it remained unclear whether these particles control pre-mRNA processing. Here, we developed individual-nucleotide resolution UV-cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to study the role of hnRNP C in splicing regulation. iCLIP data demonstrate that hnRNP C recognizes uridine tracts with a defined long-range spacing consistent with hnRNP particle organization. hnRNP particles assemble on both introns and exons, but remain generally excluded from splice sites. Integration of transcriptome-wide iCLIP data and alternative splicing profiles into an ‘RNA map’ indicates how the positioning of hnRNP particles determines their effect on inclusion of alternative exons. The ability of high-resolution iCLIP data to provide insights into the mechanism of this regulation holds promise for studies of other higher-order ribonucleoprotein complexes. PMID:20601959

  18. Morphological details in bloodstain particles.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2015-01-01

    During the commission of crimes blood can be transferred to the clothing of the offender or on other crime related objects. Bloodstain particles are sub-millimetre sized flakes that are lost from dried bloodstains. The nature of these red particles is easily confirmed using spectroscopic methods. In casework, bloodstain particles showing highly detailed morphological features were observed. These provided a rationale for a series of experiments described in this work. It was found that the "largest" particles are shed from blood deposited on polyester and polyamide woven fabrics. No particles are lost from the stains made on absorbent fabrics and from those made on knitted fabrics. The morphological features observed in bloodstain particles can provide important information on the substrates from which they were lost.

  19. Virus particles of cucumber green mottle mosaic tobamovirus move systemically in the phloem of infected cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Simón-Buela, L; García-Arenal, F

    1999-02-01

    Systemic movement through the phloem of infected host plants is a key process in the life cycle of plant viruses, knowledge of which is scant. A main point to be elucidated is the structural form in which virus infection moves within the phloem. Indirect evidence suggests that virions might be the viral structure that moves in the phloem, but data from direct analysis in phloem sap have not been reported. We have done such analysis in the system cucumber (from which phloem exudate can be collected)/cucumber green mottle mosaic tobamovirus (CGMMV). CGMMV has structurally well-characterized particles. Both CGMMV coat protein and RNA were found in phloem exudate from infected cucumbers. Analysis of the accessibility of CGMMV RNA in phloem exudate to RNase A indicates that it is protected within a ribonucleoprotein structure. The accessibility to RNase A of the RNA in these structures was as in virus particles. Centrifugation analyses showed that the ribonucleoprotein structures in the phloem exudate have the same mass and isopycnic density as virions. Virus particles indistinguishable from purified virions were detected by electron microscopy in phloem exudate. No evidence of free RNA or other CGMMV-related structure was found in phloem exudate of infected plants. These results indicate that CGMMV movement in the phloem occurs mainly, if not exclusively, in the form of virus particles.

  20. Gas, Dust, and Nuclei: Cometary Types in the Largest IR Survey of Comets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, James; Kramer, Emily; Mainzer, Amy; Grav, Tommy; Masiero, Joseph; Stevenson, Rachel; Nugent, Carrie; Sonnett, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Space-based infrared (IR) surveys of objects have the potential to yield rich data sets for any particular class of small body. Thermal IR measurements often yield the most fundamental of astrophysical properties, the object’s size. When these data are synergistically combined with shorter-wavelength observations, the albedos of these bodies can be determined. The interpretation of IR observations of cometary bodies are more complicated, since their activity may obscure the bare surfaces of their nuclei. Yet space-based IR surveys provide the opportunity to observe this emitted dust and gas at wavelengths and sensitivities not possible from the ground.With the 163 comets detected during the WISE prime mission, and the more than 60 comets seen in the first year of data since the NEOWISE reactivated mission, the combined sample represents the largest survey of comets in the mid-IR. These data of over 200 comets provide dust particle size constraints and dust reflectance measurements, as well as nucleus size measurements. They are sensitive to the presence of the rarely observed gas species, CO2, directly detectable only from above the Earth’s atmosphere, and to the presence of CO emission, which is difficult to view from the ground. The data contain large samples of major cometary types (long-period and short-period comets), as well as smaller samples of Halley-type comets, Main Belt comets, and Near Earth comets, observed at multiple epochs, and so provide an unprecedentedly comprehensive view of the different comet populations.

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Induces the Cytoplasmic Retention of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 by Disrupting Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Anne; Ajamian, Lara; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-opts host proteins and cellular machineries to its advantage at every step of the replication cycle. Here we show that HIV-1 enhances heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm. The latter was dependent on the nuclear export of the unspliced viral genomic RNA (vRNA) and to alterations in the abundance and localization of the FG-repeat nuclear pore glycoprotein p62. hnRNP A1 and vRNA remain colocalized in the cytoplasm supporting a post-nuclear function during the late stages of HIV-1 replication. Consistently, we show that hnRNP A1 acts as an internal ribosomal entry site trans-acting factor up-regulating internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation initiation of the HIV-1 vRNA. The up-regulation and cytoplasmic retention of hnRNP A1 by HIV-1 would ensure abundant expression of viral structural proteins in cells infected with HIV-1. PMID:19737937

  2. Functional separation of pre-rRNA processing steps revealed by truncation of the U3 small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein component, Mpp10

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sarah J.; Baserga, Susan J.

    1997-01-01

    The U3 small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) is required for three cleavage events that generate the mature 18S rRNA from the pre-rRNA. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, depletion of Mpp10, a U3 snoRNP-specific protein, halts 18S rRNA production and impairs cleavage at the three U3 snoRNP-dependent sites: A0, A1, and A2. We have identified truncation mutations of Mpp10 that affect 18S rRNA synthesis and confer cold-sensitivity and slow growth. However, distinct from yeast cells depleted of Mpp10, the mutants carrying these truncated Mpp10 proteins accumulate a novel precursor, resulting from cleavage at only A0. The Mpp10 truncations do not alter association of Mpp10 with the U3 snoRNA, nor do they affect snoRNA or protein stability. Thus, the role in processing of the U3 snoRNP can be separated into cleavage at the A0 site, which occurs in the presence of truncated Mpp10, and cleavage at the A1/A2 sites, which occurs only with intact Mpp10. These results strongly argue for a role for Mpp10 in processing at the A1/A2 sites. PMID:9391061

  3. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of mammalian heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, is an alternative splicing factor that binds to UCUAUC splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Jennifer L; Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M

    2009-10-16

    Alternative splicing is regulated by cis sequences in the pre-mRNA that serve as binding sites for trans-acting alternative splicing factors. In a previous study, we used bioinformatics and molecular biology to identify and confirm that the intronic hexamer sequence UCUAUC is a nematode alternative splicing regulatory element. In this study, we used RNA affinity chromatography to identify trans factors that bind to this sequence. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, binds to UCUAUC in the context of unc-52 intronic regulatory sequences as well as to RNAs containing tandem repeats of this sequence. The three Us in the hexamer are the most important determinants of this binding specificity. We demonstrate, using RNA interference, that HRP-2 regulates the alternative splicing of two genes, unc-52 and lin-10, both of which have cassette exons flanked by an intronic UCUAUC motif. We propose that HRP-2 is a protein responsible for regulating alternative splicing through binding interactions with the UCUAUC sequence.

  4. Sphingosine Kinase 1 Serves as a Pro-Viral Factor by Regulating Viral RNA Synthesis and Nuclear Export of Viral Ribonucleoprotein Complex upon Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young-Jin; Pritzl, Curtis J.; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Bomb, Kavita; McClain, Mariah E.; Alexander, Stephen; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2013-01-01

    Influenza continues to pose a threat to humans by causing significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is imperative to investigate mechanisms by which influenza virus manipulates the function of host factors and cellular signal pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that influenza virus increases the expression and activation of sphingosine kinase (SK) 1, which in turn regulates diverse cellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of SK suppressed virus-induced NF-κB activation and markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins. Further, SK blockade interfered with activation of Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3), a cofactor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1), to inhibit CRM1-mediated nuclear export of the influenza viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In support of this observation, SK inhibition altered the phosphorylation of ERK, p90RSK, and AKT, which is the upstream signal of RanBP3/CRM1 activation. Collectively, these results indicate that SK is a key pro-viral factor regulating multiple cellular signal pathways triggered by influenza virus infection. PMID:24137500

  5. Uncovering the stoichiometry of Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P, a multi-subunit catalytic ribonucleoprotein complex, by surface-induced dissociation and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Lai, Lien B; Lai, Stella M; Tanimoto, Akiko; Foster, Mark P; Wysocki, Vicki H; Gopalan, Venkat

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate that surface-induced dissociation (SID) coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a powerful tool for determining the stoichiometry of a multi-subunit ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex assembled in a solution containing Mg(2+). We investigated Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P, an archaeal RNP that catalyzes tRNA 5' maturation. Previous step-wise, Mg(2+)-dependent reconstitutions of Pfu RNase P with its catalytic RNA subunit and two interacting protein cofactor pairs (RPP21⋅RPP29 and POP5⋅RPP30) revealed functional RNP intermediates en route to the RNase P enzyme, but provided no information on subunit stoichiometry. Our native MS studies with the proteins showed RPP21⋅RPP29 and (POP5⋅RPP30)2 complexes, but indicated a 1:1 composition for all subunits when either one or both protein complexes bind the cognate RNA. These results highlight the utility of SID and IM-MS in resolving conformational heterogeneity and yielding insights on RNP assembly.

  6. The human telomerase RNA component, hTR, activates the DNA-dependent protein kinase to phosphorylate heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1.

    PubMed

    Ting, Nicholas S Y; Pohorelic, Brant; Yu, Yaping; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Beattie, Tara L

    2009-10-01

    Telomere integrity in human cells is maintained by the dynamic interplay between telomerase, telomere associated proteins, and DNA repair proteins. These interactions are vital to suppress DNA damage responses and unfavorable changes in chromosome dynamics. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is critical for this process. Cells deficient for functional DNA-PKcs show increased rates of telomere loss, accompanied by chromosomal fusions and translocations. Treatment of cells with specific DNA-PK kinase inhibitors leads to similar phenotypes. These observations indicate that the kinase activity of DNA-PK is required for its function at telomeres possibly through phosphorylation of essential proteins needed for telomere length maintenance. Here we show that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a direct substrate for DNA-PK in vitro. Phosphorylation of hnRNP A1 is stimulated not only by the presence of DNA but also by the telomerase RNA component, hTR. Furthermore, we show that hnRNP A1 is phosphorylated in vivo in a DNA-PK-dependent manner and that this phosphorylation is greatly reduced in cell lines which lack hTR. These data are the first to report that hTR stimulates the kinase activity of DNA-PK toward a known telomere-associated protein, and may provide further insights into the function of DNA-PK at telomeres.

  7. Solution Structure of the HIV-1 Intron Splicing Silencer and Its Interactions with the UP1 Domain of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1*

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Niyati; Morgan, Christopher E.; Rife, Brittany D.; Salemi, Marco; Tolbert, Blanton S.

    2016-01-01

    Splicing patterns in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are maintained through cis regulatory elements that recruit antagonistic host RNA-binding proteins. The activity of the 3′ acceptor site A7 is tightly regulated through a complex network of an intronic splicing silencer (ISS), a bipartite exonic splicing silencer (ESS3a/b), and an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE3). Because HIV-1 splicing depends on protein-RNA interactions, it is important to know the tertiary structures surrounding the splice sites. Herein, we present the NMR solution structure of the phylogenetically conserved ISS stem loop. ISS adopts a stable structure consisting of conserved UG wobble pairs, a folded 2X2 (GU/UA) internal loop, a UU bulge, and a flexible AGUGA apical loop. Calorimetric and biochemical titrations indicate that the UP1 domain of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 binds the ISS apical loop site-specifically and with nanomolar affinity. Collectively, this work provides additional insights into how HIV-1 uses a conserved RNA structure to commandeer a host RNA-binding protein. PMID:26607354

  8. Opposite Dysregulation of Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein and Heteronuclear Ribonucleoprotein C Protein Associates with Enhanced APP Translation in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Borreca, Antonella; Gironi, Katia; Amadoro, Giusy; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2016-07-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is overexpressed in familiar and sporadic Alzheimer Disease (AD) patients suggesting that, in addition to abnormalities in APP cleavage, enhanced levels of APP full length might contribute to the pathology. Based on data showing that the two RNA binding proteins (RBPs), Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and heteronuclear Ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C), exert an opposite control on APP translation, we have analyzed whether expression and translation of these two RBPs vary in relation to changes in APP protein and mRNA levels in the AD brain at 1, 3, and 6 months of age. Here, we show that, as expected, human APP is overexpressed in hippocampal total extract from Tg2576 mice at all age points. APP overexpression, however, is not stable over time but reaches its maximal level in 1-month-old mutants in association with the stronger (i) reduction of FMRP and (ii) augmentation of hnRNP C. APP levels then decrease progressively as a function of age in close relationship with the gradual normalization of FMRP and hnRNP C levels. Consistent with the mouse data, expression of FMRP and hnRNP C are, respectively, decreased and increased in hippocampal synaptosomes from sporadic AD patients. Our findings identify two RBP targets that might be manipulated for reducing abnormally elevated levels of APP in the AD brain, with the hypothesis that acting upstream of amyloidogenic processing might contribute to attenuate the amyloid burden.

  9. Solution Structure of the HIV-1 Intron Splicing Silencer and Its Interactions with the UP1 Domain of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1.

    PubMed

    Jain, Niyati; Morgan, Christopher E; Rife, Brittany D; Salemi, Marco; Tolbert, Blanton S

    2016-01-29

    Splicing patterns in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are maintained through cis regulatory elements that recruit antagonistic host RNA-binding proteins. The activity of the 3' acceptor site A7 is tightly regulated through a complex network of an intronic splicing silencer (ISS), a bipartite exonic splicing silencer (ESS3a/b), and an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE3). Because HIV-1 splicing depends on protein-RNA interactions, it is important to know the tertiary structures surrounding the splice sites. Herein, we present the NMR solution structure of the phylogenetically conserved ISS stem loop. ISS adopts a stable structure consisting of conserved UG wobble pairs, a folded 2X2 (GU/UA) internal loop, a UU bulge, and a flexible AGUGA apical loop. Calorimetric and biochemical titrations indicate that the UP1 domain of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 binds the ISS apical loop site-specifically and with nanomolar affinity. Collectively, this work provides additional insights into how HIV-1 uses a conserved RNA structure to commandeer a host RNA-binding protein.

  10. [Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding Brassica napus small nuclear ribonucleoprotein BnSmD1].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Meng; Zhou, Yun-Tao; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Xue, Hua; Zhou, Lin; Zhao, Yun

    2007-12-01

    By using substractive hybridization (SSH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR), a full-length cDNA encoding Brassica napus small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, named BnSmD1, was obtained. It had 484 base pairs in length containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 354 bp and encoding a predicted protein of 118 amino acids with a molecular weight of 13 kDa. The BnSmD1 protein shares two highly conserved Sm folds (Sm-1 and Sm-2) and a C-terminal RG dipeptide repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed that BnSmD1 was expressed in all tested organs in B. napus, but its transcript level in early floral buds was much higher than that in leaf and stem tissues. No obvious expression difference was observed in leaf and stem tissues between the apetalous line Apet33-10 petalled near-isogenic line Pet33-10. Compared with wild type, the expression of BnSmD1 in the early floral buds of apetalous mutant Apet33-10 was significantly reduced. Taken together, our results suggest that BnSmD1 may play an important role in early floral petal development in B. napus.

  11. Heterogeneous Ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) Binds miR-122, a Mature Liver-Specific MicroRNA Required for Hepatitis C Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Fan, Baochang; Sutandy, F X Reymond; Syu, Guan-Da; Middleton, Stefani; Yi, Guanghui; Lu, Kuan-Yi; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) binds to the 5' untranslated region of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and is required for HCV RNA replication. The hnRNP K binding site on HCV RNA overlaps with the sequence recognized by the liver-specific microRNA, miR-122. A proteome chip containing ∼17,000 unique human proteins probed with miR-122 identified hnRNP K as one of the strong binding proteins. In vitro kinetic study showed hnRNP K binds miR-122 with a nanomolar dissociation constant, in which the short pyrimidine-rich residues in the central and 3' portion of the miR-122 were required for hnRNP K binding. In liver hepatocytes, miR-122 formed a coprecipitable complex with hnRNP K. High throughput Illumina DNA sequencing of the RNAs precipitated with hnRNP K was enriched for mature miR-122. SiRNA knockdown of hnRNP K in human hepatocytes reduced the levels of miR-122. These results show that hnRNP K is a cellular protein that binds and affects the accumulation of miR-122. Its ability to also bind HCV RNA near the miR-122 binding site suggests a role for miR-122 recognition of HCV RNA.

  12. CmRBP50 Protein Phosphorylation Is Essential for Assembly of a Stable Phloem-mobile High-affinity Ribonucleoprotein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pingfang; Ham, Byung-Kook; Lucas, William J.

    2011-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that play crucial roles in RNA processing for gene regulation. The angiosperm sieve tube system contains a unique population of transcripts, some of which function as long-distance signaling agents involved in regulating organ development. These phloem-mobile mRNAs are translocated as RNP complexes. One such complex is based on a phloem RBP named Cucurbita maxima RNA-binding protein 50 (CmRBP50), a member of the polypyrimidine track binding protein family. The core of this RNP complex contains six additional phloem proteins. Here, requirements for assembly of this CmRBP50 RNP complex are reported. Phosphorylation sites on CmRBP50 were mapped, and then coimmunoprecipitation and protein overlay studies established that the phosphoserine residues, located at the C terminus of CmRBP50, are critical for RNP complex assembly. In vitro pull-down experiments revealed that three phloem proteins, C. maxima phloem protein 16, C. maxima GTP-binding protein, and C. maxima phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-like protein, bind directly with CmRBP50. This interaction required CmRBP50 phosphorylation. Gel mobility-shift assays demonstrated that assembly of the CmRBP50-based protein complex results in a system having enhanced binding affinity for phloem-mobile mRNAs carrying polypyrimidine track binding motifs. This property would be essential for effective long-distance translocation of bound mRNA to the target tissues. PMID:21572046

  13. Heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by increasing protein translation of selected transcripts in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Elizabeth T; Parekh, Palak R; Yang, Qingyuan; Nguyen, Duc M; Carrier, France

    2016-03-01

    The heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by coordinating the translation of selected transcripts associated with proliferation and survival. hnRNP A18 binds to and stabilizes the transcripts of pro-survival genes harboring its RNA signature motif in their 3'UTRs. hnRNP A18 binds to ATR, RPA, TRX, HIF-1α and several protein translation factor mRNAs on polysomes and increases de novo protein translation under cellular stress. Most importantly, down regulation of hnRNP A18 decreases proliferation, invasion and migration in addition to significantly reducing tumor growth in two mouse xenograft models, melanoma and breast cancer. Moreover, tissue microarrays performed on human melanoma, prostate, breast and colon cancer indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in 40 to 60% of these malignant tissue as compared to normal adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemistry data indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in the stroma and hypoxic areas of human tumors. These data thus indicate that hnRNP A18 can promote tumor growth in in vivo models by coordinating the translation of pro-survival transcripts to support the demands of proliferating cells and increase survival under cellular stress. hnRNP A18 therefore represents a new target to selectively inhibit protein translation in tumor cells.

  14. Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein R regulates arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase synthesis via internal ribosomal entry site-mediated translation in a circadian manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa-Rim; Kim, Tae-Don; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Youngseob; Lee, Dohyun; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2015-11-01

    Rhythmic arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) synthesis is a prominent circadian-controlled response that occurs in most mammals. AANAT is the core enzyme in melatonin production; because melatonin participates in many physiological processes, the regulation of AANAT is an important research topic. In this study, we focused on the role of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) in the translation of AANAT. A novel RNA-binding protein hnRNP R widely interacted with the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of AANAT mRNA and contributed to translation through an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Fine-tuning of AANAT protein synthesis occurred in response to knockdown and overexpression of hnRNP R. Nocturnal elevation of AANAT protein was dependent on the rhythmic changes of hnRNP R, whose levels are elevated in the pineal gland during nighttime. Increases in hnRNP R additionally improved AANAT production in rat pinealocytes under norepinephrine (NE) treatment. These results suggest that cap-independent translation of AANAT mRNA plays a role in the rhythmic synthesis of melatonin through the recruitment of translational machinery to hnRNP R-bound AANAT mRNA.

  15. Chemical proteomics identifies heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 as the molecular target of quercetin in its anti-cancer effects in PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chia-Chen; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Chih-Ta; Liu, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Fong-Chi; Hsu, Kai-Chao; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2014-08-08

    Quercetin, a flavonoid abundantly present in plants, is widely used as a phytotherapy in prostatitis and prostate cancer. Although quercetin has been reported to have a number of therapeutic effects, the cellular target(s) responsible for its anti-cancer action has not yet been clearly elucidated. Here, employing affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) as a direct target of quercetin. A specific interaction between quercetin and hnRNPA1 was validated by immunoblotting and in vitro binding experiments. We found that quercetin bound the C-terminal region of hnRNPA1, impairing the ability of hnRNPA1 to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and ultimately resulting in its cytoplasmic retention. In addition, hnRNPA1 was recruited to stress granules after treatment of cells with quercetin for up to 48 h, and the levels of cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis), an internal ribosome entry site translation-dependent protein, were reduced by hnRNPA1 regulation. This is the first report that anti-cancer effects of quercetin are mediated, in part, by impairing functions of hnRNPA1, insights that were obtained using a chemical proteomics strategy.

  16. Modulation of exon skipping and inclusion by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 and pre-mRNA splicing factor SF2/ASF.

    PubMed Central

    Mayeda, A; Helfman, D M; Krainer, A R

    1993-01-01

    The essential splicing factor SF2/ASF and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) modulate alternative splicing in vitro of pre-mRNAs that contain 5' splice sites of comparable strengths competing for a common 3' splice site. Using natural and model pre-mRNAs, we have examined whether the ratio of SF2/ASF to hnRNP A1 also regulates other modes of alternative splicing in vitro. We found that an excess of SF2/ASF effectively prevents inappropriate exon skipping and also influences the selection of mutually exclusive tissue-specific exons in natural beta-tropomyosin pre-mRNA. In contrast, an excess of hnRNP A1 does not cause inappropriate exon skipping in natural constitutively or alternatively spliced pre-mRNAs. Although hnRNP A1 can promote alternative exon skipping, this effect is not universal and is dependent, e.g., on the size of the internal alternative exon and on the strength of the polypyrimidine tract in the preceding intron. With appropriate alternative exons, an excess of SF2/ASF promotes exon inclusion, whereas an excess of hnRNP A1 causes exon skipping. We propose that in some cases the ratio of SF2/ASF to hnRNP A1 may play a role in regulating alternative splicing by exon inclusion or skipping through the antagonistic effects of these proteins on alternative splice site selection. Images PMID:8474457

  17. tRNA is entrapped in similar, but distinct, nuclear and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes, both of which contain vigilin and elongation factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, C; Grünweller, A; Willkomm, D K; Pfeiffer, T; Hartmann, R K; Müller, P K

    1998-01-01

    Vigilin, which is found predominantly in cells and tissues with high levels of protein biosynthesis, was isolated in its native form from human HEp-2 cells (A.T.C.C. CCL23) by immunoaffinity chromatography. Here we demonstrate that vigilin is part of a novel large tRNA-binding ribonucleoprotein complex (tRNP), found not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nuclei of human cells. Compositional differences in the protein pattern were detected between the nuclear and cytoplasmic tRNPs, although some properties of the purified nuclear tRNP, such as tRNA protection against nuclease attack, were identical with those of the cytoplasmic tRNP. By using either a pool of total human nuclear RNA or radioactively labelled yeast tRNAAsp in rebinding experiments, we could show that tRNA is specifically recaptured by the RNA-depleted, vigilin-containing nuclear complex. We could also show that vigilin is capable of binding tRNA in vitro. Another tRNA-binding protein is elongation factor 1 alpha, which appears to be enriched in the cytoplasmic and nuclear tRNP complexes. This suggests that the cytoplasmic tRNP may be involved in the channelled tRNA cycle in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Our results also suggest that the nuclear vigilin-containing tRNP may be related to the nuclear export of tRNA. PMID:9445390

  18. Efficient sequence-specific isolation of DNA fragments and chromatin by in vitro enChIP technology using recombinant CRISPR ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-04-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system is widely used for various biological applications, including genome editing. We developed engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) using CRISPR to isolate target genomic regions from cells for their biochemical characterization. In this study, we developed 'in vitro enChIP' using recombinant CRISPR ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to isolate target genomic regions. in vitro enChIP has the great advantage over conventional enChIP of not requiring expression of CRISPR complexes in cells. We first showed that in vitro enChIP using recombinant CRISPR RNPs can be used to isolate target DNA from mixtures of purified DNA in a sequence-specific manner. In addition, we showed that this technology can be used to efficiently isolate target genomic regions, while retaining their intracellular molecular interactions, with negligible contamination from irrelevant genomic regions. Thus, in vitro enChIP technology is of potential use for sequence-specific isolation of DNA, as well as for identification of molecules interacting with genomic regions of interest in vivo in combination with downstream analysis.

  19. Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cosmic connections between physics on the very largest and very smallest scales are reviewed with an emphasis on the symbiotic relation between elementary particle physics and cosmology. After a review of the early Universe as a cosmic accelerator, various cosmological and astrophysical constraints on models of particle physics are outlined. To illustrate this approach to particle physics via cosmology, reference is made to several areas of current research: baryon non-conservation and baryon asymmetry; free quarks, heavy hadrons and other exotic relics; primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino masses. In the last few years we have witnessed the birth and growth to healthy adolescence of a new collaboration between astrophysicists and particle physicists. The most notable success of this cooperative effort has been to provide the framework for understanding, within the context of GUTs and the hot big-bang cosmology, the universal baryon asymmetry. The most exciting new predictions this effort has spawned are that exotic relics may exist in detectable abundances. In particular, we may live in a neutrino-dominated Universe. In the next few years, accummulating laboratory data (for example proton decay, neutrino masses and oscillations) coupled with theoritical work in particle physics and cosmology will ensure the growth to maturity of this joint effort.

  20. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans [Reno, NV; Chakrabarty, Rajan K [Reno, NV; Arnott, W Patrick [Reno, NV

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  1. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  2. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  3. Particulate air pollution and mortality in 38 of China's largest cities: time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; He, Guojun; Fan, Maoyong; Chiu, Kowk Yan; Fan, Maorong; Liu, Chang; Xue, An; Liu, Tong; Pan, Yuhang; Mu, Quan; Zhou, Maigeng

    2017-03-14

    Objectives To estimate the short term effect of particulate air pollution (particle diameter <10 μm, or PM10) on mortality and explore the heterogeneity of particulate air pollution effects in major cities in China.Design Generalised linear models with different lag structures using time series data.Setting 38 of the largest cities in 27 provinces of China (combined population >200 million).Participants 350 638 deaths (200 912 in males, 149 726 in females) recorded in 38 city districts by the Disease Surveillance Point System of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention from 1 January 2010 to 29 June 2013.Main outcome measure Daily numbers of deaths from all causes, cardiorespiratory diseases, and non-cardiorespiratory diseases and among different demographic groups were used to estimate the associations between particulate air pollution and mortality.Results A 10 µg/m(3) change in concurrent day PM10 concentrations was associated with a 0.44% (95% confidence interval 0.30% to 0.58%) increase in daily number of deaths. Previous day and two day lagged PM10 levels decreased in magnitude by one third and two thirds but remained statistically significantly associated with increased mortality. The estimate for the effect of PM10 on deaths from cardiorespiratory diseases was 0.62% (0.43% to 0.81%) per 10 µg/m(3) compared with 0.26% (0.09% to 0.42%) for other cause mortality. Exposure to PM10 had a greater impact on females than on males. Adults aged 60 and over were more vulnerable to particulate air pollution at high levels than those aged less than 60. The PM10 effect varied across different cities and marginally decreased in cities with higher PM10 concentrations.Conclusion Particulate air pollution has a greater impact on deaths from cardiorespiratory diseases than it does on other cause mortality. People aged 60 or more have a higher risk of death from particulate air pollution than people aged less than 60. The estimates of the effect

  4. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F.; Lisse, Thomas S.; Garcia, Alejandro J.; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L.; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S.; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH)2D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH)2D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH)2D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of transcription. PMID:27672039

  5. Radiosensitization and downregulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) upon inhibition of mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) in malignant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stefan; Lamkowski, Andreas; Priller, Markus; Port, Matthias; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is an important cofactor in the p53-mediated DNA damage response pathway upon ionizing radiation (IR) and exerts anti-apoptotic effects also independent of p53 pathway activation. Furthermore, hnRNP K is overexpressed in various neoplasms including malignant melanoma (MM). Here, we investigate the role of hnRNP K in the radioresistance of MM cells. Methods and results Our results show cytoplasmic expression of hnRNP K in human MM surgical specimens, but not in benign nevi, and a quick dose- and time-dependent upregulation in response to IR accompanied by cytoplasmic redistribution of the protein in the IPC-298 cellular tumor model carrying an activating NRAS mutation (p.Q61L). SiRNA-based knockdown of hnRNP K induced a delayed decline in γH2AX/53BP1-positive DNA repair foci upon IR. Pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling abrogated ERK phosphorylation, diminished cellular hnRNP K levels, impaired γH2AX/53BP1-foci repair and proliferative capability and increased apoptosis comparable to the observed hnRNP K knockdown phenotype in IPC-298 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling increases vulnerability of NRAS-mutant malignant melanoma cells to ionizing radiation along with downregulation of endogenous hnRNP K and point towards a possible use for combined MEK inhibition and localized radiation therapy of MM in the NRAS-mutant setting where BRAF inhibitors offer no clinical benefit. PMID:26136337

  6. Primary structures of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2, B1, and C2 proteins: a diversity of RNA binding proteins is generated by small peptide inserts.

    PubMed Central

    Burd, C G; Swanson, M S; Görlach, M; Dreyfuss, G

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs for the major heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2, B1, and C2 proteins and determined their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences. The A2 and B1 cDNAs are identical except for a 36-nucleotide in-frame insert in B1. Similarly, the sequence of the C2 protein cDNA is related to that of C1 in that C2 contains an extra 39 in-frame nucleotides. Therefore, the B1 amino acid sequence is identical to A2 except for the insertion of 12 amino acids near its amino terminus, and C1 and C2 are also identical to each other except for an extra 13 amino acids near the middle of C2. All three proteins are members of a large family of RNA binding proteins that contain the consensus sequence-type RNA binding domain (CS-RBD). The A2 and B1 proteins have a modular structure similar to that of the hnRNP protein A1: they contain two CS-RBDs and a glycine-rich auxiliary domain at the carboxyl terminus. The CS-RBDs of A2 and B1 have approximately 80% amino acid identity with those of A1, whereas the glycine-rich auxiliary domain is considerably more divergent with less than 30% of the amino acids being identical. These findings indicate that the addition of small peptides, probably by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, generates some of the diversity apparent among hnRNP proteins. Images PMID:2557628

  7. Release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) activates hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein (HEXIM1) transcription.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Nilson, Kyle A; Price, David H; Peterlin, B Matija

    2014-04-04

    By phosphorylating negative elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is composed of CycT1 or CycT2 and CDK9, activates eukaryotic transcription elongation. In growing cells, it is found in active and inactive forms. In the former, free P-TEFb is a potent transcriptional coactivator. In the latter, it is inhibited by HEXIM1 or HEXIM2 in the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), which contains, additionally, 7SK snRNA, methyl phosphate-capping enzyme (MePCE), and La-related protein 7 (LARP7). This P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of growth and proliferation of the cell. In this study, the release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP led to increased synthesis of HEXIM1 but not HEXIM2 in HeLa cells, and this occurred only from an unannotated, proximal promoter. ChIP with sequencing revealed P-TEFb-sensitive poised RNA polymerase II at this proximal but not the previously annotated distal HEXIM1 promoter. Its immediate upstream sequences were fused to luciferase reporters and were found to be responsive to many P-TEFb-releasing compounds. The superelongation complex subunits AF4/FMR2 family member 4 (AFF4) and elongation factor RNA polymerase II 2 (ELL2) were recruited to this proximal promoter after P-TEFb release and were required for its transcriptional effects. Thus, P-TEFb regulates its own equilibrium in cells, most likely to maintain optimal cellular homeostasis.

  8. Application of largest Lyapunov exponent analysis on the studies of dynamics under external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odavić, Jovan; Mali, Petar; Tekić, Jasmina; Pantić, Milan; Pavkov-Hrvojević, Milica

    2017-06-01

    Dynamics of driven dissipative Frenkel-Kontorova model is examined by using largest Lyapunov exponent computational technique. Obtained results show that besides the usual way where behavior of the system in the presence of external forces is studied by analyzing its dynamical response function, the largest Lyapunov exponent analysis can represent a very convenient tool to examine system dynamics. In the dc driven systems, the critical depinning force for particular structure could be estimated by computing the largest Lyapunov exponent. In the dc+ac driven systems, if the substrate potential is the standard sinusoidal one, calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent offers a more sensitive way to detect the presence of Shapiro steps. When the amplitude of the ac force is varied the behavior of the largest Lyapunov exponent in the pinned regime completely reflects the behavior of Shapiro steps and the critical depinning force, in particular, it represents the mirror image of the amplitude dependence of critical depinning force. This points out an advantage of this technique since by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent in the pinned regime we can get an insight into the dynamics of the system when driving forces are applied. Additionally, the system is shown to be not chaotic even in the case of incommensurate structures and large amplitudes of external force, which is a consequence of overdampness of the model and the Middleton's no passing rule.

  9. Trajectory Studies of Large HNO3-Containing PSC Particles in the Arctic: Evidence for the Role of NAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinney, K. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Dhaniyala, S.; Fahey, D. W.; Northway, M. J.; Kuenzi, K. F.; Kleinboehl, A.; Sinnhuber, M.; Kuellmann, H.; Bremer, H.; Mahoney, M. J.; Bui, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    Large (5 to >20 micron diameter) nitric-acid-containing polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles were observed in the Arctic stratosphere during the winter of 1999-2000. We use a particle growth and sedimentation model to investigate the environment in which these particles grew and the likely phase of the largest particles. Particle trajectory calculations show that, while simulated nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) particle sizes are significantly smaller than the observed maximum particle sizes, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particle trajectories are consistent with the largest observed particle sizes.

  10. The structure of Escherichia coli signal recognition particle revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mainprize, Iain L; Beniac, Daniel R; Falkovskaia, Elena; Cleverley, Robert M; Gierasch, Lila M; Ottensmeyer, F Peter; Andrews, David W

    2006-12-01

    Structural studies on various domains of the ribonucleoprotein signal recognition particle (SRP) have not converged on a single complete structure of bacterial SRP consistent with the biochemistry of the particle. We obtained a three-dimensional structure for Escherichia coli SRP by cryoscanning transmission electron microscopy and mapped the internal RNA by electron spectroscopic imaging. Crystallographic data were fit into the SRP reconstruction, and although the resulting model differed from previous models, they could be rationalized by movement through an interdomain linker of Ffh, the protein component of SRP. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments determined interdomain distances that were consistent with our model of SRP. Docking our model onto the bacterial ribosome suggests a mechanism for signal recognition involving interdomain movement of Ffh into and out of the nascent chain exit site and suggests how SRP could interact and/or compete with the ribosome-bound chaperone, trigger factor, for a nascent chain during translation.

  11. Solar Energetic Particle Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    2003-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic-particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In fact, the highest proton intensities directly measured near Earth at energies up to approximately 1 GeV occur at the time of passage of shocks, which arrive about a day after the CMEs leave the Sun. CME-driven shocks expanding across magnetic fields can fill over half of the heliosphere with SEPs. Proton-generated Alfven waves trap particles near the shock for efficient acceleration but also throttle the intensities at Earth to the streaming limit early in the events. At high energies, particles begin to leak from the shock and the spectrum rolls downward to form an energy-spectral 'knee' that can vary in energy from approximately 1 MeV to approximately 1 GeV in different events. All of these factors affect the radiation dose as a function of depth and latitude in the Earth's atmosphere and the risk to astronauts and equipment in space. SEP ionization of the polar atmosphere produces nitrates that precipitate to become trapped in the polar ice. Observations of nitrate deposits in ice cores reveal individual large SEP events and extend back approximately 400 years. Unlike sunspots, SEP events follow the approximately 80-100-year Gleissberg cycle rather faithfully and are now at a minimum in that cycle. The largest SEP event in the last 400 years appears to be related to the flare observed by Carrington in 1859, but the probability of SEP events with such large fluences falls off sharply because of the streaming limit.

  12. Deletion of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) in Prader-Willi syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Two sibs with the typical phenotype without a cytogenetic deletion in chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kibe, Tetsuya; Wada, Yoshiro

    1996-04-24

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene is regarded as one of the candidates for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We describe two sibs with typical PWS presenting deletion of SNRPN detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Neither a cytogenetically detectable 15q12 deletion nor a deletion for the D15S11, D15S10, and GABRB3 cosmid probes were found in either patient. This implies a smaller deletion limited to the PWS critical region. FISH with a SNRPN probe will permit analysis of PWS patients with limited deletions not detectable with other probes. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Particle transport in 3 He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Zhang, L. D.; Mason, G. L.; Lakhina, G. S.; Hada, T.; Arballo, J. K.; Zwickl, R. D.

    2002-04-01

    Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths l

  14. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  15. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  16. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  17. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  18. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  19. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS AND JACOBI ENSEMBLES: LARGEST EIGENVALUE, TRACY-WIDOM LIMITS AND RATES OF CONVERGENCE.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Iain M

    2008-12-01

    Let A and B be independent, central Wishart matrices in p variables with common covariance and having m and n degrees of freedom, respectively. The distribution of the largest eigenvalue of (A + B)(-1)B has numerous applications in multivariate statistics, but is difficult to calculate exactly. Suppose that m and n grow in proportion to p. We show that after centering and, scaling, the distribution is approximated to second-order, O(p(-2/3)), by the Tracy-Widom law. The results are obtained for both complex and then real-valued data by using methods of random matrix theory to study the largest eigenvalue of the Jacobi unitary and orthogonal ensembles. Asymptotic approximations of Jacobi polynomials near the largest zero play a central role.

  20. Transit profiles: The thirty largest agencies for the 1992 section 15 report year. Statistical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This publication consists of consolidated profiles for the thirty (30) largest transit agencies in the United States. The criteria used to determine the thirty (30) largest transit agencies is operating expense reported for the 1992 report year. The data contained in each profile consists of general and summary reports, as well as modal, performance, and trend indicators for the 1992 report year. The 1992 Report Year is defined as a transit reporting agency with a fiscal year ending on or between January 1 and December 31.

  1. Evolution of influenza A virus PB2 genes: implications for evolution of the ribonucleoprotein complex and origin of human influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Gorman, O T; Donis, R O; Kawaoka, Y; Webster, R G

    1990-10-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 20 influenza A virus PB2 genes showed that PB2 genes have evolved into the following four major lineages: (i) equine/Prague/56 (EQPR56); (ii and iii) two distinct avian PB2 lineages, one containing FPV/34 and H13 gull virus strains and the other containing North American avian and recent equine strains; and (iv) human virus strains joined with classic swine virus strains (i.e., H1N1 swine virus strains related to swine/Iowa/15/30). The human virus lineage showed the greatest divergence from its root relative to other lineages. The estimated nucleotide evolutionary rate for the human PB2 lineage was 1.82 x 10(-3) changes per nucleotide per year, which is within the range of published estimates for NP and NS genes of human influenza A viruses. At the amino acid level, PB2s of human viruses have accumulated 34 amino acid changes over the past 55 years. In contrast, the avian PB2 lineages showed much less evolution, e.g., recent avian PB2s showed as few as three amino acid changes relative to the avian root. The completion of evolutionary analyses of the PB1, PB2, PA and NP genes of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex permits comparison of evolutionary pathways. Different patterns of evolution among the RNP genes indicate that the genes of the complex are not coevolving as a unit. Evolution of the PB1 and PB2 genes is less correlated with host-specific factors, and their proteins appear to be evolving more slowly than NP and PA. This suggests that protein functional constraints are limiting the evolutionary divergence of PB1 and PB2 genes. The parallel host-specific evolutionary pathways of the NP and PA genes suggest that these proteins are coevolving in response to host-specific factors. PB2s of human influenza A viruses share a common ancestor with classic swine virus PB2s, and the pattern of evolution suggests that the ancestor was an avian virus PB2. This same pattern of evolution appears in the other genes of the RNP complex. Antigenic

  2. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  3. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  4. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  5. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  6. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  7. EPA Administrator and San Francisco Bay Area government agencies celebrate nations largest solar energy partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy joined Bay Area agencies to celebrate the Regional Renewable Energy Procurement Project (R-REP), the nation's largest solar energy government collaboration and the launch of the Federal Agg

  8. Pterosaur from the latest cretaceous of west Texas: discovery of the largest flying creature.

    PubMed

    Lawson, D A

    1975-03-14

    Three partial skeletons of a large pterosaur have been found in the latest Cretaceous nonmarine rock of West Texas. This flying reptile had thin, elongate, perhaps toothless jaws and a long neck similar to Pterodaustro and Pterodactylus. With an estimated wingspan of 15.5 meters, it is undoutbtedly the largest flying creature presently known.

  9. Is Bigger Easier? John Forte: Administrating One of the Largest Districts in the Country.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    In this interview, John Forte, Fairfax County (Virginia) Public Schools' assistant superintendent for general services, explains how he uses his training and professional experience to oversee a smoothly running operation in one of the nation's largest school districts. His real challenge is providing extra support to students in low-income areas.…

  10. The 2003 Music in Our School's Month and World's Largest Concert Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    On March 13, 2003 millions of school children, teachers, and citizens from around the world participate simultaneously in the "World's Largest Concert" (WLC). This concert, a sing-along program, is broadcast on PBS and the Armed Forces Radio and Television Network overseas. Participating in the WLC is a way to celebrate Music in Our…

  11. 45. FINISHING STANDS, 98INCH CONTINUOUS HOT STRIP MILL, WORLD'S LARGEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. FINISHING STANDS, 98-INCH CONTINUOUS HOT STRIP MILL, WORLD'S LARGEST AT THE TIME OF INSTALLATION IN 1937. THE MILL WAS REPLACED BY A NEW 84-INCH MILL IN 1971 AND IS SEEN HERE PARTIALLY DISMANTLED IN PREPARATION FOR DEMOLITION. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. Profile of a Woman Officer; Findings of a Study of Executives in America's 1300 Largest Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    The typical woman officer from the nation's largest industrial, banking, retail and utility companies is married, at least 50 years of age, has had some college, was born into a family of low or lower middle class income, and has a work salary of less than $30,000. While the number of women officers in leading business organizations is small, the…

  13. 360 Video Tour of the World’s Largest Laser

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-08-24

    Welcome to the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the world’s largest and most energetic laser system. It draws researchers from around the globe for experiments that can’t be conducted anywhere else on Earth. Let’s take a closer look.

  14. Phase space reconstruction and estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent for gait kinematic data

    SciTech Connect

    Josiński, Henryk; Świtoński, Adam; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2015-03-10

    The authors describe an example of application of nonlinear time series analysis directed at identifying the presence of deterministic chaos in human motion data by means of the largest Lyapunov exponent. The method was previously verified on the basis of a time series constructed from the numerical solutions of both the Lorenz and the Rössler nonlinear dynamical systems.

  15. Coordinated observations using the world largest low-frequency radio telescopes and space misiions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Zarka, Ph.; Kolyadin, V. L.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Stepkin, S. V.; Panchenko, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Fischer, G.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Melnik, V. N.; Litvinenko, G. V.; Sidorchuk, M. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Vasilyeva, Ya. Yu.; Bojko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Mann, G.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Koval, A. A.; Mylostna, K.; Pylaev, O. S.; Shepelev, V. A.; Reznik, A. P.

    2013-09-01

    The positive possibilities of astrophysical objects studies(including the Solar system investigations) using coordinated observations with the largest existing and coming low frequency radio telescopes are shown. The observations of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn, ant others with UTR-2, URAN, NDA radio telescopes, and WIND, Cassini and STEREO space missions at frequencies lower than 40 MHz have been carried out.

  16. Solar system radio emissions studies with the largest low-frequency radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Litvinenko, G.; Kolyadin, V.; Zarka, P.; Mylostna, K.; Vasylieva, I.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Sidorchuk, M.; Rucker, H.; Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the trends and tasks in the field of lowfrequency studies of radio emission from the Solar system's objects. The world's largest decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN have a unique combination of sensitivity and time/frequency resolution parameters, providing the capability of the most detailed studies of various types of solar and planetary emissions.

  17. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  18. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  19. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  20. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  1. 12 CFR 1501.3 - Comparable ratings requirement for national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. 1501.3 Section 1501.3 Banks and Banking DEPARTMENT OF... national banks among the second 50 largest insured banks. (a) Scope and purpose. Section 5136A of the Revised Statutes permits a national bank that is within the second 50 largest insured banks to own...

  2. The strongest gravitational lenses. III. The order statistics of the largest Einstein radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waizmann, J.-C.; Redlich, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Bartelmann, M.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The Einstein radius of a gravitational lens is a key characteristic. It encodes information about decisive quantities such as halo mass, concentration, triaxiality, and orientation with respect to the observer. Therefore, the largest Einstein radii can potentially be utilised to test the predictions of the ΛCDM model. Aims: Hitherto, studies have focussed on the single largest observed Einstein radius. We extend those studies by employing order statistics to formulate exclusion criteria based on the n largest Einstein radii and apply these criteria to the strong lensing analysis of 12 MACS clusters at z> 0.5. Methods: We obtain the order statistics of Einstein radii by a Monte Carlo approach, based on the semi-analytic modelling of the halo population on the past lightcone. After sampling the order statistics, we fit a general extreme value distribution to the first-order distribution, which allows us to derive analytic relations for the order statistics of the Einstein radii. Results: We find that the Einstein radii of the 12 MACS clusters are not in conflict with the ΛCDM expectations. Our exclusion criteria indicate that, in order to exhibit tension with the concordance model, one would need to observe approximately twenty Einstein radii with θeff ≳ 30″, ten with θeff ≳ 35″, five with θeff ≳ 42″, or one with θeff ≳ 74″ in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.0 on the full sky (assuming a source redshift of zs = 2). Furthermore, we find that, with increasing order, the haloes with the largest Einstein radii are on average less aligned along the line-of-sight and less triaxial. In general, the cumulative distribution functions steepen for higher orders, giving them better constraining power. Conclusions: A framework that allows the individual and joint order distributions of the n-largest Einstein radii to be derived is presented. From a statistical point of view, we do not see any evidence of an Einstein ring problem even for the

  3. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  4. Auroral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-06-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  5. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  6. Largest lyapunov-exponent estimation and selective prediction by means of simplex forecast algorithms

    PubMed

    Dunki

    2000-11-01

    Limited predictability is one of the remarkable features of deterministic chaos and this feature may be quantized in terms of Lyapunov exponents. Accordingly, Lyapunov-exponent estimates may be expected to follow in a natural way from forecast algorithms. Exploring this idea, we propose a method estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent from a time series which uses the behavior of so-called simplex forecasts. The method considers the estimation of properties of the distribution of local simplex expansion coefficients. These are also used for the definition of error bars for the Lyapunov-exponent estimates and allows for selective forecasts with improved prediction accuracy. We demonstrate these concepts on standard test examples and three realistic applications to time series concerning largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation of an experimentally obtained hyperchaotic NMR signal, brain state differentiation, and stock-market prediction.

  7. Largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation and selective prediction by means of simplex forecast algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünki, Rudolf M.

    2000-11-01

    Limited predictability is one of the remarkable features of deterministic chaos and this feature may be quantized in terms of Lyapunov exponents. Accordingly, Lyapunov-exponent estimates may be expected to follow in a natural way from forecast algorithms. Exploring this idea, we propose a method estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent from a time series which uses the behavior of so-called simplex forecasts. The method considers the estimation of properties of the distribution of local simplex expansion coefficients. These are also used for the definition of error bars for the Lyapunov-exponent estimates and allows for selective forecasts with improved prediction accuracy. We demonstrate these concepts on standard test examples and three realistic applications to time series concerning largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation of an experimentally obtained hyperchaotic NMR signal, brain state differentiation, and stock-market prediction.

  8. Public health aspects of the world's largest mass gathering: The 2013 Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, India.

    PubMed

    Balsari, Satchit; Greenough, P Gregg; Kazi, Dhruv; Heerboth, Aaron; Dwivedi, Shraddha; Leaning, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    India's Kumbh Mela remains the world's largest and longest mass gathering. The 2013 event, where participants undertook a ritual bath, hosted over 70 million Hindu pilgrims during 55 days on a 1936 hectare flood plain at the confluence of the Yamuna and Ganga Rivers. On the holiest bathing days, the population surged. Unlike other religious, cultural, and sports mass gatherings, the Kumbh Mela's administration cannot estimate or limit the participant number. The event created serious and uncommon public health challenges: initiating crowd safety measures where population density and mobility directly contact flowing bodies of water; providing water, sanitation, and hygiene to a population that frequently defecates in the open; and establishing disease surveillance and resource use measures within a temporary health delivery system. We review the world's largest gathering by observing first-hand the public health challenges, plus the preparations for and responses to them. We recommend ways to improve preparedness.

  9. Public health aspects of the world's largest mass gathering: The 2013 Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, India.

    PubMed

    Balsari, Satchit; Greenough, P Gregg; Kazi, Dhruv; Heerboth, Aaron; Dwivedi, Shraddha; Leaning, Jennifer

    2016-09-08

    India's Kumbh Mela remains the world's largest and longest mass gathering. The 2013 event, where participants undertook a ritual bath, hosted over 70 million Hindu pilgrims during 55 days on a 1936 hectare flood plain at the confluence of the Yamuna and Ganga Rivers. On the holiest bathing days, the population surged. Unlike other religious, cultural, and sports mass gatherings, the Kumbh Mela's administration cannot estimate or limit the participant number. The event created serious and uncommon public health challenges: initiating crowd safety measures where population density and mobility directly contact flowing bodies of water; providing water, sanitation, and hygiene to a population that frequently defecates in the open; and establishing disease surveillance and resource use measures within a temporary health delivery system. We review the world's largest gathering by observing first-hand the public health challenges, plus the preparations for and responses to them. We recommend ways to improve preparedness.

  10. A method for reducing the largest relative errors in Monte Carlo iterated-fission-source calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J. L.; Sutton, T. M.

    2013-07-01

    In Monte Carlo iterated-fission-source calculations relative uncertainties on local tallies tend to be larger in lower-power regions and smaller in higher-power regions. Reducing the largest uncertainties to an acceptable level simply by running a larger number of neutron histories is often prohibitively expensive. The uniform fission site method has been developed to yield a more spatially-uniform distribution of relative uncertainties. This is accomplished by biasing the density of fission neutron source sites while not biasing the solution. The method is integrated into the source iteration process, and does not require any auxiliary forward or adjoint calculations. For a given amount of computational effort, the use of the method results in a reduction of the largest uncertainties relative to the standard algorithm. Two variants of the method have been implemented and tested. Both have been shown to be effective. (authors)

  11. THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY IN A85: THE LARGEST CORE KNOWN SO FAR

    SciTech Connect

    López-Cruz, O.; Añorve, C.; Ibarra-Medel, H. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.

    2014-11-10

    We have found that the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in A85, Holm 15A, displays the largest core known so far. Its cusp radius, r {sub γ} = 4.57 ± 0.06 kpc (4.''26 ± 0.''06), is more than 18 times larger than the mean for BCGs and ≳ 1 kpc larger than A2261-BCG, hitherto the largest-cored BCG. Holm 15A hosts the luminous amorphous radio source 0039-095B and has the optical signature of a LINER. Scaling laws indicate that this core could host a supermassive black hole (SMBH) of mass M {sub •} ∼ (10{sup 9}-10{sup 11}) M {sub ☉}. We suggest that cores this large represent a relatively short phase in the evolution of BCGs, whereas the masses of their associated SBMH might be set by initial conditions.

  12. Polynomial potentials determined from the energy spectrum and transition dipole moments that give the largest hyperpolarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Nathan J.; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2016-12-01

    We attempt to get a polynomial solution to the inverse problem, that is, to determine the form of the mechanical Hamiltonian when given the energy spectrum and transition dipole moment matrix. Our approach is to determine the potential in the form of a polynomial by finding an approximate solution to the inverse problem, then to determine the hyperpolarizability for that system's Hamiltonian. We find that the largest hyperpolarizabilities approach the apparent limit of previous potential optimization studies, but we do not find real potentials for the parameter values necessary to exceed this apparent limit. We also explore half potentials with positive exponent, which cannot be expressed as a polynomial except for integer powers. This yields a simple closed potential with only one parameter that scans nearly the full range of the intrinsic hyperpolarizability. The limiting case of vanishing exponent yields the largest intrinsic hyperpolarizability.

  13. Limiting statistics of the largest and smallest eigenvalues in the correlated Wishart model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Tim; Kieburg, Mario; Guhr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The correlated Wishart model provides a standard tool for the analysis of correlations in a rich variety of systems. Although much is known for complex correlation matrices, the empirically much more important real case still poses substantial challenges. We put forward a new approach, which maps arbitrary statistical quantities, depending on invariants only, to invariant Hermitian matrix models. For completeness we also include the quaternion case and deal with all three cases in a unified way. As an important application, we study the statistics of the largest eigenvalue and its limiting distributions in the correlated Wishart model, because they help to estimate the behavior of large complex systems. We show that even for fully correlated Wishart ensembles, the Tracy-Widom distribution can be the limiting distribution of the largest as well as the smallest eigenvalue, provided that a certain scaling of the empirical eigenvalues holds.

  14. Rapid Deposition Technology Holds the Key for the World's Largest Solar Manufacturer (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    Thanks in part to years of collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a manufacturer of thin-film solar modules has grown from a small garage-type operation to become the world's largest manufacturer of solar modules. First Solar, Inc. now manufactures cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar modules throughout the world, but it began in Ohio as a small company called Solar Cells, Inc.

  15. Distribution of the largest event in the critical epidemic-type aftershock-sequence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vere-Jones, David; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2008-10-01

    This Brief Report corrects and extends the results of Zhuang and Ogata [Phys. Rev. E 73, 046134 (2006)] on the asymptotic behavior of the largest event in the epidemic-type aftershock-sequence model for earthquake occurrence. We show that, in the special case that the underlying branching process is critical, there exists a previously unnoticed mode of behavior, which occurs when the expected family size grows relatively slowly.

  16. Largest impact features on Venus: Non-preserved or non-recognizable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Olga V.

    1993-03-01

    Conventional explanation of a lack of impact craters with diameters greater than 300 km on Venus is that they formed during the intense bombardment era and had lunar-like morphology, but they are not preserved now because of rapid viscous relaxation of their topograpy and/or high endogenous reworking of surface. Other explanation invokes failure to recognize these larger craters because of their non-lunar-like morphology from the moment of formation, since larger gravity of Venus relatively to the Moon results in that largest craters on Venus may form within the mass of shock melted material while comparably sized lunar craters would be still almost 'dry'. To test this hypothesis, morphologies and rim-crest diameters of the largest peak-ring and Orientale-type basins and all larger impact features on Moon, Mercury, Mars, and Venus were compiled and compared to rim crest diameters of model craters with different melt volume/transient-cavity volume ratios. Results show that the final diameters of model craters formed at depth of melting about twice of transient cavity depth correspond to changeover from a planet-similar morphology of all the smaller basins on any terrestrial planet to a planet-specific morphology of all the larger basins on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars. On Venus, these largest impact features are not found and instead, a Venus-specific morphology of the largest concentric coronae appears in this size range. The coronae were suggested to form over sites of mantle upwelling and modified by subsequent volcanism and gravitational relaxation. The results here suggest that mantle upwelling - the first and necessary step of the corona formation models - may be induced by impact event (as a result of transient cavity collapse) and operated under cover of hot, slowly cooled impact melt in the areas of thinned crust and/or thermally active regions.

  17. Reduced IgG anti-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with positive IgM anti-cytomegalovirus antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Palafox Sánchez, Claudia Azucena; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward KL; Carcamo, Wendy C; Muñoz Valle, José Francisco; Orozco Barocio, Gerardo; Oregon Romero, Edith; Navarro Hernández, Rosa Elena; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio; Vázquez del Mercado, Mónica

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by production of autoantibodies to RNA or DNA–protein complexes such as small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). A role of Epstein–Barr virus in the pathogenesis has been suggested. Similar to Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects the majority of individuals at a young age and establishes latency with a potential for reactivation. Homology of CMV glycoprotein B (UL55) with the U1snRNP-70 kDa protein (U1–70 k) has been described; however, the role of CMV infection in production of anti-snRNPs is controversial. We investigated the association of CMV serology and autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Sixty-one Mexican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were tested for CMV and Epstein–Barr virus serology (viral capsid antigen, IgG, IgM) and autoantibodies by immunoprecipitation and ELISA (IgG and IgM class, U1RNP/Sm, U1–70 k, P peptide, rheumatoid factor, dsDNA, β2-glycoprotein I). Results IgG anti-CMV and IgM anti-CMV were positive in 95% (58/61) and 33% (20/61), respectively, and two cases were negative for both. Clinical manifestation and autoantibodies in the IgM anti-CMV(+) group (n = 20) versus the IgM anti-CMV(-)IgG (+) (n = 39) group were compared. Most (19/20) of the IgM anti-CMV(+) cases were IgG anti-CMV(+), consistent with reactivation or reinfection. IgM anti-CMV was unrelated to rheumatoid factor or IgM class autoantibodies and none was positive for IgM anti-Epstein–Barr virus–viral capsid antigen, indicating that this is not simply due to false positive results caused by rheumatoid factor or nonspecific binding by certain IgM. The IgM anti-CMV(+) group has significantly lower levels of IgG anti-U1RNP/Sm and IgG anti-U1–70 k (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0046, respectively). This finding was also confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Among the IgM anti-CMV(-) subset, anti-Su was associated with anti-U1RNP and anti-Ro (P < 0.05). High levels of Ig

  18. Experimental Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Carl; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Purohit, Milind V.

    2014-08-31

    , which collected data at SLAC until 2008. They continued to analyze the voluminous BaBar data with an emphasis on precision tests of Quantum Chromodynamics and on properties of the "eta_B," a bottom quark paired in a meson with a strange quark. The ATLAS experiment became the principal research focus for Purohit. One of the world's largest pieces of scientific equipment, ATLAS observes particle collisions at the highest-energy particle accelerator ever built, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Our efforts on ATLAS included participation in the commissioning, calibration, and installation of components called "CSCs". The unprecedented energy of 14 TeV enabled the ATLAS and CMS collaborations to declare discovery of the famous Higgs particle in 2012.

  19. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  20. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  1. Single particle imaging of mRNAs crossing the nuclear pore: Surfing on the edge.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Truong, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Six years ago, the Singer lab published a landmark paper which described how individual mRNA particles cross the nuclear pore complex in mammalian tissue culture cells. This involved the simultaneous imaging of mRNAs, each labeled by a large number of tethered fluorescent proteins and fluorescently tagged nuclear pore components. Now two groups have applied this technique to the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Their results indicate that in the course of nuclear export, mRNAs likely engage complexes that are present on either side of the pore and that these interactions are modulated by proteins present in the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex. These findings lend support to the notion that just before and/or after the completion of nuclear export, mRNPs undergo one or more maturation steps that prepare the packaged mRNAs for translation. These results represent new and exciting insights into the mechanism of mRNA nuclear export.

  2. Deep, diverse and definitely different: unique attributes of the world's largest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Brandt, A.; Danovaro, R.; Escobar, E.; German, C. R.; Levin, L. A.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Menot, L.; Buhl-Mortensen, P.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Smith, C. R.; Tittensor, D. P.; Tyler, P. A.; Vanreusel, A.; Vecchione, M.

    2010-04-01

    The deep sea, the largest biome on Earth, has a series of characteristics that make this environment both distinct from other marine and land ecosystems and unique for the entire planet. This review describes these patterns and processes, from geological settings to biological processes, biodiversity and biogeographical patterns. It concludes with a brief discussion of current threats from anthropogenic activities to deep-sea habitats and their fauna. Investigations of deep-sea habitats and their fauna began in the late 19th Century. In the intervening years, technological developments and stimulating discoveries have promoted deep-sea research and changed our way of understanding life on the planet. Nevertheless, the deep sea is still mostly unknown and current discovery rates of both habitats and species remain high. The geological, physical and geochemical settings of the deep-sea floor and the water column form a series of different habitats with unique characteristics that support specific faunal communities. Since 1840, 27 new habitats/ecosystems have been discovered from the shelf break to the deep trenches and discoveries of new habitats are still happening in the early 21st Century. However, for most of these habitats, the global area covered is unknown or has been only very roughly estimated; an even smaller - indeed, minimal - proportion has actually been sampled and investigated. We currently perceive most of the deep-sea ecosystems as heterotrophic, depending ultimately on the flux on organic matter produced in the overlying surface ocean through photosynthesis. The resulting strong food limitation, thus, shapes deep-sea biota and communities, with exceptions only in reducing ecosystems such as inter alia hydrothermal vents or cold seeps, where chemoautolithotrophic bacteria play the role of primary producers fuelled by chemical energy sources rather than sunlight. Other ecosystems, such as seamounts, canyons or cold-water corals have an increased

  3. Deep, diverse and definitely different: unique attributes of the world's largest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Brandt, A.; Danovaro, R.; de Mol, B.; Escobar, E.; German, C. R.; Levin, L. A.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Menot, L.; Buhl-Mortensen, P.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Smith, C. R.; Tittensor, D. P.; Tyler, P. A.; Vanreusel, A.; Vecchione, M.

    2010-09-01

    The deep sea, the largest biome on Earth, has a series of characteristics that make this environment both distinct from other marine and land ecosystems and unique for the entire planet. This review describes these patterns and processes, from geological settings to biological processes, biodiversity and biogeographical patterns. It concludes with a brief discussion of current threats from anthropogenic activities to deep-sea habitats and their fauna. Investigations of deep-sea habitats and their fauna began in the late 19th century. In the intervening years, technological developments and stimulating discoveries have promoted deep-sea research and changed our way of understanding life on the planet. Nevertheless, the deep sea is still mostly unknown and current discovery rates of both habitats and species remain high. The geological, physical and geochemical settings of the deep-sea floor and the water column form a series of different habitats with unique characteristics that support specific faunal communities. Since 1840, 28 new habitats/ecosystems have been discovered from the shelf break to the deep trenches and discoveries of new habitats are still happening in the early 21st century. However, for most of these habitats the global area covered is unknown or has been only very roughly estimated; an even smaller - indeed, minimal - proportion has actually been sampled and investigated. We currently perceive most of the deep-sea ecosystems as heterotrophic, depending ultimately on the flux on organic matter produced in the overlying surface ocean through photosynthesis. The resulting strong food limitation thus shapes deep-sea biota and communities, with exceptions only in reducing ecosystems such as inter alia hydrothermal vents or cold seeps. Here, chemoautolithotrophic bacteria play the role of primary producers fuelled by chemical energy sources rather than sunlight. Other ecosystems, such as seamounts, canyons or cold-water corals have an increased

  4. Particle Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2014-05-01

    Geophysics research has long been dominated by classical mechanics, largely disregarding the potential of particle physics to augment existing techniques. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in probing Earth's interior with muons and neutrinos. Existing results for various volcanological targets are reviewed. Geoneutrinos are also highlighted as examples in which the neutrino probes elucidate the composition of Earth's deep interior. Particle geophysics has the potential to serve as a useful paradigm to transform our understanding of Earth as dramatically as the X-ray transformed our understanding of medicine and the body.

  5. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  6. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  7. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  8. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  9. Analysis of the largest tandemly repeated DNA families in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Peter E; Hasson, Dan; Guillem, Flavia; Lescale, Chloe; Jin, Xiaoping; Abrusan, Gyorgy

    2008-01-01

    Background Tandemly Repeated DNA represents a large portion of the human genome, and accounts for a significant amount of copy number variation. Here we present a genome wide analysis of the largest tandem repeats found in the human genome sequence. Results Using Tandem Repeats Finder (TRF), tandem repeat arrays greater than 10 kb in total size were identified, and classified into simple sequence e.g. GAATG, classical satellites e.g. alpha satellite DNA, and locus specific VNTR arrays. Analysis of these large sequenced regions revealed that several "simple sequence" arrays actually showed complex domain and/or higher order repeat organization. Using additional methods, we further identified a total of 96 additional arrays with tandem repeat units greater than 2 kb (the detection limit of TRF), 53 of which contained genes or repeated exons. The overall size of an array of tandem 12 kb repeats which spanned a gap on chromosome 8 was found to be 600 kb to 1.7 Mbp in size, representing one of the largest non-centromeric arrays characterized. Several novel megasatellite tandem DNA families were observed that are characterized by repeating patterns of interspersed transposable elements that have expanded presumably by unequal crossing over. One of these families is found on 11 different chromosomes in >25 arrays, and represents one of the largest most widespread megasatellite DNA families. Conclusion This study represents the most comprehensive genome wide analysis of large tandem repeats in the human genome, and will serve as an important resource towards understanding the organization and copy number variation of these complex DNA families. PMID:18992157

  10. Comprehensive smoke-free laws--50 largest U.S. cities, 2000 and 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-11-16

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure causes heart disease and lung cancer in nonsmoking adults and several health conditions in children. Only completely eliminating smoking in indoor spaces fully protects nonsmokers from SHS. State and local laws can provide this protection in enclosed workplaces and public places by completely eliminating smoking in these settings. CDC considers a smoke-free law to be comprehensive if it prohibits smoking in all indoor areas of private workplaces, restaurants, and bars, with no exceptions. In response to growing evidence on the health effects of SHS, communities and states have increasingly adopted comprehensive smoke-free (CSF) laws in recent years. To assess trends in protecting the population from SHS exposure, CDC and the American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation (ANRF) compared coverage by local or state CSF laws in the 50 largest U.S. cities as of December 31, 2000, and October 5, 2012. The analysis focused on smoking restrictions in the 50 largest cities because these cities represent an important indicator of nationwide trends in local and state policy and because they are home to an estimated 47 million persons, or nearly 15% of the U.S. population. The analysis found that the number of these cities covered by local and/or state CSF laws increased from one city (2%) in 2000 to 30 cities (60%) in 2012. A total of 20 cities (40%) were not covered by a CSF law at either the local or state level in 2012, although 14 of these cities had 100% smoke-free provisions in place at the local or state level in at least one of the three settings considered. The results of this analysis indicate that substantial progress has been achieved during 2000-2012 in implementing CSF laws in the 50 largest U.S. cities. However, gaps in coverage, especially in the southern United States and in states with laws that preempt local smoking restrictions, are contributing to disparities in SHS protections.

  11. An unusual symbiont from the gut of surgeonfishes may be the largest known prokaryote.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, K D; Bullivant, S

    1991-01-01

    Symbionts first reported from the gut of a Red Sea surgeonfish, Acanthurus nigrofuscus (family Acanthuridae), were subsequently described as Epulopiscium fishelsoni. The taxonomic position of this very large (up to 576 microns in length) microorganism has previously been designated in the literature as either uncertain or eukaryotic. We suggest that similar symbionts from Great Barrier Reef surgeonfish may be prokaryotes, which together with E. fishelsoni from the Red Sea may represent the largest known forms of this cell type. Features identifying the symbionts as prokaryotes include the presence of bacterial-type flagella and a bacterial nucleoid and the absence of a nucleus or any other membrane-bound organelle. Images PMID:1885516

  12. THE MASS OF (4) VESTA DERIVED FROM ITS LARGEST GRAVITATIONAL EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmanoski, Mike; Novakovic, Bojan; Apostolovska, Gordana E-mail: bojan@matf.bg.ac.r

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we present a recalculated value of the mass of (4) Vesta, derived from its largest gravitational perturbations on selected asteroids during their mutual close encounters. This was done by using a new method for mass determination, which is based on the linking of pre-encounter observations to the orbit determined from post-encounter ones. The estimated weighted mean of the mass of (4) Vesta is (1.300 {+-} 0.001) x 10{sup -10} M{sub sun}.

  13. The Genome Russia project: closing the largest remaining omission on the world Genome map.

    PubMed

    Oleksyk, Taras K; Brukhin, Vladimir; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    We are witnessing the great era of genome exploration of the world, as genetic variation in people is being detailed across multiple varied world populations in an effort unprecedented since the first human genome sequence appeared in 2001. However, these efforts have yet to produce a comprehensive mapping of humankind, because important regions of modern human civilization remain unexplored. The Genome Russia Project promises to fill one of the largest gaps, the expansive regions across the Russian Federation, informing not just medical genomics of the territories, but also the migration settlements  of historic and pre-historic Eurasian peoples.

  14. A Very Simple Method to Calculate the (Positive) Largest Lyapunov Exponent Using Interval Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Eduardo M. A. M.; Nepomuceno, Erivelton G.

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, a very simple method to calculate the positive Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE) based on the concept of interval extensions and using the original equations of motion is presented. The exponent is estimated from the slope of the line derived from the lower bound error when considering two interval extensions of the original system. It is shown that the algorithm is robust, fast and easy to implement and can be considered as alternative to other algorithms available in the literature. The method has been successfully tested in five well-known systems: Logistic, Hénon, Lorenz and Rössler equations and the Mackey-Glass system.

  15. Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3-D Printed Object

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-29

    Researchers at the MDF have 3D-printed a large-scale trim tool for a Boeing 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet airliner. The additively manufactured tool was printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine over a 30-hour period. The team used a thermoplastic pellet comprised of 80% ABS plastic and 20% carbon fiber from local material supplier. The tool has proven to decrease time, labor, cost and errors associated with traditional manufacturing techniques and increased energy savings in preliminary testing and will undergo further, long term testing.

  16. Infrared Time Lapse of World’s Largest 3D-Printed Object

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-29

    Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have 3D-printed a large-scale trim tool for a Boeing 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet airliner. The additively manufactured tool was printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine over a 30-hour period. The team used a thermoplastic pellet comprised of 80% ABS plastic and 20% carbon fiber from local material supplier. The tool has proven to decrease time, labor, cost and errors associated with traditional manufacturing techniques and increased energy savings in preliminary testing and will undergo further, long term testing.

  17. Female urethral diverticulum presenting with acute urinary retention: Reporting the largest diverticulum with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Manas Ranjan; Ranjan, Priyadarshi; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2012-04-01

    Female urethral diverticulum is a rare entity with diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations. It is a very rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in females presenting with acute urinary retention associated with a vaginal mass. Strong clinical suspicion combined with thorough physical examination and focused radiological investigations are vital for its diagnosis. Herein we report a case of giant urethral diverticulum presenting with acute urinary retention in a young female. It was managed by excision and urethral closure, and is the largest urethral diverticulum reported till date in the literature.

  18. Mesophotic fishes of the Abrolhos Shelf, the largest reef ecosystem in the South Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Simon, T; Pinheiro, H T; Moura, R L; Carvalho-Filho, A; Rocha, L A; Martins, A S; Mazzei, E; Francini-Filho, R B; Amado-Filho, G M; Joyeux, J-C

    2016-07-01

    Fishes inhabiting rhodolith beds and reefs at mesophotic depths on the Abrolhos Shelf, which encompasses the largest and richest coral reef formation in the South Atlantic Ocean, were assessed through technical diving and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). A total of 74 fish species were recorded, including at least one new species, one new record for the south-western Atlantic and six new records for the Abrolhos region. Overfishing, mining and port activities are already threatening many endangered and commercially important species recorded on the mesophotic reefs of Abrolhos Shelf, and the establishment of marine protected areas and off-reserve fisheries regulations are urgently needed.

  19. Venezuelan projects advance to develop world`s largest heavy oil reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, G.; Stauffer, K.

    1996-07-08

    A number of joint venture projects at varying stages of progress promise to greatly increase Venezuela`s production of extra heavy oil. Units of Conoco, Chevron, Total, Arco, and Mobil have either signed agreements or are pursuing negotiations with affiliates of state-owned Petroleos de Venezuela SA on the development of huge reserves of 8--10{degree} gravity crude. Large heavy oil resources are present in the oil producing areas of eastern and western Venezuela, and the largest are in eastern Venezuela`s Orinoco heavy oil belt. The paper discusses the Orinoco heavy oil belt geology and several joint ventures being implemented.

  20. Health benefits of particle filtration.

    PubMed

    Fisk, W J

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  1. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  2. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  3. Largest vertebrate vomeronasal type 1 receptor gene repertoire in the semiaquatic platypus.

    PubMed

    Grus, Wendy E; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2007-10-01

    Vertebrate vomeronasal chemoreception plays important roles in many aspects of an organism's daily life, such as mating, territoriality, and foraging. Vomeronasal type 1 receptors (V1Rs) and vomeronasal type 2 receptors (V2Rs), 2 large families of G protein-coupled receptors, serve as vomeronasal receptors to bind to various pheromones and odorants. Contrary to the previous observations of reduced olfaction in aquatic and semiaquatic mammals, we here report the surprising finding that the platypus, a semiaquatic monotreme, has the largest V1R repertoire and nearly largest combined repertoire of V1Rs and V2Rs of all vertebrates surveyed, with 270 intact genes and 579 pseudogenes in the V1R family and 15 intact genes, 55 potentially intact genes, and 57 pseudogenes in the V2R family. Phylogenetic analysis shows a remarkable expansion of the V1R repertoire and a moderate expansion of the V2R repertoire in platypus since the separation of monotremes from placentals and marsupials. Our results challenge the view that olfaction is unimportant to aquatic mammals and call for further study into the role of vomeronasal reception in platypus physiology and behavior.

  4. A Mighty Claw: Pinching Force of the Coconut Crab, the Largest Terrestrial Crustacean

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Taketeru; Miyamoto, Kei

    2016-01-01

    Crustaceans can exert a greater force using their claws than many animals can with other appendages. Furthermore, in decapods, the chela is a notable organ with multifunctional roles. The coconut crab, Birgus latro, is the largest terrestrial crustacean and has a remarkable ability to lift weights up to approximately 30 kg. However, the pinching force of this crab’s chelae has not been previously investigated. In the present study, we measured the pinching force of the chelae in 29 wild coconut crabs (33–2,120 g in body weight). The maximum force ranged from 29.4 to 1,765.2 N, and showed a strong positive correlation with body mass. Based on the correlation between pinching force and body weight, the force potentially exerted by the largest crab (4 kg weight) reported in a previous study would be 3300 N, which greatly exceeds the pinching force of other crustaceans as well as the bite force of most terrestrial predators. The mighty claw is a terrestrial adaptation that is not only a weapon, which can be used to prevent predator attack and inhibit competitors, but is also a tool to hunt other terrestrial organisms with rigid exteriors, aiding in these organisms to be omnivores. PMID:27880779

  5. Sequencing of tsunami waves: Why the first wave is not always the largest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, Emile; Synolakis, Costas

    2015-04-01

    In many instances, the largest wave to hit a coastline during a tsunami is not the first one. Classical examples include the arrivals of the 1960 Chilean tsunami in Hilo, Hawaii, and of the 1964 Alaskan tsunami in Crescent City, California, where most casualties took place during later arrivals. This situation can be socially treacherous, since residents and civil defense authorities are led to believe that the worst is over after a first, relatively mild arrival, and to give an early "all clear" before the true largest wave, as was the case in Papeete, Tahiti during the 2011 Tohoku tsunami. We research this problem by using a number of simple models for which analytical solutions are available, as well as more realistic simulations of the large earthquake tsunamis of the past decade, and compare their results to a catalog of waveforms obtained at DART buoys spread over the Pacific Basin. Preliminary results indicate a transition from a regime of Maximum First Wave to one of Delayed Maximum when distance is increased, azimuth to receiver is moved away from the normal to fault strike, and/or source size is reduced.

  6. Public health preparedness for the world's largest mass gathering: 2010 World Exposition in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Yi, He; Zheng'an, Yuan; Fan, Wu; Xiang, Guo; Chen, Dong; Yongchao, He; Xiaodong, Sun; Hao, Pan; Mahany, Mollie; Keim, Mark

    2012-12-01

    The 2010 World Exposition in Shanghai China (Expo) was the largest mass gathering in world history, attracting a record 72 million visitors. More than 190 countries participated in the Expo, along with more than 50 international organizations. The 2010 Expo was six months in duration (May 1 through October 30, 2010), and the size of the venue site comprised 5.28 square kilometers. Great challenges were imposed on the public health system in Shanghai due to the high number and density of visitors, long duration of the event, and other risk factors such as high temperatures, typhoon, etc. As the major metropolitan public health agency in Shanghai, the Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention (SCDC) implemented a series of actions in preparing for, and responding to, the potential health impact of the world's largest mass gathering to date, which included partnerships for capacity building, enhancement of internal organizational structure, risk assessment, strengthened surveillance, disaster planning and exercises, laboratory management, vaccination campaign, health education, health intervention, risk communication and mass media surveillance, and technical support for health inspection. The clear-cut organizational structures and job responsibilities, as well as comprehensive operational and scientific preparations, were key elements to ensure the success of the 2010 World Exposition.

  7. Oklahoma experiences largest earthquake during ongoing regional wastewater injection hazard mitigation efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, W. L.; Hayes, G. P.; McNamara, D. E.; Rubinstein, J. L.; Barnhart, W. D.; Earle, P. S.; Benz, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    The 3 September 2016, Mw 5.8 Pawnee earthquake was the largest recorded earthquake in the state of Oklahoma. Seismic and geodetic observations of the Pawnee sequence, including precise hypocenter locations and moment tensor modeling, shows that the Pawnee earthquake occurred on a previously unknown left-lateral strike-slip basement fault that intersects the mapped right-lateral Labette fault zone. The Pawnee earthquake is part of an unprecedented increase in the earthquake rate in Oklahoma that is largely considered the result of the deep injection of waste fluids from oil and gas production. If this is, indeed, the case for the M5.8 Pawnee earthquake, then this would be the largest event to have been induced by fluid injection. Since 2015, Oklahoma has undergone wide-scale mitigation efforts primarily aimed at reducing injection volumes. Thus far in 2016, the rate of M3 and greater earthquakes has decreased as compared to 2015, while the cumulative moment—or energy released from earthquakes—has increased. This highlights the difficulty in earthquake hazard mitigation efforts given the poorly understood long-term diffusive effects of wastewater injection and their connection to seismicity.

  8. The Largest Response Component in the Motor Cortex Reflects Movement Timing but Not Movement Type

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Ryu, Stephen I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural activity in monkey motor cortex (M1) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) can reflect a chosen movement well before that movement begins. The pattern of neural activity then changes profoundly just before movement onset. We considered the prediction, derived from formal considerations, that the transition from preparation to movement might be accompanied by a large overall change in the neural state that reflects when movement is made rather than which movement is made. Specifically, we examined “components” of the population response: time-varying patterns of activity from which each neuron’s response is approximately composed. Amid the response complexity of individual M1 and PMd neurons, we identified robust response components that were “condition-invariant”: their magnitude and time course were nearly identical regardless of reach direction or path. These condition-invariant response components occupied dimensions orthogonal to those occupied by the “tuned” response components. The largest condition-invariant component was much larger than any of the tuned components; i.e., it explained more of the structure in individual-neuron responses. This condition-invariant response component underwent a rapid change before movement onset. The timing of that change predicted most of the trial-by-trial variance in reaction time. Thus, although individual M1 and PMd neurons essentially always reflected which movement was made, the largest component of the population response reflected movement timing rather than movement type. PMID:27761519

  9. Supergranulation as the Largest Buoyantly Driven Convective Scale of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark P.

    2016-09-01

    The origin of solar supergranulation remains a mystery. Unlike granulation, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale-height in the photosphere, supergranulation does not reflect any obvious length scale of the solar convection zone. Moreover, recent observations of flows in the photosphere using Doppler imaging or correlation or feature tracking show a monotonic decrease in horizontal flow power at scales larger than supergranulation. Both local area and global spherical shell simulations of solar convection by contrast show the opposite, an increase in horizontal flow amplitudes to a low wavenumber. We examine these disparities and investigate how the solar supergranulation may arise as a consequence of nonlocal heat transport by cool diving plumes. Using three-dimensional anelastic simulations with surface driving, we show that the kinetic energy of the largest convective scales in the upper layers of a stratified domain reflects the depth of transition from strong buoyant driving to adiabatic stratification below caused by the dilution of the granular downflows. This depth is quite shallow because of the rapid increase of the mean density below the photosphere. We interpret the observed monotonic decrease in solar convective power at scales larger than supergranulation to be a consequence of this rapid transition, with the supergranular scale the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection in the Sun.

  10. New Closed-Form of the Largest Eigenvalue PDF for Max-SNR MIMO System Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letessier, Jonathan; Vrigneau, Baptiste; Rostaing, Philippe; Burel, Gilles

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) maximum-SNR (max-SNR) system employs the maximum ratio combiner (MRC) at the receiver side and the maximum ratio transmitter (MRT) at the transmitter side. Its performances highly depend on MIMO channel characteristics, which vary according to both the number of antennas and their distribution between the transmitter and receiver sides. By using the decomposition of the ordered Wishart distribution in the uncorrelated Rayleigh case, we derived a closed-form expression of the largest eigenvalue probability density function (PDF). The final result yields to an expression form of the PDF where polynomials are multiplied by exponentials; it is worth underlining that, though this form had been previously observed for given couples of antennas, to date no formally-written closed-form was available in the literature for an arbitrary couple. Then, this new expression permits one to quickly and easily get the well known largest eigenvalue PDF and use it to determine the binary error probability (BEP) of the max-SNR.

  11. Impact of closing Canada's largest point-source of mercury emissions on local atmospheric mercury concentrations.

    PubMed

    Eckley, Chris S; Parsons, Matthew T; Mintz, Rachel; Lapalme, Monique; Mazur, Maxwell; Tordon, Robert; Elleman, Robert; Graydon, Jennifer A; Blanchard, Pierrette; St Louis, Vincent

    2013-09-17

    The Flin Flon, Manitoba copper smelter was Canada's largest point source of mercury emissions until its closure in 2010 after ~80 years of operation. The objective of this study was to understand the variables controlling the local ground-level air mercury concentrations before and after this major point source reduction. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) in air, mercury in precipitation, and other ancillary meteorological and air quality parameters were measured pre- and postsmelter closure, and mercury speciation measurements in air were collected postclosure. The results showed that TGM was significantly elevated during the time period when the smelter operated (4.1 ± 3.7 ng m(-3)), decreased only 20% during the year following its closure, and remained ~2-fold above background levels. Similar trends were observed for mercury concentrations in precipitation. Several lines of evidence indicated that while smelter stack emissions would occasionally mix down to the surface resulting in large spikes in TGM concentrations (up to 61 ng m(-3)), the largest contributor to elevated TGM concentrations before and after smelter closure was from surface-air fluxes from mercury-enriched soils and/or tailings. These findings highlight the ability of legacy mercury, deposited to local landscapes over decades from industrial activities, to significantly affect local air concentrations via emissions/re-emissions.

  12. The largest strongly connected component in the cyclical pedigree model of Wakeley et al.

    PubMed

    Blath, Jochen; Kadow, Stephan; Ortgiese, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    We establish a link between Wakeley et al.'s (2012) cyclical pedigree model from population genetics and a randomized directed configuration model (DCM) considered by Cooper and Frieze (2004). We then exploit this link in combination with asymptotic results for the in-degree distribution of the corresponding DCM to compute the asymptotic size of the largest strongly connected component S(N) (where N is the population size) of the DCM resp. the pedigree. The size of the giant component can be characterized explicitly (amounting to approximately 80% of the total populations size) and thus contributes to a reduced 'pedigree effective population size'. In addition, the second largest strongly connected component is only of size O(logN). Moreover, we describe the size and structure of the 'domain of attraction' of S(N). In particular, we show that with high probability for any individual the shortest ancestral line reaches S(N) after O(loglogN) generations, while almost all other ancestral lines take at most O(logN) generations.

  13. Constraining gravity at the largest scales through CMB lensing and galaxy velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. EG is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and σ8. While traditionally, the lensing field for EG has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for EG at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of EG ever, up to 150 Mpc h-1, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter β. We report EG(z = 0.57) = 0.243 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity (GR) prediction at a level of 2.6σ. Note that our EG measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc h-1, scales which have not been probed by previous EG tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.

  14. Population genetic structure of Earth's largest fish, the whale shark (Rhincodon typus).

    PubMed

    Castro, A L F; Stewart, B S; Wilson, S G; Hueter, R E; Meekan, M G; Motta, P J; Bowen, B W; Karl, S A

    2007-12-01

    Large pelagic vertebrates pose special conservation challenges because their movements generally exceed the boundaries of any single jurisdiction. To assess the population structure of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus), we sequenced complete mitochondrial DNA control regions from individuals collected across a global distribution. We observed 51 single site polymorphisms and 8 regions with indels comprising 44 haplotypes in 70 individuals, with high haplotype (h = 0.974 +/- 0.008) and nucleotide diversity (pi = 0.011 +/- 0.006). The control region has the largest length variation yet reported for an elasmobranch (1143-1332 bp). Phylogenetic analyses reveal no geographical clustering of lineages and the most common haplotype was distributed globally. The absence of population structure across the Indian and Pacific basins indicates that oceanic expanses and land barriers in Southeast Asia are not impediments to whale shark dispersal. We did, however, find significant haplotype frequency differences (AMOVA, Phi(ST) = 0.107, P < 0.001) principally between the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific populations. In contrast to other recent surveys of globally distributed sharks, we find much less population subdivision and no evidence for cryptic evolutionary partitions. Discovery of the mating and pupping areas of whale sharks is key to further population genetic studies. The global pattern of shared haplotypes in whale sharks provides a compelling argument for development of broad international approaches for management and conservation of Earth's largest fish.

  15. Evaluation of nonlinear properties of epileptic activity using largest Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana M.; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Sysoev, Ilya V.

    2016-04-01

    Absence seizures are known to be highly non-linear large amplitude oscillations with a well pronounced main time scale. Whilst the appearance of the main frequency is usually considered as a transition from noisy complex dynamics of baseline EEG to more regular absence activity, the dynamical properties of this type of epileptiformic activity in genetic absence models was not studied precisely. Here, the estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent from intracranial EEGs of 10 WAG/Rij rats (genetic model of absence epilepsy) was performed. Fragments of 10 seizures and 10 episodes of on-going EEG each of 4 s length were used for each animal, 3 cortical and 2 thalamic channels were analysed. The method adapted for short noisy data was implemented. The positive values of the largest Lyapunov exponent were found as for baseline as for spike wave discharges (SWDs), with values for SWDs being significantly less than for on-going activity. Current findings may indicate that SWD is a chaotic process with a well pronounced main timescale rather than a periodic regime. Also, the absence activity was shown to be less chaotic than the baseline one.

  16. Metagenomic Characterisation of the Viral Community of Lough Neagh, the Largest Freshwater Lake in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsov, Timofey; de Leeuwe, Colin; Quinn, John P.; McGrath, John W.; Allen, Christopher C. R.; McElarney, Yvonne; Watson, Catherine; Arkhipova, Ksenia; Lavigne, Rob; Kulakov, Leonid A.

    2016-01-01

    Lough Neagh is the largest and the most economically important lake in Ireland. It is also one of the most nutrient rich amongst the world’s major lakes. In this study, 16S rRNA analysis of total metagenomic DNA from the water column of Lough Neagh has revealed a high proportion of Cyanobacteria and low levels of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes. The planktonic virome of Lough Neagh has been sequenced and 2,298,791 2×300 bp Illumina reads analysed. Comparison with previously characterised lakes demonstrates that the Lough Neagh viral community has the highest level of sequence diversity. Only about 15% of reads had homologs in the RefSeq database and tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales) were identified as a major grouping. Within the Caudovirales, the Podoviridae and Siphoviridae were the two most dominant families (34.3% and 32.8% of the reads with sequence homology to the RefSeq database), while ssDNA bacteriophages constituted less than 1% of the virome. Putative cyanophages were found to be abundant. 66,450 viral contigs were assembled with the largest one being 58,805 bp; its existence, and that of another 34,467 bp contig, in the water column was confirmed. Analysis of the contigs confirmed the high abundance of cyanophages in the water column. PMID:26927795

  17. A Mighty Claw: Pinching Force of the Coconut Crab, the Largest Terrestrial Crustacean.

    PubMed

    Oka, Shin-Ichiro; Tomita, Taketeru; Miyamoto, Kei

    2016-01-01

    Crustaceans can exert a greater force using their claws than many animals can with other appendages. Furthermore, in decapods, the chela is a notable organ with multifunctional roles. The coconut crab, Birgus latro, is the largest terrestrial crustacean and has a remarkable ability to lift weights up to approximately 30 kg. However, the pinching force of this crab's chelae has not been previously investigated. In the present study, we measured the pinching force of the chelae in 29 wild coconut crabs (33-2,120 g in body weight). The maximum force ranged from 29.4 to 1,765.2 N, and showed a strong positive correlation with body mass. Based on the correlation between pinching force and body weight, the force potentially exerted by the largest crab (4 kg weight) reported in a previous study would be 3300 N, which greatly exceeds the pinching force of other crustaceans as well as the bite force of most terrestrial predators. The mighty claw is a terrestrial adaptation that is not only a weapon, which can be used to prevent predator attack and inhibit competitors, but is also a tool to hunt other terrestrial organisms with rigid exteriors, aiding in these organisms to be omnivores.

  18. Particle classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, B.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a classifier for particulate material comprising a housing having an inlet to receive a classifying air flow flowing in a given direction, collection means downstream of the inlet to receive material classified by the air flow, and material introduction means intermediate the inlet and the collection means to introduce particles entrained in a secondary air stream into the housing in a direction other than the given direction. The material introduction means includes a material outlet aperture in a wall of the housing extending generally perpendicular to the given direction, conveying means to convey material and the secondary air stream to the material outlet and diverting means to divert the secondary air stream to a direction generally parallel to the classifying air flow flowing in the given direction. The diverting means includes a surface extending downstream from the outlet and adjacent thereto and being dimensioned to divert the secondary airstream by a Coanda effect generally parallel to the given direction and thereby segregate the secondary air/stream from the particles and permit continued movement of the particles along predictable trajectories.

  19. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  20. Rapid Deposition Technology Holds the Key for the World's Largest Manufacturer of Thin-Film Solar Modules (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    First Solar, Inc. has been collaborating with NREL since 1991, advancing its thin-film cadmium telluride solar technology to grow from a startup company to become one of the world's largest manufacturers of solar modules, and the world's largest manufacturer of thin-film solar modules.

  1. Deoxygenation alters bacterial diversity and community composition in the ocean’s largest oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beman, J. Michael; Carolan, Molly T.

    2013-10-01

    Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet how deoxygenation will affect the microbial communities that control these cycles is unclear. Here we sample across dissolved oxygen gradients in the oceans’ largest OMZ and show that bacterial richness displays a unimodal pattern with decreasing dissolved oxygen, reaching maximum values on the edge of the OMZ and decreasing within it. Rare groups on the OMZ margin are abundant at lower dissolved oxygen concentrations, including sulphur-cycling Chromatiales, for which 16S rRNA was amplified from extracted RNA. Microbial species distribution models accurately replicate community patterns based on multivariate environmental data, demonstrate likely changes in distributions and diversity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, and highlight the sensitivity of key bacterial groups to deoxygenation. Through these mechanisms, OMZ expansion may alter microbial composition, competition, diversity and function, all of which have implications for biogeochemical cycling in OMZs.

  2. Microvirga massiliensis sp. nov., the human commensal with the largest genome.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Aurélia; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Azza, Saïd; Robert, Catherine; Mouelhi, Donia; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-04-01

    Microvirga massiliensis sp. nov. strain JC119(T) is a bacteria isolated in Marseille from a stool sample collected in Senegal. The 16S rRNA (JF824802) of M. massiliensis JC119(T) revealed 95% sequence identity with Microvirga lotononidis WSM3557(T) (HM362432). This bacterium is aerobic, gram negative, catalase positive, and oxidase negative. The draft genome of M. massiliensis JC119(T) comprises a 9,207,211-bp-long genome that is the largest bacterial genome of an isolate in humans. The genome exhibits a G+C content of 63.28% and contains 8685 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA genes, including 21 rRNA genes. Here, we describe the features of M. massiliensis JC119(T), together with the genome sequence information and its annotation.

  3. Delineating taxonomic boundaries in the largest species complex of black flies (Simuliidae) in the Oriental Region

    PubMed Central

    Low, Van Lun; Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Pramual, Pairot; Adler, Peter H.; Ya’cob, Zubaidah; Huang, Yao-Te; Da Pham, Xuan; Ramli, Rosli; Chen, Chee Dhang; Wannaket, Anukhcha; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Perspicuous assessments of taxonomic boundaries and discovery of cryptic taxa are of paramount importance in interpreting ecological and evolutionary phenomena among black flies (Simuliidae) and combating associated vector-borne diseases. Simulium tani Takaoka & Davies is the largest and perhaps the most taxonomically challenging species complex of black flies in the Oriental Region. We use a DNA sequence-based method to delineate currently recognized chromosomal and morphological taxa in the S. tani complex on the Southeast Asian mainland and Taiwan, while elucidating their phylogenetic relationships. A molecular approach using multiple genes, coupled with morphological and chromosomal data, supported recognition of cytoform K and morphoform ‘b’ as valid species; indicated that S. xuandei, cytoform L, and morphoform ‘a’ contain possible cryptic species; and suggested that cytoform B is in the early stages of reproductive isolation whereas lineage sorting is incomplete in cytoforms A, C, and G. PMID:26839292

  4. Delineating taxonomic boundaries in the largest species complex of black flies (Simuliidae) in the Oriental Region.

    PubMed

    Low, Van Lun; Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Pramual, Pairot; Adler, Peter H; Ya'cob, Zubaidah; Huang, Yao-Te; Da Pham, Xuan; Ramli, Rosli; Chen, Chee Dhang; Wannaket, Anukhcha; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2016-02-03

    Perspicuous assessments of taxonomic boundaries and discovery of cryptic taxa are of paramount importance in interpreting ecological and evolutionary phenomena among black flies (Simuliidae) and combating associated vector-borne diseases. Simulium tani Takaoka & Davies is the largest and perhaps the most taxonomically challenging species complex of black flies in the Oriental Region. We use a DNA sequence-based method to delineate currently recognized chromosomal and morphological taxa in the S. tani complex on the Southeast Asian mainland and Taiwan, while elucidating their phylogenetic relationships. A molecular approach using multiple genes, coupled with morphological and chromosomal data, supported recognition of cytoform K and morphoform 'b' as valid species; indicated that S. xuandei, cytoform L, and morphoform 'a' contain possible cryptic species; and suggested that cytoform B is in the early stages of reproductive isolation whereas lineage sorting is incomplete in cytoforms A, C, and G.

  5. Secrecy is toxic--building community right-to-know in Canada's largest municipality.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of toxic chemicals in Canada has undergone many twists and turns in the last 40 years. This paper describes the emergence of a new alliance, one which brought together people from a broad range of backgrounds to formulate common strategy to address the continuing use and dissemination of toxic chemicals, especially carcinogens. In just over a decade, Canada's largest municipality, Toronto, adopted a bylaw which introduced a comprehensive scheme for community right-to-know about toxic chemicals being used, released, and disposed-the first in the country. The bylaw represents the success of a network that integrated experience and expertise from community activism, environment, labour, public health, politics and cancer prevention.

  6. Microbial life in the Lake Medee, the largest deep-sea salt-saturated formation.

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Michail M; La Cono, Violetta; Slepak, Vladlen Z; La Spada, Gina; Arcadi, Erika; Messina, Enzo; Borghini, Mireno; Monticelli, Luis S; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Golyshina, Olga V; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2013-12-19

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic lakes (DHALs) of the Eastern Mediterranean represent some of the most hostile environments on our planet. We investigated microbial life in the recently discovered Lake Medee, the largest DHAL found to-date. Medee has two unique features: a complex geobiochemical stratification and an absence of chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, which usually play the primary role in dark bicarbonate assimilation in DHALs interfaces. Presumably because of these features, Medee is less productive and exhibits reduced diversity of autochthonous prokaryotes in its interior. Indeed, the brine community almost exclusively consists of the members of euryarchaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 candidate divisions. Our experiments utilizing cultivation and [(14)C]-assimilation, showed that these organisms at least partially rely on reductive cleavage of osmoprotectant glycine betaine and are engaged in trophic cooperation. These findings provide novel insights into how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated conditions and sustain active metabolism at the thermodynamic edge of life.

  7. Largest Laplacian eigenvalue predicts the emergence of costly punishment in the evolutionary ultimatum game on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Cao, Lang

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in studying the role of costly punishment in promoting altruistic behaviors among selfish individuals. Rejections in ultimatum bargaining as a metaphor exemplify costly punishment, where the division of a sum of resources proposed by one side may be rejected by the other side, and both sides get nothing. Under a setting of the network of contacts among players, we find that the largest Laplacian eigenvalue of the network determines the critical division of players’ proposals, below which pure punishers who never accept any offers will emerge as a phase transition in the system. The critical division of offers that predicts the emergence of costly punishment is termed as the selfishness tolerance of a network within evolutionary ultimatum game, and extensive numerical simulations on the data of the science collaboration network, and computer-generated small-world/scale-free networks support the analytical findings.

  8. Rapid increase in fish numbers follows creation of world's largest marine reserve network.

    PubMed

    Russ, Garry R; Cheal, Alistair J; Dolman, Andrew M; Emslie, Michael J; Evans, Richard D; Miller, Ian; Sweatman, Hugh; Williamson, David H

    2008-06-24

    No-take marine reserves (NTMRs) are much advocated as a solution to managing marine ecosystems, protecting exploited species and restoring natural states of biodiversity [1,2]. Increasingly, it is becoming clear that effective marine conservation and management at ecosystem and regional scales requires extensive networks of NTMRs [1,2]. The world's largest network of such reserves was established on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in 2004. Closing such a large area to all fishing has been socially and politically controversial, making it imperative that the effectiveness of this new reserve network be assessed. Here we report evidence, first, that the densities of the major target species of the GBR reef line fisheries were significantly higher in the new NTMRs, compared with fished sites, in just two years; and second, that the positive differences were consistent for multiple marine reserves over an unprecedented spatial scale (>1,000 km).

  9. Deoxygenation alters bacterial diversity and community composition in the ocean's largest oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Beman, J Michael; Carolan, Molly T

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet how deoxygenation will affect the microbial communities that control these cycles is unclear. Here we sample across dissolved oxygen gradients in the oceans' largest OMZ and show that bacterial richness displays a unimodal pattern with decreasing dissolved oxygen, reaching maximum values on the edge of the OMZ and decreasing within it. Rare groups on the OMZ margin are abundant at lower dissolved oxygen concentrations, including sulphur-cycling Chromatiales, for which 16S rRNA was amplified from extracted RNA. Microbial species distribution models accurately replicate community patterns based on multivariate environmental data, demonstrate likely changes in distributions and diversity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, and highlight the sensitivity of key bacterial groups to deoxygenation. Through these mechanisms, OMZ expansion may alter microbial composition, competition, diversity and function, all of which have implications for biogeochemical cycling in OMZs.

  10. Rates of speciation and morphological evolution are correlated across the largest vertebrate radiation.

    PubMed

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Santini, Francesco; Eastman, Jonathan; Smith, Stephen A; Sidlauskas, Brian; Chang, Jonathan; Alfaro, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Several evolutionary theories predict that rates of morphological change should be positively associated with the rate at which new species arise. For example, the theory of punctuated equilibrium proposes that phenotypic change typically occurs in rapid bursts associated with speciation events. However, recent phylogenetic studies have found little evidence linking these processes in nature. Here we demonstrate that rates of species diversification are highly correlated with the rate of body size evolution across the 30,000+ living species of ray-finned fishes that comprise the majority of vertebrate biological diversity. This coupling is a general feature of fish evolution and transcends vast differences in ecology and body-plan organization. Our results may reflect a widespread speciational mode of character change in living fishes. Alternatively, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that phenotypic 'evolvability'-the capacity of organisms to evolve-shapes the dynamics of speciation through time at the largest phylogenetic scales.

  11. Mauna Loa--history, hazards and risk of living with the world's largest volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Mauna Loa on the Island Hawaiʻi is the world’s largest volcano. People residing on its flanks face many hazards that come with living on or near an active volcano, including lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and local tsunami (giant seawaves). The County of Hawaiʻi (Island of Hawaiʻi) is the fastest growing County in the State of Hawaii. Its expanding population and increasing development mean that risk from volcano hazards will continue to grow. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) closely monitor and study Mauna Loa Volcano to enable timely warning of hazardous activity and help protect lives and property.

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of the largest living fish: whale shark Rhincodon typus (Orectolobiformes: Rhincodontidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Ai, Weiming; Pan, Lianghao; Shi, Xiaofang

    2016-01-01

    The whale shark Rhincodon typus (Pisces: Chondrichthyes, Orectolobiformes, Rhincodontidae) is the largest living fish on Earth. In this study, we presented its complete mitogenome. It is 16,928 bp in length, contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and one control region with the typical gene order and transcriptional direction in the vertebrates. Overall base composition of the R. typus mitogenome is 33.5% A, 24.3% C, 12.8% G and 29.5% T. Two start codon (GTG and ATG) and two stop codon patterns (TAG and TAA/T) were found in protein-coding genes. The tRNA-Ser2 could not be folded into the typical cloverleaf secondary structure because of the replacement of its dihydrouridine arm by a simple loop. A termination associated sequences (TAS) and three conserved sequence blocks (CSB1-3) were identified in the control region.

  13. Legionella pneumophila, armed to the hilt: justifying the largest arsenal of effectors in the bacterial world.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Alexander W

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use dedicated translocation systems to deliver arsenals of effector proteins to their hosts. Once inside the host cytosol, these effectors modulate eukaryotic cell biology to acquire nutrients, block microbial degradation, subvert host defenses, and enable pathogen transmission to other hosts. Among all bacterial pathogens studied to date, the gram-negative pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, maintains the largest arsenal of effectors, with over 330 effector proteins translocated by the Dot/Icm type IVB translocation system. In this review, I will discuss some of the recent work on understanding the consequences of this large arsenal. I will also present several models that seek to explain how L. pneumophila has acquired and subsequently maintained so many more effectors than its peers.

  14. Contamination Control Assessment of the World's Largest Space Environment Simulation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Aaron; Henry, Michael W.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Sinclair, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Power Facility s thermal vacuum test chamber is the largest chamber in the world capable of providing an environment for space simulation. To improve performance and meet stringent requirements of a wide customer base, significant modifications were made to the vacuum chamber. These include major changes to the vacuum system and numerous enhancements to the chamber s unique polar crane, with a goal of providing high cleanliness levels. The significance of these changes and modifications are discussed in this paper. In addition, the composition and arrangement of the pumping system and its impact on molecular back-streaming are discussed in detail. Molecular contamination measurements obtained with a TQCM and witness wafers during two recent integrated system tests of the chamber are presented and discussed. Finally, a concluding remarks section is presented.

  15. Were extreme waves in the Rockall Trough the largest ever recorded?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday, Naomi P.; Yelland, Margaret J.; Pascal, Robin; Swail, Val R.; Taylor, Peter K.; Griffiths, Colin R.; Kent, Elizabeth

    2006-03-01

    In February 2000 those onboard a British oceanographic research vessel near Rockall, west of Scotland experienced the largest waves ever recorded by scientific instruments in the open ocean. Under severe gale force conditions with wind speeds averaging 21 ms-1 a shipborne wave recorder measured individual waves up to 29.1 m from crest to trough, and a maximum significant wave height of 18.5 m. The fully formed sea developed in unusual conditions as westerly winds blew across the North Atlantic for two days, during which time a frontal system propagated at a speed close to the group velocity of the peak waves. The measurements are compared to a wave hindcast (AES40, Swail and Cox, 2000) which successfully simulated the arrival of the wave group but underestimated the most extreme waves.

  16. Induced Seismicity: What is the Size of the Largest Expected Earthquake?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoeller, G.; Holschneider, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injections of fluids is a well-known origin for the triggering of earthquake sequences. The growing number of projects related to enhanced geothermal systems, fracking and others has led to the question, which maximum earthquake magnitude can be expected as a consequence of fluid injection. This question is addressed from the perspective of statistical analysis. Using basic empirical laws of earthquake statistics, we estimate the magnitude MT of the maximum expected earthquake in a pre-defined future time window T. A case study of the fluid injection site at Paradox Valley, Colorado, USA, demonstrates that the magnitude m=4.3 of the largest observed earthquake on 27 May 2000 is lying very well within the expectation from past seismicity without adjusting any parameters. Vice versa, for a given maximum tolerable earthquake at an injection site, we can constrain the corresponding amount of injected fluids that must not be exceeded within pre-defined confidence bounds.

  17. From Pushing Paper to Pushing Dirt - Canada's Largest LLRW Cleanup Gets Underway - 13111

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, Walter van; Lawrence, Dave

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is the larger of the two projects in the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), Canada's largest low level radioactive waste (LLRW) cleanup. With a budget of approximately $1 billion, the Port Hope Project includes a broad and complex range of remedial elements from a state of the art water treatment plant, an engineered waste management facility, municipal solid waste removal, remediation of 18 major sites within the Municipality of Port Hope (MPH), sediment dredging and dewatering, an investigation of 4,800 properties (many of these homes) to identify LLRW and remediation of approximately 450 of these properties. This paper discusses the status of the Port Hope Project in terms of designs completed and regulatory approvals received, and sets out the scope and schedule for the remaining studies, engineering designs and remediation contracts. (authors)

  18. Active sand dunes are largest dust source in the Sahara Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Dried up lakebeds and playas in the Sahara Desert of North Africa are large sources of dust in the atmosphere. The Bodélé Depression at the southern edge of the Sahara Desert, for example, is the single largest source of dust in the world; on average, 100 dust storms a year originate from the Bodélé Depression. A new study by Crouvi et al., however, finds that active sand dunes could be even bigger sources of desert dust in the atmosphere. Atmospheric dust plays active roles in climate and biological processes in the ocean: It regulates heating at the surface of the Earth; modifies cloud properties that affect rainfall; and acts as the only source of iron, a critical nutrient for microorganisms in the ocean. Little is known about types of dust sources in the Sahara Desert, which alone accounts for more than 50% of the dust in the atmosphere.

  19. Microbial life in the Lake Medee, the largest deep-sea salt-saturated formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Michail M.; La Cono, Violetta; Slepak, Vladlen Z.; La Spada, Gina; Arcadi, Erika; Messina, Enzo; Borghini, Mireno; Monticelli, Luis S.; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Golyshina, Olga V.; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N.; Giuliano, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic lakes (DHALs) of the Eastern Mediterranean represent some of the most hostile environments on our planet. We investigated microbial life in the recently discovered Lake Medee, the largest DHAL found to-date. Medee has two unique features: a complex geobiochemical stratification and an absence of chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, which usually play the primary role in dark bicarbonate assimilation in DHALs interfaces. Presumably because of these features, Medee is less productive and exhibits reduced diversity of autochthonous prokaryotes in its interior. Indeed, the brine community almost exclusively consists of the members of euryarchaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 candidate divisions. Our experiments utilizing cultivation and [14C]-assimilation, showed that these organisms at least partially rely on reductive cleavage of osmoprotectant glycine betaine and are engaged in trophic cooperation. These findings provide novel insights into how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated conditions and sustain active metabolism at the thermodynamic edge of life.

  20. Fifteen Years of Operation at NASA's National Transonic Facility with the World's Largest Adjustable Speed Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, George H.; Bhatia, Ram; Krattiger, Hansueli; Mylius, Justus; Schafer, D.

    2012-01-01

    In September 1995, a project was initiated to replace the existing drive line at NASA's most unique transonic wind tunnel, the National Transonic Facility (NTF), with a single 101 MW synchronous motor driven by a Load Commutated Inverter (LCI). This Adjustable Speed Drive (ASD) system also included a custom four-winding transformer, harmonic filter, exciter, switch gear, control system, and feeder cable. The complete system requirements and design details have previously been presented and published [1], as well as the commissioning and acceptance test results [2]. The NTF was returned to service in December 1997 with the new drive system powering the fan. Today, this installation still represents the world s largest horizontal single motor/drive combination. This paper describes some significant events that occurred with the drive system during the first 15 years of service. These noteworthy issues are analyzed and root causes presented. Improvements that have substantially increased the long term viability of the system are given.

  1. Mapping Biomass for REDD in the Largest Forest of Central Africa: the Democratic Republic of Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Aurelie; Saatchi, Sassan

    2014-05-01

    With the support of the International Climate Initiative (ICI) of the Federal Ministry of the Environment, Conservation, and Nuclear Security, the implementation of the German Development Bank KfW, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Germany, the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and local DRC partners will produce a national scale biomass map for the entire forest coverage of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) along with feasibility assessments of different forest protection measures within a framework of a REDD+ model project. The « Carbon Map and Model (CO2M&M) » project will produce a national forest biomass map for the DRC, which will enable quantitative assessments of carbon stocks and emissions in the largest forest of the Congo Basin. This effort will support the national REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) program in DRC, which plays a major role in sustainable development and poverty alleviation. This map will be developed from field data, complemented by airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and aerial photos, systematically sampled throughout the forests of the DRC and up-scaled to satellite images to accurately estimate carbon content in all forested areas. The second component of the project is to develop specific approaches for model REDD projects in key landscapes. This project represents the largest LiDAR-derived mapping effort in Africa, under unprecedented logistical constraints, which will provide one of the poorest nations in the world with the richest airborne and satellites derived datasets for analyzing forest structure, biomass and biodiversity.

  2. Risk Factors and Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Five Largest Islands of Indonesia: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Syam, Ari Fahrial; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Makmun, Dadang; Nusi, Iswan Abbas; Zain, Lukman Hakim; Zulkhairi; Akil, Fardah; Uswan, Willi Brodus; Simanjuntak, David; Uchida, Tomohisa; Adi, Pangestu; Utari, Amanda Pitarini; Rezkitha, Yudith Annisa Ayu; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Nasronudin; Suzuki, Rumiko; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia is still controversial and mainly investigated in the largest ethnic group, Javanese. We examined the prevalence of H. pylori infection using four different tests including culture, histology confirmed by immunohistochemistry and rapid urease test. We also analyzed risk factors associated with H. pylori infection in five largest islands in Indonesia. From January 2014-February 2015 we consecutively recruited a total of 267 patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Java, Papua, Sulawesi, Borneo and Sumatera Island. Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 22.1% (59/267). Papuan, Batak and Buginese ethnics had higher risk for H. pylori infection than Javanese, Dayak and Chinese ethnics (OR = 30.57, 6.31, 4.95; OR = 28.39, 5.81, 4.61 and OR = 23.23, 4.76, 3.77, respectively, P <0.05). The sensitivity and specificity for RUT and culture were 90.2%, 92.9% and 80.5%, 98.2%, respectively. The patients aged 50-59 years group had significantly higher H. pylori infection than 30-39 years group (OR 2.98, P = 0.05). Protestant had significantly higher H. pylori infection rate than that among Catholic (OR 4.42, P = 0.008). It was also significantly lower among peoples who used tap water as source of drinking water than from Wells/river (OR 9.67, P = 0.03). However only ethnics as become independent risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although we confirmed low prevalence of H. pylori in Javanese; predominant ethnic in Indonesia, several ethnic groups had higher risk of H. pylori infection. The age, religion and water source may implicate as a risk factor for H. pylori infection in Indonesia.

  3. The Roseau Tuff: Redefining the Largest Quaternary Eruption in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, T. M.; Lindsay, J. M.; Shane, P. A.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Although activity is the Lesser Antilles is generally characterized by dome-forming eruptions, pyroclastic flow deposits on the island of Dominica indicate that a series of Plinian eruptions occurred 20-30 ka ago. The largest pyroclastic deposit, the Roseau Tuff, outcrops on the western side of the island. Although sub-aerial material from this eruption has an estimated volume of only 3 km3 (Sigurdsson 1972), Carey and Sigurdsson (1980) correlated tephra and pyroclastic flow deposits from 26 deep sea cores to the Roseau Tuff and calculated a total erupted tephra volume of 58 km3. Based on this estimate, the Roseau Tuff eruption is considered the largest Quaternary eruption in the Caribbean. New evidence based on major and trace element whole rock data and mineral chemistry suggests that the homogeneity of eruptive deposits from southern Dominica may result in ambiguous correlations. Microprobe analyses from orthopyroxenes (En52-58), clinopyroxenes (En64-69), plagioclases (An54-92), Fe-Ti oxides, and amphiboles were used to characterize the Roseau Tuff and other pyroclastic deposits across the island. Although the data show significant differences between eruptions of different centres, multiple eruptions from individual centres appear homogenous over time spans of up to 20 ka. The homogenous character of the mineral populations implies a long-lived magma reservoir beneath each centre. However, equilibrium constraints show that mineral populations in individual eruptions are not in equilibrium. This suggests that either some mineral populations are xenocrystic or a significant amount of magma mixing occurred just prior to eruption. While the homogenous character of the eruptive deposits provides insight into the nature of andesitic volcanism in island arcs, it also limits the potential for stratigraphic correlation and calls into question the original volume estimate of the Roseau Tuff eruption.

  4. Risk Factors and Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Five Largest Islands of Indonesia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Makmun, Dadang; Nusi, Iswan Abbas; Zain, Lukman Hakim; Zulkhairi; Akil, Fardah; Uswan, Willi Brodus; Simanjuntak, David; Uchida, Tomohisa; Adi, Pangestu; Utari, Amanda Pitarini; Rezkitha, Yudith Annisa Ayu; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Nasronudin; Suzuki, Rumiko; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia is still controversial and mainly investigated in the largest ethnic group, Javanese. We examined the prevalence of H. pylori infection using four different tests including culture, histology confirmed by immunohistochemistry and rapid urease test. We also analyzed risk factors associated with H. pylori infection in five largest islands in Indonesia. From January 2014–February 2015 we consecutively recruited a total of 267 patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Java, Papua, Sulawesi, Borneo and Sumatera Island. Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 22.1% (59/267). Papuan, Batak and Buginese ethnics had higher risk for H. pylori infection than Javanese, Dayak and Chinese ethnics (OR = 30.57, 6.31, 4.95; OR = 28.39, 5.81, 4.61 and OR = 23.23, 4.76, 3.77, respectively, P <0.05). The sensitivity and specificity for RUT and culture were 90.2%, 92.9% and 80.5%, 98.2%, respectively. The patients aged 50–59 years group had significantly higher H. pylori infection than 30–39 years group (OR 2.98, P = 0.05). Protestant had significantly higher H. pylori infection rate than that among Catholic (OR 4.42, P = 0.008). It was also significantly lower among peoples who used tap water as source of drinking water than from Wells/river (OR 9.67, P = 0.03). However only ethnics as become independent risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although we confirmed low prevalence of H. pylori in Javanese; predominant ethnic in Indonesia, several ethnic groups had higher risk of H. pylori infection. The age, religion and water source may implicate as a risk factor for H. pylori infection in Indonesia. PMID:26599790

  5. Ages and Loads of Riverine Carbon of the Five Largest Rivers in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. J.; Shin, Y.; Oh, N. H.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the quantity and quality of riverine carbon is crucial to predict the changes of the regional carbon cycle and to efficiently manage drinking water quality. We investigated both the loads and ages of carbon exported by the five largest rivers in South Korea using seasonal sampling and dual carbon isotope analysis for 2012 - 2013. Annually a total of 581 Gg of carbon (DIC, DOC, and POC combined) was transported to the ocean through the five rivers, releasing 7.6, 1.7, and 0.8 g-C m-2 yr-1 of DIC, DOC, and POC, respectively, which accounted for 80%, 14%, and 6% of the annual loads of riverine carbon, respectively. About 37-45% of annual riverine DIC loads, 37-51% of DOC loads, and 33-47% of POC loads were released from the basins during the summer monsoon (June - August) indicating strong effects of precipitation in the riverine carbon export. Modern to ~1,020 years old carbon was released from the five river basins. The δDI13C and ΔDI14C showed a negative correlation in each river whereas no consistent correlation was observed between δDO13C and ΔDO14C, suggesting a large variation in DOC sources. Riverine POC load increased sharply after a typhoon and ΔPO14C was higher in summer than winter in the five rivers. The results suggested that both quantity and quality of riverine carbon released from the five largest basins could be strongly influenced by the Asian monsoon climates and that relatively young dissolved carbon could be predominantly released as the intensity and frequency of storms increase.

  6. Ceres In Context: What the Rest of the Asteroid Population Tells Us About Its Largest Member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ceres is famously the largest object in the asteroid belt. Over the course of the last 215 years it has been considered everything from a unique protoplanet (or indeed full-fledged "planet") to a large but run-of-the-mill piece of rock. Over the last decade, models of Ceres' thermal history and shape measurements based on HST imagery have led to the recognition that Ceres is a differentiated object, and likely an ice-rich one. In the last year the Dawn spacecraft has provided unprecedented views of Ceres' surface and combined with data from observational facilities like Herschel and countless telescopes it has shown the varied nature of its geology and ongoing processes. Even given these recent results, Ceres remains an inhabitant of the asteroid belt, existing in the ambient environment and affected by impactors, micrometeorites, solar wind, and other factors. While we only have spacecraft imagery from a very small number of targets, we do have a wealth of Earth-based data from the objects that have shared space with Ceres for billions of years. The insights gained from studying these objects can be applied to Ceres to understand its context and nature. Similarly, what we learn at Ceres will be applicable in many ways to other objects, particularly the twenty or so largest asteroids, which tend to be low-albedo, water-rich bodies. I will discuss our current understanding of the asteroids, particularly those that share important characteristics with Ceres, and focus on what we can learn about Ceres from these bodies.

  7. Characterization of fine particles from machining in automotive plants.

    PubMed

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James; Gundrum, Aaron; Sutherland, John; Johnson, John; Carlson, David

    2005-12-01

    Sampling of the full range of particle sizes was carried out on 16 processes in six different General Motors plants over a period of 2.5 years. This article deals with particle characterization from five of the processes that relate to machining, specifically, wet machining with water-based fluids from old and new technology processes, grinding with straight oils from old and new technology processes, and dry machining. The concentrations measured by different instruments were in reasonable agreement, although the light-scattering instrument generally produced higher values than filters. Of the processes studied, the old technology grinding using straight oils generated the highest particle concentrations. The new technology controls (enclosed, vented machines) were highly effective but more so for large particles than small particles. The particle size distribution was shifted to smaller particles with enclosed processes. Dry machining generated the largest particles of all processes studied.

  8. Genome of Phaeocystis globosa virus PgV-16T highlights the common ancestry of the largest known DNA viruses infecting eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Sebastien; Jeudy, Sandra; Bartoli, Julia; Poirot, Olivier; Lescot, Magali; Abergel, Chantal; Barbe, Valérie; Wommack, K Eric; Noordeloos, Anna A M; Brussaard, Corina P D; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2013-06-25

    Large dsDNA viruses are involved in the population control of many globally distributed species of eukaryotic phytoplankton and have a prominent role in bloom termination. The genus Phaeocystis (Haptophyta, Prymnesiophyceae) includes several high-biomass-forming phytoplankton species, such as Phaeocystis globosa, the blooms of which occur mostly in the coastal zone of the North Atlantic and the North Sea. Here, we report the 459,984-bp-long genome sequence of P. globosa virus strain PgV-16T, encoding 434 proteins and eight tRNAs and, thus, the largest fully sequenced genome to date among viruses infecting algae. Surprisingly, PgV-16T exhibits no phylogenetic affinity with other viruses infecting microalgae (e.g., phycodnaviruses), including those infecting Emiliania huxleyi, another ubiquitous bloom-forming haptophyte. Rather, PgV-16T belongs to an emerging clade (the Megaviridae) clustering the viruses endowed with the largest known genomes, including Megavirus, Mimivirus (both infecting acanthamoeba), and a virus infecting the marine microflagellate grazer Cafeteria roenbergensis. Seventy-five percent of the best matches of PgV-16T-predicted proteins correspond to two viruses [Organic Lake phycodnavirus (OLPV)1 and OLPV2] from a hypersaline lake in Antarctica (Organic Lake), the hosts of which are unknown. As for OLPVs and other Megaviridae, the PgV-16T sequence data revealed the presence of a virophage-like genome. However, no virophage particle was detected in infected P. globosa cultures. The presence of many genes found only in Megaviridae in its genome and the presence of an associated virophage strongly suggest that PgV-16T shares a common ancestry with the largest known dsDNA viruses, the host range of which already encompasses the earliest diverging branches of domain Eukarya.

  9. Genome of Phaeocystis globosa virus PgV-16T highlights the common ancestry of the largest known DNA viruses infecting eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sebastien; Jeudy, Sandra; Bartoli, Julia; Poirot, Olivier; Lescot, Magali; Abergel, Chantal; Barbe, Valérie; Wommack, K. Eric; Noordeloos, Anna A. M.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Large dsDNA viruses are involved in the population control of many globally distributed species of eukaryotic phytoplankton and have a prominent role in bloom termination. The genus Phaeocystis (Haptophyta, Prymnesiophyceae) includes several high-biomass-forming phytoplankton species, such as Phaeocystis globosa, the blooms of which occur mostly in the coastal zone of the North Atlantic and the North Sea. Here, we report the 459,984-bp-long genome sequence of P. globosa virus strain PgV-16T, encoding 434 proteins and eight tRNAs and, thus, the largest fully sequenced genome to date among viruses infecting algae. Surprisingly, PgV-16T exhibits no phylogenetic affinity with other viruses infecting microalgae (e.g., phycodnaviruses), including those infecting Emiliania huxleyi, another ubiquitous bloom-forming haptophyte. Rather, PgV-16T belongs to an emerging clade (the Megaviridae) clustering the viruses endowed with the largest known genomes, including Megavirus, Mimivirus (both infecting acanthamoeba), and a virus infecting the marine microflagellate grazer Cafeteria roenbergensis. Seventy-five percent of the best matches of PgV-16T–predicted proteins correspond to two viruses [Organic Lake phycodnavirus (OLPV)1 and OLPV2] from a hypersaline lake in Antarctica (Organic Lake), the hosts of which are unknown. As for OLPVs and other Megaviridae, the PgV-16T sequence data revealed the presence of a virophage-like genome. However, no virophage particle was detected in infected P. globosa cultures. The presence of many genes found only in Megaviridae in its genome and the presence of an associated virophage strongly suggest that PgV-16T shares a common ancestry with the largest known dsDNA viruses, the host range of which already encompasses the earliest diverging branches of domain Eukarya. PMID:23754393

  10. Carbonaceous Particles Production in a Sputtering Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Dominique, Claire; Sant, Marco; Arnas, Cecile

    2005-10-31

    Spherical dust particles have been produced in argon glow discharge by sputtering of a graphite cathode. Their size varies from 40 to 200 nm depending on the distance between the two electrodes and the largest ones have a cauliflower shape. Simulations giving the evolution of the energy distribution of sputtered carbon atoms suggest a mechanism of growth by carbon vapour condensation. The chemical composition and structure of particles have been investigated by infrared spectroscopy and appear to be a complex arrangement of the carbon atoms and hetero-atoms.

  11. The ash deposits of the 4200 BP Cerro Blanco eruption: the largest Holocene eruption of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, Jose-Luis; Saavedra, Julio; Perez-Torrado, Francisco-Jose; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Lobo, Agustin; Rejas, Marta; Gallardo, Juan-Fernando; Osterrieth, Margarita; Carrizo, Julieta; Esteban, Graciela; Martinez, Luis-Dante; Gil, Raul-Andres; Ratto, Norma; Baez, Walter

    2015-04-01

    We present new data about a major eruption -spreading approx. 110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in the Central Andes of NW Argentina (Southern Puna, 26°45' S, 67°45' W). This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. Discrimination and correlation of pyroclastic deposits of this eruption of Cerro Blanco was conducted comparing samples of proximal (domes, pyroclastic flow and fall deposits) with distal ash fall deposits (up to 400 km from de vent). They have been characterized using optical and electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, particle-size distribution by laser diffraction and electron microprobe and HR-ICP-MS with laser ablation for major and trace element composition of glass, feldspars and biotite. New and published 14C ages were calibrated using Bayesian statistics. An one-at-a-time inversion method was used to reconstruct the eruption conditions using the Tephra2 code (Bonadonna et al. 2010, https://vhub.org/resources/tephra2). This method allowed setting the main features of the eruption that explains the field observations in terms of thickness and grain size distributions of the ash fall deposit. The main arguments that justify the correlation are four: 1) Compositional coincidence for glass, feldspars, and biotite in proximal and distal materials; 2) Stratigraphic and geomorphological relationships, including structure and thickness variation of the distal deposits; 3) Geochronological consistency, matching proximal and distal ages; and 4) Geographical distribution of correlated outcrops in relation to the eruption centre at the coordinates of Cerro Blanco. With a magnitude of 7.0 and a volcanic explosivity index or VEI 7, this eruption of ~4200 BP at Cerro Blanco is the largest in the last five millennia known in the Central

  12. Largest SEP events observed on board CORONAS-F satellite from august 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S.; Kudela, K.; Myagkova, I.; Podorolsky, A.; Ryumin, S.; Yushkov, B.

    The "CORONAS-F" satellite, the second one of CORONAS satellite series, was launched on July 31, 2001 into a circular orbit with a titude 507+/-21 km and 82.5ol inclination. The satellite was oriented towards the Sun and was equipped with the set of instruments for studies of solar flares and corresponding solar energetic particle (SEP) events. These instruments are intended for different energetic particles measurements - electrons 0.3-112 MeV, protons 1 90 MeV, alpha particles 23-35- MeV/n, CNO (up to Mg) nuclei 3 30 MeV/n. All charged particle detectors were- oriented in the anti-Sunward direction. One of the instrument, SONG, was developed in cooperation of the Institutes (1) and (2). During time interval from August 14, 2001 (when we began to receive the data) to March 2002 more than ten solar flares leading to SEP were observed in different experiments. We have analyzed three most intensive SEP events, namely those observed after solar flares in September, 24, November, 4, and 23, 2001. We obtained SEP fluxes detected by "CORONAS-F" satellite in the polar caps, where it was during about 15 minutes every 47 minutes, and compared these data with GOES and ACE satellites ones. SEP generation and distribution were analyzed in view of conditions in the near-Earth interplanetary space. November 4 event is compared with ground based neutron monitor measurements (GLE62). Solar flare events September, 24 and November, 4 have taken place near to the central solar meridian. Flares September, 24 and November, 4 have generated CME and the powerful bow shock with an initial velocity about 1500-2000 km/s. Besides that the bow shock, generated by November, 4 event during CME propagation, interacted with CME ejected during November, 1 event. The event November, 22 was possibly connected with two flares observed with the time lag about three hours near to the western limb and have generated two interacting CME. The bow shock velocity in this event was also estimated about 2000

  13. Hydraulics and basin morphometry of the largest flash floods in the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The maximum rainfall-runoff floods measured by indirect methods in small basins (0.39-370 km2) in the conterminous United States are examined. This analysis identified twelve floods that were the largest ever measured. These floods all occurred in semiarid to arid areas. For eleven of the twelve largest rainfall-runoff floods measured in small basins by the slope-area method, values of hydraulic depth; hydraulic radius; width-depth ratio; n value; mean velocity; velocity-head coefficient; Froude number; water-surface, energy, and channel slopes; shear stress; and unit stream power are tabulated. Estimated composite n values weighted by subsection conveyance range from 0.028 to 0.048 with a mean of 0.038. Mean velocities ranged from 3.47 to 9.97 m s-1. Froude numbers ranged from 0.81 to 2.49, with 9 of 12 floods having values greater than 1.00. Water-surface, energy, and channel slopes vary considerably for each flood. Energy slope always was less than water-surface slope by values of 1-104%. Channel slope was greater than energy slope in eight floods. Shear stresses ranged between 61 and 855 N m-2, and unit stream power from 212 to 8131 w m-1. Floods in these small basins produced shear stresses and unit stream powers several hundred times greater than floods in large rivers. Floods on other small streams, with smaller unit discharges, produced greater shear stresses and stream powers. This indicates that the force of a flood is controlled by the depth-slope product, not absolute discharge. In the twelve watersheds studied, basin relief ranged from 165 to 1280 m, elongation ratios ranged from 0.55 to 0.80, the number of first-order streams (basin magnitude) ranged from 10 to 4297, drainage density ranged from 4.1 to 10.9 km km-2, basin slope ranged from 0.0043 to 0.2486, relief ratio ranged from 0.0097 to 0.34, ruggedness number ranged from 0.69 to 7.17, and first-order channel frequency ranged from 5.1 to 38.6 km-2. Elongation ratios were larger, and drainage

  14. Genesis of the largest Amazonian wetland in northern Brazil inferred by morphology and gravity anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Dilce de Fátima; Cassola Molina, Eder; Cremon, Édipo Henrique

    2016-08-01

    The Pantanal Setentrional (PS) is the second largest wetland in Brazil, occurring in a region of northern Amazonia previously regarded as part of the intracratonic Solimões Basin. However, while Paleozoic to Neogene strata are recorded in this basin, the PS constitutes a broad region with an expressive record of only Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits. The hypothesis investigated in the present work is if these younger deposits were formed within a sedimentary basin having a geological history separated from the Solimões Basin. Due to the location in a remote region of low accessibility, the sedimentary fill of the PS wetland remains largely unknown in subsurface. In the present work, we combine geomorphological and gravity data acquired on a global basis by several satellite gravity missions to approach the geological context of this region. The results revealed a wetland characterized in surface by a low-lying terrain with wedge shape and concave-up geometry that is in sharp contact with highland areas of Precambrian rocks of the Guiana Shield. Such contact is defined by a series of mainly NE- or NW-trending straight lineaments that eventually extend into both the Guiana Shield and the PS wetland. Also of relevance is that a great part of the PS wetland sedimentary cover consists of dominantly sandy deposits preserved as residual paleo-landforms with triangular shapes previously related to megafan depositional systems. These are distributed radially at the northern margin of the PS, with axis toward basement rocks and fringes toward the wetland's center, the latter containing the largest megafan landform. The analysis of gravity anomaly data revealed a main NNE-trending chain ∼500 km in length defined by high gravity values (i.e., up to 60 mGal); these are bounded by negative anomalies as low as -90 mGal. The chain with positive gravity anomaly marks the center of a subsiding area having a geological evolution that differs from the adjacent intracratonic

  15. Foundations and Public Information: Sunshine or Shadow? Preliminary Findings from a Study of the Public Information Accountability of the Country's Largest Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Ellen; And Others

    The types of written information that the largest foundations in the United States voluntarily make available to the public were studied. Of the 208 foundations contacted, 150 were the largest grant-making foundations, 30 were the largest community foundations, and 28 were the largest corporate foundations. The response rate to written and…

  16. The Million-Body Problem: Particle Simulations in Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema

    Rasio, Fred [Northwestern University

    2016-07-12

    Computer simulations using particles play a key role in astrophysics. They are widely used to study problems across the entire range of astrophysical scales, from the dynamics of stars, gaseous nebulae, and galaxies, to the formation of the largest-scale structures in the universe. The 'particles' can be anything from elementary particles to macroscopic fluid elements, entire stars, or even entire galaxies. Using particle simulations as a common thread, this talk will present an overview of computational astrophysics research currently done in our theory group at Northwestern. Topics will include stellar collisions and the gravothermal catastrophe in dense star clusters.

  17. A search for free fractional electric charge elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2001-07-01

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied-about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 × 10-22 particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  18. On effects of viscosity and magnetic fields on the largest growth rate of linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we investigate the effect of viscosity on the largest growth rate in the linear Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability of a three-dimensional nonhomogeneous incompressible viscous flow in a bounded domain. By adapting a modified variational approach and careful analysis, we show that the largest growth rate in linear RT instability tends to zero as the viscosity coefficient goes to infinity. Moreover, the largest growth rate increasingly converges to one of the corresponding inviscid fluids as the viscosity coefficient goes to zero. Applying these analysis techniques to the corresponding viscous magnetohydrodynamic fluids, we can also show that the largest growth rate in linear magnetic RT instability tends to zero as the strength of horizontal (or vertical) magnetic field increasingly goes to a critical value.

  19. North Andean origin and diversification of the largest ithomiine butterfly genus

    PubMed Central

    Lisa De-Silva, Donna; Mota, Luísa L.; Chazot, Nicolas; Mallarino, Ricardo; Silva-Brandão, Karina L.; Piñerez, Luz Miryam Gómez; Freitas, André V.L.; Lamas, Gerardo; Joron, Mathieu; Mallet, James; Giraldo, Carlos E.; Uribe, Sandra; Särkinen, Tiina; Knapp, Sandra; Jiggins, Chris D.; Willmott, Keith R.; Elias, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    The Neotropics harbour the most diverse flora and fauna on Earth. The Andes are a major centre of diversification and source of diversity for adjacent areas in plants and vertebrates, but studies on insects remain scarce, even though they constitute the largest fraction of terrestrial biodiversity. Here, we combine molecular and morphological characters to generate a dated phylogeny of the butterfly genus Pteronymia (Nymphalidae: Danainae), which we use to infer spatial, elevational and temporal diversification patterns. We first propose six taxonomic changes that raise the generic species total to 53, making Pteronymia the most diverse genus of the tribe Ithomiini. Our biogeographic reconstruction shows that Pteronymia originated in the Northern Andes, where it diversified extensively. Some lineages colonized lowlands and adjacent montane areas, but diversification in those areas remained scarce. The recent colonization of lowland areas was reflected by an increase in the rate of evolution of species’ elevational ranges towards present. By contrast, speciation rate decelerated with time, with no extinction. The geological history of the Andes and adjacent regions have likely contributed to Pteronymia diversification by providing compartmentalized habitats and an array of biotic and abiotic conditions, and by limiting dispersal between some areas while promoting interchange across others. PMID:28387233

  20. Epidemiological study of hepatitis A, B and C in the largest Afro-Brazilian isolated community.

    PubMed

    Matos, Márcia A D; Reis, Nádia Rúbia S; Kozlowski, Aline G; Teles, Sheila A; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Mello, Francisco C A; Gomes, Selma A; Martins, Regina M B

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and molecular epidemiological features of viral hepatitis A, B and C in the Kalunga population, which represents the largest Afro-Brazilian isolated community. Among 878 individuals studied, the overall prevalence of anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies was 80.9%, with a significant rise from 44.8% to near 100% between the first and fourth decade of life. Rates for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) of 1.8% and 35.4%, respectively, were found. Increasing age, male gender, illiteracy and history of multiple sexual partners were associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. An occult HBV infection rate of 1.7% (5/295) was found among anti-HBc-positive individuals. HBV genotype A (subtype Aa) was dominant in this community. Only 5/878 individuals (0.6%) were positive for anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV RNA was detected in three of them, who were infected with genotype 1 (subtype 1a). These findings point out high, intermediate and low endemicity for hepatitis A, B and C, respectively, in the Kalunga community in Brazil. Circulation of HBV genotype A (subtype Aa) in this Afro-Brazilian isolated community indicates the introduction of this virus during the slave trade from Africa to Brazil.

  1. Largest known Mesozoic multituberculate from Eurasia and implications for multituberculate evolution and biology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Xingliao; Pu, Hanyong; Jia, Songhai; Zhang, Jiming; Lü, Junchang; Meng, Jin

    2015-10-22

    A new multituberculate, Yubaartar zhongyuanensis gen. and sp. nov., is reported from the Upper Cretaceous of Luanchuan County, Henan Province, China. The holotype of the new taxon is a partial skeleton with nearly complete cranium and associated lower jaws with in situ dentitions. The new species is the southern-most record of a Late Cretaceous multituberculate from outside of the Mongolian Plateau in Asia and represents the largest known Mesozoic multituberculate from Eurasia. The new specimen displays some intriguing features previously unknown in multituberculates, such as the first evidence of replacement of the ultimate upper premolar and a unique paleopathological case in Mesozoic mammals in which the animal with a severely broken right tibia could heal and survive in natural condition. The phylogenetic analysis based on craniodental characters places Yubaartar as the immediate outgroup of Taeniolabidoidea, a group consisting of a North American clade and an Asian clade. This relationship indicates at least a faunal interchange of multituberculates before the K-Pg transition. The new evidence further supports the hypothesis that disparity in dental complexity, which relates to animal diets, increased with generic richness and disparity in body size, and that an adaptive shift towards increased herbivory across the K-Pg transitional interval.

  2. Human impact on the fish diversity in the four largest lakes of Sweden.

    PubMed

    Degerman, E; Hammar, J; Nyberg, P; Svärdson, G

    2001-12-01

    The four largest Swedish lakes, Vänern, Vättern, Mälaren, Hjälmaren, host important commercial fisheries for char, salmon, trout, whitefish, vendace (cisco), perch, pike-perch, pike and eel, i.e. highly diverse biological resources. Case studies illustrate physical, chemical and biological impacts on some of these commercial species caused by constructions of dams and ship canals, eutrophication, and overexploitation. Although some original species have been lost and a few new species have been added, the recent human interference has basically caused major shifts in dominance of the fish community structures because of eutrophication, alterations in the abundance of eel or crayfish, and due to overfishing. The latter is in some cases caused by the Great Lake Fishery Paradox--in an environment with several predators and competitors, but with ample food resources, especially salmonid fish but also species like pike-perch may adapt a life history favoring growth over sexual maturation. If harvested at a conventional size these populations will decline rapidly due to too small spawning stocks.

  3. Normal modes from the 2013 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake, the largest deep event ever recorded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    With a moment of 4.1 10**28 dyn*cm, the Sea of Okhotsk earthquake of 24 May 2013 is the largest deep event ever recorded. This provides a unique opportunity to study the excitation of low-frequency normal modes, including overtone and radial ones. The principal questions addressed will be the possible existence of a slow component to the source, which is not warranted by preliminary results; and the possible presence of an isotropic component to the moment tensor of its source. The latter was strongly debated in the case of the 1970 Colombian event (Gilbert and Dziewonski, 1973; Okal and Geller, 1979), and clearly found absent from the source of the 1994 Bolivian one (Kikuchi and Kanamori, 1994; Okal, 1996). Critical in this respect will be the investigation of the relative excitation of the the radial modes, and in particular, the fundamental 0s0, for which a sufficiently long (90 days) time series was not available by the submission deadline.

  4. Monitoring carbon monoxide pollution over the largest ten cities in the US using satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; de Beurs, K.; Owsley, B.; Krehbiel, C. P.; Henebry, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the several air pollutants that are largely produced by anthropogenic activities in urban areas as a result of incomplete combustion of carbon-containing fuels. Long-term satellite data can monitor spatial and temporal changes in CO globally. Here we investigated spatial, vertical, and temporal changes in CO concentrations over the largest ten US metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) using Version 6 MOPITT TIR-only CO retrievals. The 15-year average of MOPITT Surface CO concentrations over urban areas were highest (388 ppbv) over New York City and lowest (151 ppbv) over Miami. The influence of cities on elevated CO levels extends well beyond the immediate urban area. The CO seasonal profiles above the surface show distinct seasonality with peaks March-April and troughs September-October. However, larger cities show a lack of CO seasonality near the surface. We applied the nonparametric Seasonal Kendall (SK) trend test to the CO time series. Results revealed significant decreasing trends in CO concentration, with stronger trends in the lower atmosphere (>700 hPa) than in the mid-troposphere (500-700 hPa). Our results demonstrate the strong influence of local urban emissions on (near-) surface CO concentrations. Decreasing urban CO over the past 15 years reflects improved urban metabolism through improved energy efficiency, and increasing use of alternative transportation and zero-emission vehicles.

  5. Landscapes of thermal inequity: disproportionate exposure to urban heat in the three largest US cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Bruce C.; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2015-11-01

    Heat waves are the most significant cause of mortality in the US compared to other natural hazards. Prior studies have found increased heat exposure for individuals of lower socioeconomic status in several US cities, but few comparative analyses of the social distribution of urban heat have been conducted. To address this gap, our paper examines and compares the environmental justice consequences of urban heat risk in the three largest US cities: New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago. Risk to urban heat is estimated on the basis of three characteristics of the urban thermal landscape: land surface temperature, vegetation abundance, and structural density of the built urban environment. These variables are combined to develop an urban heat risk index, which is then statistically compared with social vulnerability indicators representing socioeconomic status, age, disability, race/ethnicity, and linguistic isolation. The results indicate a consistent and significant statistical association between lower socioeconomic and minority status and greater urban heat risk, in all three cities. Our findings support a growing body of environmental justice literature that indicates the presence of a landscape of thermal inequity in US cities and underscores the need to conduct comparative analyses of social inequities in exposure to urban heat.

  6. Fire carbon emissions over maritime southeast Asia in 2015 largest since 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijnen, V.; Wooster, M. J.; Kaiser, J. W.; Gaveau, D. L. A.; Flemming, J.; Parrington, M.; Inness, A.; Murdiyarso, D.; Main, B.; van Weele, M.

    2016-05-01

    In September and October 2015 widespread forest and peatland fires burned over large parts of maritime southeast Asia, most notably Indonesia, releasing large amounts of terrestrially-stored carbon into the atmosphere, primarily in the form of CO2, CO and CH4. With a mean emission rate of 11.3 Tg CO2 per day during Sept-Oct 2015, emissions from these fires exceeded the fossil fuel CO2 release rate of the European Union (EU28) (8.9 Tg CO2 per day). Although seasonal fires are a frequent occurrence in the human modified landscapes found in Indonesia, the extent of the 2015 fires was greatly inflated by an extended drought period associated with a strong El Niño. We estimate carbon emissions from the 2015 fires to be the largest seen in maritime southeast Asia since those associated with the record breaking El Niño of 1997. Compared to that event, a much better constrained regional total carbon emission estimate can be made for the 2015 fires through the use of present-day satellite observations of the fire’s radiative power output and atmospheric CO concentrations, processed using the modelling and assimilation framework of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) and combined with unique in situ smoke measurements made on Kalimantan.

  7. Nutritional properties of the largest bamboo fruit Melocanna baccifera and its ecological significance

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Balaji; Johnson, Anil John; Nair, Sadasivan Nair Ajikumaran; Gopakumar, Bhaskaran; Mallampalli, Karuna Sri Lakshmi; Venkataraman, Ramaswamy; Koshy, Konnath Chacko; Baby, Sabulal

    2016-01-01

    Melocanna baccifera is a unique bamboo which produces the largest fruits in the grass family. Its gregarious flowering once in 45–50 years in north east India and adjacent regions is a botanical enigma, resulting in a glut of fruits. Proper utilization of M. baccifera fruits is not extant, and huge quantities of fruits are left underexploited due to lack of scientific information on their chemical composition and nutritional potential. Here we report the nutritional properties of M. baccifera fruits, and the ecological significance of its fruiting. This pear-shaped, fleshy bamboo fruit is rich in amino acids (lysine, glutamic acid), sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose) and phenolics (ferulic acid). Protein content (free, bound) in M. baccifera fruits is very low. Fruits are rich in saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid), minerals (potassium), and only B series vitamins (B3) are detected in them. Rat feeding experiments showed that M. baccifera fruit alone is not a complete food, but with other protein supplements, it is a valuable food additive. This study could lead to better utilization of M. baccifera fruits during future flowering/fruiting events. These results could also help in the successful management of rodent outbreaks and other ecological problems associated with M. baccifera fruiting. PMID:27194218

  8. Nutritional properties of the largest bamboo fruit Melocanna baccifera and its ecological significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, Balaji; Johnson, Anil John; Nair, Sadasivan Nair Ajikumaran; Gopakumar, Bhaskaran; Mallampalli, Karuna Sri Lakshmi; Venkataraman, Ramaswamy; Koshy, Konnath Chacko; Baby, Sabulal

    2016-05-01

    Melocanna baccifera is a unique bamboo which produces the largest fruits in the grass family. Its gregarious flowering once in 45–50 years in north east India and adjacent regions is a botanical enigma, resulting in a glut of fruits. Proper utilization of M. baccifera fruits is not extant, and huge quantities of fruits are left underexploited due to lack of scientific information on their chemical composition and nutritional potential. Here we report the nutritional properties of M. baccifera fruits, and the ecological significance of its fruiting. This pear-shaped, fleshy bamboo fruit is rich in amino acids (lysine, glutamic acid), sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose) and phenolics (ferulic acid). Protein content (free, bound) in M. baccifera fruits is very low. Fruits are rich in saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid), minerals (potassium), and only B series vitamins (B3) are detected in them. Rat feeding experiments showed that M. baccifera fruit alone is not a complete food, but with other protein supplements, it is a valuable food additive. This study could lead to better utilization of M. baccifera fruits during future flowering/fruiting events. These results could also help in the successful management of rodent outbreaks and other ecological problems associated with M. baccifera fruiting.

  9. The nutrient economy of Lodoicea maldivica, a monodominant palm producing the world's largest seed.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Peter J; Fleischer-Dogley, Frauke; Kaiser-Bunbury, Christopher N

    2015-05-01

    The iconic Lodoicea maldivica palm appears to invest heavily in reproduction, with females bearing the world's largest seeds and males producing copious pollen. We asked how these palms, which grow in extremely poor soils, obtain sufficient nutrients to support such high levels of reproductive function. Our study site was the Vallée de Mai UNESCO Site on Praslin, Seychelles. We measured the trees' allocations of dry matter, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to aboveground growth and reproduction, quantified stemflow and throughfall, and measured availabilities of N and P in the soil. We show that the nutrient costs of reproduction are very high in male and female plants, and for P far exceed those of vegetative growth. We describe how the palm leaves form a huge funnel that intercepts particulate material, especially pollen, which is flushed to the base of the trunk when it rains. In this way, Lodoicea improves its nutrient supply and that of its dispersal-limited offspring. Lodoicea shares many functional characteristics with dominant trees of other monodominant forests in the humid tropics. It also exhibits unique features, including its huge seed, effective funnelling mechanism and diverse community of closely associated animals, suggesting a long evolutionary history under relatively stable conditions.

  10. The Tissint Martian meteorite as evidence for the largest impact excavation.

    PubMed

    Baziotis, Ioannis P; Liu, Yang; DeCarli, Paul S; Melosh, H Jay; McSween, Harry Y; Bodnar, Robert J; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure minerals in meteorites provide clues for the impact processes that excavated, launched and delivered these samples to Earth. Most Martian meteorites are suggested to have been excavated from 3 to 7 km diameter impact craters. Here we show that the Tissint meteorite, a 2011 meteorite fall, contains virtually all the high-pressure phases (seven minerals and two mineral glasses) that have been reported in isolated occurrences in other Martian meteorites. Particularly, one ringwoodite (75 × 140 μm(2)) represents the largest grain observed in all Martian samples. Collectively, the ubiquitous high-pressure minerals of unusually large sizes in Tissint indicate that shock metamorphism was widely dispersed in this sample (~25 GPa and ~2,000 °C). Using the size and growth kinetics of the ringwoodite grains, we infer an initial impact crater with ~90 km diameter, with a factor of 2 uncertainty. These energetic conditions imply alteration of any possible low-T minerals in Tissint.

  11. Photographer: Voyager 1 Jupiter, its Great Red Spot and Three of its four largest satellites are

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Photographer: Voyager 1 Jupiter, its Great Red Spot and Three of its four largest satellites are visible here. The spacecraft was 28.4 million kilometers (17.5 million miles) from the planet at this time. The inner-most large satellite, Io, can be seen against Jupiter's disk. Io is distinguished by its bright, brown-yellow surface. To the right of Jupiter is the satellite Europa, also very bright but with fainter surface markings. The darkest satellite, Callisto (still nearly twice as bright as Earth's Moon), is barely visible a the bottom left of the picture. Callisto shows a bright patch in its northern hemisphere. All three orbit Jupiter in the equatorial plane, and appear in their present position because Voyager is above the plane. All three satellites show the same face to Jupiter always -- just as Earth's Moon always shows us the same face. In this photo we see the sides of the satellites that always face away from the planet. Jupiters' colorfully banded atmosphere displays complex patterns highlighted by the Great Red Spot, a large, circulating atmospheric distrubance. This black-and-white photo was taken through a violet filter. (JPL ref: P-21083 1-22 B/W)

  12. Evidence for protection of targeted reef fish on the largest marine reserve in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Pina-Amargós, Fabián; González-Sansón, Gaspar; Martín-Blanco, Félix; Valdivia, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Marine reserves can restore fish abundance and diversity in areas impacted by overfishing, but the effectiveness of reserves in developing countries where resources for enforcement are limited, have seldom been evaluated. Here we assess whether the establishment in 1996 of the largest marine reserve in the Caribbean, Gardens of the Queen in Cuba, has had a positive effect on the abundance of commercially valuable reef fish species in relation to neighboring unprotected areas. We surveyed 25 sites, including two reef habitats (reef crest and reef slope), inside and outside the marine reserve, on five different months, and over a one-and-a-half year period. Densities of the ten most frequent, highly targeted, and relatively large fish species showed a significant variability across the archipelago for both reef habitats that depended on the month of survey. These ten species showed a tendency towards higher abundance inside the reserve in both reef habitats for most months during the study. Average fish densities pooled by protection level, however, showed that five out of these ten species were at least two-fold significantly higher inside than outside the reserve at one or both reef habitats. Supporting evidence from previously published studies in the area indicates that habitat complexity and major benthic communities were similar inside and outside the reserve, while fishing pressure appeared to be homogeneous across the archipelago before reserve establishment. Although poaching may occur within the reserve, especially at the boundaries, effective protection from fishing was the most plausible explanation for the patterns observed.

  13. Sustained Presence of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Urban Manaus, the Largest Human Settlement in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Benício, Ednelza; Cordeiro, Mayara; Monteiro, Hannah; Moura, Marco Antônio Saboia; Oliveira, Cintia; Gadelha, Ellen Pricilla Nunes; Chrusciak-Talhari, Anette; Talhari, Carolina; de Lima Ferreira, Luiz Carlos; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Talhari, Sinésio; Schriefer, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon is responsible for approximately 40% of the American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) in Brazil. Herein the sustained presence of ATL in Manaus, the largest settlement in the Amazon, was investigated. Records of notification of historic cases, and data from cases prospectively enrolled in the Tropical Medicine Foundation of the Amazonas State were used. Geographic coordinates of prospective patients' living sites were used to detect inner-city clusters of ATL. Infecting Leishmania species was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Among prospectively enrolled subjects, 94.8% were infected with Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis, 76.7% were male, 30.2% were 0–20 years old, and 69.8% had an urban residence. Historic cases showed a profile similar to that of prospectively enrolled subjects. Several clusters of ATL, widely distributed within the city of Manaus, could be detected. In conclusion, there was a high frequency of disease in young age groups and cases clustered in urban neighborhoods. It cannot be determined from these data whether transmission of these cases occurred within or outside the city of Manaus. PMID:26483119

  14. Predicting bite force and cranial biomechanics in the largest fossil rodent using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Philip G; Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Josephoartigasia monesi, from the Pliocene of Uruguay, is the largest known fossil rodent, with an estimated body mass of 1000 kg. In this study, finite element analysis was used to estimate the maximum bite force that J. monesi could generate at the incisors and the cheek teeth. Owing to uncertainty in the model inputs, a sensitivity study was conducted in which the muscle forces and orientations were sequentially altered. This enabled conclusions to be drawn on the function of some of the masticatory muscles. It was found that J. monesi had a bite of 1389 N at the incisors, rising to 4165 N at the third molar. Varying muscle forces by 20% and orientations by 10° around the medio-lateral aspect led to an error in bite force of under 35% at each tooth. Predicted stresses across the skull were only minimally affected by changes to muscle forces and orientations, but revealed a reasonable safety factor in the strength of the skull. These results, combined with previous work, lead us to speculate that J. monesi was behaving in an elephant-like manner, using its incisors like tusks, and processing tough vegetation with large bite forces at the cheek teeth. PMID:25652795

  15. Anatomizing one of the largest saltwater inflows into the Baltic Sea in December 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräwe, Ulf; Naumann, Michael; Mohrholz, Volker; Burchard, Hans

    2015-11-01

    In December 2014, an exceptional inflow event into the Baltic Sea was observed, a so-called Major Baltic Inflow (MBI). Such inflow events are important for the deep water ventilation in the Baltic Sea and typically occur every 3-10 years. Based on first observational data sets, this inflow had been ranked as the third largest since 100 years. With the help of a multinested modeling system, reaching from the North Atlantic (8 km resolution) to the Western Baltic Sea (600 m resolution, which is baroclinic eddy resolving), this event is reproduced in detail. The model gave a slightly lower salt transport of 3.8 Gt, compared to the observational estimate of four Gt. Moreover, by using passive tracers to mark the different inflowing water masses, including an age tracer, the inflowing water masses could be tracked and their paths and timing through the different basins could be reproduced and investigated. The analysis is supported by the recently developed Total Exchange Flow (TEF) to quantify the volume transport in different salinity classes. To account for uncertainties in the modeled velocity and tracer fields, a Monte Carlo Analysis (MCA) is applied to correct possible biases and errors. With the help of the MCA, 95% confidence intervals are computed for the transport estimates. Based on the MCA, the "best guess" of the volume transport is 291.0 ± 13.65 km3 and 3.89 ± 0.18 Gt for the total salt transport.

  16. Mapping the Cosmic Web with the largest all-sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Peacock, John A.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Steward, Louise

    2016-10-01

    Our view of the low-redshift Cosmic Web has been revolutionized by galaxy redshift surveys such as 6dFGS, SDSS and 2MRS. However, the trade-off between depth and angular coverage limits a systematic three-dimensional account of the entire sky beyond the Local Volume (z < 0.05). In order to reliably map the Universe to cosmologically significant depths over the full celestial sphere, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. We have undertaken a dedicated program of cross-matching the largest photometric all-sky surveys - 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS - to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts - the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ, Bilicki et al. 2014a) - has been publicly released and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a mean redshift of z=0.08. Here we summarize how this catalog was constructed and how using the WISE mid-infrared sample together with SuperCOSMOS optical data allows us to push to redshift shells of z~ 0.2 -0.3 on unprecedented angular scales. Our catalogs, with ~ 20 million sources in total, provide access to cosmological volumes crucial for studies of local galaxy flows (clustering dipole, bulk flow) and cross-correlations with the cosmic microwave background such as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect or lensing studies.

  17. Unveiling the formation route of the largest galaxies in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea, Jaime D.; Solanes, José M.

    2016-09-01

    Observational evidence indicates that the role of gas is secondary to that of gravity in the formation of the most luminous spheroids inhabiting the centres of galaxy associations, as originally conjectured in the late 80s/early 90s. However, attempts to explain the origin of the Fundamental Plane (FP) of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) - a tilted version of the scaling relation connecting the size, velocity dispersion and mass of virialized homologous systems - based on sequences of pairwise mergers, have systematically concluded that dissipation cannot be ignored. We use controlled simulations of the pre-virialization stage of galaxy groups to show that multiple collisionless merging is capable of creating realistic first-ranked galaxies. Our mock remnants define a thin FP that perfectly fits data from all kinds of giant ETGs in the local volume, showing the existence of a unified relationship for these systems. High-ranked galaxies occupy in the FP different areas than standard objects, a segregation which is viewed essentially as zero-point offsets in the 2D correlations arising from standard projections of this plane. Our findings make a strong case for considering hierarchical dissipationless merging a viable route for the formation of the largest galaxies in the Universe.

  18. Next-Generation Museomics Disentangles One of the Largest Primate Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Johannes; Sawyer, Susanna; Valente, Luis M.; Bailey, Sebastian; Finstermeier, Knut; Sabin, Richard; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Sonet, Gontran; Nagy, Zoltán T.; Lenglet, Georges; Mayer, Frieder; Savolainen, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Guenons (tribe Cercopithecini) are one of the most diverse groups of primates. They occupy all of sub-Saharan Africa and show great variation in ecology, behavior, and morphology. This variation led to the description of over 60 species and subspecies. Here, using next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) in combination with targeted DNA capture, we sequenced 92 mitochondrial genomes from museum-preserved specimens as old as 117 years. We infer evolutionary relationships and estimate divergence times of almost all guenon taxa based on mitochondrial genome sequences. Using this phylogenetic framework, we infer divergence dates and reconstruct ancestral geographic ranges. We conclude that the extraordinary radiation of guenons has been a complex process driven by, among other factors, localized fluctuations of African forest cover. We find incongruences between phylogenetic trees reconstructed from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, which can be explained by either incomplete lineage sorting or hybridization. Furthermore, having produced the largest mitochondrial DNA data set from museum specimens, we document how NGS technologies can “unlock” museum collections, thereby helping to unravel the tree-of-life. [Museum collection; next-generation DNA sequencing; primate radiation; speciation; target capture.] PMID:23503595

  19. Prostate Cancer Screening in Jamaica: Results of the Largest National Screening Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Belinda F.; Aiken, William; Mayhew, Richard; Gordon, Yulit; Reid, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent in Jamaica and is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Our aim was to evaluate the patterns of screening in the largest organized screening clinic in Jamaica at the Jamaica Cancer Society. A retrospective analysis of all men presenting for screening at the Jamaica Cancer Society from 1995 to 2005 was done. All patients had digital rectal examinations (DRE) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests done. Results of prostate biopsies were noted. 1117 men of mean age 59.9 ± 8.2 years presented for screening. The median documented PSA was 1.6 ng/mL (maximum of 5170 ng/mL). Most patients presented for only 1 screen. There was a gradual reduction in the mean age of presentation for screening over the period. Prostate biopsies were requested on 11% of screening visits; however, only 59% of these were done. 5.6% of all persons screened were found to have cancer. Of the cancers diagnosed, Gleason 6 adenocarcinoma was the commonest grade and median PSA was 8.9 ng/mL (range 1.5–1059 ng/mL). Older men tend to screen for prostate cancer in Jamaica. However, compliance with regular maintenance visits and requests for confirmatory biopsies are poor. Screening needs intervention in the Jamaican population. PMID:27034668

  20. Largest known Mesozoic multituberculate from Eurasia and implications for multituberculate evolution and biology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Xingliao; Pu, Hanyong; Jia, Songhai; Zhang, Jiming; Lü, Junchang; Meng, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A new multituberculate, Yubaartar zhongyuanensis gen. and sp. nov., is reported from the Upper Cretaceous of Luanchuan County, Henan Province, China. The holotype of the new taxon is a partial skeleton with nearly complete cranium and associated lower jaws with in situ dentitions. The new species is the southern-most record of a Late Cretaceous multituberculate from outside of the Mongolian Plateau in Asia and represents the largest known Mesozoic multituberculate from Eurasia. The new specimen displays some intriguing features previously unknown in multituberculates, such as the first evidence of replacement of the ultimate upper premolar and a unique paleopathological case in Mesozoic mammals in which the animal with a severely broken right tibia could heal and survive in natural condition. The phylogenetic analysis based on craniodental characters places Yubaartar as the immediate outgroup of Taeniolabidoidea, a group consisting of a North American clade and an Asian clade. This relationship indicates at least a faunal interchange of multituberculates before the K-Pg transition. The new evidence further supports the hypothesis that disparity in dental complexity, which relates to animal diets, increased with generic richness and disparity in body size, and that an adaptive shift towards increased herbivory across the K-Pg transitional interval. PMID:26492455

  1. Percolation under noise: Detecting explosive percolation using the second-largest component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viles, Wes; Ginestet, Cedric E.; Tang, Ariana; Kramer, Mark A.; Kolaczyk, Eric D.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of distinguishing between different rates of percolation under noise. A statistical model of percolation is constructed allowing for the birth and death of edges as well as the presence of noise in the observations. This graph-valued stochastic process is composed of a latent and an observed nonstationary process, where the observed graph process is corrupted by type-I and type-II errors. This produces a hidden Markov graph model. We show that for certain choices of parameters controlling the noise, the classical (Erdős-Rényi) percolation is visually indistinguishable from a more rapid form of percolation. In this setting, we compare two different criteria for discriminating between these two percolation models, based on the interquartile range (IQR) of the first component's size, and on the maximal size of the second-largest component. We show through data simulations that this second criterion outperforms the IQR of the first component's size, in terms of discriminatory power. The maximal size of the second component therefore provides a useful statistic for distinguishing between different rates of percolation, under physically motivated conditions for the birth and death of edges, and under noise. The potential application of the proposed criteria for the detection of clinically relevant percolation in the context of applied neuroscience is also discussed.

  2. Seasonal variations of trace elements in precipitation at the largest city in Tibet, Lhasa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junming; Kang, Shichang; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Qianggong; Tripathee, Lekhendra; Sillanpää, Mika

    2015-02-01

    Precipitation samples were collected from March 2010 to August 2012 at an urban site in Lhasa, the capital and largest city of Tibet. The volume weighted mean (VWM) concentrations of 17 trace elements in precipitation were higher during the non-monsoon season than in the monsoon season, but inverse seasonal variations occurred for wet deposition fluxes of most of the trace elements. Concentrations for most of trace elements were negatively correlated with precipitation amount, indicating that below-cloud scavenging of trace elements was an important mechanism contributing to wet deposition of these elements. The elements Al, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Mn, Ni, and U displayed low crustal enrichment factors (EFs), whereas Co, Cu, Zn, As, Cd Sn, Pb, and Bi showed high EF values in precipitation, suggesting that anthropogenic activities might be important contributors of these elements at Lhasa. However, this present work indicates a much lower anthropogenic emission at Lhasa than in seriously polluted regions. Our study will not only provide insights for assessing the current status of the atmospheric environment in Lhasa but also enhance our understanding for updating the baseline for environmental protection over the Tibetan Plateau.

  3. Influenza surveillance in Shenzhen, the largest migratory metropolitan city of China, 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Cheng, X W; Ma, H W; He, J F; Xie, X; Fang, S S; Wu, C L; Lu, X; Mei, S J; Li, Y; Cheng, J Q

    2011-10-01

    Shenzhen is one of the largest migratory metropolitan cities in China. A standardized influenza surveillance system has been operating in Shenzhen for several years. The objectives of the present study were to describe the epidemiology of influenza in Shenzhen and to assess the impact of pandemic H1N1 on influenza activity. An average rate of 71 cases of influenza-like illness (ILI)/1000 consultations was reported, which was greater than the rate in the preceding 3 years. Laboratory surveillance showed that the annual proportion of specimens positive for influenza was 25·4% in 2009, representing a significant increase over the proportions of 5·4%, 11·6% and 12·2% in 2006, 2007 and 2008, respectively. A total of 414 ILI outbreaks were reported in 2009, which was a marked increase compared to the previous 3 years. Influenza activity reached a record high in Shenzhen in 2009. Seasonal A/H3N2 was the dominant strain during the summer and was gradually replaced by pandemic H1N1. A semi-annual cycle for influenza circulation began to appear due to the emergence of pandemic H1N1.

  4. Fire carbon emissions over maritime southeast Asia in 2015 largest since 1997

    PubMed Central

    Huijnen, V.; Wooster, M. J.; Kaiser, J. W.; Gaveau, D. L. A.; Flemming, J.; Parrington, M.; Inness, A.; Murdiyarso, D.; Main, B.; van Weele, M.

    2016-01-01

    In September and October 2015 widespread forest and peatland fires burned over large parts of maritime southeast Asia, most notably Indonesia, releasing large amounts of terrestrially-stored carbon into the atmosphere, primarily in the form of CO2, CO and CH4. With a mean emission rate of 11.3 Tg CO2 per day during Sept-Oct 2015, emissions from these fires exceeded the fossil fuel CO2 release rate of the European Union (EU28) (8.9 Tg CO2 per day). Although seasonal fires are a frequent occurrence in the human modified landscapes found in Indonesia, the extent of the 2015 fires was greatly inflated by an extended drought period associated with a strong El Niño. We estimate carbon emissions from the 2015 fires to be the largest seen in maritime southeast Asia since those associated with the record breaking El Niño of 1997. Compared to that event, a much better constrained regional total carbon emission estimate can be made for the 2015 fires through the use of present-day satellite observations of the fire’s radiative power output and atmospheric CO concentrations, processed using the modelling and assimilation framework of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) and combined with unique in situ smoke measurements made on Kalimantan. PMID:27241616

  5. Staphylococcus aureus outbreak in the intensive care unit of the largest public hospital in Quito, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Paul A; Alarcón, Marta; Narvaez, Inés; Salazar, Ramiro; Falconí, Guillermo; Espinel, Mauricio; Trueba, Gabriel

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of nosocomial pneumonia and bacteremia worldwide. Classical and molecular epidemiology approaches were used to study a S. aureus outbreak in the intensive care unit (ICU) of one of the largest public hospitals in Quito. Staphylococcus aureus isolates from 17 patients and 19 potential carriers from the staff were collected from March 2007 to February 2008 and analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to determine their clonal relationships. During this period the hospital reported 16 cases of hospital-acquired staphylococcal pneumonia and an apparent outbreak occurred from June to September 2007. DNA from these isolates formed six different PFGE patterns: four clonal groups, and two groups of clonally related isolates. Molecular typing failed to identify any staphylococcal reservoir among staff members. The current study suggested that a staphylococcal outbreak that occurred in the summer of 2007 was caused by different bacterial clones, although some clones were shared by two patients. Historical analysis of the staphylococcal infections in the ICU showed a higher incidence during the summer months, which coincided with the programmed personnel shift. This observation suggests that outbreaks might be produced by the introduction of improperly trained personnel.

  6. Insight into diversity, body size and morphological evolution from the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhonghe; Clarke, Julia; Zhang, Fucheng

    2008-05-01

    Most of Mesozoic bird diversity comprises species that are part of one of two major lineages, namely Ornithurae, including living birds, and Enantiornithes, a major radiation traditionally referred to as 'opposite birds'. Here we report the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird from north-east China, which provides evidence that basal members of Enantiornithes share more morphologies with ornithurine birds than previously recognized. Morphological evolution in these two groups has been thought to be largely parallel, with derived members of Enantiornithes convergent on the 'advanced' flight capabilities of ornithurine birds. The presence of an array of morphologies previously thought to be derived within ornithurine and enantiornithine birds in a basal enantiornithine species provides evidence of the complex character evolution in these two major lineages. The cranial morphology of the new specimen is among the best preserved for Mesozoic avians. The new species extends the size range known for Early Cretaceous Enantiornithes significantly and provides evidence of forelimb to hind limb proportions distinct from all other known members of the clade. As such, it sheds new light on avian body size evolution and diversity, and allows a re-evaluation of a previously proposed hypothesis of competitive exclusion among Early Cretaceous avian clades.

  7. KIC-5473556: the largest and longest-period Kepler transiting circumbinary planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Veselin

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new Kepler transiting circumbinary planet (CBP). This latest addition to the still-small family of CBPs defies the current trend of short-period CBPs orbiting near the stability limit of binary stars. Unlike the previous discoveries, the planet in the KIC-5473556 system has a very long orbital period (~1100 days) and was at conjunction only twice during the Kepler mission -- making it the longest-period transiting CBP at the time of writing. With a radius of nearly 12 REarth, it is also the largest such planet to date. It produced three transits in the light curve of KIC 5473556, one of them during a syzygy. The planet revolves around an ~11-day Eclipsing Binary consisting of two Solar-mass stars on a slightly inclined to the line of sight, mildly eccentric (ebin = 0.16) orbit. The CBP measurably perturbs the times of the stellar eclipses, allowing us to constrain its mass well. Here we present our spectroscopic and photometric observations of the target, discuss our analysis of the system, and outline the theoretical implications of our discovery.

  8. Kepler-1647b: The Largest and Longest-period Kepler Transiting Circumbinary Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Veselin B.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Haghighipour, Nader; Quarles, Billy; Short, Donald R.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Ford, Eric B.; Gregorio, Joao; Hinse, Tobias C.; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Kane, Stephen; Kull, Ilya; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Müller, Tobias W. A.; Pepper, Joshua; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H.; Torres, Guillermo; Windmiller, Gur; Borucki, William J.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a new Kepler transiting circumbinary planet (CBP). This latest addition to the still-small family of CBPs defies the current trend of known short-period planets orbiting near the stability limit of binary stars. Unlike the previous discoveries, the planet revolving around the eclipsing binary system Kepler-1647 has a very long orbital period (˜1100 days) and was at conjunction only twice during the Kepler mission lifetime. Due to the singular configuration of the system, Kepler-1647b is not only the longest-period transiting CBP at the time of writing, but also one of the longest-period transiting planets. With a radius of 1.06 ± 0.01 R Jup, it is also the largest CBP to date. The planet produced three transits in the light curve of Kepler-1647 (one of them during an eclipse, creating a syzygy) and measurably perturbed the times of the stellar eclipses, allowing us to measure its mass, 1.52 ± 0.65 M Jup. The planet revolves around an 11-day period eclipsing binary consisting of two solar-mass stars on a slightly inclined, mildly eccentric (e bin = 0.16), spin-synchronized orbit. Despite having an orbital period three times longer than Earth’s, Kepler-1647b is in the conservative habitable zone of the binary star throughout its orbit.

  9. Monitoring coastal pollution associated with the largest oil refinery complex of Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Bone, David; Bastidas, Carolina; Ramos, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pollution levels in water and sediments of Península de Paraguaná and related these levels with benthic macrofauna along a coastal area where the largest Venezuelan oil refineries have operated over the past 60 years. For this, the concentration of heavy metals, of hydrocarbon compounds and the community structure of the macrobenthos were examined at 20 sites distributed along 40 km of coastline for six consecutive years, which included windy and calm seasons. The spatial variability of organic and inorganic compounds showed considerably high coastal pollution along the study area, across both years and seasons. The southern sites, closest to the refineries, had consistently higher concentrations of heavy metals and organic compounds in water and sediments when compared to those in the north. The benthic community was dominated by polychaetes at all sites, seasons and years, and their abundance and distribution were significantly correlated with physical and chemical characteristics of the sediments. Sites close to the oil refineries were consistently dominated by families known to tolerate xenobiotics, such as Capitellidae and Spionidae. The results from this study highlight the importance of continuing long-term environmental monitoring programs to assess the impact of effluent discharge and spill events from the oil refineries that operate in the western coast of Paraguaná, Venezuela. PMID:27375970

  10. Monitoring coastal pollution associated with the largest oil refinery complex of Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Croquer, Aldo; Bone, David; Bastidas, Carolina; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pollution levels in water and sediments of Península de Paraguaná and related these levels with benthic macrofauna along a coastal area where the largest Venezuelan oil refineries have operated over the past 60 years. For this, the concentration of heavy metals, of hydrocarbon compounds and the community structure of the macrobenthos were examined at 20 sites distributed along 40 km of coastline for six consecutive years, which included windy and calm seasons. The spatial variability of organic and inorganic compounds showed considerably high coastal pollution along the study area, across both years and seasons. The southern sites, closest to the refineries, had consistently higher concentrations of heavy metals and organic compounds in water and sediments when compared to those in the north. The benthic community was dominated by polychaetes at all sites, seasons and years, and their abundance and distribution were significantly correlated with physical and chemical characteristics of the sediments. Sites close to the oil refineries were consistently dominated by families known to tolerate xenobiotics, such as Capitellidae and Spionidae. The results from this study highlight the importance of continuing long-term environmental monitoring programs to assess the impact of effluent discharge and spill events from the oil refineries that operate in the western coast of Paraguaná, Venezuela.

  11. Avoiding bias in reconstructing the largest observable scales from partial-sky data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2011-11-01

    Obscuration due to Galactic emission complicates the extraction of information from cosmological surveys, and requires some combination of the (typically imperfect) modeling and subtraction of foregrounds, or the removal of part of the sky. This particularly affects the extraction of information from the largest observable scales. Maximum-likelihood estimators for reconstructing the full-sky spherical harmonic coefficients from partial-sky maps have recently been shown to be susceptible to contamination from within the sky cut, arising due to the necessity to band-limit the data by smoothing prior to reconstruction. Using the WMAP 7-year data, we investigate modified implementations of such estimators which are robust to the leakage of contaminants from within masked regions. We provide a measure, based on the expected amplitude of residual foregrounds, for selecting the most appropriate estimator for the task at hand. We explain why the related quadratic maximum-likelihood estimator of the angular power spectrum does not suffer from smoothing-induced bias.

  12. Sixty years of environmental change in the world's largest freshwater lake – Lake Baikal, Siberia

    PubMed Central

    HAMPTON, STEPHANIE E; IZMEST'EVA, LYUBOV R; MOORE, MARIANNE V; KATZ, STEPHEN L; DENNIS, BRIAN; SILOW, EUGENE A

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution data collected over the past 60 years by a single family of Siberian scientists on Lake Baikal reveal significant warming of surface waters and long-term changes in the basal food web of the world's largest, most ancient lake. Attaining depths over 1.6 km, Lake Baikal is the deepest and most voluminous of the world's great lakes. Increases in average water temperature (1.21 °C since 1946), chlorophyll a (300% since 1979), and an influential group of zooplankton grazers (335% increase in cladocerans since 1946) may have important implications for nutrient cycling and food web dynamics. Results from multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling suggest that cladocerans increased strongly in response to temperature but not to algal biomass, and cladocerans depressed some algal resources without observable fertilization effects. Changes in Lake Baikal are particularly significant as an integrated signal of long-term regional warming, because this lake is expected to be among those most resistant to climate change due to its tremendous volume. These findings highlight the importance of accessible, long-term monitoring data for understanding ecosystem response to large-scale stressors such as climate change.

  13. Unique Features of Fish Immune Repertoires: Particularities of Adaptive Immunity Within the Largest Group of Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Magadan, Susana; Sunyer, Oriol J; Boudinot, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Fishes (i.e., teleost fishes) are the largest group of vertebrates. Although their immune system is based on the fundamental receptors, pathways, and cell types found in all groups of vertebrates, fishes show a diversity of particular features that challenge some classical concepts of immunology. In this chapter, we discuss the particularities of fish immune repertoires from a comparative perspective. We examine how allelic exclusion can be achieved when multiple Ig loci are present, how isotypic diversity and functional specificity impact clonal complexity, how loss of the MHC class II molecules affects the cooperation between T and B cells, and how deep sequencing technologies bring new insights about somatic hypermutation in the absence of germinal centers. The unique coexistence of two distinct B-cell lineages respectively specialized in systemic and mucosal responses is also discussed. Finally, we try to show that the diverse adaptations of immune repertoires in teleosts can help in understanding how somatic adaptive mechanisms of immunity evolved in parallel in different lineages across vertebrates.

  14. Bubble nucleation in simple and molecular liquids via the largest spherical cavity method

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Bresme, Fernando

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we propose a methodology to compute bubble nucleation free energy barriers using trajectories generated via molecular dynamics simulations. We follow the bubble nucleation process by means of a local order parameter, defined by the volume of the largest spherical cavity (LSC) formed in the nucleating trajectories. This order parameter simplifies considerably the monitoring of the nucleation events, as compared with the previous approaches which require ad hoc criteria to classify the atoms and molecules as liquid or vapor. The combination of the LSC and the mean first passage time technique can then be used to obtain the free energy curves. Upon computation of the cavity distribution function the nucleation rate and free-energy barrier can then be computed. We test our method against recent computations of bubble nucleation in simple liquids and water at negative pressures. We obtain free-energy barriers in good agreement with the previous works. The LSC method provides a versatile and computationally efficient route to estimate the volume of critical bubbles the nucleation rate and to compute bubble nucleation free-energies in both simple and molecular liquids.

  15. Synchronized observations by using the STEREO and the largest ground-based decametre radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Mann, G.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Kaiser, M. L.; Briand, C.; Zarka, P.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Koval, A. A.; Mel'nik, V. N.; Mukha, D. V.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the approach to simultaneous (synchronous) solar observations of radio emission by using the STEREO-WAVES instruments (frequency range 0.125-16 MHz) and the largest ground-based low-frequency radio telescope. We illustrate it by the UTR-2 radio telescope implementation (10-30 MHz). The antenna system of the radio telescope is a T-shape-like array of broadband dipoles and is located near the village Grakovo in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine). The third observation point on the ground in addition to two space-based ones improves the space-mission performance capabilities for the determination of radio-emission source directivity. The observational results from the high sensitivity antenna UTR-2 are particularly useful for analysis of STEREO data in the condition of weak event appearances during solar activity minima. In order to improve the accuracy of flux density measurements, we also provide simultaneous observations with a large part of the UTR-2 radio telescope array and its single dipole close to the STEREO-WAVES antennas in sensitivity. This concept has been studied by comparing the STEREO data with ground-based records from 2007-2011 and shown to be effective. The capabilities will be useful in the implementation of new instruments (LOFAR, LWA, MWA, etc.) and during the future Solar Orbiter mission.

  16. Predicting bite force and cranial biomechanics in the largest fossil rodent using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Philip G; Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R Ernesto

    2015-03-01

    Josephoartigasia monesi, from the Pliocene of Uruguay, is the largest known fossil rodent, with an estimated body mass of 1000 kg. In this study, finite element analysis was used to estimate the maximum bite force that J. monesi could generate at the incisors and the cheek teeth. Owing to uncertainty in the model inputs, a sensitivity study was conducted in which the muscle forces and orientations were sequentially altered. This enabled conclusions to be drawn on the function of some of the masticatory muscles. It was found that J. monesi had a bite of 1389 N at the incisors, rising to 4165 N at the third molar. Varying muscle forces by 20% and orientations by 10° around the medio-lateral aspect led to an error in bite force of under 35% at each tooth. Predicted stresses across the skull were only minimally affected by changes to muscle forces and orientations, but revealed a reasonable safety factor in the strength of the skull. These results, combined with previous work, lead us to speculate that J. monesi was behaving in an elephant-like manner, using its incisors like tusks, and processing tough vegetation with large bite forces at the cheek teeth.

  17. The Transportation Energy and Carbon Footprints of the 100 Largest U.S. Metropolitan Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, Frank; Sonnenberg, Anthon; Brown, Marilyn A

    2008-01-01

    We present estimates of the automobile and truck travel based energy and carbon footprints of the largest 100 U.S. metropolitan areas. The footprints are based on the estimated vehicle miles traveled and the transportation fuels consumed. Results are presented on an annual basis and represent end use emissions only. Total carbon emissions, emissions per capita, and emissions per dollar of gross metropolitan product are reported. Two years of annual data were examined, 2000 and 2005, with most of the in-depth analysis focused on the 2005 results. In section 2 we provide background data on the national picture and derive some carbon and energy consumption figures for the nation as a whole. In section 3 of the paper we examine the metropolitan area-wide results based on the sums and averages across all 100 metro areas, and compare these with the national totals and averages. In section 4 we present metropolitan area specific footprints and examine the considerable variation that is found to exist across individual metro areas. In doing so we pay particular attention to the effects that urban form might have on these differences. Finally, section 5 provides a summary of major findings, and a list of caveats that need to be borne in mind when using the results due to known limitations in the data sources used.

  18. The Provence 250 MWe unit: The largest CFB boiler ready for operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jaud, P.; Jacquet, L.; Piedfer, O.; Jestin, L.

    1995-12-31

    Today, the largest Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) project approaching operation is the 250 MWe Provence CFB boiler, located in the south of France. At such a size, the CFB technique has now reached a capacity corresponding to thermal power plants operated by utilities. This new unit, with a pant leg design, is also a very important step towards larger size i.e. 400 MWe and greater. The purpose of the Provence project was to replace the existing pulverized coal boiler unit 4, commissioned in 1967, of the Provence/Gardanne power plant, with a new CFB boiler while reusing most of the existing equipment. The 250 MWe boiler is of the superheat-reheat type, 1,050 F--1,050 F, firing local high-sulfur subbituminous coal with the possibility of co-firing high viscosity fuel oil (with a high sulfur content) up to a 50%--50% energy ratio. The first firing of the boiler is due in May 1995. This paper describes the progress in the construction of the plant and provides technical details of the new boiler and auxiliaries. Also presented is the associated R and D program designed to give a thorough evaluation of this boiler with a view to the design of larger CFBs in the future.

  19. Scaling relationships among drivers of aquatic respiration from the smallest to the largest freshwater ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Ed K; Schoolmaster, Donald; Amado, A.M; Stets, Edward G.; Lennon, J.T.; Domaine, L.; Cotner, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    To address how various environmental parameters control or constrain planktonic respiration (PR), we used geometric scaling relationships and established biological scaling laws to derive quantitative predictions for the relationships among key drivers of PR. We then used empirical measurements of PR and environmental (soluble reactive phosphate [SRP], carbon [DOC], chlorophyll a [Chl-a)], and temperature) and landscape parameters (lake area [LA] and watershed area [WA]) from a set of 44 lakes that varied in size and trophic status to test our hypotheses. We found that landscape-level processes affected PR through direct effects on DOC and temperature and indirectly via SRP. In accordance with predictions made from known relationships and scaling laws, scale coefficients (the parameter that describes the shape of a relationship between 2 variables) were found to be negative and have an absolute value 1, others <1). We also found evidence of a significant relationship between temperature and SRP. Because our dataset included measurements of respiration from small pond catchments to the largest body of freshwater on the planet, Lake Superior, these findings should be applicable to controls of PR for the great majority of temperate aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Storing and Accessing the Largest Astronomical Catalogs with the SAI CAS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koposov, S.; Bartunov, O.; Belinskiy, A.; Karpov, S.

    2007-10-01

    We present a new project -- SAI CAS (Sternberg Astronomical Institute Catalog Access Services). The goal of this project is to provide the Russian and international community with online access to major large astronomical catalogs (USNO-A2.0/B1.0, SDSS, 2MASS, GSC I/II, DENIS, UCAC) and provide tools and services facilitating scientific research using these catalogs. Currently SAI CAS is the largest astronomical data center in Russia. It provides primary services such as cone search, cross match between catalogs inside a region on the sky, and between system and user catalogs, etc. Several science projects in Russia already use SAI CAS. The SAI CAS project is based on open source software and is an open source itself. The system uses relational database storage (PostgreSQL), where all data and metadata are stored. The spatial searches and cross matches are performed using the Q3C plugin for PostgreSQL. Our system can be accessed via web-services (SOAP and simple HTTP POST/GET) and web interfaces. The SAI CAS project is located at http://vo.astronet.ru.

  1. Insight into diversity, body size and morphological evolution from the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhonghe; Clarke, Julia; Zhang, Fucheng

    2008-01-01

    Most of Mesozoic bird diversity comprises species that are part of one of two major lineages, namely Ornithurae, including living birds, and Enantiornithes, a major radiation traditionally referred to as ‘opposite birds’. Here we report the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird from north-east China, which provides evidence that basal members of Enantiornithes share more morphologies with ornithurine birds than previously recognized. Morphological evolution in these two groups has been thought to be largely parallel, with derived members of Enantiornithes convergent on the ‘advanced’ flight capabilities of ornithurine birds. The presence of an array of morphologies previously thought to be derived within ornithurine and enantiornithine birds in a basal enantiornithine species provides evidence of the complex character evolution in these two major lineages. The cranial morphology of the new specimen is among the best preserved for Mesozoic avians. The new species extends the size range known for Early Cretaceous Enantiornithes significantly and provides evidence of forelimb to hind limb proportions distinct from all other known members of the clade. As such, it sheds new light on avian body size evolution and diversity, and allows a re-evaluation of a previously proposed hypothesis of competitive exclusion among Early Cretaceous avian clades. PMID:18397240

  2. Carbon footprint of premium quality export bananas: case study in Ecuador, the world's largest exporter.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Alfredo; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Villalobos, Pablo

    2014-02-15

    Nowadays, the new international market demands challenge the food producing countries to include the measurement of the environmental impact generated along the production process for their products. In order to comply with the environmentally responsible market requests the measurement of the greenhouse gas emissions of Ecuadorian agricultural goods has been promoted employing the carbon footprint concept. Ecuador is the largest exporter of bananas in the world. Within this context, this study is a first assessment of the carbon footprint of the Ecuadorian premium export banana (Musa AAA) using a considerable amount of field data. The system boundaries considered from agricultural production to delivery in a European destination port. The data collected over three years permitted identifying the hot spot stages. For the calculation, the CCaLC V3.0 software developed by the University of Manchester is used. The carbon footprint of the Ecuadorian export banana ranged from 0.45 to 1.04 kg CO2-equivalent/kg banana depending on the international overseas transport employed. The principal contributors to the carbon footprint are the on farm production and overseas transport stages. Mitigation and reduction strategies were suggested for the main emission sources in order to achieve sustainable banana production.

  3. Bioremediation efficiency of the largest scale artificial Porphyra yezoensis cultivation in the open sea in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hailong; Huo, Yuanzi; Zhang, Jianheng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yating; He, Peimin

    2015-06-15

    The bioremediation efficiency of China's largest scale Porphyra yezoensis cultivation for removing dissolved nutrients and controlling harmful algae was studied in the radial sandbanks waters of Jiangsu Province in the year 2012-2013. Mean nutrient concentration values in the P. yezoensis cultivation area were significantly lower than those in the non-cultivation area, especially during the cultivation season (p<0.05). Tissue nitrogen and phosphorus contents of seaweeds were 5.99-0.80% (dry weight (DW)) and 0.16-0.19% (DW), respectively. Production of P. yezoensis was 58950.87tons DW. Based on these values, 3688.15tons of tissue nitrogen and 105.61tons of tissue phosphorus were removed by harvesting P. yezoensis. The richness index of the red tide species Skeleton emacostatum declined from 0.32 to 0.05 during the P. yezoensis cultivation season. These results indicate that large-scale cultivation of P. yezoensis can be used to efficiently alleviate eutrophication and control harmful algae blooms in open sea.

  4. Unique Features of Fish Immune Repertoires: Particularities of Adaptive Immunity Within the Largest Group of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, Oriol J.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes (i.e., teleost fishes) are the largest group of vertebrates. Although their immune system is based on the fundamental receptors, pathways, and cell types found in all groups of vertebrates, fishes show a diversity of particular features that challenge some classical concepts of immunology. In this chapter, we discuss the particularities of fish immune repertoires from a comparative perspective. We examine how allelic exclusion can be achieved when multiple Ig loci are present, how isotypic diversity and functional specificity impact clonal complexity, how loss of the MHC class II molecules affects the cooperation between T and B cells, and how deep sequencing technologies bring new insights about somatic hypermutation in the absence of germinal centers. The unique coexistence of two distinct B-cell lineages respectively specialized in systemic and mucosal responses is also discussed. Finally, we try to show that the diverse adaptations of immune repertoires in teleosts can help in understanding how somatic adaptive mechanisms of immunity evolved in parallel in different lineages across vertebrates. PMID:26537384

  5. Characteristics and Trends in Hypnotics Consumption in the Largest Health Care System in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, G.; Stein, N.; Landsman, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To quantify and characterize hypnotics consumption habits among adult patients insured by Clalit Health Services (CHS), the largest health care provider in Israel, in 2000 and 2010. Methods. A retrospective analysis of CHS computerized pharmacy records. Data were collected for all patients over the age of 18 years who were prescribed hypnotics in 2000 and in 2010. Results. Sleep medications were consumed by 8.7% of the adult CHS population in 2000 and by 9.6% in 2010. About one-quarter of consumers were treated for more than 6 months in both years. Multiple sleeping drugs were consumed more often in 2010 (45.2%) than a decade before (22%). While in 2000 benzodiazepines accounted for 84.5% of hypnotics, in 2010 this was reduced to 73.7% (p < 0.05). Of all patients treated for longer than 6 months only 11% in 2000 and 9% in 2010 required a dose escalation suggesting the absence of tolerance. Conclusions. Nine percent of the Israeli population consumes hypnotics. There is a major increase in prescription of combination of medications between 2000 and 2010, with an increase in Z class medications use and reduction in benzodiazepines. Most patients chronically treated did not escalate dosage, suggesting the absence of tolerance. PMID:27660727

  6. Dramatic variations in emergent wetland area in China's largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xuefei; Dai, Zhijun; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Chen, Jiyu

    2016-10-01

    Freshwater wetlands are important ecosystems experiencing rapid degradation around the world. As much as 64% of world's wetland area has been lost since 1900; the situation is even more serious in Asia, where land reclamation and anthropogenic modifications of rivers are increasing the rate of wetland disappearance. In this study, we provide a first complete estimation of daily Emergent Wetland Area (EWA) in Poyang Lake, China's largest freshwater lake, from 1955 to 2012. A wavelet analysis indicates a strong periodicity in the monthly EWA time series with two oscillations having a period of 12 and 60-72 months, respectively. A dramatic increase in mean annual EWA is detected since 2003, when the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) was completed, mainly due to the seasonal drying of 1078 km2 of wetlands in October. It is found that the timing of wetland emergence during the dry season has been anticipated of one month, from November to October, since the establishment of TGD. It is argued that a significant increase in wetland exposure and an observable shift in the seasonal timing of flooding and drying will seriously degrade the wetland system and threaten the endangered migratory birds that inhabit it unless effective countermeasures are implemented.

  7. Investigation of science faculty with education specialties within the largest university system in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bush, Seth D; Pelaez, Nancy J; Rudd, James A; Stevens, Michael T; Tanner, Kimberly D; Williams, Kathy S

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to improve science education include university science departments hiring Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES), scientists who take on specialized roles in science education within their discipline. Although these positions have existed for decades and may be growing more common, few reports have investigated the SFES approach to improving science education. We present comprehensive data on the SFES in the California State University (CSU) system, the largest university system in the United States. We found that CSU SFES were engaged in three key arenas including K-12 science education, undergraduate science education, and discipline-based science education research. As such, CSU SFES appeared to be well-positioned to have an impact on science education from within science departments. However, there appeared to be a lack of clarity and agreement about the purpose of these SFES positions. In addition, formal training in science education among CSU SFES was limited. Although over 75% of CSU SFES were fulfilled by their teaching, scholarship, and service, our results revealed that almost 40% of CSU SFES were seriously considering leaving their positions. Our data suggest that science departments would likely benefit from explicit discussions about the role of SFES and strategies for supporting their professional activities.

  8. World's largest macroalgal bloom caused by expansion of seaweed aquaculture in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongyan; Keesing, John K; Xing, Qianguo; Shi, Ping

    2009-06-01

    In late June 2008, just weeks before the opening of the Beijing Olympics, a massive green-tide occurred covering about 600km(2) along the coast of Qingdao, host city for Olympic sailing regatta. Coastal eutrophication was quickly attributed with the blame by the international media and some scientists. However, we explored an alternative hypothesis that the cause of the green-tide was due to the rapid expansion of Porphyra yezoensis aquaculture along the coastline over 180km away from Qingdao, and oceanographic conditions which favoured rapid growth of the bloom and contributed to transport of the bloom north into the Yellow Sea and then onshore northwest to Qingdao. At its peak offshore, the bloom covered 1200km(2) and affected 40,000km(2). This is the largest green-tide ever reported, the most extensive translocation of a green-tide and the first case of expansive seaweed aquaculture leading to a green-tide. Given similar oceanographic conditions to those that occurred in 2008, these green-tides may re-occur unless mitigation measures such as those proposed here are taken.

  9. Age and growth and maturity of southern Africa's largest cyprinid fish, the largemouth yellowfish Labeobarbus kimberleyensis.

    PubMed

    Ellender, B R; Weyl, O L F; Winker, H

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to use specimens of the largemouth yellowfish Labeobarbus kimberleyensis, southern Africa's largest cyprinid [IUCN red-listed as Near Threatened (NT)], obtained from gillnet by-catch to describe aspects of its biology in order to assist future conservation and management decisions. Ninety three L. kimberleyensis were collected between March 2007 and May 2008 from Lake Gariep, South Africa. Labeobarbus kimberleyensis was present in 38% of all gillnet catches, but in low numbers (2% of the catch) and it contributed 8% to the catch by mass. Age was estimated using astericus otoliths. Growth increment formation on these otoliths was validated as annual using edge analysis and the mark-recapture of chemically tagged captive fish. Resultant analysis showed that the species is slow growing and the oldest aged fish was a 17 year, 690 mm fork length (L(F)) male. The smallest ripe female fish measured 394 mm L(F) and was 7+ years old and the smallest mature male was 337 mm L(F) and 5+ years old. Slow growth and late maturity make this species vulnerable to exploitation emphasizing the need for continued high conservation priority.

  10. TCM Database@Taiwan: The World's Largest Traditional Chinese Medicine Database for Drug Screening In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advancing computational technologies have greatly speeded up the development of computer-aided drug design (CADD). Recently, pharmaceutical companies have increasingly shifted their attentions toward traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for novel lead compounds. Despite the growing number of studies on TCM, there is no free 3D small molecular structure database of TCM available for virtual screening or molecular simulation. To address this shortcoming, we have constructed TCM Database@Taiwan (http://tcm.cmu.edu.tw/) based on information collected from Chinese medical texts and scientific publications. TCM Database@Taiwan is currently the world's largest non-commercial TCM database. This web-based database contains more than 20,000 pure compounds isolated from 453 TCM ingredients. Both cdx (2D) and Tripos mol2 (3D) formats of each pure compound in the database are available for download and virtual screening. The TCM database includes both simple and advanced web-based query options that can specify search clauses, such as molecular properties, substructures, TCM ingredients, and TCM classification, based on intended drug actions. The TCM database can be easily accessed by all researchers conducting CADD. Over the last eight years, numerous volunteers have devoted their time to analyze TCM ingredients from Chinese medical texts as well as to construct structure files for each isolated compound. We believe that TCM Database@Taiwan will be a milestone on the path towards modernizing traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:21253603

  11. Astronomer's new guide to the galaxy: largest map of cold dust revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    Astronomers have unveiled an unprecedented new atlas of the inner regions of the Milky Way, our home galaxy, peppered with thousands of previously undiscovered dense knots of cold cosmic dust -- the potential birthplaces of new stars. Made using observations from the APEX telescope in Chile, this survey is the largest map of cold dust so far, and will prove an invaluable map for observations made with the forthcoming ALMA telescope, as well as the recently launched ESA Herschel space telescope. ESO PR Photo 24a/09 View of the Galactic Plane from the ATLASGAL survey (annotated and in five sections) ESO PR Photo 24b/09 View of the Galactic Plane from the ATLASGAL survey (annotated) ESO PR Photo 24c/09 View of the Galactic Plane from the ATLASGAL survey (in five sections) ESO PR Photo 24d/09 View of the Galactic Plane from the ATLASGAL survey ESO PR Photo 24e/09 The Galactic Centre and Sagittarius B2 ESO PR Photo 24f/09 The NGC 6357 and NGC 6334 nebulae ESO PR Photo 24g/09 The RCW120 nebula ESO PR Video 24a/09 Annotated pan as seen by the ATLASGAL survey This new guide for astronomers, known as the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) shows the Milky Way in submillimetre-wavelength light (between infrared light and radio waves [1]). Images of the cosmos at these wavelengths are vital for studying the birthplaces of new stars and the structure of the crowded galactic core. "ATLASGAL gives us a new look at the Milky Way. Not only will it help us investigate how massive stars form, but it will also give us an overview of the larger-scale structure of our galaxy", said Frederic Schuller from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, leader of the ATLASGAL team. The area of the new submillimetre map is approximately 95 square degrees, covering a very long and narrow strip along the galactic plane two degrees wide (four times the width of the full Moon) and over 40 degrees long. The 16 000 pixel-long map was made with the LABOCA submillimetre

  12. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  13. Inflationary cosmology: exploring the universe from the smallest to the largest scales.

    PubMed

    Guth, Alan H; Kaiser, David I

    2005-02-11

    Understanding the behavior of the universe at large depends critically on insights about the smallest units of matter and their fundamental interactions. Inflationary cosmology is a highly successful framework for exploring these interconnections between particle physics and gravitation. Inflation makes several predictions about the present state of the universe-such as its overall shape, large-scale smoothness, and smaller scale structure-which are being tested to unprecedented accuracy by a new generation of astronomical measurements. The agreement between these predictions and the latest observations is extremely promising. Meanwhile, physicists are busy trying to understand inflation's ultimate implications for the nature of matter, energy, and spacetime.

  14. CERN and the Hunt for Elementary Particles and Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsesmelis, Emmanuel

    2008-04-01

    CERN is the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, the world's largest particle physics research centre. Founded in 1954, the Laboratory was one of Europe's first joint ventures and has become a premier example of international collaboration. CERN's subject of study is pure science and is concentrated on exploring the Universe's most fundamental questions, such as What is it made of? and How did it come to be the way it is? The Laboratory's tools, the particle accelerators and particle detectors, are amongst the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments. The Laboratory's primary aims will be presented and a look at past achievements and present endeavours, particularly the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will be reviewed. A brief look into the future will also be given.

  15. The Chaco Megafans: Hydrogeomorphology of the Largest Coalescing Megafans System in Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.; Cafaro, E. D.; Ramonell, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    Publications on megafans increased significantly providing information and opening debates on their global distribution and the importance of megafans across disciplines. With a few exceptions, however, little is known yet on the South American megafans evolution and on their present day morphodynamics. The Chaco plain, spreading 840,000 km2 to the east of the Andes mountain range along 1200 km from N to S, is the main area in the planet containing megafans. The main rivers drain the Andes and debouch on the Chaco plain, which acts as a sort of complex foreland-platform sedimentary basin. The Chaco rivers with headwaters in the Andes show, as a common geomorphological feature, alluvial fans ranging from typical piedmont alluvial fans to giant fluvial fans. The largest Chaco fans are generated by five major rivers (from north to south): Grande, Parapetí, Pilcomayo, Bermejo and Juramento rivers. We concentrated our analysis on an area of approximately 400,000 km2, 570 long (from 21°S to 27°S) and, 700 km wide from west to east, between the Subandean Ranges and the Paraguay and Paraná rivers where the Pilcomayo, Bermejo, Juramento, Itiyuro and del Valle megafans developed. The largest megafan is the Pilcomayo fan that stretches over an area of 220,000 km2, having a 610 km radius and a fan-front of 720 km. Systematic field work was developed in the area since 2005. Remote sensing products (Landsat 5, CBERS2, SRTM and MODIS) were processed in a GIS platform ENVI. Morphological parameters of alluvial fans and river channels such as planform areas, mean slopes, mean widths, thalweg sinuosity, among other morphometric parameters, were measured/estimated. Morpho-sedimentary units were identified in the field and the stratigraphic record ranges from the Late Pleistocene to present. Hydrological data were obtained from ten gauge stations. The main Chaco rivers built during the Late Pleistocene giant alluvial fans that were bigger than the present day fans. Water discharge

  16. Rewriting the Landform History of One of Africa's Three Largest Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The Kalahari Basin in southern Africa - one of the largest basins in Africa, along with the Congo and Chad basins - has attracted attention since David Livingstone traveled through the area in the 1840s. It is a semiarid desert with a large freshwater swampland known as the Okavango Swamp (150 km radius). This prominent megafan (a fan with radii >100 km), with its fingers of dark green forests projecting into the dun colors of the dunes of the Kalahari semi-desert, has been well photographed by astronauts over the years. The study area in the northern Kalahari basin is centered on the Okavango megafan of northwest Botswana, whose swampland has become well known as an African wildlife preserve of importance to biology and tourism alike. The Okavango River is unusual because it has deposited not one but two megafans along its course: the Okavango megafan and the Cubango megafan. The Okavango megafan is one of only three well-known megafans in Africa. Megafans on Earth were once thought to be rare, but recent research has documented 68 in Africa alone. Eleven megafans, plus three more candidates, have been documented in the area immediately surrounding the Okavango feature. These 11 megafans occupy the flattest and smoothest terrains adjacent to the neighboring upland and stand out as the darkest areas in the roughness map of the area. Megafan terrains occupy at least 200,000 sq km of the study area. The roughness map shown is based on an algorithm used first on Mars to quantify topographic roughness. Research of Earth's flattest terrains is just beginning with the aid of such maps, and it appears that these terrains are analogous to the flattest regions of Mars. Implications: 1. The variability in depositional style in each subbasin may apply Africa-wide: rift megafan length is dominated by rift width, whereas Owambo subbasin megafans are probably controlled by upland basin size; Zambezi subbasin megafans appear more like foreland basin types, with the position of

  17. The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Thomas C.; Strom, Dean; Beulow, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

  18. Hydrological drivers of record-setting water level rise on Earth's largest lake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronewold, A. D.; Bruxer, J.; Durnford, D.; Smith, J. P.; Clites, A. H.; Seglenieks, F.; Qian, S. S.; Hunter, T. S.; Fortin, V.

    2016-05-01

    Between January 2013 and December 2014, water levels on Lake Superior and Lake Michigan-Huron, the two largest lakes on Earth by surface area, rose at the highest rate ever recorded for a 2 year period beginning in January and ending in December of the following year. This historic event coincided with below-average air temperatures and extensive winter ice cover across the Great Lakes. It also brought an end to a 15 year period of persistently below-average water levels on Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron that included several months of record-low water levels. To differentiate hydrological drivers behind the recent water level rise, we developed a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) routine for inferring historical estimates of the major components of each lake's water budget. Our results indicate that, in 2013, the water level rise on Lake Superior was driven by increased spring runoff and over-lake precipitation. In 2014, reduced over-lake evaporation played a more significant role in Lake Superior's water level rise. The water level rise on Lake Michigan-Huron in 2013 was also due to above-average spring runoff and persistent over-lake precipitation, while in 2014, it was due to a rare combination of below-average evaporation, above-average runoff and precipitation, and very high inflow rates from Lake Superior through the St. Marys River. We expect, in future research, to apply our new framework across the other Laurentian Great Lakes, and to Earth's other large freshwater basins as well.

  19. Climatic effects of urban expansion over the three largest urban agglomerations of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Yu, Deyong; Georgescu, Matei; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-04-01

    Urbanization has long been known to affect local, regional, and global climate. China is urbanizing at an unprecedented rate, and modification of land surface to urban areas has raised climate concerns for its citizens. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, we examine how urbanization under different intensities and climate regimes affects regional climate of the three largest urban agglomerations across China - the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH), the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), and the Pearl River Delta (PRD). We simulated three urban expansion scenarios corresponding to 1988, 2000, and 2010 conditions into the WRF model, with each scenario simulated by three separate summers (i.e., 2001, 2003, and 2005). Urban extent of the three regions indicates stable growth during 1988 - 2000, followed by a phase of rapid expansion during 2000 - 2010. Our simulations show that urban environment-induced near-surface warming, mainly rising temperatures during nighttime, is greatest over the BTH with local maximum warming approaching 1.5 °C, followed by the YRD with peak warming reaching 1 °C and the PRD 0.8 °C. Due to the initial moisture conditions, the YRD and the PRD suffer more humidity deficit, particularly during daytime, with maximum reductions in water vapor mixing ratio reaching 0.8 g/kg. Our findings demonstrate that urban expansion has warmed and dried the urbanized regions in eastern China. The spatial pattern and magnitude of temperature and humidity differences quantified by our simulations provide useful information for understanding the impacts of urbanization on regional climate and for developing mitigation and adaptation strategies that can alleviate the deleterious impacts induced by urban expansion.

  20. The world's largest macroalgal bloom in the Yellow Sea, China: Formation and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongyan; Keesing, John K.; He, Peimin; Wang, Zongling; Shi, Yajun; Wang, Yujue

    2013-09-01

    The world's largest trans-regional macroalgal blooms during 2008-2012 occurred in the Yellow Sea, China. This review addresses the causes, development and future challenges in this unique case. Satellite imagery and field observations showed that the macroalgal blooms in the Yellow Sea originated from the coast of Jiangsu province and that favorable geographic and oceanographic conditions brought the green macroalgae from the coast offshore. Optimal temperature, light, nutrients and wind contributed to the formation and transport of the massive bloom north into the Yellow Sea and its deposition onshore along the coast of Shandong province. Morphological and genetic evidence demonstrated that the species involved was Ulva prolifera, a fouling green commonly found growing on structures provided by facilities of Porphyra aquaculture. Large scale Porphyra aquaculture (covering >20,000 ha) along the Jiangsu coast thus hypothetically provided a nursery bed for the original biomass of U. prolifera. Porphyra growers remove U. prolifera from the mariculture rafts, and the cleaning releases about 5000 wet weight tonnes of green algae into the water column along the coast of Jiangsu province; the biomass then is dispersed by hydrographic forcing, and takes advantage of rather high nutrient supply and suitable temperatures to grow to impressive levels. Certain biological traits of U. prolifera —efficient photosynthesis, rapid growth rates, high capacity for nutrient uptake, and diverse reproductive systems— allowed growth of the original 5000 tonnes of U. prolifera biomass into more than one million tonnes of biomass in just two months. The proliferation of U. prolifera in the Yellow Sea resulted from a complex contingency of circumstances, including human activity (eutrophication by release of nutrients from wastewater, agriculture, and aquaculture), natural geographic and hydrodynamic conditions (current, wind) and the key organism's biological attributes. Better

  1. Using DNA to track the origin of the largest ivory seizure since the 1989 trade ban

    PubMed Central

    Wasser, Samuel K.; Mailand, Celia; Booth, Rebecca; Mutayoba, Benezeth; Kisamo, Emily; Clark, Bill; Stephens, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The illegal ivory trade recently intensified to the highest levels ever reported. Policing this trafficking has been hampered by the inability to reliably determine geographic origin of contraband ivory. Ivory can be smuggled across multiple international borders and along numerous trade routes, making poaching hotspots and potential trade routes difficult to identify. This fluidity also makes it difficult to refute a country's denial of poaching problems. We extend an innovative DNA assignment method to determine the geographic origin(s) of large elephant ivory seizures. A Voronoi tessellation method is used that utilizes genetic similarities across tusks to simultaneously infer the origin of multiple samples that could have one or more common origin(s). We show that this joint analysis performs better than sample-by-sample methods in assigning sample clusters of known origin. The joint method is then used to infer the geographic origin of the largest ivory seizure since the 1989 ivory trade ban. Wildlife authorities initially suspected that this ivory came from multiple locations across forest and savanna Africa. However, we show that the ivory was entirely from savanna elephants, most probably originating from a narrow east-to-west band of southern Africa, centered on Zambia. These findings enabled law enforcement to focus their investigation to a smaller area and fewer trade routes and led to changes within the Zambian government to improve antipoaching efforts. Such outcomes demonstrate the potential of genetic analyses to help combat the expanding wildlife trade by identifying origin(s) of large seizures of contraband ivory. Broader applications to wildlife trade are discussed. PMID:17360505

  2. Using DNA to track the origin of the largest ivory seizure since the 1989 trade ban.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Samuel K; Mailand, Celia; Booth, Rebecca; Mutayoba, Benezeth; Kisamo, Emily; Clark, Bill; Stephens, Matthew

    2007-03-06

    The illegal ivory trade recently intensified to the highest levels ever reported. Policing this trafficking has been hampered by the inability to reliably determine geographic origin of contraband ivory. Ivory can be smuggled across multiple international borders and along numerous trade routes, making poaching hotspots and potential trade routes difficult to identify. This fluidity also makes it difficult to refute a country's denial of poaching problems. We extend an innovative DNA assignment method to determine the geographic origin(s) of large elephant ivory seizures. A Voronoi tessellation method is used that utilizes genetic similarities across tusks to simultaneously infer the origin of multiple samples that could have one or more common origin(s). We show that this joint analysis performs better than sample-by-sample methods in assigning sample clusters of known origin. The joint method is then used to infer the geographic origin of the largest ivory seizure since the 1989 ivory trade ban. Wildlife authorities initially suspected that this ivory came from multiple locations across forest and savanna Africa. However, we show that the ivory was entirely from savanna elephants, most probably originating from a narrow east-to-west band of southern Africa, centered on Zambia. These findings enabled law enforcement to focus their investigation to a smaller area and fewer trade routes and led to changes within the Zambian government to improve antipoaching efforts. Such outcomes demonstrate the potential of genetic analyses to help combat the expanding wildlife trade by identifying origin(s) of large seizures of contraband ivory. Broader applications to wildlife trade are discussed.

  3. The Quest for the Largest Depleted Galaxy Core: Supermassive Black Hole Binaries and Stalled Infalling Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfini, Paolo; Graham, Alister W.

    2016-10-01

    Partially depleted cores are practically ubiquitous in luminous early-type galaxies (M B ≲ -20.5 mag) and are typically smaller than 1 kpc. In one popular scenario, supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries—established during dry (i.e., gas-poor) galaxy mergers—kick out the stars from a galaxy’s central region via three-body interactions. Here, this “binary black hole scouring scenario” is probed at its extremes by investigating the two galaxies reported to have the largest partially depleted cores found to date: 2MASX J09194427+5622012 and 2MASX J17222717+3207571 (the brightest galaxy in Abell 2261). We have fit these galaxy’s two-dimensional light distribution using the core-Sérsic model and found that the former galaxy has a core-Sérsic break radius {R}b,{cS}=0.55 {{kpc}}, which is three times smaller than the published value. We use this galaxy to caution that other reportedly large break radii may too have been overestimated if they were derived using the “sharp-transition” (inner core)-to-(outer Sérsic) model. In the case of 2MASX J17222717+3207571, we obtain R b,cS = 3.6 kpc. While we confirm that this is the biggest known partially depleted core of any galaxy, we stress that it is larger than expected from the evolution of SMBH binaries—unless one invokes substantial gravitational-wave-induced (black hole-)recoil events. Given the presence of multiple nuclei located (in projection) within the core radius of this galaxy, we explored and found support for the alternative “stalled infalling perturber” core-formation scenario, in which this galaxy’s core could have been excavated by the action of an infalling massive perturber.

  4. North American velvet ants form one of the world's largest known Müllerian mimicry complexes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joseph S; Jahner, Joshua P; Forister, Matthew L; Sheehan, Erica S; Williams, Kevin A; Pitts, James P

    2015-08-17

    Color mimicry is often celebrated as one of the most straightforward examples of evolution by natural selection, as striking morphological similarity between species evolves in response to a shared predation pressure. Recently, a large North American mimetic complex was described that included 65 species of Dasymutilla velvet ants (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae). Beyond those 65 species, little is known about how many species participate in this unique Müllerian complex, though several other arthropods are thought to be involved as Müllerian mimics (spider wasps) and Batesian mimics (beetles, antlions, and spiders; see references in). Müllerian mimicry is similarity in appearance or phenotype among harmful species, while Batesian mimicry is similarity in which not all species are harmful. Here, we investigate the extent of the velvet ant mimicry complex beyond Dasymutilla by examining distributional and color pattern similarities in all of the 21 North American diurnal velvet ant genera, including 302 of the 361 named species (nearly 84%), as well as 16 polymorphic color forms and an additional 33 undescribed species. Of the 351 species and color forms that were analyzed (including undescribed species), 336 exhibit some morphological similarities and we hypothesize that they form eight distinct mimicry rings (Figure 1A; Supplemental Information). Two of these eight mimicry rings, red-headed Timulla and black-headed Timulla, were not documented in earlier assessments of mimicry in velvet ants, and are newly described here. These findings identify one of the largest known Müllerian mimicry systems worldwide and provide a novel system to test hypotheses about aposematism and mimicry, especially those regarding the evolution of imperfect mimicry.

  5. Assessing Climate Change Effect on the World's Largest Lakes Using Satellite Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Gabriel, R.; Norouzi, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Landsat program offers the longest continuous global record of the Earth's surface using satellite imagery for over forty years (1972-2014). Millions of images and relevant data have since been acquired using the instrument on the Landsat satellite to monitor the Earth's interesting phenomena. There are Landsat receiving stations around the world including the United States that process and archive the images that are a unique resource for global change research and applications in agriculture, forestry, regional planning, geology, cartography and global warming. So far, National Oceanic Atmospheric and Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), have launched a total of eight successfully orbiting satellites throughout its forty-two years of service. The main objective of this project aims to use Landsat images to monitor the changes of the world's largest lakes from 1972 to present. We focus on areas around the planet that are home to large scale lakes such as Lake Urmia, Lake Vanern, Lake Winnipegosis, Lake Albert and Lake Mweru. Then using U.S Geological Survey (USGS) database as a source for gathering cloud free images that are covering each lake, we were able to download and obtain necessary data. For larger lakes, images were mosaic to cover the entire area of the lake and using a Maximum Likelihood technique images were specifically classified into land and water content using ENVI software. The extent of the water content was quantified for each year and a temporal analysis of the area was performed. It is also found that the lakes which locates near the equator or at low latitude are seriously facing threats of becoming mostly dry. Future work is needed for establishing the dynamic characteristic of more lakes' water extent changes and also to compare them with other available information such as precipitation and soil moisture in each region. In lakes where high latitude, the change in extent of ice during winter

  6. Evidence for protection of targeted reef fish on the largest marine reserve in the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Amargós, Fabián; González-Sansón, Gaspar; Martín-Blanco, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Marine reserves can restore fish abundance and diversity in areas impacted by overfishing, but the effectiveness of reserves in developing countries where resources for enforcement are limited, have seldom been evaluated. Here we assess whether the establishment in 1996 of the largest marine reserve in the Caribbean, Gardens of the Queen in Cuba, has had a positive effect on the abundance of commercially valuable reef fish species in relation to neighboring unprotected areas. We surveyed 25 sites, including two reef habitats (reef crest and reef slope), inside and outside the marine reserve, on five different months, and over a one-and-a-half year period. Densities of the ten most frequent, highly targeted, and relatively large fish species showed a significant variability across the archipelago for both reef habitats that depended on the month of survey. These ten species showed a tendency towards higher abundance inside the reserve in both reef habitats for most months during the study. Average fish densities pooled by protection level, however, showed that five out of these ten species were at least two-fold significantly higher inside than outside the reserve at one or both reef habitats. Supporting evidence from previously published studies in the area indicates that habitat complexity and major benthic communities were similar inside and outside the reserve, while fishing pressure appeared to be homogeneous across the archipelago before reserve establishment. Although poaching may occur within the reserve, especially at the boundaries, effective protection from fishing was the most plausible explanation for the patterns observed. PMID:24688853

  7. Lessons Learned in Deploying the World s Largest Scale Lustre File System

    SciTech Connect

    Dillow, David A; Fuller, Douglas; Wang, Feiyi; Oral, H Sarp; Zhang, Zhe; Hill, Jason J; Shipman, Galen M

    2010-01-01

    The Spider system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) is the world's largest scale Lustre parallel file system. Envisioned as a shared parallel file system capable of delivering both the bandwidth and capacity requirements of the OLCF's diverse computational environment, the project had a number of ambitious goals. To support the workloads of the OLCF's diverse computational platforms, the aggregate performance and storage capacity of Spider exceed that of our previously deployed systems by a factor of 6x - 240 GB/sec, and 17x - 10 Petabytes, respectively. Furthermore, Spider supports over 26,000 clients concurrently accessing the file system, which exceeds our previously deployed systems by nearly 4x. In addition to these scalability challenges, moving to a center-wide shared file system required dramatically improved resiliency and fault-tolerance mechanisms. This paper details our efforts in designing, deploying, and operating Spider. Through a phased approach of research and development, prototyping, deployment, and transition to operations, this work has resulted in a number of insights into large-scale parallel file system architectures, from both the design and the operational perspectives. We present in this paper our solutions to issues such as network congestion, performance baselining and evaluation, file system journaling overheads, and high availability in a system with tens of thousands of components. We also discuss areas of continued challenges, such as stressed metadata performance and the need for file system quality of service alongside with our efforts to address them. Finally, operational aspects of managing a system of this scale are discussed along with real-world data and observations.

  8. Nature Appropriation and Associations with Population Health in Canada’s Largest Cities

    PubMed Central

    Rainham, Daniel; Cantwell, Rory; Jason, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Earth is a finite system with a limited supply of resources. As the human population grows, so does the appropriation of Earth’s natural capital, thereby exacerbating environmental concerns such as biodiversity loss, increased pollution, deforestation and global warming. Such concerns will negatively impact human health although it is widely believed that improving socio-economic circumstances will help to ameliorate environmental impacts and improve health outcomes. However, this belief does not explicitly acknowledge the fact that improvements in socio-economic position are reliant on increased inputs from nature. Gains in population health, particularly through economic means, are disconnected from the appropriation of nature to create wealth so that health gains become unsustainable. The current study investigated the sustainability of human population health in Canada with regard to resource consumption or “ecological footprints” (i.e., the resources required to sustain a given population). Ecological footprints of the 20 largest Canadian cities, along with several important determinants of health such as income and education, were statistically compared with corresponding indicators of human population health outcomes. A significant positive relationship was found between ecological footprints and life expectancy, as well as a significant negative relationship between ecological footprints and the prevalence of high blood pressure. Results suggest that increased appropriation of nature is linked to improved health outcomes. To prevent environmental degradation from excessive appropriation of natural resources will require the development of health promotion strategies that are de-coupled from ever-increasing and unsustainable resource use. Efforts to promote population health should focus on health benefits achieved from a lifestyle based on significantly reduced consumption of natural resources. PMID:23531492

  9. Hydroclimatological influences at multi-spatial scales on recently increased droughts in China's largest freshwater lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wu, G.

    2014-05-01

    Lake droughts are the consequences of climatic, hydrologic and anthropogenic influences. It may produce substantial impacts on local water sources, inhabitants and economy, but few studies have determined the contributions from the individual influences, especially under the changing climate, which is of highly valuable for policymakers to make effective adaption. This study proposes to use a multi-scale hydroclimatic analysis for the determination, taking Poyang Lake as an example. It is the China's largest freshwater lake, which has been undergoing drastic hydrological alterations in recent decade. Our analysis demonstrates that in the recent decade the lake droughts worsened in terms of duration, frequency, magnitude and severity, and intensified in magnitude significantly. At the lake region, water deficiency severed as the hydroclimatic foundation for the worsening droughts. Overall contribution to the lake droughts included decreased inflow (45%), increased outflow (24%), reduced local precipitation (23%), and increased evapotranspiration (8%). At the basin scale, the decreased inflow was ascribed to reduced basin-scale precipitation (82%) and increased evapotranspiration (18%). The increased outflow was principally controlled by the weakened blocking effects of the Yangtze River, which serves as a boundary condition of Poyang Lake. Water impoundments of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) established upstream should not be responsible for the increased drought occurrence, but they may have enhanced the drought magnitude with a limit contribution. The findings provide an example of intensified lake droughts, and offer an insightful view into lake droughts under the changing climate and anthropogenic influences. It should be valuable for improving our understanding and for promoting effective climate adaptation and water resources management practices.

  10. Nature appropriation and associations with population health in Canada's largest cities.

    PubMed

    Rainham, Daniel; Cantwell, Rory; Jason, Timothy

    2013-03-26

    Earth is a finite system with a limited supply of resources. As the human population grows, so does the appropriation of Earth's natural capital, thereby exacerbating environmental concerns such as biodiversity loss, increased pollution, deforestation and global warming. Such concerns will negatively impact human health although it is widely believed that improving socio-economic circumstances will help to ameliorate environmental impacts and improve health outcomes. However, this belief does not explicitly acknowledge the fact that improvements in socio-economic position are reliant on increased inputs from nature. Gains in population health, particularly through economic means, are disconnected from the appropriation of nature to create wealth so that health gains become unsustainable. The current study investigated the sustainability of human population health in Canada with regard to resource consumption or "ecological footprints" (i.e., the resources required to sustain a given population). Ecological footprints of the 20 largest Canadian cities, along with several important determinants of health such as income and education, were statistically compared with corresponding indicators of human population health outcomes. A significant positive relationship was found between ecological footprints and life expectancy, as well as a significant negative relationship between ecological footprints and the prevalence of high blood pressure. Results suggest that increased appropriation of nature is linked to improved health outcomes. To prevent environmental degradation from excessive appropriation of natural resources will require the development of health promotion strategies that are de-coupled from ever-increasing and unsustainable resource use. Efforts to promote population health should focus on health benefits achieved from a lifestyle based on significantly reduced consumption of natural resources.

  11. Preserving the World Second Largest Hypersaline Lake under Future Irrigation and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkam, Somayeh; Ludwig, Fulco; van Vliet, Michelle; Pastor, Amandine; Kabat, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Urmia Lake, the world second largest hypersaline lake, has been largely desiccated over the last two decades resulting in socio-environmental consequences similar or even larger than the Aral Sea disaster. To rescue the lake a new water management plan has been proposed, a rapid 40% decline in irrigation water use replacing a former plan which intended to develop reservoirs and irrigation. However, none of these water management plans, which have large socio-economic impacts, have been assessed under future changes in climate and water availability. By adapting a method of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) for hypersaline lakes, we estimated annually 3.9•109 m3 water is needed to preserve Urmia Lake. Then, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model was forced with bias-corrected climate model outputs for both the lowest (RCP2.6) and highest (RCP8.5) greenhouse-gas concentration scenarios to estimate future water availability and impacts of water management strategies. Results showed a 10% decline in future water availability in the basin under RCP2.6 and 27% under RCP8.5. Our results showed that if future climate change is highly limited (RCP2.6) inflow can be just enough to meet the EFRs by implementing the reduction irrigation plan. However, under more rapid climate change scenario (RCP8.5) reducing irrigation water use will not be enough to save the lake and more drastic measures are needed. Our results showed that future water management plans are not robust under climate change in this region. Therefore, an integrated approach of future land-water use planning and climate change adaptation is therefore needed to improve future water security and to reduce the desiccating of this hypersaline lake.

  12. Dragon's Paradise Lost: Palaeobiogeography, Evolution and Extinction of the Largest-Ever Terrestrial Lizards (Varanidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hocknull, Scott A.; Piper, Philip J.; van den Bergh, Gert D.; Due, Rokus Awe; Morwood, Michael J.; Kurniawan, Iwan

    2009-01-01

    Background The largest living lizard species, Varanus komodoensis Ouwens 1912, is vulnerable to extinction, being restricted to a few isolated islands in eastern Indonesia, between Java and Australia, where it is the dominant terrestrial carnivore. Understanding how large-bodied varanids responded to past environmental change underpins long-term management of V. komodoensis populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We reconstruct the palaeobiogeography of Neogene giant varanids and identify a new (unnamed) species from the island of Timor. Our data reject the long-held perception that V. komodoensis became a giant because of insular evolution or as a specialist hunter of pygmy Stegodon. Phyletic giantism, coupled with a westward dispersal from mainland Australia, provides the most parsimonious explanation for the palaeodistribution of V. komodoensis and the newly identified species of giant varanid from Timor. Pliocene giant varanid fossils from Australia are morphologically referable to V. komodoensis suggesting an ultimate origin for V. komodoensis on mainland Australia (>3.8 million years ago). Varanus komodoensis body size has remained stable over the last 900,000 years (ka) on Flores, a time marked by major faunal turnovers, extinction of the island's megafauna, the arrival of early hominids by 880 ka, co-existence with Homo floresiensis, and the arrival of modern humans by 10 ka. Within the last 2000 years their populations have contracted severely. Conclusions/Significance Giant varanids were once a ubiquitous part of Subcontinental Eurasian and Australasian faunas during the Neogene. Extinction played a pivotal role in the reduction of their ranges and diversity throughout the late Quaternary, leaving only V. komodoensis as an isolated long-term survivor. The events over the last two millennia now threaten its future survival. PMID:19789642

  13. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kevin J; Shultz, Allison J; Title, Pascal O; Mason, Nicholas A; Barker, F Keith; Klicka, John; Lanyon, Scott M; Lovette, Irby J

    2014-06-01

    Thraupidae is the second largest family of birds and represents about 4% of all avian species and 12% of the Neotropical avifauna. Species in this family display a wide range of plumage colors and patterns, foraging behaviors, vocalizations, ecotypes, and habitat preferences. The lack of a complete phylogeny for tanagers has hindered the study of this evolutionary diversity. Here, we present a comprehensive, species-level phylogeny for tanagers using six molecular markers. Our analyses identified 13 major clades of tanagers that we designate as subfamilies. In addition, two species are recognized as distinct branches on the tanager tree. Our topologies disagree in many places with previous estimates of relationships within tanagers, and many long-recognized genera are not monophyletic in our analyses. Our trees identify several cases of convergent evolution in plumage ornaments and bill morphology, and two cases of social mimicry. The phylogeny produced by this study provides a robust framework for studying macroevolutionary patterns and character evolution. We use our new phylogeny to study diversification processes, and find that tanagers show a background model of exponentially declining diversification rates. Thus, the evolution of tanagers began with an initial burst of diversification followed by a rate slowdown. In addition to this background model, two later, clade-specific rate shifts are supported, one increase for Darwin's finches and another increase for some species of Sporophila. The rate of diversification within these two groups is exceptional, even when compared to the overall rapid rate of diversification found within tanagers. This study provides the first robust assessment of diversification rates for the Darwin's finches in the context of the larger group within which they evolved.

  14. Solomon Islands Largest Hawksbill Turtle Rookery Shows Signs of Recovery after 150 Years of Excessive Exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Richard J.; Bird, Tomas; Gereniu, Collin; Pita, John; Ramohia, Peter C.; Walter, Richard; Goerlich, Clara; Limpus, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The largest rookery for hawksbill turtles in the oceanic South Pacific is the Arnavon Islands, which are located in the Manning Strait between Isabel and Choiseul Province, Solomon Islands. The history of this rookery is one of overexploitation, conflict and violence. Throughout the 1800s Roviana headhunters from New Georgia repeatedly raided the Manning Strait to collect hawksbill shell which they traded with European whalers. By the 1970s the Arnavons hawksbill population was in severe decline and the national government intervened, declaring the Arnavons a sanctuary in 1976. But this government led initiative was short lived, with traditional owners burning down the government infrastructure and resuming intensive harvesting in 1982. In 1991 routine beach monitoring and turtle tagging commenced at the Arnavons along with extensive community consultations regarding the islands’ future, and in 1995 the Arnavon Community Marine Conservation Area (ACMCA) was established. Around the same time national legislation banning the sale of all turtle products was passed. This paper represents the first analysis of data from 4536 beach surveys and 845 individual turtle tagging histories obtained from the Arnavons between 1991-2012. Our results and the results of others, reveal that many of the hawksbill turtles that nest at the ACMCA forage in distant Australian waters, and that nesting on the Arnavons occurs throughout the year with peak nesting activity coinciding with the austral winter. Our results also provide the first known evidence of recovery for a western pacific hawksbill rookery, with the number of nests laid at the ACMCA and the remigration rates of turtles doubling since the establishment of the ACMCA in 1995. The Arnavons case study provides an example of how changes in policy, inclusive community-based management and long term commitment can turn the tide for one of the most charismatic and endangered species on our planet. PMID:25853880

  15. Solomon Islands largest hawksbill turtle rookery shows signs of recovery after 150 years of excessive exploitation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Richard J; Bird, Tomas; Gereniu, Collin; Pita, John; Ramohia, Peter C; Walter, Richard; Goerlich, Clara; Limpus, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The largest rookery for hawksbill turtles in the oceanic South Pacific is the Arnavon Islands, which are located in the Manning Strait between Isabel and Choiseul Province, Solomon Islands. The history of this rookery is one of overexploitation, conflict and violence. Throughout the 1800s Roviana headhunters from New Georgia repeatedly raided the Manning Strait to collect hawksbill shell which they traded with European whalers. By the 1970s the Arnavons hawksbill population was in severe decline and the national government intervened, declaring the Arnavons a sanctuary in 1976. But this government led initiative was short lived, with traditional owners burning down the government infrastructure and resuming intensive harvesting in 1982. In 1991 routine beach monitoring and turtle tagging commenced at the Arnavons along with extensive community consultations regarding the islands' future, and in 1995 the Arnavon Community Marine Conservation Area (ACMCA) was established. Around the same time national legislation banning the sale of all turtle products was passed. This paper represents the first analysis of data from 4536 beach surveys and 845 individual turtle tagging histories obtained from the Arnavons between 1991-2012. Our results and the results of others, reveal that many of the hawksbill turtles that nest at the ACMCA forage in distant Australian waters, and that nesting on the Arnavons occurs throughout the year with peak nesting activity coinciding with the austral winter. Our results also provide the first known evidence of recovery for a western pacific hawksbill rookery, with the number of nests laid at the ACMCA and the remigration rates of turtles doubling since the establishment of the ACMCA in 1995. The Arnavons case study provides an example of how changes in policy, inclusive community-based management and long term commitment can turn the tide for one of the most charismatic and endangered species on our planet.

  16. Quantifying the contribution of glacier meltwater in the expansion of the largest lake in Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Kai; Su, Fengge; Xu, Baiqing

    2016-10-01

    Lake Siling Co is currently the largest endorheic lake in Tibet, and the lake surface area has expanded by about 40% since the 1970s, with a remarkable acceleration after 1999. In this study, a hydrologic modeling framework was established by linking the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface hydrologic model with the degree-day glacier-melt model over the Lake Siling Co basin, with an aim to quantify the contribution of each runoff component to changes in the lake storage. We found that glacier melt contributed to less than 10% of the total water input to the lake during 1979-2013, while precipitation-induced runoff in nonglacierized area was responsible for about 67-75%. The mean annual water input to the lake increased by 2.15 × 109 m3 yr-1 in 2000-2013 relative to that in 1979-1999. The amount of precipitation over the lake surface, precipitation-induced runoff, and glacier-melt runoff accounted for 13%, 82%, and 5% of this total increase, respectively, suggesting that the substantial expansion of Siling Co in the 2000s was mostly due to the increase in precipitation-induced runoff. When modeling lake level changes during 1979-2013, we found that the water level rose by 14.1 m when glacier melt was included and by only 10.5 m, a reduction of about one fourth, when glacier melt was removed. It is concluded that glacier melt played an important role in controlling the water level of Siling Co, although it only contributed less than 10% of water input to the lake during 1979-2013.

  17. Alcohol availability and youth homicide in the 91 largest US cities, 1984-2006.

    PubMed

    Parker, Robert N; Williams, Kirk R; McCaffree, Kevin J; Acensio, Emily K; Browne, Angela; Strom, Kevin J; Barrick, Kelle

    2011-09-01

    The aggregate relationship between homicide and alcohol availability is well established across a number of national and sub-national settings in North America, Europe and some parts of Asia. However, results linking youth homicide and alcohol availability at the retail level are largely absent from the literature, especially at the city level and across longer time periods. In a multivariate, pooled time series and cross-section study, youth homicide offending rates for two age groups, 13-17 and 18-24, were analysed for the 91 largest cities in the USA between 1984 and 2006. Data for social and economic characteristics, drug use, street gang activity and gun availability were also used as time series measures. Data on the availability of alcohol for each city were gathered from the US Census of Economic Activity, which is conducted every 5 years. These data were used to construct an annual time series for the density of retail alcohol outlets in each city. Results indicated that net of other variables, several of which had significant impacts on youth homicide, the density of alcohol outlets had a significant positive effect on youth homicide for those aged 13-17 and 18-24. Such positive effects have been found for adults in national and neighbourhood level studies, but this is the first study to report such evidence for teenagers and young adults. An important policy implication of these findings is that the reduction of the density of retail alcohol outlets in a city may be an effective tool for violent crime reduction among such youth.

  18. Preserving the world second largest hypersaline lake under future irrigation and climate change.

    PubMed

    Shadkam, Somayeh; Ludwig, Fulco; van Vliet, Michelle T H; Pastor, Amandine; Kabat, Pavel

    2016-07-15

    Iran Urmia Lake, the world second largest hypersaline lake, has been largely desiccated over the last two decades resulting in socio-environmental consequences similar or even larger than the Aral Sea disaster. To rescue the lake a new water management plan has been proposed, a rapid 40% decline in irrigation water use replacing a former plan which intended to develop reservoirs and irrigation. However, none of these water management plans, which have large socio-economic impacts, have been assessed under future changes in climate and water availability. By adapting a method of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) for hypersaline lakes, we estimated annually 3.7·10(9)m(3) water is needed to preserve Urmia Lake. Then, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model was forced with bias-corrected climate model outputs for both the lowest (RCP2.6) and highest (RCP8.5) greenhouse-gas concentration scenarios to estimate future water availability and impacts of water management strategies. Results showed a 10% decline in future water availability in the basin under RCP2.6 and 27% under RCP8.5. Our results showed that if future climate change is highly limited (RCP2.6) inflow can be just enough to meet the EFRs by implementing the reduction irrigation plan. However, under more rapid climate change scenario (RCP8.5) reducing irrigation water use will not be enough to save the lake and more drastic measures are needed. Our results showed that future water management plans are not robust under climate change in this region. Therefore, an integrated approach of future land-water use planning and climate change adaptation is therefore needed to improve future water security and to reduce the desiccating of this hypersaline lake.

  19. Engineering the largest RNA virus genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Almazán, Fernando; González, José M.; Pénzes, Zoltan; Izeta, Ander; Calvo, Enrique; Plana-Durán, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2000-01-01

    The construction of cDNA clones encoding large-size RNA molecules of biological interest, like coronavirus genomes, which are among the largest mature RNA molecules known to biology, has been hampered by the instability of those cDNAs in bacteria. Herein, we show that the application of two strategies, cloning of the cDNAs into a bacterial artificial chromosome and nuclear expression of RNAs that are typically produced within the cytoplasm, is useful for the engineering of large RNA molecules. A cDNA encoding an infectious coronavirus RNA genome has been cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome. The rescued coronavirus conserved all of the genetic markers introduced throughout the sequence and showed a standard mRNA pattern and the antigenic characteristics expected for the synthetic virus. The cDNA was transcribed within the nucleus, and the RNA translocated to the cytoplasm. Interestingly, the recovered virus had essentially the same sequence as the original one, and no splicing was observed. The cDNA was derived from an attenuated isolate that replicates exclusively in the respiratory tract of swine. During the engineering of the infectious cDNA, the spike gene of the virus was replaced by the spike gene of an enteric isolate. The synthetic virus replicated abundantly in the enteric tract and was fully virulent, demonstrating that the tropism and virulence of the recovered coronavirus can be modified. This demonstration opens up the possibility of employing this infectious cDNA as a vector for vaccine development in human, porcine, canine, and feline species susceptible to group 1 coronaviruses. PMID:10805807

  20. Forest biomonitoring of the largest Slovene thermal power plant with respect to reduction of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Al Sayegh Petkovšek, Samar

    2013-02-01

    The condition of the forest ecosystem in the vicinity of the largest Slovene power plant [the Šoštanj Thermal Power Plant (ŠTPP)] was monitored during the period 1991-2008 by determining the total concentration of sulphur, ascorbic acid and chlorophyll in Norway spruce needles. After 1995, the introduction of cleaning devices at the ŠTPP dramatically reduced the former extremely high SO(2) and dust emissions. The most significant findings of this comprehensive, long-duration survey are as follows: (1) the chosen parameters are suitable bioindicators of stress caused by air pollution in Norway spruce needles; they reflect both spatial and temporal variations in air pollution as well as the degree of efficiency of the cleaning devices; (2) observations show that the physiological condition of Norway spruce in northern Slovenia has significantly improved since 1995, when the first desulphurization device at ŠTPP was built, together with a reduction in the area influenced by pollution from ŠTPP; (3) metabolic processes in spruce needles react to air pollution according to the severity of the pollution and the length of exposure; exposure to high SO(2) ambient levels and/or spread over a long duration can damage the antioxidant defence mechanisms of spruce trees as well as diminishing the concentration of ascorbic acid; (4) a reduction in the exposure to air pollution improves the vitality of the trees (e.g. higher concentrations of total (a + b) chlorophyll), as well as restoring their defence capabilities as shown by higher concentrations of ascorbic acid; and (5) forest monitoring should be continued and focused on integrating the effects of multiple stressors, which can additionally affect a forest ecosystem.

  1. THE CHANDRA VIEW OF THE LARGEST QUASAR LENS SDSS J1029+2623

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Naomi; Oguri, Masamune; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Ofek, Eran O.; Blandford, Roger D.; Schrabback, Tim; Inada, Naohisa

    2012-10-10

    We present results from Chandra observations of the cluster lens SDSS J1029+2623 at z{sub l} = 0.58, which is a gravitationally lensed quasar with the largest known image separation. We clearly detect X-ray emission both from the lensing cluster and the three lensed quasar images. The cluster has an X-ray temperature of kT = 8.1{sup +2.0}{sub -1.2} keV and bolometric luminosity of L{sub X} = 9.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. Its surface brightness is centered near one of the brightest cluster galaxies, and it is elongated east-west. We identify a subpeak northwest of the main peak, which is suggestive of an ongoing merger. Even so, the X-ray mass inferred from the hydrostatic equilibrium assumption appears to be consistent with the lensing mass from the Einstein radius of the system. We find significant absorption in the soft X-ray spectrum of the faintest quasar image, which can be caused by an intervening material at either the lens or source redshift. The X-ray flux ratios between the quasar images (after correcting for absorption) are in reasonable agreement with those at optical and radio wavelengths, and all the flux ratios are inconsistent with those predicted by simple mass models. This implies that microlensing effect is not significant for this system and dark matter substructure is mainly responsible for the anomalous flux ratios.

  2. Paramyxovirus Glycoprotein Incorporation, Assembly and Budding: A Three Way Dance for Infectious Particle Production

    PubMed Central

    El Najjar, Farah; Schmitt, Anthony P.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2014-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are a family of negative sense RNA viruses whose members cause serious diseases in humans, such as measles virus, mumps virus and respiratory syncytial virus; and in animals, such as Newcastle disease virus and rinderpest virus. Paramyxovirus particles form by assembly of the viral matrix protein, the ribonucleoprotein complex and the surface glycoproteins at the plasma membrane of infected cells and subsequent viral budding. Two major glycoproteins expressed on the viral envelope, the attachment protein and the fusion protein, promote attachment of the virus to host cells and subsequent virus-cell membrane fusion. Incorporation of the surface glycoproteins into infectious progeny particles requires coordinated interplay between the three viral structural components, driven primarily by the matrix protein. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contributions of the matrix protein and glycoproteins in driving paramyxovirus assembly and budding while focusing on the viral protein interactions underlying this process and the intracellular trafficking pathways for targeting viral components to assembly sites. Differences in the mechanisms of particle production among the different family members will be highlighted throughout. PMID:25105277

  3. GPUs in experimental particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Niklaus

    2012-03-01

    Many applications in particle and nuclear physics demand vast computational power with high throughput and low latency. Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) provide such massively parallel floating point computing power at low cost. Indeed many problems are easily parallelized and can be sped up by orders of magnitude by the use of GPUs. The talk will discuss two very different examples, namely the use of GPUs for partial wave analysis and on-line track reconstruction. Partial wave analysis is a key tool in hadron spectroscopy. The unbinned likelihood fits employed are an almost perfect match for the architecture of GPUs. GPU based partial wave analysis was pioneered at the Beijing Spectrometer III experiment in order to deal with world's largest datasets from electron-positron collisions in the charm threshold energy region and is now employed by many groups in the field. The presentation will describe the challenges for implementing a GPU based partial wave analysis and how they were overcome. Usually the most time consuming part of analysing particle physics events is the reconstruction of tracks of charged particles. A new generation of high rate experiments running without a hardware trigger (e.g. the LHCb upgrade, PANDA, a proposed μ->eee search) will be relying on very fast on-line event reconstruction, including tracking. This in turn requires massive amounts of computing power, which is currently best provided by GPUs. The talk will describe the state of GPU based tracking efforts.

  4. The proximal region of the 3'-untranslated region of cyclooxygenase-2 is recognized by a multimeric protein complex containing HuR, TIA-1, TIAR, and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U.

    PubMed

    Cok, Steven J; Acton, Stephen J; Morrison, Aubrey R

    2003-09-19

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an early response gene induced in renal mesangial cells by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of COX-2 mRNA plays an important role in IL-1beta induction by regulating message stability and translational efficiency. The first 60 nucleotides of the 3'-UTR of COX-2 are highly conserved and contain multiple copies of the regulatory sequence AUUUA. Introduction of the 60-nucleotide sequence into the 3'-UTR of a heterologous reporter gene resulted in a 70% decrease in reporter gene expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that mesangial cell nuclear fractions contain a multimeric protein complex that bound this region of COX-2 mRNA in a sequence-specific manner. We identified four members of the protein-RNA complex as HuR, TIA-1, TIAR, and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U). Treatment of mesangial cells with IL-1beta caused an increase in cytosolic HuR, which was accompanied by an increase in COX-2 mRNA that co-immunoprecipitated with cytosolic HuR. Therefore, we propose that HuR binds to the proximal region of the 3'-UTR of COX-2 following stimulation by IL-1beta and increases the expression of COX-2 mRNA by facilitating its transport out of the nucleus.

  5. Purification, cloning, and expression of a murine phosphoprotein that binds the kappa B motif in vitro identifies it as the homolog of the human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein. Description of a novel DNA-dependent phosphorylation process.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, J; Van Seuningen, I; Seger, R; Rauch, C T; Sleath, P R; McMullen, B A; Bomsztyk, K

    1994-07-01

    The kappa B enhancer element regulates expression of many genes involved in immune responses and other processes. kappa B motif binds a number of proteins, some but not all, are related to the NF-kappa B family of transcription factors. We have previously identified a 65-kDa phosphoprotein that is specifically recognized by the kappa B motif (Ostrowski, J., Sims, J. E., Sibley, C. H., Valentine, M. A., Dower, S. K., Meier, K. E., and Bomsztyk, K. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 12722-12733). This protein is closely associated with a serine/threonine kinase that is responsive to treatment of cells with interleukin-1 and other agents. We report here purification, cloning, and expression of this kappa B motif-binding phosphoprotein. The primary structure deduced from the isolated murine cDNA, identifies the protein as the homolog of the human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein. Antipeptide antibodies and expression of the cloned cDNA in Escherichia coli, demonstrated that the K protein is the authentic phosphoprotein that binds the kappa B motif in vitro. We also demonstrate that the in vitro phosphorylation of the natural and the recombinant K proteins by the associated kinase is stimulated by the kappa B motif.

  6. Characteristics and ship traffic source identification of air pollutants in China's largest port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minjiang; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weichun; Fu, Qingyan; Yang, Xin; Li, Chunlei; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Qi; Chen, Limin

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the air pollutants in Shanghai Port and identify the contribution from ship traffic emission, field measurements have been conducted in 2011. The trace gases SO2, NO2 and O3 were monitored and aerosol samples of TSP, PM2.5 and size-segregated particles were collected in a working area of Shanghai Port. Elements including V, Ni, Al, Fe, Si, Ca, Na, Mg, Mn, Zn, Co, Cr in aerosol samples and heavy fuel oil samples were analyzed. The results revealed that average hourly SO2 and NO2 concentrations in Shanghai Port were respectively 29.4 and 63.7 μg m-3, average daily concentrations of TSP and PM2.5 were 114.39 and 62.60 μg m-3, comparable with the ones in Shanghai land area. Ni and V were found enriched in fine particles with averaged concentrations of 80.0 and 14.8 ng m-3 in PM2.5 respectively. Also ratio of V/Ni in aerosol under summertime airflow was 3.4, very close to the ratio of averaged V and Ni content in international heavy fuel oils used in Shanghai Port. The backward trajectory analysis further revealed that SO2, NO2, and V under coastal airflows were mainly from ship traffic emission. The mean concentration of V was 15.84 ng m-3 under hybrid coastal airflows, much higher than that of 9.84 ng m-3 under continental airflows. Furthermore, V was found to be highly correlated with ship fluxes, and was selected as an indicator of ship traffic emission in Shanghai. The estimated primary PM2.5 contribution from ship traffic ranged from 0.63 to 3.58 μg m-3, with an average of 1.96 μg m-3. This PM2.5 fraction accounted for 4.23% of the total PM2.5 in an average level, and reached to a maximum of 12.8%. Furthermore, there could be 64% of primary PM2.5 contributed by ships in Shanghai Port transported to inland region. Our results suggest that ship traffic has a non-negligible contribution on ambient levels of fine particles and secondary contribution of SO2 and NO2 emitted by ships need to be estimated on local and regional scale in future.

  7. The Higgs Particle: A Useful Analogy for Physics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    In November 2009, the largest experiment in history was restarted. Its prime target is the Higgs particle--the last remaining undiscovered piece of our current theory of matter. We present a very simple way to introduce this topic to senior secondary school students, using a comparison with the refractive index of light.

  8. Transcriptome Sequencing and Analysis for Culm Elongation of the World’s Largest Bamboo (Dendrocalamus sinicus)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Wang, Haiying; Liao, Shengxi; Tang, Qi; Li, Li; Cui, Yongzhong; He, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Dendrocalamus sinicus is the world’s largest bamboo species with strong woody culms, and known for its fast-growing culms. As an economic bamboo species, it was popularized for multi-functional applications including furniture, construction, and industrial paper pulp. To comprehensively elucidate the molecular processes involved in its culm elongation, Illumina paired-end sequencing was conducted. About 65.08 million high-quality reads were produced, and assembled into 81,744 unigenes with an average length of 723 bp. A total of 64,338 (79%) unigenes were annotated for their functions, of which, 56,587 were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and 35,262 were annotated in the Swiss-Prot database. Also, 42,508 and 21,009 annotated unigenes were allocated to gene ontology (GO) categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG), respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 33,920 unigenes were assigned to 128 KEGG pathways. Meanwhile, 8,553 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 81,534 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were identified, respectively. Additionally, 388 transcripts encoding lignin biosynthesis were detected, among which, 27 transcripts encoding Shikimate O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) specifically expressed in D. sinicus when compared to other bamboo species and rice. The phylogenetic relationship between D. sinicus and other plants was analyzed, suggesting functional diversity of HCT unigenes in D. sinicus. We conjectured that HCT might lead to the high lignin content and giant culm. Given that the leaves are not yet formed and culm is covered with sheaths during culm elongation, the existence of photosynthesis of bamboo culm is usually neglected. Surprisedly, 109 transcripts encoding photosynthesis were identified, including photosystem I and II, cytochrome b6/f complex, photosynthetic electron transport and F-type ATPase, and 24 transcripts were characterized as antenna

  9. Sequencing of tsunami waves: why the first wave is not always the largest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, Emile A.; Synolakis, Costas E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the factors contributing to the `sequencing' of tsunami waves in the far field, that is, to the distribution of the maximum sea surface amplitude inside the dominant wave packet constituting the primary arrival at a distant harbour. Based on simple models of sources for which analytical solutions are available, we show that, as range is increased, the wave pattern evolves from a regime of maximum amplitude in the first oscillation to one of delayed maximum, where the largest amplitude takes place during a subsequent oscillation. In the case of the simple, instantaneous uplift of a circular disk at the surface of an ocean of constant depth, the critical distance for transition between those patterns scales as r_0^3 / h^2 where r0 is the radius of the disk and h the depth of the ocean. This behaviour is explained from simple arguments based on a model where sequencing results from frequency dispersion in the primary wave packet, as the width of its spectrum around its dominant period T0 becomes dispersed in time in an amount comparable to T0, the latter being controlled by a combination of source size and ocean depth. The general concepts in this model are confirmed in the case of more realistic sources for tsunami excitation by a finite-time deformation of the ocean floor, as well as in real-life simulations of tsunamis excited by large subduction events, for which we find that the influence of fault width on the distribution of sequencing is more important than that of fault length. Finally, simulation of the major events of Chile (2010) and Japan (2011) at large arrays of virtual gauges in the Pacific Basin correctly predicts the majority of the sequencing patterns observed on DART buoys during these events. By providing insight into the evolution with time of wave amplitudes inside primary wave packets for far field tsunamis generated by large earthquakes, our results stress the importance, for civil defense authorities, of issuing warning and

  10. Africa's largest long-lasting insecticide-treated net producer: lessons from A to Z Textiles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Field trials have demonstrated the efficacy of insecticide-treated nets, and the WHO has recently endorsed a shift toward Long-Lasting Insecticide Treated nets (LLINs) due to factors such as reduced distribution costs. However, the need for LLINs poses several challenges. Is it possible to manufacture LLINs in large quantities in the African continent, where malaria is most endemic? When production is located in low-income countries, what role is played by local funding and employment, scaling up manufacturing, and partnerships? What factors influence availability and pricing? Discussion A case study of A to Z Textiles was undertaken to answer the question of how large-scale production of LLINs can occur in a low income setting. One of the largest sources of bed nets for Africa, A to Z Textiles is Africa-based, and its Tanzanian operations have a production capacity of 30 million LLINs per year, along with full WHO recommendation for its nets. Our analysis is based on semi-structured interviews with key informants familiar with A to Z, site visits in Tanzania, and literature reviews. This paper discusses the history and current status of A to Z Textiles, identifies the factors that led to its success, and suggests policy considerations that could support similar initiatives in the future. Local funding, scaling up manufacturing, technology transfer, and partnerships all played important roles in A to Z’s ascent, as did perceived benefits of local employment and capacity-building. Regulatory issues and procurement rules acted as barriers. A to Z cost-effectively manufactures high-quality LLINs where malaria is most endemic. Summary With a production capacity of 30 million LLINs per year, and full WHOPES (WHO Pesticide Evaluation Scheme) certification, A to Z Textiles demonstrates how key health goods can be successfully produced in the low-income countries that use them. Its example may be instructive and of high interest to readers in the malaria

  11. What Caused the UK's Largest Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis) Mass Stranding Event?

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Paul D.; Deaville, Robert; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Barnett, James; Brownlow, Andrew; Brownell Jr., Robert L.; Clare, Frances C.; Davison, Nick; Law, Robin J.; Loveridge, Jan; Macgregor, Shaheed K.; Morris, Steven; Murphy, Sinéad; Penrose, Rod; Perkins, Matthew W.; Pinn, Eunice; Seibel, Henrike; Siebert, Ursula; Sierra, Eva; Simpson, Victor; Tasker, Mark L.; Tregenza, Nick; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On 9 June 2008, the UK's largest mass stranding event (MSE) of short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) occurred in Falmouth Bay, Cornwall. At least 26 dolphins died, and a similar number was refloated/herded back to sea. On necropsy, all dolphins were in good nutritive status with empty stomachs and no evidence of known infectious disease or acute physical injury. Auditory tissues were grossly normal (26/26) but had microscopic haemorrhages (5/5) and mild otitis media (1/5) in the freshest cases. Five lactating adult dolphins, one immature male, and one immature female tested were free of harmful algal toxins and had low chemical pollutant levels. Pathological evidence of mud/seawater inhalation (11/26), local tide cycle, and the relative lack of renal myoglobinuria (26/26) suggested MSE onset on a rising tide between 06∶30 and 08∶21 hrs (9 June). Potential causes excluded or considered highly unlikely included infectious disease, gas/fat embolism, boat strike, by-catch, predator attack, foraging unusually close to shore, chemical or algal toxin exposure, abnormal weather/climatic conditions, and high-intensity acoustic inputs from seismic airgun arrays or natural sources (e.g., earthquakes). International naval exercises did occur in close proximity to the MSE with the most intense part of the exercises (including mid-frequency sonars) occurring four days before the MSE and resuming with helicopter exercises on the morning of the MSE. The MSE may therefore have been a “two-stage process” where a group of normally pelagic dolphins entered Falmouth Bay and, after 3–4 days in/around the Bay, a second acoustic/disturbance event occurred causing them to strand en masse. This spatial and temporal association with the MSE, previous associations between naval activities and cetacean MSEs, and an absence of other identifiable factors known to cause cetacean MSEs, indicates naval activity to be the most probable cause of the Falmouth Bay MSE. PMID

  12. Serenitatis: The Oldest, Largest Impact Basin Sampled in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, G.

    1997-01-01

    The Serenitatis Basin was recognized in the early 1960s as a multiring impact basin. Poikilitic impact melt breccias collected on the Apollo 17 mission, generally inferred to be Serenitatis impact melt, precisely define its age as 3.893 +/- 0.009 Ga. On the topographic map produced from Clementine data, the basin has a well-defined, circular structure corresponding closely with mare fill. In the review by , this circular structure has a diameter of 620 km (Taurus ring). The main rim is deemed to have a diameter of 920 km (Vitruvius ring). Thus Serenitatis is both the oldest and the largest basin in the solar system to which we can confidently assign samples. The central flooded part of the Serenitatis Basin displays a mascon gravity anomaly. Gravity and topographic studies by Neumann, correcting for the mascon, indicate that the crust was thinned to about 30 km compared to a surrounding thickness of about 55 km. The rim has a slightly thickened crust. The Apollo 17 landing site lies between the Taurus and the Vitruvius rings. Remote studies show that the Taurus highlands differ in chemical composition from those around the Crisium and Nectaris Basins. They are consistently lower in alumina and higher in Fe and radioactive elements: the highlands are the noritic, rather than the anorthosite, stereotype of the ancient highlands. Tracks show that many of the poikilitic impact melt breccias rolled from high in the massifs, possibly from ledges. They vary in grain size and texture. Larger boulders display sharp contacts between texturally different units, which differ slightly big significantly in composition. They have about 18% Al2O3 and incompatible elements of about 100x chondrites. The breccias contain lithic clasts. Feldspathic granulitic breccias are the most common, but these do not form any significant component of the melt composition itself. Other lithic components are mainly plutonic igneous rocks such as norite and troctolite. Ferroan anorthosites and mare

  13. Cosmology with the largest galaxy cluster surveys: going beyond Fisher matrix forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Khedekar, Satej; Majumdar, Subhabrata E-mail: subha@tifr.res.in

    2013-02-01

    We make the first detailed MCMC likelihood study of cosmological constraints that are expected from some of the largest, ongoing and proposed, cluster surveys in different wave-bands and compare the estimates to the prevalent Fisher matrix forecasts. Mock catalogs of cluster counts expected from the surveys — eROSITA, WFXT, RCS2, DES and Planck, along with a mock dataset of follow-up mass calibrations are analyzed for this purpose. A fair agreement between MCMC and Fisher results is found only in the case of minimal models. However, for many cases, the marginalized constraints obtained from Fisher and MCMC methods can differ by factors of 30-100%. The discrepancy can be alarmingly large for a time dependent dark energy equation of state, w(a); the Fisher methods are seen to under-estimate the constraints by as much as a factor of 4-5. Typically, Fisher estimates become more and more inappropriate as we move away from ΛCDM, to a constant-w dark energy to varying-w dark energy cosmologies. Fisher analysis, also, predicts incorrect parameter degeneracies. There are noticeable offsets in the likelihood contours obtained from Fisher methods that is caused due to an asymmetry in the posterior likelihood distribution as seen through a MCMC analysis. From the point of mass-calibration uncertainties, a high value of unknown scatter about the mean mass-observable relation, and its redshift dependence, is seen to have large degeneracies with the cosmological parameters σ{sub 8} and w(a) and can degrade the cosmological constraints considerably. We find that the addition of mass-calibrated cluster datasets can improve dark energy and σ{sub 8} constraints by factors of 2-3 from what can be obtained from CMB+SNe+BAO only . Finally, we show that a joint analysis of datasets of two (or more) different cluster surveys would significantly tighten cosmological constraints from using clusters only. Since, details of future cluster surveys are still being planned, we emphasize

  14. Transcriptome Sequencing and Analysis for Culm Elongation of the World's Largest Bamboo (Dendrocalamus sinicus).

    PubMed

    Cui, Kai; Wang, Haiying; Liao, Shengxi; Tang, Qi; Li, Li; Cui, Yongzhong; He, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Dendrocalamus sinicus is the world's largest bamboo species with strong woody culms, and known for its fast-growing culms. As an economic bamboo species, it was popularized for multi-functional applications including furniture, construction, and industrial paper pulp. To comprehensively elucidate the molecular processes involved in its culm elongation, Illumina paired-end sequencing was conducted. About 65.08 million high-quality reads were produced, and assembled into 81,744 unigenes with an average length of 723 bp. A total of 64,338 (79%) unigenes were annotated for their functions, of which, 56,587 were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and 35,262 were annotated in the Swiss-Prot database. Also, 42,508 and 21,009 annotated unigenes were allocated to gene ontology (GO) categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG), respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 33,920 unigenes were assigned to 128 KEGG pathways. Meanwhile, 8,553 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 81,534 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were identified, respectively. Additionally, 388 transcripts encoding lignin biosynthesis were detected, among which, 27 transcripts encoding Shikimate O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) specifically expressed in D. sinicus when compared to other bamboo species and rice. The phylogenetic relationship between D. sinicus and other plants was analyzed, suggesting functional diversity of HCT unigenes in D. sinicus. We conjectured that HCT might lead to the high lignin content and giant culm. Given that the leaves are not yet formed and culm is covered with sheaths during culm elongation, the existence of photosynthesis of bamboo culm is usually neglected. Surprisedly, 109 transcripts encoding photosynthesis were identified, including photosystem I and II, cytochrome b6/f complex, photosynthetic electron transport and F-type ATPase, and 24 transcripts were characterized as antenna

  15. What caused the UK's largest common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) mass stranding event?

    PubMed

    Jepson, Paul D; Deaville, Robert; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Barnett, James; Brownlow, Andrew; Brownell, Robert L; Clare, Frances C; Davison, Nick; Law, Robin J; Loveridge, Jan; Macgregor, Shaheed K; Morris, Steven; Murphy, Sinéad; Penrose, Rod; Perkins, Matthew W; Pinn, Eunice; Seibel, Henrike; Siebert, Ursula; Sierra, Eva; Simpson, Victor; Tasker, Mark L; Tregenza, Nick; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On 9 June 2008, the UK's largest mass stranding event (MSE) of short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) occurred in Falmouth Bay, Cornwall. At least 26 dolphins died, and a similar number was refloated/herded back to sea. On necropsy, all dolphins were in good nutritive status with empty stomachs and no evidence of known infectious disease or acute physical injury. Auditory tissues were grossly normal (26/26) but had microscopic haemorrhages (5/5) and mild otitis media (1/5) in the freshest cases. Five lactating adult dolphins, one immature male, and one immature female tested were free of harmful algal toxins and had low chemical pollutant levels. Pathological evidence of mud/seawater inhalation (11/26), local tide cycle, and the relative lack of renal myoglobinuria (26/26) suggested MSE onset on a rising tide between 06:30 and 08∶21 hrs (9 June). Potential causes excluded or considered highly unlikely included infectious disease, gas/fat embolism, boat strike, by-catch, predator attack, foraging unusually close to shore, chemical or algal toxin exposure, abnormal weather/climatic conditions, and high-intensity acoustic inputs from seismic airgun arrays or natural sources (e.g., earthquakes). International naval exercises did occur in close proximity to the MSE with the most intense part of the exercises (including mid-frequency sonars) occurring four days before the MSE and resuming with helicopter exercises on the morning of the MSE. The MSE may therefore have been a "two-stage process" where a group of normally pelagic dolphins entered Falmouth Bay and, after 3-4 days in/around the Bay, a second acoustic/disturbance event occurred causing them to strand en masse. This spatial and temporal association with the MSE, previous associations between naval activities and cetacean MSEs, and an absence of other identifiable factors known to cause cetacean MSEs, indicates naval activity to be the most probable cause of the Falmouth Bay MSE.

  16. Evaluation of world's largest social welfare scheme: An assessment using non-parametric approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet

    2016-08-01

    Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) is the world's largest social welfare scheme in India for the poverty alleviation through rural employment generation. This paper aims to evaluate and rank the performance of the states in India under MGNREGA scheme. A non-parametric approach, Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is used to calculate the overall technical, pure technical, and scale efficiencies of states in India. The sample data is drawn from the annual official reports published by the Ministry of Rural Development, Government of India. Based on three selected input parameters (expenditure indicators) and five output parameters (employment generation indicators), I apply both input and output oriented DEA models to estimate how well the states utilize their resources and generate outputs during the financial year 2013-14. The relative performance evaluation has been made under the assumption of constant returns and also under variable returns to scale to assess the impact of scale on performance. The results indicate that the main source of inefficiency is both technical and managerial practices adopted. 11 states are overall technically efficient and operate at the optimum scale whereas 18 states are pure technical or managerially efficient. It has been found that for some states it necessary to alter scheme size to perform at par with the best performing states. For inefficient states optimal input and output targets along with the resource savings and output gains are calculated. Analysis shows that if all inefficient states operate at optimal input and output levels, on an average 17.89% of total expenditure and a total amount of $780million could have been saved in a single year. Most of the inefficient states perform poorly when it comes to the participation of women and disadvantaged sections (SC&ST) in the scheme. In order to catch up with the performance of best performing states, inefficient states on an average need to enhance

  17. What happens after and during deglaciation? Some insight from observations at the largest glacier in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Avian, Michael; Lieb, Gerhard K.; Kaufmann, Viktor

    2014-05-01

    Pasterze Glacier is the largest glacier in Austria and the Eastern Alps. The glacier is located at the foot of Mt. Großglockner (3798 m a.s.l.), the highest peak in Austria, and is accessible rather easily by a high alpine road ending above the main glacier tongue. At present, the glacier covers an area of about 17 km2, has a length of 8.3 km, a maximum ice thickness of about 190 m and is characterized by two unequally sized glacier tongues. The main glacier tongue is c.4 km long and heavily covered by debris. Since the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA) at around AD 1850 this glacier receded by 2.1 km. During the last c.160 years the main glacier tongue lowered by some 250 m on average. The glacier surface flow velocity decreased substantially, i.e. for example by 32% between the time periods 2003-2006 and 2006-2009. Glacier recession revealed large areas of previously ice-buried bedrock as well as minerogenic and biogenic sediments. In this contribution we present a compendium of research results based on several projects related to pure proglacial but also paraglacial processes and landforms in the vicinity of the present glacier. We will discuss (a) rock slope adjustment processes and its causes influencing for instance the supraglacial debris cover of the main glacier tongue substantially, (b) landform dynamics in the outwash plain and adjacent slopes close to the present glacier terminus, (c) the role of dead-ice for the proglacial landsystem, (d) formation and rapid enlargement of rock outcrops within the ice-fall, and (e) related natural hazard aspects. A further aspect discussed here - which is rather particular for Pasterze Glacier - is the (e) biogenic material (peat lumps and wood fragments) which has been found in recently deglaciated terrain. This material provides valuable insight into past ecological, glaciological and climatological conditions. Further rapid back- and downwasting of this glacier is very likely due to lack of ice replenishment. The

  18. Distribution of icy particles across Enceladus' surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Wagner, R.; Hansen, G. B.; Brown, R. H.; Cassini Vims Science Team

    Compositionally, the surface of Enceladus is build up almost completely by water ice [1]. However, distinct variations in the size of water ice particles are apparent. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer [2] observed Enceladus with high spatial resolution during two Cassini flybys in 2005 (orbit 4 and 11). A detailed analysis of the VIMS spectra in comparison to theoretically calculated water ice spectra supports the assumption that almost pure water ice characterizes the surface of Enceladus and that the particle size varies between 0.002 and 0.1mm. Three dis-tinct spectral units can be separated exhibiting different particle sizes which are strongly correlated to surface features. A comparison between the classifications of particle sizes and geological maps of the regions observed during the flybys 4 and 11 demonstrate this result. Our measurements show that the particle size of water ice increases toward younger regions with the largest ones in "fresh" surface material. The smallest particles were generally found in old more or less densely cratered plains and the larger ones in younger tectonically resurfaced areas [4]. The largest particles are concentrated in the so called "tiger stripes" of the south polar area [1,5]. Our findings support the results of [1,7] with amorphous water ice being concen-trated in older terrain due to the longterm exposure to incoming radiation, and crys-talline water ice in the vicinity of the younger resurfaced regions, esp. the South Pole. Amorphization usually goes along with the destruction of water ice particles, resulting in the decrease of mean particle size. Unlike the Galilean satellites, which undergo a daily thermal cycle resulting in the crystallization of ice particles, the surface stays cooler (70K) [6] on Enceladus and the water ice remains in an amor-phous state. In contrast the sulci esp. the "tiger stripes" close to the South Pole are characterized by higher temperature [1,5,6], which leads to the

  19. Structural studies of large nucleoprotein particles, vaults

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Hideaki; TSUKIHARA, Tomitake

    2012-01-01

    Vault is the largest nonicosahedral cytosolic nucleoprotein particle ever described. The widespread presence and evolutionary conservation of vaults suggest important biologic roles, although their functions have not been fully elucidated. X-ray structure of vault from rat liver was determined at 3.5 Å resolution. It exhibits an ovoid shape with a size of 40 × 40 × 67 nm3. The cage structure of vault consists of a dimer of half-vaults, with each half-vault comprising 39 identical major vault protein (MVP) chains. Each MVP monomer folds into 12 domains: nine structural repeat domains, a shoulder domain, a cap-helix domain and a cap-ring domain. Interactions between the 42-turn-long cap-helix domains are key to stabilizing the particle. The other components of vaults, telomerase-associated proteins, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and small RNAs, are in location in the vault particle by electron microscopy. PMID:23060231

  20. Attempt to determine the largest scale of primordial density perturbations in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berera, Arjun; Fang, Li-Zhi; Hinshaw, Gary

    1998-02-01

    The principle of causality requires that a pure power-law spectrum of cosmological density perturbations possess a super-Hubble suppression scale. We search for evidence of such suppression by performing a three parameter likelihood analysis of the COBE-DMR 4-year sky maps with respect to the amplitude, the spectral index, and the suppression scale. It is found that all suppression scales larger than c/H0 are consistent with the data, but that scales of order c/H0 are slightly preferred, at roughly the one-sigma level. Super-Hubble density fluctuations on very large scales (>>c/H0) can only be explained in the context of present theory by a de Sitter expansion phase, whereas those that are ``small'' (~c/H0) can also be explained within the standard hot big-bang model. Density perturbations originating after any conceivable de Sitter expansion phase or during non-isentropic de Sitter expansion have natural kinematic constraints which could explain a small super-Hubble suppression scale. Standard inflationary cosmology, which is characterized by isentropic de Sitter expansion, generically predicts that the particle horizon should be much larger than the present-day Hubble radius, c/H0. For such scenarios, a small super-Hubble suppression scale would require the duration of the inflation epoch to be fairly short. Suppression scales smaller than c/H0 are strongly excluded by the COBE data.