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Sample records for las vegas convention

  1. Las Vegas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of Las Vegas, NV was acquired on August, 2000 and covers an area 42 km (25 miles) wide and 30 km (18 miles) long. The image displays three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region, with a spatial resolution of 15 m. McCarran International Airport to the south and Nellis Air Force Base to the NE are the two major airports visible. Golf courses appear as bright red areas of worms. The first settlement in Las Vegas (which is Spanish for The Meadows) was recorded back in the early 1850s when the Mormon church, headed by Brigham Young, sent a mission of 30 men to construct a fort and teach agriculture to the Indians. Las Vegas became a city in 1905 when the railroad announced this city was to be a major division point. Prior to legalized gambling in 1931, Las Vegas was developing as an agricultural area. Las Vegas' fame as a resort area became prominent after World War II. The image is located at 36.1 degrees north latitude and 115.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  2. BEA Annual Convention: A Look Back at BEA 97 and Preparing for BEA 98, April 3-6, Las Vegas, Nevada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feedback, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The 42nd annual Broadcast Education Association (BEA) Convention ("Reinventing Electronic Media: Multimedia in the New Millennium") for electronic media educators was held April 3-6, 1997 in Las Vegas, Nevada. This article outlines events at the 1997 convention and provides a "sneak peek" at planning for the 1998 convention, "Electronic Media:…

  3. EMPACT: THE LAS VEGAS INTERAGENCY PILOT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ENPACT: The Las Vegas Interagency Pilot Project

    The Las Vegas Interagency Pilot Project of the EMPACT program has involved eleven efforts. These efforts are described in brief on the poster presentation. They include: Las Vegas Environmental Monitoring Inventory, the Qual...

  4. Where the Action is; Selected Addresses and Proceedings of the American Industrial Arts Association's Annual Convention (31st, Las Vegas).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taxis, Linda A., Ed.

    Manuscripts of 99 speeches are compiled in book form for general, subject area, and special interest sessions of the convention. Speeches in the subject area and special interest sessions addressed one of the following major topics: (1) Curriculum Development, (2) Inner-City Schools, (3) Instructional Systems, (4) Teacher Education, (5) Vocational…

  5. LANDSCAPE CHANGE OF THE LAS VEGAS VALLEY, 1972 TO 1998

    EPA Science Inventory

    Las Vegas has become one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States. The cities population has doubled from 1980 to 1994 and in 1995 Las Vegas has surpassed the one million mark. The population of Las Vegas is currently growing at a rate of 7 percent annually....

  6. Las Vegas Basin Seismic Response Project: Preliminary Results From Seismic Refraction Experiments, Las Vegas, NV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza, S. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Luke, B.; Buck, B. J.; Hanson, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    In May and September 2002, seismic refraction data were acquired in the Las Vegas basin. Located in the southern Basin and Range province, the cities of Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, and Henderson sit atop a fault-bounded basin with a depth of up to 5 km and basin dimensions of roughly 60 km wide (east-west) by 50 km in length (north-south). Previous isostatic gravity, seismic reflection, and aeromagnetic studies indicate that a series of sub-basins exist beneath the unconsolidated basin fill, with the deepest sub-basin occurring 5 km west of the fault block bounding the eastern edge of the basin (Frenchman Mountain). The basin is significantly deeper along its northern extremity, following the path of the fault block bounding the northern edge of the basin (Las Vegas Valley Shear Zone), and along the western edge of Frenchman Mountain. Recent, paleoseismic studies have indicated that faults in the Las Vegas region have the potential for an earthquake of M6.5 to 7.0. It is estimated that a M6.9 earthquake in the basin could produce about 11 billion dollars in damage and a significant number of deaths and/or injuries. In addition, an equivalent or larger event in the Death Valley fault zone, 150 km distance, would also be devastating to the metropolitan area of approximately 1.5 million residents. Therefore, it is essential to understand the seismic hazard posed to the Las Vegas region. This project is part of a larger collaborative effort to characterize the basin and its response to ground shaking. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas with assistance from the University of Texas at El Paso, students from UNLV and UTEP, volunteers from the community and several students from Centennial High school deployed 432 portable seismic recorders ("Texans") throughout the valley. Shot point locations were located at three quarries in the valley, one to the north, one to the east and one to the southwest. The profiles cross the Las Vegas Valley Shear zone as well as a prominent

  7. Radioxenon Atmospheric Measurements in North Las Vegas

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Karr, L.; Shafer, David S.; Tappen, J.

    2007-09-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) deployed the Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) in North Las Vegas for two weeks in February and March 2006 for the purpose of measuring the radioxenon background at a level of sensitivity much higher than previously done in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The measurements establish what might be expected if future measurements are taken at NTS itself and investigate improved methods of environmental monitoring of NTS for test site readiness. Also, such radioxenon measurements have not previously been performed in a United States location considered to be as remote from nuclear reactors. A second detector, the Portable Environmental Monitoring Station (PEMS), built and operated by the Desert Research Institute (DRI), was deployed in conjunction with the ARSA and contained a pressure ion chamber, aerosol collection filters, and meteorological sensors. Some of the radioxenon measurements detected 133Xe at levels up to 3 mBq/m3. This concentration of radioxenon is consistent with the observation of low levels of radioxenon emanating from distance nuclear reactors. Previous measurements in areas of high nuclear reactor concentration have shown similar results, but the western US, in general, does not have many nuclear reactors. Measurements of the wind direction indicate that the air carrying the radioxenon came from south of the detector and not from the NTS.

  8. What Happens in Vegas Does "Not" Stay in Vegas: Youth Leadership in the Immigrant Rights Movement in Las Vegas, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revilla, Anita Tijerina

    2012-01-01

    Students calling themselves the Las Vegas Activist Crew shut down the city's famed Strip on May 1, 2006, with an immigrant rights protest that was one of the largest demonstrations in Nevada's history. This research analyzes the ways that students engage in activism to improve their own social conditions and those of their communities. The…

  9. The Las Vegas Sustainability Atlas: Modeling Place-based Interactions and Implications in the Las Vegas Valley Bioregion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ego, H.; McCown, K.; Saghafi, N.; Gross, E.; Hunter, W.; Zawarus, P.; Gann, A.; Piechota, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Las Vegas, Nevada, with 2 million residents and 40 million annual visitors, is one of the driest metropolitan environments of its size in the world. The metro imports nearly all of its resources, including energy, water and food. Rapid population increases, drought, and temperature increases due to climate change create challenges for planning resilient systems in the Las Vegas Valley. Because of its growth rate, aridity, Las Vegas, Nevada is a significant and relevant region for the study of the water, energy, food and climate nexus. Cities in the United States and the world are seeing increasing trends in urbanization and water scarcity. How does the water-energy-climate-food nexus affect each metropolitan area? How can this complex information be used for resiliency planning? How can it be related to the public, so they can understand the issues in a way that makes them meaningful participants in the planning process? The topic of our presentation is a 'resiliency atlas.' The atlas is a place-based model tested in Las Vegas to explore bioregional distinctiveness of the water-energy-climate-food nexus, including regional transportation systems. The atlas integrates the systems within a utilitarian organization of information. Systems in this place-based model demonstrate how infrastructure services are efficiently provided for the Las Vegas Valley population. This resiliency atlas can clarify how the nexus applies to place; and how it can be used to spur geographically germane adaption strategies. In the Las Vegas Valley, climate change (drought and high sustained temperatures) and population affect water, energy, and food systems. This clarity of a place based model can help educate the public about the resilience of their place, and facilitate and organize the planning process in the face of uncertainty.

  10. Aeromagnetic map of Nevada: Las Vegas sheet, Map 95

    SciTech Connect

    Saltus, R.W.; Ponce, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    A 1:250,000-scale map showing total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field at intervals of 10 to 500 nanoteslas, and a 1:1,000,000-scale merged aeromagnetic map. The topographic base with drainage pattern and cultural information is from the Las Vegas 1/degree/ by 2/degree/ Quadrangle. (6 refs.)

  11. Solar Hot Water for a Motor Inn -- Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar hot-water installation at motor inn in Las Vegas, Nevada is described in report containing descriptions of design, philosophy, operation of system and problems and solutions. Provides drawings of solar roof plan, operator's instructions, manufacturers' brochures and copy of acceptance report.

  12. 40 CFR 81.80 - Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.80 Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Las Vegas...

  13. 40 CFR 81.80 - Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.80 Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Nevada) has been revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Las Vegas Intrastate Air...

  14. Solar hot water system installed at Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A solar energy hot water system installed in a motor inn at Las Vegas, Nevada is described. The inn is a three story building with a flat roof for installation of the solar panels. The system consists of 1,200 square feet of liquid flat plate collectors, a 2,500 gallon insulated vertical steel storage tank, two heat exchangers, and pumps and controls. The system was designed to supply approximately 74 percent of the total hot water load.

  15. GIS methodology for quantifying channel change in Las Vegas, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckingham, S.E.; Whitney, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study applies spatial analyses to examine the consequences of accelerated urban expansion on a hydrologic system over a period of 24 years. Three sets of historical aerial photos are used in a GIS analysis to document the geomorphic history of Las Vegas Wash, which drains the rapidly growing Las Vegas urban area in southern Nevada. New spatial techniques are introduced to make quantitative measurements of the erosion at three specific time intervals in the hydrologic evolution of the channel and floodplain. Unlike other erosion studies that use two different elevation surfaces to assess erosion, this study used a single elevation surface to remove systematic and nonsystemic elevation errors. The spatial analysis quantifies channel changes for discrete time periods, calculates erosion volumes, and provides a foundation to examine how the specific mechanisms related to urban expansion have affected Las Vegas Wash. The erosion calculated over 24 years is the largest documented sediment loss attributed to the effect of rapid urban growth. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  16. Geology of Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, R.V.; Karakouzian, M. ); Bax-Valentine, V. ); Peterson, L.; Palmer, S. ); Slemmons, D.B.

    1993-03-01

    Las Vegas is one of the fastest growing cities in the US. Its regional geologic setting is in the Basin and Range geomorphic province and in the Sevier orogenic belt. The city itself lies in a broad north-south valley formed by coalescing alluvial fans and lake beds which give rise to several soil and foundation problems. Although destructive earthquakes have not occurred in the Las Vegas area in modern times, the record is very short. Major earthquakes could have taken place in the past when the area was unoccupied except for a few nomadic tribes. Studies are underway to better define the seismicity. Although the climate is hot and dry, flash flooding occurs frequently from late summer thunderstorms and torrential rains. The Regional Flood Control District is actively constructing retention basins and drainage improvements for diversion and protection from such floods. Water supply is a problem for the increasing population. The groundwater supply has long been overdrawn, and the allotment to Nevada under the Colorado River Compact will be completely utilized in the near future. Las Vegas has faced the problems of solid waste disposal, water treatment, rational water use, flooding and earthquakes - all of which are related to the unique geologic and geomorphic setting.

  17. Source Water Assessment for the Las Vegas Valley Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, S. P.; Piechota, T. C.

    2003-12-01

    The 1996 amendment to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 created the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) with an objective to evaluate potential sources of contamination to drinking water intakes. The development of a Source Water Assessment Plan for Las Vegas Valley surface water runoff into Lake Mead is important since it will guide future work on source water protection of the main source of water. The first step was the identification of the watershed boundary and source water protection area. Two protection zones were delineated. Zone A extends 500 ft around water bodies, and Zone B extends 3000 ft from the boundaries of Zone A. These Zones extend upstream to the limits of dry weather flows in the storm channels within the Las Vegas Valley. After the protection areas were identified, the potential sources of contamination in the protection area were inventoried. Field work was conducted to identify possible sources of contamination. A GIS coverage obtained from local data sources was used to identify the septic tank locations. Finally, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits were obtained from the State of Nevada, and included in the inventory. After the inventory was completed, a level of risk was assigned to each potential contaminating activity (PCA). The contaminants of concern were grouped into five categories: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), synthetic organic compounds (SOCs), inorganic compounds (IOCs), microbiological, and radionuclides. The vulnerability of the water intake to each of the PCAs was assigned based on these five categories, and also on three other factors: the physical barrier effectiveness, the risk potential, and the time of travel. The vulnerability analysis shows that the PCAs with the highest vulnerability rating include septic systems, golf courses/parks, storm channels, gas stations, auto repair shops, construction, and the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Based on the current water quality

  18. City of Las Vegas Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-31

    The City of Las Vegas was awarded Department of Energy (DOE) project funding in 2009, for the City of Las Vegas Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Demonstration Program. This project allowed the City of Las Vegas to purchase electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and associated electric vehicle charging infrastructure. The City anticipated the electric vehicles having lower overall operating costs and emissions similar to traditional and hybrid vehicles.

  19. Geological Mapping Using Legacy Geophysical Data in Las Vegas Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D.; O'Donnell, J.; McLin, K.

    2014-12-01

    In 2008-2011, Clark County, Building Department contracted with Optim to collect 10,700 Reflection Microtremor (ReMi) 600 ft seismic lines that cover most of the metropolitan area of Las Vegas and other outlying communities such as Moapa, Laughlin, Primm, and Coyote Spring. The County completed their goal of characterizing seismic susceptibility of the top 100 ft and the results are posted at http://gisgate.co.clark.nv.us/openweb/. The research question of the authors is: What additional geologic information can be inferred from the data, either through reprocessing, cross correlation of drill hole data or additional data collection? An advantage of geophysical data is that it can be reprocessed to provide additional insight into the local geologic setting. The interpretation is also improved if combined with drill hole data and / or hydrologic information. It should be noted that there is also legacy geophysical data in limited areas collected by the USGS, primarily in conjunction with water well drilling, where some of the ReMi seismic data was collected. An unexpected result of the ReMi survey was a clear delineation of current and paleo channels in Laughlin, Moapa, and Las Vegas. The geometry of the paleochanel, of the Colorado River, is well away from the current position. however the signal is very similar to modern streams such as the Muddy River. Although the surficial geologic mapping in Las Vegas Valley was very detailed, and importantly, was performed prior to development; the new geophysical data provides better details of the lithologic properties of the units. That is it may be an excellent basis for remapping for specific properties related to engineering and hydrologic modeling.

  20. Characteristics of the Las Vegas/Clark County visitor economy

    SciTech Connect

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a review of the Clark County visitor economy and the Clark County visitor. The review, undertaken in support of NWPO`s two objectives mentioned above, addressed a number of topics including performance of the Clark County visitor economy as a generator of employment, earnings and tax base; importance of the Clark County visitor economy to the Nevada economy as a whole; elements of the Clark County visitor economy outside the Las Vegas strip and downtown areas; current trends in the Clark County visitor industry; and indirect economic effects of Clark County casino/hotel purchases.

  1. REMOTE SENSING OF PERCHLORATE EFFECTS ON SALT CEDAR PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE LAS VEGAS WASH

    EPA Science Inventory



    Sodium Perchlorate and ammonium Perchlorate, major components of solid rocket fuel, have been manufactured in the Las Vegas Valley immediately up gradient from the Las Vegas Wash, since 1945 and 1956, respectively. Measurements of emerging ground water quality in the vici...

  2. A Total Water Management Analysis of the Las Vegas Wash Watershed, Nevada

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change, land use change, and population growth are fundamental factors affecting future hydrologic conditions in streams, especially in arid regions with scarce water resources. Located in the arid southwest, Las Vegas Valley located within the Las Vegas Wash watershed is...

  3. Problem-Solving in Las Vegas: Students Are Building Skills and a Global Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Gregory; Curry, Don

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project initiated at Silverado High School in Las Vegas, where students from Las Vegas and schools across the United States monitor the levels of radon in the atmosphere. Enables students to learn first hand about the collection, analysis, and interpretation of scientific data and to network with other students from the United States…

  4. Response-Induced Reversals of Preference in Gambling: An Extended Replication in Las Vegas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenstein, Sarah; Slovic, Paul

    1973-01-01

    The present report describes an expanded replication of the previous experiments in a nonlaboratory real-play setting unique to the experimental literature on decision processes - a casino in downtown Las Vegas. (Author)

  5. Earthquake Hazard Class Mapping by Parcel in Las Vegas Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancha, A.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Louie, J. N.; Hellmer, W. K.

    2011-12-01

    Clark County, Nevada completed the very first effort in the United States to map earthquake hazard class systematically through an entire urban area. The map is used in development and disaster response planning, in addition to its direct use for building code implementation and enforcement. The County contracted with the Nevada System of Higher Education to classify about 500 square miles including urban Las Vegas Valley, and exurban areas considered for future development. The Parcel Map includes over 10,000 surface-wave array measurements accomplished over three years using Optim's SeisOpt° ReMi measurement and processing techniques adapted for large scale data. These array measurements classify individual parcels on the NEHRP hazard scale. Parallel "blind" tests were conducted at 93 randomly selected sites. The rms difference between the Vs30 values yielded by the blind data and analyses and the Parcel Map analyses is 4.92%. Only six of the blind-test sites showed a difference with a magnitude greater than 10%. We describe a "C+" Class for sites with Class B average velocities but soft surface soil. The measured Parcel Map shows a clearly definable C+ to C boundary on the west side of the Valley. The C to D boundary is much more complex. Using the parcel map in computing shaking in the Valley for scenario earthquakes is crucial for obtaining realistic predictions of ground motions.

  6. Atmospheric Radioxenon Measurements in North Las Vegas, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Karr, L.; Shafer, D.; Tappen, J.

    2006-07-31

    PNNL deployed the ARSA radioxenon measurement system in North Las Vegas for two weeks in February and March 2006 for the purpose of measuring the radioxenon background at a level of sensitivity much higher than previously done in the vicinity of the NTS. The measurements establish what might be expected if future measurements are taken at NTS itself. The measurements are also relevant to test site readiness. A second detector, the PEMS, built and operated by DRI, was deployed in conjunction with the ARSA and contained a PIC, aerosol collection filters, and meteorological sensors. Originally, measurements were also to be performed at Mercury, NV on the NTS, but these were canceled due to initial equipment problems with the ARSA detector. Some of the radioxenon measurements detected 133Xe at levels up to 3 mBq/m3. This concentration of radioxenon is consistent with the observation of low levels of radioxenon emanating from distance nuclear reactors. Previous measurements in areas of high nuclear reactor concentration have shown similar results, but the western US, in general, does not have many nuclear reactors. Measurements of the wind direction indicate that the air carrying the radioxenon came from south of the detector and not from the NTS.

  7. Monitoring Changes in Channel Morphology in Las Vegas Wash with Global Fiducials Program Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    To borrow from a popular adage, "What happens in Las Vegas [Wash], stays in Las Vegas [Wash]"—but only with a lot of help. This past decade has seen a concerted effort to curb erosion and sediment transport along the 12 mile long channel between East Las Vegas and Lake Mead. Las Vegas Wash is prototypical of an urban river in an arid environment that is being impacted by increasing urban development and impervious surface runoff within its drainage area. Rapid urbanization since the 1970s has increased the flow of water into Las Vegas Wash, causing severe channel destabilization. Within two decades millions of cubic yards of rocks and sediment were scoured out of the wash and transported downstream to Lake Mead. The wetlands that once covered over 2,000 acres within Las Vegas Wash dwindled to 200 acres in the 1990s as the channel became as much as 40 feet deeper and 300 feet wider at some points. In 1999 the Las Vegas Wash Coordination Committee (LVWCC) initiated a 20-year plan to construct erosion control structures (weirs) for channel stabilization and rock riprap for stream bank protection. The hope is to design structures that will slow down the water flow, trap sediments, and to eventually restore much of the wetland environment. Using high-resolution satellite imagery from the Global Fiducials Program Library housed at the U. S. Geological Survey, this transition is being tracked from 1999 to the present. From November 1999 to July 2008 new residential and commercial development has claimed an additional 12 square kilometers (3000 acres) of land in Henderson, NV, along the south side of Las Vegas Wash. Even with the increased volume of surface and groundwater runoff entering the wash, current sediment yields are much lower than the 1999 totals. The imagery documents the construction of 14 of the 22 LVWCC planned weirs by the year 2011. It also shows many miles of stream bank stabilization by riprap, planting of riparian vegetation and placing of

  8. 40 CFR 81.80 - Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.80 Section 81.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.80 Las...

  9. Identification of methyl triclosan and halogenated analogues in male common carp (Cyprinus carpio) from Las Vegas Bay and semipermeable membrane devices from Las Vegas Wash, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leiker, T.J.; Abney, S.R.; Goodbred, S.L.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Methyl triclosan and four halogenated analogues have been identified in extracts of individual whole-body male carp (Cyprinus carpio) tissue that were collected from Las Vegas Bay, Nevada, and Semipermeable Membrane Devices (SPMD) that were deployed in Las Vegas Wash, Nevada. Methyl triclosan is believed to be the microbially methylated product of the antibacterial agent triclosan (2, 4, 4'-trichloro-4-hydroxydiphenyl ether, Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number 3380-34-5, Irgasan DP300). The presence of methyl triclosan and four halogenated analogues was confirmed in SPMD extracts by comparing low- and high-resolution mass spectral data and Kovats retention indices of methyl triclosan with commercially obtained triclosan that was derivatized to the methyl ether with ethereal diazomethane. The four halogenated analogues of methyl triclosan detected in both whole-body tissue and SPMD extracts were tentatively identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. Methyl triclosan was detected in all 29 male common carp from Las Vegas Bay with a mean concentration of 596????g kg- 1 wet weight (ww) which is more than an order of magnitude higher than previously reported concentrations in the literature. The halogenated analogs were detected less frequently (21%-76%) and at much lower concentrations (< 51????g kg- 1 ww). None of these compounds were detected in common carp from a Lake Mead reference site in Overton Arm, Nevada.

  10. Crustal structure in the vicinity of Las Vegas, Nevada, from seismic and gravity observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roller, John C.

    1963-01-01

    A seismic-refraction profile indicates that the crust of the Earth increases in thickness by as much as 5 km over a horizontal distance of less than 25 km northeast of Las Vegas, Nevada. This feature correlates with a decrease in the Bouguer anomaly and an increase in the average surface altitude.

  11. Hydrologic impacts of climate change and urbanization in Las Vegas Wash Watershed, Nevada

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a cell-based model for the Las Vegas Wash (LVW) Watershed in Clark County, Nevada, was developed by combining the traditional hydrologic modeling methods (Thornthwaite’s water balance model and the Soil Conservation Survey’s Curve Number method) with the pixel-base...

  12. Episodic Impacts from California Wildfires Identified in Las Vegas Near-Road Air Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutant concentrations near major highways are usually attributed to a combination of nearby traffic emissions and regional background, and generally presumed to be additive in nature. During a recent year-long near-road monitoring study conducted in Las Vegas, NV, a substa...

  13. Changes in the morphometry of Las Vegas Wash and the impact on water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roline, Richard A.; Sartoris, James J.

    1988-01-01

    Las Vegas Wash, a natural wash east of Las Vegas, Nevada, carries stormwater, groundwater drainage, and sewage effluent from two sewage treatment plants to Lake Mean. Over 80 percent of the normal discharge of approximately 3.4 m3/s (120 ft3/s) consists of effluent from the City of Las Vegas and Clark County sewage treatment plants. Beginning in the 1950s, a large wetland area developed along the wash that supported waterfowl populations and contributed to some water quality transformations. Heavy rains and subsequent flooding in the area in 1983 and 1984 resulted in erosion and channelization that greatly reduced the wetland area within Las Vegas Wash. The reduction in wetland area shortened water travel time in the wash and affected water quality. The primary impacts on the water entering Lake Mead have been an increase in temperature, a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentration, and an increase in ammonia levels. Other physical-chemical parameters and changes in nutrient transformations are also discussed.

  14. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - NextGen Home, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on the NextGen demo home built in Las Vegas. The home has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index score of 44 with R-40 spray foam attic insulation, R-40 insulated concrete walls, and a 4kW DC solar laminate

  15. Perceptions toward the Value of Higher Education for Hotel Professionals in Las Vegas: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deel, Gary Lee

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns a qualitative investigation of the views toward higher education and its importance to hospitality career success among hotel professionals in the Las Vegas, Nevada area. Existing literature supported the premise that education may be important to professional career success in several different ways, and that values concerning…

  16. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Masco Environments for Living, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Masco’s Environments for Living Certified Green demo home at the 2009 International Builders Show in Las Vegas. The home has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index score of 44, a right-sized air conditi

  17. 77 FR 65332 - Proposed Modification of Class B Airspace; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... establishing the Las Vegas, NV, Terminal Control Area (TCA) with an effective date of November 11, 1974 (39 FR... to ensure that turbine-powered aircraft operations were fully contained within the TCA (47 FR 30052). In 1993, as part of the Airspace Reclassification Final Rule (56 FR 65638), the term...

  18. 76 FR 35371 - Proposed Modification of the Las Vegas, NV, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ...: (1) The meeting on Thursday, August 18, 2011, will be held at Centennial High School, 10200... Coronado High School, 10 1 Coronado Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89052; (3) The meeting on Thursday, August 25, 2011, will be held at Shadow Ridge High School, 5050 Brent Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89131....

  19. Hydrologic impacts of climate change and urbanization in Las Vegas Wash Watershed, Nevada

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a cell-based model for the Las Vegas Wash (LVW) Watershed in Clark County, Nevada, was developed by combining the traditional hydrologic modeling methods (Thornthwaite’s water balance model and the Soil Conservation Survey’s Curve Number method) with th...

  20. 75 FR 38778 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 89 Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... the Federal Register (74 FR 59131-59132, 11/17/09) and the application has been processed pursuant to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 89 Las Vegas, NV Pursuant to its authority...

  1. PERCHLORATE UPTAKE BY SALT CEDAR (TAMARIX RAMOSISSIMA) IN THE LAS VEGAS WASH RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate ion (CIO4-) has been identified in samples of dormant salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) growing in the Las vegas Wash. Perchlorate is an oxidenat, but its reduction is kineticaly hindered. CXoncern over thyrpoid effects caused the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...

  2. State-of-the-Art Building Concepts Lower Energy Bills, Pulte Homes - Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    Houses built by Pulte Homes as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program in Las Vegas, Nevada, save money for the home owners by reducing electric air-conditioning costs and gas heating costs with little or no additional inv

  3. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  4. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  5. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  6. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  7. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  8. Best Practices Case Study: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas Division

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    Case study of Pulte Homes Las Vegas Division, who certified nearly 1,200 homes to the DOE Builders Challenge between 2008 and 2012. All of the homes by Las Vegas’ biggest builder achieved HERS scores of lower than 70, and many floor plans got down to the mid 50s, with ducts located in sealed attics insulated along the roof line, advanced framing, and extra attention to air sealing.

  9. Long-term assessment of ultrafine particles on major roadways in Las Vegas, Nevada and Detroit, Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation at the National Air Monitoring conference, given at the request of OAQPS partners. The presentation will cover ultrafine particle data collected at three locations - Las Vegas, Detroit, and Research Triangle Park.

  10. Quantifying multi-temporal urban development characteristics in Las Vegas from Landsat and ASTER data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.; McMahon, C.

    2008-01-01

    Urban development has expanded rapidly in Las Vegas, Nevada of the United States, over the last fifty years. A major environmental change associated with this urbanization trend is the transformation of the landscape from natural cover types to increasingly anthropogenic impervious surface. This research utilizes remote sensing data from both the Landsat and Terra-Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instruments in conjunction with digital orthophotography to estimate urban extent and its temporal changes by determining sub-pixel impervious surfaces. Percent impervious surface area has shown encouraging agreement with urban land extent and development density. Results indicate that total urban land-use increases approximately 110 percent from 1984 to 2002. Most of the increases are associated with medium-to high-density urban development. Places having significant increases in impervious surfaces are in the northwestern and southeastern parts of Las Vegas. Most high-density urban development, however, appears in central Las Vegas. Impervious surface conditions for 2002 measured from Landsat and ASTER satellite data are compared in terms of their accuracy. ?? 2008 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  11. Surficial geology and distribution of post-impoundment sediment in Las Vegas Bay, Lake Mead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Rudin, Mark J.; Parolski, Kenneth F.; Rendigs, Richard R.

    2001-01-01

    Sidescan sonar imagery and seismic-reflection profiles were collected in the northwestern part of Las Vegas Bay to map the distribution and volume of sediment that has accumulated in this part of Lake Mead since impoundment. The mapping suggests that three ephemeral streams are the primary source of this sediment, and of these, Las Vegas Wash is the largest. Two deltas off the mouth of Las Vegas Wash formed at different lake elevations and account for 41% of the total volume of post-impoundment sediment within the study area. Deltas off the other two washes (Gypsum and Government) account for only 6% of the total volume. The sediment beyond the front of the deltas is primarily mud, and it only occurs in valley floors, where it forms a flat-lying blanket that is mostly less than 1.5 m thick. Although a thin layer, the fine-grained sediment accounts for approximately 53% of the total post-impoundment sediment volume of 5.7 x 106 m3 that has accumulated in the study area. This sediment appears to have been transported several kilometers from the river sources by density flows.

  12. Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site Readiness Ground Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A

    2008-01-16

    In this report we describe the data sets used to evaluate ground motion hazards in Las Vegas from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. This analysis is presented in Rodgers et al. (2005, 2006) and includes 13 nuclear explosions recorded at the John Blume and Associates network, the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and a temporary deployment of broadband station in Las Vegas. The data are available in SAC format on CD-ROM as an appendix to this report.

  13. A brief hydrologic appraisal of the July 3-4, 1975, flash flood in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katzer, T.L.; Glancy, Patrick A.; Harmsen, Lynn

    1976-01-01

    Heavy thunderstorm precipitation on the afternoon of July 3, 1975, between metropolitan Las Vegas and the mountains to the south, west, and north, caused flash flooding in the city area. Total storm precipitation equaled or exceeded 3 inches (76 mm) in some areas. The total storm yield on the area of significant runoff was probably between 20,000 and 25,000 acre-feet (2.5 x 107 m3 and 3.1 x 107 m3) of water. Of this amount, probably less than 3,000 acre-feet (37 x 106 m3) flowed directly to Lake Mead. Peak flows of Tropicana Wash, Flamingo Wash, Las Vegas Creek, and Las Vegas Wash were the highest ever determined. Flooding caused the loss of two lives and inflicted extensive property damage. Total damage was reportedly estimated by the Clark County Flood Control District at $4-5 million. Problems associated with sediment erosion, transportation, and deposition occurred throughout the flooded area. An unknown amount of the material transported during the flood was deposited in Lake Mead near the mouth of Las Vegas Wash. Lateral erosion appeared more prominent than vertical erosion along most major channels, except on Las Vegas Wash at Northshore Road where downcutting threatened the loss of the highway. Sediment deposits were particularly noticeable and troublesome in Flamingo Wash at Caesars Palace parking lot and on the Winterwood Golf Course near the junction of Flamingo Wash and Las Vegas Wash.

  14. Shear Velocity Structure Beneath the Las Vegas Valley, Nevada From Regional and Teleseismic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwan, D. J.; Snelson, C. M.; Tkalcic, H.; Rodgers, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Las Vegas Valley (LVV), Nevada is located in the central Basin and Range province of western North America. The Valley sits atop a broad sedimentary basin and is susceptible to large earthquakes generated by local and regional faults. During ground motion events, the Las Vegas basin has been found to amplify seismic energy. In addition, the crustal and upper mantle structure of the Valley is poorly understood. Therefore, surface wave data have been used to create shear velocity profiles of the crust and upper mantle beneath LVV using regional and teleseismic events. This project is part of a larger collaborative study, which is characterizing the Las Vegas basin for test site readiness and seismic hazards. Although the frequency of large events is small, the risk associated with such an event is very high for the Valley. As a result, the Las Vegas Valley Broadband array (LVVBB) was deployed in late September 2002 by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Nevada Las Vegas. It consists of a mixture of twelve three-component broadband and short period seismometers deployed in a saw-tooth geometry oriented northeast-southwest across the northeastern and central LVV, above the area estimated to be the deepest portion of the basin. Data examined as part of this study include both regional and global earthquake events recorded within a five-month period on seven of the twelve stations. All seven broadband stations used a three-component Guralp CMG40T sensor with a 40 samples/second sampling rate. Group velocity dispersion curves from Rayleigh waves and Love waves were determined using a multiple filter technique. Rayleigh wave group velocities range from 2.7 to 3.5 km/s for periods from 10 to 30s. Love wave group velocities range from 3.1 to 4.0 km/s for periods from 10 to 100s. In addition, Rg and Lg were examined from local events. 1-D shear velocity profiles of the crust and upper mantle have been produced through inversion along regional

  15. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of the City of North Las Vegas

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Wasiolek

    2008-06-01

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of the city of North Las Vegas for the purpose of mapping natural radiation background and locating any man-made radioactive sources. Survey areas were selected in collaboration with the City Manager's office and included four separate areas: (1) Las Vegas Motor Speedway (10.6 square miles); (2) North Las Vegas Downtown Area (9.2 square miles); (3) I-15 Industrial Corridor (7.4 square miles); and (4) Future site of University of Nevada Las Vegas campus (17.4 square miles). The survey was conducted in three phases: Phase 1 on December 11-12, 2007 (Areas 1 and 2), Phase 2 on February 28, 2008 (Area 3), and Phase 3 on March 19, 2008 (Area 4). The total completed survey covered a total of 44.6 square miles. The flight lines (without the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. A total of eight 2.5-hour-long flights were performed at an altitude of 150 ft above ground level (AGL) with 300 feet of flight-line spacing. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to ensure quality control of the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected continually (every second) over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Collection of spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific radioactive isotopes. As a courtesy service, with

  16. Earthquakes in the Classroom, Las Vegas, NV: The Nevada Educational Seismic Network (NESN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J.; Snelson, C. M.; Zaragoza, S. A.; Smith, K.; Depolo, D.

    2002-12-01

    Geophysics is a term guaranteed to strike fear into the heart of the bravest high school science student. Using math to describe the earth can involve complex equations that can only be deciphered by enigmatic computer programs. But high school science students in the Las Vegas Valley have been given a unique opportunity to gather important research information while learning about geophysics, real-time data collection, and Internet communications in a less threatening environment. Three seismograph stations funded by the Department of Energy and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas have been installed in three different high schools in the Clark County School District. These three stations form a triangle in the Las Vegas Valley basin covering areas where the basin depths change significantly. The geophones are buried outside and a cable connects the sensors and GPS receiver to a digitizer on a local PC. The data is transmitted continuously in real-time via Internet communications protocols to the Seismic Explorer Monitoring Network. There it is available to all schools and to researchers who will analyze the data. These short-period geophones will record small local earthquakes and larger more distant events contributing to real-time seismic network operations in southern Nevada. Students at a school site are able to see live real-time data from other school stations as well as from seismograph stations in southern Nevada, the western US, and the world. Mentored by researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno and University of Nevada, Las Vegas, the teachers and students conduct simple waveform analysis to determine earthquake locations and magnitudes and operate the stations in this cooperative research effort. The goal of this partnership between secondary and university educational systems is to create a successful alliance that will benefit the research community as well as the classroom teacher and his/her students. Researchers will use the data collected

  17. The Las Vegas Valley Seismic Response Project: Ground Motions in Las Vegas Valley from Nuclear Explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; McCallen, D

    2005-03-18

    Between 2001-2004 the Las Vegas Seismic Response Project has sought to understand the response of Las Vegas Valley (LVV) to seismic excitation. In this study, the author report the findings of this project with an emphasis on ground motions in LVV from nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These ground motions are used to understand building structural response and damage as well as human perception. Historical nuclear explosion observations are augmented with earthquake recordings from a temporary deployment of seismometers to improve spatial coverage of LVV. The nuclear explosions were conducted between 1968 and 1989 and were recorded at various sites within Las Vegas. The data from past nuclear tests were used to constrain ground motions in LVV and to gain a predictive capability of ground motions for possible future nuclear tests at NTS. Analysis of ground motion data includes peak ground motions (accelerations and velocities) and amplification of basin sites relative to hard rock sites (site response). Site response was measured with the Standard Spectral Ratios (SSR) technique relative to hard rock reference sites on the periphery of LVV. The site response curves indicate a strong basin amplification of up to a factor of ten at frequencies between 0.5-2 Hz. Amplifications are strongest in the central and northern portions of LVV, where the basin is deeper than 1 km based on the reported basin depths of Langenheim et al (2001a). They found a strong correlation between amplification and basin depth and shallow shear wave velocities. Amplification below 1 Hz is strongly controlled by slowness-averaged shear velocities to depths of 30 and 100 meters. Depth averaged shear velocities to 10 meters has modest control of amplifications between 1-3 Hz. Modeling reveals that low velocity material in the shallow layers (< 200 m) effectively controls amplification. They developed a method to scale nuclear explosion ground motion time series to sites around LVV

  18. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the City of North Las Vegas (Downtown) and the Motor Speedway

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Wasiolek

    2007-12-01

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey on December 11-12, 2007, with the purpose of mapping natural radiation background and locating any man-made radioactive sources. The survey covered 19.4 square miles (9.2 square miles over the downtown area of the City of North Las Vegas and 10.2 square miles over the Las Vegas Motor Speedway [LVMS]). The flight lines over the surveyed areas are presented in Figures 1 and 2. A total of four 2.5-hour-long flights were performed at an altitude of 150 ft above ground level (AGL) with 300 ft of flight line spacing. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to ensure quality control of the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system-REDAR V using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data in the form of gamma energy spectra were collected continually (every second) over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Collection of spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes sources. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific radioactive isotopes. As a courtesy service with the approval of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, RSL-Nellis is providing this summary to the office of the Mayor of City of North Las Vegas and LVMS security along with the gross counts-based exposure rate and man-made counts maps.

  19. Seismic Wave Amplification in Las Vegas: Site Response and Empirical Estimates of Ground Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, A.; McCallen, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Wagoner, J.; Louie, J.; Anderson, J.; Luke, B.; Snelson, C.; Taylor, W.

    2004-12-01

    This presentation will summarize a multidisciplinary effort to understand seismic wave amplification in Las Vegas Valley. The project involves weak motion recording and analysis, geotechnical and seismic refraction field studies, geologic and lithologic interpretation and model building. We will provide a brief overview of the project, then focus on specifics of seismic wave amplification including observations and interpretations. We analyzed recordings of nuclear explosions from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and regional earthquakes to estimate site response in Las Vegas. An empirical transfer function method was used to transform ground motion time-series at one (reference) station to other stations, using frequency dependent site response curves in the band 0.2-5.0 Hz. The method transforms the time-series to the frequency domain by Fast Fourier transform, multiplies the amplitude spectrum by the site response curve and inverse FFT's back to the time domain. The approach is validated by the ability to predict horizontal component S-wave ground motion measures, such as peak and rms ground velocities and accelerations. We then can provide empirical estimates of ground motion for a wider distribution of sites in Las Vegas. Frequency dependent amplifications (site response) and peak ground motions are strongly correlated with measures of shallow shear-wave (geotechnical) velocities. Details of the geotechnical measurements and models will be presented in a companion presentation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  20. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Las Vegas Strip and Adjacent Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Wasiolek, Piotr

    2009-02-01

    As proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of the Las Vegas Strip and adjacent areas on December 29, 2008. This survey was one of the bi-annual surveys carried in support of the city of Las Vegas Police Department (LVPD) before significant events on the Las Vegas Strip: e.g., the annual New Year’s Eve and July Fourth celebrations. The AMS operation and appropriate law enforcement agencies selected this area as an appropriate urban location to exercise AMS capability for mapping environmental radiation and searching for man-made radioactive sources. The surveys covered approximately 11 square miles. Each survey required a 2.5-hour-long flight, performed at an altitude of 300 ft above ground level (AGL) at a line spacing of 600 ft. Water line and test line flights are conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to determine the non-terrestrial background contributed by aircraft, radon, and cosmic activity, and to determine the altitude-dependent air mass correction. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2" x 4" x 16" sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Gamma energy spectral data were collected second-by-second over the survey area. This spectral data allows the system to distinguish between natural terrestrial background contributions and man-made radioisotope contributions. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific man-made radioactive isotopes. Data geo-locations were determined with a Real-Time Differential Global Positioning System (RDGPS).

  1. Interferograms showing land subsidence and uplift in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, 1992-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavelko, Michael T.; Hoffmann, Jorn; Damar, Nancy A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources-Division of Water Resources and the Las Vegas Valley Water District, compiled 44 individual interferograms and 1 stacked interferogram comprising 29 satellite synthetic aperture radar acquisitions of Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, from 1992 to 1999. The interferograms, which depict short-term, seasonal, and long-term trends in land subsidence and uplift, are viewable with an interactive map. The interferograms show that land subsidence and uplift generally occur in localized areas, are responsive to ground-water pumpage and artificial recharge, and, in part, are fault controlled. Information from these interferograms can be used by water and land managers to mitigate land subsidence and associated damage. Land subsidence attributed to ground-water pumpage has been documented in Las Vegas Valley since the 1940s. Damage to roads, buildings, and other engineered structures has been associated with this land subsidence. Land uplift attributed to artificial recharge and reduced pumping has been documented since the 1990s. Measuring these land-surface changes with traditional benchmark and Global Positioning System surveys can be costly and time consuming, and results typically are spatially and temporally sparse. Interferograms are relatively inexpensive and provide temporal and spatial resolutions previously not achievable. The interferograms are viewable with an interactive map. Landsat images from 1993 and 2000 are viewable for frames of reference to locate areas of interest and help determine land use. A stacked interferogram for 1992-99 is viewable to visualize the cumulative vertical displacement for the period represented by the individual interferograms. The interactive map enables users to identify and estimate the magnitude of vertical displacement, visually analyze deformation trends, and view interferograms and Landsat images side by side. The

  2. Geodetic leveling data used to define historical height changes between Tonopah Junction and Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.D.

    1992-12-31

    This report documents geodetic leveling data for a survey route following US Highway 95 from Tonopah Junction, approximately 50 km west of Tonopah, Nevada, to Las Vegas, Nevada. The survey route passes immediately south of the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. Comparisons among the results of the several repeated levelings along this survey route provide a partial basis for evaluating contemporary crustal deformation patterns in the vicinity of the Yucca Mountain site and the relation between any such deformation and geologic structures known or suspected to have been active during Quaternary time.

  3. The study of ozone variations in the Las Vegas metropolitan area using remote sensing information and ground observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.

    2006-01-01

    Urban development in the Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, has grown rapidly in the past fifty years. Associated with this growth has been a change in landscape from natural cover types to developed urban land mixed with planned vegetation canopy throughout in the metropolitan area. Air quality in the Las Vegas Valley has been affected by increases in anthropogenic emissions and concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, and criteria pollutants of particular matter. Ozone concentration in the region is generally influenced by synoptic and mesoscale meteorological conditions, as well as regional transport of pollutants from the western side of Las Vegas. Local influences from ground-level nitrogen oxide emissions and vegetation canopy coverage also affect ozone concentration. Multi-year observational data collected by a network of local air monitoring stations in Clark County, Nevada, indicate that ozone maximums develop in May and June, while minimums exist primarily from November to February. Ozone concentrations are high on the west and northwest sides of the valley. A nighttime ozone reduction in the urban area characterizes the heterogeneous features of spatial distribution for average ozone levels in the Las Vegas urban area. The urban vegetation canopy has a locally positive effect by reducing ozone in urban areas. Decreased ozone levels associated with increased urban development density suggests that the highest ozone concentrations are associated with medium- to low-density urban development in Las Vegas.

  4. Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffmann, J.; Zebker, H.A.; Galloway, D.L.; Amelung, F.

    2001-01-01

    Analyses of areal variations in the subsidence and rebound occurring over stressed aquifer systems, in conjunction with measurements of the hydraulic head fluctuations causing these displacements, can yield valuable information about the compressibility and storage properties of the aquifer system. Historically, stress-strain relationships have been derived from paired extensometer/piezometer installations, which provide only point source data. Because of the general unavailability of spatially detailed deformation data, areal stress-strain relations and their variability are not commonly considered in constraining conceptual and numerical models of aquifer systems. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques can map ground displacements at a spatial scale of tens of meters over 100 km wide swaths. InSAR has been used previously to characterize larger magnitude, generally permanent aquifer system compaction and land subsidence at yearly and longer timescales, caused by sustained drawdown of ground-water levels that produces intergranular stresses consistently greater than the maximum historical stress. We present InSAR measurements of the typically small-magnitude, generally recoverable deformations of the Las Vegas Valley aquifer system occurring at seasonal timescales. From these we derive estimates of the elastic storage coefficient for the aquifer system at several locations in Las Vegas Valley. These high-resolution measurements offer great potential for future investigations into the mechanics of aquifer systems and the spatial heterogeneity of aquifer system structure and material properties as well as for monitoring ongoing aquifer system compaction and land subsidence.

  5. Excess air during aquifer storage and recovery in an arid basin (Las Vegas Valley, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, D. Kip; Cole, Erin; Leising, Joseph F.

    2011-02-01

    The Las Vegas Valley Water District in Nevada, USA, has operated an artificial recharge (AR) program since 1989. In summer 2001, observations of gas exsolving from tap water prompted a study that revealed total dissolved gas (TDG) pressures approaching 2 atm with a gas composition that it is predominantly air. Measurements of TDG pressure at well heads and in the distribution system indicated two potential mechanisms for elevated TDG pressures: (1) air entrainment during AR operations, and (2) temperature changes between the winter recharge season and the summer withdrawal season. Air entrainment during pumping was investigated by intentionally allowing the forebay (upstream reservoir) of a large pumping station to drawdown to the point of vortex formation. This resulted in up to a 0.7 atm increase in TDG pressure. In general, the solubility of gases in water decreases as the temperature increases. In the Las Vegas Valley, water that acquired a modest amount of dissolved gas during winter artificial recharge operations experienced an increase in dissolved gas pressure (0.04 atm/°C) as the water warmed in the subsurface. A combination of air entrainment during AR operations and its amplification by temperature increase after recharge can account for most of the observed amounts of excess gas at this site.

  6. Sociohydrology of an Arid City: Development of a Coupled Model of Water Management in Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. E.; Islam, S.; Portney, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapidly growing cities in arid regions present a significant water management challenge. Key to tackling this challenge is understanding how and why some cities transition to more sustainable water management; acknowledging that urban water resources decisions are both responding to and precipitating hydrologic change, this question is best tackled through a sociohydrology approach. While coupling of natural and societal systems is in it's infancy in the field of hydrology, there is a strong tradition of studying coupled systems in the field of Socio-Ecological Systems. We build on Ostrom's Socio-Ecological Systems framework to develop a system dynamics model of water management for the Las Vegas metropolitan area using Vensim. A key objective our proposed modeling framework is to illuminate the dynamic interactions of the sociohydrologic system components and enable testing of various assumptions and strategies. The model of Las Vegas water management consists of five sub-modules: water supply, water demand, finances, public perception and policy making process. The development of the first three modules were based on clearly defined system structure. The public perception sub-module tracks the level public risk perception of a water supply shortage and represents the hypothesis that public risk perception is updated periodically when shortage events are experienced. The policy making process module uses an algorithm capturing the hypothesized decision making process to select policy actions (or in-action) from a set of feasible actions in response to the system states tracked by the model and observable to decision makers. The model was tested and parameterized using mix of quantitative data on water demands, supplies and costs and qualitative data from document analysis and interview data covering 1990 to 2010 period. Given that not only the parameters but also the structure of the public perception and the policy making process sub-systems is contested, a

  7. 76 FR 3678 - Board Meeting: February 16, 2011-Las Vegas, NV, the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting: February 16, 2011--Las Vegas, NV, the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review... Radioactive Waste Pursuant to its authority under section 5051 of Public Law 100-203, Nuclear Waste...

  8. Seasonal and diurnal analysis of NO2 concentrations from a long-duration study conducted in Las Vegas, Nevada

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study, conducted in Las Vegas, NV from mid-December 2008 to mid-December 2009 along an interstate highway, collected continuous and integrated ambient air quality samples for a wide variety of species including NO2 and NOX. Previous near-road studies have been short duration, ...

  9. Preliminary information on ambient concentrations measured at the Las Vegas National Near-Road MSAT study site

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides preliminary information on the trends in ambient concentrations observed near a heavily traveled highway in Las Vegas, Nevada. As part of a joint effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Federal Highway Administration, an air monitoring pro...

  10. Female Adolescent Subjectivities in Las Vegas: Poststructural Thoughts on the Intersections of Gender, Sexuality, Consumer Logic and Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentith, Audrey M.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, data collected from an ethnographic study of adolescent girls growing up in the city of Las Vegas in the US is used to further our understanding of the role of mediated sex and consumer culture and in relationship to emerging adolescent female identities. Girls in this study articulated a clear sense of their abilities to make…

  11. Neighborhood Reputation and Resident Sentiment in the Wake of the Las Vegas Foreclosure Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Jeremy; Batson, Christie D.; Monnat, Shannon M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how two major components of a neighborhood’s reputation—perceived disorder and collective efficacy—shape individuals’ sentiments toward their neighborhoods during the foreclosure crisis triggered by the Great Recession. Of central interest are whether neighborhood reputations are durable in the face of a crisis (neighborhood resiliency hypothesis) or whether neighborhood reputations wane during times of duress (foreclosure crisis hypothesis). Geo-coded individual-level data from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Area Social Survey merged with data on census tract foreclosure rates are used to address this question. The results provide qualified support for both perspectives. In support of the neighborhood resiliency hypothesis, collective efficacy is positively associated with how residents feel about the quality of their neighborhoods, and this relationship is unaltered by foreclosure rates. In support of the foreclosure crisis hypothesis, foreclosure rates mediate the effects of neighborhood disorder on resident sentiment. The implications of these findings for community resiliency are discussed. PMID:25678735

  12. Perchlorate uptake by salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) in the Las Vegas wash riparian ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Urbansky, E T; Magnuson, M L; Kelty, C A; Brown, S K

    2000-07-10

    Perchlorate ion (ClO4-) has been identified in samples of dormant salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) growing in the Las Vegas Wash. Perchlorate is an oxidant, but its reduction is kinetically hindered. Concern over thyroid effects caused the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to add perchlorate to the drinking water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). Beginning in 2001, utilities will look for perchlorate under the Unregulated Contaminants Monitoring Rule (UCMR). In wood samples acquired from the same plant growing in a contaminated stream, perchlorate concentrations were found as follows: 5-6 microg g(-1) in dry twigs extending above the water and 300 microg g(-1) in stalks immersed in the stream. Perchlorate was leached from samples of wood, and the resulting solutions were analyzed by ion chromatography after clean-up. The identification was confirmed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry after complexation of perchlorate with decyltrimethylammonium cation. Because salt cedar is regarded as an invasive species, there are large scale programs aimed at eliminating it. However, this work suggests that salt cedar might play a role in the ecological distribution of perchlorate as an environmental contaminant. Consequently, a thorough investigation of the fate and transport of perchlorate in tamarisks is required to assess the effects that eradication might have on perchlorate-tainted riparian ecosystems, such as the Las Vegas Wash. This is especially important since water from the wash enters Lake Mead and the Colorado River and has the potential to affect the potable water source of tens of millions of people as well as irrigation water used on a variety of crops, including much of the lettuce produced in the USA. PMID:10902849

  13. Stratospheric contribution to surface ozone in the desert Southwest during the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Brioude, J. F.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lin, M.; Marchbanks, R.; Pierce, R. B.; Reddy, P. J.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.; Gustin, M. S.; Iraci, L. T.; Leblanc, T.; Yates, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was designed to investigate the potential impact of stratosphere-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport of pollution from Asia on surface O3 concentrations in Clark County, NV. This measurement campaign, which took place in May and June of 2013, was conducted at Angel Peak, NV, a high elevation site about 2.8 km above mean sea level and 45 km west of Las Vegas. The study was organized around the NOAA ESRL truck-based TOPAZ scanning ozone lidar with collocated in situ sampling of O3, CO, and meteorological parameters. These measurements were supported by the NOAA/NESDIS real time modelling system (RAQMS), FLEXPART particle dispersion model, and the NOAA GFDL AM3 model. In this talk, I will describe one of several STT events that occurred during the LVOS campaign. This intrusion, which was profiled by TOPAZ on the night of May 24-25, was also sampled by the NASA Alpha Jet, the Table Mountain ozone lidar, and by an ozonesonde flying above southern California. This event also led to significant ozone increases at surface monitors operated by Clark County, the California Air Resources Board, the U.S. National Park Service, and the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NRVOI), and resulted in exceedances of the 2008 75 ppbv O3 NAAQS both in Clark County and in surrounding areas of Nevada and southern California. The potential implications of this and similar events for air quality compliance in the western U.S. will be discussed.

  14. Human-health pharmaceutical compounds in Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona, and Las Vegas Wash, Nevada, October 2000-August 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Robert A.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service conducted a reconnaissance study to investigate the occurrence of selected human-health pharmaceutical compounds in water samples collected from Lake Mead on the Colorado River and Las Vegas Wash, a waterway used to transport treated wastewater from the Las Vegas metropolitan area to Lake Mead. Current research indicates many of these compounds can bioaccumulate and may adversely affect aquatic organisms by disrupting physiological processes, impairing reproductive functions, increasing cancer rates, contributing to the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, and acting in undesirable ways when mixed with other substances. These compounds may be present in effluent because a high percentage of prescription and non-prescription drugs used for human-health purposes are excreted from the body as a mixture of parent compounds and degraded metabolite compounds; also, they can be released to the environment when unused products are discarded by way of toilets, sinks, and trash in landfills. Thirteen of 33 targeted compounds were detected in at least one water sample collected between October 2000 and August 2001. All concentrations were less than or equal to 0.20 micrograms per liter. The most frequently detected compounds in samples from Las Vegas Wash were caffeine, carbamazepine (used to treat epilepsy), cotinine (a metabolite of nicotine), and dehydronifedipine (a metabolite of the antianginal Procardia). Less frequently detected compounds in samples collected from Las Vegas Wash were antibiotics (clarithromycin, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim), acetaminophen (an analgesic and anti-inflammatory), cimetidine (used to treat ulcers), codeine (a narcotic and analgesic), diltiazem (an antihypertensive), and 1,7-dimethylxanthine (a metabolite of caffeine). Fewer compounds were detected in samples collected from Lake Mead than from Las Vegas Wash. Caffeine was detected in all samples

  15. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of Lake Mead National Recreation Area; Las Vegas Wash to Virgin River, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.; Bales, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    This study is the last of a series of eight geohydrologic reconnaissance studies that were done in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. The studies were done to evaluate the water resources in the recreation area and to identify areas having potential for the development of water supplies that would be adequate for marinas and campgrounds. The study area includes about 250 square miles north of Lake Mead from Las Vegas Wash to the Virgin River (Overton Arm), Nevada. Volcanic rocks, consolidated sedimentary rocks, and unconsolidated to semiconsolidated sedimentary rocks underlie the area. Surface-water sources include the Colorado River, Virgin River, Muddy River, and Las Vegas Wash. Elsewhere in the area, streamflow is meager and extremely variable. Ground water originates from four sources: (1) subsurface flow in local basins, (2) infiltration of water from Lake Mead into permeable rocks near the lake, (3) subsurface flow in valleys of perennial streams, and (4) subsurface flow in consolidated rocks of the Muddy Mountains. The quantity of water from Lake Mead that has saturated rocks adjacent to the lake probably is greater than the quantity of ground water from all the Other sources. Rocks saturated by water from the lake probably extend less than 0.5 mileinland from the lake shore. The quality of virtually all the ground water in the area is not acceptable for drinking purposes. The most favorable areas for obtaining ground water are those underlain by the coarse-grained deposits of the older alluvium and the younger alluvium adjacent to Lake Mead. The least favorable areas are those underlain by the mudstone facies of the Muddy Creek Formation and fine-grained rocks of the Horse Spring Formation. Four areas identified as having potential for ground-water development are (1) near Overton Beach, (2) west of Callville Bay, (3) near Middle Point, and (4) in the lower Moapa Valley. Usable quantities of water probably can be obtained at these sites, but the

  16. Understanding Ground Motion in Las Vegas: Insights from Data Analysis and Two-Dimensional Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; McCallen, D

    2004-02-05

    Seismic ground motions are amplified in low velocity sedimentary basins relative to adjacent sites on high velocity hard rock. We used historical recordings of NTS nuclear explosions and earthquake recordings in Las Vegas Valley to quantify frequency-dependent basin amplification using Standard Spectral Ratios. We show that amplifications, referred to as site response, can reach a factor of 10 in the frequency band 0.4-2.0 Hz. Band-averaged site response between 0.4-2.0 Hz is strongly correlated with basin depth. However, it is also well known that site response is related to shallow shear-wave velocity structure. We simulated low frequency (f<1Hz) ground motion and site response with two-dimensional elastic finite difference simulations. We demonstrate that physically plausible models of the shallow subsurface, including low velocity sedimentary structure, can predict relative amplification as well as some of the complexity in the observed waveforms. This study demonstrates that site response can be modeled without invoking complex and computationally expensive three-dimensional structural models.

  17. Episodic Impacts from California Wildfires Identified in Las Vegas Near-Road Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, Sue; Hays, Michael; Preston, Bill; Vallero, Daniel A; Hagler, Gayle S W

    2016-01-01

    Air pollutant concentrations near major highways are usually attributed to a combination of nearby traffic emissions and regional background, and generally presumed to be additive in nature. During a near-road measurement study conducted in Las Vegas, NV, the effects of distant wildfires on regional air quality were indicated over a several day period in the summer of 2009. Area-wide elevated particulate levoglucosan (maximum of 0.83 μg/m(3)) and roadside measurements of ultraviolet light-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM) in comparison to black carbon (Delta-C) were apparent over the three-day period. Back-trajectory modeling and satellite images supported the measurement results and indicated the transport of air pollutants from wildfires burning in southern California. Separating roadside measurements under apparent biomass burning event (Delta-C > 1000 ng m(-3)) and nonevent (Delta-C < 1000 ng m(-3)) periods, and constraining to specific days of week, wind speed range, wind direction from the road and traffic volume range, roadside carbon monoxide, black carbon, total particle number count (20-200 nm), and accumulation mode particle number count (100-200 nm) increased by 65%, 146%, 58%, and 366%, respectively, when biomass smoke was indicated. Meanwhile, ultrafine particles (20-100 nm) decreased by 35%. This episode indicates that the presence of aged wildfire smoke may interact with freshly emitted ultrafine particles, resulting in a decrease of particles in the ultrafine mode. PMID:26618236

  18. Using mixture tuned match filtering to measure changes in subpixel vegetation area in Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelsford, Christa; Shepherd, Doug

    2013-09-01

    In desert cities, securing sufficient water supply to meet the needs of both existing population and future growth is a complex problem with few easy solutions. Grass lawns are a major driver of water consumption and accurate measurements of vegetation area are necessary to understand drivers of changes in household water consumption. Measuring vegetation change in a heterogeneous urban environment requires sub-pixel estimation of vegetation area. Mixture Tuned Match Filtering has been successfully applied to target detection for materials that only cover small portions of a satellite image pixel. There have been few successful applications of MTMF to fractional area estimation, despite theory that suggests feasibility. We use a ground truth dataset over ten times larger than that available for any previous MTMF application to estimate the bias between ground truth data and matched filter results. We find that the MTMF algorithm underestimates the fractional area of vegetation by 5-10%, and calculate that averaging over 20 to 30 pixels is necessary to correct this bias. We conclude that with a large ground truth dataset, using MTMF for fractional area estimation is possible when results can be estimated at a lower spatial resolution than the base image. When this method is applied to estimating vegetation area in Las Vegas, NV spatial and temporal trends are consistent with expectations from known population growth and policy goals.

  19. Episodic Impacts from California Wildfires Identified in Las Vegas Near-Road Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, Sue; Hays, Michael; Preston, Bill; Vallero, Daniel A; Hagler, Gayle S W

    2016-01-01

    Air pollutant concentrations near major highways are usually attributed to a combination of nearby traffic emissions and regional background, and generally presumed to be additive in nature. During a near-road measurement study conducted in Las Vegas, NV, the effects of distant wildfires on regional air quality were indicated over a several day period in the summer of 2009. Area-wide elevated particulate levoglucosan (maximum of 0.83 μg/m(3)) and roadside measurements of ultraviolet light-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM) in comparison to black carbon (Delta-C) were apparent over the three-day period. Back-trajectory modeling and satellite images supported the measurement results and indicated the transport of air pollutants from wildfires burning in southern California. Separating roadside measurements under apparent biomass burning event (Delta-C > 1000 ng m(-3)) and nonevent (Delta-C < 1000 ng m(-3)) periods, and constraining to specific days of week, wind speed range, wind direction from the road and traffic volume range, roadside carbon monoxide, black carbon, total particle number count (20-200 nm), and accumulation mode particle number count (100-200 nm) increased by 65%, 146%, 58%, and 366%, respectively, when biomass smoke was indicated. Meanwhile, ultrafine particles (20-100 nm) decreased by 35%. This episode indicates that the presence of aged wildfire smoke may interact with freshly emitted ultrafine particles, resulting in a decrease of particles in the ultrafine mode.

  20. Reference materials and intercomparison samples available from the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, E.J.; Laska, P.R.

    1985-06-01

    Reference materials and intercomparison samples may be obtained by laboratories involved in the analysis of environmental samples containing radioactivity, pesticides, toxic inorganic species, or toxic organic species. These reference materials and intercomparison samples are available from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Quality Assurance Division located at the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). These materials are useful for incorporation into a laboratory's quality control program for the evaluation of the precision and accuracy of analytical work. Media used for radiation reference materials are pitchblende, Monazite ore, uranium mill tailings, Mancos shale, fly ash, and water spiked with radionuclides. Radioactivity intercomparison samples consist of water, milk, air, urine, and a simulated diet slurry spiked with radionuclides. Media available for toxic organic reference materials are sludge, shale oil, and rag oil, and for intercomparison samples are soil and water. Characterized fly ash, foundry sludge, and river sediment serve as reference materials for toxic inorganics, while spiked soil and water serve as intercomparison samples. Finally, spiked adipose tissue, blood plasma, urine, and water comprise the pesticide intercomparison samples, and, after the disclosure of the true pesticide compositions and concentrations of these samples, the laboratory can use the samples as reference materials. The reference materials are generally available continuously, but the intercomparison samples are distributed on a scheduled basis and in some cases only to certain laboratories. 9 tables.

  1. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Las Vegas, Nevada, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect

    2011-03-16

    LAS VEGAS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Las Vegas, Nevada DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on March 16th, at the Las Vegas Hilton. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by JR Bluehouse, Program Manager, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Mr. Bluehouse was assisted by Tamara, Underwood, Program Assistant, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal governments and communities attended the roundtable. Tracey LeBeau, newly appointed Director of the Office of Indian Energy attended.    LaMont Jackson from DOE’s Office of Electricity attended. Also attending from the administration and federal agencies were Kim Teehee, Senior Policy Advisor for Native American Affairs, The White House; Charlie Galbraith, Associate Director of the Office of Public Engagement and Deputy Associate Director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, The White House; Jodi Gillette, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Economic Development, the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  2. Analysis of the real estate market in Las Vegas: Bubble, seasonal patterns, and prediction of the CSW indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei-Xing; Sornette, Didier

    2008-01-01

    We analyze 27 house price indices of Las Vegas from June 1983 to March 2005, corresponding to 27 different zip codes. These analyses confirm the existence of a real estate bubble, defined as a price acceleration faster than exponential, which is found, however, to be confined to a rather limited time interval in the recent past from approximately 2003 to mid-2004 and has progressively transformed into a more normal growth rate comparable to pre-bubble levels in 2005. There has been no bubble till 2002 except for a medium-sized surge in 1990. In addition, we have identified a strong yearly periodicity which provides a good potential for fine-tuned prediction from month to month. A monthly monitoring using a model that we have developed could confirm, by testing the intra-year structure, if indeed the market has returned to “normal” or if more turbulence is expected ahead. We predict the evolution of the indices one year ahead, which is validated with new data up to September 2006. The present analysis demonstrates the existence of very significant variations at the local scale, in the sense that the bubble in Las Vegas seems to have preceded the more global USA bubble and has ended approximately two years earlier (mid-2004 for Las Vegas compared with mid-2006 for the whole of the USA).

  3. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering in Mexico City: Comparison With Las Vegas, NV, and Los Angeles, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Campbell, D.; Fujita, E.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The primary site in Mexico City was an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP). Similar campaigns were held in Las Vegas, NV in January-February, 2003; and Los Angeles, CA at numerous sites during all seasons from 2003 through 2007. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions. The photoacoustic instrument (PAS) used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In Mexico City the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of Mexico City resulted in more direct solar radiation. Further insight on the meteorological connections and population dynamics will be discussed.

  4. Reconciling Scale Mismatch in Water Governance, Hydro-climatic Processes and Infrastructure Systems of Water Supply in Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. E.; Alarcon, T.; Portney, K.; Islam, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water resource systems are a classic example of a common pool resource due to the high cost of exclusion and the subtractability of the resource; for common pool resources, the performance of governance systems primarily depends on how well matched the institutional arrangements and rules are to the biophysical conditions and social norms. Changes in water governance, hydro-climatic processes and infrastructure systems occur on disparate temporal and spatial scales. A key challenge is the gap between current climate change model resolution, and the spatial and temporal scale of urban water supply decisions. This gap will lead to inappropriate management policies if not mediated through a carefully crafted decision making process. Traditional decision support and planning methods (DSPM) such as classical decision analysis are not equipped to deal with a non-static climate. While emerging methods such as decision scaling, robust decision making and real options are designed to deal with a changing climate, governance systems have evolved under the assumption of a static climate and it is not clear if these methods are well suited to the existing governance regime. In our study, these questions are contextualized by examining an urban water utility that has made significant changes in policy to adapt to changing conditions: the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) which serves metropolitan Las Vegas. Like most desert cities, Las Vegas exists because of water; the artesian springs of the Las Vegas Valley once provided an ample water supply for Native Americans, ranchers and later a small railroad city. However, population growth has increased demands far beyond local supplies. The area now depends on the Colorado River for the majority of its water supply. Natural climate variability with periodic droughts has further challenged water providers; projected climate changes and further population growth will exacerbate these challenges. Las Vegas is selected as a case

  5. SOURCE AND PATHWAY DETERMINATION FOR BERYLLIUM FOUND IN BECHTEL NEVADA NORTH LAS VEGAS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-07-01

    In response to the report ''Investigation of Beryllium Exposure Cases Discovered at the North Las Vegas Facility of the National Nuclear Security Administration'', published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in August 2003, Bechtel Nevada (BN) President and General Manager Dr. F. A. Tarantino appointed the Beryllium Investigation & Assessment Team (BIAT) to identify both the source and pathway for the beryllium found in the North Las Vegas (NLV) B-Complex. From September 8 to December 18, 2003, the BIAT investigated the pathway for beryllium and determined that a number of locations existed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which could have contained sufficient quantities of beryllium to result in contamination if transported. Operations performed in the B-1 Building as a result of characterization activities at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD); Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (RMAD); Test Cells A and C; and the Central Support Facility in Area 25 had the greatest opportunity for transport of beryllium. Investigative monitoring and sampling was performed at these sites with subsequent transport of sample materials, equipment, and personnel from the NTS to the B-1 Building. The timeline established by the BIAT for potential transport of the beryllium contamination into the B-1 Building was from September 1997 through November 2002. Based on results of recently completed swipe sampling, no evidence of transport of beryllium from test areas has been confirmed. Results less than the DOE beryllium action level of 0.2 ???g/100 cm2 were noted for work support facilities located in Area 25. All of the identified sites in Area 25 worked within the B-1 tenant's residency timeline have been remediated. Legacy contaminants have either been disposed of or capped with clean borrow material. As such, no current opportunity exists for release or spread of beryllium contamination. Historical

  6. Tritium contamination at EG&G/EM in North Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Sowell, C.V.; Arent, L.J.

    1996-06-01

    The tritium contamination discovered at the EG&G Energy Measurements (EG&G/EM) facility in North Las Vegas, Nevada, on 20 April 1995, could have been averted by good health physics practices and/or adequate management oversight. Scandium tritide (ScT{sub 3}) targets were installed for use in sealed tube neutron generators at EG&G/EM. In addition, EG&G/EM was also storing zirconium tritide (ZrT{sub 3}) and titanium tritide (TiT{sub 3}) foils. Since the targets were classified as sealed sources, the appropriate administrative and engineering control measures such as relocating targets/sources, air monitoring, bioassay, waste stream management, labeling/posting and training were not implemented. In all there were six unreported incidents of tritium contamination from March 1994 to July 1995. Swipe surveys revealed areas exceeding the action level of 10,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} by up to three orders of magnitude. After reclassifying the targets as unsealed sources, a bioassay program was instituted, and the results were higher than expected for three employees. The doses assigned to the three individuals working in the contaminated area were 35, 58, and 61 mrem committed effective dose equivalent. Though the doses were low, the decontamination costs were in excess of $350,000.00. An investigation, was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office to analyze the events that led to the tritium contamination and recommend actions to prevent recurrence. Event and causal factor charting, Project Evaluation Tree (PET) analysis techniques, and root cause analysis, were used to evaluate management systems, causal sequences, and systems factors contributing to the tritium release.

  7. Site Response in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada from NTS Explosions and Earthquake Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Arthur; Tkalcic, Hrvoje; McCallen, David; Larsen, Shawn; Snelson, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    We report site response in Las Vegas Valley (LVV) from historical recordings of Nevada Test Site (NTS) nuclear explosions and earthquake recordings from permanent and temporary seismic stations. Our data set significantly improves the spatial coverage of LVV over previous studies, especially in the northern, deeper parts of the basin. Site response at stations in LVV was measured for frequencies in the range 0.2 5.0 Hz using Standard Spectral Ratios (SSR) and Horizontal-Vertical Spectral Ratios (HVR). For the SSR measurements we used a reference site (approximately NEHRP B ``rock'' classification) located on Frenchman Mountain outside the basin. Site response at sedimentary sites is variable in LVV with average amplifications approaching a factor of 10 at some frequencies. We observed peaks in the site response curves at frequencies clustered near 0.6, 1.2 and 2.0 Hz, with some sites showing additional lower amplitude peaks at higher frequencies. The spatial pattern of site response is strongly correlated with the reported depth to basement for frequencies between 0.2 and 3.0 Hz, although the frequency of peak amplification does not show a similar correlation. For a few sites where we have geotechnical shear velocities, the amplification shows a correlation with the average upper 30-meter shear velocities, V 30. We performed two-dimensional finite difference simulations and reproduced the observed peak site amplifications at 0.6 and 1.2 Hz with a low velocity near-surface layer with shear velocities 600 750 m/s and a thickness of 100 200 m. These modeling results indicate that the amplitude and frequencies of site response peaks in LVV are strongly controlled by shallow velocity structure.

  8. Surface and Airborne Arsenic Concentrations in a Recreational Site near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic, up to 7058 μg g-1 in topsoil and bedrock, and more than 0.03 μg m-3 in air on a 2-week basis, were measured in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a very popular off-road area near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. The elevated arsenic concentrations in the topsoil and bedrock are correlated to outcrops of yellow sandstone belonging to the Muddy Creek Formation (≈ 10 to 4 Ma) and to faults crossing the area. Mineralized fluids moved to the surface through the faults and deposited the arsenic. A technique was developed to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations from the arsenic content in the topsoil. The technique was tested by comparing calculated with measured concentrations at 34 locations in the NDRA, for 3 periods of 2 weeks each. We then applied it to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations for more than 500 locations all over the NDRA. The highest airborne arsenic concentrations occur over sand dunes and other zones with a surficial layer of aeolian sand. Ironically these areas show the lowest levels of arsenic in the topsoil. However, they are highly susceptible to wind erosion and emit very large amounts of sand and dust during episodes of strong winds, thereby also emitting much arsenic. Elsewhere in the NDRA, in areas not or only very slightly affected by wind erosion, airborne arsenic levels equal the background level for airborne arsenic in the USA, approximately 0.0004 μg m-3. The results of this study are important because the NDRA is visited by more than 300,000 people annually. PMID:25897667

  9. Distress in the Desert: Neighborhood Disorder, Resident Satisfaction, and Quality of Life during the Las Vegas Foreclosure Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Batson, Christie D.; Monnat, Shannon M.

    2014-01-01

    Using surveys collected from a sample of households nested within ‘naturally occurring’ neighborhoods in Las Vegas, NV during the 2007-2009 economic recession, this study examines the associations between real and perceived measures of neighborhood distress (foreclosure rate, physical decay, crime) and residents' reports of neighborhood quality of life and neighborhood satisfaction. Consistent with social disorganization theory, both real and perceived measures of neighborhood disorder were negatively associated with quality of life and neighborhood satisfaction. Residents' perceptions of neighborliness partially acted as a buffer against the effects of neighborhood distress, including housing foreclosures, on quality of life and neighborhood satisfaction. PMID:25750507

  10. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of Lake Mead National Recreation Area; Las Vegas Wash to Opal Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study is a geohydrologic reconnaissance of about 170 square miles in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area from Las Vegas Wash to Opal Mountain, Nevada. The study is one of a series that describes the geohydrology of the recreation area and that indentifies areas where water supplies can be developed. Precipitation in this arid area is about 5 inches per year. Streamflow is seasonal and extremely variable except for that in the Colorado River, which adjoins the area. Pan evaporation is more than 20 times greater than precipitation; therefore, regional ground-water supplies are meager except near the Colorado River, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave. Large ground-water supplies can be developed near the river and lakes, and much smaller supplies may be obtained in a few favorable locations farther from the river and lakes. Ground water in most of the areas probably contains more than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, but water that contains less than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids can be obtained within about 1 mile of the lakes. Crystalline rocks of metamorphic, intrusive and volcanic origin crop out in the area. These rocks are overlain by conglomerate and mudstone of the Muddy Creek Formation, gravel and conglomerate of the older alluvium, and sand and gravel of the Chemehuevi Formation and younger alluvium. The crystalline rocks, where sufficiently fractured, yield water to springs and would yield small amounts of water to favorably located wells. The poorly cemented and more permeable beds of the older alluvium, Chemehuevi Formation, and younger alluvium are the better potential aquifers, particularly along the Colorado River and Lakes Mead and Mohave. Thermal springs in the gorge of the Colorado River south of Hoover Dam discharge at least 2,580 acre-feet per year of water from the volcanic rocks and metamorphic and plutonic rocks. The discharge is much greater than could be infiltrated in the drainage basin above the springs

  11. An analysis of urban thermal characteristics and associated land cover in Tampa Bay and Las Vegas using Landsat satellite data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.

    2006-01-01

    Remote sensing data from both Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 systems were utilized to assess urban area thermal characteristics in Tampa Bay watershed of west-central Florida, and the Las Vegas valley of southern Nevada. To quantitatively determine urban land use extents and development densities, sub-pixel impervious surface areas were mapped for both areas. The urban-rural boundaries and urban development densities were defined by selecting certain imperviousness threshold values and Landsat thermal bands were used to investigate urban surface thermal patterns. Analysis results suggest that urban surface thermal characteristics and patterns can be identified through qualitatively based urban land use and development density data. Results show the urban area of the Tampa Bay watershed has a daytime heating effect (heat-source), whereas the urban surface in Las Vegas has a daytime cooling effect (heat-sink). These thermal effects strongly correlated with urban development densities where higher percent imperviousness is usually associated with higher surface temperature. Using vegetation canopy coverage information, the spatial and temporal distributions of urban impervious surface and associated thermal characteristics are demonstrated to be very useful sources in quantifying urban land use, development intensity, and urban thermal patterns. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in air quality at near-roadway schools after a major freeway expansion in Las Vegas, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven G; McCarthy, Michael C; DeWinter, Jennifer L; Vaughn, David L; Roberts, Paul T

    2014-09-01

    Near-roadway ambient black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations were measured at two schools adjacent to a freeway and at an urban background school 2 km from the freeway to determine the change in concentrations attributable to vehicle emissions after the three-lane expansion of U.S. Highway 95 (US 95) in Las Vegas, Nevada. Between summer 2007 and summer 2008, average weekday small-vehicle volume increased by 40% +/- 2% (standard error). Average weekday large-vehicle volume decreased by 17% +/- 5%, due to a downturn in the economy and an associated decline in goods movement. Average vehicle speed increased from 58 to 69 mph, a 16% +/- 1% increase. The authors compared BC and CO concentrations in summer 2007 with those in summer 2008 to understand what effect the expansion of the freeway may have had on ambient concentrations: BC and CO were measured 17 m north of the freeway sound wall, CO was measured 20 m south of the sound wall, and BC was measured at an urban background site 2 km south of the freeway. Between summer 2007 and summer 2008, median BC decreased at the near-road site by 40% +/- 2% and also decreased at the urban background site by 24% +/- 4%, suggesting that much of the change was due to decreases in emissions throughout Las Vegas, rather than only on US 95. CO concentrations decreased by 14% +/- 2% and 10% +/- 3% at the two near-road sites. The decrease in BC concentrations after the expansion is likely due to the decrease in medium- and heavy-duty-vehicle traffic resulting from the economic recession. The decrease in CO concentrations may be a result of improved traffic flow, despite the increase in light-duty-vehicle traffic. Implications: Monitoring of BC and CO at near-road locations in Las Vegas demonstrated the impacts of changes in traffic volume and vehicle speed on near-road concentrations. However, urban-scale declines in concentrations were larger than near-road changes due to the impacts of the economic recession that

  13. Changes in air quality at near-roadway schools after a major freeway expansion in Las Vegas, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven G; McCarthy, Michael C; DeWinter, Jennifer L; Vaughn, David L; Roberts, Paul T

    2014-09-01

    Near-roadway ambient black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations were measured at two schools adjacent to a freeway and at an urban background school 2 km from the freeway to determine the change in concentrations attributable to vehicle emissions after the three-lane expansion of U.S. Highway 95 (US 95) in Las Vegas, Nevada. Between summer 2007 and summer 2008, average weekday small-vehicle volume increased by 40% +/- 2% (standard error). Average weekday large-vehicle volume decreased by 17% +/- 5%, due to a downturn in the economy and an associated decline in goods movement. Average vehicle speed increased from 58 to 69 mph, a 16% +/- 1% increase. The authors compared BC and CO concentrations in summer 2007 with those in summer 2008 to understand what effect the expansion of the freeway may have had on ambient concentrations: BC and CO were measured 17 m north of the freeway sound wall, CO was measured 20 m south of the sound wall, and BC was measured at an urban background site 2 km south of the freeway. Between summer 2007 and summer 2008, median BC decreased at the near-road site by 40% +/- 2% and also decreased at the urban background site by 24% +/- 4%, suggesting that much of the change was due to decreases in emissions throughout Las Vegas, rather than only on US 95. CO concentrations decreased by 14% +/- 2% and 10% +/- 3% at the two near-road sites. The decrease in BC concentrations after the expansion is likely due to the decrease in medium- and heavy-duty-vehicle traffic resulting from the economic recession. The decrease in CO concentrations may be a result of improved traffic flow, despite the increase in light-duty-vehicle traffic. Implications: Monitoring of BC and CO at near-road locations in Las Vegas demonstrated the impacts of changes in traffic volume and vehicle speed on near-road concentrations. However, urban-scale declines in concentrations were larger than near-road changes due to the impacts of the economic recession that

  14. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering at Four Sites in and Near Mexico City: Comparison with Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Miranda, G. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    Four photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS) for aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The four sites included: an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP); a suburban site at the Technological University of Tecamac; a rural site at "La Biznaga" ranch; and a site at the Paseo de Cortes (altitude 3,810 meters ASL) in the rural area above Amecameca in the State of Mexico, on the saddle between the volcanoes Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl. A similar campaign was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA in January-February, 2003. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions while the other sites provided characterization of the plume, mixed in with any local sources. The second and third sites are north of Mexico City, and the fourth site is south. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Instruments at the second and third sites operate at 870 nm, and the one at the fourth site at 780 nm. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. Comparisons with TSI nephelometer scattering at the T0 site will be presented. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of

  15. Exploring the effects of population growth on future land use change in the Las Vegas Wash watershed: an integrated approach of geospatial modeling and analytics

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Las Vegas Valley metropolitan area is one of the fastest growing areas in the southwestern United States. The rapid urbanization has led to many environmental problems. For instance, as population growth and urbanization continue, there will be a problem with water shortage. ...

  16. The Birth of a New Vocational-Technical Center. National Vocational-Technical Facility Planning Conference (Las Vegas, Nevada, May, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Clayton

    The principal of the Southern Nevada Vocational-Technical Center at Las Vegas, Nevada, briefly outlines its development and function. The facility cost approximately 3 million dollars and was built on 390 acres of land purchased from the Federal government. The PERT method was used in planning. Instructional facilities, including those for auto…

  17. Long-term continuous measurement of near-road air pollution in Las Vegas: Seasonal variability in traffic emissions impact on local air quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess air pollution along roadways is an issue of public health concern and motivated a long-term measurement effort established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Las Vegas, Nevada. Measurements of air pollutants – including black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO),...

  18. Explorations of Colleges, Universities, and Career Training Centers in Las Vegas, Nevada: Creating Educational and Training Programs for Displaced Workers to Learn Marketable Employment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonyea, Jacob Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The city of Las Vegas, Nevada has experienced a slowdown in tourism, a drop in property taxes and consolidated tax revenue used to support the city's operating budget, and a lack of economic diversification. Because of these changes, the ability of displaced workers to learn marketable employment skills continues to be an important issue for…

  19. Summary of chemical data from onsite and laboratory analyses of groundwater samples from the surficial aquifer, Las Vegas, Nevada, April and August 1993 and September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Gunther, Charmaine D.

    2012-01-01

    Samples were collected from groundwater wells in and about the city of Las Vegas, Nevada, and were analyzed for selected major, minor and trace constituents. Analyses of blank and reference samples are summarized as mean and standard deviation values for all positive results.

  20. Six month progress report on the Waste Package Project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, July 1991--January 1992: Management, quality assurance and overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ladkany, S.G.

    1991-12-31

    The progress of the waste package project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas was the subject of this report. It covered aspects of management and quality assurance, container design, application of ASME Pressure Vessel Codes, structural analysis of containers, design of rock tunnels for storage, and heat transfer phenomena. (MB)

  1. Six month progress report on the Waste Package Project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, July 1991--January 1992: Management, quality assurance and overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ladkany, S.G.

    1991-01-01

    The progress of the waste package project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas was the subject of this report. It covered aspects of management and quality assurance, container design, application of ASME Pressure Vessel Codes, structural analysis of containers, design of rock tunnels for storage, and heat transfer phenomena. (MB)

  2. School Resegregation in the Mississippi of the West: Community Counternarratives on the Return to Neighborhood Schools in Las Vegas, 1968-1994

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsford, Sonya Douglass; Sampson, Carrie; Forletta, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    Background: School desegregation and resegregation in the Mountain West remain understudied despite the substantial impact the region's growth and demographic change have had on racial balance and diversity in schools. Home to the largest school district in the Mountain West and fifth largest school district in the country, Las Vegas's…

  3. Full House: The Las Vegas building boom has stretched the creativity and resources of the fastest-growing school district in the nation. Edutopia, September/October 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furger, Roberta

    2004-01-01

    This once sleepy community, founded by Mormon missionaries in 1855 and jumpstarted by gambling 85 years later, now gobbles up real estate faster than a conventioneer chowing down at a midnight buffet. Every day of the week, two acres of Las Vegas area land are developed for commercial or residential use in a frenetic drive to accommodate the…

  4. Reproductive Responses of Common Carp Cyprinus carpio in Cages to Influent of the Las Vegas Wash in Lake Mead, Nevada, from late Winter to early Spring

    EPA Science Inventory

    To investigate the potential for contaminants in Las Vegas Wash (LW) influent to produce effects indicative of endocrine disruption in vivo, adult male and female common carp were exposed in cages for 42-48 d at four sites and two reference locations in Lake Mead.

  5. Heavy Metal Contamination and Salt Efflorescence Associated With Decorative Landscaping Rocks, Las Vegas, Nevada: The Need for Regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, S. A.; Buck, B. J.; Brock, A. L.

    2004-12-01

    Las Vegas, Nevada is one of the fastest growing cities in the United States. Faced with water restrictions, decorative rock xeroscaping has become a very popular form of landscaping. Currently, there are no regulations controlling the geochemistry of the decorative rocks that can be used for these purposes. In this study, we examined three sites containing two different decorative rock products. The landscaping rocks, underlying soil, and surface salt crusts were analyzed to determine their mineralogy and chemistry. Methods of analysis include scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP), thin section analysis, and laser particle size analysis (LPSA). Preliminary results indicate the presence of halite (NaCl), bloedite (Na2Mg(SO4)2 4H2O), a hydrated magnesium sulfate, and possibly copper sulfate and copper chloride mineral phases in the surface salt crusts. Both copper minerals are regarded as hazardous substances by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); these agencies have established minimum exposure limits for human contact with these substances. Copper sulfate and copper chloride are not naturally occurring minerals in the soils of the Las Vegas Valley, and analyses indicate that their formation may be attributed to the mineralogy of the decorative landscaping rocks. Further testing is needed to characterize this potential health hazard; however the preliminary results of this study demonstrate the need for regulations controlling the geochemistry of decorative rocks used for urban landscaping.

  6. A preliminary assessment of earthquake ground shaking hazard at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and implications to the Las Vegas region

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, I.G.; Green, R.K.; Sun, J.I.; Pezzopane, S.K.; Abrahamson, N.A.; Quittmeyer, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    As part of early design studies for the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the authors have performed a preliminary probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of ground shaking. A total of 88 Quaternary faults within 100 km of the site were considered in the hazard analysis. They were characterized in terms of their probability o being seismogenic, and their geometry, maximum earthquake magnitude, recurrence model, and slip rate. Individual faults were characterized by maximum earthquakes that ranged from moment magnitude (M{sub w}) 5.1 to 7.6. Fault slip rates ranged from a very low 0.00001 mm/yr to as much as 4 mm/yr. An areal source zone representing background earthquakes up to M{sub w} 6 1/4 = 1/4 was also included in the analysis. Recurrence for these background events was based on the 1904--1994 historical record, which contains events up to M{sub w} 5.6. Based on this analysis, the peak horizontal rock accelerations are 0.16, 0.21, 0.28, and 0.50 g for return periods of 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 10,000 years, respectively. In general, the dominant contributor to the ground shaking hazard at Yucca Mountain are background earthquakes because of the low slip rates of the Basin and Range faults. A significant effect on the probabilistic ground motions is due to the inclusion of a new attenuation relation developed specifically for earthquakes in extensional tectonic regimes. This relation gives significantly lower peak accelerations than five other predominantly California-based relations used in the analysis, possibly due to the lower stress drops of extensional earthquakes compared to California events. Because Las Vegas is located within the same tectonic regime as Yucca Mountain, the seismic sources and path and site factors affecting the seismic hazard at Yucca Mountain also have implications to Las Vegas. These implications are discussed in this paper.

  7. Sources and concentrations of mercury and selenium in compartments within the Las Vegas Wash during a period of rapid change.

    PubMed

    Cizdziel, James; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2005-08-01

    The Las Vegas Wash, which drains the Las Vegas valley watershed and provides the second largest inflow to Lake Mead, is being dramatically altered with erosion control structures and wetland restoration efforts. The impact of these changes on the cycling and distribution of Hg and Se is of particular interest because of their tendency to bioaccumulate and because of a lack of information on these contaminants in the Wash. In this study, we determined concentrations of Hg and Se in surface water (monthly), groundwater (once) and sediments (quarterly) from strategic locations within and along the Wash during 2002 and 2003. The data was used to characterize Se sources and loading into the Wash. Samples containing resurfacing groundwater and urban runoff (LW10.75 and Duck Creek) had significantly higher yearly means (13.7 +/- 4.4 and 23.8 +/- 4.1 microg/L, respectively) compared with mainstream samples containing primarily treated wastewater (2.8 +/- 0.8 microg/L). Investigation of Se in tributaries, street runoff and rain suggest that the source of the elevated Se is likely groundwater seeps located within a relatively narrow geographic band on the southeast side of the valley. Se content of sediments was similar, except for LW10.75 which was rich in organic matter. Hg concentrations in the water and sediments were low, averaging 4 +/- 5 ng/L and 34 +/- 20 ng/g, dw, respectively. Overall, this study suggests that water quality remains relatively stable despite changes in the Wash and managers of developing wetlands should not use tributary water as source water.

  8. Geologic and geophysical maps of the Las Vegas 30' x 60' quadrangle, Clark and Nye counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Harris, Anita G.; Langenheim, V.E.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Mahan, Shannon; Paces, James B.; Dixon, Gary L.; Rowley, Peter D.; Burchfiel, B.C.; Bell, John W.; Smith, Eugene I.

    2005-01-01

    Las Vegas and Pahrump are two of the fastest growing cities in the US, and the shortage of water looms as among the greatest future problems for these cities. These new maps of the Las Vegas 30 x 60-minute quadrangle provide a geologic and geophysical framework and fundamental earth science database needed to address societal issues such as ground water supply and contamination, surface flood, landslide, and seismic hazards, and soil properties and their changing impact by and on urbanization. The mountain ranges surrounding Las Vegas and Pahrump consist of Mesozoic, Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks. A majority of these rocks are Paleozoic carbonate rocks that are part of Nevada's carbonate rock aquifer province. The Spring Mountains represent a major recharge site in the province, where maximum altitude is 3,632 m (Charleston Peak) above sea level. Rocks in the Sheep and Las Vegas Ranges and Spring Mountains contain correlative, northeast-striking, southeast-verging thrust faults that are part of the Cretaceous, Sevier orogenic belt. These thrusts were offset during the Miocene by the Las Vegas Valley shear system (LVVSZ). We conducted new mapping in the Blue Diamond area, highlighting refined work on the Bird Spring thrust, newly studied ancient landslides, and gravity-slide blocks. We conducted new mapping in the Las Vegas Range and mapped previously unrecognized structures such as the Valley thrust and fold belt; recognition of these structures has led to a refined correlation of Mesozoic thrust faults across the LVVSZ. New contributions in the quadrangle also include a greatly refined stratigraphy of Paleozoic bedrock units based on conodont biostragraphy. We collected over 200 conodont samples in the quadrangle and established stratigraphic reference sections used to correlate units across the major Mesozoic thrust faults. Quaternary deposits cover about half of the map area and underlie most of the present urbanized area. Deposits consist of large coalescing

  9. 78 FR 43772 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... (77 FR 65332). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by submitting... reopening the comment period until February 13, 2013 (78 FR 2646). The Aircraft Owners and Pilots... to reduce the number of Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) alerts between Las...

  10. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Las Vegas, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-31

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Las Vegas, Nevada by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  11. Using mixture-tuned match filtering to measure changes in subpixel vegetation area in Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelsford, Christa; Shepherd, Doug

    2014-01-01

    In desert cities, accurate measurements of vegetation area within residential lots are necessary to understand drivers of change in water consumption. Most residential lots are smaller than an individual 30-m pixel from Landsat satellite images and have a mixture of vegetation and other land covers. Quantifying vegetation change in this environment requires estimating subpixel vegetation area. Mixture-tuned match filtering (MTMF) has been successfully used for subpixel target detection. There have been few successful applications of MTMF to subpixel abundance estimation because the relationship observed between MTMF estimates and ground measurements of abundance is noisy. We use a ground truth dataset over 10 times larger than that available for any previous MTMF application to estimate the bias between ground data and MTMF results. We find that MTMF underestimates the fractional area of vegetation by 5% to 10% and show that averaging over multiple pixels is necessary to reduce noise in the dataset. We conclude that MTMF is a viable technique for fractional area estimation when a large dataset is available for calibration. When this method is applied to estimating vegetation area in Las Vegas, Nevada, spatial and temporal trends are consistent with expectations from known population growth and policy changes.

  12. Environmental and social determinants of youth physical activity intensity levels at neighborhood parks in Las Vegas, NV.

    PubMed

    Coughenour, Courtney; Coker, Lisa; Bungum, Tim J

    2014-12-01

    Parks can play an important role in youth activity. This study used observational data to evaluate the relationship of environmental and social determinants to youth physical activity intensity levels in Las Vegas neighborhood parks. System for observing play and leisure activity in youth was used to code activity levels as sedentary, walking, or vigorous in five low-income and five high-income parks. Environmental determinants included amenities, incivilities, size, high-speed streets, sidewalk condition, and temperature. Social determinants included percent minority and Hispanic, gender, and income. A multinomial logistic regression model was performed. We observed 1,421 youth, 59% male, 41% female; 21% were sedentary, 38% walking, and 41% vigorous. Males were more likely to be observed walking (OR 1.42) and vigorous (OR 2.21) when compared to sedentary. High-speed streets (OR 0.76), sidewalks condition (OR 0.34), and low-income neighborhoods (OR 0.07) was associated with decreased odds of vigorous activity; incivilities (OR 1.34) and amenities (OR 1.27) were associated with greater odds of being vigorous. Environmental and social determinants are associated with physical activity intensity levels at parks. Stakeholders should ensure quality parks, as they relate to physical activity levels in youth. Understanding environmental and social determinants that influence physical activity at parks is critical to utilizing their full potential in an effort to combat childhood obesity.

  13. Analysis of impacts of urban land use and land cover on air quality in the Las Vegas region using remote sensing information and ground observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.

    2007-01-01

    Urban development in the Las Vegas Valley of Nevada (USA) has expanded rapidly over the past 50 years. The air quality in the valley has suffered owing to increases from anthropogenic emissions of carbon monoxide, ozone and criteria pollutants of particular matter. Air quality observations show that pollutant concentrations have apparent heterogeneous characteristics in the urban area. Quantified urban land use and land cover information derived from satellite remote sensing data indicate an apparent local influence of urban development density on air pollutant distributions. Multi-year observational data collected by a network of local air monitoring stations specify that ozone maximums develop in the May and June timeframe, whereas minimum concentrations generally occur from November to February. The fine particulate matter maximum occurs in July. Ozone concentrations are highest on the west and northwest sides of the valley. Night-time ozone reduction contributes to the heterogeneous features of the spatial distribution for average ozone levels in the Las Vegas metropolitan area. Decreased ozone levels associated with increased urban development density suggest that the highest ozone and lowest nitrogen oxides concentrations are associated with medium to low density urban development in Las Vegas.

  14. New 40Ar/39Ar isotopic dates from Miocene volcanic rocks in the Lake Mead area and southern Las Vegas Range, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Duebendorfer, E.M.; Deibert, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar dates on volcanic rocks interlayered with synextensional Miocene sedimentary rocks in the western Lake Mead area and southern end of the Las Vegas Range provide tight constraints on magmatism, basin formation, and extensional deformation in the Basin and Range province of southern Nevada. Vertical axis rotations associated with movement along the Las Vegas Valley shear zone occurred after 15.67??0.10 Ma (2??), based on a 40Ar/39Ar date from a tuff in the Gass Peak formation in the southern Las Vegas Range. Basaltic magmatism in the western Lake Mead area began as early as 13.28??0.09 Ma, based on a date from a basalt flow in the Lovell Wash Member of the Horse Spring Formation. Isotopic dating of a basalt from the volcanic rocks of Callville Mesa indicates that these rocks are as old as 11.41??0.14 Ma, suggesting that volcanic activity began shortly after formation of the Boulder basin, the extensional basin in which the informally named red sandstone unit was deposited. The red sandstone unit is at least as old as 11.70??0.08 Ma and contains megabreccia deposits younger than 12.93??0.10 Ma. This results shows that formation of the Boulder basin was associated with development of topographic relief that was probably generated by movement along the Saddle Island low-angle normal fault. Stratal tilting associated with extension occurred both prior to and after 11.5 Ma.

  15. A Tale of two Cities: Photoacoustic and Aethalometer Measurements Comparisons of Light Absorption in Mexico City and Las Vegas, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-05-01

    As part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments, MIRAGE-Mex deployment to Mexico City in the period of 30 days, March 2006, a suite of photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS; W. Arnott & G. Paredes), nephelometer scattering, and aetholemeter absorption instruments (N. Marley & J.Gaffney) were installed to measure at ground level the light absorption and scattering by aerosols at the urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP). This IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed. The Las Vegas, NV site was located at East Charleston Street on January-February, 2003. In east Las Vegas typical westerly winds carry the city plume across the site. Comparisons of PAS aerosol light absorption and aetholemeter absorption measurements at 521 nm at both Las Vegas NV and Mexico City sites will be presented. We will also present a broad overview of the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the sites in relation to secondary aerosol formation.

  16. The influence of faults in basin-fill deposits on land subsidence, Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    The role of horizontal deformation caused by pumping of confined-aquifer systems is recognized as contributing to the development of earth fissures in semiarid regions, including Las Vegas Valley, Nevada. In spite of stabilizing water levels, new earth fissures continue to develop while existing ones continue to lengthen and widen near basin-fill faults. A three-dimensional granular displacement model based on Biot's consolidation theory (Biot, MA, 1941, General theory of three-dimensional consolidation. Jour. Applied Physics 12:155-164) has been used to evaluate the nature of displacement in the vicinity of two vertical faults. The fault was simulated as (1) a low-permeability barrier to horizontal flow, (2) a gap or structural break in the medium, but where groundwater flow is not obstructed, and (3) a combination of conditions (1) and (2). Results indicate that the low-permeability barrier greatly enhances horizontal displacement. The fault plane also represents a location of significant differential vertical subsidence. Large computed strains in the vicinity of the fault may suggest high potential for failure and the development of earth fissures when the fault is assumed to have low permeability. Results using a combination of the two boundaries suggest that potential fissure development may be great at or near the fault plane and that horizontal deformation is likely to play a key role in this development. Résumé. On considère que la déformation horizontale provoquée par un pompage dans un aquifère captif joue un rôle dans le développement des fissures du sol en régions semi-arides, comme la vallée de Las Vegas (Nevada). Malgré des niveaux d'eau stabilisés, de nouvelles fissures du sol continuent de se développer en longueur et en largeur au voisinage de failles dans les bassins sédimentaires. Un modèle de déplacement granulaire tri-dimensionnel, basé sur la théorie de la consolidation de Biot (Biot, M A, 1941, General theory of three

  17. The influence of faults in basin-fill deposits on land subsidence, Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    The role of horizontal deformation caused by pumping of confined-aquifer systems is recognized as contributing to the development of earth fissures in semiarid regions, including Las Vegas Valley, Nevada. In spite of stabilizing water levels, new earth fissures continue to develop while existing ones continue to lengthen and widen near basin-fill faults. A three-dimensional granular displacement model based on Biot's consolidation theory (Biot, MA, 1941, General theory of three-dimensional consolidation. Jour. Applied Physics 12:155-164) has been used to evaluate the nature of displacement in the vicinity of two vertical faults. The fault was simulated as (1) a low-permeability barrier to horizontal flow, (2) a gap or structural break in the medium, but where groundwater flow is not obstructed, and (3) a combination of conditions (1) and (2). Results indicate that the low-permeability barrier greatly enhances horizontal displacement. The fault plane also represents a location of significant differential vertical subsidence. Large computed strains in the vicinity of the fault may suggest high potential for failure and the development of earth fissures when the fault is assumed to have low permeability. Results using a combination of the two boundaries suggest that potential fissure development may be great at or near the fault plane and that horizontal deformation is likely to play a key role in this development. Résumé. On considère que la déformation horizontale provoquée par un pompage dans un aquifère captif joue un rôle dans le développement des fissures du sol en régions semi-arides, comme la vallée de Las Vegas (Nevada). Malgré des niveaux d'eau stabilisés, de nouvelles fissures du sol continuent de se développer en longueur et en largeur au voisinage de failles dans les bassins sédimentaires. Un modèle de déplacement granulaire tri-dimensionnel, basé sur la théorie de la consolidation de Biot (Biot, M A, 1941, General theory of three

  18. American Vocational Education Research Association Proceedings, Annual Convention (Las Vegas, Nevada, December 11-14, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt-Gohdes, Wanda

    This proceedings includes the following papers and carousel presentations: "Information Technology Related Career Development Needs of Secondary Vocational Teachers" (Joe W. Kotrlik, Betty C. Harrison, Donna H. Redmann, Cindy S. Handley); "Do Gender and Academic Risk Matter? Influences on Career Decision Making and Occupational Choice in Early…

  19. Palinspastic reconstruction of Lower Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences near the latitude of Las Vegas: Implications for the entire Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Marzolf, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    On the Colorado Plateau, lower Mesozoic stratigraphy is subdivided by regional unconformities into the Lower Triassic Moenkopi, Upper Triassic Chinle, Lower and Middle( ) Jurassic Glen Canyon, and Middle Jurassic lower San Rafael tectonosequences. Palinspastic reconstruction for Cenozoic extensional and mesozoic compressional deformations near the latitude of Las Vegas indicates the Moenkopi tectono-sequence constructed a passive-margin-like architecture of modest width overlapping folded. Thrust-faulted, and intruded Permian strata, with state boundaries fixed relative to the Colorado Plateau, comparison of the location of the Early Triassic shelf-slope break near latitude 36[degree] with the palinspastically restored location of the shelf-slope break in southeastern Idaho implies strata of the Moenkopi tectonosequence in the Mesozoic marine province of northwest NV lay in western utah in the Early Triassic. This reconstruction: suggests that the Galconda and Last Chance faults are part of the same thrust system; aligns late Carnian paleovalleys of the chinle tectonosequence on the Colorado Plateau with a coeval northwest-trending paleovalley cut across the Star Pea, and the Norian Cottonwood paleovalley with the coeval Grass Valley delta; defines a narrow, northward deepening back-arc basin in which the Glen Canyon tectonosequence was deposited; aligns east-facing half grabens along the back side of the arc from the Cowhole Mountains to the Clan Alpine Range; projects the volcan-arc/back-arc transition from northwest Arizona to the east side of the Idaho batholith; and predicts the abrupt facies change from silicic volcanics to marine strata of the lower San Rafael sequence lay in western Utah. The paleogeographic was altered in the late Bathonian to Callovian by back-arc extension north of a line extending from Cedar City, UT to Mina, NV. The palinspastic reconstruction implies the Paleozoic was tectonically stacked at the close of the Paleozoic.

  20. First records of Canis dirus and Smilodon fatalis from the late Pleistocene Tule Springs local fauna, upper Las Vegas Wash, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Scott, Eric; Springer, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Late Pleistocene groundwater discharge deposits (paleowetlands) in the upper Las Vegas Wash north of Las Vegas, Nevada, have yielded an abundant and diverse vertebrate fossil assemblage, the Tule Springs local fauna (TSLF). The TSLF is the largest open-site vertebrate fossil assemblage dating to the Rancholabrean North American Land Mammal Age in the southern Great Basin and Mojave Desert. Over 600 discrete body fossil localities have been recorded from the wash, including an area that now encompasses Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument (TUSK). Paleowetland sediments exposed in TUSK named the Las Vegas Formation span the last 250 ka, with fossiliferous sediments spanning ∼100-13 ka. The recovered fauna is dominated by remains of Camelopsand Mammuthus, and also includes relatively common remains of extinct Equusand Bisonas well as abundant vertebrate microfaunal fossils. Large carnivorans are rare, with only Puma concolor and Panthera atrox documented previously. Postcranial remains assigned to the species Canis dirus (dire wolf) and Smilodon fatalis (sabre-toothed cat) represent the first confirmed records of these species from the TSLF, as well as the first documentation of Canis dirus in Nevada and the only known occurrence of Smilodonin southern Nevada. The size of the recovered canid fossil precludes assignment to other Pleistocene species of Canis. The morphology of the felid elements differentiates them from other large predators such as Panthera, Homotherium, and Xenosmilus, and the size of the fossils prevents assignment to other species of Smilodon. The confirmed presence of S. fatalis in the TSLF is of particular interest, indicating that this species inhabited open habitats. In turn, this suggests that the presumed preference of S. fatalis for closed-habitat environments hunting requires further elucidation.

  1. First records of Canis dirus and Smilodon fatalis from the late Pleistocene Tule Springs local fauna, upper Las Vegas Wash, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Scott, Eric; Springer, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Late Pleistocene groundwater discharge deposits (paleowetlands) in the upper Las Vegas Wash north of Las Vegas, Nevada, have yielded an abundant and diverse vertebrate fossil assemblage, the Tule Springs local fauna (TSLF). The TSLF is the largest open-site vertebrate fossil assemblage dating to the Rancholabrean North American Land Mammal Age in the southern Great Basin and Mojave Desert. Over 600 discrete body fossil localities have been recorded from the wash, including an area that now encompasses Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument (TUSK). Paleowetland sediments exposed in TUSK named the Las Vegas Formation span the last 250 ka, with fossiliferous sediments spanning ∼100-13 ka. The recovered fauna is dominated by remains of Camelopsand Mammuthus, and also includes relatively common remains of extinct Equusand Bisonas well as abundant vertebrate microfaunal fossils. Large carnivorans are rare, with only Puma concolor and Panthera atrox documented previously. Postcranial remains assigned to the species Canis dirus (dire wolf) and Smilodon fatalis (sabre-toothed cat) represent the first confirmed records of these species from the TSLF, as well as the first documentation of Canis dirus in Nevada and the only known occurrence of Smilodonin southern Nevada. The size of the recovered canid fossil precludes assignment to other Pleistocene species of Canis. The morphology of the felid elements differentiates them from other large predators such as Panthera, Homotherium, and Xenosmilus, and the size of the fossils prevents assignment to other species of Smilodon. The confirmed presence of S. fatalis in the TSLF is of particular interest, indicating that this species inhabited open habitats. In turn, this suggests that the presumed preference of S. fatalis for closed-habitat environments hunting requires further elucidation. PMID:27366649

  2. Does the spatial arrangement of vegetation and anthropogenic land cover features matter? Case studies of urban warming and cooling in Phoenix and Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myint, S. W.; Zheng, B.; Fan, C.; Kaplan, S.; Brazel, A.; Middel, A.; Smith, M.

    2014-12-01

    While the relationship between fractional cover of anthropogenic and vegetation features and the urban heat island has been well studied, the effect of spatial arrangements (e.g., clustered, dispersed) of these features on urban warming or cooling are not well understood. The goal of this study is to examine if and how spatial configuration of land cover features influence land surface temperatures (LST) in urban areas. This study focuses on Phoenix, AZ and Las Vegas, NV that have undergone dramatic urban expansion. The data used to classify detailed urban land cover types include Geoeye-1 (Las Vegas) and QuickBird (Phoenix). The Geoeye-1 image (3 m resolution) was acquired on October 12, 2011 and the QuickBird image (2.4 m resolution) was taken on May 29, 2007. Classification was performed using object based image analysis (OBIA). We employed a spatial autocorrelation approach (i.e., Moran's I) that measures the spatial dependence of a point to its neighboring points and describes how clustered or dispersed points are arranged in space. We used Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data acquired over Phoenix (daytime on June 10, 2011 and nighttime on October 17, 2011) and Las Vegas (daytime on July 6, 2005 and nighttime on August 27, 2005) to examine daytime and nighttime LST with regards to the spatial arrangement of anthropogenic and vegetation features. We spatially correlate Moran's I values of each land cover per surface temperature, and develop regression models. The spatial configuration of grass and trees shows strong negative correlations with LST, implying that clustered vegetation lowers surface temperatures more effectively. In contrast, a clustered spatial arrangement of anthropogenic land-cover features, especially impervious surfaces, significantly elevates surface temperatures. Results from this study suggest that the spatial configuration of anthropogenic and vegetation features influence urban warming and cooling.

  3. Inverse modeling using PS-InSAR for improved calibration of hydraulic parameters and prediction of future subsidence for Las Vegas Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, T. J.; Zhang, M.

    2015-11-01

    Las Vegas Valley has had a long history of surface deformation due to groundwater pumping that began in the early 20th century. After nearly 80 years of pumping, PS-InSAR interferograms have revealed detailed and complex spatial patterns of subsidence in the Las Vegas Valley area that do not coincide with major pumping regions. High spatial and temporal resolution subsidence observations from InSAR and hydraulic head data were used to inversely calibrate transmissivities (T), elastic and inelastic skeletal storage coefficients (Ske and Skv) of the developed-zone aquifer and conductance (CR) of the basin-fill faults for the entire Las Vegas basin. The results indicate that the subsidence observations from PS-InSAR are extremely beneficial for accurately quantifying hydraulic parameters, and the model calibration results are far more accurate than when using only water-levels as observations, and just a few random subsidence observations. Future predictions of land subsidence to year 2030 were made on the basis of existing pumping patterns and rates. Simulation results suggests that subsidence will continue in northwest subsidence bowl area, which is expected to undergo an additional 11.3 cm of subsidence. Even mitigation measures that include artificial recharge and reduced pumping do not significantly reduce the compaction in the northwest subsidence bowl. This is due to the slow draining of thick confining units in the region. However, a small amount of uplift of 0.4 cm is expected in the North and Central bowl areas over the next 20 years.

  4. First records of Canis dirus and Smilodon fatalis from the late Pleistocene Tule Springs local fauna, upper Las Vegas Wash, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Late Pleistocene groundwater discharge deposits (paleowetlands) in the upper Las Vegas Wash north of Las Vegas, Nevada, have yielded an abundant and diverse vertebrate fossil assemblage, the Tule Springs local fauna (TSLF). The TSLF is the largest open-site vertebrate fossil assemblage dating to the Rancholabrean North American Land Mammal Age in the southern Great Basin and Mojave Desert. Over 600 discrete body fossil localities have been recorded from the wash, including an area that now encompasses Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument (TUSK). Paleowetland sediments exposed in TUSK named the Las Vegas Formation span the last 250 ka, with fossiliferous sediments spanning ∼100–13 ka. The recovered fauna is dominated by remains of Camelopsand Mammuthus, and also includes relatively common remains of extinct Equusand Bisonas well as abundant vertebrate microfaunal fossils. Large carnivorans are rare, with only Puma concolor and Panthera atrox documented previously. Postcranial remains assigned to the species Canis dirus (dire wolf) and Smilodon fatalis (sabre-toothed cat) represent the first confirmed records of these species from the TSLF, as well as the first documentation of Canis dirus in Nevada and the only known occurrence of Smilodonin southern Nevada. The size of the recovered canid fossil precludes assignment to other Pleistocene species of Canis. The morphology of the felid elements differentiates them from other large predators such as Panthera, Homotherium, and Xenosmilus, and the size of the fossils prevents assignment to other species of Smilodon. The confirmed presence of S. fatalis in the TSLF is of particular interest, indicating that this species inhabited open habitats. In turn, this suggests that the presumed preference of S. fatalis for closed-habitat environments hunting requires further elucidation. PMID:27366649

  5. Receptor modeling of near-roadway aerosol mass spectrometer data in Las Vegas, Nevada, with EPA PMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. G.; Lee, T.; Norris, G. A.; Roberts, P. T.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Paatero, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2011-08-01

    Ambient non-refractory PM1 aerosol particles were measured with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) at an elementary school 20 m from the US 95 freeway in Las Vegas, Nevada, during January 2008. Additional collocated continuous measurements of black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and meteorological data were collected. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) positive matrix factorization (PMF) data analysis tool was used to apportion organic matter (OM) as measured by HR-AMS, and rotational tools in EPA PMF were used to better characterize the solution space and pull resolved factors toward known source profiles. Three- to six-factor solutions were resolved. The four-factor solution was the most interpretable, with the typical AMS PMF factors of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA), and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). When the measurement site was downwind of the freeway, HOA composed about half the OM, with SV-OOA and LV-OOA accounting for the rest. Attempts to pull the PMF factor profiles toward source profiles were successful but did not qualitatively change the results, indicating that these factors are very stable. Oblique edges were present in G-space plots, suggesting that the obtained rotation may not be the most plausible one. Since solutions found by pulling the profiles or using Fpeak retained these oblique edges, there appears to be little rotational freedom in the base solution. On average, HOA made up 26 % of the OM, and it made up nearly half of the OM when the monitoring site was downwind of US 95 during morning rush hour. LV-OOA was highest in the afternoon and accounted for 26 % of the OM. BBOA occurred in the evening hours, was predominantly from the residential area to the north, and on average constituted 12 % of the OM; SV-OOA accounted for the remaining

  6. Receptor modeling of near-roadway aerosol mass spectrometer data in Las Vegas, Nevada, with EPA PMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. G.; Lee, T.; Norris, G. A.; Roberts, P. T.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Paatero, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Ambient non-refractory PM1 aerosol particles were measured with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) at an elementary school 18 m from the US 95 freeway soundwall in Las Vegas, Nevada, during January 2008. Additional collocated continuous measurements of black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and meteorological data were collected. The US~Environmental Protection Agency's~(EPA) positive matrix factorization (PMF) data analysis tool was used to apportion organic matter (OM) as measured by HR-AMS, and rotational tools in EPA PMF were used to better characterize the solution space and pull resolved factors toward known source profiles. Three- to six-factor solutions were resolved. The four-factor solution was the most interpretable, with the typical AMS PMF factors of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA), and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). When the measurement site was downwind of the freeway, HOA composed about half the OM, with SV-OOA and LV-OOA accounting for the rest. Attempts to pull the PMF factor profiles toward source profiles were successful but did not qualitatively change the results, indicating that these factors are very stable. Oblique edges were present in G-space plots, suggesting that the obtained rotation may not be the most plausible one. Since solutions found by pulling the profiles or using Fpeak retained these oblique edges, there appears to be little rotational freedom in the base solution. On average, HOA made up 26% of the OM, while LV-OOA was highest in the afternoon and accounted for 26% of the OM. BBOA occurred in the evening hours, was predominantly from the residential area to the north, and on average constituted 12% of the OM; SV-OOA accounted for the remaining third of the OM. Use of the pulling techniques available in EPA PMF and ME-2 suggested that the four

  7. The Las Vegas Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sughrua, William

    2010-01-01

    Following "reflexive ethnography" and utilizing an approach of "performative narrative" and "layered text", this article explores how Bachelor of Arts students in the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language program at a public university in Mexico successfully manage the writing of an inductive-oriented thesis in English by resisting…

  8. High-level nuclear waste transport and storage assessment of potential impacts on tourism in the Las Vegas area. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-01

    The literature review and empirical analyses presented in this report were undertaken, for the most part, between August and October 1983. They are not comprehensive. No primary data were gathered, nor were any formal surveys conducted. Additionally, because construction of a repository at Yucca Mountain, if that site is selected for a repository, is not scheduled to begin until 1993, engineering design and planned physical appearance of the repository are very preliminary. Therefore, specific design features or visual appearance were not addressed in the analyses. Finally, because actual transportation routes have not been designated, impacts on tourism generated specifically by transportation activities are not considered separately. Chapter 2 briefly discusses possible means by which a repository could impact tourism in the Las Vegas area. Chapter 3 presents a review of previous research on alternative methods for predicting the response of people to potential hazards. A review of several published studies where these methods have been applied to facilities and activities associated with radioactive materials is included in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 contains five case studies of tourism impacts associated with past events that were perceived by the public to represent safety hazards. These perceptions of safety hazards were evidenced by news media coverage. These case studies were conducted specifically for this report. Conclusions of this preliminary analysis regarding the potential impact on tourism in the Las Vegas area of a repository at Yucca Mountain are in Chapter 5. Recommendations for further research are contained in Chapter 6.

  9. Sensing the ups and downs of Las Vegas: InSAR reveals structural control of land subsidence and aquifer-system deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amelung, F.; Galloway, D.L.; Bell, J.W.; Zebker, H.A.; Laczniak, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Land subsidence in Las Vegas, Nevada, United States, between April 1992 and December 1997 was measured using spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar. The detailed deformation maps clearly show that the spatial extent of subsidence is controlled by geologic structures (faults) and sediment composition (clay thickness). The maximum detected subsidence during the 5.75 yr period is 19 cm. Comparison with leveling data indicates that the subsidence rates declined during the past decade as a result of rising ground-water levels brought about by a net reduction in ground-water extraction. Temporal analysis also detects seasonal subsidence and uplift patterns, which provide information about the elastic and inelastic properties of the aquifer system and their spatial variability.

  10. U.S. Geological Survey Subsidence Interest Group Conference; proceedings of the Technical Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, February 14-16, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prince, Keith R.; Leake, Stanley A.

    1997-01-01

    Introducation to Papers: This report is a compilation of short papers that are based on oral presentations summarizing the results of recent research that were given at the third meeting of the Subsidence Interest Group held in Las Vegas, Nevada, February 14?16, 1995. The report includes case studies of land subsidence and aquifer-system deformation resulting from fluid withdrawal, geothermal development, and mine collapse. Methods for monitoring land subsidence using Global Positioning System technology for the rapid and accurate measurement of changes in land-surface altitude also are described. The current status of numerical simulation of land subsidence in the USGS is summarized, and several of the short papers deal with the development and application of new numerical techniques for simulation and quantification of aquifersystem deformation. Not all oral presentations made at the meeting are documented in this report. Several of the presentations were of ongoing research and as such, the findings were provisional in nature and were offered at the meeting to stimulate scientific discussion and debate among colleagues. The information presented in this report, although only a subset of the proceedings of the meeting in Las Vegas, should help expand the scientific basis for management decisions to mitigate or control the effects of land subsidence. The short papers describing the results of these studies provide a cross section of ongoing research in aquifer mechanics and land subsidence and also form an assessment of the current technology and 'state of the science.' The analytical and interpretive methods described in this report will be useful to scientists involved in studies of ground-water hydraulics and aquifer-system deformation.

  11. Estimates of hydraulic properties from a one-dimensional numerical model of vertical aquifer-system deformation, Lorenzi site, Las Vegas, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavelko, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    Land subsidence related to aquifer-system compaction and ground-water withdrawals has been occurring in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, since the 1930's, and by the late 1980's some areas in the valley had subsided more than 5 feet. Since the late 1980's, seasonal artificial-recharge programs have lessened the effects of summertime pumping on aquifer-system compaction, but the long-term trend of compaction continues in places. Since 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey has continuously monitored water-level changes in three piezometers and vertical aquifer-system deformation with a borehole extensometer at the Lorenzi site in Las Vegas, Nevada. A one-dimensional, numerical, ground-water flow model of the aquifer system below the Lorenzi site was developed for the period 1901-2000, to estimate aquitard vertical hydraulic conductivity, aquitard inelastic skeletal specific storage, and aquitard and aquifer elastic skeletal specific storage. Aquifer water-level data were used in the model as the aquifer-system stresses that controlled simulated vertical aquifer-system deformation. Nonlinear-regression methods were used to calibrate the model, utilizing estimated and measured aquifer-system deformation data to minimize a weighted least-squares objective function, and estimate optimal property values. Model results indicate that at the Lorenzi site, aquitard vertical hydraulic conductivity is 3 x 10-6 feet per day, aquitard inelastic skeletal specific storage is 4 x 10-5 per foot, aquitard elastic skeletal specific storage is 5 x 10-6 per foot, and aquifer elastic skeletal specific storage is 3 x 10-7 per foot. Regression statistics indicate that the model and data provided sufficient information to estimate the target properties, the model adequately simulated observed data, and the estimated property values are accurate and unique.

  12. An overview of the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS): Impact of stratospheric intrusions and long-range transport on surface air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J.; Brioude, J.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lin, M. Y.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Pierce, R. B.; Sandberg, S. P.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.

    2015-05-01

    The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was conducted in the late spring and early summer of 2013 to assess the seasonal contribution of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport to surface ozone in Clark County, Nevada and determine if these processes directly contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in this area. Secondary goals included the characterization of local ozone production, regional transport from the Los Angeles Basin, and impacts from wildfires. The LVOS measurement campaign took place at a former U.S. Air Force radar station ∼45 km northwest of Las Vegas on Angel Peak (∼2.7 km above mean sea level, asl) in the Spring Mountains. The study consisted of two extended periods (May 19-June 4 and June 22-28, 2013) with near daily 5-min averaged lidar measurements of ozone and backscatter profiles from the surface to ∼2.5 km above ground level (∼5.2 km asl), and continuous in situ measurements (May 20-June 28) of O3, CO, (1-min) and meteorological parameters (5-min) at the surface. These activities were guided by forecasts and analyses from the FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTticle) dispersion model and the Real Time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS), and the NOAA Geophysical Research Laboratory (NOAA GFDL) AM3 chemistry-climate model. In this paper, we describe the LVOS measurements and present an overview of the results. The combined measurements and model analyses show that STT directly contributed to each of the three O3 exceedances that occurred in Clark County during LVOS, with contributions to 8-h surface concentrations in excess of 30 ppbv on each of these days. The analyses show that long-range transport from Asia made smaller contributions (<10 ppbv) to surface O3 during two of those exceedances. The contribution of regional wildfires to surface O3 during the three LVOS exceedance events was found to be negligible, but wildfires were found to be a major factor during exceedance events

  13. A comparison of greenhouse gas emissions and local area pollution of highspeed rail and air travel between Los Angeles and Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Damien

    Global warming is one of the most discussed global environmental issues in the world today. Global warming is driven by fossil fuel combustion emissions known as Green-house Gases (GHG). One of the major contributors to GHG emissions is the transport sector, emitting approximately 30% of total U.S. CO 2 emissions in 2010. Air travel contributed approximately 3.5% of total U.S. CO2 in 2008. High-speed Rail (HSR) is often touted as cleaner, more sustainable mode of transport than air travel. HSR is one of few modes of transport capable of competing with air travel for short to medium-haul distances. There has been considerable study of GHG emissions of each independently. Research has also been carried out into the economics and competition of these transport modes. However, there has been very limited study of the comparative emissions of each, apart from one study in Europe (Givoni, 2007). The current study was undertaken with the goal of quantifying potential emission savings due to mode substitution from air travel to HSR in the Los Angeles to Las Vegas corridor. This study only considered the emissions which occurred from the combustion of the relevant fuels, either in power plants or the engines of an aircraft. Emissions from fuel production/refining or transport of fuels were not considered. Another issue compared was Local Area Pollution (LAP), which is a measure of the severity of emissions effect on the environment. This was examined because all emissions from HSR occur close to the surface of the earth, and hence effect the local environment, while only a portion of aircraft emissions do. This study was carried out using internationally recognized emission inventory methodologies. For the air travel emission estimate methodologies and data published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) were used. The HSR energy use was estimated from energy use data from currently running HSR

  14. Immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological profile of health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust from sand dunes at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV.

    PubMed

    Keil, Deborah; Buck, Brenda; Goossens, Dirk; Teng, Yuanxin; Leetham, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey; Pollard, James; Eggers, Margaret; McLaurin, Brett; Gerads, Russell; DeWitt, Jamie

    2016-01-15

    Exposure to geogenic particulate matter (PM) comprised of mineral particles has been linked to human health effects. However, very little data exist on health effects associated with geogenic dust exposure in natural settings. Therefore, we characterized particulate matter size, metal chemistry, and health effects of dust collected from the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a popular off-road vehicle area located near Las Vegas, NV. Adult female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to several concentrations of mineral dust collected from active and vegetated sand dunes in NDRA. Dust samples (median diameter: 4.4 μm) were suspended in phosphate-buffered saline and delivered at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 mg dust/kg body weight by oropharyngeal aspiration. ICP-MS analyses of total dissolution of the dust resulted in aluminum (55,090 μg/g), vanadium (70 μg/g), chromium (33 μg/g), manganese (511 μg/g), iron (21,600 μg/g), cobalt (9.4 μg/g), copper (69 μg/g), zinc (79 μg/g), arsenic (62 μg/g), strontium (620 μg/g), cesium (13 μg/g), lead 25 μg/g) and uranium (4.7 μg/g). Arsenic was present only as As(V). Mice received four exposures, once/week over 28-days to mimic a month of weekend exposures. Descriptive and functional assays to assess immunotoxicity and neurotoxicity were performed 24 h after the final exposure. The primary observation was that 0.1 to 100 mg/kg of this sand dune derived dust dose-responsively reduced antigen-specific IgM antibody responses, suggesting that dust from this area of NDRA may present a potential health risk.

  15. Health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dusts from arsenic-rich sediment at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Jamie; Buck, Brenda; Goossens, Dirk; Hu, Qing; Chow, Rebecca; David, Winnie; Young, Sharon; Teng, Yuanxin; Leetham-Spencer, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey; Pollard, James; McLaurin, Brett; Gerads, Russell; Keil, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Geogenic dust from arid environments is a possible inhalation hazard for humans, especially when using off-road vehicles that generate significant dust. This study focused on immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust generated from sediments in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area near Las Vegas, Nevada that are particularly high in arsenic; the naturally-occurring arsenic concentrations in these surficial sediments ranged from 4.8 to 346μg/g. Dust samples from sediments used in this study had a median diameter of 4.5μm and also were a complex mixture of naturally-occurring metals, including aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, strontium, cesium, lead, uranium, and arsenic. Adult female B6C3F1 mice exposed via oropharyngeal aspiration to 0.01 to 100mg dust/kg body weight, four times, a week apart, for 28days, were evaluated 24h after the last exposure. Peripheral eosinophils were increased at all concentrations, serum creatinine was dose responsively increased beginning at 1.0mg/kg/day, and blood urea nitrogen was decreased at 10 and 100mg/kg/day. Antigen-specific IgM responses and natural killer cell activity were dose-responsively suppressed at 0.1mg/kg/day and above. Splenic CD4+CD25+ T cells were decreased at 0.01, 0.1, 10, and 100mg/kg/day. Antibodies against MBP, NF-68, and GFAP were selectively reduced. A no observed adverse effect level of 0.01mg/kg/day and a lowest observed adverse effect level of 0.1mg/kg/day were determined from IgM responses and natural killer cell activity, indicating that exposure to this dust, under conditions similar to our design, could affect these responses. PMID:27221630

  16. Immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological profile of health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust from sand dunes at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV.

    PubMed

    Keil, Deborah; Buck, Brenda; Goossens, Dirk; Teng, Yuanxin; Leetham, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey; Pollard, James; Eggers, Margaret; McLaurin, Brett; Gerads, Russell; DeWitt, Jamie

    2016-01-15

    Exposure to geogenic particulate matter (PM) comprised of mineral particles has been linked to human health effects. However, very little data exist on health effects associated with geogenic dust exposure in natural settings. Therefore, we characterized particulate matter size, metal chemistry, and health effects of dust collected from the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a popular off-road vehicle area located near Las Vegas, NV. Adult female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to several concentrations of mineral dust collected from active and vegetated sand dunes in NDRA. Dust samples (median diameter: 4.4 μm) were suspended in phosphate-buffered saline and delivered at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 mg dust/kg body weight by oropharyngeal aspiration. ICP-MS analyses of total dissolution of the dust resulted in aluminum (55,090 μg/g), vanadium (70 μg/g), chromium (33 μg/g), manganese (511 μg/g), iron (21,600 μg/g), cobalt (9.4 μg/g), copper (69 μg/g), zinc (79 μg/g), arsenic (62 μg/g), strontium (620 μg/g), cesium (13 μg/g), lead 25 μg/g) and uranium (4.7 μg/g). Arsenic was present only as As(V). Mice received four exposures, once/week over 28-days to mimic a month of weekend exposures. Descriptive and functional assays to assess immunotoxicity and neurotoxicity were performed 24 h after the final exposure. The primary observation was that 0.1 to 100 mg/kg of this sand dune derived dust dose-responsively reduced antigen-specific IgM antibody responses, suggesting that dust from this area of NDRA may present a potential health risk. PMID:26644169

  17. Ground-water quality and geochemistry of Las Vegas Valley, Clark County, Nevada, 1981-83; implementation of a monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettinger, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    As a result of rapid urban growth in Las Vegas Valley, rates of water use and wastewater disposal have grown rapidly during the last 25 years. Concern has developed over the potential water quality effects of this growth. The deep percolation of wastewater and irrigation return flow (much of which originates as imported water from Lake Mead), along with severe overdraft conditions in the principal aquifers of the valley, could combine to pose a long-term threat to groundwater quality. The quantitative investigations of groundwater quality and geochemical conditions in the valley necessary to address these concerns would include the establishment of data collection networks on a valley-wide scale that differ substantially from existing networks. The valley-wide networks would have a uniform areal distribution of sampling sites, would sample from all major depth zones, and would entail repeated sampling from each site. With these criteria in mind, 40 wells were chosen for inclusion in a demonstration monitoring network. Groundwater in the northern half of the valley generally contains 200 to 400 mg/L of dissolved solids, and is dominated by calcium, magnesium , and bicarbonate ions, reflecting a chemical equilibrium between the groundwater and the dominantly carbonate rocks in the aquifers of this area. The intermediate to deep groundwater in the southern half of the valley is of poorer quality (containing 700 to 1,500 mg/L of dissolved solids) and is dominated by calcium, magnesium, sulfate, and bicarbonate ions, reflecting the occurrence of other rock types including evaporite minerals among the still-dominant carbonate rocks in the aquifers of this part of the valley. The poorest quality groundwater in the valley is generally in the lowland parts of the valley in the first few feet beneath the water table, where dissolved solids concentrations range from 2,000 to > 7,000 mg/L , and probably reflects the effects of evaporite dissolution, secondary recharge, and

  18. On the variability of Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkovskaya, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    For 60 years Vega has been accepted as a standard star in the near infrared, optical, and ultraviolet ranges. However, a 21-year spectral and spectrophotometric variability of Vega has been revealed. Vega also demonstrates short-term unexplained variability. Recent spectropolarimetric studies have revealed a weak magnetic field on Vega. We analyze the results of 15-year observations performed at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and we hypothesize that the magnetic field variation is caused by stellar rotation. In the present work we summarize the results of investigations on the variability of Vega.

  19. Hydrologic and geologic characteristics of the Yucca Mountain site relevant to the performance of a potential repository: Day 1, Las Vegas, Nevada to Pahrump, Nevada: Stop 6A. Keane Wonder Spring and regional groundwater flow in the Death Valley region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinkampf, W.C.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located ~100 mi northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been designated by Congress as a site to be characterized for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This field trip will examine the regional geologic and hydrologic setting for Yucca Mountain, as well as specific results of the site characterization program, The first day focuses on the regional seeing with emphasis on current and paleo hydrology, which are both of critical concern for predicting future performance of a potential repository. Morning stops will be in southern Nevada and afternoon stops will be in Death Valley. The second day will be spent at Yucca Mountain. The filed trip will visit the underground testing sites in the "Exploratory Studies Facility" and the "Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Field Test" plus several surface-based testing sites. Much of the work at the site has concentrated on studies of the unsaturated zone, and element of the hydrologic system that historically has received little attention. Discussions during the second day will comprise selected topics of Yucca Mountain geology, mic hazard in the Yucca Mountain area. Evening discussions will address modeling of regional groundwater flow, the geology and hydrology of Yucca Mountain to the performance of a potential repository. Day 3 will examine the geologic framework and hydrology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Groundwater Basin and then will continue to Reno via Hawthorne, Nevada and the Walker Lake area.

  20. Status of the VEGA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Kondtatyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Jacobs, N.; Malaza, V.

    2015-06-01

    Motivation and status of the VEGA (Velocity-Energy Guide based Array) project is presented. One armed fission fragments spectrometer with an electrostatic guide system is proposed for installation at the vertical experimental channel of the IBR-2 reactor. Scientific program aimed at investigation of new multi-body decays of actinides, shapeisomeric states in fission fragments and fission modes is reported.

  1. VEGA Balloon System and Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Kremnev, R S; Linkin, V M; Lipatov, A N; Pichkadze, K M; Shurupov, A A; Terterashvili, A V; Bakitko, R V; Blamont, J E; Malique, C; Ragent, B; Preston, R A; Elson, L S; Crisp, D

    1986-03-21

    The VEGA Venus balloon radio transmissions received on Earth were used to measure the motion of the balloons and to obtain the data recorded by onboard sensors measuring atmospheric characteristics. Thus the balloons themselves, the gondolas, the onboard sensors, and the radio transmission system were all components of the experiment. A description of these elements is given, and a few details of data sampling and formatting are discussed.

  2. Retrofitting Las Vegas. Implementing Energy Efficiency in Two Las Vegas Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Puttagunta, S.

    2013-04-01

    In 2009, the state of Nevada received nearly $40 million in Neighborhood Stabilization Funds from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to use to stabilize communities that have suffered from foreclosures and abandonment. In order to provide guidance to local officials and maximize how effectively this NSP funding is used in retrofitting homes, the CARB team provided design specifications, energy modeling, and technical support for the BARA team and its local partners—Better Building Performance, Nevada Energy Star Partners Green Alliance, and Home Free Nevada—for two retrofit test homes. One home demonstrated a modest retrofit and the other a deep energy retrofit. This report describes the retrofit packages, which were used as an educational experience for home performance professionals, building trades, remodelers, and the general public.

  3. UV SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF VEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.

    2010-12-20

    We show that the UV spectrum (1280-3200 A) of the 'superficially normal' A-star Vega, as observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite at a resolution comparable to the star's rotational broadening width, can be fit remarkably well by a single-temperature synthetic spectrum based on LTE atmosphere models and a newly constructed UV line list. If Vega were a normal, equator-on, slow-rotating star, then its spectrum and our analysis would indicate a temperature of T{sub eff} {approx_equal}9550 K, surface gravity of log g {approx_equal}3.7, general surface metallicity of [m/H] {approx_equal}-0.5, and a microturbulence velocity of v{sub turb} {approx_equal}2.0 km s{sup -1}. Given its rapid rotation and nearly pole-on orientation, however, these parameters must be regarded as representing averages across the observed hemisphere. Modeling the complex UV line spectrum has allowed us to determine the specific surface abundances for 17 different chemical elements, including CNO, the light metals, and the iron group elements. The resultant abundance pattern agrees in general with previous results, although there is considerable scatter in the literature. Despite its peculiarities, Vega has turned out to provide a powerful test of the extent of our abilities to model the atmospheric properties of the early A-stars, particularly the detailed UV line spectrum. The value of the measurements from this pilot study will increase as this analysis is extended to more objects in the rich high-dispersion IUE data archive, including both normal and peculiar objects.

  4. The Vega particulate shell - Comets or asteroids?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) science team has discovered a shell of particulate material around the star Vega. At the mean distance and temperature of the shell, the expected condensation products from a protostellar nebula would be dominated by frozen volatiles, in particular water ice. It is not possible to discriminate between dirty ice and silicate materials in the Vega shell on the basis of the IRAS data. The Vega shell is probably a ring of cometary bodies with an estimated minimum mass of 15 earth masses, analogous to one that has been hypothesized for the solar system. A possible hot inner shell around Vega may be an asteroid-like belt of material a few astronomical units from the star.

  5. The vega particulate shell: comets or asteroids?

    PubMed

    Weissman, P R

    1984-06-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) science team has discovered a shell of particulate material around the star Vega. At the mean distance and temperature of the shell, the expected condensation products from a protostellar nebula would be dominated by frozen volatiles, in particular water ice. It is not possible to discriminate between dirty ice and silicate materials in the Vega shell on the basis of the IRAS data. The Vega shell is probably a ring of cometary bodies with an estimated minimum mass of 15 earth masses, analogous to one that has been hypothesized for the solar system. A possible hot inner shell around Vega may be an asteroid-like belt of material a few astronomical units from the star. PMID:17731997

  6. Global climate change response program. Part 1. Potential effects of global change on chlorophyll alpha concentrations in a southwestern desert reservoir: Las Vegas Bay, Lake Mead, Nevada. Part 2. Simulated impacts of a double CO2 climate on the location of the thermocline in Lake Mead, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, D.M.; Medina, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    Three algal bioassay experiments were conducted from March 1992 through September 1993 in an area of Lake Mead that has experienced problems associated with severe nutrient enrichment. The first experiment determined the effects of elevated CO2 (700 ppm) (2xCO2), vs ambient CO2 on the natural algal assemblage without nutrient enrichment. The second experiment determined the effects of 2xCO2 on nutrient enriched bioassays and if nutrients were limiting. The third experiment examined elevated temperatures and 2xCO2. Nested climate models were used to predict changes in water temperatures and thermocline development in Las Vegas Bay. The lake model predicted an increase in mean water temperatures of 1.8 deg under a 2xCO2 scenario. A thermocline definition of 1 deg. C change per 2-m depth was applied to water temperatures developed by a lake model coupled to nested general circulation and regional-scale atmospheric models in 3-year simulations of the current and double-CO2 climates.

  7. VEGA, a small launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duret, François; Fabrizi, Antonio

    1999-09-01

    Several studies have been performed in Europe aiming to promote the full development of a small launch vehicle to put into orbit one ton class spacecrafts. But during the last ten years, the european workforce was mainly oriented towards the qualification of the heavy class ARIANE 5 launch vehicle.Then, due also to lack of visibility on this reduced segment of market, when comparing with the geosatcom market, no proposal was sufficiently attractive to get from the potentially interrested authorities a clear go-ahead, i.e. a financial committment. The situation is now rapidly evolving. Several european states, among them ITALY and FRANCE, are now convinced of the necessity of the availability of such a transportation system, an important argument to promote small missions, using small satellites. Application market will be mainly scientific experiments and earth observation; some telecommunications applications may be also envisaged such as placement of little LEO constellation satellites, or replacement after failure of big LEO constellation satellites. FIAT AVIO and AEROSPATIALE have proposed to their national agencies the development of such a small launch vehicle, named VEGA. The paper presents the story of the industrial proposal, and the present status of the project: Mission spectrum, technical definition, launch service and performance, target development plan and target recurring costs, as well as the industrial organisation for development, procurement, marketing and operations.

  8. VEGAS: VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussa, Srikanth; VEGAS Development Team

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (NSF-ATI) program is funding a new spectrometer backend for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This spectrometer is being built by the CICADA collaboration - collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) at the University of California Berkeley.The backend is named as VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) and will replace the capabilities of the existing spectrometers. This backend supports data processing from focal plane array systems. The spectrometer will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams or a bandwidth up to 10 GHz from a dual polarized beam.The spectrometer will be using 8-bit analog to digital converters (ADC), which gives a better dynamic range than existing GBT spectrometers. There will be 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth, which will enhance the capability of simultaneous observation of multiple spectral transitions. The maximum spectral dump rate to disk will be about 0.5 msec. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several science projects with the GBT. The projects include mapping temperature and density structure of molecular clouds; searches for organic molecules in the interstellar medium; determination of the fundamental constants of our evolving Universe; red-shifted spectral features from galaxies across cosmic time and survey for pulsars in the extreme gravitational environment of the Galactic Center.

  9. The long-term variability of Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkovskaya, V.; Plachinda, S.; Valyavin, G.; Baklanova, D.; Lee, B.-C.

    2011-12-01

    Over the time of 60 years Vega (α Lyrae = HD 172167, A0V) has been generally accepted as a standard star in the near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet regions. But is the spectrophotometric standard Vega really non-variable star? Researchers give very different answers to this question. We aim to search a periodicity in our results of spectropolarimetric study of Vega, namely periodic variations in equivalent width of the spectral lines and longitudinal magnetic field measurements. High-accuracy spectropolarimetric observations of Vega have been performed during 26 nights from 1997 to 2010 using the Coudé spectrograph of the 2.6-m Shain reflector at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO, Ukraine) and during 4 nights in 2007 and 2008 using the echelle spectrograph BOES at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO, South Korea). The long-term (year-to-year) variability of Vega was confirmed. It was concluded that this variability does not have magnetic nature. The paper is dedicated to the memory of V.P. Merezhin.

  10. Line Blanketing in Vega and Sirus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical model and spectrum calculation for Vega is discussed. The abundance of carbon is approximately -3.8, which is 0.3 lower than the old solar value and supports Mount and Linsky's newer value. The oxygen abundance is approximately -3.5. Assuming that Vega has solar abundances, the solar oxygen abundance appears to have been overestimated by 0.3 in the log. Other abundances appear to be solar. For Sirius the calculations do not agree with the observed spectrum. Line opacity is considerably underestimated, notably in third-spectrum iron group lines. Carbon is underabundant relative to Vega by 0.2 in the log. Nitrogen is unchanged. Oxygen is enhanced by 0.3. Heavier elements are enhanced by 1.0 in the log. Calibration yields 1.3E-10 ergs/sq cm/s/nm for each U1 Copernicus count at 130 nm.

  11. Retrofitting Vegas: Implementing Energy Efficiency in Two Las Vegas Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Puttagunta, S.

    2013-04-01

    In 2009, the state of Nevada received nearly forty million dollars in Neighborhood Stabilization Funds from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The purpose of this funding was to stabilize communities that have suffered from foreclosures and abandonment. In an effort to provide guidance to local officials and maximize how effectively this NSP funding is utilized in retrofitting homes, CARB provided design specifications, energy modeling, and technical support for the Building America Retrofit Alliance (BARA) team and its local partners - Better Building Performance, Nevada Energy Star Partners Green Alliance, and Home Free Nevada - for two retrofit test homes. One home was to demonstrate a modest retrofit and the other a deep energy retrofit. Through this project, CARB has provided two robust solution packages for retrofitting homes built in this region between the 1980s and early 1990s without substantially inconveniencing the occupants. The two test homes, the Carmen and Sierra Hills, demonstrate how cost-effectively energy efficient upgrades can be implemented in the hot, dry climate of the Southwest. In addition, the homes were used as an educational experience for home performance professionals, building trades, remodelers, and the general public. In-field trainings on air-sealing, HVAC upgrades, and insulating were provided to local contractors during the retrofit and BARA documented these retrofits through a series of video presentations, beginning with a site survey and concluding with the finished remodel and test out.

  12. Proceedings of Selected Research Paper Presentations at the 1986 Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology and Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division (Las Vegas, NV, January 16-21, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

    Current issues in educational communications and technology are addressed in this collection of 47 papers, in which research reports dominate. Topics discussed include factors related to the learner, e.g., problem-solving skills, motivation, comparison of instructional design strategies, effects of organizational cues and text layouts, and…

  13. Quick Vegas: Improving Performance of TCP Vegas for High Bandwidth-Delay Product Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Liang; Ho, Cheng-Yuan

    An important issue in designing a TCP congestion control algorithm is that it should allow the protocol to quickly adjust the end-to-end communication rate to the bandwidth on the bottleneck link. However, the TCP congestion control may function poorly in high bandwidth-delay product networks because of its slow response with large congestion windows. In this paper, we propose an enhanced version of TCP Vegas called Quick Vegas, in which we present an efficient congestion window control algorithm for a TCP source. Our algorithm improves the slow-start and congestion avoidance techniques of original Vegas. Simulation results show that Quick Vegas significantly improves the performance of connections as well as remaining fair when the bandwidth-delay product increases.

  14. Image Processing of Vega-Tv Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhlmann, D.; Danz, M.; Elter, G.; Mangold, T.; Rubbert, B.; Weidlich, U.; Lorenz, H.; Richter, G.

    1986-12-01

    Different algorithms, used to identify real structures in the near-nucleus TV-images of the VEGA-spacecrafts are described. They refer mainly to image-restauration, noise-reduction and different methods of texture analysis. The resulting images, showing first indications for structure of the surface of P/Halley, are discussed shortly.

  15. Nevada Power: Clark Station; Las Vegas, Nevada (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2006-03-27

    A partnership with the University of Nevada and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  16. University of Nevada (UNLV): Las Vegas, Nevada (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2006-03-18

    A partnership with the University of Nevada and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  17. Fear and Loving in Las Vegas: Evolution, Emotion, and Persuasion

    PubMed Central

    Griskevicius, Vladas; Goldstein, Noah J.; Mortensen, Chad R.; Sundie, Jill M.; Cialdini, Robert B.; Kenrick, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    How do arousal-inducing contexts, such as frightening or romantic television programs, influence the effectiveness of basic persuasion heuristics? Different predictions are made by three theoretical models: A general arousal model predicts that arousal should increase effectiveness of heuristics; an affective valence model predicts that effectiveness should depend on whether the context elicits positive or negative affect; an evolutionary model predicts that persuasiveness should depend on both the specific emotion that is elicited and the content of the particular heuristic. Three experiments examined how fear-inducing versus romantic contexts influenced the effectiveness of two widely used heuristics—social proof (e.g., “most popular”) and scarcity (e.g., “limited edition”). Results supported predictions from an evolutionary model, showing that fear can lead scarcity appeals to be counter-persuasive, and that romantic desire can lead social proof appeals to be counter-persuasive. The findings highlight how an evolutionary theoretical approach can lead to novel theoretical and practical marketing insights. PMID:19727416

  18. University of Nevada Las Vegas LED Display Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-31

    The primary objective of this part of the project is to develop and implement a method that compensates for the inefficiency of the green LED. The proposed engineering solution which will be the backbone of this project will be to use RGBW combination in every pixel to save energy. Two different RGBW geometrical pixel configurations will be implemented and compared against traditional LED configurations. These configurations will be analyzed for energy efficiency while keeping the quality of the display the same. Cost of the addition of white LEDs to displays along with energy cost savings will be presented and analyzed.

  19. Massive Smash-up at Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist concept illustrates how a massive collision of objects perhaps as large as the planet Pluto smashed together to create the dust ring around the nearby star Vega. New observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicate the collision took place within the last one million years. Astronomers think that embryonic planets smashed together, shattered into pieces, and repeatedly crashed into other fragments to create ever finer debris.

    In the image, a collision is seen between massive objects that measured up to 2,000 kilometers (about 1,200 miles) in diameter. Scientists say the big collision initiated subsequent collisions that created dust particles around the star that were a few microns in size. Vega's intense light blew these fine particles to larger distances from the star, and also warmed them to emit heat radiation that can be detected by Spitzer's infrared detectors.

  20. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, John B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet spectral atlas for the A0 V star Alpha Lyr (Vega) has been prepared from data taken by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. The spectral region from 2000 to 3187 A has been scanned with a resolution of 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs with a normalized continuum, and an identification table for the absorption features has been prepared.

  1. Vega is a rapidly rotating star.

    PubMed

    Peterson, D M; Hummel, C A; Pauls, T A; Armstrong, J T; Benson, J A; Gilbreath, G C; Hindsley, R B; Hutter, D J; Johnston, K J; Mozurkewich, D; Schmitt, H R

    2006-04-13

    Vega, the second brightest star in the northern hemisphere, serves as a primary spectral type standard. Although its spectrum is dominated by broad hydrogen lines, the narrower lines of the heavy elements suggested slow to moderate rotation, giving confidence that the ground-based calibration of its visible spectrum could be safely extrapolated into the ultraviolet and near-infrared (through atmosphere models), where it also serves as the primary photometric calibrator. But there have been problems: the star is too bright compared to its peers and it has unusually shaped absorption line profiles, leading some to suggest that it is a distorted, rapidly rotating star seen pole-on. Here we report optical interferometric observations that show that Vega has the asymmetric brightness distribution of the bright, slightly offset polar axis of a star rotating at 93 per cent of its breakup speed. In addition to explaining the unusual brightness and line shape peculiarities, this result leads to the prediction of an excess of near-infrared emission compared to the visible, in agreement with observations. The large temperature differences predicted across its surface call into question composition determinations, adding uncertainty to Vega's age and opening the possibility that its debris disk could be substantially older than previously thought. PMID:16612375

  2. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances in Sirius and Vega

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.L.; Roby, S.W.; Bell, R.A.

    1982-03-15

    Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances are obtained from C I, N I, and O I high excitation permitted lines in the spectra of the standard A star Vega and the ''hot'' Am star Sirius. Vega has normal abundances. Relative to Vega, Sirius is C deficient by 0.60 dex, N enhanced by 0.22 dex, and O deficient by 0.27 dex.

  3. VEGAS2: Software for More Flexible Gene-Based Testing.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aniket; Macgregor, Stuart

    2015-02-01

    Gene-based tests such as versatile gene-based association study (VEGAS) are commonly used following per-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) GWAS (genome-wide association studies) analysis. Two limitations of VEGAS were that the HapMap2 reference set was used to model the correlation between SNPs and only autosomal genes were considered. HapMap2 has now been superseded by the 1,000 Genomes reference set, and whereas early GWASs frequently ignored the X chromosome, it is now commonly included. Here we have developed VEGAS2, an extension that uses 1,000 Genomes data to model SNP correlations across the autosomes and chromosome X. VEGAS2 allows greater flexibility when defining gene boundaries. VEGAS2 offers both a user-friendly, web-based front end and a command line Linux version. The online version of VEGAS2 can be accessed through https://vegas2.qimrberghofer.edu.au/. The command line version can be downloaded from https://vegas2.qimrberghofer.edu.au/zVEGAS2offline.tgz. The command line version is developed in Perl, R and shell scripting languages; source code is available for further development.

  4. Structure in the Dusty Debris around Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilner, D. J.; Holman, M.; Kuchner, M. J.; Ho, P. T. P.

    2002-01-01

    We present images of the Vega system obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer at a 1.3 millimeter wavelength with submillijansky sensitivity and approximately 2.5 inches resolution (about 20 AU). These observations clearly detect the stellar photosphere and two dust emission peaks offset from the star by 9.5 inches and 8.0 inches to the northeast and southwest, respectively. These offset emission peaks are consistent with the barely resolved structure visible in previous submillimeter images, and they account for a large fraction of the dust emission. The presence of two dust concentrations at the observed locations is plausible explained by the dynamical influence of an unseen planet of a few Jupiter masses in a highly eccentric orbit that traps dust in Principal mean motion resonances. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer.

  5. The abundance of boron in Vega and Sirius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praderie, F.; Milliard, B.; Pitois, M. L.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution (0.05 A) Copernicus observations of the 1362.46-A B II resonance line in Sirius and Vega are analyzed. In Vega, this line is found to be strong, broad, asymmetric, and blended with another line; it is not observed in Sirius. Angular velocities of 18-20 km/s for Vega and 10 km/s for Sirius are determined. A search for subordinate lines of B II reveals no such features in the Sirius spectrum and the possible weak presence of two unblended lines in that of Vega. The cause of the asymmetry of the B II blend in Vega is investigated, line-profile calculations are performed for Sirius, and the B content of Vega is obtained by means of an LTE synthesis of the B II blend as well as a non-LTE computation of the B II line alone. It is concluded that Sirius is deficient in B relative to Vega by a factor of at least 20. The Be abundances of both stars are also examined in relation to the galactic-cosmic-ray spallation theory for the origin of light elements.

  6. Evolution of Vega-like disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, C.; Habing, H. J.; Hjhvega Consortium

    Vega-like stars are main-sequence stars with IR excesses usually attributed to the presence of a circumstellar debris disk. According to the results from the IRAS database, approximately 30 % or more of all main sequence stars should show such an excess (Aumann & Good 1990, AJ 350, 408; Aumann 1988, AJ 96, 1414) however, a more recent re-evaluation of this problem indicates numbers clearly below 20 % (Plets 1997, PHD-thesis, University Leuven). One of the problems of the IRAS studies was that the samples used to study the phenomenon usually were poorly defined. This was also prohibitive to a detailed statistical study of age effects these stars. We have undertaken the study of a volume-limited sample with ISO. Studying this sample and theoretical models we will show in this contribution that: 1. There is an age-excess relation for main sequence stars. We find a fraction of excess stars in our sample of approximately 20 %, higher for young stars. 2. By example of a particular G type star we show that the inner hole in the disk required to fit the observations needs not only to be created when the stars forms, but also needs to be maintained over the history of the stars evolution. 3. We present calculations which indicate that the sun was a Vega-like star when it was young, but that the current amount of material is too little to produce an amount of dust which would be observable with current technology (ISO) from a nearby star.

  7. A NEW VIEW OF VEGA'S COMPOSITION, MASS, AND AGE

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jinmi; Peterson, Deane M.; Kurucz, Robert L.; Zagarello, Robert J. E-mail: dpeterson@astro.sunysb.ed E-mail: rzagarello@mail.astro.sunysb.ed

    2010-01-01

    We present estimates of Vega's composition, mass, and age based on a simultaneous fit of high-resolution metal line profiles, the wings of the Balmer lines, the absolute visible/near-IR fluxes, and high angular resolution triple phase data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer to gravity-darkened Roche models. This substantially expands our earlier analysis. We determine that Vega has a much lower mass, 2.135 +- 0.074 M{sub sun}, than generally assumed. This strongly supports the contention that Vega is metal-poor throughout (Z approx 0.008), suggesting it was formed that way. Assuming a uniform composition equal to that derived for the surface, and the luminosity and radius obtained here, we derive a best estimate of Vega's age, 455 +- 13 Myr, and mass, 2.157 +- 0.017 M{sub sun}, by fitting to standard isochrones. We continue to argue that Vega is much too old to be coeval with other members of the Castor moving group and is thus unlikely to be a member. The updated chemical abundances continue to support the conclusion that Vega is a lambda Boo star.

  8. Chemical composition, gravity, and temperature of Vega

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiling, L.A.; Bell, R.A.

    1980-10-15

    Several flux-constant, line-blanketed model stellar atmospheres have been computed for the bright star Vega. The stellar effective temperature has been found to be 9650 K by comparisions of observed and computed absolute fluxes at 5556 A and of relative absolute fluxes between 3300 and 10800 A. The Balmer line profiles give log g=3.9 +- 0.2, consistent with the result from the Balmer jump and with that found from the radius and (estimated) mass. Te Ti II and Fe II curves of growth give abundances of log N(Ti)=4.7 +- 0.3 and log N(Fe)=7.1 +- 0.3 on the scale log N(H)=12.0. These abundances are slightly less than normalized meteoritic values and solar values deduced from ionized lines. The local thermodynamic equilbrium (LTE) Fe I curve of growth gives log N(Fe)=6.9 +- 0.3, whereas correction for non-LTE effects suggests log N(Fe)=7.5 +- 0.3.

  9. High-contrast imaging with Spitzer: deep observations of Vega, Fomalhaut, and ɛ Eridani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Markus; Quanz, Sascha P.; Carson, Joseph C.; Thalmann, Christian; Lafrenière, David; Amara, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Stars with debris disks are intriguing targets for direct-imaging exoplanet searches, owing both to previous detections of wide planets in debris disk systems, and to commonly existing morphological features in the disks themselves that may be indicative of a planetary influence. Here we present observations of three of the most nearby young stars, which are also known to host massive debris disks: Vega, Fomalhaut, and ɛ Eri. The Spitzer Space Telescope is used at a range of orientation angles for each star to supply a deep contrast through angular differential imaging combined with high-contrast algorithms. The observations provide the opportunity to probe substantially colder bound planets (120-330 K) than is possible with any other technique or instrument. For Vega, some apparently very red candidate point sources detected in the 4.5 μm image remain to be tested for common proper motion. The images are sensitive to ~2 Mjup companions at 150 AU in this system. The observations presented here represent the first search for planets around Vega using Spitzer. The upper 4.5 μm flux limit on Fomalhaut b could be further constrained relative to previous data. In the case of ɛ Eri, planets below both the effective temperature and the mass of Jupiter could be probed from 80 AU and outward, although no such planets were found. The data sensitively probe the regions around the edges of the debris rings in the systems where planets can be expected to reside. These observations validate previous results showing that more than an order of magnitude improvement in performance in the contrast-limited regime can be acquired with respect to conventional methods by applying sophisticated high-contrast techniques to space-based telescopes, thanks to the high degree of PSF stability provided in this environment.

  10. Ages of Late Spectral Type Vega-like Stars.

    PubMed

    Song; Caillault; Barrado Y Navascués D; Stauffer; Randich

    2000-04-10

    We have estimated the ages of eight late-type Vega-like stars by using standard age-dating methods for single late-type stars, e.g., location on the color-magnitude diagram, Li lambda6708 absorption, Ca ii H and K emission, X-ray luminosity, and stellar kinematic population. With the exception of the very unusual pre-main-sequence star system HD 98800, all the late-type Vega-like stars are the same age as the Hyades cluster (600-800 Myr) or older. PMID:10727387

  11. The Vega balloon experiment - Initial results from the global radio tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Finley, S. G.; Stelzried, C. T.; Ellis, J.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Matveenko, L. I.; Linkin, V. M.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.

    1986-01-01

    A unique global array of 20 radio telescopes provided 24-h telemetry acquisition of meteorological data from the Vega balloons and differential VLBI measurements of their trajectories. Initial Doppler-tracking analysis indicates mean zonal wind velocities of 69 + or - 1 and 66 + or - 1 m/sec at the Vega 1 and Vega 2 float heights, and discloses an anomaly in the Vega 2 trajectory above the mountains in Aphrodite Terra.

  12. VEGAS - VISUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR GRAPHICS-ORIENTED ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelectic, J. F.

    1994-01-01

    VEGAS is a program which allows application programmers to create X-Y plots in various modes through high-level subroutine calls. The modes consist of passive, autoupdate, and interactive modes. The passive mode takes input data, produces a plot, and returns the control to an application program. Autoupdate mode forms plots and automatically updates them as more information is received. The interactive mode displays the plot and provides pop-up menus for the user to alter the display's appearance or to modify the data. Among the many functions available in interactive mode are the abilities to zoom in on particular points; to position the plot; to scale the axes; to remove specific points; and to flag, modify and curve fit points and curves. This package is built on top of and is consistent with the TEMPLATE graphics subroutine package. VEGAS is written in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. It requires TEMPLATE 6.0, a graphics library from the Liant Software Corporation. VEGAS requires 350K of RAM. The program is available in DEC VAX BACKUP format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape (standard distribution medium) or on a TK50 tape cartridge. VEGAS was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. TEMPLATE is a registered trademark of Liant Software Corporation.

  13. Modelling the Dust Around Vega-Like Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sylvester, Roger J.; Skinner, C. J.; Barlow, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Models are presented of four Vega-like stars: main-sequence stars with infrared emission from circumstellar dust. The dusty environments of the four stars are rather diverse, as shown by their spectral energy distributions. Good fits to the observations were obtained for all four stars.

  14. RESOLVING VEGA AND THE INCLINATION CONTROVERSY WITH CHARA/MIRC

    SciTech Connect

    Monnier, J. D.; Che Xiao; Baron, F.; Kraus, S.; Zhao Ming; Ekstroem, S.; Maestro, V.; Tuthill, P. G.; Aufdenberg, Jason; Georgy, C.; McAlister, H.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Ten Brummelaar, T.; Turner, N.; Pedretti, E.; Ridgway, S.; Thureau, N.

    2012-12-10

    Optical and infrared interferometers definitively established that the photometric standard Vega (={alpha} Lyrae) is a rapidly rotating star viewed nearly pole-on. Recent independent spectroscopic analyses could not reconcile the inferred inclination angle with the observed line profiles, preferring a larger inclination. In order to resolve this controversy, we observed Vega using the six-beam Michigan Infrared Combiner on the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy Array. With our greater angular resolution and dense (u, v)-coverage, we find that Vega is rotating less rapidly and with a smaller gravity darkening coefficient than previous interferometric results. Our models are compatible with low photospheric macroturbulence and are also consistent with the possible rotational period of {approx}0.71 days recently reported based on magnetic field observations. Our updated evolutionary analysis explicitly incorporates rapid rotation, finding Vega to have a mass of 2.15{sup +0.10}{sub -0.15} M{sub Sun} and an age 700{sup -75}{sub +150} Myr, substantially older than previous estimates with errors dominated by lingering metallicity uncertainties (Z = 0.006{sup +0.003}{sub -0.002}).

  15. Interferometric Gravity Darkening Observations of Vega with the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufdenberg, J. P.; Merand, A.; Coude Foresto, V.; Absil, O.; Di Folco, E.; Kervella, P.; Ridgway, S. T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Turner, N. H.; Berger, D. H.; McAlister, H. A.

    2005-12-01

    We have obtained high-precision interferometric measurements of the A0 V standard star Vega with the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array and the Fiber Linked Unit for Optical Recombination (FLUOR) beam combiner in the K' band at projected baselines between 103 m and 273 m. The measured squared visibility amplitudes beyond the first lobe are significantly weaker than expected for a slowly rotating star and provide strong evidence for the model of Vega as a rapidly rotating star viewed very nearly pole on. We have constructed a Roche-von Zeipel gravity-darkened model atmosphere which is in generally good agreement with both our interferometric data and archival spectrophotometry. Our model indicates Vega is rotating at ˜92% of its angular break-up rate with an equatorial velocity of ˜275 km s-1. We find a polar effective temperature of ˜10150 K and a pole-to-equator effective temperature difference of ˜2500 K, much larger than the ˜300 K derived by Gulliver, Hill, and Adelman. Our model suggests that Vega's cool equatorial atmosphere may have significant convective flux and predicts a significantly cooler spectral energy distribution for Vega as seen by its surrounding debris disk. This work was performed in part under contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) funded by NASA through the Michelson Fellowship Program. JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology. The CHARA Array is operated by the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy with support from Georgia State University and the National Science Foundation, the Keck Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  16. Asteroid Belts in Debris Disk Twins: Vega and Fomalhaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Malhortra, Renu; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bonsor, Amy; Wilner, David J.; Balog, Zoltan; Watson, Dan M.; Werner, Michael W.; Misselt, Karl A.

    2013-01-01

    Vega and Fomalhaut are similar in terms of mass, ages, and global debris disk properties; therefore, they are often referred to as debris disk twins. We present Spitzer 10-35 micrometers spectroscopic data centered at both stars and identify warm, unresolved excess emission in the close vicinity of Vega for the first time. The properties of the warm excess in Vega are further characterized with ancillary photometry in the mid-infrared and resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The Vega warm excess shares many similar properties with the one found around Fomalhaut. The emission shortward of approximately 30 micrometers from both warm components is well described as a blackbody emission of approximately 170 K. Interestingly, two other systems, Eri and HR 8799, also show such an unresolved warm dust using the same approach. These warm components may be analogous to the solar system s zodiacal dust cloud, but of far greater mass (fractional luminosity of approximately 10(exp-5) to 10(exp-6) compared to 10(exp-8) to 10(exp-7). The dust temperature and tentative detections in the submillimeter suggest that the warm excess arises from dust associated with a planetesimal ring located near the water-frost line and presumably created by processes occurring at similar locations in other debris systems as well. We also review the properties of the 2 micrometers hot excess around Vega and Fomalhaut, showing that the dust responsible for the hot excess is not spatially associated with the dust we detected in the warm belt.We suggest it may arise from hot nano grains trapped in the magnetic field of the star. Finally, the separation between the warm and cold belt is rather large with an orbital ratio greater than or approximately 10 in all four systems. In light of the current upper limits on the masses of planetary objects and the large gap, we discuss the possible implications for their underlying planetary architecture and suggest that multiple, low

  17. ASTEROID BELTS IN DEBRIS DISK TWINS: VEGA AND FOMALHAUT

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Misselt, Karl A.; Malhotra, Renu; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bonsor, Amy; Balog, Zoltan; Watson, Dan M.; Werner, Michael W.

    2013-02-15

    Vega and Fomalhaut are similar in terms of mass, ages, and global debris disk properties; therefore, they are often referred to as 'debris disk twins'. We present Spitzer 10-35 {mu}m spectroscopic data centered at both stars and identify warm, unresolved excess emission in the close vicinity of Vega for the first time. The properties of the warm excess in Vega are further characterized with ancillary photometry in the mid-infrared and resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The Vega warm excess shares many similar properties with the one found around Fomalhaut. The emission shortward of {approx}30 {mu}m from both warm components is well described as a blackbody emission of {approx}170 K. Interestingly, two other systems, {epsilon} Eri and HR 8799, also show such an unresolved warm dust using the same approach. These warm components may be analogous to the solar system's zodiacal dust cloud, but of far greater mass (fractional luminosity of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} compared to 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7}). The dust temperature and tentative detections in the submillimeter suggest that the warm excess arises from dust associated with a planetesimal ring located near the water-frost line and presumably created by processes occurring at similar locations in other debris systems as well. We also review the properties of the 2 {mu}m hot excess around Vega and Fomalhaut, showing that the dust responsible for the hot excess is not spatially associated with the dust we detected in the warm belt. We suggest it may arise from hot nano grains trapped in the magnetic field of the star. Finally, the separation between the warm and cold belt is rather large with an orbital ratio {approx}>10 in all four systems. In light of the current upper limits on the masses of planetary objects and the large gap, we discuss the possible implications for their underlying planetary architecture and suggest that multiple, low-mass planets likely reside between the

  18. 1st Stage Separation Aerodynamics Of VEGA Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genito, M.; Paglia, F.; Mogavero, A.; Barbagallo, D.

    2011-05-01

    VEGA is an European launch vehicle under development by the Prime Contractor ELV S.p.A. in the frame of an ESA contract. It is constituted by four stages, dedicated to the scientific/commercial market of small satellites (300 ÷ 2500 kg) into Low Earth Orbits, with inclinations ranging from 5.2° up to Sun Synchronous Orbits and with altitude ranging from 300 to 1500 km. Aim of this paper is to present a study of flow field due to retro-rockets impingement during the 1st stage VEGA separation phase. In particular the main goal of the present work is to present the aerodynamic activities performed for the justification of the separation phase.

  19. TASS reports VEGAS-1 encounter with Halley's Comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-09-01

    The Soviet automatic station Vega-1, whose flight is taking place within the framework of the multipurpose international project Venera-kometa Galleya, has successfully performed its program of research of Halley's Comet. On March 6, 1986, the Vega-1 station passed through the comet's gas and dust shell at a distance of about 9,000 kilometers from its nucleus and performed comprehensive scientific studies of this heavenly body for the first time. With the aid of apparatus developed jointly by scientists and specialists of the USSR, Austria, Bulgaria, the German Democratic Republic, Poland, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Czechoslovakia, large-scale pictures of the comet nucleus were obtained, and measurements were made of the temperature and other physical chemistry characteristics of the comet. The chemical composition of gas and dust component substances of the comet were analyzed, and studies were made of the electromagnetic fields around the comet and of physical processes taking place in its shell.

  20. The Very Specific Vortex Shedding Test on VEGA Launch Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leofanti, Jose Luis; Fotio, Domenico; Grillenbeck, Anton; Dillinger, Stephan; Scaccia, Aldo

    2012-07-01

    When tall structures are subjected to lateral wind flow, under certain conditions, vortices are shed from alternate sides of the structure inducing periodic cross wind loads on the structure. The periodic loads, in a relatively narrow and stable frequency band, can couple with the structure’s natural frequencies. To avoid this effect the VEGA Launch System (LS) comprised a decoupling device at the launch vehicle (LV) base called Anti Vortex Shedding (AVS). During the LV-Ground Segment combined test campaign in Kourou, the LV mounted on AVS was experimentally verified, including a modal characterization test, a verification under artificial operational loads and finally tested under real wind environment. The paper gives an overview on the particular aspects of test planning, the test setup preparation inside the launch pad gantry, the test performance, test results and the conclusion for the VEGA launch system’s operational readiness.

  1. The Mg II h and k lines in Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, R. F.; Gouttebroze, P.; Kondo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    High resolution h (2802.7 A) and k (2795.5 A) lines Mg II obtained for the star Vega (Alpha Lyr, A0V) with Copernicus satellite and a balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer (BUSS) are interpreted by means of theoretical NLTE line profiles in the frame work of complete (CR) and partial (PR) redistribution hypothesis. The PR profiles are remarkably coincident with the observed ones for a magnesium abundance Mg/H = 0.00001 and a projected rotation velocity v sin i = 17 km/s. LTE and NLTE atmospheric models with a temperature plateau or with temperature rises (depending on whether the atmosphere is in radiative equilibrium or not) are used to account for the possible presence of a chromosphere on Vega. The possible presence of an interstellar Mg II absorption line superimposed on the stellar ones is also discussed.

  2. Physical properties of P/Halley derived from VEGA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehlmann, D.; Mangoldt, T.; Boerner, H.; Rubbert, B.; Danz, M.; Weidlich, U.; Elter, G.

    1986-12-01

    The surface structure of P/Halley was analyzed using Vega images. Using a three-axial ellipsoid to approximate P/Halley, the derived dimensions are 16km x 8km x 6km. Along the longest axis the perpendicular dimensions decrease from 8km x 6km to 5km x 4km. The uncertainties in every dimension are 1km. Brightness distribution is shown.

  3. Hubble Space Telescope CALSPEC Flux Standards: Sirius (and Vega)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2014-06-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) has measured the flux for Sirius from 0.17 to 1.01 μm on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) White Dwarf scale. Because of the cool debris disk around Vega, Sirius is commonly recommended as the primary IR flux standard. The measured STIS flux agrees well with predictions of a special Kurucz model atmosphere, adding confidence to the modeled IR flux predictions. The IR flux agrees to 2%-3% with respect to the standard template of Cohen and to 2% with the Midcourse Space Experiment absolute flux measurements in the mid-IR. A weighted average of the independent visible and mid-IR absolute flux measures implies that the monochromatic flux at 5557.5 Å (5556 Å in air) for Sirius and Vega, respectively, is 1.35 × 10-8 and 3.44 × 10-9 erg cm-2 s-1 Å-1 with formal uncertainties of 0.5%. Contrary to previously published conclusions, the Hipparcos photometry offers no support for the variability of Vega. Pulse pileup severely affects the Hp photometry for the brightest stars.

  4. HST/WFC3 flux calibration ladder: Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana E.; Bohlin, Ralph; Pirzkal, Nor; MacKenty, John

    2014-08-01

    Vega is one of only a few stars calibrated against an SI-traceable blackbody, and is the historical flux standard. Photometric zeropoints of the Hubble Space Telescope's instruments rely on Vega, through the transfer of its calibration via stellar atmosphere models to the suite of standard stars. HST's recently implemented scan mode has enabled us to develop a path to an absolute SI traceable calibration for HST IR observations. To fill in the crucial gap between 0.9 and 1.7 micron in the absolute calibration, we acquired -1st order spectra of Vega with the two WFC3 infrared grisms. At the same time, we have improved the calibration of the -1st orders of both WFC3 IR grisms, as well as extended the dynamic range of WFC3 science observations by a factor of 10000. We describe our progress to date on the WFC3 `flux calibration ladder' project to provide currently needed accurate zeropoint measurements in the IR

  5. Hubble space telescope calspec flux standards: Sirius (and Vega)

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2014-06-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) has measured the flux for Sirius from 0.17 to 1.01 μm on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) White Dwarf scale. Because of the cool debris disk around Vega, Sirius is commonly recommended as the primary IR flux standard. The measured STIS flux agrees well with predictions of a special Kurucz model atmosphere, adding confidence to the modeled IR flux predictions. The IR flux agrees to 2%-3% with respect to the standard template of Cohen and to 2% with the Midcourse Space Experiment absolute flux measurements in the mid-IR. A weighted average of the independent visible and mid-IR absolute flux measures implies that the monochromatic flux at 5557.5 Å (5556 Å in air) for Sirius and Vega, respectively, is 1.35 × 10{sup –8} and 3.44 × 10{sup –9} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} Å{sup –1} with formal uncertainties of 0.5%. Contrary to previously published conclusions, the Hipparcos photometry offers no support for the variability of Vega. Pulse pileup severely affects the Hp photometry for the brightest stars.

  6. Asteroid Belts in Debris Disk Twins: Vega and Fomalhaut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kate Y.; Rieke, G.

    2013-01-01

    Nearby debris disks have been playing an important role in our understanding the complexity of the underlying planetary architectures (planets, minor bodies and debris) since their first discovery by IRAS through infrared excesses. Among them, the two early-type stars, Vega and Fomalhaut, are similar in terms of mass, age, distance and global disk properties; therefore, they are often referred as “Debris Disk Twins”. Much attention has been focused on their large, cold Kuiper-belt-analog rings because they contain the majority of the left-over planetesimals and fine debris that covers a large surface area, making them readily detectable through infrared and submillimeter observations. We present Spitzer 10-35 μm spectroscopic data centered at both stars, and identify warm, unresolved excess emission in the close vicinity of Vega for the first time. The properties of the warm excess in Vega are further characterized with ancillary photometry in the mid-infrared using data probed area within ~5" diameter from the star and resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The Vega warm excess shares many similar properties with the one found around Fomalhaut. The emission shortward of ~30 μm from both warm components is well described as a blackbody emission of ~170 K, just above the temperature at which water ice sublimates. Interestingly, two other systems, eps Eri and HR 8799, also show such an unresolved warm component using the same approach of combining imaging and mid-infrared spectroscopy. These warm components may be analogous to our asteroid belt, but of far greater mass (fractional luminosity of ~1e-5 - 1e-6). The dust characteristic temperature and tentative detections at submillimeter suggest the warm excess arises from a planetesimal ring placed near the ice line and presumably created by processes occurring near the equivalent location in other debris systems as well. In light of the current detection limits on the planetary

  7. EGSE (Electrical Ground Support Equipment) for ESA VEGA Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, M.; Ortenzi, A.; del Re, V.; Bordin, M.; Saccucci, Fr.

    2004-08-01

    Activities belonging to Assembly, Integration and Validation (AIV) phase of a launch vehicle are fundamental in development of a so much delicate system. The equipment used to support this long and crucial phase can be described as a set of Mechanical and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE). This paper describes the approach followed to develop such a system, and the benefits that this brings in terms of lower risk, more coordinated interfaces and improved functionality. The paper briefly outlines VEGA Electrical Ground Support Equipment major characteristics. In particular, this paper describes the EGSE design for a small launch vehicle such as VEGA. The objective of EGSE is to provide hardware and software for efficient electrical testing of either single stages and integrated launcher. The needs to develop a small launcher is a response to a Resolution in the Space Transportation Strategy adopted by the ESA Council in June 2000, aiming at: "completing, in the medium term, the range of launch services offered by the addition of European manufactured small and medium launcher, complementary to Ariane, consistent with diversified users' needs and relying on common elements, such as stages, subsystems, technologies, production facilities and operational infrastructure, thereby increasing the European launcher industry's competitiveness". Three different parts principally compose the Vega EGSE: TCS (Test Configuration System), TES (Test Execution System), PPS (Post Processing System). The TES is the part of the EGSE devoted to the tests execution; it has capabilities of immediate test data analysis, parameters monitoring and it is able to undertake pre-defined actions, in case of anomalous events happen, in order to put in safe conditions the Unity Under Test (UUT). The TES is composed of two main components: HLCS and LLCS. The HLCS is based on SCOS 2000 ESA product; it is mainly devoted to the interaction with operators. It allows loading Test Sequences and

  8. Metallic line profiles of the AOV star Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. Murray; Gulliver, Austin F.; Adelman, Saul J.; Crowley, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    High dispersion ultrahigh signal to noise Reticon spectra of Vega were obtained with the coude spectrograph of the 1.2 m telescope. A mean signal to noise ratio of 2500 over the spectral region lambdas from 3825 to 5435 was achieved. Examination of the line profiles confirmed the presence of two different types of profiles which were previously seen in IIIaJ and lower signal to noise Reticon spectra. The profiles of the strong lines are essentially classical rotational profiles with enhanced wings which are slightly stronger than expected while those of weak lines are clearly flat-bottomed resulting in a trapezoidal appearance. A few possible theoretical explanations are presented.

  9. Metallic line profiles of the AO V star Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulliver, Austin F.; Adelman, Saul J.; Cowley, Charles R.; Fletcher, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    High dispersion ultrahigh signal to noise Reticon spectra of Vega were obtained with the coude spectrograph of the 1.2 m telescope. A mean signal to noise ratio of 2500 over the spectral region lambdas from 3825 to 5435 was achieved. Examination of the line profiles confirmed the presence of two different types of profiles which were previously seen in IIIaJ and lower signal to noise Reticon spectra. The profiles of the strong lines are essentially classical rotational profiles with enhanced wings which are slightly stronger than expected while those of weak lines are clearly flat-bottomed resulting in a trapezoidal appearance. A few possible theoretical explanations are presented.

  10. A search for Vega-like fields in OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Folsom, C. P.; Blazere, A.

    2014-12-01

    Very weak magnetic fields (with a longitudinal component below 1 Gauss) have recently been discovered in the A star Vega as well as in a few Am stars. According to fossil field scenarios, such weak fields should also exist in more massive stars. In the framework of the ANR project Imagine, we have started to investigate the existence of this new class of very weakly magnetic stars among O and B stars thanks to ultra-deep spectropolarimetric observations. The first results and future plans are presented.

  11. Photometric characteristics of the Vega 1 and Vega 2 CCD cameras for the observation of Comet Halley.

    PubMed

    Abergel, A; Bertaux, J L; Avanessov, G A; Tarnopolsky, V I; Zhukov, B S

    1987-10-15

    The first pictures of the nucleus of Comet Halley were returned from the CCD TV system (TVS) placed onboard the two Soviet spacecraft Vega 1 and 2. Comet Halley was observed from 4 to 11 Mar. 1986, and ~1500 images were transmitted to the earth. The raw data are given in digital numbers which must be converted into units of brightness. After a brief description of the experiment, the on-ground calibration tests are discussed. Many images were registered and processed to obtain standard correcting images and absolute calibration. Photometric performance could also be checked during flight with observations of Jupiter; in-flight and on-ground performances are compared.

  12. An overview of the Soviet Vega balloon experiment and studies of the atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the VEGA probe to Venus is given, including a detailed examination of the balloon experiment to study the atmosphere of Venus. The areas of study include the ground network, the global network of radiotelescopes, meteorological measurements, the thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere in the middle cloud layer, atmospheric dynamics, and other results of the VEGA 1 and 2 experiments.

  13. Review and latest news from the VEGA/CHARA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardetto, N.; Mourard, D.; Perraut, K.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Meilland, A.; Stee, P.; Ligi, R.; Challouf, M.; Clausse, J.-M.; Berio, P.; Spang, A.

    2014-12-01

    The VEGA instrument located at the focus of the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) array in California is a collaborating project between the Lagrange laboratory in Nice, where it has been developed (Mourard et al. 2009, 2011), the IPAG (Grenoble) and CRAL (Lyon) laboratories, and the CHARA group at Mount Wilson Observatory. The outcome from this international collaboration is to provide to the community a visible spectro-interferometer with an unprecedented angular resolution of 0.3 milli-second of arc (mas) together with a spectral resolution of 5000 or 30000. With such an instrument it becomes possible to determine simultaneously the size and the kinematic of the photosphere and/or of the circumstellar environment of the star as a function of the wavelength, which basically means for each spectral channel in the continuum and/or within spectral lines (in Hα for instance). The only limitation is to get enough signal to noise ratio in each spectral channel. We can currently reach a limiting magnitude of 8 in visible in medium spectral resolution (5000) and 4.5 in high resolution (30000). In this proceeding, we illustrate the two main subjects studied with the VEGA instrument, namely (1) how angular diameters are useful to accurately derive the fundamental parameters of stars, (2) how the spectral resolution can allow to study the kinematical structure of stars or even to derive chromatic images of stellar objects.

  14. Follow-up of Candidate Companions to Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Markus; Quanz, Sascha; Carson, Joseph; Thalmann, Christian; Lafreniere, David; Amara, Adam

    2014-12-01

    Vega hosts one of the most nearby massive debris disks, with a morphology that may be indicative of wide giant planetary companions. Its proximity and relatively young age also make it an attractive target for direct imaging searches for such companions. We therefore observed Vega with Spitzer during cycle 9, which provides the best sensitivity to planets in wide orbits that is available with any existing facility. Three candidates were discovered in the data which are substantially brighter at 4.5 micron than at 3.6 micron, while typical background sources have much smaller brightness differences between these bands. We now propose to follow the system up in a second epoch to test the three candidates for common proper motion with the primary star. If real, physical companions, the candidates have separations of 265-335 AU and masses of 2-3 Mjup according to evolutionary models (regardless of initial entropy conditions), and would therefore constitute the coldest and lowest-mass planets ever imaged outside of the Solar System.

  15. Vega-Giotto flyby missions and cometary cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Bruno

    1989-01-01

    The most important implication of the Vega/Giotto flyby missions to Halley's Comet for cometary cosmogony is the opportunity to absorb the results of the in-situ measurements as made onboard the spacecrafts. Unfortunately the exploration of ejecta form the nucleus was unable to provide an unambiguous definition of the chemical-mineralogical nature of the nucleus: it failed to provide information comparable to that which was expected from a sample return mission. However, the obtained results are significant enough to affect and redirect cosmogonical thinking. Accordingly, the understanding of the cometary-matter dichotomy is modified as deduced from the distiction of water-dominated volitiles and silicate-based non-volitiles. Organic carbon compounds emerge as a major constituent of cometary nuclei. Presently, it is likely that the revision of Whipple's classic concept of the icy conglomerate cannot be avoided. Affected by the Vega/Giotto flyby missions to Hally's Comet, cometary cosmogony seems to enter a new conceptual period. The results of the in-situ measurements (mass spectrometric, UV spectroscopic, and IR spectroscopic) appear to be of basic importance. A chemical explanation is employed to explain the occurrence inside the nuclei of the variety of species, as inferred from the mass spectrometric data, to predict the results of the processes possibly involved. A cosmochemical factor is postulated to operate behind the observed cometary phenomena. The chemistry of the interstellar medium, covering the circumstellar and interstellar dust, advances cometary cosmogony.

  16. On the nature of the material surrounding Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Davidson, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of Vega at 193 microns indicate that the far-infrared emission from the circumstellar material discovered by IRAS (Aumann et al. 1984) may decline more rapidly than a Planck spectrum at wavelengths greater than 100 microns. This suggests that the emitting particles may be smaller than the millimeter-sized objects proposed by Aumann et al. (1984). Small grains would be driven from the stellar system by radiation pressure, or their orbits would decay as a result of Poynting -Robertson drag. In order to maintain a state of dynamic equilibrium, a continuous supply of new particles would be required. It is hypothesized that the small grains are ejected by sublimation of volatile material from larger comet-like bodies in a partially coalesced preplanetary disk. A reservoir containing less than a few hundred earth masses could sustain the source over the lifetime of the star.

  17. Vega: A rapidly rotating pole-on star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulliver, Austin F.; Hill, Graham; Adelman, Saul J.

    1994-01-01

    High-dispersion (2.4 A/mm), ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio (3000:1) Reticon spectra of Vega revealed two distinct types of profiles. The strong lines exhibit classical rotational profiles with enhanced wings, but the weak lines have distinctly different, flat-bottomed profiles. Using ATLAS9 model atmopheres and SYNTHE synthetic spectra, Vega has been modeled as a rapidly rotating, pole-on star with a gradient in temperature and gravity over the photosphere. By fitting to the flat-bottomed line profiles of Fe 1 lambda 4528 and Ti 2 lambda 4529, we find least-squares fit values of V sin i = 21.8 plus or minus 0.2 km/sec polar T(sub eff) = 9695 plus or minus 25 K, polar log(base 10)g = 3.75 plus or minus 0.02 dex, V(sub eq) = 245 plus or minus 15 km/sec, and inclination 5 deg .1 plus or minus 0 deg .3. The variations in T(sub eff) and log(base 10)g over the photosphere total 390 K and 0.08 dex, respectively. Assuming V sin i = 21.8 km/sec, an independent fit to the observed continuous flux from 1200 to 10,500 A produced a similar set of values with polar T(sub eff) = 9595 plus or minus 20 K, polar log(base 10)g = 3.80 plus or minus 0.03 dex, and inclination 6 deg .0 plus or minus 0 deg .7.

  18. Programs and Perspectives of Visible Long Baseline Interferometry VEGA/CHARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourard, D.; Nardetto, N.; Ligi, R.; Perraut, K.

    VEGA/CHARA is a visible spectro-interferometer installed on the CHARA Array at Mount Wilson Observatory. Combining high spectral resolution (6,000 or 30,000) and high angular resolution (0.3 mas), VEGA/CHARA opens a wide class of astrophysical topics in the stellar physics domain. Circumstellar environments and fundamental parameters with a high precision could be studied. We will present a review of recent results and discuss the programs currently engaged in the field of pulsating stars and more generally for the fundamental stellar parameters. Details could be found at http://www-n.oca.eu/vega/en/publications/index.htm.

  19. VEGAS-SSS: A VST Early-Type GAlaxy Survey: Analysis of Small Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.

    VEGAS-SSS is a program devoted to study the properties of small stellar systems (SSSs) around bright galaxies, built on the VEGAS survey. At completion, the survey will have collected detailed photometric information of ˜ 100 bright early-type galaxies to study the properties of diffuse light (surface brightness, colours, SBF, etc.) and the clustered light (compact stellar systems) out to previously unreached projected galactocentric radii. VEGAS-SSS will define an accurate and homogeneous dataset that will have an important legacy value for studies of the evolution and transformation processes taking place in galaxies through the fossil information provided by SSSs.

  20. Lasers '85; Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Dec. 2-6, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on laser technology development encompasses issues in such areas as VUV and X-ray lasers; optical phase conjugation and nonlinear optics; laser applications in medicine; methods for optical processing; laser and nonlinear spectroscopy; ultrashort-pulse lasers and their applications; frequency selection in pulsed lasers; and interactions between laser beams, material surfaces, and material volumes. Also treated are laser applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative program, chemical laser design and performance, the lasing of biophysical materials, laser diagnostics in fluids and plasma, semiconductor laser diodes and arrays, solid state lasers, radiation- and solar-pumped lasers, laser cavities and propagation, remote sensing with lasers and fiber-optics, coupled resonators and diode lasers, industrial applications of lasers, excimer lasers, optoelectronics, CO/sub 2/ lasers, fiber-optic sensors, alexandrite lasers, free electron lasers, and IR and visible wavelength lasers.

  1. 78 FR 2200 - Establishment of VOR Federal Airway V-629; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ..., NV. (77 FR 54859). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p.389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation...

  2. 77 FR 54859 - Proposed Establishment of VOR Federal Airway V-629; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The incorporation by... of marginal radar coverage. This would enhance the efficiency of the National Airspace System...

  3. Is Internet Addiction Prevalent Among Methadone Maintenance Treatment Patients? Data from Las Vegas and Tel Aviv.

    PubMed

    Peles, Einat; Linzy, Shirley; Sason, Anat; Tene, Oren; Adelson, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Internet addiction is known to be associated with depression. The Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) for depression were studied among non-selective methadone maintenance treatment patients from the United States (n = 164) and Israel (n = 113). Thirty percent were not exposed to the internet, and 2.9% (n = 8) had an "occasional/frequent problem." The IAT and CES-D scores correlated significantly (p = .03). The non-exposed group was older, less educated, and had more benzodiazepine abusers. Unlike other behavioral addictions that characterized these patients, the internet addiction problem is rare, but should not be ignored.

  4. The National Near-Road Mobile Source Air Toxics Study: Las Vegas

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in collaboration with FHWA, has been involved in a large-scale monitoring research study in an effort to characterize highway vehicle emissions in a near-road environment. The pollutants of interest include particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microns ...

  5. Las Vegas Valley Public Land and Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-06-27

    06/27/2012 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (text of measure as introduced: CR S4677-4682) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. 78 FR 2646 - Proposed Modification of Class B Airspace; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... FR 65332) closed on December 26, 2012, is reopened until February 13, 2013. ADDRESSES: Send comments... beginning of your comments. You may also submit comments through the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov... particularly helpful in developing reasoned regulatory decisions on the proposal. Comments are...

  7. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Pulte Homes, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    The builder teamed with Building Science Corporation to design HERS-54 homes with high-efficiency HVAC with ducts in conditioned space, jump ducts, and a fresh air intake; advanced framed walls; low-e windows; and PV roof tiles.

  8. Venera-Vega Geochemical Analyses: What Geologic Units are the Source of the Analyzed Material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrakhimov, A. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.

    2004-03-01

    Based on Basilevsky &Head (this conference), craters which ejecta contributed into the airfall deposits covered the Venera-Vega landing ellipses, were selected, then the contributions of deep-seated geologic units into the analyzed material were estimated.

  9. Resurrecting an Extinct Species: Archival DNA, Taxonomy, and Conservation of the Vegas Valley Leopard Frog

    EPA Science Inventory

    Suggestions that the extinct Vegas Valley leopard frog (Rana fisheri = Lithobates fisheri) may have been synonymous with one of several declining species has complicated recovery planning for imperiled leopard frogs in southwestern North America. To address this concern, we recon...

  10. Preliminary results of the Vega 1 and Vega 2 optical investigation of aerosol in the atmosphere of Venus at 30-60 KM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moshkin, B. Y.; Moroz, V. I.; Gnedykh, V. I.; Grigoryev, A. V.

    1986-01-01

    Aerosol concentration profiles were measured by an aerosol spectrometer above the landing sites of the Vega 1 and Vega 2 landers. Approximately the same altitude zones were found as in previous experiments: a three-layered basic cloud cover, an intermediate zone and subcloud haze. There were significant quantitative differences in the concentrations of particles, however, and especially in the spectra of their dimensions. Nightglow was found in the troposphere of Venus at a wavelength of about 1 micron. The backscatter coefficient and the extinction coefficient change very little between 32 and 63 km. Large numbers of submicron particles apparently exist in the atmosphere above the landing sites.

  11. A Study on the Characteristics of the Structure of Vega's Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Ji, Jiang-hui

    2013-10-01

    The clumpy structure in the Vega's debris disk was reported at millimeter wavelengths previously, and attributed to the concentration of dust grains trapped in resonances with a potential high-eccentricity planet. However, current imaging at multi-wavelengths with higher sensitivity indicates that the Vega's debris disk has a smooth structure. But a planet orbiting Vega could not be neglected, and the present-day observations may place a severe constraint on the orbital parameters for the potential planet. Herein, we utilize the modi- fied MERCURY codes to numerically simulate the Vega system, which consists of a debris disk and a planet. In our simulations, the initial inner and outer boundaries of the debris disk are assumed to be 80 AU and 120 AU, respectively. The dust grains in the disk have the sizes from 10 μm to 100 μm, and the nearly coplanar orbits. From the outcomes, we show that the evolution of debris disk is consistent with recent observations, if there is no planet orbiting Vega. However, if Vega owns a planet with a high eccentricity (e.g., e = 0.6), the planet's semi- major axis cannot be larger than 60 AU, otherwise, an aggregation phenomenon will occur in the debris disk due to the existence of the postulated planet. In addition, the 2:1 mean motion resonances may play a significant role in forming the structure of debris disk.

  12. Vega-Constellation Tools to Analize Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savorskiy, V.; Loupian, E.; Balashov, I.; Kashnitskii, A.; Konstantinova, A.; Tolpin, V.; Uvarov, I.; Kuznetsov, O.; Maklakov, S.; Panova, O.; Savchenko, E.

    2016-06-01

    Creating high-performance means to manage massive hyperspectral data (HSD) arrays is an actual challenge when it is implemented to deal with disparate information resources. Aiming to solve this problem the present work develops tools to work with HSD in a distributed information infrastructure, i.e. primarily to use those tools in remote access mode. The main feature of presented approach is in the development of remotely accessed services, which allow users both to conduct search and retrieval procedures on HSD sets and to provide target users with tools to analyze and to process HSD in remote mode. These services were implemented within VEGA-Constellation family information systems that were extended by adding tools oriented to support the studies of certain classes of natural objects by exploring their HSD. Particular developed tools provide capabilities to conduct analysis of such objects as vegetation canopies (forest and agriculture), open soils, forest fires, and areas of thermal anomalies. Developed software tools were successfully tested on Hyperion data sets.

  13. A Study on the Characteristics of the Structure of Vega's Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Ji, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    Clumpy structure in the Vega's debris disk has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to the concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with a potential planet. However, current imaging at multi-wavelengths with higher sensitivity is against the former observed structure. The disk is now revealed to have a smooth structure. A planet orbiting Vega could not be neglected,but the present-day observations may place a severe constraint on the orbital parameters for the potential planet. Herein, we utilize modified MERCURY codes to numerically simulate Vega system, consisting of debris disk and a planet. In our simulations, the initial inner and outer boundaries of the debris disk are assumed to be 80~AU and 120~AU, respectively. The radius of dust grains distributes in the range from 10 μm to 100 μm, in nearly coplanar orbits. From the outcomes, we show that the evolution of debris disk is consistent with recent observations, if there is no planet orbiting Vega. However, if Vega owns a planet with a high eccentricity (e.g., e=0.6), the planetary semi-major axis cannot be larger than 60~AU, otherwise, the structure of debris disk will congregate due to the existence of the postulated planet. The 2:1 mean motion resonances may play a significant role in sculpting the debris disk.

  14. Dust counter and mass analyser (DUCMA) measurements of comet Halley's coma from Vega spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.; Perkins, M. A.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Ksanfomaliti, L. V.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of dust particles in comet Halley's coma from Vega spacecraft made with instruments using a new principle of dust detection and having a high time resolution over a large range of dust fluxes and masses are reported. The dust coma, whether quiescent (as seen by Vega 2) or containing a major jet structure, (as seen by Vega 1) displays large, short-term variations throughout which are at times quasi-periodic. The integral mass spectra increase in intensity to the lowest masses measured, and the flux levels lie approximately in the ranges estimated previously from ground-based observations. The coma is highly dynamical on all spatial and temporal scales, suggesting a complex structure of localized regions of dust emission from the nucleus.

  15. Performances and first science results with the VEGA/CHARA visible instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourard, D.; Tallon, M.; Bério, Ph.; Bonneau, D.; Chesneau, O.; Clausse, J. M.; Delaa, O.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Spang, A.; Stee, Ph.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the current status of the VEGA (Visible spEctroGraph and polArimeter) instrument installed at the coherent focus of the CHARA Array, Mount Wilson CA. Installed in september 2007, the first science programs have started during summer 2008 and first science results are now published. Dedicated to high angular (0.3mas) and high spectral (R=30000) astrophysical studies, VEGA main objectives are the study of circumstellar environments of hot active stars or interactive binary systems and a large palette of new programs dedicated to fundamental stellar parameters. We will present successively the main characteristics of the instrument and its current performances in the CHARA environment, a short summary of two science programs and finally we will develop some studies showing the potential and difficulties of the 3 telescopes mode of VEGA/CHARA.

  16. Comparison of observed and theoretical absolute energy distributions in the spectrum of Vega

    SciTech Connect

    Merezhin, V.P.; Ruban, E.V.

    1988-11-01

    The absolute energy distribution observed in the spectrum of Vega in the range 3100-10800 /angstrom/ at the Principal Astronomical Observatory of the USSR Academy of Sciences in 1986 by comparing the radiation of Vega with the radiation of a laboratory source calibrated by means of the Soviet State Standard is compared with the data of models of stellar atmospheres. It is shown that the observed distribution is best described by a model with T/sub eff/ = 9850/degree/K. It is noted that there is an excess of radiation in the interval 7500-10800 /angstrom/ by 7-10% compared with the model data. An attempt is made to explain the observed excess. Vega is probably a rapid rotator (v /approx equal/ 230 km/sec) with angle of inclination of the rotation axis to the line of sight of i = 4/degree/-7/degree/.

  17. An elemental abundance analysis of the superficially normal A star Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Gulliver, Austin F.

    1990-01-01

    An elemental abundance analysis of Vega has been performed using high-signal-to-noise 2.4 A/mm Reticon observations of the region 4313-4809 A. Vega is found to be a metal-poor star with a mean underabundance of 0.60 dex. The He/H ratio of 0.03 as derived from He I 4472 A suggests that the superficial helium convection zone has disappeared and that radiative diffusion is producing the photospheric abundance anomalies.

  18. An elemental abundance analysis of the superficially normal A star Vega

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, S.J.; Gulliver, A.F. Brandon Univ. )

    1990-01-01

    An elemental abundance analysis of Vega has been performed using high-signal-to-noise 2.4 A/mm Reticon observations of the region 4313-4809 A. Vega is found to be a metal-poor star with a mean underabundance of 0.60 dex. The He/H ratio of 0.03 as derived from He I 4472 A suggests that the superficial helium convection zone has disappeared and that radiative diffusion is producing the photospheric abundance anomalies. 45 refs.

  19. Vega rocket series of multi-stage amateur's rocket program 1965-1968

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstein, Aleksander; Krmelj, Miloš

    2003-08-01

    The Astronautical and Rocket Society of Celje (ARSC — Astronavtično in raketno društvo Celje) Slovenia has been involved in experimental programs for students and adults since early in 1962 when the early maned space flight inspired many young people. In the history of ARSC (1962-1999) many project undergone the period 37 years, but one is significant; the PROJECT MULTISTAGE ROCKETS VEGA. The present paper contains chronological and systematical presentation of most rockets, launching and static tests undergone during the period of 1965-1968. VEGA - III - C launching was viewed by some of 500 participants of XVIII International Astronautic Federation Congress, which was held in Belgrade in the former Yugoslavia at that time. Project VEGA, whose main objecture was solid fuel ≫micrograne≪ motor of 100 mm to 160 mm diameter improvements and interconnecting motors in parallel spree and sequentially in stages has been completed with rocket VEGA - IV. This rocket has never been launched and it is still in storage.

  20. High Resolution Spectroscopy of Vega-like Stars: Abundances and Circumstellar Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkin, S. K.; Barlow, M. J.; Ryan, Sean G.

    1996-01-01

    Vega-like stars are main-sequence stars exhibiting excess infrared emission. In an effort to improve the information available on this class of star, 13 stars have been analyzed which have been classed as Vega-like, or have an infra-red excess attributable to dust in their circumstellar environment. In a separate paper stellar properties such as effective temperature and log g have been derived and in this poster we highlight the results of the photospheric abundance analysis also carried out during this work. King recently drew attention to the possible link between Vega-like stars and the photospheric metal-depleted class of A-stars, the Lambda Bootis stars. Since Vega-like stars are thought to have disks of dust, it might be expected that accretion of depleted gas onto the surface of these stars may cause this same phenomenon. In the 6 stars studied for depletions, none showed the extreme underabundance patterns observed in Lambda Bootis stars. However, depletions of silicon and magnesium were found in two of the sample, suggesting that these elements are in silicate dust grains in the circumstellar environment of these stars. Absorption lines attributed to circumstellar gas have been positively identified in three stars in our sample. Individual cases show evidence either of high-velocity outflowing gas, variability in the circumstellar lines observed, or evidence of circumstellar gas in excited lines of Fe II. No previous identification of circumstellar material has been made for two of the stars in question.

  1. Detection of parent molecules in the IR spectrum of P/Halley with the IKS-Vega spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Encrenaz, Therese; Crovisier, J.; Combes, M.; Moroz, V. I.; Grigoriev, A.

    1988-01-01

    The two spectroscopic channels of the IKS experiment on board the Vega probes were designed for the detection of emission bands of parent molecules and/or cometary dust, in the 2.5 to 5 micrometer range and the 6 to 12 micron range respectively. On Vega 1, the experiment worked successfully, and cometary spectra were recorded at distances from the comet nucleus ranging from about 250,000 to 40,000 km. The field of view was 1 deg and the spectral resolving power was about 50. On Vega 2, no result could be obtained due to a failure of the cryogenic system. The emission spectra obtained are briefly analyzed.

  2. Vega landing sites - Venera 15/16 unit analogs from Pioneer Venus reflectivity and RMS slope data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Duane L.; Head, James W., III; Garvin, James B.

    1986-01-01

    Pioneer Venus radar data on surface properties have been used to compare the Vega spacecraft landing sites with the northern 1/4 of Venus mapped by the orbiters Venera 15 and 16. The regions surrounding both landing sites possess surface reflectivity and small-scale roughness properties most similar to those of mapped volcanoes and volcanic plains regions and different surface properties than those of mapped tectonic units. Regions analogous to the Vega 1 site are relatively rare, covering 2.8 percent of the mapped surface. Vega 2 analogs are much more common and cover 22.6 percent of the surface. Neither landing site is representative of the nearby highlands of Aphrodite, but the Vega 2 landing site is similar to much of the northern plains of Venus.

  3. VEGAS-SSS: A VST Programme to Study the Satellite Stellar Systems around Bright Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Napolitano, N.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Paolillo, M.; Iodice, E.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Raimondo, G.; Spavone, M.; La Barbera, F.; Puzia, T. H.; Schipani, P.

    2015-03-01

    The VEGAS-SSS programme is devoted to studying the properties of small stellar systems (SSSs) in and around bright galaxies, built on the VLT Survey Telescope early-type galaxy survey (VEGAS), an ongoing guaranteed time imaging survey distributed over many semesters (Principal Investigator: Capaccioli). On completion, the VEGAS survey will have collected detailed photometric information of ~ 100 bright early-type galaxies to study the properties of diffuse light (surface brightness, colours, surface brightness fluctuations, etc.) and the distribution of clustered light (compact ''small'' stellar systems) out to previously unreached projected galactocentric radii. VEGAS-SSS will define an accurate and homogeneous dataset that will have an important legacy value for studies of the evolution and transformation processes taking place in galaxies through the fossil information provided by SSSs.

  4. Magnetic field draping in the Comet Halley coma - Comparison of VEGA observations with computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Yeroshenko, Ye.; Phillips, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Fedder, J. A.

    1987-06-01

    During the Vega-1 encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer observed draping and compression of the interplanetary magnetic field. These are reproduced well by a three-dimensional MHD simulation of the cometary interaction. Rotations in the magnetic field similar to those at closest approach are also observed 2.75 hours earlier. It is suggested that both rotations correspond to the same IMF interval and that the spacecraft had overtaken the plasma and encountered 'older' magnetic field as it penetrated the coma. Analysis of the MHD model indicates that it should take about 3 to 5 hours for a solar wind parcel to pass from the unperturbed solar wind to Vega-1 at closest approach. A simulated magnetic field profile composed of nested sections for different IMF orientations closely resembles the observations. This result supports the hypothesis of layered magnetic orientations in the coma.

  5. The design of real time infrared image generation software based on Creator and Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-feng; Wu, Wei-dong; Huo, Jun-xiu

    2013-09-01

    Considering the requirement of high reality and real-time quality dynamic infrared image of an infrared image simulation, a method to design real-time infrared image simulation application on the platform of VC++ is proposed. This is based on visual simulation software Creator and Vega. The functions of Creator are introduced simply, and the main features of Vega developing environment are analyzed. The methods of infrared modeling and background are offered, the designing flow chart of the developing process of IR image real-time generation software and the functions of TMM Tool and MAT Tool and sensor module are explained, at the same time, the real-time of software is designed.

  6. Search for Vega-like nearby stars with 12 micron excess

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Probst, Ronald G.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of Vega-like main-sequence stars with 10-micron excess would permit important measurements of the spatial extent of the radiating material with ground-based telescopes. In fact, 55 of the 548 nearby A, F, G, and K dwarfs with IRAS catalog magnitudes at 12 microns appear to have excess 12-micron flux. However, for only two of these stars, Beta Pic and Zeta Lep, was it possible, using small-aperture photometry at 2.2 and 10 microns, to verify that the 12-micron excess is with high likelihood associated with the star. For the remaining stars the apparent 12-micron color of the 106 A, F, G, and K stars in the observing program is only 0.02 mag. Excess flux due to a Vega-like cloud which may surround some of the sources in the observing program, like Alpha Lyrae, is thus typically not detectable at 10 microns.

  7. Detection of Extended Thermal Infrared Emission around the Vega-like Source HD 141569.

    PubMed

    Fisher; Telesco; Piña; Knacke; Wyatt

    2000-04-01

    We report the detection of extended IR emission at 10.8 and 18.2 µm around the Vega-like source HD 141569. Mid-IR imaging with OSCIR on Keck II shows emission from dust extending out to 100 AU from the B9.5 Ve star. Our modeling of the dust places an upper limit of approximately 2 µm on the diameter of the mid-IR-emitting particles if they are Mie spheres of astronomical silicates. Comparison of our mid-IR images to the near-IR (1.1 µm) NICMOS images of HD 141569 (Weinberger et al. 1999) shows that the mid-IR emission originates at smaller distances from the star than the scattered near-IR light, as also previously observed for the archetype Vega-like source beta Pictoris. PMID:10715244

  8. CONFIRMING THE PRIMARILY SMOOTH STRUCTURE OF THE VEGA DEBRIS DISK AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Plambeck, Richard; Chiang, Eugene; Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; Mason, Brian; Carpenter, John M.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Su, Kate; Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phil; Devlin, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 {mu}m and an angular resolution of 5''; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and an angular resolution of 5''; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10''. Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3{sigma}) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width {approx}> 50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 {mu}m emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of {approx}<100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.

  9. ASTROMETRIC STUDIES OF ALDEBARAN, ARCTURUS, VEGA, THE HYADES, AND OTHER REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gatewood, George

    2008-07-15

    The results of astrometric studies in the regions of Groombridge 34A, the Hyades, Aldebaran, Ross 47, BD+5{sup 0} 1668, 81 Cancri, BD+15{sup 0} 2620, Arcturus, Vega, and Ross 248 are presented. Estimates of the absolute parallax of each star are presented and a mass estimate is present for 81 Cancri. Comments include the discussion of the apparent motions of a few previously suggested planetary systems.

  10. Infrared space observatory photometry of circumstellar dust in Vega-type systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Stencel, R. E.; Backman, D. E.; Thakur, N.

    1998-01-01

    The ISOPHOT (Infrared Space Observatory Photometry) instrument onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was used to obtain 3.6-90 micron photometry of Vega-type systems. Photometric data were calibrated with the ISOPHOT fine calibration source 1 (FCS1). Linear regression was used to derive transformations to make comparisons to ground-based and IRAS photometry systems possible. These transformations were applied to the photometry of 14 main-sequence stars. Details of these results are reported on.

  11. The Fast Rotating Star 51 Oph Probed by VEGA/CHARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamialahmadi, N.; Berio, P.; Meilland, A.; Perraut, K.; Mourard, D.; Lopez, B.; Stee, P.; Nardetto, N.; Pichon, B.; Clausse, J. M.; Spang, A.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2015-12-01

    Stellar rotation is a key in our understanding of both mass-loss and evolution of intermediate and massive stars. It can lead to anisotropic mass-loss in the form of radiative wind or an excretion disk. We used the VEGA visible beam combiner installed on the CHARA array that reaches a sub milliarcsecond resolution. We derived, for the first time, the extension and flattening of 51 Oph photosphere. We found an elongated ratio of 1.45 ± 0.12.

  12. Dynamic Simulation of VEGA SRM Bench Firing By Using Propellant Complex Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Trapani, C. D.; Mastrella, E.; Bartoccini, D.; Squeo, E. A.; Mastroddi, F.; Coppotelli, G.; Linari, M.

    2012-07-01

    During the VEGA launcher development, from the 2004 up to now, 8 firing tests have been performed at Salto di Quirra (Sardinia, Italy) and Kourou (Guyana, Fr) with the objective to characterize and qualify of the Zefiros and P80 Solid Rocket Motors (SRM). In fact the VEGA launcher configuration foreseen 3 solid stages based on P80, Z23 and Z9 Solid Rocket Motors respectively. One of the primary objectives of the firing test is to correctly characterize the dynamic response of the SRM in order to apply such a characterization to the predictions and simulations of the VEGA launch dynamic environment. Considering that the solid propellant is around 90% of the SRM mass, it is very important to dynamically characterize it, and to increase the confidence in the simulation of the dynamic levels transmitted to the LV upper part from the SRMs. The activity is articulated in three parts: • consolidation of an experimental method for the dynamic characterization of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus of elasticity of visco-elastic materials applicable to the SRM propellant operative conditions • introduction of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus in a numerical FEM benchmark based on MSC NASTRAN solver • analysis of the effect of the introduction of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus in the Zefiros FEM focusing on experimental firing test data reproduction with numerical approach.

  13. Vega's hot dust from icy planetesimals scattered inwards by an outward-migrating planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Sean N.; Bonsor, Amy

    2014-07-01

    Vega has been shown to host multiple dust populations, including both hot exozodiacal dust at sub-au radii and a cold debris disc extending beyond 100 au. We use dynamical simulations to show how Vega's hot dust can be created by long-range gravitational scattering of planetesimals from its cold outer regions. Planetesimals are scattered progressively inwards by a system of 5-7 planets from 30 to 60 au to very close-in. In successful simulations, the outermost planets are typically Neptune mass. The back-reaction of planetesimal scattering causes these planets to migrate outwards and continually interact with fresh planetesimals, replenishing the source of scattered bodies. The most favourable cases for producing Vega's exozodi have negative radial mass gradients, with sub-Saturn- to Jupiter-mass inner planets at 5-10 au and outer planets of 2.5 - 20 M⊕ . The mechanism fails if a Jupiter-sized planet exists beyond ˜15 au because the planet preferentially ejects planetesimals before they can reach the inner system. Direct-imaging planet searches can therefore directly test this mechanism.

  14. THE DEBRIS DISK OF VEGA: A STEADY-STATE COLLISIONAL CASCADE, NATURALLY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.; Loehne, T.; Krivov, A. V.

    2010-01-10

    The archetypical debris disk around Vega has been observed intensively over the past 25 years. It has been argued that the resulting photometric data and images may be in contradiction with a standard, steady-state collisional scenario of the disk evolution. In particular, the emission in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) appears to be in excess of what is expected from a 'Kuiper belt' at approx100 AU, which is evident in the submillimeter images and inferred from the majority of photometric points. Here we re-address the question of whether or not the Vega disk observations are compatible with a continuous dust production through a collisional cascade. Instead of seeking a size and spatial distribution of dust that provide the best fit to observations, our approach involves physical modeling of the debris disk 'from the sources'. We assume that dust is maintained by a belt of parent planetesimals, and employ our collisional and radiative transfer codes to consistently model the size and radial distribution of the disk material and then thermal emission of dust. In doing so, we vary a broad set of parameters, including the stellar properties, the exact location, extension, and dynamical excitation of the planetesimal belt, chemical composition of solids, and the collisional prescription. We are able to reproduce the spectral energy distribution in the entire wavelength range from the near-IR to millimeter, as well as the mid-IR and submillimeter radial brightness profiles of the Vega disk. Thus, our results suggest that the Vega disk observations are not in contradiction with a steady-state collisional dust production, and we put important constraints on the disk parameters and physical processes that sustain it. The total disk mass in approx<100 km-sized bodies is estimated to be approx10 Earth masses. Provided that collisional cascade has been operating over much of the Vega age of approx350 Myr, the disk must have lost a few Earth masses of solids during that time. We

  15. ITC/USA/'90; Proceedings of the International Telemetering Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Oct. 29-Nov. 2, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This conference presents papers in the fields of airborne telemetry, measurement technology, video instrumentation and monitoring, tracking and receiving systems, and real-time processing in telemetry. Topics presented include packet telemetry ground station simulation, a predictable performance wideband noise generator, an improved drone tracking control system transponder, the application of neural networks to drone control, and an integrated real-time turbine engine flight test system.

  16. 75 FR 428 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Revision to the Las Vegas Resource Management Plan and Associated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... the close of the scoping period or 15 days after the last public ] meeting, whichever is later. We... District Office. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information and/or to have your name added to..., you should submit comments within 60 days of the last public meeting. Before including your...

  17. International Conference on Environmental Sensing and Assessment, Las Vegas, Nev., September 14-19, 1975, Proceedings. Volumes 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The papers deal with the detection of hazardous environmental pollutants, the development of emission control plans, and the design of compliance monitoring systems. Topics include remote sensing techniques in environmental pollution monitoring, monitoring of atmospheric particulate matter, air pollution due to sulfur dioxide and other inorganic compounds, marine pollution, atmospheric aerosols, industrial pollution, and legal aspects of pollution monitoring. Other papers examine the toxic effects of heavy metals and halogenated hydrocarbons, pollution associated with waste-disposal processes, pesticide residues in soil and groundwater, evaluations of groundwater quality, and monitoring of nuclear wastes. The interaction of climate and pollution is also discussed along with global pollutant transport, environmental modeling, ambient environmental air quality, aircraft and ground-vehicle emissions, and pollution associated with energy extraction and utilization processes. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  18. The Trade and Industrial Education Research Committee. Proceedings of the Carousel Session, American Vocational Conference (Las Vegas, Nevada, December 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L., Ed.; Walter, Richard, Ed.

    This document presents three papers dealing with trade and industrial education research. "Educating the Vocational Teacher Educator" (Clyde Knight) reports a study to identify needs of vocational teacher educators to improve existing programs and make necessary changes in doctoral programs. "The Relationship between Perceived Learning Style and…

  19. IEEE PLANS '90 - Position Location and Navigation Symposium, Las Vegas, NV, Mar. 20-23, 1990, Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on position, location, and navigation are presented. The general topics addressed include: space-based navigation systems; inertial sensor development; other radio navigation system technologies; surveying, mapping, and digital electronics technology; positioning, pointing, and stabilization of space systems; inertial systems development and applications; integrated communicaiton/navigration systems and standard avionics; application of statistical filtering to navigation technology; GPS applications and equipment in civil, governmental, and commercial areas. Also discussed are: integrated navigation and targeting systems; civil aviation and marine navigation/traffic control; geodesy, gravity measurement, and earth reference systems; GPS military applications and equipment; integrated aircraft navigation and flight control; land vehicle navigation, positioning, and information systems; differential GPS; GPS/inertial navigation; terrain aided air vehicle navigation.

  20. Wolfcampian brachiopods from the Bird Spring Group, Wamp Spring area, Las Vegas Range, Clark County, Nevada ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, P.C.; Langenheim, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Wamp Spring section of the Bird Spring Group is subdivided into a basal platy limestone member, lower cliff-forming member, and upper cliff-forming member. Triticites, Schwagerina, and Schubertella kingi in the platy limestone member indicate an early Wolfcampian age. Schwagerina, Schubertella kingi, and a distinctive assemblage of brachiopods, similar to the West Texas fauna, indicate that the upper cliff-forming member is late Wolfcampian. The lower cliff-forming member is tentatively assigned to the middle Wolfcampian. The Wamp Spring sequence correlates temporally with the BSe 'formation' of the Bird Spring Group. The fossil-rich upper cliff-forming limestone member includes the new species Pontisia boodi, Crurithyris wampensis, and Calliprotonia(?) n. sp. A, as well as Hustedia culcitula, Crenispirifer(?) sp., Cenorhynchia(?) sp., Kutorginella(?) sp., marginiferids, lyssacine hexactinellid sponges, pleurotomarid and bellerophontid gastropods, cidaroid echinoids, rugose corals, cylindrical cryptostome bryozoans, and nuculids. -from Authors

  1. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 19th, Las Vegas, NV, July 20-22, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The results of research concerning the effects of nuclear and space radiation are presented. Topics discussed include the basic mechanisms of nuclear and space radiation effects, radiation effects in devices, and radiation effects in microcircuits, including studies of radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in MOS structures, silicon solar cell damage from electrical overstress, radiation-induced charge dynamics in dielectrics, and the enhanced radiation effects on submicron narrow-channel NMOS. Also examined are topics in SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, hardness assurance and testing, energy deposition, desometry, and radiation transport, and single event phenomena. Among others, studies are presented concerning the limits to hardening electronic boxes to IEMP coupling, transient radiation screening of silicon devices using backside laser irradiation, the damage equivalence of electrons, protons, and gamma rays in MOS devices, and the single event upset sensitivity of low power Schottky devices.

  2. Proceedings of the CIAE Pre-Conference (61st, Las Vegas, Nevada, November 4-6, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Commission on International Adult Education (CIAE) of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) provides a forum for the discussion of international issues related to adult education in general, as well as adult education in various countries around the globe. The following purposes summarize the work of the…

  3. 77 FR 28569 - Reorganization and Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 89 Under Alternative Site Framework, Las Vegas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ..., the Board adopted the alternative site framework (ASF) (74 FR 1170, 01/12/2009; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/2009; 75 FR 71069- 71070, 11/22/2010) as an option for the establishment or reorganization of... the Federal Register (76 FR 76934, 12/09/2011) and the application has been processed pursuant to...

  4. EPA/Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Near Road Collaboration Project: Las Vegas Near Road Study – MSAT Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    The series of studies conducted as part of the National Near Road Study focused on the collection of criteria air pollutants and mobile source air toxics (MSATs). The six priority compounds of interest were diesel particulate matter, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, acrolein, acetaldehyde...

  5. Proceedings of the 1988 IPMAAC Conference on Personnel Assessment (12th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 19-23, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Personnel Management Association, Washington, DC.

    Author-generated summaries/outlines of papers presented at the annual conference of the International Personnel Management Association Assessment Council (IPMAAC) in 1988 are provided. The "Presidential Address" is by N. E. Abrams. The keynote address is "Is There a Future for Intelligence?" by R. Thorndike. Summaries of 53 papers on the following…

  6. New Constraints on Companions and Dust within a Few AU of Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Hanot, C.; Martin, S. R.; Liewer, K.; Mawet, D.

    2011-07-01

    We report on high contrast near-infrared (~2.2 μm) observations of Vega obtained with the Palomar Fiber Nuller, a dual sub-aperture rotating coronagraph installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. The data show consistent astrophysical null depth measurements at the ~= 10-3 level or below for three different baseline orientations spanning 60 deg in azimuth, with individual 1σ uncertainties <=7 × 10-4. These high cancellation and accuracy levels translate into a dynamic range greater than 1000:1 inside the diffraction limit of the 5 m telescope beam. Such high contrast performance is unprecedented in the near-infrared and provides improved constraints on Vega's immediate (sime20 to 250 mas, or sime0.15 to 2 AU) environment. In particular, our measurements rule out any potential companion in the [0.25-1 AU] region contributing more than 1% of the overall near-infrared stellar flux, with limits as low as 0.2% near 0.6 AU. These are the best upper limits established so far by direct detection for a companion to Vega in this inner region. We also conclude that any dust population contributing a significant (>=1%) near-infrared thermal excess can arise only within 0.2 AU of the star, and that it must consist of much smaller grains than in the solar zodiacal cloud. Dust emission from farther than sime2 AU is also not ruled out by our observations, but would have to originate in strong scattering, pointing again to very small grains. Based on observations obtained at the Hale Telescope, Palomar Observatory as part of a continuing collaboration between the California Institute of Technology, NASA/JPL, and Cornell University.

  7. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON COMPANIONS AND DUST WITHIN A FEW AU OF VEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Martin, S. R.; Liewer, K.; Mawet, D.; Hanot, C.

    2011-07-20

    We report on high contrast near-infrared ({approx}2.2 {mu}m) observations of Vega obtained with the Palomar Fiber Nuller, a dual sub-aperture rotating coronagraph installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. The data show consistent astrophysical null depth measurements at the {approx_equal} 10{sup -3} level or below for three different baseline orientations spanning 60 deg in azimuth, with individual 1{sigma} uncertainties {<=}7 x 10{sup -4}. These high cancellation and accuracy levels translate into a dynamic range greater than 1000:1 inside the diffraction limit of the 5 m telescope beam. Such high contrast performance is unprecedented in the near-infrared and provides improved constraints on Vega's immediate ({approx_equal}20 to 250 mas, or {approx_equal}0.15 to 2 AU) environment. In particular, our measurements rule out any potential companion in the [0.25-1 AU] region contributing more than 1% of the overall near-infrared stellar flux, with limits as low as 0.2% near 0.6 AU. These are the best upper limits established so far by direct detection for a companion to Vega in this inner region. We also conclude that any dust population contributing a significant ({>=}1%) near-infrared thermal excess can arise only within 0.2 AU of the star, and that it must consist of much smaller grains than in the solar zodiacal cloud. Dust emission from farther than {approx_equal}2 AU is also not ruled out by our observations, but would have to originate in strong scattering, pointing again to very small grains.

  8. Vega roll and attitude control system algorithms trade-off study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, N.; Cuciniello, G.; Cruciani, I.; Corraro, F.; Spallotta, D.; Nebula, F.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the trade-off study for the selection of the most suitable algorithms for the Roll and Attitude Control System (RACS) within the FPS-A program, aimed at developing the new Flight Program Software of VEGA Launcher. Two algorithms were analyzed: Switching Lines (SL) and Quaternion Feedback Regulation. Using a development simulation tool that models two critical flight phases (Long Coasting Phase (LCP) and Payload Release (PLR) Phase), both algorithms were assessed with Monte Carlo batch simulations for both of the phases. The statistical outcomes of the results demonstrate a 100 percent success rate for Quaternion Feedback Regulation, and support the choice of this method.

  9. The Vega balloons - A tool for studying atmosphere dynamics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremnev, R. S.; Selivanov, A. S.; Linkin, V. M.; Lipatov, A. N.; Tarnoruder, I. IA.; Puchkov, V. I.; Kustodiev, V. D.; Shurupov, A. A.; Ragent, B.; Preston, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Vega balloon experiment, designed to measure the dynamics of the Venus atmosphere, comprised the balloons themselves, their gondolas with on-board sensors and radio transmitters, and the radio telescope network on the earth. The structures and the physical parameters of the balloon probe are described, together with the instruments on the gondola, designed for the measurements of the atmospheric pressure, temperature, and vertical wind flows, and illumination, as well as possible flashes of lightning. Consideration is also given to the formatting of the information flow for the individual parameters measured.

  10. Planetary system evolution and the Vega stars: The potential for ESA's Infrared Space Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Backman, Dana E.

    1994-01-01

    ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), scheduled for launch within the next 2-3 years, will place a complement of powerful infrared imagers and spectrometers into high orbit, with an operational life anticipated to be about 18 months. During this time, numerous scientific investigations of every conceivable astrophysical target will be made. The purpose of this paper is to consider the instrumental complement in terms of specific observations of Vega-like systems with cold, infrared excesses, in order to investigate problems relating to the evolution of planetary systems, and to optimize the scientific results possible with ISO on such topics.

  11. [Lope de Vegas comedy "Los locos de Valencia" a view of a 16th century psychiatric institution].

    PubMed

    Dieckhöfer, K

    1975-01-01

    With the comedy "Los locos de Valencia" (The Insane of Valencia) Lope de Vega left us valuable evidence of the nursing of the insane in the 16th century. After a summarizing presentation of the intricate plot of the play the manifold details about admission, general treatment of the mentally ill as well as the habits in the oldest psychiatric institution of the world are communicated and analysed by means of citations form comedy. Furthermore, an attempt is being made to demonstrate the nosolgic understanding of the Humanist and non-physician Lope de Vega for the psychiatric conditions and way of living from the same source.

  12. Holocene oceanographic and climatic variability of the Vega Drift deduced through foraminiferal interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szymcek, Phillip; Ishman, Scott E.; Domack, Eugene W.; Leventer, Amy

    2007-01-01

    fusiformis assemblages. Most agglutinated forms tend to decrease downcore, and comparisons to modern analogues imply post-depositional disintegration, while calcareous taxa indicate non-corrosive bottom waters. The lower to middle Holocene Vega Drift sediments are characterized by the calcareous S. fusiformis assemblage and glacial plume sediments. This assemblage is characterized by calcareous forms including Globocassidulina biora, G. subglobosa, and Nonionella iridea. The planktic species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma is associated with the S. fusiformis assemblage. The S. fusiformis assemblage is faunally similar to assemblages described in fjords of the western Antarctic Peninsula and indicates non-corrosive bottom water. Sediments of the mid to upper Holocene interval are characterized by the T. wiesneri and M. arenacea assemblages and indicate the presence of Hyper Saline Shelf Water. These assemblages are similar to modern assemblages directly to the south in the Prince Gustav Channel. The upper Holocene is marked by several small intervals with taxonomic characteristics similar to the S. fusiformis assemblage, indicating periodic introduction of non-corrosive bottom water to the Vega Drift

  13. Design of a robust control law for the Vega launcher ballistic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valli, Monica; Lavagna, Michèle R.; Panozzo, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    This work presents the design of a robust control law, and the related control system architecture, for the Vega launcher ballistic phase, taking into account the complete six degrees of freedom dynamics. To gain robustness a non-linear control approach has been preferred: more specifically the Lyapunov's second stability theorem has been exploited, being a very powerful tool to guarantee asymptotic stability of the controlled dynamics. The dynamics of Vega's actuators has also been taken into account. The system performance has been checked and analyzed by numerical simulations run on real mission data for different operational and configuration scenarios, and the effectiveness of the synthesized control highlighted: in particular scenarios including a wide range of composite's inertial configurations performing various typologies of maneuvers have been run. The robustness of the controlled dynamics has been validated by 100 cases Monte Carlo analysis campaign: the containment of the dispersion for the controlled variables - say the composite roll, yaw and pitch angles - confirmed the wide validity and generality of the proposed control law. This paper will show the theoretical approach and discuss the obtained results.

  14. Deep Photometry of Galaxies in the VEGAS Survey: The Case of NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spavone, M.

    The VST-VEGAS project is aimed at observing and studying a rich sample of nearby early-type galaxies in order to systematically characterize their properties over a wide baseline of sizes and out to the faint outskirts where data are rather scarce so far. The external regions of galaxies more easily retain signatures about the formation and evolution mechanisms which shaped them, as their relaxation time are longer, and they are more weakly influenced by processes such as mergers, secular evolution, central black hole activity, and supernova feedback on the ISM, which tend to level age and metallicity gradients. The collection of a wide photometric dataset of a large number of galaxies in various environmental conditions, may help to shed light on these questions. To this end VEGAS exploits the potential of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) which provides high quality images of 1 deg2 field of view in order to satisfy both the requirement of high resolution data and the need of studying nearby, and thus large, objects. We present a detailed study of the surface photometry of the elliptical galaxy NGC4472 and of smaller ETGs in its field, performed by using new g and i bands images to constrain the formation history of this nearby giant galaxy, and to investigate the presence of very faint substructures in its surroundings.

  15. A STUDY OF VEGA: A RAPIDLY ROTATING POLE-ON STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Graham; Gulliver, Austin F.; Adelman, Saul J. E-mail: gulliver@brandonu.c

    2010-03-20

    Ultra-high signal-to-noise, high dispersion spectroscopy over the wavelength range lambdalambda4519-4535 shows Vega to be a rapidly rotating star with V{sub eq} of 211 km s{sup -1} seen almost pole-on. The analysis of five independent series of spectroscopic data is combined with analyses of the hydrogen lines, Hgamma, Hbeta, and Halpha, and the latest absolute continuum flux for Vega to yield the following results: Vsin i = 20.8 +- 0.2 km s{sup -1}, polar T{sub eff} = 10, 000 +- 30 K, polar log g = 4.04 +- 0.01 dex, V{sub eq} = 211 +- 4 km s{sup -1}, breakup fraction = 0.81 +- 0.02, microturbulence (xi{sub T}) = 1.0 +- 0.1 km s{sup -1}, macroturbulence (zeta) = 7.4 +- 0.5 km s{sup -1}, and an inclination i = 5.{sup 0}7 +- 0.{sup 0}1. The variations in T{sub eff} and log g over the photosphere total 1410 K and 0.26 dex, respectively, while the mean temperature is 9560 +- 30 K and log g is 3.95 +- 0.01 dex. Low level variations in the Ti II 4529 A profile are also illustrated.

  16. Small-Scale Dust Structures in Halley's Coma: Evidence from the Vega-2 Electric Field Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberc, P.

    1999-07-01

    Owing to simultaneous dust and plasma wave observations onboard the Vega mission to Comet Halley, previous studies have found that the two double probe antennas, short (of APV-N experiment) and long (APV-V), (i) responded to plasma clouds induced by impacts of relatively large particles, (ii) the target area was comparable to the whole spacecraft projection, and (iii) the mass thresholds depended on the ambient plasma conditions. Subsequently, the response mechanisms have been identified, and it was shown that if impacts became continuous, the sensitivity of the antennas to individual plasma clouds was reduced or even cancelled. In the present paper, about 30 short-time events of continuous impact (CIEs), recognized in the Vega-2 records from the two experiments mostly near the closest approach to (at ∼104 km from) the nucleus, are investigated. The high-resolution APV-N waveforms reveal that the respective dust formations were structured. A few types of structure, all belonging to one family, have been distinguished. The basic structure, as seen along the Vega-2 pass, is a sequence of particle clouds. CIEs have time scales shorter than or comparable to the time resolution of the dust experiments (spatial scale less than 200 km) and do not correlate with the SP-1 observations (m≤10-10 g) nor with the published SP-2 fluxes (m≤5.8×10-8 g). But, these dust data, combined with an integral criterion for continuous impact, provide a constraint which implies that the particles responsible were bigger than 10-9-10-8 g. The data from the DUCMA V-detector confirm positively this inference for about 1/3 (∼10) of CIEs and indicate that particles (much) bigger than 10-7 g were decisive in generating several other events. Using an argument from the dusty gas dynamics, it is shown that the small-scale dust structures were not jets but have originated from the disintegration of particle aggregates. An estimate of the total mass contained within a dust structure leads to

  17. γ Pegasi: testing Vega-like magnetic fields in B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Monin, D.; Leroy, B.; Mathis, S.; Bohlender, D.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The bright B pulsator γ Peg shows both p and g modes of β Cep and SPB types. It has also been claimed that it is a magnetic star, while others do not detect any magnetic field. Aims: We check for the presence of a magnetic field, with the aim to characterise it if it exists, or else provide a firm upper limit of its strength if it is not detected. If γ Peg is magnetic as claimed, it would make an ideal asteroseismic target for testing various theoretical scenarios. If it is very weakly magnetic, it would be the first observation of an extension of Vega-like fields to early B stars. Finally, if it is not magnetic and we can provide a very low upper limit on its non-detected field, it would make an important result for stellar evolution models. Methods: We acquired high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric Narval data at Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL). We also gathered existing dimaPol spectropolarimetric data from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) and Musicos spectropolarimetric data from TBL. We analysed the Narval and Musicos observations using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique to derive the longitudinal magnetic field and Zeeman signatures in lines. The longitudinal field strength was also extracted from the Hβ line observed with the DAO. With a Monte Carlo simulation we derived the maximum strength of the field possibly hosted by γ Peg. Results: We find that no magnetic signatures are visible in the very high quality spectropolarimetric data. The average longitudinal field measured in the Narval data is Bl = -0.1 ± 0.4 G. We derive a very strict upper limit of the dipolar field strength of Bpol ~ 40 G. Conclusions: We conclude that γ Peg is not magnetic: it hosts neither a strong stable fossil field as observed in a fraction of massive stars nor a very weak Vega-like field. There is therefore no evidence that Vega-like fields exist in B stars, contrary to the predictions by fossil field dichotomy scenarios

  18. Mirror-mode structures at Comet 1P/Halley: A comparison between VEGA1 and Giotto Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volwerk, M.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Schmid, D.; Delva, M.; Koenders, C.

    2014-04-01

    The pickup of freshly ionized particles emitted by the cometary nucleus creates a particle distribution in phase-space which is, amongst others, mirror-mode unstable. Many detailed studies have shown the presence of mirror-mode structures in the vicinity of comet 1P/Halley, using data from VEGA1/2 and Giotto. In the current presentation the almost similar flybys of VEGA1 and Giotto are compared with respect to the presence and occurrence rate of mirrormode structures. An automated search on the magnetic field data is performed, using minimum variance analysis, which has proved its usefulness in earlier mirror-mode studies at Earth, Venus and comets. It is found that there is an asymmetry between the two flybys: both missions show many events before closest approach and magnetic pile up region, however, after closest approach and magnetic pile up region the mirror-modes are strongly reduced at Giotto, whereas they increase in number for VEGA1. One source of influence could be the solar wind IMF, which is different: VEGA1 IMF ≈ (0, 0, 15) nT, Vsw ≈ 500 km/s and Giotto IMF ≈ (-3/3, -4, 5) nT (Bx rotating over the passage), Vsw ≈ 370 km/s. In this presentation we will discuss the occurrence rate, sizes and other characteristics of the mirror-mode structures.

  19. The volcanology of Venera and VEGA landing sites and the geochemistry of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Komatsu, G.; Baker, V. R.; Strom, R. G.

    1993-06-01

    Magellan radar images are noted to verify the volcanic character of Venera and VEGA lander images and geochemical data; if the latter compositional data are roughly representative of the upper crust, merely 10 km of the average material distributted globally would contain as much K as all of the terrestrial continental and oceanic crust. Venus' crust is suggested to represent the differentiated magmatic equivalent of the Earth's granitoid continents, as well as the anorthositic lunar highlands. The Venus mantle is noted to be almost identical to that of the Earth, and different from all other planetary objects of known composition, implying that the combined geochemical effects of condensation, accretion, and core formation were very similar.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VEGAS: A VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey (Capaccioli+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioli, M.; Spavone, M.; Grado, A.; Iodice, E.; Limatola, L.; Napolitano, N. R.; Cantiello, M.; Paolillo, M.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Puzia, T. H.; Raimondo, G.; Schipani, P.

    2015-11-01

    The VST Elliptical GAlaxies Survey (VEGAS) is a deep multiband (g,r,i) imaging survey of early-type galaxies in the southern hemisphere carried out with VST at the ESO Cerro Paranal Observatory (Chile). The large field of view (FOV) of the OmegaCAM mounted on VST (one square degree matched by pixels 0.21-arcsec wide), together with its high efficiency and spatial resolution (typically better than 1-arcsec; Kuijken, 2011Msngr.146....8K) allows us to map with a reasonable integration time the surface brightness of a galaxy out to isophotes encircling about 95% of the total light. Observations started in October 2011 (ESO Period 88), and since then, the survey has acquired exposures for about 20 bright galaxies (and for a wealth of companion objects in the field), for a totality of ~80h (up to Period 93). (1 data file).

  1. Geologic and hydrologic data collected at test hole NC-8, Vega Alta, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús; Scharlach, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Test hole NC-8 was drilled in the municipality of Vega Alta as part of a study of the aquifers in the Northern Coastal Province of Puerto Rico. Test hole NC-8 was drilled to a depth of 1,736 feet below land surface. Geologic and hydrologic data collected during drilling included continuous core, water- quality samples, water-level measurements, and estimates of aquifer yields from the water-bearing zones. Test hole NC-8 penetrated five geologic formations of middle Tertiary age: the Aymamon Limestone, the Los Puertos Formation, the Cibao Formation, the Lares Limestone, and the San Sebastian Formation. Test hole NC-8 penetrated a water-table aquifer and seven artesian aquifers.

  2. The International VEGA "Venus-Halley" (1984-1986) Experiment: Description and Scientific Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Venus-Halley (Vega) project will provide a unique opportunity to combine a mission over Venus with a transfer flight to Halley's comet. This project is based on three research goals: (1) to study the surface of Venus; (2) to study the air circulation on Venus and its meteorological parameters; and (3) to study Halley's comet. The objective of the study of Halley's comet is to: determine the physical characteristics of its nucleus; define the structure and dynamics of the coma around the nucleus; define the gas composition near the nucleus; investigate the dust particle distribution as a function of mass at various distances from the nucleus; and investigate the solar wind interaction with the atmosphere and ionosphere of the comet.

  3. System Tests on Full Scale VEGA Launcher Mock-Up at the European Spaceport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leofanti, Jose Luis; Fotino, Domenico; Bianchini, Angelo; Scaccia, Aldo

    2012-07-01

    Between the end of 2010 and the first half of 2011, a full scale mock-up of the VEGA launcher was assembled at Kourou spaceport in the frame of the so- called “Combined Tests”. Beyond the verification of the interfaces with the ground segment, this mock-up was used to perform dry runs of the flight time-line up lift off in both night and day conditions and, during these dry runs, several system tests in representative environmental conditions were carried out. This paper gives an overview on all the tests performed mainly in terms of test sequence, test setup preparation and main results. Attention is focused on the final countdown dry-run were thermal, inertial system alignment, ground operations and structural dynamic tests have been performed contemporarily following the operational plan.

  4. A Monte Carlo Analysis for Collision Risk Assessment on Vega Launcher Payloads and LARES Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindoni, G.; Ciufolini, I.; Battie, F.

    2016-03-01

    This work has been developed in the framework of the LARES mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The LARES satellite has been built to test, with high accuracy, the frame-dragging effect predicted by the theory of General Relativity, specifically the Lense-Thirring drag of its node. LARES was the main payload in the qualification flight of the European Space Agency launcher VEGA. A concern arose about the possibility of an impact between the eight secondary payloads among themselves, with LARES and with the last stage of the launcher (AVUM). An impact would have caused failure on the payloads and the production of debris in violation of the space debris mitigation measures established internationally. As an additional contribution, this study allowed the effect of the payload release on the final manoeuvers of the AVUM to be understood.

  5. Simulations of radiation pressure ion acceleration with the VEGA Petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach Petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 :1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022 W cm-2 impinging normally on 20 - 60 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure-dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  6. Simulations of ion acceleration from ultrathin targets with the VEGA petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2015-05-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 : 1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022Wcm-2 impinging normally on 5 - 40 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  7. Tokamak coordinate conventions: COCOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    Dealing with electromagnetic fields, in particular current and related magnetic fields, yields "natural" physical vector relations in 3-D. However, when it comes to choosing local coordinate systems, the "usual" right-handed systems are not necessarily the best choices, which means that there are several options being chosen. In the magnetic fusion community such a difficulty exists for the choices of the cylindrical and of the toroidal coordinate systems. In addition many codes depend on knowledge of an equilibrium. In particular, the Grad-Shafranov axisymmetric equilibrium solution for tokamak plasmas, ψ, does not depend on the sign of the plasma current Ip nor that of the magnetic field B0. This often results in ill-defined conventions. Moreover the sign, amplitude and offset of ψ are of less importance, since the free sources in the equation depend on the normalized radial coordinate. The signs of the free sources, dp/dψ and dF2/dψ (p being the pressure, ψ the poloidal magnetic flux and F=RBφ), must be consistent to generate the current density profile. For example, RF and CD calculations (Radio Frequency heating and Current Drive) require an exact sign convention in order to calculate a co- or counter-CD component. It is shown that there are over 16 different coordinate conventions. This paper proposes a unique identifier, the COCOS convention, to distinguish between the 16 most-commonly used options. Given the present worldwide efforts towards code integration, the proposed new index COCOS defining uniquely the COordinate COnventionS required as input by a given code or module is particularly useful. As codes use different conventions, it is useful to allow different sign conventions for equilibrium code input and output, equilibrium being at the core of any calculations in magnetic fusion. Additionally, given two different COCOS conventions, it becomes simple to transform between them. The relevant transformations are described in detail.

  8. Interpretation of Conventional Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungjun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    The conventional mass is not a precise physical quantity but useful virtual one in mass metrology. Because the precise level of conventional mass is related to the OIML class, it is necessary to check if the assignment of weight class is under control. The documents of OIML (International Organization of Legal Metrology) D 28 and R 111 describe the limitation of the quantity in real application. In this presentation, we are trying to interpret and review the concept of conventional mass, for example, by estimating buoyancy deviation and maximum permissible error, in weight calibrations in Korea. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  9. Cincinnati; Our Convention City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borchin, Anna

    1970-01-01

    During Easter week, 1971, Cincinnati will be the hostess of the 50th anniversary convention of the Catholic Library Association. Items of historical interest concerning the city are briefly described. (NH)

  10. The 2.5-12 micrometers spectrum of comet Halley from the IKS-VEGA experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combes, M.; Moroz, V. I.; Crovisier, J.; Encrenaz, T.; Bibring, J. P.; Grigoriev, A. V.; Sanko, N. F.; Coron, N.; Crifo, J. F.; Gispert, R.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Owen, T.; Emerich, C.; Lamarre, J. M.; Rocard, F.

    1988-01-01

    The infrared instrument IKS flown on board the VEGA space probes was designed for the detection of emission bands of parent molecules, and for a measurement of the size and temperature of the thermal emitting nuclear region. The instrument had three channels with cooled detectors: an "imaging channel" designed to modulate the signal of the nucleus and two spectroscopic channels operating at 2.5-5 and 6-12 micrometers, respectively, equipped with circular variable filters of resolving power approximately 50. This paper presents and discusses the results from the spectral channels. On VEGA 1, usable spectra were obtained at distances D from the comet nucleus ranging from 250,000 to 40,000 km corresponding to fields of view 4000 and 700 km in diameter, respectively. The important internal background signal caused by the instrument itself, which could not be cooled, had to be eliminated. Since no sky chopping was performed, we obtain difference spectra between the current spectrum and a reference spectrum with little or no cometary signal taken at the beginning of the observing sequence (D approximately 200,000 km). Final discrimination between cometary signal and instrumental background is achieved using their different time evolution, since the instrumental background is proportional to the slow temperature drift of the instrument, and the cometary signal due to parent molecules or dust grains is expected to vary in first order as D-1. The 2.5-5 micrometers IKS spectra definitely show strong narrow signals at 2.7 and 4.25 micrometers, attributed to the nu 3 vibrational bands of H2O and CO2, respectively, and a broader signal in the region 3.2-3.5 micrometers, which may be attributed to CH-bearing molecules. All these signals present the expected D-1 intensity variation. Weaker emission features at 3.6 and 4.7 micrometers could correspond to the nu 1 and nu 5 bands of H2CO and the (1 - 0) band of CO, respectively. Molecular production rates are derived from the

  11. An investigation of the close environment of β Cephei with the VEGA/CHARA interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardetto, N.; Mourard, D.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Tallon, M.; Berio, P.; Chapellier, E.; Bonneau, D.; Chesneau, O.; Mathias, P.; Perraut, K.; Stee, P.; Blazit, A.; Clausse, J. M.; Delaa, O.; Marcotto, A.; Millour, F.; Roussel, A.; Spang, A.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Context. High-precision interferometric measurements of pulsating stars help to characterize their close environment. In 1974, a close companion was discovered around the pulsating star β Cep using the speckle interferometry technique, and features at the limit of resolution (20 milli-arcsec or mas) of the instrument were mentioned that may be due to circumstellar material. β Cep has a magnetic field that might be responsible for a spherical shell or ring-like structure around the star as described by the MHD models. Aims: Using the visible recombiner VEGA installed on the CHARA long-baseline interferometer at Mt. Wilson, we aim to determine the angular diameter of β Cep and resolve its close environment with a spatial resolution up to 1 mas level. Methods: Medium spectral resolution (R = 6000) observations of β Cep were secured with the VEGA instrument over the years 2008 and 2009. These observations were performed with the S1S2 (30 m) and W1W2 (100 m) baselines of the array. Results: We investigated several models to reproduce our observations. A large-scale structure of a few mas is clearly detected around the star with a typical flux relative contribution of 0.23 ± 0.02. Our best model is a co-rotational geometrical thin ring around the star as predicted by magnetically-confined wind shock models. The ring inner diameter is 8.2 ± 0.8 mas and the width is 0.6 ± 0.7 mas. The orientation of the rotation axis on the plane of the sky is PA = 60 ± 1 deg, while the best fit of the mean angular diameter of β Cep gives ΦUD[ V] = 0.22 ± 0.05 mas. Our data are compatible with the predicted position of the close companion of β Cep. Conclusions: These results bring additional constraints on the fundamental parameters and on the future MHD and asteroseismological models of the star.

  12. Convents as homes.

    PubMed

    Arias, Enrique Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The present article discusses convents as homes. Resulting from the study of a Gregorian source presently housed at DePaul University's Richardson library, this article probes the complexities and restrictions of convent life in 17th century Spain. The Sanctoral de Visperas (1653) functions as a backdrop for a consideration of how singing chant and attendant rituals enriched the lives of nuns. Also included are references to nuns from this period who were outstanding musicians and poets and whose works have recently received enthusiastic attention. PMID:16556588

  13. Convents as homes.

    PubMed

    Arias, Enrique Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The present article discusses convents as homes. Resulting from the study of a Gregorian source presently housed at DePaul University's Richardson library, this article probes the complexities and restrictions of convent life in 17th century Spain. The Sanctoral de Visperas (1653) functions as a backdrop for a consideration of how singing chant and attendant rituals enriched the lives of nuns. Also included are references to nuns from this period who were outstanding musicians and poets and whose works have recently received enthusiastic attention.

  14. Real-time visual simulation of APT system based on RTW and Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shuai; Fu, Chengyu; Tang, Tao

    2012-10-01

    The Matlab/Simulink simulation model of APT (acquisition, pointing and tracking) system is analyzed and established. Then the model's C code which can be used for real-time simulation is generated by RTW (Real-Time Workshop). Practical experiments show, the simulation result of running the C code is the same as running the Simulink model directly in the Matlab environment. MultiGen-Vega is a real-time 3D scene simulation software system. With it and OpenGL, the APT scene simulation platform is developed and used to render and display the virtual scenes of the APT system. To add some necessary graphics effects to the virtual scenes real-time, GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language) shaders are used based on programmable GPU. By calling the C code, the scene simulation platform can adjust the system parameters on-line and get APT system's real-time simulation data to drive the scenes. Practical application shows that this visual simulation platform has high efficiency, low charge and good simulation effect.

  15. Development of a Repair Technique for Filament Wound Composite Cases of VEGA Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataloni, A.; Perugini, P.; Pantanella, G.; Caldaronello, C.; Biagi, M.

    2012-07-01

    The solid rocket motors cases of the VEGA family are made with the filament winding technology. These large structures are constituted by high strength carbon/epoxy materials, that allow strong weight reduction with respect to traditional metal cases. The present work describes the selection process and the experimental activity that led to define and validate on subscale components the repair technique of damaged structures. A preliminary trade off, based on a characterization at coupon level, identified the best repair material able to fit both the structural and technological requirements. The problem has been then split from a structural point of view, developing parallel techniques for the repair of pressure vessels (body of the case component), subjected to high tensile loads, and skirt components, typically subjected to compressive loads. Experimental tests have been finally performed, comparing the structural performance of the undamaged items with the repaired one, and verifying that the initial strength and stiffness have been fully recovered. Starting from the validated repair approach, a feasibility study for the technological scale up of the process has been done.

  16. Measurements of eight early-type stars angular diameters using VEGA/CHARA interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challouf, M.; Nardetto, N.; Mourard, D.; Aroui, H.; Delaa, O.

    2014-12-01

    The surface brightness color (SBC) relation is an important tool to derive the distance of extragalatic eclipsing binaries. We determined the uniform disc angular diameter of the eight following early-type stars using VEGA/CHARA interferometric observations: θ_{UD}[δ Cyg] = 0.766 ± 0.047 mas, θ_{UD}[γ Lyr] = 0.742& ± 0.010 mas, θ_{UD}[γ Ori] = 0.701 ± 0.005 mas, θ_{UD}[ζ Peg] = 0.539 ± 0.009 mas, θ_{UD}[λ Aql] = 0.529 ± 0.003 mas, θ_{UD}[ζ Per] = 0.531 ± 0.007 mas, θ_{UD}[ι Her] = 0.304 ± 0.010 mas and θ_{UD}[8 Cyg] = 0.229 ± 0.011 mas (by extending V-K range from -0.76 to 0.02) with typical precision of about 1.5%. By combining these data with previous angular diameter determinations available in the literature, Challouf et al. (2014) provide for the very first time a SBC relation for early-type stars (-1≤V-K≤0) with a precision of about 0.16 magnitude or 7% in term of angular diameter (when using this SBC relation to derive the angular diameter of early-type stars).

  17. Main-sequence stars with circumstellar solid material - The Vega phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backman, Dana E.; Paresce, Francesco

    1993-01-01

    The detection of solid grains with temperatures of 50 to 125 K and fractional bolometric luminosities in the range 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -3 early in the IRAS mission around three nearby A main-sequence stars, Alpha Lyrae (Vega), Alpha Piscis Austrinus (Fomalhaut), and Beta Pictoris, is discussed. Spatial resolution of the emission indicates that: the grains are larger than interstellar grains, the material probably lies in disks in the stellar equatorial planes, the disks extend to distances of 100 to 1000 AU from the stars, and zones a few tens of AU in radius around the central stars are relatively empty. Subsequent surveys of IRAS data reveal more than 100 main-sequence stars of all spectral classes having unresolved excesses with similar temperatures and fractional luminosities to the three prototypes. Some stars with excesses have estimated ages of 1 to 5 Gyr. Thus, main-sequence FIR excesses appear to be widespread and are present in systems old enough to be probably past the stage of active planet formation.

  18. WFC3: Precision Infrared Spectrophotometry with Spatial Scans of HD 189733b and Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Peter R.; Crouzet, N.; Deming, D.; Madhusudhan, N.; Deustua, S. E.; WFC3

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) now routinely provides near-infrared spectroscopy of transiting extrasolar planet atmospheres with better than ~50 ppm precision per 0.05-micron resolution bin per transit, for sufficiently bright host stars. Two improvements of WFC3 (the detector) and HST (the spatial scanning technique) have made transiting planet spectra more sensitive and more repeatable than was feasible with NICMOS. In addition, the data analysis is much simpler with WFC3 than with NICMOS. We present time-series spectra of HD 189733b from 1.1 to 1.7 microns in transit and eclipse with fidelity similar to that of the WFC3 transit spectrum of HD 209458b (Deming et al. 2013). In a separate program, we obtained scanned infrared spectra of the bright star, Vega, thereby extending the dynamic range of WFC3 to ~26 magnitudes! Analysis of these data will affect the absolute spectrophotometric calibration of the WFC3, placing it on an SI traceable scale.

  19. Convention Problems - 1787.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Deroy L.

    Designed to motivate eighth-grade civics students in the study of the United States Constitution, this game is intended to simulate the basic problems faced by the delegates to the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. The four parts of the game introduce the governmental concepts of the bicameral legislature, the executive branch, the judicial branch,…

  20. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  1. Laparoscopic versus conventional appendectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Vallina, V L; Velasco, J M; McCulloch, C S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to prospectively define the impact of laparoscopy on the management of patients with a presumed diagnosis of appendicitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: While the role of laparoscopy in the management of cholelithiasis is well established, its impact on the management of acute appendicitis needs to be objectively defined and compared to that of conventional management. Several authors have predicted that laparoscopic appendectomy will become the preferred treatment for appendicitis. METHODS: Two groups of consecutive patients with similar clinical characteristics of acute appendicitis were compared. Data on the laparoscopic group were compiled prospectively on standardized forms; data on the conventional group were collected retrospectively. Operative time, hospital stay, analgesia, cost, and return to normal activities were noted. RESULTS: Seventeen consecutive patients who underwent appendectomy were compared to 18 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopy (16 of these 18 had laparoscopic appendectomy). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical characteristics and appendiceal histopathology. The mean operative times were 61 +/- 4.1 minutes and 46 +/- 2.9 minutes for the laparoscopy and conventional groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic appendectomy group, with 81% of patients being discharged on their first postoperative day (p < 0.001). The laparoscopic appendectomy patients required significantly less narcotic analgesia (p < 0.02). Return to normal activity was not significantly different between the two groups. The average total cost of laparoscopic appendectomy was 30% greater than that of conventional appendectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy is a useful adjunct to the management of patients with a presumed clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:8239785

  2. The peculiar fast-rotating star 51 Ophiuchi probed by VEGA/CHARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamialahmadi, N.; Berio, P.; Meilland, A.; Perraut, K.; Mourard, D.; Lopez, B.; Stee, P.; Nardetto, N.; Pichon, B.; Clausse, J. M.; Spang, A.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Vargas, N.; Scott, N.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Stellar rotation is a key in our understanding of both mass-loss and evolution of intermediate and massive stars. It can lead to anisotropic mass-loss in the form of radiative wind or an excretion disk. Aims: We wished to spatially resolve the photosphere and gaseous environment of 51 Oph, a peculiar star with a very high vsini of 267 km s-1 and an evolutionary status that remains unsettled. It has been classified by different authors as a Herbig, a β Pic, or a classical Be star. Methods: We used the VEGA visible beam combiner installed on the CHARA array that reaches a submilliarcsecond resolution. Observation were centered on the Hα emission line. Results: We derived, for the first time, the extension and flattening of 51 Oph photosphere. We found a major axis of θeq = 8.08 ± 0.70 R⊙ and a minor axis of θpol = 5.66 ± 0.23 R⊙. This high photosphere distortion shows that the star is rotating close to its critical velocity. Finally, using spectro-interferometric measurements in the Hα line, we constrained the circumstellar environment geometry and kinematics and showed that the emission is produced in a 5.2 ± 2 R⋆ disk in Keplerian rotation. Conclusions: From the visible point of view, 51 Oph presents all the features of a classical Be star: near critical-rotation and double-peaked Hα line in emission produced in a gaseous disk in Keplerian rotation. However, this does not explain the presence of dust as seen in the mid-infrared and millimeter spectra, and the evolutionary status of 51 Oph remains unsettled.

  3. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led tomore » the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.« less

  4. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led to the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.

  5. Chemical analysis of aerosol in the Venusian cloud layer by reaction gas chromatography on board the Vega landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelman, B. G.; Drozdov, Y. V.; Melnikov, V. V.; Rotin, V. A.; Khokhlov, V. N.; Bondarev, V. B.; Dolnikov, G. G.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Nenarokov, D. F.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment on sulfuric acid aerosol determination in the Venusian cloud layer on board the Vega landers is described. An average content of sulfuric acid of approximately 1 mg/cu m was found for the samples taken from the atmosphere at heights from 63 to 48 km and analyzed with the SIGMA-3 chromatograph. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was revealed in the gaseous sample at the height of 48 km. From the experimental results and blank run measurements, a suggestion is made that the Venusian cloud layer aerosol consists of more complicated particles than the sulfuric acid water solution does.

  6. Conventional mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    The provision of mechanical ventilation for the support of infants and children with respiratory failure or insufficiency is one of the most common techniques that are performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Despite its widespread application in the PICUs of the 21st century, before the 1930s, respiratory failure was uniformly fatal due to the lack of equipment and techniques for airway management and ventilatory support. The operating rooms of the 1950s and 1960s provided the arena for the development of the manual skills and the refinement of the equipment needed for airway management, which subsequently led to the more widespread use of endotracheal intubation thereby ushering in the era of positive pressure ventilation. Although there seems to be an ever increasing complexity in the techniques of mechanical ventilation, its successful use in the PICU should be guided by the basic principles of gas exchange and the physiology of respiratory function. With an understanding of these key concepts and the use of basic concepts of mechanical ventilation, this technique can be successfully applied in both the PICU and the operating room. This article reviews the basic physiology of gas exchange, principles of pulmonary physiology, and the concepts of mechanical ventilation to provide an overview of the knowledge required for the provision of conventional mechanical ventilation in various clinical arenas. PMID:20927268

  7. ESD and the Rio Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarabhai, Kartikeya V.; Ravindranath, Shailaja; Schwarz, Rixa; Vyas, Purvi

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 36 of Agenda 21, a key document of the 1992 Earth Summit, emphasised reorienting education towards sustainable development. While two of the Rio conventions, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed communication, education and public awareness (CEPA)…

  8. VEGAS: A VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey. I. Presentation, wide-field surface photometry, and substructures in NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioli, Massimo; Spavone, Marilena; Grado, Aniello; Iodice, Enrichetta; Limatola, Luca; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Cantiello, Michele; Paolillo, Maurizio; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Raimondo, Gabriella; Schipani, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    Context. We present the VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey (VEGAS), which is designed to obtain deep multiband photometry in g,r,i, of about one hundred nearby galaxies down to 27.3, 26.8, and 26 mag/arcsec2 respectively, using the ESO facility VST/OmegaCAM. Aims: The goals of the survey are 1) to map the light distribution up to ten effective radii, re; 2) to trace color gradients and surface brightness fluctuation gradients out to a few re for stellar population characterization; and 3) to obtain a full census of the satellite systems (globular clusters and dwarf galaxies) out to 20% of the galaxy virial radius. The external regions of galaxies retain signatures of the formation and evolution mechanisms that shaped them, and the study of nearby objects enables a detailed analysis of their morphology and interaction features. To clarify the complex variety of formation mechanisms of early-type galaxies (ETGs), wide and deep photometry is the primary observational step, which at the moment has been pursued with only a few dedicated programs. The VEGAS survey has been designated to provide these data for a volume-limited sample with exceptional image quality. Methods: In this commissioning photometric paper we illustrate the capabilities of the survey using g- and i-band VST/OmegaCAM images of the nearby galaxy NGC 4472 and of smaller ETGs in the surrounding field. Results: Our surface brightness profiles reach rather faint levels and agree excellently well with previous literature. Genuine new results concern the detection of an intracluster light tail in NGC 4472 and of various substructures at increasing scales. We have also produced extended (g - i) color profiles. Conclusions: The VST/OmegaCAM data that we acquire in the context of the VEGAS survey provide a detailed view of substructures in the optical emission from extended galaxies, which can be as faint as a hundred times below the sky level. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. De "El Caballero de Illescas" a "Los Intereses Creados" (From "The Gentleman from Illescas" [Lope de Vega] to "Vested Interests" [Benavente]).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Damaso

    1967-01-01

    Across the centuries the heroes in dramatic works develop and play out action along the same lines, although the dramas may have been created by different authors and may reflect various eras and cultures. A case in point is a comparison of the two Spanish plays "El Caballero de Illescas" by Lope de Vega (1602) and "Los Intereses Creados" by…

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Vega Alta Public Supply Wells, Puerto Rico (first remedial action), September 1987. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-29

    The Vega Alta Public Supply Wells site is a public water supply well field located in the municipality of Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, approximately 32 km west of San Juan where ground water is the primary source of water. The well field consists of eight active wells. It currently supplies about 3.8 million gallons per day of water to Vega Alta and surrounding residential areas. The Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA) is responsible for operation and maintenance of the public water-supply system. The first indication of contamination was discovered in June 1983, when a survey of public water wells made by the U.S. Geological Survey detected 574 ug/1 of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the Ponderosa public supply well. Other VOCs were detected at lower concentrations in non-public wells in the well field system and ground water contamination was suspected. In June and August of 1983 Ponderosa and well GE 1 were shut down by PRASA because of contamination, respectively. This shutdown caused a potential water supply shortage in Vega Alta. PRASA constructed well Bajura 3 to eliminate the shortage. In 1984 an air stripper was constructed at the Ponderosa well and operated until May 1985 when technical problems arose with the air stripper. Currently, ground water is contaminated with 1,1,1-trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, 1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethene and other VOCs.

  11. Method, instruments, and results of the determination of elements contained in Venusian rock by the Vega-2 interplanetary probe

    SciTech Connect

    Surkov, Y.A.; Dudin, A.D.; Kharyukova, V.P.; Manvelyan, O.S.; Moskaleva, L.P.; Shcheglov, O.P.

    1986-04-01

    With an x-ray fluorescent spectrometer installed in the lander of the Vega-2 interplanetary station, elements contained in Venusian rock were determined for the northern part of Terra Aphroditae. The composition proved to be most similar to that of rocks of the anorthosite-norite-troctolite (ANT) group which constitute the basis of the moon's continental crust. The determination of the abundance of basic rock-forming elements from Mg to Fe, and also of some heavier rare elements, was carried out by x-ray-radiometry with the use of instruments installed in the lander. The measuring element included three radioisotope sources (one source of plutonium-238 and two sources of iron-55), four gas-discharge proportional counters, and soil collectors in which was placed the rock material to be analyzed.

  12. A new solar irradiance calibration from 3295 A to 8500 A derived from absolute spectrophotometry of Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, G. W.; Tueg, H.; White, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    By imaging sunlight diffracted by 20- and 30-micron diameter pinholes onto the entrance aperture of a photoelectric grating scanner, the solar spectral irradiance was determined relative to the spectrophotometric standard star Vega, observed at night with the same instrument. Solar irradiances are tabulated at 4 A increments from 3295 A to 8500 A. Over most of the visible spectrum, the internal error of measurement is less than 2 percent. This calibration is compared with earlier irradiance measurements by Neckel and Labs (1984) and by Arvesen et al. (1969) and with the high-resolution solar atlas by Kurucz et al. The three calibrations agree well in visible light but differ by as much as 10 percent in the ultraviolet.

  13. Discovery of starspots on Vega. First spectroscopic detection of surface structures on a normal A-type star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, T.; Holschneider, M.; Lignières, F.; Petit, P.; Rainer, M.; Paletou, F.; Wade, G.; Alecian, E.; Carfantan, H.; Blazère, A.; Mirouh, G. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The theoretically studied impact of rapid rotation on stellar evolution needs to be compared with these results of high-resolution spectroscopy-velocimetry observations. Early-type stars present a perfect laboratory for these studies. The prototype A0 star Vega has been extensively monitored in recent years in spectropolarimetry. A weak surface magnetic field was detected, implying that there might be a (still undetected) structured surface. First indications of the presence of small amplitude stellar radial velocity variations have been reported recently, but the confirmation and in-depth study with the highly stabilized spectrograph SOPHIE/OHP was required. Aims: The goal of this article is to present a thorough analysis of the line profile variations and associated estimators in the early-type standard star Vega (A0) in order to reveal potential activity tracers, exoplanet companions, and stellar oscillations. Methods: Vega was monitored in quasi-continuous high-resolution echelle spectroscopy with the highly stabilized velocimeter SOPHIE/OHP. A total of 2588 high signal-to-noise spectra was obtained during 34.7 h on five nights (2 to 6 of August 2012) in high-resolution mode at R = 75 000 and covering the visible domain from 3895-6270 Å. For each reduced spectrum, least square deconvolved equivalent photospheric profiles were calculated with a Teff = 9500 and log g = 4.0 spectral line mask. Several methods were applied to study the dynamic behaviour of the profile variations (evolution of radial velocity, bisectors, vspan, 2D profiles, amongst others). Results: We present the discovery of a spotted stellar surface on an A-type standard star (Vega) with very faint spot amplitudes ΔF/Fc ~ 5 × 10-4. A rotational modulation of spectral lines with a period of rotation P = 0.68 d has clearly been exhibited, unambiguously confirming the results of previous spectropolarimetric studies. Most of these brightness inhomogeneities seem to be located in lower

  14. The European convention on bioethics.

    PubMed

    de Wachter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Nearly fifteen years after the Council of Europe first called for a pan-European convention on issues in bioethics to harmonize disparate national regulations, in November 1996 the council's Committee of Ministers approved the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine for formal adoption. The draft convention, released in July 1994, provoked strong public, professional, and governmental debate among European nations, particularly regarding provisions for biomedical research with subjects unable to give informed consent. If ratified, the "bioethics convention" will become the first such document to have binding force internationally.

  15. School Law in Review--1986. Proceedings of the NSBA Council of School Attorneys Annual School Law Seminar (Las Vegas, Nevada, April 4-5, 1986). Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittins, Naomi E., Ed.; And Others

    This volume of seminar presentations covers a broad range of legal issues affecting public schools. The first chapter summarizes employee free speech developments since "Connick v. Myers" (1983), a United States Supreme Court decision upholding a district attorney's right to dismiss a transferred assistant for circulating a controversial…

  16. Quarterly progress report on the DOE Waste Package project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, July 1, 1993 through September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ladkany, S.G.

    1993-11-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: overview and progress of waste package project and container design; waste container design considerations (criticality analysis, experimental drift model); waste container alternate design considerations; thermal simulation of high level nuclear waste canister emplacement; structural analysis and design of nuclear waste package canister; robotic manipulation of the nuclear waste container; investigation of stress in a circular tunnel due to overburden & thermal loading of horizontally placed 21PWR multi-purpose canisters; investigation of faulted tunnel models by combined photoelasticity and finite element analysis; and transport phenomena in the near field.

  17. Integration of gas chromatographs into the Federal Highway Administration/Environmental Protection Agency near road MSAT study in Las Vegas, NV

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper documents the technical evaluation of a semi-continuous gas chromatograph (GC) for the measurement of benzene and 1,33butadiene in the near road environment. This paper will also consider the some of the non-technical implications associated with the operation of a GC ...

  18. Characterization and variability of pollutant concentrations for the Las Vegas implementation of the National Near-Road Mobile Source Air Toxics Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in collaboration with FHWA, has been involved in a large-scale monitoring research study in an effort to characterize highway vehicle emissions in a near-road environment. The pollutants of interest include particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microns ...

  19. Engineering the ADA from Vision to Reality with Technology (16th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 12-17, 1993). Volume 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binion, Mary, Ed.

    This compilation of presentations from RESNA's conference proceedings focused on the progress and potential of assistive and rehabilitation technology for individuals with disabilities and ways that RESNA members could help these ideas to be realized. Papers were presented on the following topics: (1) service delivery and public policy issues; (2)…

  20. To provide for the conveyance of certain Bureau of Land Management land in the State of Nevada to the Las Vegas Motor Speedway, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Heller, Dean [R-NV-2

    2009-01-09

    07/20/2009 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Entrepreneurship and Economic Development: Catalysts for Change. Proceedings of the Meeting of the National Entrepreneurship Education Consortium (Las Vegas, Nevada, December 3, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine, Ed.

    These proceedings include the following reports: "Entrepreneurship Education: The Seed of Economic Development" (Gordon Ropp); "A Community College Statewide System" (Randy Grissom); "REAL [Rural Education Action Learning] Enterprises" (June Atkinson); "SBIR [Small Business Innovation Research] Opportunities" (Lou Perry); "The Trade and…

  2. Attaining Excellence in the 80's. Research in Agricultural Education. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (14th, Las Vegas, Nevada, December 4, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannebach, Alfred J., Comp.

    Among the 36 research papers and critiques are "A Comparison of 1972 and 1980 Secondary Agricultural Education Students" (Navaratnam, Oliver); "A Day Late and a Dollar Short" (Moore); "Assessment of Preservice Preparation by Recent Graduates of Agricultural Education Programs" (Yahya, Burnett); "Characteristics and Activities of Vocational…

  3. Combining continuous near-road monitoring and inverse modeling to isolate the effect of highway expansion on a school in Las Vegas

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of a highway expansion on a school adjacent to the highway is investigated with a novel method called the Sustained Wind Incidence Method (SWIM). SWIM falls under the broad group of environmental forensics methods where measured concentration data are used to identify ...

  4. Creating the Future through Research. Proceedings of the National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (Las Vegas, Nevada, December 10, 1997). Volume XXIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, James J., Ed.; Murphy, Tim H., Ed.

    The following are among the 51 papers and 7 poster sessions included: "Agriculture in the Classroom" (Hillison); "Effects of an Elementary Agri-Science Program on Student Perceptions of and Performance in Agriculture and Science" (Howell); "Current Status of Preservice Teacher Education Programs in Agriculture" (Swortzel); "Problems and Challenges…

  5. The Chicano Literary World--1974. The National Symposium on Chicano Literature and Critical Analysis (1st, Las Vegas, New Mexico, November 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortego, Felipe, Comp.; Conde, David, Comp.

    Over 200 participants from 10 states and 17 universities attended "The First National Symposium on Chicano Literature and Critical Analysis." Five of the papers presented at the symposium are given in this publication. The papers cover Chicano poetry, novel, drama, and popular folklore humor. "National Character vs Universality in Chicano Poetry"…

  6. Library Automation; The State of the Art II. Papers Presented at the Preconference Institute on Library Automation (Las Vegas, Nevada, June 22-23, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Susan K., Ed.; Butler, Brett, Ed.

    Eight papers are included in this report of the Preconference Institute on Library Automation, June 1973. Papers addressing automation in user services, cataloging systems, acquisitions systems, and personnel are presented. Other papers focus on a review of the trends in library automation and computer technology, innovative strategies in systems…

  7. National Rural Studies Committee: A Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (5th, Las Vegas, New Mexico, May 14-16, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Emery, Ed.; Baldwin, Barbara, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 11 papers that focus on issues and problems of rural communities in the Southwest. Papers include: (1) "Dilemmas of a New Age: A Half-Millennium of Landscape Change in New Mexico and the Southwest," by Paul F. Starrs; (2) "American Indians Today," by C. Matthew Snipp; (3) "The Southwest: Global Issues in a Regional…

  8. Simulation of flow in the upper North Coast Limestone Aquifer, Manati-Vega Baja area, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherry, Gregory S.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional computer ground-water model was constructed of the Manati-Vega Baja area to improve the understanding of the unconfined upper aquifer within the North Coast Province of Puerto Rico. The modeled area covers approximately 79 square miles within the municipios of Manati and Vega Baja and small portions of Vega Alta and Barceloneta. Steady-state two-dimensional ground-water simulations were correlated to conditions prior to construction of the Laguna Tortuguero outlet channel in 1940 and calibrated to the observed potentiometric surface in March 1995. At the regional scale, the unconfined Upper North Coast Limestone aquifer is a diffuse ground-water flow system through the Aguada and Aymamon limestone units. The calibrated model input parameters for aquifer recharge varied from 2 inches per year in coastal areas to 18 inches per year in the upland areas south of Manati and Vega Baja. The calibrated transmissivity values ranged from less than 500 feet squared per day in the upland areas near the southern boundary to 70,000 feet squared per day in the areas west of Vega Baja. Increased ground-water withdrawals from 1.0 cubic foot per second for 1940 conditions to 26.3 cubic feet per second in 1995, has reduced the natural ground-water discharge to springs and wetland areas, and induced additional recharge from the rivers. The most important regional drainage feature is Laguna Tortuguero, which is the major ground-water discharge body for the upper aquifer, and has a drainage area of approximately 17 square miles. The discharge to the sea from Laguna Tortuguero through the outlet channel has been measured on a bi-monthly basis since 1974. The outflow represents a combination of ground- and surface-water discharge over the drainage area. Hydrologic conditions, prior to construction of the Laguna Tortuguero outlet channel in 1943, can be considered natural conditions with minimal ground-water pumpage (1.0 cubic foot per second), and heads in the lagoon

  9. A comparison between VEGA 1, 2 and Giotto flybys of comet 1P/Halley: Implications for Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volwerk, Martin; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Delva, Magda; Schmid, Daniel; Koenders, Christoph; Richter, Ingo; Szegö, Karoly

    2015-04-01

    Three flybys of comet 1P/Halley, by VEGA 1, 2 and Giotto, are investigated with respect to the occurrence of mirror mode waves in the cometosheath and field line draping in the magnetic pile-up region around the nucleus. The time interval covered by these flybys is approximately 8 days, which is also the approximate length of an orbit or flyby of Rosetta around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Thus any significant changes observed around Halley are changes that might occur for Rosetta during one pass of 67P/CG. It is found that the occurrence of mirror mode waves in the cometosheath is strongly influenced by the dynamical pressure of the solar wind and the outgassing rate of the comet. Field line draping happens in the magnetic pile-up region. Changes in nested draping regions (i.e. regions with different Bx-directions) can occur within a few days, possibly in fluenced by changes in the outgassing rate of the comet and thereby the conductivity of the cometary ionosphere.

  10. Preparation of In-Situ Data from the VEGA Balloon Mission at Venus for Archival on the PDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph; Crisp, David

    In 1985, the pioneering Soviet VEGA mission deployed two helium balloons into the atmosphere of Venus - the first, and so far only, planetary balloon mission. The balloons were tracked by an international network of radio telescopes, with a slow trickle of in-situ pressure, temperature, optical and wind measurements transmitted directly to Earth over 46 hours until battery depletion. While the key results of the mission were published at the time, the data have not been generally available in numerical form. Here we report an effort to archive the data on the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). In fact the very low telemetry rate dictated by the direct-to-Earth communication and minimal energy budget on-board demanded heavy data compression/selection, and the reconstruction of the history of altitude and meteorological measurements had to address ambiguities in the lossy compression scheme. These challenges entailed a significant effort as part of the postdoctoral work of D. Crisp, and have not been documented fully in the literature. Here we summarize the mission and the telemetry data, together with the approach used to reconstruct/interpolate the archival dataset. This documentation and numerical files are being prepared for submission to the PDS Atmospheres Node, where it will be available to all.

  11. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  12. Land Analysis System (LAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, P. B.

    1989-01-01

    Version 4.1 of LAS provides flexible framework for algorithm development and processing and analysis of image data. Over 500,000 lines of code enable image repair, clustering, classification, film processing, geometric registration, radiometric correction, and manipulation of image statistics.

  13. Categorical Indicator Kriging for assessing the risk of groundwater nitrate pollution: the case of Vega de Granada aquifer (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Chica-Olmo, Mario; Luque-Espinar, Juan Antonio; Rodriguez-Galiano, Victor; Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Chica-Rivas, Lucía

    2014-02-01

    Groundwater nitrate pollution associated with agricultural activity is an important environmental problem in the management of this natural resource, as acknowledged by the European Water Framework Directive. Therefore, specific measures aimed to control the risk of water pollution by nitrates must be implemented to minimise its impact on the environment and potential risk to human health. The spatial probability distribution of nitrate contents exceeding a threshold or limit value, established within the quality standard, will be helpful to managers and decision-makers. A methodology based on non-parametric and non-linear methods of Indicator Kriging was used in the elaboration of a nitrate pollution categorical map for the aquifer of Vega de Granada (SE Spain). The map has been obtained from the local estimation of the probability that a nitrate content in an unsampled location belongs to one of the three categories established by the European Water Framework Directive: CL. 1 good quality [Min - 37.5 ppm], CL. 2 intermediate quality [37.5-50 ppm] and CL. 3 poor quality [50 ppm - Max]. The obtained results show that the areas exceeding nitrate concentrations of 50 ppm, poor quality waters, occupy more than 50% of the aquifer area. A great proportion of the area's municipalities are located in these poor quality water areas. The intermediate quality and good quality areas correspond to 21% and 28%, respectively, but with the highest population density. These results are coherent with the experimental data, which show an average nitrate concentration value of 72 ppm, significantly higher than the quality standard limit of 50 ppm. Consequently, the results suggest the importance of planning actions in order to control and monitor aquifer nitrate pollution.

  14. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  15. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  16. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  17. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  18. Implementing the chemical weapons convention

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

    1999-12-07

    In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty

  19. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  20. A mathematical model for the release of noble gas and Cs from porous nuclear fuel based on VEGA 1&2 experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simones, M. P.; Reinig, M. L.; Loyalka, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    Release of fission products from nuclear fuel in accidents is an issue of major concern in nuclear reactor safety, and there is considerable room for development of improved models, supported by experiments, as one needs to understand and elucidate role of various phenomena and parameters. The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program on several irradiated nuclear fuels investigated the release rates of radionuclides and results demonstrated that the release rates of radionuclides from all nuclear fuels tested decreased with increasing external gas pressure surrounding the fuel. Hidaka et al. (2004-2011) accounted for this pressure effect by developing a 2-stage diffusion model describing the transport of radionuclides in porous nuclear fuel. We have extended this 2-stage diffusion model to account for mutual binary gas diffusion in the open pores as well as to introduce the appropriate parameters to cover the slip flow regime (0.01 ⩽ Kn ⩽ 0.1). While we have directed our numerical efforts toward the simulation of the VEGA experiments and assessments of differences from the results of Hidaka et al., the model and the techniques reported here are of larger interest as these would aid in modeling of diffusion in general (e.g. in graphite and other nuclear materials of interest).

  1. Conventional terrorism and critical care.

    PubMed

    Singer, Pierre; Cohen, Jonathan D; Stein, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Incidents of conventional weapons terror are increasingly part of the reality of the modern world, and in Israel, 19,948 incidents have been reported from September 2000 to December 2003. Most victims are injured in explosions resulting from suicide bombings. Exposure to the blast (primary mechanism of injury) may produce unique injuries affecting gas-containing organs, including perforation of the eardrums (most common injury); pulmonary blast injury, characterized by alveolar capillary disruption and bronchopleural fistulas; and bowel perforation, which is uncommon and may be delayed from 1 to 14 days after the injury. However, most injuries are the result of penetrating trauma (secondary mechanism) resulting from bomb fragments and nails, bolts, and steel pellets embedded in the bomb striking the victim, and blunt trauma (tertiary mechanism) sustained when the victim is propelled against an object by the blast wind. The severity of the injuries is increased when the blast occurs in a confined space. Victims of terror-inflicted injuries have a high Injury Severity Score (30% >16), a high requirement for intensive care unit admission (22.8% in Israel), and have a more prolonged hospital course and higher mortality than victims of any other form of trauma. PMID:15640681

  2. Equal Remuneration Convention (ILO No. 100).

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The government of Uruguay ratified this UN International Labor Organization convention on equal remuneration on November 16, 1989, and the Government of Zimbabwe ratified this Convention on December 14, 1989.

  3. LAS - LAND ANALYSIS SYSTEM, VERSION 5.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, P. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Land Analysis System (LAS) is an image analysis system designed to manipulate and analyze digital data in raster format and provide the user with a wide spectrum of functions and statistical tools for analysis. LAS offers these features under VMS with optional image display capabilities for IVAS and other display devices as well as the X-Windows environment. LAS provides a flexible framework for algorithm development as well as for the processing and analysis of image data. Users may choose between mouse-driven commands or the traditional command line input mode. LAS functions include supervised and unsupervised image classification, film product generation, geometric registration, image repair, radiometric correction and image statistical analysis. Data files accepted by LAS include formats such as Multi-Spectral Scanner (MSS), Thematic Mapper (TM) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The enhanced geometric registration package now includes both image to image and map to map transformations. The over 200 LAS functions fall into image processing scenario categories which include: arithmetic and logical functions, data transformations, fourier transforms, geometric registration, hard copy output, image restoration, intensity transformation, multispectral and statistical analysis, file transfer, tape profiling and file management among others. Internal improvements to the LAS code have eliminated the VAX VMS dependencies and improved overall system performance. The maximum LAS image size has been increased to 20,000 lines by 20,000 samples with a maximum of 256 bands per image. The catalog management system used in earlier versions of LAS has been replaced by a more streamlined and maintenance-free method of file management. This system is not dependent on VAX/VMS and relies on file naming conventions alone to allow the use of identical LAS file names on different operating systems. While the LAS code has been improved, the original capabilities

  4. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list of conventional pollutants designated pursuant...

  5. Division Reports from the 2005 AECT Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Association for Educational Communication & Technology held its International Convention in Orlando, Florida, October 18-22, 2005. The convention theme was "Exploring the Vision". Division report highlights include: (1) Reflections on a Convention: A Vision Explored (Wes Miller); (2) Definition and Terminology Committee (Al Januszewski); (3)…

  6. VEGAS-SSS. A VST early-type galaxy survey: analysis of small stellar systems. Testing the methodology on the globular cluster system in NGC 3115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, Michele; Capaccioli, Massimo; Napolitano, Nicola; Grado, Aniello; Limatola, Luca; Paolillo, Maurizio; Iodice, Enrica; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Raimondo, Gabriella; Spavone, Marilena; La Barbera, Francesco; Puzia, Thomas H.; Schipani, Pietro

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of globular clusters (GCs) and other small stellar systems (SSSs) in the field of NGC 3115, observed as part of the ongoing wide-field imaging survey VEGAS, carried out with the 2.6 m VST telescope. We used deep g and i observations of NGC 3115, a well-studied lenticular galaxy that is covered excellently well in the scientific literature. This is fundamental to test the methodologies, verify the results, and probe the capabilities of the VEGAS-SSS. Leveraging the large field of view of the VST allowed us to accurately study the distribution and properties of SSSs as a function of galactocentric distance, well beyond ~20 galaxy effective radii, in a way that is rarely possible. Our analysis of colors, magnitudes, and sizes of SSS candidates confirms the results from existing studies, some of which were carried out with 8-10 m class telescopes, and further extends them to previously unreached galactocentric distances with similar accuracy. In particular, we find a color bimodality for the GC population and a de Vaucouleurs r1/4 profile for the surface density of GCs similar to the galaxy light profile. The radial color gradient of blue and red GCs previously found, for instance, by the SLUGGS survey with Subaru and Keck data, is further extended out to the largest galactocentric radii inspected, ~65 kpc. In addition, the surface density profiles of blue and red GCs taken separately are well approximated by a r1/4 density profile, with the fraction of blue GCs being slightly larger at larger radii. We do not find hints of a trend for the red GC subpopulation and for the GC turnover magnitude to vary with radius, but we observe a ~0.2 mag difference in the turnover magnitude of the blue and red GC subpopulations. Finally, from inspecting SSS sizes and colors, we obtain a list of ultracompact dwarf galaxies and GC candidates suitable for future spectroscopic follow-up. In conclusion, our study shows i) the reliability of the methodologies developed

  7. Las Campanas Stellar Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan; Beletsky, Yuri; Worthey, Guy

    2015-08-01

    Stellar libraries are fundamental tools required to understand stellar populations in star clusters and galaxies as well as properties of individual stars. Comprehensive libraries exist in the optical domain, but the near-infrared (NIR) domain stays a couple of decades behind. Here we present the Las Campanas Stellar Library project aiming at obtaining high signal-to-noise intermediate-resolution (R=8000) NIR spectra (0.83<λ<2.5μm) for a sample of 1200 stars in the Southern sky using the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph at the 6.5-m Magellan Baade telescope. We developed a dedicated observing strategy and customized the telescope control software in order to achieve the highest possible level of data homogeniety. As of 2015, we observed about 600 stars of all spectral types and luminosity classes making our library the largest homogeneous collection of stellar spectra covering the entire NIR domain. We also re-calibrated in flux and wavelength the two existing optical stellar libraries, INDO-US and UVES-POP and followed up about 400 non-variable stars in the NIR in order to get complete optical-NIR coverage. Worth mentioning that our current sample includes about 80 AGB stars and a few dozens of bulge/LMC/SMC stars.

  8. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  9. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  10. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  11. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  12. The arbitrariness and normativity of social conventions.

    PubMed

    Al-Amoudi, Ismael; Latsis, John

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates a puzzling feature of social conventions: the fact that they are both arbitrary and normative. We examine how this tension is addressed in sociological accounts of conventional phenomena. Traditional approaches tend to generate either synchronic accounts that fail to consider the arbitrariness of conventions, or diachronic accounts that miss central aspects of their normativity. As a remedy, we propose a processual conception that considers conventions as both the outcome and material cause of much human activity. This conceptualization, which borrows from the économie des conventions as well as critical realism, provides a novel perspective on how conventions are nested and defined, and on how they are established, maintained and challenged. PMID:24712730

  13. XTOD to Conventional Facilities Interface Control Document

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, D

    2005-09-29

    This document describes the interface between the LCLS X-ray Transport and Diagnostics (XTOD) (WBS 1.5) and the LCLS Conventional Facilities (CF) (WBS 1.1). The interface locations ranging from the beam dump to the far experimental hall are identified. Conventional Facilities provides x-ray, beamline and equipment enclosures, mounting surfaces, conventional utilities, compressed (clean, dry) air, process and purge gases, exhaust systems, power, and environmental conditions for the XTOD components and controls.

  14. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  15. ACTE Convention a Big Success in Nashville

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article features the 2009 Association for Career and Technical Education's (ACTE) Annual Convention and Career Tech Expo which was held in Nashville in November. Despite somber economic times, the Annual Convention drew thousands of attendees, more than 200 exhibitors, offered engaging sessions and speakers, and the new chief of the Office of…

  16. AECT Convention, Orlando, Florida 2008 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Eddie

    2009-01-01

    This article presents several reports that highlight the events at the 2008 Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) International Convention in Orlando, Florida. At the annual convention this year, the Multimedia Production Division goal was to continue to share information about the latest tools in multimedia production,…

  17. The European Convention on Human Rights. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castberg, Frede

    This book outlines the contents of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and its Protocols 1 and 4. The major goal of the Convention, which constitutes an innovation in international law, is to guarantee the protection of "human rights" by allowing both member states and individuals to institute proceedings…

  18. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  19. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  20. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  1. Using Conventional Sequences in L2 French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsberg, Fanny

    2010-01-01

    By means of a phraseological identification method, this study provides a general description of the use of conventional sequences (CSs) in interviews at four different levels of spoken L2 French as well as in interviews with native speakers. Use of conventional sequences is studied with regard to overall quantity, category distribution and type…

  2. Conventional Expressions. Investigating Pragmatics and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Conventional expressions, a subset of multiword units, are the target of the current study, which aims to address questions concerning native and nonnative speakers' knowledge and processing of a set of such strings. To this end, 13 expressions identified as conventional in the southwest of France were tested in an online contextualized…

  3. [New challenges in the biological weapons convention].

    PubMed

    Sissonen, Susanna; Raijas, Tiina; Haikala, Olli; Hietala, Heikki; Virri, Markku; Nikkari, Simo

    2012-01-01

    Microbes and their toxins are biological weapons that can cause disease in humans, animals or plants, and which can be used with hostile intent in warfare and terrorism. Biological agents can be used as weapons of mass destruction and therefore, immense human and social and major economical damage can be caused. Rapid development of life sciences and technologies during the recent decades has posed new challenges to the Biological Weapons Convention. The Convention states that the States Parties to the BWC strive to ensure that the Convention remains relevant and effective, despite changes in science, technology or politics.

  4. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors.

  5. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....316 Conventional churns. Churns shall be constructed of aluminum, stainless steel or equally corrosion resistant metal, free from cracks, and in good repair. All gasket material shall be fat resistant,...

  6. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....316 Conventional churns. Churns shall be constructed of aluminum, stainless steel or equally corrosion resistant metal, free from cracks, and in good repair. All gasket material shall be fat resistant,...

  7. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....316 Conventional churns. Churns shall be constructed of aluminum, stainless steel or equally corrosion resistant metal, free from cracks, and in good repair. All gasket material shall be fat resistant,...

  8. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....316 Conventional churns. Churns shall be constructed of aluminum, stainless steel or equally corrosion resistant metal, free from cracks, and in good repair. All gasket material shall be fat resistant,...

  9. Nanoporous films: From conventional to the conformal

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie

    2015-12-14

    Here, thin and continuous films of porous metal-organic frameworks can now be conformally deposited on various substrates using a vapor-phase synthesis approach that departs from conventional solution-based routes.

  10. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE PAGES

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  11. Predictive Assessments of Non-conventional Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In some situations, ecoepidemiological methods are the reasonable choice for setting effect benchmarks (e.g., protective criteria), especially for non-conventional pollutants. Ecoepidemiological methods are becoming more common because of advances in computational power and data...

  12. Optics of non-conventional media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, O. M.; Eritsyan, O. S.

    2014-12-01

    Media with unconventional wave-vector surfaces are systematized with respect to the shape of their surfaces. The characteristic optical features of these media, caused by new forms of wave vector surface (atypical of conventional optics), are indicated.

  13. Complementary and conventional medicine: a concept map

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carol M; Kroesen, Kendall; Trochim, William M; Bell, Iris R

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite the substantive literature from survey research that has accumulated on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States and elsewhere, very little research has been done to assess conceptual domains that CAM and conventional providers would emphasize in CAM survey studies. The objective of this study is to describe and interpret the results of concept mapping with conventional and CAM practitioners from a variety of backgrounds on the topic of CAM. Methods Concept mapping, including free sorts, ratings, and multidimensional scaling was used to organize conceptual domains relevant to CAM into a visual "cluster map." The panel consisted of CAM providers, conventional providers, and university faculty, and was convened to help formulate conceptual domains to guide the development of a CAM survey for use with United States military veterans. Results Eight conceptual clusters were identified: 1) Self-assessment, Self-care, and Quality of Life; 2) Health Status, Health Behaviors; 3) Self-assessment of Health; 4) Practical/Economic/ Environmental Concerns; 5) Needs Assessment; 6) CAM vs. Conventional Medicine; 7) Knowledge of CAM; and 8) Experience with CAM. The clusters suggest panelists saw interactions between CAM and conventional medicine as a critical component of the current medical landscape. Conclusions Concept mapping provided insight into how CAM and conventional providers view the domain of health care, and was shown to be a useful tool in the formulation of CAM-related conceptual domains. PMID:15018623

  14. VLTI near-IR interferometric observations of Vega-like stars. Radius and age of α PsA, β Leo, β Pic, ɛ Eri and τ Cet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Folco, E.; Thévenin, F.; Kervella, P.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Ségransan, D.; Morel, P.

    2004-11-01

    We report in this paper the direct interferometric measurement of the angular diameter of five nearby Vega-like stars: α PsA, β Leo, β Pic, ɛ Eri and τ Cet. The near-infrared (K and H bands) observations were conducted at the VLTI during the commissioning period with the VINCI instrument and three different baselines ranging from 66 m to 140 m. The five stellar photospheres are resolved and we derive their angular diameters with a 1 to 2% accuracy, except for β Pic (14%). We discuss the detectability and the influence of a possible small amount of warm circumstellar dust on our measurements. In addition, we have used the stellar evolution code CESAM (Morel \\cite{m97}) to compare the computed fundamental parameters to the observed values (linear diameter, luminosity, temperature and chemical abundance). As a result of the simulation, the age of the stars is inferred and found to be in good agreement with previous estimates from various other methods.

  15. Conventions and workflows for using Situs

    SciTech Connect

    Wriggers, Willy

    2012-04-01

    Recent developments of the Situs software suite for multi-scale modeling are reviewed. Typical workflows and conventions encountered during processing of biophysical data from electron microscopy, tomography or small-angle X-ray scattering are described. Situs is a modular program package for the multi-scale modeling of atomic resolution structures and low-resolution biophysical data from electron microscopy, tomography or small-angle X-ray scattering. This article provides an overview of recent developments in the Situs package, with an emphasis on workflows and conventions that are important for practical applications. The modular design of the programs facilitates scripting in the bash shell that allows specific programs to be combined in creative ways that go beyond the original intent of the developers. Several scripting-enabled functionalities, such as flexible transformations of data type, the use of symmetry constraints or the creation of two-dimensional projection images, are described. The processing of low-resolution biophysical maps in such workflows follows not only first principles but often relies on implicit conventions. Situs conventions related to map formats, resolution, correlation functions and feature detection are reviewed and summarized. The compatibility of the Situs workflow with CCP4 conventions and programs is discussed.

  16. Unfavorable situation: NATO and the conventional balance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J.A.

    1988-11-01

    The view, long and widely held, that NATO conventional military forces are inferior to Warsaw Pact forces is one of the most important factors shaping postwar history. It influenced the size and nature of the American military commitment to Europe. It is at the heart of the extended deterrence strategy, in which the U.S. commitment to use nuclear weapons in the defense of Europe offsets the Warsaw Pact's perceived conventional superiority. The notion of Western inferiority runs through much of today's public debate on security policy-the INF Treaty, the future of nuclear and conventional arms control, U.S. and Allied defense programs, the burden-sharing debate, and so forth. The debates have spawned a new round of discussions on the nature of the conventional military balance in Europe and will affect U.S. and Western policies. The term balance conjures up the image of a scale, with the Warsaw Pacts military power placed on one side and NATO's on the other. This reflects the normal bean count approach to the military balance: Total number of tanks, artillery, combat aircraft, etc. is the surrogate for military power. The image of the scale conveys a deeper meaning, however: If the Warsaw Pact were military superior or the balance were unfavorable to NATO, NATO would, by implication, lose a military conflict in Central Europe fought with purely conventional weapons. The perception is the one that has shaped the broader Western policy debate.

  17. Two techniques for verifying conventional reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Maxfield, R.; Meerburg, A.J.

    1989-08-01

    Conventional forces, long the forgotten stepchild of the arms control process, have recently taken on an unprecedented importance. In the United States, the Bush administration has placed the question of the conventional balance in Europe at the top of its negotiating agenda. And the NATO summit meeting in May 1989 resolved a difficult intra-alliance dispute on nuclear modernization by pledging to reach a conventional reductions agreement with the Eastern bloc in the short span of one year. The author attempt here to develop two approaches to minimize data exchanges - the envelope scheme and tagging - which could be applied in the event of conventional arms control agreements in Europe. In this context, they confine themselves to a scenario imposing restrictions on the levels of certain categories of weapon systems used for waging offensive warfare or mounting surprise attacks. NATO and the Warsaw Pact have already agreed at Negotiation Conventional armed Forced in Europe (CFE) that such treaty-limited items (TLIs) would include tanks, artillery, armored troop carries, combat aircraft, and helicopters, though precise definitions are still to be worked out. The emerging CFE agreement is expected to cover troop levels as well, but this article will focus on verification of armaments.

  18. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  19. Distance Education at Conventional Universities in Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kappel, Hans-Henning; Lehmann, Burkhard; Loeper, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Reviews developments in German distance education from the Fernuniversitat in the 1970s to the hybridized (face-to-face and distance education) programs at conventional universities. Discusses the work of the German Association for Distance Education and two dual-mode programs: the master of arts degree at the University of Koblenz-Landau and the…

  20. James Madison and the Constitutional Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    Part 1 of this three-part article traces James Madison's life and focuses primarily on those events that prepared him for leadership in the U.S. Constitutional Convention of 1787. It describes his early love of learning, education, and public service efforts. Part 2 chronicles Madison's devotion to study and preparation prior to the Constitutional…

  1. 47 CFR 32.20 - Numbering convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... made by citing the account numbers to the right of the decimal point; e.g., Account 2232 rather than... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.20 Numbering convention. (a) The number “32” (appearing to the left of the first decimal point) indicates the part number. (b) The numbers...

  2. 47 CFR 32.20 - Numbering convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... made by citing the account numbers to the right of the decimal point; e.g., Account 2232 rather than... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.20 Numbering convention. (a) The number “32” (appearing to the left of the first decimal point) indicates the part number. (b) The numbers...

  3. Teaching the Conventions of Academic Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thonney, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on disciplinary discourses, it's not surprising that so little recent attention has been devoted to identifying conventions that are universal in academic discourse. In this essay, the author argues that there are shared features that unite academic writing, and that by introducing these features to first-year students…

  4. A Convention for Coordinated Universal Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Dennis

    2012-08-01

    To keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical year, intercalary days are inserted following a commonly adopted convention that defines the Gregorian Calendar. Similarly, to keep the day composed of 86, 400 Système Inter national (SI) seconds synchronized with the day defined by the Earth’s rotation, intercalary seconds are occasionally inserted in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). Both procedures are timekeeping adjustments that attempt to account for the fact that the astronomical phenomena cannot be characterized conveniently by an integral number of smaller units of uniform duration. In the former case the duration of the year varies slowly and predictably so that it is relatively easy to account for the length of the y ear and to plan ahead accordingly. In the latter case, however, the relatively unpredictable nature of the Earth’s rotational speed makes the intercalation of seconds in common timekeeping difficult to predict and problematic to plan in advance. Adopting a convention analogous to the conventional rules that define the Gregorian calendar would appear to be a possible solution. The current definition of UTC requires that UT1 - UTC remain less than 0.9s. Using historical data that characterize the Earth’s variable rotation the magnitude of the expected values of UT1 - UTC that might be expected as the result of using forecasts is evaluated for various possible conventional intercalary second models.

  5. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F&ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F&ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I&C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Industry/University Cooperative Programs. Proceedings of a Workshop Held in Conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States (20th, Las Vegas, Nevada, December 2, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Graduate Schools in the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Proceedings of a 1980 workshop on industry/university cooperative programs are presented. Program presentations and authors include: "On Industry/Academia Relations" (T. Baron); "The MIT Liaison Program" (J. D. Bruce); "An Industrial Perspective of Academic Programs" (R. Fuller); "University/Industry Interactions through 'Centers'" (R. L.…

  8. A Selection of Papers from NWAVE [New Ways of Analyzing Variation] (25th, Las Vegas, Nevada, October 1996). University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 4, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boberg, Charles, Ed.; Meyerhoff, Miriam, Ed.; Strassel, Stephanie, Ed.

    This issue includes the following articles: "Towards a Sociolinguistics of Style" (Alan Bell, Gary Johnson); "Engendering Identities: Pronoun Selection as an Indicator of Salient Intergroup Identities" (Miriam Meyerhoff); "A Majority Sound Change in a Minority Community" (Carmen Fought); "Addressing the Actuation Question for Local Linguistic…

  9. Why are Children Still Being Infected with HIV? Impact of an Integrated Public Health and Clinical Practice Intervention on Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission in Las Vegas, Nevada, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ezeanolue, EE; Pharr, JR; Hunt, A; Patel, D; Jackson, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: During a 9 months period, September 2005 through June 2006, Nevada documented six cases of pediatric HIV acquired through mother-to-child transmission. Subsequently, a community-based approach to the care of women and children living with or exposed to HIV was implemented. Subjects and Methods: A detailed review of mother-infant pairs where HIV transmission occurred was performed to identify missed opportunities for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission. An intervention program was developed and implemented using the six-step process. Data were collected prospectively over a 6 years period (2007–2012) and were evaluated for six core outcomes measures: (1) adequacy of prenatal care (2) HIV diagnoses of expectant mothers prior to delivery (3) appropriate use of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy before delivery (4) appropriate use of cesarean section for delivery (5) adequacy of zidovudine prophylaxis to newborn (6) HIV transmission rate. Results: Twenty-six infants were born to HIV-infected mothers from July 2005 to June 2006 with 6 documented infections. One hundred and five infants were born to HIV infected mothers from January 2007 to December 2012. Postimplementation, adequacy of prenatal care increased from 58% (15/26) to 85% (89/105); appropriate use of ARV therapy before delivery increased from 73% (19/26) to 86% (90/105); cesarean section as the method for delivery increased from 62% (16/26) to 74% (78/105); adequacy of zidovudine prophylaxis to newborn increased from 54% (14/26) to 87% (91/105). HIV transmission rate dropped from 23% (6/26) to 0%. Conclusion: Integrating public health and clinical services in the care of HIV-infected pregnant women and exposed infants leads to better coordination of care and improved quality of care. PMID:26229713

  10. Physical Activity in Early and Modern Populations. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Physical Education (59th, Las Vegas, Nevada, April 11-13, 1987). No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malina, Robert M., Ed.; Eckert, Helen M., Ed.

    Eleven conference papers explore physical activity in ancient societies as well as human adaptation of physical activities in modern society. The following papers are included: (1) "Physical Activity in Early and Modern Populations: An Evolutionary View" (Robert M. Malina); (2) "How Active Were Early Populations? or Squeezing the Fossil Record"…

  11. Sustaining the National Geothermal Data System: Considerations for a System Wide Approach and Node Maintenance, Geothermal Resources Council 37th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, September 29-October 2, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Lee; Chickering, Cathy; Anderson, Arlene; Richard, Stephen M.

    2013-09-23

    Since the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office has funded $33.7 million for multiple data digitization and aggregation projects focused on making vast amounts of geothermal relevant data available to industry for advancing geothermal exploration. These projects are collectively part of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), a distributed, networked system for maintaining, sharing, and accessing data in an effort to lower the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Determining “who owns” and “who maintains” the NGDS and its data nodes (repositories in the distributed system) is yet to be determined. However, the invest- ment in building and populating the NGDS has been substantial, both in terms of dollars and time; it is critical that this investment be protected by ensuring sustainability of the data, the software and systems, and the accessibility of the data. Only then, will the benefits be fully realized. To keep this operational system sustainable will require four core elements: continued serving of data and applications; maintenance of system operations; a governance structure; and an effective business model. Each of these presents a number of challenges. Data being added to the NGDS are not strictly geothermal but data considered relevant to geothermal exploration and develop- ment, including vast amounts of oil and gas and groundwater wells, among other data. These are relevant to a broader base of users. By diversifying the client base to other users and other fields, the cost of maintaining core infrastructure can be spread across an array of stakeholders and clients. It is presumed that NGDS will continue to provide free and open access to its data resources. The next-phase NGDS operation should be structured to eventually pursue revenue streams to help off-set sustainability expenses as necessary and appropriate, potentially including income from: grants and contracts (agencies, foundations, pri- vate sector), membership, fees for services (consulting, training, customization, ‘app’ development), repository services (data, services, apps, models, documents, multimedia), advertisements, fees for premier services or applications, subscriptions to value added services, licenses, contributions and donations, endow- ments, and sponsorships.

  12. Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching. Proceedings of the Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) (14th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 2-6, 1992). Volume 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Corey A., Ed.

    The focus of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) is to improve undergraduate biology laboratory experiences by promoting the development and dissemination of interesting, innovative, and reliable laboratory exercises. This proceedings volume contains 11 papers: "A Practical Guide to the Use of Cellular Slime Molds for…

  13. Annual National Leadership Development Seminar for State Directors of Vocational Education (4th, Las Vegas, Nev., September 14-17, 1971). Comprehensive Personnel Development for Vocational-Technical Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazarian, Edward N., Ed.; Ward, Darrell, L., Ed.

    The proceedings of this seminar, attended by state directors and other leaders in vocational and technical education from 41 states, the District of Columbia, Saipan and Puerto Rico, contain presentations by 18 leaders from industry, government, and education. Specific objectives were to: (1) provide a forum for presentations concerning personnel…

  14. Conventional occlusion versus pharmacologic penalization for amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianjing; Shotton, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background Amblyopia is defined as defective visual acuity in one or both eyes without demonstrable abnormality of the visual pathway, and is not immediately resolved by wearing glasses. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of conventional occlusion versus atropine penalization for amblyopia. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, preference lists, science citation index and ongoing trials up to June 2009. Selection criteria We included randomized/quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing conventional occlusion to atropine penalization for amblyopia. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened abstracts and full text articles, abstracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. Main results Three trials with a total of 525 amblyopic eyes were included. One trial was assessed as having a low risk of bias among these three trials, and one was assessed as having a high risk of bias. Evidence from three trials suggests atropine penalization is as effective as conventional occlusion. One trial found similar improvement in vision at six and 24 months. At six months, visual acuity in the amblyopic eye improved from baseline 3.16 lines in the occlusion and 2.84 lines in the atropine group (mean difference 0.034 logMAR; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.005 to 0.064 logMAR). At 24 months, additional improvement was seen in both groups; but there continued to be no meaningful difference (mean difference 0.01 logMAR; 95% CI −0.02 to 0.04 logMAR). The second trial reported atropine to be more effective than occlusion. At six months, visual acuity improved 1.8 lines in the patching group and 3.4 lines in the atropine penalization group, and was in favor of atropine (mean difference −0.16 logMAR; 95% CI −0.23 to −0.09 logMAR). Different occlusion modalities were used in these two trials. The third trial had inherent methodological flaws and limited inference could

  15. Whose Quality Conventions? The Application of Convention Theory in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    Internationally, demands for greater certainty over the quality of higher education are multiplying. This article argues that convention theory offers insights for considering quality in higher education in an increasingly market-based system. Examples from the Australian higher education system are used to show how quality conventions can be…

  16. The Conventional and Unconventional about Disability Conventions: A Reflective Analysis of United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umeasiegbu, Veronica I.; Bishop, Malachy; Mpofu, Elias

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in relation to prior United Nations conventions on disability and U.S. disability policy law with a view to identifying the conventional and also the incremental advances of the CRPD. Previous United Nations conventions related to…

  17. Time, spatial, and spectral resolution of the Hα line-formation region of Deneb and Rigel with the VEGA/CHARA interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, O.; Dessart, L.; Mourard, D.; Bério, Ph.; Buil, Ch.; Bonneau, D.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Clausse, J. M.; Delaa, O.; Marcotto, A.; Meilland, A.; Millour, F.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Roussel, A.; Spang, A.; Stee, P.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2010-10-01

    Context. BA-type supergiants are amongst the most optically-bright stars. They are observable in extragalactic environments, hence potential accurate distance indicators. Aims: An extensive record of emission activity in the Hα line of the BA supergiants β Orionis (Rigel, B8Ia) and α Cygni (Deneb, A2Ia) is indicative of localized time-dependent mass ejections. However, little is known about the spatial distribution of these apparent structures. Here, we employ optical interferometry to study the Hα line-formation region in these stellar environments. Methods: High spatial- ( 0.001'') and spectral- (R = 30 000) resolution observations of Hα were obtained with the visible recombiner VEGA installed on the CHARA interferometer, using the S1S2 array-baseline (34 m). Six independent observations were done on Deneb during the years 2008 and 2009, and two of Rigel in 2009. We analyze this dataset with the 1D non-LTE radiative-transfer code cmfgen, and assess the impact of the wind on the visible and near-IR interferometric signatures, using both Balmer-line and continuum photons. Results: We observe a visibility decrease in Hα for both Rigel and Deneb, suggesting that the line-formation region is extended ( 1.5-1.75 Rstar). We observe a significant visibility decrease for Deneb in the Siii 6371 Å line. We witness time variations in the differential phase for Deneb, implying an inhomogeneous and unsteady circumstellar environment, while no such variability is seen in differential visibilities. Radiative-transfer modeling of Deneb, with allowance for stellar-wind mass loss, accounts fairly well for the observed decrease in the Hα visibility. Based on the observed differential visibilities, we estimate that the mass-loss rate of Deneb has changed by less than 5%. Based on observations made with the CHARA array.

  18. Compliance with the Climate Change Convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil Adger, W.

    Compliance with the Climate Change Convention is a necessary step to avoid the impacts of accelerated climate change through the enhanced greenhouse effect. The political and economic factors influencing compliance are numerous. Two are focused on here. Firstly, the process by which international agreements are translated to action through becoming national programmes is important. For the U.K. and other EU members, compliance is inextricably linked to its responsibilities within the European Union. Secondly, joint implementation of the Convention through bilateral offsets is discussed. Emissions related to biological sources such as from forestry, agriculture and land use, the scientific uncertainty in their measurement, and the skewed distribution of their sources to developing countries, ensure that joint implementation which entails offsets of these emissions through sink enhancement is unlikely to be a major part of global strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, due to transactions costs and to disputes over equity in resource use.

  19. 1. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON CONVENT AVE. FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON CONVENT AVE. FROM INTERSECTION OF SOUTH CONVENT AVE. AND WEST KENNEDY ST. - Barrio Libre, West Kennedy & West Seventeenth Streets, Meyer & Convent Avenues, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  20. Non-conventional mesons at PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Non-conventional mesons, such as glueballs and tetraquarks, will be in the focus of the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. In this lecture we recall the basic properties of QCD and describe some features of unconventional states. We focus on the search of the not-yet discovered glueballs and the use of the extended Linear Sigma Model for this purpose, and on the already discovered but not-yet understood X, Y, Z states.

  1. Designing Interoperable Data Products with Community Conventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, T.; Jelenak, A.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    The HDF Product Designer (HPD) is a cloud-based client-server collaboration tool that can bring existing netCDF-3/4/CF, HDF4/5, and HDF-EOS2/5 products together to create new interoperable data products that serve the needs of the Earth Science community. The tool is designed to reduce the burden of creating and storing data in standards-compliant, interoperable HDF5 files and lower the technical and programming skill threshold needed to design such products by providing a user interface that combines the netCDF-4/HDF5 interoperable feature set with applicable metadata conventions. Users can collaborate quickly to devise new HDF5 products while at the same time seamlessly incorporating the latest best practices and conventions in their community by importing existing data products. The tool also incorporates some expert system features through CLIPS, allowing custom approaches in the file design, as well as easy transfer of preferred conventions as they are being developed. The current state of the tool and the plans for future development will be presented. Constructive input from any interested parties is always welcome.

  2. From conventional to advanced environmental sanitation.

    PubMed

    Schertenleib, R

    2005-01-01

    The basic concept of collecting domestic liquid waste in water-borne sewer systems goes back more than 100 years and became in the last century the conventional approach to sanitation in urban areas. Over the years, these sewage disposal systems had to be successively upgraded by additional sewage treatment plants increasing investment, operating and maintenance costs. Although these conventional sanitation systems could improve significantly the public health situation in those countries who could afford to install and operate them, it is highly questionable, if they are economically and ecologically sustainable. The large number of people in the developing world who still do not have access to adequate sanitation is a clear indication that the conventional approach to sanitation is not adapted to the socio-economic condition prevailing in most countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Advanced environmental sanitation is aiming not only to protect public health and the integrity of aquatic ecosystems but also to conserve precious freshwater and non-renewable resources. The Bellagio Principles and the Household Centred Environmental Sanitation Approach (HCES) are suggested as guiding principles and a new approach for planing and designing advanced (sustainable) environmental sanitation systems. PMID:16104400

  3. From conventional to advanced environmental sanitation.

    PubMed

    Schertenleib, R

    2005-01-01

    The basic concept of collecting domestic liquid waste in water-borne sewer systems goes back more than 100 years and became in the last century the conventional approach to sanitation in urban areas. Over the years, these sewage disposal systems had to be successively upgraded by additional sewage treatment plants increasing investment, operating and maintenance costs. Although these conventional sanitation systems could improve significantly the public health situation in those countries who could afford to install and operate them, it is highly questionable, if they are economically and ecologically sustainable. The large number of people in the developing world who still do not have access to adequate sanitation is a clear indication that the conventional approach to sanitation is not adapted to the socio-economic condition prevailing in most countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Advanced environmental sanitation is aiming not only to protect public health and the integrity of aquatic ecosystems but also to conserve precious freshwater and non-renewable resources. The Bellagio Principles and the Household Centred Environmental Sanitation Approach (HCES) are suggested as guiding principles and a new approach for planing and designing advanced (sustainable) environmental sanitation systems.

  4. Measures to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzman, E.; Kellman, B.

    1999-11-05

    This seminar is another excellent opportunity for those involved in preventing chemical weapons production and use to learn from each other about how the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) can become a foundation of arms control in Africa and around the world. The author is grateful to the staff of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) for inviting him to address this distinguished seminar. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors alone, and do not represent the position of the government of the US nor or of any other institution. In 1993, as the process of CWC ratification was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the treaty with national law would cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States Parties in how the Convention would be carried out. As a result the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention was prepared and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Manual was reviewed by the Committee of Legal Experts on National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Mica. In February 1998, the second edition of the Manual was published in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The second edition 1998 clarified the national implementation options to reflect post-entry-into-force thinking, added extensive references to national implementing measures that had been enacted by various States Parties, and included a prototype national implementing statute developed by the authors to provide a starting point for those whose national implementing

  5. Environmentally Endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Mutations in lasR Are Associated with Increased Disease Severity in Corneal Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hammond, John H; Hebert, Wesley P; Naimie, Amanda; Ray, Kathryn; Van Gelder, Rachel D; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Lalitha, Prajna; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Acharya, Nisha R; Lietman, Thomas; Hogan, Deborah A; Zegans, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    , multicenter clinical study of keratitis and were associated with worse clinical outcomes than LasR-intact strains despite reduced production of LasR-regulated factors. Additionally, these lasR mutants were closely related strains or clones, as determined by molecular analysis. Because bacterial keratitis is community acquired, these data indicate infection by endemic, LasR-deficient strains in the environment. These results suggest that the conventional paradigm regarding the role for LasR-mediated regulation of virulence is more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:27631025

  6. Environmentally Endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Mutations in lasR Are Associated with Increased Disease Severity in Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Hebert, Wesley P.; Naimie, Amanda; Ray, Kathryn; Van Gelder, Rachel D.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Lalitha, Prajna; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    a large, multicenter clinical study of keratitis and were associated with worse clinical outcomes than LasR-intact strains despite reduced production of LasR-regulated factors. Additionally, these lasR mutants were closely related strains or clones, as determined by molecular analysis. Because bacterial keratitis is community acquired, these data indicate infection by endemic, LasR-deficient strains in the environment. These results suggest that the conventional paradigm regarding the role for LasR-mediated regulation of virulence is more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:27631025

  7. Environmentally Endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Mutations in lasR Are Associated with Increased Disease Severity in Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Hebert, Wesley P.; Naimie, Amanda; Ray, Kathryn; Van Gelder, Rachel D.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Lalitha, Prajna; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    a large, multicenter clinical study of keratitis and were associated with worse clinical outcomes than LasR-intact strains despite reduced production of LasR-regulated factors. Additionally, these lasR mutants were closely related strains or clones, as determined by molecular analysis. Because bacterial keratitis is community acquired, these data indicate infection by endemic, LasR-deficient strains in the environment. These results suggest that the conventional paradigm regarding the role for LasR-mediated regulation of virulence is more complex than previously appreciated.

  8. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... their precursors listed in Schedules within the Convention to trade restrictions. Trade restrictions... to exports and reexports of precursor chemicals controlled by ECCN 1C350, for CB reasons. Also...

  9. The 2012 NCTE Presidential Address: Literacy, Rhetoric, Education, Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilyard, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the text of Keith Gilyard's presidential address, delivered at the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Annual Convention in Las Vegas, Nevada, on November 18, 2012. In his address he proposes several core elements that he believes will instrumentally improve the education system in the United States: a rich…

  10. VEGA/CHARA interferometric observations of Cepheids. I. A resolved structure around the prototype classical Cepheid δ Cep in the visible spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardetto, N.; Mérand, A.; Mourard, D.; Storm, J.; Gieren, W.; Fouqué, P.; Gallenne, A.; Graczyk, D.; Kervella, P.; Neilson, H.; Pietrzynski, G.; Pilecki, B.; Breitfelder, J.; Berio, P.; Challouf, M.; Clausse, J.-M.; Ligi, R.; Mathias, P.; Meilland, A.; Perraut, K.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Spang, A.; Stee, P.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The B-W method is used to determine the distance of Cepheids and consists in combining the angular size variations of the star, as derived from infrared surface-brightness relations or interferometry, with its linear size variation, as deduced from visible spectroscopy using the projection factor. The underlying assumption is that the photospheres probed in the infrared and in the visible are located at the same layer in the star whatever the pulsation phase. While many Cepheids have been intensively observed by infrared beam combiners, only a few have been observed in the visible. Aims: This paper is part of a project to observe Cepheids in the visible with interferometry as a counterpart to infrared observations already in hand. Methods: Observations of δ Cep itself were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument over the full pulsation cycle of the star. Results: These visible interferometric data are consistent in first approximation with a quasi-hydrostatic model of pulsation surrounded by a static circumstellar environment (CSE) with a size of θCSE = 8.9 ± 3.0 mas and a relative flux contribution of fCSE = 0.07 ± 0.01. A model of visible nebula (a background source filling the field of view of the interferometer) with the same relative flux contribution is also consistent with our data at small spatial frequencies. However, in both cases, we find discrepancies in the squared visibilities at high spatial frequencies (maximum 2σ) with two different regimes over the pulsation cycle of the star, φ = 0.0 - 0.8 and φ = 0.8-1.0. We provide several hypotheses to explain these discrepancies, but more observations and theoretical investigations are necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn. Conclusions: For the first time we have been able to detect in the visible domain a resolved structure around δ Cep. We have also shown that a simple model cannot explain the observations, and more work will be necessary in the future, both on observations and

  11. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  12. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described.

  13. Simulating a Guitar with a Conventional Sonometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstein, Zily; Gower, Christina M.; Varieschi, Gabriele U.

    Musical acoustics is an interesting sub-field of physics which is usually able to engage students in a dual perspective, by combining science and art together. The physics principles involved in most musical instruments can be easily demonstrated with standard laboratory equipment and can become part of lecture or lab activities. In particular, we will show in this paper how to simulate a guitar using a conventional sonometer, in relation to the problem of the instrument intonation, i.e., how to obtain correctly tuned notes on a guitar or similar string instruments.

  14. B-1B excels in conventional role

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.B.

    1992-07-01

    A report is presented of an observational flight performed in a USAF B-1B to better understand the operational aspects of the aircraft's new conventional bombing mission as an integral element of a multiaircraft tactical strike package. The basic flight plan consisted of a standard takeoff and climb, cruising to the training area at 22,000 ft, descending for a 400 ft low-level run, making two simulated bomb drops, and climbing back to 25,000 ft for the return to base. Attention is given the new/enhanced avionics, the ALQ-161 defensive electronic warfare system and ripple-release Mk. 82 bombing procedures.

  15. National Convention on Family Life Education.

    PubMed

    1973-12-01

    This secretarial report gives brief comments on some discussion of topics at the National Convention on Family Life Education. Discussion included: 1) legalized prostitution as a means to reduce venereal disease; 2) family life education promotion by government and civic groups; 3) more authority for the Population Council; 4) more liberal abortion legislation than previously; 5) statutory notification of veneral disease by medical practitioners; 6) compensatory measures for working women with young children, and 7) the need for modernization of legislation pertaining to child health, adoption, paternity, the Persons Act, infant life preservation, drugs, age of consent, and the age of minority.

  16. Non-conventional sources for ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.P.; Weiss, L.H.

    1981-12-01

    Two processes for conversion of methanol to ethylene are reviewed as to economic attractiveness at about 1990. The processes are homologation of methane to ethanol with dehydration to ethylene and direct catalytic cracking of methanol to ethylene using Mobil zeolite catalysts. For the economic projections, synthesis gas is assumed to be available from a large leverage-financed, synthetis gas unit based on a pressurized, entrained bed, coal-gasifier, built on the US Gulf Coast in 1990 at a cost of $0.19/m/sup 3/, and methane is valued at $650/metric ton in 1990 based on continuous operation of natural gas-based methanol plants in the US. The economics of ethylene production via conventional steam cracking of naphtha/gas oil are compared with those of the new technology. The methanol homologation/ethanol dehydration route to ethylene is more attractive than catalytic cracking at 40% carbon selectivity to ethylene. At higher selectivities, the methanol cracking scheme becomes economically competitive. However, with an assumption of a price of $650/metric ton for methanol in 1990, neiter methanol-based route is competitive with conventional steam cracking on the Gulf Coast in 1990. A methanol price of $500/metric ton would make the methanol-based oriduction routes attractive. 23 references.

  17. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  18. The Chemical Weapons Convention -- Legal issues

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) offers a unique challenge to the US system of constitutional law. Its promise of eliminating what is the most purely genocidal type of weapon from the world`s arsenals as well as of destroying the facilities for producing these weapons, brings with it a set of novel legal issues. The reservations about the CWC expressed by US business people are rooted in concern about safeguarding confidential business information and protecting the constitutional right to privacy. The chief worry is that international verification inspectors will misuse their power to enter commercial property and that trade secrets or other private information will be compromised as a result. It has been charged that the Convention is probably unconstitutional. The author categorically disagrees with that view and is aware of no scholarly writing that supports it. The purpose of this presentation is to show that CWC verification activities can be implemented in the US consistently with the traditional constitutional regard for commercial and individual privacy. First, he very briefly reviews the types of verification inspections that the CWC permits, as well as some of its specific privacy protections. Second, he explains how the Fourth Amendment right to privacy works in the context of CWC verification inspections. Finally, he reviews how verification inspections can be integrated into these constitutional requirements in the SU through a federal implementing statute.

  19. Suggested notation conventions for rotational seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    We note substantial inconsistency among authors discussing rotational motions observed with inertial seismic sensors (and much more so in the broader topic of rotational phenomena). Working from physics and other precedents, we propose standard terminology and a preferred reference frame for inertial sensors (Fig. 1) that may be consistently used in discussions of both finite and infinitesimal observed rotational and translational motions in seismology and earthquake engineering. The scope of this article is limited to observations because there are significant differences in the analysis of finite and infinitesimal rotations, though such discussions should remain compatible with those presented here where possible. We recommend the general use of the notation conventions presented in this tutorial, and we recommend that any deviations or alternatives be explicitly defined.

  20. Subcutaneous Emphysema following Emergent Surgical Conventional Tracheostomy

    PubMed Central

    Ardekian, Leon; Barak, Michal; Rachmiel, Adi

    2014-01-01

    In maxillofacial surgery, tracheostomy is indicated in congenital, inflammatory, oncologic, or traumatic respiratory obstruction. In traumatic cases, however, it is sometimes hard to implement. We describe subcutaneous emphysema following emergent surgical conventional tracheostomy performed after stab injury to the floor of the mouth. We analyze the course that led to this complication and discuss suggestions on how to avoid it. In addition, we review the literature to improve our knowledge and practice regarding this entity. Massive subcutaneous neck emphysema occurred because ventilation started at the time when the hemorrhage was not completely managed and the tracheal tube was not fully secured. In traumatic cases with profound bleeding, hemorrhage management must be performed carefully. The recommendation not to ventilate until the hemorrhage is completely managed should be observed. PMID:25383149

  1. HMI conventions for process control graphics.

    PubMed

    Pikaar, Ruud N

    2012-01-01

    Process operators supervise and control complex processes. To enable the operator to do an adequate job, instrumentation and process control engineers need to address several related topics, such as console design, information design, navigation, and alarm management. In process control upgrade projects, usually a 1:1 conversion of existing graphics is proposed. This paper suggests another approach, efficiently leading to a reduced number of new powerful process graphics, supported by a permanent process overview displays. In addition a road map for structuring content (process information) and conventions for the presentation of objects, symbols, and so on, has been developed. The impact of the human factors engineering approach on process control upgrade projects is illustrated by several cases.

  2. Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z. . E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D.; Foo, M.L.; Cava, R.J.

    2006-07-15

    Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

  3. Formalizing Linguistic Conventions for Conceptual Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Jörg; Delfmann, Patrick; Herwig, Sebastian; Lis, Łukasz; Stein, Armin

    A precondition for the appropriate analysis of conceptual models is not only their syntactic correctness but also their semantic comparability. Assuring comparability is challenging especially when models are developed by different persons. Empirical studies show that such models can vary heavily, especially in model element naming, even if they express the same issue. In contrast to most ontology-driven approaches proposing the resolution of these differences ex-post, we introduce an approach that avoids naming differences in conceptual models already during modeling. Therefore we formalize naming conventions combining domain thesauri and phrase structures based on a lin-guistic grammar. This allows for guiding modelers automatically during the modeling process using standardized labels for model elements. Our approach is generic, making it applicable for any modeling language.

  4. Microtearing modes in spherical and conventional tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Pusztai, I.; Guttenfelder, W.; Fülöp, T.; Mollén, A.

    2013-06-01

    The onset and characteristics of microtearing modes (MTM) in the core of spherical (NSTX) and conventional tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade and JET) are studied through local linear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO (Candy and Belli 2011 General Atomics Report GA-A26818). For experimentally relevant core plasma parameters in the NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks, in agreement with previous works, we find MTMs as the dominant linear instability. Also, for JET-like core parameters considered in our study an MTM is found as the most unstable mode. In all of these plasmas, finite collisionality is needed for MTMs to become unstable and the electron temperature gradient is found to be the fundamental drive. However, a significant difference is observed in the dependence of the linear growth rate of MTMs on electron temperature gradient. While it varies weakly and non-monotonically in JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas, in NSTX it increases with the electron temperature gradient.

  5. Bimatoprost, Prostamide Activity and Conventional Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Z.; Woodward, D.F.; Cornell, C.; Fliri, H.; Martos, J.; Petit, S.; Wang, J.W.; Kharlamb, A.B.; Wheeler, L.A.; Garst, M.E.; Landsverk, K.; Struble, C.S.; Stamer, W.D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Despite structural similarity with prostaglandin F2α, the ocular hypotensive agent, bimatoprost (Lumigan), shows unique pharmacology in vitro and functional activity in vivo. Unfortunately, the precise mechanisms that underlie bimatoprost's distinctive impact on aqueous humor dynamics are unclear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of bimatoprost and a novel prostamide-selective antagonist, AGN 211334, on human conventional drainage. Methods: Two model systems were employed to test the consequences of bimatoprost and/or AGN 211334 treatment on conventional drainage. Human anterior segments in organ culture were perfused at a constant flow rate of 2.5μl/min while pressure was recorded continuously. After stable baseline facilities were established, segments were treated with drug(s) and pressure was monitored for an additional three days. In parallel, drug(s) effects on hydraulic conductivity of human trabecular meshwork (TM) cell monolayers were evaluated. Pharmacological properties of AGN 211334 were characterized using isolated feline iris preparations in organ culture and heterologously expressed G-protein coupled receptors in vitro. Results: Bimatoprost increased outflow facility by an average of 40 ± 10 % within 48 hours of treatment (n=10, p<0.001). Preincubation or coincubation with AGN 211334 significantly blunted bimatoprost effects by 95% or 43%, respectively. Similar results were obtained in cell culture experiments where bimatoprost increased hydraulic conductivity of TM cell monolayers by 78 ± 25 %. Pretreatment with AGN 211334 completely blocked bimatoprost effects while coincubation decreased bimatoprost effects on average by 74%. Interestingly, in both models AGN 211334 alone significantly decreased fluid flux across trabecular tissues/cells. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that bimatoprost interacts with a prostamide receptor in the trabecular meshwork to increase outflow facility. PMID:17724194

  6. CECSelected Convention Papers; Annual International Convention (46th, New York City, April 14-20, 1968.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    A collection of selected convention papers is presented on the following topics: the gifted child, children with behavioral disorders, the visually handicapped, programs in special education, the homebound and hospitalized, children with learning disabilities, international aspects of special education, general articles, administration programs,…

  7. NESTA Revolutionizing Teacher's Experiences at NSTA Conventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F.

    2002-05-01

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) conventions are traditionally composed of short workshops, half or full day workshops, and lectures on science teaching or education research. Occasional science lectures such as the AGU lecture offer science content information. The National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) will join the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT), American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Geological Institute (AGI) to bring teachers a suite of exciting and informative events at the (NSTA) 2002 convention. Events begin with a guided learning field trip to Mission Trails Regional Park and Torrey Pines State Reserve where Earth and space science teachers experience a model of constructivist leaning techniques. Most field trips are a "show and tell" experience, designed to transmit knowledge from the field trip leader to the field trip participants. In the "guided learning" environment, the leader serves as a facilitator, asking questions, guiding participants to discover concepts for themselves. Participants examine selected processes and features that constitute a constructivist experience in which knowledge acquired at any given location builds on knowledge brought to the site. Employing this strategy involves covering less breadth but greater depth, modeling the concept of "less is more." On Thursday NESTA will host two Share-a-thons. These are not what a person would think of as a traditional workshop where presenter makes a presentation then the participants work on an activity. They could be called the flea market of teaching ideas. Tables are set around the perimeter of a room where the presenters are stationed. Teachers move from table to table picking up information and watching short demonstrations. The Earth and Space Science Resource Day on Friday will focus on teachers needs. Starting with breakfast, teachers will hear from Soames Summerhays, Naturalist and President of Summerhays Films, about how he

  8. 77 FR 51546 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... appropriate landholding agencies at the following addresses AIR FORCE: Mr. Robert Moore, Air Force Real... Alan Bible Federal Bldg. 600 S. Las Vegas Blvd. Las Vegas NV 89101 Landholding Agency: GSA...

  9. Conventional and advanced imaging in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Y; Sutton, I J; Ghadiri, M; Masters, L; Zivadinov, R; Barnett, M H

    2014-08-01

    Myelitis and optic neuritis are prototypic clinical presentations of both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Once considered a subtype of multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, is now known to have a discrete pathogenesis in which antibodies to the water channel, aquaporin 4, play a critical role. Timely differentiation of neuromyelitis optica from MS is imperative, determining both prognosis and treatment strategy. Early, aggressive immunosuppression is required to prevent the accrual of severe disability in neuromyelitis optica; conversely, MS-specific therapies may exacerbate the disease. The diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica requires the integration of clinical, MR imaging, and laboratory data, but current criteria are insensitive and exclude patients with limited clinical syndromes. Failure to recognize the expanding spectrum of cerebral MR imaging patterns associated with aquaporin 4 antibody seropositivity adds to diagnostic uncertainty in some patients. We present the state of the art in conventional and nonconventional MR imaging in neuromyelitis optica and review the place of neuroimaging in the diagnosis, management, and research of the condition.

  10. [Conventional and semi-open kyphoplasty].

    PubMed

    Boszczyk, B M; Bierschneider, M; Hauck, S; Vastmans, J; Potulski, M; Beisse, R; Robert, B; Jaksche, H

    2004-01-01

    Kyphoplasty is a young method which was developed for the minimally invasive augmentation of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. In contrast to vertebroplasty, the kyphoplasty technique allows an age-dependent fracture reduction through the inflation of a special balloon in the fractured cancellous bone of the vertebral body. The cancellous bone of the fracture zone is compressed by the balloon, so that a cavity remains in the vertebral body after removing the balloon, which is filled with highly viscous augmentation material. The reduced risk of serious complications, for example epidural leakage of augmentation material, justifies progressively expanding the indications for this technique to traumatic fractures with involvement of the posterior vertebral wall and neoplastic vertebral collapse due to osteolytic metastasis. Besides the indications for the conventional percutaneous approaches, the microsurgical interlaminary approach allows the use of kyphoplasty in more complex fractures involving compression of the neural structures. Kyphoplasty induces swift pain relief and allows rapid mobilisation of patients due to the immediate stabilisation of the affected vertebral bodies. Apart from the operative intervention, the medical treatment of the primary disease and the rehabilitation of the individual patient should be optimised through an interdisciplinary approach.

  11. Occupational differences between conventional and saturation divers.

    PubMed

    Biersner, R J; Hall, D A; Linaweaver, P G

    1976-01-01

    Diving experiences of 53 Divers First Class attending the U.S. Navy Saturation Diver Training Program were compared to 155 Divers First Class performing routine operational dives. The two groups were matched for years of diving experience, total number of dives, and total number of SCUBA dives. The Diving Experience Questionnaire (DEQ), which consisted of 43 items dealing with specific diving conditions and activites, was used to document the diving backgrounds of the two groups. Five of the 43 items were found to significantly and uniquely differentiate between the two groups. Those attending the Saturation Diving Program a) made more dives between 46-61 m (151-200 ft), b) had more experience with semiclosed-circuit SCUBA, c) attended more deep-diving training courses, d) made fewer dives in water warmer than 70 degrees F, and e) had fewer specialized qualifications outside deep diving. The multiple regression analysis which differentiated between the two groups resulted in an R of 0.48. These five items indicate that volunteering for saturation diving is consistent or congruent with past deep-diving experience, while remaining in conventional diving is congruent with previous shallow-water experience. These results indicate that the DEQ may be a highly useful method of differentiating between experienced divers.

  12. Non-conventional therapeutics for oral infections.

    PubMed

    Allaker, Robert P; Ian Douglas, C W

    2015-01-01

    As our knowledge of host-microbial interactions within the oral cavity increases, future treatments are likely to be more targeted. For example, efforts to target a single species or key virulence factors that they produce, while maintaining the natural balance of the resident oral microbiota that acts to modulate the host immune response would be an advantage. Targeted approaches may be directed at the black-pigmented anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, associated with periodontitis. Such pigments provide an opportunity for targeted phototherapy with high-intensity monochromatic light. Functional inhibition approaches, including the use of enzyme inhibitors, are also being explored to control periodontitis. More general disruption of dental plaque through the use of enzymes and detergents, alone and in combination, shows much promise. The use of probiotics and prebiotics to improve gastrointestinal health has now led to an interest in using these approaches to control oral disease. More recently the potential of antimicrobial peptides and nanotechnology, through the application of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive and delivery capabilities, has been explored. The aim of this review is to consider the current status as regards non-conventional treatment approaches for oral infections with particular emphasis on the plaque-related diseases. PMID:25668296

  13. Josephson current between topological and conventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioselevich, P. A.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Feigel'man, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the stationary Josephson current in a junction between a topological and an ordinary (topologically trivial) superconductor. Such an S-TS junction hosts a Majorana zero mode that significantly influences the current-phase relation. The presence of the Majorana state is intimately related with the breaking of the time-reversal symmetry in the system. We derive a general expression for the supercurrent for a class of short topological junctions in terms of the normal-state scattering matrix. The result is strongly asymmetric with respect to the superconducting gaps in the ordinary (Δ0) and topological (Δtop) leads. We apply the general result to a simple model of a nanowire setup with strong spin-orbit coupling in an external magnetic field and proximity-induced superconductivity. The system shows parametrically strong suppression of the critical current Ic∝Δtop/RN2 in the tunneling limit (RN is the normal-state resistance). This is in strong contrast with the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation applicable to junctions with preserved time-reversal symmetry. We also consider the case of a generic junction with a random scattering matrix and obtain a more conventional scaling law Ic∝Δtop/RN .

  14. Non-conventional therapeutics for oral infections

    PubMed Central

    Allaker, Robert P; Ian Douglas, CW

    2015-01-01

    As our knowledge of host-microbial interactions within the oral cavity increases, future treatments are likely to be more targeted. For example, efforts to target a single species or key virulence factors that they produce, while maintaining the natural balance of the resident oral microbiota that acts to modulate the host immune response would be an advantage. Targeted approaches may be directed at the black-pigmented anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, associated with periodontitis. Such pigments provide an opportunity for targeted phototherapy with high-intensity monochromatic light. Functional inhibition approaches, including the use of enzyme inhibitors, are also being explored to control periodontitis. More general disruption of dental plaque through the use of enzymes and detergents, alone and in combination, shows much promise. The use of probiotics and prebiotics to improve gastrointestinal health has now led to an interest in using these approaches to control oral disease. More recently the potential of antimicrobial peptides and nanotechnology, through the application of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive and delivery capabilities, has been explored. The aim of this review is to consider the current status as regards non-conventional treatment approaches for oral infections with particular emphasis on the plaque-related diseases. PMID:25668296

  15. What radius does the conventional keratometer measure?

    PubMed

    Bennett, A G; Rabbetts, R B

    1991-07-01

    The reflected mire images used in conventional keratometry suffer from oblique astigmatism, resulting in separated sagittal and tangential image planes. Further complications arise if the cornea is assumed to be aspherical. To investigate the consequential effects on the readings--hitherto largely neglected--ray tracing methods were applied to two hypothetical models. One was representative of modern variable-doubling constructions and the other of the Javal-Schiötz design. Both are seen to require the tangential image plane to be focused. Given a spherical cornea, the measured tangential image height can be converted into an accurate radius reading by means of a linear calibration formula. In the Javal-Schiötz design, a non-linear correction is needed for this. Appropriately calibrated in these ways, each model is shown to give readings extremely close to the sagittal radius of curvature at the point of incidence when applied to corneae of conicoidal form. Extensive numerical results are tabulated and the detailed calculating schemes illustrated by worked examples.

  16. The medical effects of conventional weapons.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, R F

    1992-01-01

    The medical effects of weapons used in modern conventional warfare are, overwhelmingly, penetrating. Fragments from explosive munitions such as shells, rockets, and grenades are the predominate source of missiles, especially in high-intensity war. Bullets from assault rifles and machine guns cause fewer casualties, except in counterinsurgency operations. The threat from penetrating missiles depends upon the part of the body that is struck and, to a lesser extent, upon the physical characteristics of the missile. The missile's mass and velocity determine its potential to do physical damage, but the extent to which this potential is realized depends upon diverse factors such as shape, construction, and stability. The American experience in the wars of this century indicate that approximately 20%-25% of all casualties died on the battlefield and are therefore classified as killed in action. Approximately 3%-5% die while receiving care, and thus are classified as died of wounds. Wounds of the brain or heart and great vessels are the most common causes of death. Prevention of sepsis in soft-tissue and orthopedic wounds is the major medical treatment problem in survivors. Since it determines the quality and quantity of combat casualty care, the single most important factor determining mortality or morbidity for combat casualties is the tactical situation.

  17. 15 CFR 743.4 - Conventional arms reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conventional arms reporting. 743.4... REPORTING AND NOTIFICATION § 743.4 Conventional arms reporting. (a) Scope. This section outlines special... the UN Register of Conventional Arms. Participating States of the Wassenaar Arrangement...

  18. 30 CFR 75.206 - Conventional roof support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.206 Conventional roof support. (a) Except in anthracite mines using non-mechanized mining systems, when conventional roof support... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conventional roof support. 75.206 Section...

  19. 46 CFR 15.701 - Officers Competency Certificates Convention, 1936.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Officers Competency Certificates Convention, 1936. 15... SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.701 Officers Competency Certificates Convention, 1936. (a) This section implements the Officers Competency Certificates Convention, 1936,...

  20. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics

    PubMed Central

    Song, J. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Narayan, R.; Davies, G. B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all ‘good’ or petrochemical-based products are all ‘bad’. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated ‘home’ composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted. PMID:19528060

  1. A naming convention for atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-06-01

    While the field of atmospheric organic aerosol scientific research has experienced thorough and insightful progress over the last half century, this progress has been accompanied by the evolution of a communicative and detailed yet, at times, complex and inconsistent language. The menagerie of detailed classification that now exists to describe organic compounds in our atmosphere reflects the wealth of observational techniques now at our disposal as well as the rich information provided by state-of-the-science instrumentation. However, the nomenclature in place to communicate these scientific gains is growing disjointed to the point that effective communication within the scientific community and to the public may be sacrificed. We propose standardizing a naming convention for organic aerosol classification that is relevant to laboratory studies, ambient observations, atmospheric models, and various stakeholders for air-quality problems. Because a critical aspect of this effort is to directly translate the essence of complex physico-chemical phenomena to a much broader, policy-oriented audience, we recommend a framework that maximizes comprehension among scientists and non-scientists alike. For example, to classify volatility, it relies on straightforward alphabetic terms (e.g., semivolatile, SV; intermediate volatility, IV; etc.) rather than possibly ambiguous numeric indices. This framework classifies organic material as primary or secondary pollutants and distinguishes among fundamental features important for science and policy questions including emission source, chemical phase, and volatility. Also useful is the addition of an alphabetic suffix identifying the volatility of the organic material or its precursor for when emission occurred. With this framework, we hope to introduce into the community a consistent connection between common notation for the general public and detailed nomenclature for highly specialized discussion. In so doing, we try to maintain

  2. Reconsidering "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics".

    PubMed

    Bookstein, Fred L

    2016-06-01

    Of all the articles on cephalometrics this journal has published over the last half-century, the one most cited across the scientific literature is the 1979 lecture "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics" by Robert Moyers and me. But the durable salience of this article is perplexing, as its critique was misdirected (it should have been aimed at the craniometrics of the early twentieth century, not merely the roentgenographic extension used in the orthodontic clinic) and its proposed remedies have all failed to establish themselves as methods of any broad utility. When problems highlighted by Moyers and me have been resolved at all, the innovations that resolved them owe to tools very different from those suggested in our article and imported from fields quite a bit farther from biometrics than we expected back in 1979. One of these tools was the creation de novo of a new abstract mathematical construction, statistical shape space, in the 1980s and 1990s; another was a flexible and intuitive new graphic, the thin-plate spline, for meaningfully and suggestively visualizing a wide variety of biological findings in these spaces. On the other hand, many of the complaints Moyers and I enunciated back in 1979, especially those stemming from the disarticulation of morphometrics from the explanatory styles and purposes of clinical medicine, remain unanswered even today. The present essay, a retrospective historical meditation, reviews the context of the 1979 publication, its major themes, and its relevance today. This essay is dedicated to the memory of Robert E. Moyers on the 100th anniversary of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. PMID:27241987

  3. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Murphy, R J; Narayan, R; Davies, G B H

    2009-07-27

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all 'good' or petrochemical-based products are all 'bad'. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated 'home' composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted. PMID:19528060

  4. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Murphy, R J; Narayan, R; Davies, G B H

    2009-07-27

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all 'good' or petrochemical-based products are all 'bad'. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated 'home' composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted.

  5. Las ideologias, las ciencias naturales y sus implicaciones en la educacion cientifica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozada Roldan, Sandra

    Este estudio ausculto las concepciones epistemologicas de los docentes de ciencia del nivel secundario con relacion a las ideologias y las ciencias naturales. Tambien examino las posiciones de los docentes ante asuntos publicos relacionados a la ciencia. Para propositos de este estudio se diseno y se valido el cuestionario con el cual se obtuvieron los resultados. La investigacion es de tipo cuantitativa y se utilizo como diseno la encuesta. El cuestionario se administro en varias actividades de desarrollo profesional para maestros de ciencia. Un total de 78 maestros del nivel secundario respondieron el cuestionario. Para analizar los datos obtenidos se utilizaron estadisticas descriptivas como la distribucion de frecuencia y el porciento. Ademas se establecieron codigos y categorias para describir las posiciones de los maestros ante asuntos publicos relacionados a la ciencia. Los analisis demostraron que entre los docentes participantes de este estudio prevalecen ciertas concepciones epistemologicas adecuadas acerca de las ciencias naturales, a la luz de la literatura consultada. Entre estas concepciones se destacan las siguientes: a) la filosofia materialista de las ciencias naturales, b) la naturaleza tentativa y constructivista del conocimiento cientifico, c) el uso de una metodologia que garantiza cierto grado de objetividad y con el que se justifican y validan los enunciados cientificos y d) la funcion instrumental del conocimiento cientifico. Sin embargo, entre los docentes participantes de este estudio prevalecen ciertas concepciones epistemologicas erroneas acerca de las ciencias naturales, a la luz de la literatura consultada. Entre estas concepciones se destacan las siguientes: a) tendencia inductivista en el que las teorias cientificas comienzan con observaciones que establecen generalizaciones, b) secuencia jerarquica de la metodologia cientifica. Ademas, entre los docentes participantes de este estudio prevalecen concepciones epistemologicas adecuadas

  6. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML): dictionaries and conventions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The semantic architecture of CML consists of conventions, dictionaries and units. The conventions conform to a top-level specification and each convention can constrain compliant documents through machine-processing (validation). Dictionaries conform to a dictionary specification which also imposes machine validation on the dictionaries. Each dictionary can also be used to validate data in a CML document, and provide human-readable descriptions. An additional set of conventions and dictionaries are used to support scientific units. All conventions, dictionaries and dictionary elements are identifiable and addressable through unique URIs. PMID:21999509

  7. The relationship between γ Cassiopeiae's X-ray emission and its circumstellar environment. II. Geometry and kinematics of the disk from MIRC and VEGA instruments on the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stee, Ph.; Delaa, O.; Monnier, J. D.; Meilland, A.; Perraut, K.; Mourard, D.; Che, X.; Schaefer, G. H.; Pedretti, E.; Smith, M. A.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.; Motch, C.; Henry, G. W.; Richardson, N. D.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Bücke, R.; Pollmann, E.; Zorec, J.; Gies, D. R.; ten Brummelaar, T.; McAlister, H. A.; Turner, N. H.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Ridgway, S. T.

    2012-09-01

    Context.γ Cas is thought to be the prototype of classical Be stars and is the most studied object among this group. However, as for all Be stars, the origin and the physics of its circumstellar disk responsible for the observed near IR-excess, emission lines, and peculiar X-ray emission is still being debated. Aims: We constrain the geometry and kinematics of its circumstellar disk from the highest spatial resolution ever achieved on this star. This investigation is a part of a large multi-technique observing campaign to obtain the most complete picture of γ Cas which emphasizes the relation of the circumstellar environment to the star's X-ray flux. Methods: We present new observations in the near infrared (MIRC) and in the visible (VEGA) obtained with the CHARA interferometer. The VEGA instrument allows us to not only obtain a global disk geometry but also spectrally dispersed visibility modulus and phases within the Hα emission line, which enables us to study the kinematics within γ Cas's disk. Results: We obtain a disk extension in the nearby Hα continuum of 1.72 stellar diameter and 1.86 stellar diameter in the H band at 1.65 μm assuming a Gaussian disk model but also compatible with an elliptical ring model with a minor internal diameter of 1.38 stellar diameter in H. For the first time we demonstrate that the rotation mapped by the emission in the Hα line within the disk of γ Cas and up to 10 R⋆ is Keplerian. Conclusions: These observations have pushed the size of the disk to greater proportions. γ Cas was also confirmed to be a nearly critical rotator. The disk imaging gives neither indication of a 1-arm spiral feature nor evidence of a secondary star reinforcing the interpretation that the secondary is certainly a low-mass and low-luminosity star or a degenerate companion.

  8. Unbiased quantitative testing of conventional orthodontic beliefs.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S

    1998-03-01

    This study used a preexisting database to test in hypothesis from the appropriateness of some common orthodontic beliefs concerning upper first molar displacement and changes in facial morphology associated with conventional full bonded/banded treatment in growing subjects. In an initial pass, the author used data from a stratified random sample of 48 subjects drawn retrospectively from the practice of a single, experienced orthodontist. This sample consisted of 4 subgroups of 12 subjects each: Class I nonextraction, Class I extraction, Class II nonextraction, and Class II extraction. The findings indicate that, relative to the facial profile, chin point did not, on average, displace anteriorly during treatment, either overall or in any subgroup. Relative to the facial profile, Point A became significantly less prominent during treatment, both overall and in each subgroup. The best estimate of the mean displacement of the upper molar cusp relative to superimposition on Anterior Cranial Base was in the mesial direction in each of the four subgroups. In only one extraction subject out of 24 did the cusp appear to be displaced distally. Mesial molar cusp displacement was significantly greater in the Class II extraction subgroup than in the Class II nonextraction subgroup. Relative to superimposition on anatomical "best fit" of maxillary structures, the findings for molar cusp displacement were similar, but even more dramatic. Mean mesial migration was highly significant in both the Class II nonextraction and Class II extraction subgroups. In no subject in the entire sample was distal displacement noted relative to this superimposition. Mean increase in anterior Total Face Height was significantly greater in the Class II extraction subgroup than in the Class II nonextraction subgroup. (This finding was contrary to the author's original expectation.) The generalizability of the findings from the initial pass to other treated growing subjects was then assessed by

  9. Minimally Invasive Versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rizwan Q.; Hickey, Graeme L.; Grant, Stuart W.; Bridgewater, Ben; Roxburgh, James C.; Kumar, Pankaj; Ridley, Paul; Bhabra, Moninder; Millner, Russell W. J.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Casula, Roberto; Chukwuemka, Andrew; Pillay, Thasee; Young, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has been demonstrated as a safe and effective option but remains underused. We aimed to evaluate outcomes of isolated MIAVR compared with conventional aortic valve replacement (CAVR). Methods Data from The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) were analyzed at seven volunteer centers (2006–2012). Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and midterm survival. Secondary outcomes were postoperative length of stay as well as cumulative bypass and cross-clamp times. Propensity modeling with matched cohort analysis was used. Results Of 307 consecutive MIAVR patients, 151 (49%) were performed during the last 2 years of study with a continued increase in numbers. The 307 MIAVR patients were matched on a 1:1 ratio. In the matched CAVR group, there was no statistically significant difference in in-hospital mortality [MIAVR, 4/307,(1.3%); 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%–3.4% vs CAVR, 6/307 (2.0%); 95% CI, 0.8%–4.3%; P = 0.752]. One-year survival rates in the MIAVR and CAVR groups were 94.4% and 94.6%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in midterm survival (P = 0.677; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.56–1.46). Median postoperative length of stay was lower in the MIAVR patients by 1 day (P = 0.009). The mean cumulative bypass time (94.8 vs 91.3 minutes; P = 0.333) and cross-clamp time (74.6 vs 68.4 minutes; P = 0.006) were longer in the MIAVR group; however, this was significant only in the cross-clamp time comparison. Conclusions Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a safe alternative to CAVR with respect to operative and 1-year mortality and is associated with a shorter postoperative stay. Further studies are required in high-risk (logistic EuroSCORE > 10) patients to define the role of MIAVR. PMID:26926521

  10. The dependence of Islamic and conventional stocks: A copula approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Ruzanna Ab; Ismail, Noriszura

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have found that Islamic stocks are dependent on conventional stocks and they appear to be more risky. In Asia, particularly in Islamic countries, research on dependence involving Islamic and non-Islamic stock markets is limited. The objective of this study is to investigate the dependence between financial times stock exchange Hijrah Shariah index and conventional stocks (EMAS and KLCI indices). Using the copula approach and a time series model for each marginal distribution function, the copula parameters were estimated. The Elliptical copula was selected to present the dependence structure of each pairing of the Islamic stock and conventional stock. Specifically, the Islamic versus conventional stocks (Shariah-EMAS and Shariah-KLCI) had lower dependence compared to conventional versus conventional stocks (EMAS-KLCI). These findings suggest that the occurrence of shocks in a conventional stock will not have strong impact on the Islamic stock.

  11. Bottom Sediment as a Source of Organic Contaminants in Lake Mead, Nevada, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated wastewater effluent from Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding communities’ flow through Las Vegas Wash (LVW) into the Lake Mead National Recreational Area at Las Vegas Bay (LVB). Lake sediment is a likely sink for many hydrophobic synthetic organic compounds (SOCs); however,...

  12. 75 FR 82132 - ITS Joint Program Office; Human Factors for IntelliDrive SM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; Human Factors for IntelliDrive \\SM\\ (HFID); Public Meeting; Notice of Public... Factors for IntelliDrive (HFID) program on January 6, 2011 from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Flamingo Las Vegas, 3555 Las Vegas Boulevard South Las Vegas, Nevada 89109. IntelliDrive is a research program...

  13. The framework convention on climate change a convention for sustainable energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Hassing, P.; Mendis, M.S.; Menezes, L.M.; Gowen, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    In 1992, over 165 countries signed the United Nation`s Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). These countries have implicitly agreed to alter their `anthropogenic activities` that increase the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere and deplete the natural sinks for these same greenhouse gases. The energy sector is the major source of the primary anthropogenic GHGs, notably carbon dioxide and methane. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries presently account for the major share of GHG emissions from the energy sector. However, the developing countries are also rapidly increasing their contribution to global GHG emissions as a result of their growing consumption of fossil-based energy. Implementation of this global climate change convention, if seriously undertaken by the signatory countries, will necessitate changes in the energy mix and production processes in both the OECD and developing countries. International actions also will be needed to put the world on a sustainable energy path. By adoption of the FCCC, representatives of the world`s populations have indicated their desire to move toward such a path. The Conference of Parties to the Convention has just concluded its second meeting, at which the Parties endorsed a U.S. proposal that legally binding and enforceable emissions targets be adopted. It is clearly evident that the FCCC, as presently operating, cannot achieve the objective of stabilizing GHG concentrations in the atmosphere unless it adopts a major protocol to significantly reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. As demonstrated here, a good starting point in determining the steps the Parties to the FCCC should take in designing a protocol is to remember that the primary source of anthropogenic GHG emissions is the consumption of fossil fuels and the future growth of GHG emissions will derive primarily from the ever-increasing demand for and consumption of these fuels.

  14. Effects of feeding high protein or conventional canola meal on dry cured and conventionally cured bacon.

    PubMed

    Little, K L; Bohrer, B M; Stein, H H; Boler, D D

    2015-05-01

    Objectives were to compare belly, bacon processing, bacon slice, and sensory characteristics from pigs fed high protein canola meal (CM-HP) or conventional canola meal (CM-CV). Soybean meal was replaced with 0 (control), 33, 66, or 100% of both types of canola meal. Left side bellies from 70 carcasses were randomly assigned to conventional or dry cure treatment and matching right side bellies were assigned the opposite treatment. Secondary objectives were to test the existence of bilateral symmetry on fresh belly characteristics and fatty acid profiles of right and left side bellies originating from the same carcass. Bellies from pigs fed CM-HP were slightly lighter and thinner than bellies from pigs fed CM-CV, yet bacon processing, bacon slice, and sensory characteristics were unaffected by dietary treatment and did not differ from the control. Furthermore, testing the existence of bilateral symmetry on fresh belly characteristics revealed that bellies originating from the right side of the carcasses were slightly (P≤0.05) wider, thicker, heavier and firmer than bellies from the left side of the carcass.

  15. Indentability of conventional and negative Poisson's ratio foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakes, R. S.; Elms, K.

    1992-01-01

    The indentation resistance of foams, both of conventional structure and of re-entrant structure giving rise to negative Poisson's ratio, is studied using holographic interferometry. In holographic indentation tests, re-entrant foams had higher yield strengths sigma(sub y) and lower stiffness E than conventional foams of the same original relative density. Calculated energy absorption for dynamic impact is considerably higher for re-entrant foam than conventional foam.

  16. European Convention on Human Rights: effects on psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Persaud, A; Hewitt, D

    The introduction of the European Convention on Human Rights into UK law will have a direct effect on practice in mental health care. The authors discuss developments associated with the Convention, examine different articles and suggest the changes they could bring. They suggest that, rather than reacting to the development of convention rights, healthcare professionals should take the opportunity to influence new standards for psychiatric care.

  17. Overview of the land analysis system (LAS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quirk, Bruce K.; Olseson, Lyndon R.

    1987-01-01

    The Land Analysis System (LAS) is a fully integrated digital analysis system designed to support remote sensing, image processing, and geographic information systems research. LAS is being developed through a cooperative effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center and the U. S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. LAS has over 275 analysis modules capable to performing input and output, radiometric correction, geometric registration, signal processing, logical operations, data transformation, classification, spatial analysis, nominal filtering, conversion between raster and vector data types, and display manipulation of image and ancillary data. LAS is currently implant using the Transportable Applications Executive (TAE). While TAE was designed primarily to be transportable, it still provides the necessary components for a standard user interface, terminal handling, input and output services, display management, and intersystem communications. With TAE the analyst uses the same interface to the processing modules regardless of the host computer or operating system. LAS was originally implemented at EROS on a Digital Equipment Corporation computer system under the Virtual Memorial System operating system with DeAnza displays and is presently being converted to run on a Gould Power Node and Sun workstation under the Berkeley System Distribution UNIX operating system.

  18. Environmental and safety obligations of the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzman, E.A.

    1994-04-07

    Among its many unique and precedent-setting provisions, the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) includes important requirements for States Parties to protect the public safety and the environment in the course of carrying out the treaty. These obligations will apply to the destruction of chemical weapons, of former chemical weapons production facilities, and to other activities under the Convention such as the verification scheme. This morning, I will briefly discuss the Convention`s safety and environmental obligations, concentrating on their effects in this country as the United States chemical weapons stockpile is destroyed.

  19. Taking decisions seriously: young children's understanding of conventional truth.

    PubMed

    Kalish, C; Weissman, M; Bernstein, D

    2000-01-01

    Research suggests that young children may see a direct and one-way connection between facts about the world and epistemic mental states (e.g., belief). Conventions represent instances of active constructions of the mind that change facts about the world. As such, a mature understanding of convention would seem to present a strong challenge to children's simplified notions of epistemic relations. Three experiments assessed young children's abilities to track behavioral, representational, and truth aspects of conventions. In Experiment 1, 3- and 4-year-old children (N = 30) recognized that conventional stipulations would change people's behaviors. However, participants generally failed to understand how stipulations might affect representations. In Experiment 2, 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children (N = 53) were asked to reason about the truth values of statements about pretenses and conventions. The two younger groups of children often confused the two types of states, whereas older children consistently judged that conventions, but not pretenses, changed reality. In Experiment 3, the same 3- and 5-year-olds (N = 42) participated in tasks assessing their understanding of representational diversity (e.g., false belief). In general, children's performance on false-belief and "false-convention" tasks did not differ, which suggests that conventions were understood as involving truth claims (as akin to beliefs about physical reality). Children's difficulties with the idea of conventional truth seems consistent with current accounts of developing theories of mind.

  20. 19 CFR 114.2 - Customs Conventions and Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs Conventions and Agreements. 114.2 Section 114.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARNETS General Provisions § 114.2 Customs Conventions and Agreements....

  1. Attending the AAHPERD National Convention: A Guide for Faculty Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darden, Gibson; Nelson, Sandra; Parsons, Roberta

    2005-01-01

    Student attendance at national conventions can be an important part of professional growth. Faculty advisors and administrators can increase the quality of future HPERD professionals by making greater use of this resource. Taking students to a convention may appear a daunting task. However, establishing a systematic process may help create a…

  2. VapeCons: E-cigarette user conventions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction E-cigarette ‘vaping conventions’ provide a venue for user social networking, parties, and ‘try before you buy’ access to a wide range of e-cigarette products. This study identifies and describes vaping conventions, raising awareness of this potentially problematic practice. Methods Conventions were identified via Google searches in April and May 2014 and August 2015. Details captured included location, sponsors, admission cost, event features, and promotions. Results 41 distinct organizations have planned 90 vaping conventions in 37 different locations since 2010. Conventions promoted access to a wide range of product vendors, seminars, social interactions with other users, parties, gifts, vaping contests, and other events. E-cigarette use at conventions was encouraged. Conclusions Vaping conventions promote e-cigarette use and social norms without public health having a voice to educate attendees about negative consequences of use. Future research should focus on the effects of attending these conventions on attendees and on indoor air quality in vapor-filled convention rooms. PMID:26424201

  3. Defect Detectability Improvement for Conventional Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of defect detectability via phased array ultrasound technology in conventional friction stir welds by comparing conventionally prepped post weld surfaces to a machined surface finish. A machined surface is hypothesized to improve defect detectability and increase material strength.

  4. 77 FR 2270 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Firearms Convention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Firearms Convention... the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials (Firearms Convention). Sections 742.17 and 748.14 of the Export Administration Regulations...

  5. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  6. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  7. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  8. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  9. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  10. 46 CFR 71.75-15 - Posting of Convention certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Posting of Convention certificates. 71.75-15 Section 71.75-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION....75-15 Posting of Convention certificates. (a) The certificates described in this subpart,...

  11. COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL AND PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION IN TEACHING AVIONICS FUNDAMENTALS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LONGO, ALEXANDER A.; MAYO, G. DOUGLAS

    THIS STUDY, PART OF A SERIES INVOLVING A VARIETY OF COURSE CONTENT AND TRAINING CONDITIONS, COMPARED PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION WITH CONVENTIONAL INSTRUCTION TO GAIN INFORMATION ABOUT THE GENERAL UTILITY OF PROGRAMED METHODS. THE PERFORMANCE OF 200 NAVY TRAINEES TAKING 26 HOURS OF CONVENTIONAL INSTRUCTION IN ELECTRICAL CALCULATIONS, DIRECT CURRENT…

  12. Exploring Shakespeare: Dynamic Drama Conventions in Teaching "Romeo and Juliet."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Sophie

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a Year 10 unit on teaching "Romeo and Juliet" based on standard experiential conventions which include the following: (1) Teacher in Role, (2) Soundscaping, (3) Freeze Frames, (4) Alter Egos, (5) Hot Seating, and (6) Role Playing. Suggests that these conventions can be applied to the study of any Shakespearean play. (NH)

  13. ACTE Convention and Career-Tech Expo: Racing toward Charlotte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on Association for Career and Technical Education's (ACTE's) annual convention to be held this year in Charlotte, North Carolina, from December 4-6. To provide the greatest benefits to attending educators, ACTE will again partner with several other associations at this year's convention. ACTE has lined up three speakers for…

  14. But: Do Age and Working Memory Influence Conventional Implicature Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssens, Leen; Drooghmans, Stephanie; Schaeken, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Conventional implicatures are omnipresent in daily life communication but experimental research on this topic is sparse, especially research with children. The aim of this study was to investigate if eight- to twelve-year-old children spontaneously make the conventional implicature induced by "but," "so," and…

  15. Parametric Investigations of Non-Conventional Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-12

    Hall thrusters might better scale to low power with non-conventional geometry. A 9 cm cylindrical, ceramic-channel, Hall thruster with a cusp-type magnetic field distribution has been investigated. It exhibits discharge characteristics similar to conventional coaxial Hall thrusters, but does not expose as much channel surface. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations.

  16. COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL AND PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION IN TEACHING COMMUNICATIONS PROCEDURES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, KIRK A.; AND OTHERS

    IN THIS STUDY, THE THIRD IN A SERIES EVALUATING PROGRAMED AND CONVENTIONAL INSTRUCTION IN THE SCHOOLS OF THE NAVAL AIR TECHNICAL TRAINING COMMAND, A COMPARISON WAS MADE BETWEEN TWO VERSIONS OF THE AIRBORNE RADIO CODE OPERATOR (ARCO) COURSE. IN THE CONVENTIONAL VERSION, MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS PROCEDURES WERE TAUGHT BY MEANS OF LECTURE DISCUSSION…

  17. The Greening of the David L. Lawrence Pittsburgh Convention Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The David L. Lawrence Convention Center is the largest Gold LEED NC (new construction) certified convention center in the USA and the first of its kind in the world. The designation has been awarded by the United States Green Building Council through its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. In this talk we discuss the unique green properties of this 1.5 million square foot Convention Center including the design and use of daylight, natural ventilation and other sustainable design and practices. No other building the size of the Convention Center (1.5 million square feet), uses natural ventilation or can illuminate an exhibition hall entirely through its windows and skylights. Approximately 75% of the convention center's exhibition space is lit by natural daylight. The use of natural ventilation and extensive day lighting is designed to reduce energy consumption by nearly 35% compared to traditional ventilated and lit buildings of a similar size.

  18. Comprehending conventional and novel metaphors: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Vicky Tzuyin; Curran, Tim; Menn, Lise

    2009-08-11

    The neural mechanisms underlying the processing of conventional and novel conceptual metaphorical sentences were examined with event-related potentials (ERPs). Conventional metaphors were created based on the Contemporary Theory of Metaphor and were operationally defined as familiar and readily interpretable. Novel metaphors were unfamiliar and harder to interpret. Using a sensicality judgment task, we compared ERPs elicited by the same target word when it was used to end anomalous, novel metaphorical, conventional metaphorical and literal sentences. Amplitudes of the N400 ERP component (320-440 ms) were more negative for anomalous sentences, novel metaphors, and conventional metaphors compared with literal sentences. Within a later window (440-560 ms), ERPs associated with conventional metaphors converged to the same level as literal sentences while the novel metaphors stayed anomalous throughout. The reported results were compatible with models assuming an initial stage for metaphor mappings from one concept to another and that these mappings are cognitively taxing.

  19. Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent electronic and conventional cigarette use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Strong, David R; Sussman, Steve; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Unger, Jennifer B; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of electronic (e-) cigarettes has greatly increased recently, particularly in adolescents. However, the extent of psychiatric comorbidity with adolescent e-cigarette use and dual use of conventional (combustible) and e-cigarettes is unknown. This study characterized psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent conventional and e-cigarette use. Ninth grade students attending high schools in Los Angeles, CA (M age = 14) completed self-report measures of conventional/e-cigarette use, emotional disorders, substance use/problems, and transdiagnostic psychiatric phenotypes consistent with the NIMH-Research Domain Criteria Initiative. Outcomes were compared by lifetime use of: (1) neither conventional nor e-cigarettes (non-use; N = 2557, 77.3%); (2) e-cigarettes only (N = 412, 12.4%); (3) conventional cigarettes only (N = 152, 4.6%); and (4) conventional and e-cigarettes (dual use; N = 189, 5.6%). In comparison to adolescents who used conventional cigarettes only, e-cigarette only users reported lower levels of internalizing syndromes (depression, generalized anxiety, panic, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and transdiagnostic phenotypes (i.e., distress intolerance, anxiety sensitivity, rash action during negative affect). Depression, panic disorder, and anhedonia were higher in e-cigarette only vs. non-users. For several externalizing outcomes (mania, rash action during positive affect, alcohol drug use/abuse) and anhedonia, an ordered pattern was observed, whereby comorbidity was lowest in non-users, moderate in single product users (conventional or e-cigarette), and highest in dual users. These findings: (1) raise question of whether emotionally-healthier ('lower-risk') adolescents who are not interested in conventional cigarettes are being attracted to e-cigarettes; (2) indicate that research, intervention, and policy dedicated to adolescent tobacco-psychiatric comorbidity should distinguish conventional cigarette, e-cigarette, and dual use

  20. Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent electronic and conventional cigarette use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Strong, David R; Sussman, Steve; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Unger, Jennifer B; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of electronic (e-) cigarettes has greatly increased recently, particularly in adolescents. However, the extent of psychiatric comorbidity with adolescent e-cigarette use and dual use of conventional (combustible) and e-cigarettes is unknown. This study characterized psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent conventional and e-cigarette use. Ninth grade students attending high schools in Los Angeles, CA (M age = 14) completed self-report measures of conventional/e-cigarette use, emotional disorders, substance use/problems, and transdiagnostic psychiatric phenotypes consistent with the NIMH-Research Domain Criteria Initiative. Outcomes were compared by lifetime use of: (1) neither conventional nor e-cigarettes (non-use; N = 2557, 77.3%); (2) e-cigarettes only (N = 412, 12.4%); (3) conventional cigarettes only (N = 152, 4.6%); and (4) conventional and e-cigarettes (dual use; N = 189, 5.6%). In comparison to adolescents who used conventional cigarettes only, e-cigarette only users reported lower levels of internalizing syndromes (depression, generalized anxiety, panic, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and transdiagnostic phenotypes (i.e., distress intolerance, anxiety sensitivity, rash action during negative affect). Depression, panic disorder, and anhedonia were higher in e-cigarette only vs. non-users. For several externalizing outcomes (mania, rash action during positive affect, alcohol drug use/abuse) and anhedonia, an ordered pattern was observed, whereby comorbidity was lowest in non-users, moderate in single product users (conventional or e-cigarette), and highest in dual users. These findings: (1) raise question of whether emotionally-healthier ('lower-risk') adolescents who are not interested in conventional cigarettes are being attracted to e-cigarettes; (2) indicate that research, intervention, and policy dedicated to adolescent tobacco-psychiatric comorbidity should distinguish conventional cigarette, e-cigarette, and dual use.

  1. 26 CFR 1.168(d)-1 - Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions. 1.168(d)-1 Section 1.168(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.168(d)-1...

  2. 26 CFR 1.168(d)-1 - Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions. 1.168(d)-1 Section 1.168(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... depreciation deduction for C's 1991 taxable year. For 1992, Z's depreciation deduction for the...

  3. 26 CFR 1.168(d)-1 - Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions. 1.168(d)-1 Section 1.168(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... depreciation deduction for C's 1991 taxable year. For 1992, Z's depreciation deduction for the...

  4. Substitutes or complements? Diagnosis and treatment with non-conventional and conventional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Aida Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portugal has a strong tradition of conventional western healthcare. So it provides a natural case study for the relationship between Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) and Western Medicine (WM). This work aims to test the relationship between CAM and WM users in the diagnosis and treatment stages and to estimate the determinants of CAM choice. Methods: The forth Portuguese National Health Survey is employed to estimate two single probit models and obtain the correlation between the consumption of CAM and WM medicines in the diagnosis and treatment stages. Results: Firstly, both in the diagnosis and the treatment stage, CAM and WM are seen to be complementary choices for individuals. Secondly, self-medication also shows complementarity with the choice of CAM treatment. Thirdly, education has a non-linear relationship with the choice of CAM. Finally, working status, age, smoking and chronic disease are determinant factors in the decision to use CAM. Conclusion: The results of this work are relevant to health policy-makers and for insurance companies. Patients need freedom of choice and, for the sake of safety and efficacy of treatment, WM and CAM healthcare ought to be provided in a joint and integrated health system. PMID:25844385

  5. lasA and lasB genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: analysis of transcription and gene product activity.

    PubMed Central

    Toder, D S; Ferrell, S J; Nezezon, J L; Rust, L; Iglewski, B H

    1994-01-01

    The lasA gene was the first of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genes involved in proteolysis and elastolysis to be cloned and sequenced. Its function and significance have been studied by genetic approaches (D. S. Toder, M. J. Gambello, and B. H. Iglewski, Mol. Microbiol. 5:2003-2010, 1991) and by attempts to purify an active fragment of the protein (J. E. Peters and D. R. Galloway, J. Bacteriol. 172:2236-2240, 1990). To further study LasA in vivo, we have constructed and characterized an insertional mutant in the lasA gene in strain PAO1 (PAO-A1) and in the lasB insertional mutant, PAO-B1. Analysis of these isogenic strains demonstrates that the lasA lesion diminished elastolysis more than proteolysis and that LasA is required for staphylolytic activity. Despite previous suggestions that lasB elastase cleaves the LasA protein, the size of the LasA protein was the same whether or not lasB elastase was present. Expression of lasA in a lasR-negative mutant, PAO-R1, demonstrated that the LasA protein is produced in an active form in the absence of (lasB) elastase or alkaline protease and is itself a protease with elastolytic activity. We also observed that PAO-A1 was closer to the parental phenotype, with respect to elastolytic and proteolytic activities, than the previously characterized, chemically induced lasA mutant PAO-E64. Quantification of promoter activity with lasA::lacZ and lasB::lacZ fusions suggests that PAO-E64 harbors a mutation in a gene which regulates expression of both lasA and lasB. Images PMID:8132339

  6. Primary tasks to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E.A.

    1997-12-31

    The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) is an unprecedented multilateral effort to eradicate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction and assure their continued absence through international verification. In 1993, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the treaty with national law could cause some nations to implement the Convention without regard to what others nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States Parties in how the Conventional would be carried out. As a result, the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention was prepared. The Manual is designed to assist States Parties by increasing understanding of the Convention and identifying its obligations as well as suggesting methods to meet them, duly taking into account the distinctive aspects of their legal systems. It acknowledges areas of ambiguity that States Parties should address, and it analyzes legal initiatives that may be undertaken to strengthen the Convention`s enforcement. This paper draws from the Manual and briefly addresses the two tasks that every CWC State Party must undertake first in order to effectively fulfill its extensive requirements. First, each State Party must establish a National Authority. Second, each State Party must enact implementing measures to ensure that its government as well as its businesses and citizens comply with the treaty. As this paper generally discusses how States Parties from different legal backgrounds can accomplish these two tasks, it cannot address every detail of how each State Party should proceed.

  7. Reversing the conventional leather processing sequence for cleaner leather production.

    PubMed

    Saravanabhavan, Subramani; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2006-02-01

    Conventional leather processing generally involves a combination of single and multistep processes that employs as well as expels various biological, inorganic, and organic materials. It involves nearly 14-15 steps and discharges a huge amount of pollutants. This is primarily due to the fact that conventional leather processing employs a "do-undo" process logic. In this study, the conventional leather processing steps have been reversed to overcome the problems associated with the conventional method. The charges of the skin matrix and of the chemicals and pH profiles of the process have been judiciously used for reversing the process steps. This reversed process eventually avoids several acidification and basification/neutralization steps used in conventional leather processing. The developed process has been validated through various analyses such as chromium content, shrinkage temperature, softness measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and physical testing of the leathers. Further, the performance of the leathers is shown to be on par with conventionally processed leathers through bulk property evaluation. The process enjoys a significant reduction in COD and TS by 53 and 79%, respectively. Water consumption and discharge is reduced by 65 and 64%, respectively. Also, the process benefits from significant reduction in chemicals, time, power, and cost compared to the conventional process.

  8. Management practices on organic and conventional dairy herds in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Sorge, U S; Moon, R; Wolff, L J; Michels, L; Schroth, S; Kelton, D F; Heins, B

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare husbandry practices on organic and conventional dairy farms of similar sizes in Minnesota. Organic (ORG, n=35), same-sized conventional (SC, n=15, <200 cows) and medium-sized conventional (MC, n=13, ≥200 cows) dairy herds were visited in 2012, and farmers were interviewed once about their farm, herd demographics, and herd management practices concerning nutrition, housing, and reproductive programs. Organic farms had been established as long as conventional farms, and ORG producers had most commonly selected ORG farming because of a negative perception of pesticides for human health. The distribution of cattle breeds and ages differed across farm types. Organic farms had more crossbred cows and a greater number of older cows than conventional farms, who had mainly Holstein cattle. Organic farms did not dock tails, were more likely to use breeding bulls, and were less likely to conduct pregnancy diagnoses in cattle. All conventional farmers fed corn, corn silage, and hay, but no forage or feed supplement was fed by all ORG farms with the exception of pasture. Kelp was supplemented on most ORG farms but on none of the conventional farms. In summary, although there were differences across farm types regarding the use of pasture, feeds, and feed additives, breed and age distribution, reproductive management, and the use of tail docking, observations in other management areas showed large overlap across herd types. PMID:26830734

  9. Nitrogen isotope composition of organically and conventionally grown crops.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alison S; Kelly, Simon D; Woolfe, Mark

    2007-04-01

    Authentic samples of commercially produced organic and conventionally grown tomatoes, lettuces, and carrots were collected and analyzed for their delta15N composition in order to assemble datasets to establish if there are any systematic differences in nitrogen isotope composition due to the method of production. The tomato and lettuce datasets suggest that the different types of fertilizer commonly used in organic and conventional systems result in differences in the nitrogen isotope composition of these crops. A mean delta15N value of 8.1 per thousand was found for the organically grown tomatoes compared with a mean value of -0.1 per thousand for those grown conventionally. The organically grown lettuces had a mean value of 7.6 per thousand compared with a mean value of 2.9 per thousand for the conventionally grown lettuces. The mean value for organic carrots was not significantly different from the mean value for those grown conventionally. Overlap between the delta15N values of the organic and conventional datasets (for both tomatoes and lettuces) means that it is necessary to employ a statistical methodology to try and classify a randomly analyzed "off the shelf" sample as organic/conventional, and such an approach is demonstrated. Overall, the study suggests that nitrogen isotope analysis could be used to provide useful "intelligence" to help detect the substitution of certain organic crop types with their conventional counterparts. However, delta15N analysis of a "test sample" will not provide unequivocal evidence as to whether synthetic fertilizers have been used on the crop but could, for example, in a situation when there is suspicion that mislabeling of conventionally grown crops as "organic" is occurring, be used to provide supporting evidence. PMID:17341092

  10. Endogenous Bioactive Lipids and the Regulation of Conventional Outflow Facility

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhou; Woodward, David F.; Stamer, W. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Summary Perturbation of paracrine signaling within the human conventional outflow pathway influences tissue homeostasis and outflow function. For example, exogenous introduction of the bioactive lipids, sphingosine-1-phosphate, anandamide or prostaglandin F2α, to conventional outflow tissues alters the rate of drainage of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork, and into Schlemm’s canal. This review summarizes recent data that characterizes endogenous bioactive lipids, their receptors and associated signaling partners in the conventional outflow tract. We also discuss the potential of targeting such signaling pathways as a strategy for the development of therapeutics to treat ocular hypertension and glaucoma. PMID:19381354

  11. US conventional arms transfer policy. Strategy research project

    SciTech Connect

    Langhorst, R.H.

    1996-04-15

    Millions of people around the world have been killed by conventional arms since the end of World War II. If increasing access to conventional arms is partly responsible for political and military aggression in post-Cold War Europe, what should be the United States` response. This study explores the new US Conventional Arms Transfer Policy of February 1995 in terms of ends1 ways and means and its linkages to US National Security and National Military Strategies. Analysis focuses mainly on post- Cold War Europe, providing examples of multilateral arms control successes and recommendations for US policy implementation.

  12. Comet Halley remote plasma tail observations and in situ solar wind properties - Vega-1/2 IMF/plasma observations and ground-based optical observations from 1 December 1985 to 1 May 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delva, Magda; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Niedner, Malcolm B.; Gringauz, Konstantin I.

    1991-01-01

    General features of the solar wind plasma and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are studied for the time period of December 1, 1985 - May 1, 1986. Characteristics studied include corotating events, shocks, and sector boundaries in the IMF. For the same period, Comet Halley was near its perihelion and many ground-based observations of the plasma tail were made. They show interesting events such as tail substorms and disconnection events where the whole distant plasma tail seems to be disrupted from the part that is still attached to the cometary head. Several mechanisms have been produced to explain the cause of these events. The correlation between the IMF sector boundaries measured by Vega and the observed disconnection events are studied, noting that such a correlation would support the dayside reconnection explanation. It is found that only in 50 percent of the considered events does a correlation between these two phenomena exist. For the other cases, a sector boundary of the IMF sweeping over the comet cannot explain the occurrence of disruptions of the main plasma tail.

  13. Discrimination (Employment and Occupation) Convention (ILO No. 111).

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The government of Uruguay ratified this UN International Labor Organization Convention on employment and occupation discrimination on November 16, 1989, and the government of Democratic Yemen ratified it on January 3, 1989.

  14. Workers with Family Responsibilities Convention (ILO No. 156).

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    The following countries ratified the Workers with Family Responsibilities Convention in 1988; 1) Argentina, 17 March 1988; 2) Greece, 10 June 1988; 3) Netherlands, 24 March 1988; and 4) San Marino, 19 April 1988.

  15. REMOVAL OF URANIUM FROM DRINKING WATER BY CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA currently does not regulate uranium in drinking water but will be revising the radionuclide regulations during 1989 and will propose a maximum contaminant level for uranium. The paper presents treatment technology information on the effectiveness of conventional method...

  16. Polyamines in conventional and organic vegetables exposed to exogenous ethylene.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Maria Rosecler Miranda; Vianello, Fabio; Saeki, Margarida Juri; Lima, Giuseppina Pace Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Relationships between endogenous levels of polyamines by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography (GC), nitrate and response to the application of ethylene were established between organic and conventional vegetables (broccoli, collard greens, carrots and beets), both raw and cooked. Responses to ethylene showed that organic plants were less responsive to the growth regulator. The levels of free polyamines obtained by TLC were higher in organic vegetables. Organic broccoli showed higher levels of putrescine (Put), and cooking resulted in lowering the overall content of these amines. Conventional collard green showed the highest level of putrescine in the leaves compared with organic. Tubers of carrots and beets contain the highest levels of Put. These plants also contain high levels of spermine. GC analysis showed the highest polyamines contents compared with those obtained by TLC. Cooking process decreased putrescine and cadaverine content, both in conventionally and organically grown vegetables. Organic beets contain lower NO3(-) compared with its conventional counterpart.

  17. Economics of geothermal, solar, and conventional space heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, L. L.; Bloomster, C. H.; Price, B. A.

    1980-12-01

    With the recent price increases in imported oil and natural gas and the planned decontrol of domestic prices, geothermal and solar energy becomes competitive for residential space heating throughout most of the country. Geothermal energy could competitively provide about 40% of the national demand for space heat and domestic hot water (about 7 quads based on 1980 demands). Nearly all of the geothermal energy demand would be in high population density areas. Solar energy could competitively provide about 50% (about 9 quads) of the annual demand. Most of the solar energy demand would be concentrated in suburban and rural areas. Conventional energy should remain competitive for about 30% (about 5 quads) of the annual demand. Conventional energy demand would be concentrated in the South and as supplemental energy for solar/conventional systems. Geothermal solar, and conventional energy would be equally competitive for about 20% of the annual demand, which is why the individual market shares add to 120%.

  18. THE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES COMPARISON BETWEEN ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL RICE FIELDS.

    PubMed

    Kasamesiri, P; Thaimuangphol, W

    2015-01-01

    Rice fields are temporary wetlands prone to contamination from agricultural chemicals which affect their ecotoxicology and benthic community composition. The diversity of benthic fauna in both organic and conventional rice fields in Kalasin Province, Thailand was investigated. Benthos samples were collected by grab sampling from 20 stations in organic and conventional rice fields during one successive crop in August 2014. The number of benthic organisms found at each sampling station ranged from 16-518 and 24-137 individuals for organic and conventional rice fields, respectively. The benthic fauna in organic rice fields were dominated by crustaceans 41%, insects 31%, annelids 26%, and gastropods 2%. The conventional rice fields benthic fauna was composed of insects 51%, annelids 41%, and gastropods 8%. The abundance and composition of the benthic fauna demonstrated that organic rice farming practices are beneficial to sustaining the biodiversity in rice field ecosystems.

  19. Comparison of Surface Water Quality and Yields from Organically and Conventionally Produced Sweet Corn Plots with Conservation and Conventional Tillage.

    PubMed

    Edgell, Joshua; Osmond, D L; Line, D E; Hoyt, G D; Grossman, J M; Larsen, E M

    2015-11-01

    Organic agricultural systems are often assumed to be more sustainable than conventional farming, yet there has been little work comparing surface water quality from organic and conventional production, especially under the same cropping sequence. Our objective was to compare nutrient and sediment losses, as well as sweet corn ( L. var. ) yield, from organic and conventional production with conventional and conservation tillage. The experiment was located in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. Four treatments, replicated four times, had been in place for over 18 yr and consisted of conventional tillage (chisel plow and disk) with conventional production (CT/Conven), conservation no-till with conventional production (NT/Conven), conventional tillage with organic production (CT/Org), and conservation no-till with organic production (NT/Org). Water quality (surface flow volume; nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment concentrations) and sweet corn yield data were collected in 2011 and 2012. Sediment and sediment-attached nutrient losses were influenced by tillage and cropping system in 2011, due to higher rainfall, and tillage in 2012. Soluble nutrients were affected by the nutrient source and rate, which are a function of the cropping system. Sweet corn marketable yields were greater in conventional systems due to high weed competition and reduced total nitrogen availability in organic treatments. When comparing treatment efficiency (yield kg ha /nutrient loss kg ha ), the NT/Conven treatment had the greatest sweet corn yield per unit of nutrient and sediment loss. Other treatment ratios were similar to each other; thus, it appears the most sustainably productive treatment was NT/Conven. PMID:26641338

  20. Comparison of Surface Water Quality and Yields from Organically and Conventionally Produced Sweet Corn Plots with Conservation and Conventional Tillage.

    PubMed

    Edgell, Joshua; Osmond, D L; Line, D E; Hoyt, G D; Grossman, J M; Larsen, E M

    2015-11-01

    Organic agricultural systems are often assumed to be more sustainable than conventional farming, yet there has been little work comparing surface water quality from organic and conventional production, especially under the same cropping sequence. Our objective was to compare nutrient and sediment losses, as well as sweet corn ( L. var. ) yield, from organic and conventional production with conventional and conservation tillage. The experiment was located in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. Four treatments, replicated four times, had been in place for over 18 yr and consisted of conventional tillage (chisel plow and disk) with conventional production (CT/Conven), conservation no-till with conventional production (NT/Conven), conventional tillage with organic production (CT/Org), and conservation no-till with organic production (NT/Org). Water quality (surface flow volume; nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment concentrations) and sweet corn yield data were collected in 2011 and 2012. Sediment and sediment-attached nutrient losses were influenced by tillage and cropping system in 2011, due to higher rainfall, and tillage in 2012. Soluble nutrients were affected by the nutrient source and rate, which are a function of the cropping system. Sweet corn marketable yields were greater in conventional systems due to high weed competition and reduced total nitrogen availability in organic treatments. When comparing treatment efficiency (yield kg ha /nutrient loss kg ha ), the NT/Conven treatment had the greatest sweet corn yield per unit of nutrient and sediment loss. Other treatment ratios were similar to each other; thus, it appears the most sustainably productive treatment was NT/Conven.

  1. Magnetic Gearing Versus Conventional Gearing in Actuators for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchhammer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic geared actuators (MGA) are designed to perform highly reliable, robust and precise motion on satellite platforms or aerospace vehicles. The design allows MGA to be used for various tasks in space applications. In contrast to conventional geared drives, the contact and lubrication free force transmitting elements lead to a considerable lifetime and range extension of drive systems. This paper describes the fundamentals of magnetic wobbling gears (MWG) and the deduced inherent characteristics, and compares conventional and magnetic gearing.

  2. An Overview of Preformed Metal Crowns. Part 1: Conventional Technique.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Helen J; Batley, Haris A; Deery, Chris

    2015-12-01

    This article details the clinical techniques for conventional preformed metal crown placement. It aims to increase the readers' awareness of the clinical advantages of preformed metal crowns and the indications for their use. The second part will discuss the Hall Technique. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This two-part article aims to guide the reader through the conventional and alternative techniques available for placement of a preformed metal crown whilst providing an update of the evidence for each. PMID:26855999

  3. Sandia software guidelines. Volume 3. Standards, practices, and conventions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies software standards, conventions, and practices. These guidelines are the result of a collective effort within Sandia National Laboratories to define recommended deliverables and to document standards, practices, and conventions which will help ensure quality software. 66 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Hydrochemical evaluation of groundwater in the Blue Nile Basin, eastern Sudan, using conventional and multivariate techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mohammed Tahir

    Hydrochemical evaluation of groundwater systems can be carried out using conventional and multivariate techniques, namely cluster, factor analyses and others such as correspondence analysis. The main objective of this study is to investigate the groundwater quality in the Blue Nile basin of eastern Sudan, and to workout a hydrochemical evaluation for the aquifer system. Conventional methods and multivariate techniques were applied to achieve these goals. Two water-bearing layers exist in the study area: the Nubian Sandstone Formation and the Al-Atshan Formation. The Nubian aquifer is recharged mainly from the Blue Nile and Dinder Rivers through lateral subsurface flow and through direct rainfall in outcrop areas. The Al-Atshan aquifer receives water through underground flow from River Rahad and from rainfall infiltration. The prevailing hydrochemical processes are simple dissolution, mixing, partial ion exchange and ion exchange. Limited reverse ion exchange has been witnessed in the Nubian aquifer. Three factors control the overall mineralization and water quality of the Blue Nile Basin. The first factor includes high values of total dissolved solids, electrical conductivity, sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, sulphate and magnesium. The second factor includes calcium and pH. The third factor is due to fluoride concentration in the groundwater. The study highlights the descriptive capabilities of conventional and multivariate techniques as effective tools in groundwater quality evaluation. Une étude hydrochimique de systèmes aquifères a pu être réalisée au moyen des techniques conventionnelles et multidimensionnelles, telles que les analyses de cluster et factorielles, ainsi que d'autres comme l'analyse des correspondances. Le principal objectif de ce travail est d'étudier la qualité des eaux souterraines du bassin du Nil bleu au Soudan oriental, et de réaliser une évaluation hydrochimique du système aquifère. Des méthodes conventionnelles et

  5. Buoyancy contribution to uncertainty of mass, conventional mass and force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malengo, Andrea; Bich, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The conventional mass is a useful concept introduced to reduce the impact of the buoyancy correction in everyday mass measurements, thus avoiding in most cases its accurate determination, necessary in measurements of ‘true’ mass. Although usage of conventional mass is universal and standardized, the concept is considered as a sort of second-choice tool, to be avoided in high-accuracy applications. In this paper we show that this is a false belief, by elucidating the role played by covariances between volume and mass and between volume and conventional mass at the various stages of the dissemination chain and in the relationship between the uncertainties of mass and conventional mass. We arrive at somewhat counter-intuitive results: the volume of the transfer standard plays a comparatively minor role in the uncertainty budget of the standard under calibration. In addition, conventional mass is preferable to mass in normal, in-air operation, as its uncertainty is smaller than that of mass, if covariance terms are properly taken into account, and the uncertainty over-stating (typically) resulting from neglecting them is less severe than that (always) occurring with mass. The same considerations hold for force. In this respect, we show that the associated uncertainty is the same using mass or conventional mass, and, again, that the latter is preferable if covariance terms are neglected.

  6. Induction Hardening vs Conventional Hardening of a Heat Treatable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Leitner, Harald; Zuber, Michael; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the comparison of mechanical and microstructural properties of induction and conventionally heat-treated steels in the as-quenched state. The investigated steel is a heat treatable 42CrMo4 steel. In order to characterize the mechanical properties, tensile tests and Vickers hardness tests are performed. The yield strength and hardness of the induction hardened condition turn out to be slightly lower compared to the conventionally hardened one. Light optical and scanning electron microscopy show no differences in the martensitic structure of the induction and conventionally hardened condition. However, electron back scatter diffraction investigations reveal a smaller block size within the conventionally hardened specimen. Carbon mappings by electron probe micro analysis show a homogenous carbon concentration in the conventionally hardened and a non-uniform distribution in the induction-hardened case. The segregation of the carbon exhibits line-type features in the induction hardened condition, lowering the total amount of carbon in the matrix. Therefore, the carbon content in the matrix of the conventionally hardened condition is slightly higher, which causes a smaller block size. The smaller block size is believed to be the reason for the higher hardness and yield strength.

  7. Non-conventional hydrogen bonds: pterins-metal anions.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rubicelia; Martínez, Ana

    2011-07-28

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the interaction of metal ions (Cu, Ag and Au) with three different pterins (pterin, isoxanthopterin and sepiapterin) to provide insights concerning the formation of conventional and non-conventional H bonds. Density functional theory calculations were performed in order to reveal the optimized structures of pterin molecules, dimers and tetramers compounds, both with and without metal anions (M). The interaction with small metal clusters (M(3)) is also considered. The formation of different systems is characterized in terms of the structural parameters and hydrogen binding energies (HBE). The HBE values for pterin-M systems presented in this study lie between 22 and 60 kcal mol(-1) and can therefore be classified as strong conventional and strong non-conventional hydrogen bonds. The HBE with small metal clusters (pterin-M(3)) are smaller than the HBE with metal atoms. Vertical electron detachment energies (VEDEs) are also reported in order to analyze the influence of the hydrogen bond on electronic properties. A direct correlation between VEDEs and HBE was found for pterin-M and pterin-M(3) complexes; i.e. as the VEDEs increase, the HBE also augment. The only exception is with Ag(3). The main conclusion derived from this study is that the strong non-conventional hydrogen bonds formed between pterins, dimers and tetramers do not affect the formation of conventional hydrogen bonds between pterins but they do influence the VEDEs. PMID:21695329

  8. Validity of conventional assumptions concerning flexible response. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization is an alliance for collective defense. Made up of 16 countries, NATO has been a successful alliance because there has been no war in Europe since 1945. In 1967, NATO adopted the strategy of flexible response, a strategy dependent upon conventional, tactical nuclear, and strategic nuclear weapons to provide deterrence from a Warsaw Pact attack. Although successful, NATO is suffering from an erosion in conventional strength. NATO continues to make assumptions about its conventional capabilities to successfully meet the requirements of the flexible response strategy. In the present day world of NATO, there is limited funding, a fact that is not likely to change any time in the foreseeable future. Limited funding makes it impossible to buy all the conventional force structure needed to ideally support the current strategy, also a fact that is unlikely to change. This paper shows limitations in some of the ways NATO assumes it can conventionally perform its mission. It is the author's position that NATO should modernize its conventional thinking to make it more in line with the realities of the situation NATO finds itself in today.

  9. 76 FR 76935 - Impact of Implementing the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) on Commercial Activities Involving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Impact of Implementing the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) on... implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), through the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (CWCIA), and the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR), has had on commercial...

  10. Pressure leaching las cruces copper ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezowsky, R. M.; Xue, T.; Collins, M. J.; Makwana, M.; Barton-Jones, I.; Southgate, M.; Maclean, J. K.

    1999-12-01

    A hydrometallurgical process was developed for treating the Las Cruces massive sulfide-ore deposit located near Seville, Spain. A two-stage countercurrent leach process, consisting of an atmospheric leach and a pressure leach, was developed to effectively leach copper from the copper-bearing minerals and to generate a solution suitable for the subsequent solvent-extraction and copper-electrowinning operations. The results of batch and continuous miniplant tests are presented.

  11. Improving ITC studies of cyclodextrin inclusion compounds by global analysis of conventional and non-conventional experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bertaut, Eléonore

    2014-01-01

    Summary The study of 1:1 cyclodextrin inclusion compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry was explored in a theoretical and experimental point of view to compare the efficiency of conventional and non-conventional experiments. All direct and competitive protocols were described and evaluated in terms of accuracy on both binding constant and inclusion enthalpy. Significant improvement in the calorimetric characterization may be obtained by means of the global analysis of non-conventional experiments coupled to the standard titration protocol. While the titration-release approach proved to be the most accurate strategy for classical complexations, the valuable contribution of other non-conventional experiments was demonstrated for issues concerning weak stability, enthalpy, or solubility. PMID:25550724

  12. 78 FR 70574 - Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Vegas Boulevard South, Las Vegas, Nevada 89109. Send written comments to Mr. Kib Jacobson, Bureau of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Kib Jacobson, telephone (801) 524- 3753; facsimile (801) 524-3847; email at:...

  13. Engineering challenges of the acoustics of a political convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randorff, Jack E.

    2002-05-01

    The acoustical challenges encountered during the 2000 Republican Convention are discussed. The convention has held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's First Union Center. This venue is a dual-purpose facility catering to professional basketball and professional ice hockey. The acoustical needs of the delegates and the broadcast audience are discussed. The technical performance requirements of convention sound reinforcement and media network broadcast feed are outlined. The necessary technical and performance trade-offs are enumerated with respect to the physical constraints, schedule requirements, budget limitations, and technical planning committee expectations. The conversion of a major sporting arena to a large-scale meeting room with reverberation times and general room conditions conducive to good listening was a significant undertaking. The site had been chosen for a preliminary screening visit approximately 2 years before. This presentation is a followup to ``Acoustics of Political Conventions-A Review,'' delivered at the Acoustical Society of America 139th Meeting in Atlanta in June 2000, 2 months before the convention in Philadelphia.

  14. Convention on the Rights of the Child, 20 November 1989.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    This document contains the text of the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Convention opens with a preamble which notes, among other things, that children are entitled to special care and assistance, that the family is the natural environment for the nurturing of children, and that international cooperation is important for improving the living conditions of children, especially in developing countries. Part 1 of the Convention contains 41 Articles which specify the rights of children to such things as protection against discrimination; proper care and protection; survival and development; a name and nationality; a unified family; freedom of expression, thought, conscience, religion, association, and peaceful assembly; access to information; adoption; having special needs met (in the case of handicapped children); health; social security; an adequate standard of living; education; rest and leisure; and protection from economic exploitation, illegal drugs, and sexual abuse. In addition, no child under the age of 15 years should serve in any armed forces. Parts 2 and 3 of the Convention deal with administrative issues such as the establishment of a Committee on the Rights of the Child as well as ratification, reservations, amendments, and denouncements of the Convention.

  15. Electronic structures of topological insulators with non-conventional terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiegang; Zhang, Yun; Feng, Wei; Yuan, Bingkai; Lai, Xinchun

    Until now, most works on topological insulators focus on the natural cleaving surfaces, i.e., conventional terminations. However, researches on the non-conventional surfaces of TIs are hindered due to the difficulties in preparation of those surfaces and the existence of large number of dangling bonds on those surfaces. What is more, due to the complications in the surface lattice structures, DFT calculations on the non-conventional surfaces are not favorable. In this work, by adopting the tight binding method based Green's Function, we systematically studied the surface states of non-conventional terminations of topological insulator Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3. By using MBE, we manage to prepare topological insulator Bi2Te3 thin films with fractional quintuple layer (FQL) termination. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) reveals that the as-grown Bi2Te3 thin films may not necessarily terminate at the Van der Waals gap between two adjacent quintuple layers. The electronic structures of the FQL surfaces are studied in combination with quasi-particle interference (QPI) by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Our results suggest that the topological nature of SSs be preserved on non-conventional terminations. The robustness of the topological SSs is also demonstrated. Work supported by Grants from NSFC11404298, CAEP2014B0302045.

  16. Kinetics study on conventional and microwave pyrolysis of moso bamboo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qing; Xiong, Yuanquan

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study on the pyrolysis kinetics of moso bamboo has been conducted in a conventional thermogravimetric analyzer and a microwave thermogravimetric analyzer respectively. The effect of heating rate on the pyrolysis process was also discussed. The results showed that both the maximum and average reaction rates increased with the heating rate increasing. The values of activation energy increased from 58.30 to 84.22 kJ/mol with the heating rate decreasing from 135 to 60 °C/min during conventional pyrolysis. The value of activation energy was 24.5 kJ/mol for microwave pyrolysis, much lower than that for conventional pyrolysis at a similar heating rate of 160 °C/min. The pyrolysis of moso bamboo exhibited a kinetic compensation effect. The low activation energy obtained under microwave irradiation suggests that microwaves heating would be a promising method for biomass pyrolysis.

  17. A comparison of spousal anticipatory grief and conventional grief.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, G; Fleming, S

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to compare the degree of similarity between the grief experienced by spouses of terminally-ill patients prior to (anticipatory grief) and following the death (conventional grief). Responses of this sample were also compared with those of two control groups: spouses of chronically-ill patients and spouses of relatively healthy individuals from the community. The impact of such factors as the quality of the marital relationship, perceived ability to cope, concurrent stressors, previous losses, perceived social support, and perception of spouse's pain and suffering on anticipatory and conventional grief was also systematically explored. Results indicated that these two phenomena are statistically similar with regard to the majority of subscales on the Grief Experience Inventory. Furthermore, when compared with conventional grief, anticipatory grief was unexpectedly associated with higher intensities of anger, loss of emotional control, and atypical grief responses. PMID:10342940

  18. Advances in neuroscience and the biological and toxin weapons convention.

    PubMed

    Dando, Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential threat to the prohibition of the hostile misuse of the life sciences embodied in the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention from the rapid advances in the field of neuroscience. The paper describes how the implications of advances in science and technology are considered at the Five Year Review Conferences of the Convention and how State Parties have developed their appreciations since the First Review Conference in 1980. The ongoing advances in neurosciences are then assessed and their implications for the Convention examined. It is concluded that State Parties should consider a much more regular and systematic review system for such relevant advances in science and technology when they meet at the Seventh Review Conference in late 2011, and that neuroscientists should be much more informed and engaged in these processes of protecting their work from malign misuse.

  19. Advances in Neuroscience and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential threat to the prohibition of the hostile misuse of the life sciences embodied in the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention from the rapid advances in the field of neuroscience. The paper describes how the implications of advances in science and technology are considered at the Five Year Review Conferences of the Convention and how State Parties have developed their appreciations since the First Review Conference in 1980. The ongoing advances in neurosciences are then assessed and their implications for the Convention examined. It is concluded that State Parties should consider a much more regular and systematic review system for such relevant advances in science and technology when they meet at the Seventh Review Conference in late 2011, and that neuroscientists should be much more informed and engaged in these processes of protecting their work from malign misuse. PMID:21350673

  20. Cost estimates for membrane filtration and conventional treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, M.R.; Hackney, J.; Sethi, S. ); Jacangelo, J.G. ); Laine, J.M. . Lyonnaise des Eaux)

    1994-12-01

    Costs of several ultrafiltration and nanofiltration processes are compared with the cost of conventional liquid-solid separation with and without GAC adsorption for small water treatment facilities. Data on raw-water quality, permeate flux, recovery, frequency of backflushing, and chemical dosage obtained from a pilot study were used with a previously developed model for membrane costs to calculate anticipated capital and operating costs for each instance. Data from the US Environmental Protection Agency were used to estimate conventional treatment costs. All of the membrane process calculations showed comparable or lower total costs per unit volume treated compared with conventional treatment for small facilities (< 200,000 m[sup 3]/d or about 5 mgd). Membrane processes may offer small facilities a less expensive alternative for the removal of particles and organic materials from drinking water.