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Sample records for laser ablation growth

  1. Growth of epitaxial thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1992-10-01

    High-quality, high-temperature superconductor (HTSc) films can be grown by the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process. This article provides a detailed introduction to the advantages and curent limitations of PLA for epitaxial film growth. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods and on exploitation of PLA to control epitaxial growth at either the unit cell or the atomic-layer level. Examples are taken from recent HTSc film growth. 33 figs, 127 refs. (DLC)

  2. Growth modes of ZnO nanostructures from laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Amarilio-Burshtein, I.; Tamir, S.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2010-03-08

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) and other nanostructures were grown by laser ablation of a ZnO containing target onto different substrates with and without the presence of an Au catalyst. The morphology and structure of the NWs were studied using high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopes [including imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS)]. The different growth modes obtainable could be tuned by varying the Zn concentration in the vapor phase keeping other growth parameters intact. Possible growth mechanisms of these nanowires are suggested and discussed.

  3. Promotion of protein crystal growth by actively switching crystal growth mode via femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Yusuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Yoshimura, Masashi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Masaru; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-11-01

    Large single crystals with desirable shapes are essential for various scientific and industrial fields, such as X-ray/neutron crystallography and crystalline devices. However, in the case of proteins the production of such crystals is particularly challenging, despite the efforts devoted to optimization of the environmental, chemical and physical parameters. Here we report an innovative approach for promoting the growth of protein crystals by directly modifying the local crystal structure via femtosecond laser ablation. We demonstrate that protein crystals with surfaces that are locally etched (several micrometers in diameter) by femtosecond laser ablation show enhanced growth rates without losing crystal quality. Optical phase-sensitive microscopy and X-ray topography imaging techniques reveal that the local etching induces spiral growth, which is energetically advantageous compared with the spontaneous two-dimensional nucleation growth mode. These findings prove that femtosecond laser ablation can actively switch the crystal growth mode, offering flexible control over the size and shape of protein crystals.

  4. Ablative and fractional ablative lasers.

    PubMed

    Brightman, Lori A; Brauer, Jeremy A; Anolik, Robert; Weiss, Elliot; Karen, Julie; Chapas, Anne; Hale, Elizabeth; Bernstein, Leonard; Geronemus, Roy G

    2009-10-01

    The field of nonsurgical laser resurfacing for aesthetic enhancement continues to improve with new research and technological advances. Since its beginnings in the 1980s, the laser-resurfacing industry has produced a multitude of devices employing ablative, nonablative, and fractional ablative technologies. The three approaches largely differ in their method of thermal damage, weighing degrees of efficacy, downtime, and side effect profiles against each other. Nonablative technologies generate some interest, although only for those patient populations seeking mild improvements. Fractional technologies, however, have gained dramatic ground on fully ablative resurfacing. Fractional laser resurfacing, while exhibiting results that fall just short of the ideal outcomes of fully ablative treatments, is an increasingly attractive alternative because of its far more favorable side effect profile, reduced recovery time, and significant clinical outcome.

  5. On the growth mechanism of nanoparticles in plasma during pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccogna, F.; Dell’Aglio, M.; Rutigliano, M.; Valenza, G.; De Giacomo, A.

    2017-04-01

    Particle-in-cell methodology is applied to study the simultaneous charging and coagulation of a nanoparticle, taking into account the self-consistent dynamics of surrounding plasma induced by laser ablation in liquid. The model uses, as an input, plasma temperature and electron number density which are experimentally obtained by high temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy of the laser-induced plasma in water. Results show the important role of ions in the growth process and of the atom-induced evaporation process for the final nanoparticle size. The competition between different mechanisms of nanoparticle formation in the laser-induced plasma is finally discussed.

  6. Controlled growth of ZnO nanowires by nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Guo, R.; Nishimura, J.; Matsumoto, M.; Higashihata, M.; Nakamura, D.

    2008-02-01

    Vertically aligned ZnO nanowires have been successfully synthesized on c-cut sapphire substrates by a catalyst-free nanoparticle-assisted pulsed-laser ablation deposition (NAPLD) in Ar and N II background gases. In NAPLD, the nanoparticles formed in a background gas by laser ablation are used as a starting material for the growth of the nanowires. The surface density of the nanowires can be controlled by varying the density of nanoparticles, which are accomplished by changing the energy of the ablation laser, the repetition rate of the laser and so on. When single ZnO nanowire synthesized in a N II background gas was excited by 355 nm laser-pulse with a pulse-width of 8 ns, stimulated emission was clearly observed, indicating high quality of the nanowire. These nanowires were used as building blocks for an ultraviolet light emitting diode with a structure of n-ZnO/ZnO nanowire/p-GaN.

  7. Pulsed laser ablation growth and doping of epitaxial compound semiconductor films

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.; Rouleau, C.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Budai, J.D.; Poker, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.; Strauss, M.A.; Pedraza, A.J.; Park, J.W.

    1995-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has several characteristics that are potentially attractive for the growth and doping of chemically complex compound semiconductors including (1) stoichiometric (congruent) transfer of composition from target to film, (2) the use of reactive gases to control film composition and/or doping via energetic-beam-induced reactions, and (3) low-temperature nonequilibrium phase formation in the laser-generated plasma ``plume.`` However, the electrical properties of compound semiconductors are far more sensitive to low concentrations of defects than are the oxide metals/ceramics for which PLA has been so successful. Only recently have doped epitaxial compound semiconductor films been grown by PLA. Fundamental studies are being carried out to relate film electrical and microstructural properties to the energy distribution of ablated species, to the temporal evolution of the ablation pulse in ambient gases, and to beam assisted surface and/or gas-phase reactions. In this paper the authors describe results of ex situ Hall effect, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering measurements that are being used in combination with in situ RHEED and time-resolved ion probe measurements to evaluate PLA for growth of doped epitaxial compound semiconductor films and heterostructures. Examples are presented and results analyzed for doped II-VI, I-III-VI, and column-III nitride materials grown recently in this and other laboratories.

  8. Indirect-drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments on the Shenguang-II laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.; Zheng, W. D.; Wang, M.; Pei, W. B.; Zhu, S. P.; Zhang, W. Y.; Miao, W. Y.; Yuan, Y. T.; Cao, Z. R.; Deng, B.; Jiang, S. E.; Liu, S. Y.; Ding, Y. K.; Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H. He, X. T.

    2014-04-15

    In this research, a series of single-mode, indirect-drive, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability experiments performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility [X. T. He and W. Y. Zhang, Eur. Phys. J. D 44, 227 (2007)] using planar target is reported. The simulation results from the one-dimensional hydrocode for the planar foil trajectory experiment indicate that the energy flux at the hohlraum wall is obviously less than that at the laser entrance hole. Furthermore, the non-Planckian spectra of x-ray source can strikingly affect the dynamics of the foil flight and the perturbation growth. Clear images recorded by an x-ray framing camera for the RT growth initiated by small- and large-amplitude perturbations are obtained. The observed onset of harmonic generation and transition from linear to nonlinear growth regime is well predicted by two-dimensional hydrocode simulations.

  9. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  10. Growth of anatase and rutile phase TiO2 nanoparticles using pulsed laser ablation in liquid: Influence of surfactant addition and ablation time variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Amita; Joshi, M. P.; Mondal, P.; Sinha, A. K.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were grown using nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ti target in DI water and in 0.001 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant aqueous solution. Growth was carried out with varying ablation times i. e. 30 min, 60 min and 90 min. The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of variations in liquid ambience conditions on the growth of the nanoparticles in a pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) process. Size, composition and optical properties of the grown TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The obtained nanoparticles of TiO2 were found almost spherical in shape and polycrystalline in nature in both the liquid mediums i.e. DI water and aqueous solution of surfactant. Nanoparticles number density was also found to increase with increasing ablation time in both the liquid mediums. However crystalline phase of the grown TiO2 nanoparticles differs with the change in liquid ambience conditions. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED), PL and XRD studies suggest that DI water ambience is favorable for the growth of anatase phase TiO2 nanoparticles for all ablation times. While Surfactant added water ambience is favorable for the growth of rutile phase TiO2 nanoparticles but for shorter ablation times of 30 min and 60 min only, for longer ablation time of 90 min anatase phase was also observed along with the rutile phase TiO2 nanoparticles. The formation of anatase phase in DI water and rutile and anatase phase in aqueous solution of surfactant is explained on the basis of varying thermodynamic conditions with the two different liquid ambiences and different ablation times.

  11. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  12. Modelling ultrafast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rethfeld, Baerbel; Ivanov, Dmitriy S.; E Garcia, Martin; Anisimov, Sergei I.

    2017-05-01

    This review is devoted to the study of ultrafast laser ablation of solids and liquids. The ablation of condensed matter under exposure to subpicosecond laser pulses has a number of peculiar properties which distinguish this process from ablation induced by nanosecond and longer laser pulses. The process of ultrafast ablation includes light absorption by electrons in the skin layer, energy transfer from the skin layer to target interior by nonlinear electronic heat conduction, relaxation of the electron and ion temperatures, ultrafast melting, hydrodynamic expansion of heated matter accompanied by the formation of metastable states and subsequent formation of breaks in condensed matter. In case of ultrashort laser excitation, these processes are temporally separated and can thus be studied separately. As for energy absorption, we consider peculiarities of the case of metal irradiation in contrast to dielectrics and semiconductors. We discuss the energy dissipation processes of electronic thermal wave and lattice heating. Different types of phase transitions after ultrashort laser pulse irradiation as melting, vaporization or transitions to warm dense matter are discussed. Also nonthermal phase transitions, directly caused by the electronic excitation before considerable lattice heating, are considered. The final material removal occurs from the physical point of view as expansion of heated matter; here we discuss approaches of hydrodynamics, as well as molecular dynamic simulations directly following the atomic movements. Hybrid approaches tracing the dynamics of excited electrons, energy dissipation and structural dynamics in a combined simulation are reviewed as well.

  13. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  14. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C

    2008-02-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. The fractional techniques such as Fraxel are used to treat non-adjacent microzones without ablation of the epidermis. Around 25 p. 100 of the affected region is treated per session without ablation of the epidermis. Each fraction is only mini-invasive and is performed under local anesthesia. Social hindrance is minimal. Nonetheless, the results are inferior to those obtained with ablative lasers, especially regarding deep wrinkles. The treatment is costly and four sessions are usually required to treat the whole affected area. Others regions of the face may also be treated. Encouraging results have been obtained with mélasma.

  15. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  16. Growth of highly doped p-type ZnTe films by pulsed laser ablation in molecular nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.; Rouleau, C.M.; Budai, J.D.; Poker, D.B.; Geohegan, D.B.; Zhu, Shen; McCamy, J.W.; Puretzky, A.

    1995-04-01

    Highly p-doped ZnTe films have been grown on semi-insulating GaAs (001) substrates by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) of a stoichiometric ZnTe target in a high-purity N{sub 2} ambient without the use of any assisting (DC or AC) plasma source. Free hole concentrations in the mid-10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} to > 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3} range were obtained for a range of nitrogen pressures The maximum hole concentration equals the highest hole doping reported to date for any wide band gap II-VI compound. The highest hole mobilities were attained for nitrogen pressures of 50--100 mTorr ({approximately}6.5-13 Pa). Unlike recent experiments in which atomic nitrogen beams, extracted from RF and DC plasma sources, were used to produce p-type doping during molecular beam epitaxy deposition, spectroscopic measurements carried out during PLA of ZnTe in N{sub 2} do not reveal the presence of atomic nitrogen. This suggests that the high hole concentrations in laser ablated ZnTe are produced by a new and different mechanism, possibly energetic beam-induced reactions with excited molecular nitrogen adsorbed on the growing film surface, or transient formation of Zn-N complexes in the energetic ablation plume. This appears to be the first time that any wide band gap (Eg > 2 eV) II-VI compound (or other) semiconductor has been impurity-doped from the gas phase by laser ablation. In combination with the recent discovery that epitaxial ZnSe{sub l-x}S{sub x} films and heterostructures with continuously variable composition can be grown by ablation from a single target of fixed composition, these results appear to open the way to explore PLA growth and doping of compound semiconductors as a possible alternative to molecular beam epitaxy.

  17. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  18. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  19. Laser ablation: LIBS and ICPMS

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Liu, Chunyi

    2006-08-29

    Laser ablation has become a dominant technology for directsolid sampling chemical analysis. Commonly used detection modalitiesinclude LIBS (laser induced breakdown spectroscopy) for directspectroscopic analysis from the laser-induced plasma at the samplesurface,and ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy) in whichthe ablated aerosol is transported and excited in a secondary source.Each measurement approach dictates the laser parameters required foroptimum performance. Fundamental and experimental research studies haveled to significant improvements in performance metrics for laser ablationsolid sampling chemical analysis using both LIBS and ICPMS.

  20. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  1. Femtosecond laser ablation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Yeow-Whatt; Lu, Yong-Feng; Hong, Ming-Hui; Chong, Tow Chong

    2003-02-01

    In recent years, femtosecond (fs) laser ablation has attracted much interest in both basic and applied physics, mainly because of its potential application in micromachining and pulsed laser deposition. Ultrashort laser ablation have the capability to ablate materials precisely with little or no collateral damage, even with materials that are impervious to laser energy from conventional pulsed lasers. The extreme intensities and short timescale at which ultrashort pulsed lasers operate differentiate them from other lasers such as nanosecond laser. In this work, we investigate the expansion dynamics of Cu (copper) plasma generated by ultrashort laser ablation of pure copper targets by optically examining the plasma plume. Time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy measurements by using intensified charged couple detector array (ICCD) imaging were used to detect the species present in the plasma and to study the laser-generated plasma formation and evolution. Temporal emission profiles are measured. Our interest in the dynamics of laser-generated copper plasma arises from the fact that copper has been considered as a substitute for Aluminum (Al) interconnects/metallization in ULSI devices (for future technology). It is important to know the composition and behavior of copper plasma species for the understanding of the mechanisms involved and optimizing the micro-machining processes and deposition conditions.

  2. Growth Of Graphitic Polyhedra, SiC Platelets, And Carbon Nanotubes Filled With SiC Nanowires By Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kokai, Fumio; Uchiyama, Kunihiro; Chigusa, Hajime; Nozaki, Iori; Noguchi, Eriko; Kameda, Yuto; Koshio, Akira

    2010-10-08

    Three characteristic silicon/carbon nanostructures, i.e., graphitic polyhedral (GP) particles, silicon carbide (SiC) platelets, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with SiC nanowires, were synthesized by the laser ablation of Si-C targets in the presence of high-pressure Ar gas up to 0.9 MPa. The growth of nanostructures was controlled merely by adjusting the Si content in graphite and the ambient Ar gas pressure. Deposits containing GP particles were purified by heat treatment at 550 deg. C in a pure oxygen atmosphere for 1 h. CNTs filled with SiC nanowires were grown without a catalyst. Unlike previous studies of CNTs filled with metals or compounds, all the CNTs checked by transmission electron microscopy contained SiC nanowires and no unfilled CNTs were produced. We discuss the growth mechanisms of the three nanostructures.

  3. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  4. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  5. Dynamical modeling of laser ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    Several physics and computational approaches have been developed to globally characterize phenomena important for film growth by pulsed laser deposition of materials. These include thermal models of laser-solid target interactions that initiate the vapor plume; plume ionization and heating through laser absorption beyond local thermodynamic equilibrium mechanisms; gas dynamic, hydrodynamic, and collisional descriptions of plume transport; and molecular dynamics models of the interaction of plume particles with the deposition substrate. The complexity of the phenomena involved in the laser ablation process is matched by the diversity of the modeling task, which combines materials science, atomic physics, and plasma physics.

  6. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  7. Physical processes of laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-05-01

    The revised ablation model applicable to homogeneous tissues is presented. It is based on the thermal mechanism and involves the instability of the laserinduced evaporation (thermodestruction) front the growth of the surface ripple structure the interference of the laser wave and of the surface wave arising by diffraction on the ripples Beer''s law violation the pulsed thermodestruction of the organic structural component the tissue water boiling and gas dynamic expansion of the resulting products into the surrounding medium which is followed by the shock wave formation. The UV and IR ablation schemes were implemented and compared to the corneal ablation experiments. The initial ablation pressure and temperature are given restored from the timeofflight measurements of the supersonic expansion of the product. 1.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  9. Growth and structure of fullerene-like CNx thin films produced by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voevodin, A. A.; Jones, J. G.; Zabinski, J. S.; Czigany, Zs.; Hultman, L.

    2002-11-01

    The growth and structure of fullerene-like CNx films produced by laser ablation of graphite in low pressure nitrogen were investigated. Deposition conditions were selected based on investigations of CN and C2 concentration at the condensation surface, vibrational temperature of CN radicals, and kinetic energies of atomic and molecular species. Films were characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and stress analyses. The nitrogen content in CNx films directly depended on the concentration of CN radicals at the condensation surface. Formation of fullerene-like structures required a high vibrational temperature of these radicals, which was maximized at about 4 eV for depositions at 10 mTorr N2 and laser fluences of approx7 J/cm2. The presence of C2 had only a minor effect on film composition and structure. Optimization of plasma characteristics and a substrate temperature of 300 degC helped to produce about 1-mum-thick solid films of CNx (N/C ratioapproximately0.2-0.3) and pure carbon consisting of fullerene-like fragments and packages. In contrast to carbon films, fullerene-like CNx films exhibited a high elastic recovery of about 80% in using a Berkovich tip at 5 mN load and indentation depths up to 150 nm. Their elastic modulus was about 160 GPa measured from the unloading portion of an indentation curve, and about 250 GPa measured with a 40 Hz tip oscillation during nanoindentation tests. The difference was related to time dependent processes of shape restoration of fullerene-like fragments, and an analogy was made to the behavior of elastomer polymers. However, unlike elastomers, CNx film hardness was as high as 30 GPa, which was twice that of fullerene-like carbon films. The unusual combination of high elasticity and hardness of CNx films was explained by crosslinking of fullerene fragments induced by the incorporated nitrogen and stored compressive stress. The

  10. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  11. Liquid assisted ablation of zirconium for the growth of LIPSS at varying pulse durations and pulse energies by femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, M. Shahid; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Investigations have been performed to explore the optimized conditions for the growth of Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) by varying pulse durations and pulse energies during ultrashort pulsed laser ablation of zirconium (Zr). The Ti: Sapphire laser with central wavelength of 800 nm, maximum pulse energy of 1 mJ is used to ablate Zr targets in the wet environment of ethanol. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis was performed for central as well as the peripheral ablated area to characterize nano and microstructures formed on the Zr surface. Raman spectroscopy was carried out to explore the chemical and compositional changes produced in laser ablated Zr. In order to explore the effect of varying pulse durations ranging from 25 to 100 fs, targets were exposed to 1000 succeeding pulses keeping the pulse energy constant at 600 μJ. The micrographs of peripheral ablated areas reveal the formation of nano scale ripples or Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) for all pulse durations. LIPSS are more distinct and well organized for the shortest pulse duration of 25 fs. Whereas, LIPSS become diffused and indistinct with the increase in the pulse duration. This is the clear indication that shortest pulse duration (in our case 25 fs) is most suitable for the growth of nanoscale ripples. In order to explore the effect of varying pulse energies on the growth of LIPSS, targets were exposed to 1000 succeeding pulses with energies ranging from 200 μJ to 600 μJ for a pulse duration of 25 fs. In the peripheral ablated areas LIPSS are grown for all pulse energies. For the lowest pulse energy of 200 μJ, LIPSS are distinct and well defined. For intermediate energies of 300 and 400 μJ they become diffused and indistinct. For higher pulse energies of 500 and 600 μJ, their appearance again becomes well defined and distinct. For central ablated areas LIPSS are grown but their appearance diffuses with increasing pulse energies. For the highest pulse

  12. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    PubMed

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  13. Laser Ablation Propulsion A Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Sayed A.; Ugalatad, Akshata C.

    Laser Ablation Propulsion (LAP) will serve as an alternative propulsion system for development of microthrusters. The principle of LAP is that when a laser (pulsed or continuous wave) with sufficient energy (more than the vaporization threshold energy of material) is incident on material, ablation or vaporization takes place which leads to the generation of plasma. The generated plasma has the property to move away from the material hence pressure is generated which leads to the generation of thrust. Nowadays nano satellites are very common in different space and defence applications. It is important to build micro thruster which are useful for orienting and re-positioning small aircraft (like nano satellites) above the atmosphere. modelling of LAP using MATLAB and Mathematica. Schematic is made for the suitable optical configuration of LAP. Practical experiments with shadowgraphy and self emission techniques and the results obtained are analysed taking poly (vinyl-chloride) (PVC) as propellant to study the

  14. Effect of ambient gas pressure on pulsed laser ablation plume dynamics and ZnTe film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Rouleau, C.M.; Lowndes, D.H.; Geohegan, D.B.; Allard, L.F.; Strauss, M.A.; Cao, S.; Pedraza, A.J.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Epitaxial thin films of nitrogen-doped p-ZnTe were grown on single-crystal, semi-insulating Ga-As substrates via pulsed laser ablation of a stoichiometric ZnTe target. Both low pressure nitrogen ambients and high vacuum were used. Results of in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and time-resolved ion probe measurements have been compared with ex situ Hall effect and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. A strong correlation was observed between the nature of the film`s surface during growth (2-D vs. 3-D, assessed via RHEED) and the ambient gas pressures employed during deposition. The extended defect content (assessed via cross-sectional TEM) in the region >150 mn from the film/substrate interface was found to increase with the ambient gas pressure during deposition, which could not be explained by lattice mismatch alone. At sufficiently high pressures, misoriented, columnar grains developed which were not only consistent with the RHEED observations but also were correlated with a marked decrease in Hall mobility and a slight decrease in hole concentration. Ion probe measurements, which monitored the attenuation and slowing of the ion current arriving at the substrate surface, indicated that for increasing nitrogen pressure the fast (vacuum) velocity distribution splits into a distinct fast and two collisionally-slowed components or modes. Gas controlled variations in these components mirrored trends in electrical properties and microstructural measurements.

  15. A parametric study of single-wall carbon nanotube growth by laser ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William A.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Results of a parametric study of carbon nanotube production by the double-pulse laser oven process are presented. The effect of various operating parameters on the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is estimated by characterizing the nanotube material using analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermo gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The study included changing the sequence of the laser pulses, laser energy, pulse separation, type of buffer gas used, operating pressure, flow rate, inner tube diameter, as well as its material, and oven temperature. It was found that the material quality and quantity improve with deviation from normal operation parameters such as laser energy density higher than 1.5 J/cm2, pressure lower than 67 kPa, and flow rates higher than 100 sccm. Use of helium produced mainly small diameter tubes and a lower yield. The diameter of SWCNTs decreases with decreasing oven temperature and lower flow rates.

  16. A parametric study of single-wall carbon nanotube growth by laser ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William A.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Results of a parametric study of carbon nanotube production by the double-pulse laser oven process are presented. The effect of various operating parameters on the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is estimated by characterizing the nanotube material using analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermo gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The study included changing the sequence of the laser pulses, laser energy, pulse separation, type of buffer gas used, operating pressure, flow rate, inner tube diameter, as well as its material, and oven temperature. It was found that the material quality and quantity improve with deviation from normal operation parameters such as laser energy density higher than 1.5 J/cm2, pressure lower than 67 kPa, and flow rates higher than 100 sccm. Use of helium produced mainly small diameter tubes and a lower yield. The diameter of SWCNTs decreases with decreasing oven temperature and lower flow rates.

  17. Effective temperatures of polymer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-09-01

    Effective temperatures of laser ablation of certain polymers are extracted from experimental dependences of ablation depths on laser fluences. Dependence of these temperatures on laser pulse durations is established. Comparison with the known thermodestruction data shows that the effective temperature corresponds to transient thermodestruction proceeding by the statistically most probable way.

  18. Watching the growth of aluminum hydroxide nanoparticles from aluminum nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in aqueous surfactant solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seulki; Shin, Jae Ho; Choi, Myong Yong

    2013-03-01

    Aluminum nanospheres were prepared by a pulsed Nd-YAG laser ablation method in aqueous surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), solutions. In the absence of CTAB but with aging, fast hydrolysis reaction between Al and water changed the composition and structures of Al nanospheres to Al oxides and then further to Al hydroxides, bayerite and gibbsite, via a dissolution-recrystallization process. Thus, the control of the hydrolysis rate, producing pure Al and Al hydroxide nanoparticles selectively was attempted by varying the concentration of CTAB in the pulsed laser ablation solution; the transformation processes from Al to Al hydroxides were monitored. The resulting nanoparticles at each development stage were analyzed by X-ray diffraction measurements, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscope observations, fast Fourier transform analysis, and energy dispersive spectrometer analysis. Possible mechanisms for the dissolution-recrystallization process of Al hydroxides are proposed.

  19. In situ Diagnostics During Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary results of spectral analysis of the reaction zone during the carbon nanotube production by laser ablation method indicate synergetic dependence on dual laser setup. The emission spectra recorded from different regions of the laser ablated plume at different delay times from the laser pulses are used to map the temperatures of C2 and C3. These are compared with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra also obtained during production to model the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. Experiments conducted to correlate the spectral features with nanotube yields as a function of different production parameters will be discussed.

  20. Picosecond laser ablation of polyamide electrospun nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, Marco; Krimig, Olaf; Kürbitz, Tobias; Henning, Sven; Heilmann, Andreas; Hillrichs, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Electrospun nanofibers mats have a great potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Their high porosity and enormous volume to surface ratio stimulate the growth and adhesion of mammalian cells and serve as a stable support structure. These suitable properties can be further optimized by structuring of the nanofibers. Ultrashort pulsed lasers can be used for modifying of the electrospun nanofibers without significant heat exposure. It seems also possible to generate very fine cuts from the fiber mats. In this study, polyamide electrospun nanofibers samples were processed with picosecond UV-laser irradiation (λ = 355 nm, τ = 15 ps). The samples were processed in dry, wet and immersed condition. To optimize cutting and structuring of nanofiber tissue flakes, the influence of different laser parameters on line widths, edge quality, heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the contamination of the fibers by ablated particles (debris) were examined. One additional aim was the minimization of the flake size. It was possible to generate nanofiber flakes in the sub-millimeter range. The quality of the nanofiber flakes could be improved by ablation near the ablation threshold of the material. For cutting under wet conditions shrinking of the flakes has to be taken into account.

  1. Growth of GaAs “nano ice cream cones” by dual wavelength pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamp, C. T.; Jesser, W. A.; Shivaram, B. S.

    2007-05-01

    Harmonic generation crystals inherently offer the possibility of using multiple wavelengths of light in a single laser pulse. In the present experiment, the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) wavelengths from an Nd:YAG laser are focused together on GaAs and GaSb targets for ablation. Incident energy densities up to about 45 J/cm 2 at 10 Hz with substrate temperatures between 25 and 600 °C for durations of about 60 s have been used in an ambient gas pressure of about 10 -6 Torr. The ablated material was collected on electron-transparent amorphous carbon films for TEM analysis. Apart from a high density of isolated nanocrystals, the most common morphology observed consists of a crystalline GaAs cone-like structure in contact with a sphere of liquid Ga, resembling an "ice cream cone", typically 50-100 nm in length. For all of the heterostuctures of this type, the liquid/solid/vacuum triple junction is found to correspond to the widest point on the cone. These heterostructures likely form by preferential evaporation of As from molten GaAs drops ablated from the target. The resulting morphology minimizes the interfacial and surface energies of the liquid Ga and solid GaAs.

  2. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  3. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  4. Applications of pulsed laser ablation for enhanced gold nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Tae-Bong; Phuoc, Tran X.; Chyu, Minking K.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.

    2012-09-01

    We report the exploration for enhanced gold nanofluids by using the laser ablation technique of which pulsed laser ablates energetic clusters from the bulk target immersed into liquid environment. By employing pulsed laser ablation, the behavior of optical absorption band was investigated on spherical Au nanoparticles that approach to the extremely small size of 1 nm, and rod-shaped Au nanoparticles were synthesized by controlling the aggregation behavior of energetic clusters in fluids. It was found that a nominal change in particle size induces a significant change in absorption band energy in the size range. In addition, the attempt to control the growth kinetics of particles has made remarkable progress on the synthesis of environmentally friendly gold nanorods. Experimental evidences show that the laser ablation synthesis can be widely used as a potential method for advanced gold nanofluids.

  5. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  6. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  7. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  8. Dynamics of Laser Ablation in Superfluid ^4{He}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buelna, X.; Popov, E.; Eloranta, J.

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of metal targets immersed in superfluid ^4{He} is visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography and the products are analyzed by post-experiment atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The expansion dynamics of the gaseous ablation half-bubble on the target surface appears underdamped and follows the predicted behavior for the thermally induced bubble growth mechanism. An inherent instability of the ablation bubble appears near its maximum radius and no tightly focused cavity collapse or rebound events are observed. During the ablation bubble retreat phase, the presence of sharp edges in the target introduces flow patterns that lead to the creation of large classical vortex rings. Furthermore, on the nanometer scale, AFM data reveal that the metal nanoparticles created by laser ablation are trapped in spherical vortex tangles and quantized vortex rings present in the non-equilibrium liquid.

  9. Support for High Power Laser Ablation 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-16

    Femtosecond Pulsed laser Ablation and Deposition Marta Castillejo Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid, Spain Tel:+34...system to transition the laser cavity’s low pressure to the ambient pressure outside the device. Diffusers use a series of shocks in a duct to...especially the incident laser fluence and ambient pressure. New results highlight the influence of the ambient pressure on ablation physics from the

  10. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  11. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  12. Molecular Imaging of Growth, Metabolism, and Antibiotic Inhibition in Bacterial Colonies by Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Balan, Pranav; Vertes, Akos

    2016-11-21

    Metabolism in microbial colonies responds to competing species, rapidly evolving genetic makeup, and sometimes dramatic environmental changes. Conventional characterization of the existing and emerging microbial strains and their interactions with antimicrobial agents, e.g., the Kirby-Bauer susceptibility test, relies on time consuming methods with limited ability to discern the molecular mechanism and the minimum inhibitory concentration. Assessing the metabolic adaptation of microbial colonies requires their non-targeted molecular imaging in a native environment. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) is an ambient ionization technique that in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) enables the analysis and imaging of numerous metabolites and lipids. In this contribution, we report on the application of LAESI-MS imaging to gain deeper molecular insight into microbe-antibiotic interactions, and enhance the quantitative nature of antibiotic susceptibility testing while significantly reducing the required incubation time.

  13. Growth and study of SrBi 2 (Ta, Nb) 2 O 9 thin films by pulsed excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Bharadwaja, S. S. N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2000-05-01

    Thin films of SrBi 2(Ta,Nb) 2O 9 (SBTN) were grown using pulsed-laser ablation and were ex situ crystallized. Ferroelectric properties were achieved by low temperature deposition. A polycrystalline structure was achieved, with a Ta- to Nb-ratio nearly 1:1. The smaller thickness of the film allowed the switching voltage to be low enough (1.5 V), without affecting the insulating nature of the films. The hysteresis results showed an excellent square shaped loop with a remnant polarization ( Pr) of 7.6 μC/cm 2 and a coercive field ( Ec) of 75 kV/cm. This ferroelectric material composition is having a very high Curie temperature with higher stability and can be used in non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) devices.

  14. Femtosecond laser ablation of the stapes

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Ryan G.; Sun, Hui; Rothholtz, Vanessa S.; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    A femtosecond laser, normally used for LASIK eye surgery, is used to perforate cadaveric human stapes. The thermal side effects of bone ablation are measured with a thermocouple in an inner ear model and are found to be within acceptable limits for inner ear surgery. Stress and acoustic events, recorded with piezoelectric film and a microphone, respectively, are found to be negligible. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical coherence tomography are used to confirm the precision of the ablation craters and lack of damage to the surrounding tissue. Ablation is compared to that from an Er:YAG laser, the current laser of choice for stapedotomy, and is found to be superior. Ultra-short-pulsed lasers offer a precise and efficient ablation of the stapes, with minimal thermal and negligible mechanical and acoustic damage. They are, therefore, ideal for stapedotomy operations. PMID:19405768

  15. Novel Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chung H.

    2004-06-01

    Laser ablation for surface cleaning has been pursued for the removal of paint on airplanes. It has also been pursued for the cleaning of semiconductor surfaces. However, all these approaches have been pursued by laser ablation in air. For highly contaminated surface, laser ablation in air can easily cause secondary contamination. Thus it is not suitable to apply to achieve surface decontamination for DOE facilities since many of these facilities have radioactive contaminants on the surface. Any secondary contamination will be a grave concern. The objective of this project is to develop a novel technology for laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination and to evaluate the economic feasibility for large scale surface decontamination with laser ablation in liquid. When laser ablation is pursued in the solution, all the desorbed contaminants will be confined in liquid. The contaminants can be precipitated and subsequently contained in a small volume for disposal. It can reduce the risk of the decontamination workers. It can also reduce the volume of contaminants dramatically.

  16. Laser Ablation of Silk Protein (Fibroin) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Adachi, Hisanori; Yamada, Kazushi; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Itaya, Akira

    2002-07-01

    Fibroin is the main protein component of silk and is expected to have functional applications in bioelectronics and medicine. We investigated nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser ablation of solid fibroin films with/without a dye as a photosensitizer. Laser lights at 248 nm and 532/355/351 nm excited the peptide bond of fibroin and the dye, respectively. The neat film irradiated at 248 nm was scarcely accessible to etching and swelling, and instead, a microscopic pattern (structure) was formed. In contrast, for ablation of the doped film at 532/355/351 nm, we found marked swelling (height ˜500 μm) and deep etching (depth ˜10 μm) on the irradiated surfaces. The dye-photosensitized ablation was brought about by a photothermal mechanism, whereas ablation of neat films may be induced by another process, such as a photochemical one. The ablation processes are discussed in terms of the properties of fibroin and the mode of excitation.

  17. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  18. Nanosecond laser ablation of gold nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Choi, Yeonho; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chung, Jaewon; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-10-02

    Ablation of self-assembled monolayer protected gold nanoparticle films on polyimide was explored using a nanosecond laser. When the nanoparticle film was ablated and subsequently thermally sintered to a continuous film, the elevated rim structure by the expulsion of molten pool could be avoided and the ablation threshold fluence was reduced to a value at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the gold film. This could be explained by the unusual properties of nanoparticle film such as low melting temperature, weak bonding between nanoparticles, efficient laser energy deposition, and reduced heat loss. Finally, submicron lines were demonstrated.

  19. Analysis of infrared laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Gordon P.; Timmerman, Brenda H.; Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in infrared laser tissue ablation are studied using a free electron laser (FELIX) in order to clarify whether the increased ablation efficiency reported in literature for certain infrared wavelengths is due to a wavelength effect or to the specific pulse structure of the lasers that are generally used in these studies. Investigations are presented of ablation of vitreous from pigs" eyes using several techniques including protein gel electrophoresis and ablation plume visualization. The ablation effects of three different infrared wavelengths are compared: 3 mm, which is currently in clinical surgical use, and the wavelengths associated with the amide I and amide II bands, i.e. 6.2 mm and 6.45mm, respectively. The results suggest a different ablation mechanism to be in operation for each studied wavelength, thus indicating that the generally reported increased ablation efficiency in the 6-6.5 micron range is due to the wavelength rather than the typical free electron laser pulse structure.

  20. Highspeed laser ablation cutting of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, F.; Loeschner, U.; Hartwig, L.; Szczepanski, D.; Schille, J.; Gronau, S.; Knebel, T.; Drechsel, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    2013-02-01

    In laser ablation cutting, irradiation of high-intense laser beams causes ejection of molten and evaporated material out of the cutting zone as a result of high pressure gradients, induced by expanding plasma plumes. This paper investigates highspeed laser ablation cutting of industrial grade metal sheets using high-brilliant continuous wave fiber lasers with output powers up to 5 kW. The laser beam was deflected with scan speeds up to 2700 m/min utilizing both a fast galvanometer scan system and a polygon scan system. By sharp laser beam focusing using different objectives with focal lengths ranging between 160 mm and 500 mm, small laser spot diameters between 16.5 μm and 60 μm were obtained, respectively. As a result high peak intensities between 3*108 W/cm² and 2.5*109 W/cm² were irradiated on the sample surface, and cutting kerfs with a maximum depth of 1.4 mm have been produced. In this study the impact of the processing parameters laser power, laser spot diameter, cutting speed, and number of scans on both the achievable cutting depth and the cutting edge quality was investigated. The ablation depths, the heights of the cutting burr, as well as the removed material volumes were evaluated by means of optical microscope images and cross section photographs. Finally highspeed laser ablation cutting was studied using an intensified ultra highspeed camera in order to get useful insights into the cutting process.

  1. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  2. Perspective on how laser-ablated particles grow in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, DongShi; Liu, Jun; Liang, ChangHao

    2017-07-01

    Laser ablation in liquids has emerged as a new branch of nanoscience for developing various nanomaterials with different shapes. However, how to design and control nanomaterial growth is still a challenge due to the unique chemical-physical process chain correlated with nanomaterial nucleation and growth, including plasma phase (generation and rapid quenching), gas (bubble) phase, and liquid phase. In this review, through summarizing the literature about this topic and comparing with the well-established particle growth mechanisms of the conventional wet chemistry technique, our perspective on the possible nanoparticle growth mechanisms or routes is presented, aiming at shedding light on how laser-ablated particles grow in liquids. From the microscopic viewpoint, the nanoparticle growth contains six mechanisms, including LaMer-like growth, coalescence, Ostwald ripening, particle (oriented) attachment, adsorbate-induced growth and reaction-induced growth. For each microscopic growth mechanism, the vivid growth scenes of some representative nanomaterials recorded by TEM and SEM measurements are displayed. Afterwards, the scenes from the macroscopic viewpoint for the large submicro- and micro-scale nanospheres and anisotropic nanostructures formation and evolution from one nanostructure into another one are presented. The panorama of how diverse nanomaterials grow during and after laser ablation in liquids shown in this review is intended to offer a overview for researchers to search for the possible mechanisms correlated to their synthesized nanomaterials, and more expectation is desired to better design and tailor the morphology of the nanocrystals synthesized by LAL technique.

  3. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  4. Laser ablation of a polysilane material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. G.; Robitaille, T. E.

    1987-08-01

    The laser ablation properties of a (50%)-isopropyl methyl-(50%)-n-propyl methyl silane copolymer are examined. Both 193- and 248-nm-pulsed excimer laser radiation cleanly and completely remove this material in vacuum above certain energy thresholds (30 and 50 mJ/cm2, respectively). Under these conditions the ablation properties are quite similar to those reported for typical organic polymers. Below threshold, ablation is less efficient and becomes increasingly inefficient as irradiation continues due to spectral bleaching. In the presence of air, material removal is incomplete even for high-energy densities and long exposures. The ablation rate is shown to be independent of substrate material both above and below threshold.

  5. UV laser ablation patterns in intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Apostolopoulos, A.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of UV solid state laser radiation on intraocular lens (IOL) polymer surfaces as an alternative method to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs customization. Laser ablation experiments were performed on PMMA plates and commercially available hydrophobic and hydrophilic acrylic IOLs with the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=213 nm). Circular arrays of holes were drilled on the polymer surface, covering the centre and the peripheries of the IOL. The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a conventional optical microscope (Leitz GMBH Wetzlar) and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements of ablation rates were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variationsF in surface height. Laser interaction with IOLs depends on optical and mechanical material properties, in addition to laser radiation parameters. The exact ablation mechanism is discussed. Some polymer materials, depending on their properties, are more susceptible to the photothermal mechanism than the photochemical one or vice versa. In summary, every IOL polymer exhibits specific attributes in its interaction with the 5th harmonic of Nd:YAG laser.

  6. Hetero-epitaxial growth of the cubic single crystalline HfO 2 film as high k materials by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinqiang; Tu, Hailing; Wang, Xiaona; Xiong, Yuhua; Yang, Mengmeng; Wang, Lei; Du, Jun

    2010-10-01

    We report a hetero-epitaxial growth of cubic single crystalline HfO 2 film on Si substrates as high k materials by pulse laser ablation (PLA) at 820 °C. To eliminate the interfacial defects, the HfO 2 film has then been annealed at 900 °C for 5 min in N 2. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) results indicate orientation of the HfO 2 film on Si substrates corresponding to (∥( and [∥[. An interface layer has been revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Through capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and current-voltage ( I- V), it has been obtained that the leakage current of the HfO 2 gate insulator with dielectric constant of 26 is 5×10 -6 A/cm 2 at -1 V.

  7. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  8. From Laser Desorption to Laser Ablation of Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Hillenkamp

    1998-03-01

    For selected indications laser ablation and cutting of biological tissues is clinical practice. Preferentially lasers with emission wavelengths in the far UV and the mid IR are used, for which tissue absorption is very high. Morphologically the ablation sites look surprisingly similar for the two wavelength ranges, despite of the very different prim y putative interaction mechanisms. Ablation depth as a function of fluence follows a sigmoidal curve. Even factors below the nominal ablation threshold superficial layers of material get removed from the surface. This is the fluence range for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI). Evidence will be presented which suggest that strong similarities exist between the desorption and ablation processes both for UV- as well as for IR-wavelengths.

  9. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  10. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  11. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  12. Laser ablation studies in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Edric; Forbes, A.; Turner, G. R.; Michaelis, Max M.

    2000-08-01

    With the launch of the South African National Laser Centre, new programs will need to be defined. Medical, environmental and industrial laser applications must obviously take top priority -- as opposed to the uranium isotope separation and military applications of the past. We argue however, that a small effort in laser ablation for space propulsion is justifiable, since a few very large CO2 lasers are available and since two tentative propulsion experiments have already been conducted in South Africa. We attempt to give LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) an equatorial and a Southern dimension.

  13. Laser ablation of gall bladder stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafi, M.; Makdisi, Y.; Bhatia, K. S.; Abdulah, A. H.; Kokaj, Y.; Mathew, K.; Quinn, F.; Qabazard, A.

    1999-06-01

    Study of laser interaction with calculi is presented. A system of Nd-Yag and Ho-Yag pulsed lasers were used to produce fluorescence and plasma signals at the stone surface surrounded by saline and bile fluids. Fourth harmonic from Nd-Yag laser was transmitted to the samples by graded UV optical fibres. Gall bladder stones of various compositions were subjected to the high power Ho-Yag laser. Temporal transients and spectral evolution of plasma and fluorescence signals were monitored by a streak camera. A profile of acoustic pressures generated by shock waves was recorded with sensitive hydrophones placed in the surrounding fluids. Ablation threshold, cavitation process and fluorescence dependence on the laser parameters were studied in detail. Potential of stone identification by fluorescence and possible hydrodynamic model for ablation of biological samples is discussed.

  14. Characterization of Individual Microneedles Formed on Alloy Surfaces by Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sudip; Kam, Dong Hyuck; Song, Lijun; Mazumder, Jyotirmoy

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sectional microstructural analyses of micron/nano-sized structures (termed microneedles) formed by low and high fluence pulse laser ablation of AISI 4340 steel, Ti6Al4V, and Al 5754 alloy specimens were performed. Dependence of length scale and orientation of microneedle microstructures on energy absorptance during laser irradiation, heat transfer direction, absorptivity, and thermal conductivity of the material was established. Microneedle nucleation and growth process were explained based on penetration depths, redeposition of ablated material, and ablation rates.

  15. Ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of nanocrystalline aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Gill-Comeau, Maxime; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-12-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of the ablation of nanocrystalline Al films by ultrashort laser pulses in the low-fluence (no-ionization) regime (0-2.5 times the ablation threshold, F{sub th}) are reported. The simulations employ an embedded-atom method potential for the dynamics of the ions and a realistic two-temperature model for the electron gas (and its interactions with the ion gas), which confers different electronic properties to the monocrystalline solid, nanocrystalline solid, and liquid regions of the targets. The ablation dynamics in three nanocrystalline structures is studied: two dense targets with different crystallite sizes (d=3.1 and 6.2 nm on average) and a d=6.2 nm porous sample. The results are compared to the ablation of monocrystalline Al. Significant differences are observed, the nanocrystalline targets showing, in particular, a lower ablation threshold and a larger melting depth, and yielding pressure waves of higher amplitude than the monocrystalline targets. Furthermore, it is shown that nanocrystalline targets experience no residual stress associated with thermal expansion and lateral constraints, and that little crystal growth occurs in the solid during and after ablation. Laser-induced spallation of the back surface of the films is also investigated; we find, in particular, that the high-strain fracture resistance of nanocrystalline samples is significantly reduced in comparison to the crystalline material.

  16. Thermal melting and ablation of silicon by femtosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I. Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Bunkin, A. F.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2013-03-15

    The space-time dynamics of thermal melting, subsurface cavitation, spallative ablation, and fragmentation ablation of the silicon surface excited by single IR femtosecond laser pulses is studied by timeresolved optical reflection microscopy. This dynamics is revealed by monitoring picosecond and (sub)nanosecond oscillations of probe pulse reflection, which is modulated by picosecond acoustic reverberations in the dynamically growing surface melt subjected to ablation and having another acoustic impedance, and by optical interference between the probe pulse replicas reflected by the spalled layer surface and the layer retained on the target surface. The acoustic reverberation periods change during the growth and ablation of the surface melt film, which makes it possible to quantitatively estimate the contributions of these processes to the thermal dynamics of the material surface. The results on the thermal dynamics of laser excitation are supported by dynamic measurements of the ablation parameters using noncontact ultrasonic diagnostics, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical interference microscopy of the modified regions appearing on the silicon surface after ablation.

  17. Outpatient laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J; Latif, Abdul

    2004-11-01

    Outpatient laser ablation of the palatine tonsils under local anaesthetic is an alternative technique to capsular tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis under general anaesthetic. Laser tonsillotomy ablates up to 70% of the tonsillar tissue and is performed when patients choose not to have a conventional tonsillectomy, or are unfit for a general anaesthetic. The technique described here is an adaptation of Krespis' laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy (LAST) whereby only one sitting is required. Krespis' technique effectively eliminates recurrent tonsillitis in 96% of the cases over a 4-year follow-up period and represents the only substantial study looking at treating recurrent tonsillitis with outpatient laser ablation. This study is a retrospective postal survey of 19 patients who underwent laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic for recurrent chronic tonsillitis from 1997 to 2001 and was performed in liaison with the clinical audit department at Basildon Hospital. We had a response rate of 74% and an admission rate of 0%, which compares favourably with day case tonsillectomy surgery. Of the patients, 75% did not experience further episodes of tonsillitis 12 months after the procedure and 77% of the patients were glad they had the operation. Although this technique does not completely eliminate tonsillitis, it offers an alternative for those patients who prefer a procedure that is done quickly in an outpatient setting without the additional problems of general anaesthesia, overnight hospital admission and long waiting lists.

  18. Fundamental Mechanisms of Pulsed Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, Douglas

    The ability to cut and remove biological tissue with short pulsed laser light, a process called laser ablation, has the potential to revolutionize many surgical procedures. Ablation procedures using short pulsed lasers are currently being developed or used in many fields of medicine, including cardiology, ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, orthopedics, and urology. Despite this, the underlying physics of the ablation process is not well understood. In fact, there is wide disagreement over whether the fundamental mechanism is primarily photothermal, photomechanical, or photochemical. In this thesis, both experimental and theoretical techniques are developed to explore this issue. The photothermal model postulates that ablation proceeds through vaporization of the target material. The photomechanical model asserts that ablation is initiated when the laser-induced tensile stress exceeds the ultimate tensile strength of the target. I have developed a three dimensional model of the thermoelastic response of tissue to short pulsed laser irradiation which allows the time dependent stress distribution to be calculated given the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the target. A complimentary experimental technique has been developed to verify this model, measure the needed physical properties of the tissue, and record the thermoelastic response of the tissue at the onset of ablation. The results of this work have been widely disseminated to the international research community and have led to significant findings which support the photomechanical model of ablation of tissue. First, the energy deposited in tissue is an order of magnitude less than that required for vaporization. Second, unlike the one-dimensional thermoelastic model of laser-induced stress generation that has appeared in the literature, the full three-dimensional model predicts the development of significant tensile stresses on the surface of the target, precisely where ablation is observed to

  19. Very-high-growth-factor Planar Ablative Rayleigh Taylor Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D K; Braun, D G; Glendinning, S G; Edwards, M J; Milovich, J L; Sorce, C M; Collins, G W; Haan, S W; Page, R H

    2006-10-30

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is an important factor in bounding the performance envelope of ignition targets. This paper describes an experiment for ablative RT instability that for the first time achieves growth factors close to those expected to occur in ignition targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The large growth allows small seed perturbations to be detected and can be used to place an upper bound on perturbation growth at the ablation front resulting from microstructure in the preferred Be ablator. The experiments were performed on the Omega laser using a halfraum 1.2 mm long by 2 mm diameter with a 75% laser entrance hole. The halfraum was filled with {approx} 1 atm of neopentane to delay gold plasma from closing the diagnostic line of sight down the axis of the halfraum. The ablator was mounted at the base of the halfraum, and was accelerated by a two stepped X-ray pulse consisting of an early time section {approx} 100 eV to emulate the NIF foot followed by an approximately constant {approx} 150 eV drive sustained over an additional 5-7ns. It is this long pulse duration and late time observation that distinguishes the present work from previous experiments, and is responsible for the large growth that is achieved. The growth of a 2D sinusoidal perturbation machined on the drive side of the ablator was measured using face-on radiography. The diagnostic view remained open until {approx} 11 ns with maximum growth factors measured to be {approx} 200. The trajectory of the ablator was measured using streaked backlit radiography. The design and analysis of the experiments is described, and implications for experiments on ignition target ablators are discussed.

  20. Excimer laser ablation of the cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettit, George H.; Ediger, Marwood N.; Weiblinger, Richard P.

    1995-03-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet laser ablation is being extensively investigated clinically to reshape the optical surface of the eye and correct vision defects. Current knowledge of the laser/tissue interaction and the present state of the clinical evaluation are reviewed. In addition, the principal findings of internal Food and Drug Administration research are described in some detail, including a risk assessment of the laser-induced-fluorescence and measurement of the nonlinear optical properties of cornea during the intense UV irradiation. Finally, a survey is presented of the alternative laser technologies being explored for this ophthalmic application.

  1. Laser Thermal Ablation of Thyroid Benign Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Shahrzad, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Thermal ablation therapies for benign thyroid nodules have been introduced in recent years to avoid the complications of traditional methods such as surgery. Despite the little complications and the reportedly acceptable efficacy of thermal ablation methods, quite few medical centers have sought the potential benefits of employing them. This paper provides an introduction to the literature, principles and advances of Percutaneous Laser Ablation therapy of thyroid benign nodules, as well as a discussion on its efficacy, complications and future. Several clinical research papers evaluating the thermal effect of laser on the alleviation of thyroid nodules have been reviewed to illuminate the important points. The results of this research can help researchers to advance the approach and medical centers to decide on investing in these novel therapies. PMID:26705459

  2. Laser Thermal Ablation of Thyroid Benign Nodules.

    PubMed

    Shahrzad, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Thermal ablation therapies for benign thyroid nodules have been introduced in recent years to avoid the complications of traditional methods such as surgery. Despite the little complications and the reportedly acceptable efficacy of thermal ablation methods, quite few medical centers have sought the potential benefits of employing them. This paper provides an introduction to the literature, principles and advances of Percutaneous Laser Ablation therapy of thyroid benign nodules, as well as a discussion on its efficacy, complications and future. Several clinical research papers evaluating the thermal effect of laser on the alleviation of thyroid nodules have been reviewed to illuminate the important points. The results of this research can help researchers to advance the approach and medical centers to decide on investing in these novel therapies.

  3. Measurement of ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov evolution from laser imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Delorme, B.; Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability in plastic (CH2) foils. The two-dimensional (2-D) perturbations were created by laser imprinting using a special phase plate with a 2-D single mode, ˜70 μm wavelength sinusoidal intensity pattern on the plastic foil. The growth of imprinted perturbations was measured by face-on, X-ray radiography using Sm and Ta backlighters in 30-μm and 50-μm thick plastic foils, respectively. After the initial imprinting phase, the 2-D perturbations grew due to ablative RM instability before the onset of foil acceleration when they were further amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Experimental results agree reasonably well with 2-D hydrodynamic simulations and analytic models showing that the modulation growth in areal density is due to ablative RM instability.

  4. Test of Thermal Transport Models through Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablation-Front Perturbation Growth in Laser-Driven CH Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Gotchev, O.V.; Goncharov, V.N.; Knauer, J.P.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    2006-03-24

    Heat-flow-induced dynamic overpressure at the perturbed ablation front of an inertial confinement fusion target can stabilize the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov-like instability and mitigate the subsequent ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. A series of experiments was performed on the OMEGA laser to quantify the dynamic overpressure stabilization during the shock transit. Analysis of the experimental data using hydrocode simulations shows that the observed oscillatory evolution of the ablation-front perturbations depends on D{sub c}, the size of the thermal conduction zone, and the fluid velocity in the blowoff region V{sub bl} that are sensitive to the thermal transport model used. We show that the simulations match the experiment well when the time dependence of the heat-flux inhibition is taken into account using a recently developed nonlocal heat-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)].

  5. Test of Thermal Transport Models through Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablation-Front Perturbation Growth in Laser-Driven CH Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Gotchev, O.V.; Goncharov, V.N.; Knauer, J.P.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    2006-03-24

    Heat-flow-induced dynamic overpressure at the perturbed ablation front of an ICF target can stabilize the ablative Richtmyer/Meshkov-like instability and mitigate the subsequent ablative Rayleigh/Taylor (RT) instability. A series of experiments was performed on the OMEGA laser to quantify the dynamic overpressure stabilization during the shock transit. Analysis of the experimental data using hydrocode simulations shows that the observed oscillatory evolution of the ablation-front perturbations depends on Dc, the size of the thermal conduction zone, and the fluid velocity in the blowoff region Vbl that are sensitive to the thermal transport model used. We show that the simulations match the experiment well when the time dependence of the heat-flux inhibition is taken into account using a recently developed nonlocal heat transport model.

  6. Test of thermal transport models through dynamic overpressure stabilization of ablation-front perturbation growth in laser-driven CH foils.

    PubMed

    Gotchev, O V; Goncharov, V N; Knauer, J P; Boehly, T R; Collins, T J B; Epstein, R; Jaanimagi, P A; Meyerhofer, D D

    2006-03-24

    Heat-flow-induced dynamic overpressure at the perturbed ablation front of an inertial confinement fusion target can stabilize the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov-like instability and mitigate the subsequent ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. A series of experiments was performed on the OMEGA laser to quantify the dynamic overpressure stabilization during the shock transit. Analysis of the experimental data using hydrocode simulations shows that the observed oscillatory evolution of the ablation-front perturbations depends on Dc, the size of the thermal conduction zone, and the fluid velocity in the blowoff region Vb1 that are sensitive to the thermal transport model used. We show that the simulations match the experiment well when the time dependence of the heat-flux inhibition is taken into account using a recently developed nonlocal heat-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)].

  7. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30μm. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  8. Formation and characterization of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, Justin Samuel

    The work presented in this thesis encompassed laser ablation of various transition metals within a liquid environment. Through an improved understanding of the ablation process, control over the properties of the resultant nanoparticles can be obtained, and thusly nanoparticles can be tailored with specific properties. Creation of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution is a relatively youngtechnique for nanoparticle synthesis, and the work presented should prove useful in guiding further exploration in ablation processes in liquids for nanomaterial production. When a laser is focused onto a target under a liquid environment, the target material and its surrounding liquid are vaporized. The concoction of vapor is ejected normal to the surface as a bubble. The bubble has a temperature reaching the boiling point of the metal, and has a gradient to the boiling point of the solvent. The bubble expands until it reaches a critical volume, and then subsequently collapses. It is within this bubble that nanoparticle formation occurs. As the bubble expands, the vapor cools and nanoparticle growth transpires. During the bubble collapse, pressures reaching GigaPascals have been reported, and a secondary nanoparticle formation occurs as a result of these high pressures. Chapter 1 delves a little more into the nanoparticle formation mechanisms, as well as an introduction to the analytical techniques used for characterization. Ablation of titanium took place in isopropanol, ethanol, water, and n-hexane, under various fluences, with a 532 nm Nd:YAG operating at 10 Hz. It was found that a myriad of nanoparticles could be made with vastly different compositions that were both solvent and fluence dependent. Nanoparticles were made that incorporated carbon and oxygen from the solvent, showing how solvent choice is an important factor in nanoparticle creation. Chapter 3 discusses the results of the titanium work in great detail and demonstrates carbide production with ablation in

  9. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-08

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  10. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-01

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Sänger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing "Lightcraft" and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important rôle in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  11. Approximate model for laser ablation of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusser, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents an approximate kinetic theory model of ablation of carbon by a nanosecond laser pulse. The model approximates the process as sublimation and combines conduction heat transfer in the target with the gas dynamics of the ablated plume which are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface. The ablated mass flux and the temperature of the ablating material are obtained from the assumption that the ablation rate is restricted by the kinetic theory limitation on the maximum mass flux that can be attained in a phase-change process. To account for non-uniform distribution of the laser intensity while keeping the calculation simple the quasi-one-dimensional approximation is used in both gas and solid phases. The results are compared with the predictions of the exact axisymmetric model that uses the conservation relations at the interface derived from the momentum solution of the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary strong evaporation. It is seen that the simpler approximate model provides good accuracy.

  12. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  13. Printable Nanophotonic Devices via Holographic Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yetisen, Ali K; Sabouri, Aydin; Yun, Seok Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2015-09-22

    Holography plays a significant role in applications such as data storage, light trapping, security, and biosensors. However, conventional fabrication methods remain time-consuming, costly, and complex, limiting the fabrication of holograms and their extensive use. Here, we demonstrate a single-pulse laser ablation technique to write parallel surface gratings and Fresnel zone plates. We utilized a 6 ns high-energy green laser pulse to form interference patterns to record a surface grating with 820 nm periodicity and asymmetric zone plate holograms on 4.5 nm gold-coated substrates. The holographic recording process was completed within seconds. The optical characteristics of the interference patterns have been computationally modeled, and well-ordered polychromatic diffraction was observed from the fabricated holograms. The zone plate showed a significant diffraction angle of 32° from the normal incident for the focal point. The nanosecond laser interference ablation for rapid hologram fabrication holds great potential in a vast range of optical devices.

  14. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  15. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  16. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Itina, Tatian E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamicsimulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  17. Status of the Ablative Laser Propulsion Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Lin, Jun; Cohen, Tinothy; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-01-01

    We present a short review of our laser-propulsion research as well as some of the current results of the Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP) studies currently underway at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. It has been shown that direct surface ablation of a solid material produces high specific impulse (Isp) at relatively high energy conversion efficiency (20 - 40%). We detail measurements of specific impulse, thrust and coupling coefficients for elemental target materials both with single and with double pulse laser shots. We also present measurements taken using three independent methods for determination of Isp. The three methods produce consistent values from ion time-of-flight technique, impulse measurements and imaging of the expansion front of plasma plume. We present a demonstration of our ALP lightcraft, a small free-flying micro-vehicle that is propelled by ablation. For ALP lightcraft we use a subscale thin shell of nickel replicated over a diamond turned mandrel that produces a highly polished self-focusing, truncated at the focus parabolic mirror. The mass of the lightcraft is 54 mg and it is driven by 100-ps wide, 35-mJ laser pulses at 532 nm wavelength. This is an ongoing research. We also present the latest work on laserdriven micro-thrusters and detail some the near term goals of our program.

  18. A retrospective study comparing endovenous laser ablation and microwave ablation for great saphenous varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jieqi; Zhang, Ci; Wang, Zhanshan; Gan, Shujie; Li, Ke

    2012-07-01

    Endo-venous laser or microwave ablation is a minimally invasive surgery for treating varicose veins of lower limbs. The aim of our study was to determine whether endovenous microwave ablation of the greater saphenous vein was associated with better effectiveness and less complications than the endovenous laser ablation. From July 2008 to June 2011, 259 cases (306 limbs) of varicose veins were assigned to endovenous laser ablation (n=138, 163 limbs) or endovenous microwave ablation (n=121, 143 limbs). Through analysis there was no significant difference of the operating time, length of hospital stay and Aberdeen score in the two groups. The recanalization rate was statistically higher in the laser group than that in the microwave group. The ecchymosis complication was significantly lower in microwave ablation than that of laser ablation group. However, the skin burn and paralysis complications were significantly lower in the laser ablation than that of microwave ablation group. Endo-venous microwave ablation is an effective alternative to laser ablation for treatment of varicose veins, associated with higher occlusion rate and without serious complications.

  19. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  20. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  1. Excimer laser corneal ablation: absence of a significant "incubation" effect.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G H; Ediger, M N; Weiblinger, R P

    1991-01-01

    Pulse-to-pulse consistency of excimer laser etching of cornea has been examined via two noncontact techniques: photoacoustic probe beam deflection, and time-resolved excimer pulse reflectometry. These methods clearly document the incubation phenomenon accompanying excimer laser ablation of polymethyl-methacrylate and the absence of the effect during polyimide ablation. In comparison, results for corneal ablation indicate consistent tissue etching over a train of pulses. Consequently, incubation appears to have negligible impact on corneal ablation.

  2. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  3. Role of target-substrate distance on the growth of CuInSe2 thin films by pulsed laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Kusum; Dhruvashi, Shishodia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    CuInSe2 thin films have been deposited on corning glass substrates by pulsed laser ablation technique. The chamber pressure and substrate temperature was maintained at 1 × 10-6 torr and 550°C respectively during deposition of the films. The influence of target to substrate (T-S) distance on the structural and optical properties of thin films have been investigated by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. The study reveals that thin films crystallized in a chalcopyrite structure with highly preferential orientation along (112) plane. Optimum T-S distance has been attained for the growth of thin films with large grain size. An intense Raman peak at 174 cm-1 corresponding to dominant A1 vibration mode is gradually shifted to smaller wavenumber with the increase in T-S distance. The optical bandgap energy of the films was evaluated and found to vary with the T-S distance. The bandgap tailing was observed to obey the Urbach rule and the Urbach energy was also calculated for the films. Scanning electron micrographs depicts uniform densely packed grains and EDAX studies revealed the elemental composition of CuInSe2 thin films.

  4. Role of target-substrate distance on the growth of CuInSe{sub 2} thin films by pulsed laser ablation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rawat, Kusum; Dhruvashi; Shishodia, P. K.

    2016-05-06

    CuInSe{sub 2} thin films have been deposited on corning glass substrates by pulsed laser ablation technique. The chamber pressure and substrate temperature was maintained at 1 × 10{sup −6} torr and 550°C respectively during deposition of the films. The influence of target to substrate (T-S) distance on the structural and optical properties of thin films have been investigated by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. The study reveals that thin films crystallized in a chalcopyrite structure with highly preferential orientation along (112) plane. Optimum T-S distance has been attained for the growth of thin films with large grain size. An intense Raman peak at 174 cm{sup −1} corresponding to dominant A{sub 1} vibration mode is gradually shifted to smaller wavenumber with the increase in T-S distance. The optical bandgap energy of the films was evaluated and found to vary with the T-S distance. The bandgap tailing was observed to obey the Urbach rule and the Urbach energy was also calculated for the films. Scanning electron micrographs depicts uniform densely packed grains and EDAX studies revealed the elemental composition of CuInSe{sub 2} thin films.

  5. Nanochemical effects in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-02-18

    We study chemical energy released from the oxidation of aluminum in multipulse femtosecond laser ablation in air and oxygen. Our study shows that the released chemical energy amounts to about 13% of the incident laser energy, and about 50% of the ablated material is oxidized. The ablated material mass per laser pulse is measured to be on the nanogram scale. Our study indicates that femtosecond laser ablation is capable of inducing nanochemical reactions since the femtosecond laser pulse can controllably produce nanoparticles, clusters, and atoms from a solid target.

  6. Investigating Age Resolution in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstwood, Matt; Kosler, Jan; Jackson, Simon; Pearson, Norman; Sylvester, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Workshop on Data Handling in LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Geochronology; Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 12-13 July 2008; Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) dating is an increasingly popular approach for determining the age of mineral grains and the timing of geological events. The spatial resolution offered by this technique allows detailed investigations of complex igneous and metamorphic processes, and the speed of data capture allows vast amounts of information to be gathered rapidly. Laser ablation U-Th-Pb dating is therefore becoming an increasingly influential technique to the geochronology community, providing cost-effective and ready access to age data for laboratories and end users worldwide. However, complications in acquiring, processing, and interpreting data can lead to inaccurate age information entering the literature. With the numbers of practitioners expanding rapidly, the need to standardize approaches and resolve difficulties (particularly involving the subjectivity in processing laser ablation U-Th-Pb data) is becoming important.

  7. Pulsed laser ablation of complex oxides: The role of congruent ablation and preferential scattering for the film stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wicklein, S.; Koehl, A.; Dittmann, R.; Sambri, A.; Amoruso, S.; Wang, X.; Bruzzese, R.

    2012-09-24

    By combining structural and chemical thin film analysis with detailed plume diagnostics and modeling of the laser plume dynamics, we are able to elucidate the different physical mechanisms determining the stoichiometry of the complex oxides model material SrTiO{sub 3} during pulsed laser deposition. Deviations between thin film and target stoichiometry are basically a result of two effects, namely, incongruent ablation and preferential scattering of lighter ablated species during their motion towards the substrate in the O{sub 2} background gas. On the one hand, a progressive preferential ablation of the Ti species with increasing laser fluence leads to a regime of Ti-rich thin film growth at larger fluences. On the other hand, in the low laser fluence regime, a more effective scattering of the lighter Ti plume species results in Sr rich films.

  8. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  9. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  10. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  11. Inertial effects in laser-driven ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Szeoke, A.; Howard, W.M.

    1983-07-15

    The gasdynamic partial differential equations (PDE's) governing the motion of an ablatively accelerated target (rocket) contain an inertial force term that arises from acceleration of the reference frame in which the PDE's are written. We give a simple, intuitive description of this effect, and estimate its magnitude and parametric dependences by means of approximate analytical formulas inferred from our computer hydrocode calculations. Often this inertial term is negligible, but for problems in the areas of laser fusion and laser equation of state studies we find that it can substantially reduce the attainable hydrodynamic efficiency of acceleration and implosion.

  12. Ablation and nanostructuring of metals by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ashitkov, S I; Komarov, P S; Ovchinnikov, A V; Struleva, E V; Agranat, M B; Zhakhovskii, V V; Inogamov, N A

    2014-06-30

    Using an interferometric continuous monitoring technique, we have investigated the motion of the surface of an aluminium target in the case of femtosecond laser ablation at picosecond time delays relative to the instant of laser exposure. Measurements of the temporal target dispersion dynamics, molecular dynamics simulation results and the morphology of the ablation crater have demonstrated a thermomechanical (spall) nature of the disruption of the condensed phase due to the cavitation-driven formation and growth of vapour phase nuclei upon melt expansion, followed by the formation of surface nanostructures upon melt solidification. The tensile strength of heated aluminium in a condensed state has been determined experimentally at an expansion rate of ∼10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of laser ablation brass plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Nek M.; Hafeez, Sarwat; Kalyar, M. A.; Ali, R.; Baig, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    We present optical emission studies of the laser ablation brass plasma generated by the fundamental, second, and third harmonics of a neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The spectra predominantly reveal the spectral lines of the neutral and singly ionized copper and zinc. The excitation temperatures are determined by the Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number densities have been extracted from the Stark broadened line profiles. The spatial variations in the spectral line intensities and the plasma parameters at 1000, 500, and 100 mbar air pressures have been evaluated. Besides, the effect of the ambient gases (He, Ne, and Ar), the laser irradiance, and the laser wavelengths on the plasma parameters have been investigated.

  14. Dependence of the critical temperature of laser-ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films on LaAlO3 substrate growth technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Miranda, Felix A.

    1991-01-01

    Samples of LaAlO3 made by flame fusion and Czochralski method were subjected to the same temperature conditions that they have to undergo during the laser ablation deposition of YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta) thin films. After oxygen annealing at 750 C, the LaAlO3 substrate made by two methods experienced surface roughening. The degree of roughening on the substrate made by Czochralski method was three times greater than that on the substrate made by flame fusion. This excessive surface roughening may be the origin of the experimentally observed lowering of the critical temperature of a film deposited by laser ablation on a LaAlO3 substrate made by Czochralski method with respect to its counterpart deposited on LaAlO3 substrates made by flame fusion.

  15. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  16. Ablation dynamics in laser sclerotomy ab externo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Droege, Gerit; Mohrenstecher, Dirk; Scheu, M.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-01-01

    Laser sclerostomy ab externo with flashlamp excited mid-IR laser systems emitting in the 2-3 micrometer spectral range is in phase II clinical trials. Although acutely high success rates were achieved, the restenosis rate after several months is about 40%. Laser pulses of several hundreds of microseconds, known to induce thermo-mechanical explosive evaporation were used for this procedure. We investigated the ablation dynamics in tissue and the cavitation bubble dynamics in water by means of an Er:YAG laser system to estimate the extent of mechanical damage zones in the sclera and in the anterior chamber, which may contribute to the clinical failure. We found substantial mechanical tissue deformation during the ablation process caused by the cavitation effects. Stress waves up to several bar generated by explosive evaporization were measured. The fast mechanical stretching and collapsing of the scleral tissue induced by cavitation resulted in tissue dissection as could be proved by flash photography and histology. The observed high restenosis might be a result of a subsequent enhanced wound healing process. Early fistula occlusions due to iris adherences, observed in about 20% of the clinical cases may be attributed to intraocular trauma induced by vapor bubble expansion through the anterior chamber after scleral perforation. An automatic feedback system minimizing adverse effects by steering and terminating the laser process during scleral fistulization is demonstrated. Moreover, a new approach in laser sclerostomy ab externo is presented using a cw-IR laser diode system emitting at the 1.94 micrometer mid-IR water absorption peak. This system was used in vitro and showed smaller damage zones compared to the pulsed laser radiation.

  17. Laser induced unzipping: A thermal route to polymer ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Graciela B.; Fincher, C. R., Jr.

    1994-09-01

    The data presented here show that polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) can be ablated by the evaporation of solid polymer targets with a pulsed ultraviolet laser. In situ measurements of the plume composition show that the products emitted under laser irradiation are primarily monomer and other species resulting from energetic collisions within the plasma. The similarities between the ablative and pyrolisis mass spectra suggest that ablation of PTFE and PMMA occur through a laser induced pyrolitic decomposition.

  18. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. L.; Butler, D. L.; Sim, L. M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.

    2010-11-01

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable.

  19. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.

  20. Pulsed holmium laser ablation of cardiac valves

    SciTech Connect

    Lilge, L.; Radtke, W.; Nishioka, N.S. )

    1989-01-01

    Ablation efficiency and residual thermal damage produced by pulsed holmium laser radiation were investigated in vitro for bovine mitral valves and human calcified and noncalcified cardiac valves. Low-OH quartz fibers (200 and 600 microns core diameter) were used in direct contact perpendicular to the specimen under saline or blood. Etch rate was measured with a linear motion transducer. Radiant exposure was varied from 0 to 3 kJ/cm{sup 2}. For 200-microns fibers, the energy of ablation was approximately 5 kJ/cm{sup 3} in noncalcified and 15 kJ/cm{sup 3} in calcified valves. Etch rates were dependent on mechanical tissue properties. Maximum etch rate at 1,000 J/cm{sup 2} was 1-2 mm/pulse at 3 Hz repetition rate. Microscopic examination revealed a zone of thermal damage extending 300 microns lateral into adjacent tissue. Thermal damage was independent of radiant exposure beyond twice threshold.

  1. Modeling Of Laser Ablation And Fragmentation Of Human Calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, Steven J.; Jones, Roger D.; Howsare, Charles

    1989-09-01

    The large-scale radiation-hydrodynamics computer code LASNEX, has been used to model experimental results in the laser ablation and fragmentation of renal and biliary calculi. Recent experiments have demonstrated laser ablation and fragmentation of human calculi in vitro and in vivo. In the interaction, laser light incident upon the calculus is of sufficient intensity to produce a plasma (a hot ionized gas). The physical picture which emerges is as follows. The plasma couples to acoustic and shear waves which then propagate through the dense stone material, causing spall and fracture by reflection from material discontinuities or boundaries. Experiments have thus far yielded data on the interaction against which models can be tested. Data on the following have been published: (1) light emission, (2) absorption and emission spectra, (3) fragmentation efficiency, (4) cavitation bubble dynamics and (5) mass removal. We have performed one dimensional simulations of the laser-matter interaction to elucidate the im-portant physical mechanisms. We find that good quantitative fits between simulation and experiment are obtained for visible light emission, electron temperature, electron density, plasma pressure and cavitation bubble growth. With regard to mass removal, experiment and simulation are consistent with each other and give an excellent estimate of the ablation threshold. The modeling indicates that a very small ablation layer at the surface of the calulus is responsible for significant mass loss by fragmentation within the bulk of the calculus. With such quantitative fits in hand, we believe this type of modeling can now be applied to the study of other procedures involving plasma formation of interest to the medical community.

  2. Deflection of uncooperative targets using laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    Owing to their ability to move a target in space without requiring propellant, laser-based deflection methods have gained attention among the research community in the recent years. With laser ablation, the vaporized material is used to push the target itself allowing for a significant reduction in the mass requirement for a space mission. Specifically, this paper addresses two important issues which are thought to limit seriously the potential efficiency of a laser-deflection method: the impact of the tumbling motion of the target as well as the impact of the finite thickness of the material ablated in the case of a space debris. In this paper, we developed a steady-state analytical model based on energetic considerations in order to predict the efficiency range theoretically allowed by a laser deflection system in absence of the two aforementioned issues. A numerical model was then implemented to solve the transient heat equation in presence of vaporization and melting and account for the tumbling rate of the target. This model was also translated to the case where the target is a space debris by considering material properties of an aluminium 6061-T6 alloy and adapting at every time-step the size of the computational domain along with the recession speed of the interface in order to account for the finite thickness of the debris component. The comparison between the numerical results and the analytical predictions allow us to draw interesting conclusions regarding the momentum coupling achievable by a given laser deflection system both for asteroids and space debris in function of the flux, the rotation rate of the target and its material properties. In the last section of this paper, we show how a reasonably small spacecraft could deflect a 56m asteroid with a laser system requiring less than 5kW of input power.

  3. Depth Profiling of Polymer Composites by Ultrafast Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Clayton, Clive; Longtin, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Past work has shown femtosecond laser ablation to be an athermal process at low fluences in polymer systems. The ablation rate in this low fluence regime is very low, allowing for micro-scale removal of material. We have taken advantage of this fact to perform shallow depth profiling ablation on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Neat composite and resin samples were studied to establish reference ablation profiles. These profiles and the effects of the heterogeneous distribution of carbon fibers were observed through confocal laser profilometry and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Weathered materials that have been subjected to accelerated tests in artificial sunlight or water conditions were ablated to determine the correlation between exposure and change in ablation characteristics. Preliminary Raman and micro-ATR analysis performed before and after ablation shows no chemical changes indicative of thermal effects. The low-volume-ablation property was utilized in an attempt to expose the sizing-matrix interphase for analysis.

  4. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  5. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal.

  6. Effects of pressure rise on cw laser ablation of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeCarpentier, Gerald L.; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to identify mechanisms responsible for the initiation of continuous wave (cw) laser ablation of tissue and investigate the role of pressure in the ablation process. Porcine aorta samples were irradiated in a chamber pressurized from 1 X 10-4 to 12 atmospheres absolute pressure. Acrylic and Zn-Se windows in the experimental pressure chamber allowed video and infrared cameras to simultaneously record mechanical and thermal events associated with cw argon laser ablation of these samples. Video and thermal images of tissue slabs documented the explosive nature of cw laser ablation of soft biological media and revealed similar ablation threshold temperatures and ablation onset times under different environmental pressures; however, more violent initiation explosions with decreasing environmental pressures were observed. These results suggest that ablation initiates with thermal alterations in the mechanical strength of the tissue and proceeds with an explosion induced by the presence superheated liquid within the tissue.

  7. Antibacterial effects of laser ablated Ni nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamaila, S.; Wali, H.; Sharif, R.; Nazir, J.; Zafar, N.; Rafique, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of nickel nanoparticles with Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria has been studied. The nickel nanoparticles have been fabricated by continuous wave laser ablation of nickel target and their properties are studied using different characterization techniques. The antibacterial activity of nickel nanoparticles was checked against E. coli bacteria. Escherichia coli were cultured in nutrients broth and different concentrations of nickel nanoparticles were added to bacterial culture solution to investigate the interaction of nickel nanoparticles with bacteria and to check toxicity of the nickel nanoparticles against E. coli. The fabricated Ni nanoparticles have exhibited considerable antimicrobial activity against E. coli.

  8. Ablative CO2 lasers for skin tightening: traditional versus fractional.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Arisa E; Goldman, Mitchel P; Fitzpatrick, Richard E

    2014-12-01

    With patients more resistant to invasive treatments and those that result in significant downtime, there has been a rise in using lasers to improve skin laxity and induce tissue tightening as an alternative to surgery. Traditional and fractional ablative resurfacing induces skin tightening through precise dermal heating and a wound-healing effect. The purpose of this review was to discuss the mechanism of action of using ablative lasers to induce skin tightening and compare traditional versus fractional technologies. A review of the literature was performed. The authors discuss traditional and fractional ablative lasers for achieving skin tightening. Neocollagenesis and dermal remodeling seen after ablative resurfacing contributes to the clinical improvement seen in tissue tightening. Fractional photothermolysis may enhance tissue tightening effects of ablative lasers because of its ability to ablate deeper into the reticular dermis without significant risk for scarring.

  9. Molecular dynamics investigation of mechanisms of femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Changrui

    Laser micro-machining has been widely applied for material processing in many industries. A phenomenon called "laser ablation" is usually involved in the laser micro-machining process. Laser ablation is the process of material removal after the irradiation of a laser beam onto the material. It is commonly characterized by small temporal and spatial scales, extremely high material temperature and pressure, and strong non-equilibrium thermodynamic state. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is conducted to study the femtosecond laser ablation of metals (nickel and copper) and dielectrics (fused silica, or glass). The laser heating and the ablation processes are numerically modeled, and the computation is accelerated by parallel processing technique. Both the pair-wise Morse potential and the many-body EAM (Embedded-Atom Method) potential are employed for metals. In the simulation of fused silica, the BKS (van Beest, Kramer and van Santen) potential is used, and the generation of free electrons, the energy transport from laser beam to free electrons and energy coupling between electrons and the lattice are considered. The main goal of this work is to illustrate the detailed processes of femtosecond laser ablation and to study its mechanisms. From the MD results, it is found that the mechanism of femtosecond laser ablation is strongly dependent on the laser fluences. For metals, low fluence laser ablation is mainly through phase explosion (homogeneous gas bubble nucleation), while spinodal decomposition is responsible for high fluence ablation. Ablation mechanism is determined by whether or not the material (liquid) temperature exceeds the critical temperature. For fused silica, the generation and existence of free electrons are found to affect ablation significantly, especially at low fluence, where Coulomb explosion is found to play an important role in material separation.

  10. Modeling of dynamical processes in laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    Various physics and computational approaches have been developed to globally characterize phenomena important for film growth by pulsed-laser deposition of materials. These include thermal models of laser-solid target interactions that initiate the vapor plume, plume ionization and heating through laser absorption beyond local thermodynamic equilibrium mechanisms, hydrodynamic and collisional descriptions of plume transport, and molecular dynamics models of the interaction of plume particles with the deposition substrate.

  11. Mid-infrared laser ablation of intraocular acrylic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Bacharis, C.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    Ablation rates measurements with free-running Er:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm) were performed in hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lenses. We studied the role of water in the laser ablation mechanisms by using hydrophilic lenses with different concentrations of H II0 and D II0. A mathematical model simulated the experimental results.

  12. Laser ablation plume dynamics in nanoparticle synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V V; Platonov, V V; Lisenkov, V V

    2009-06-30

    The dynamics of the plume ejected from the surface of solid targets (YSZ, Nd:YAG and graphite) by a CO{sub 2} laser pulse with a duration of {approx}500 {mu}s (at the 0.03 level), energy of 1.0-1.3 J and peak power of 6-7 kW have been studied using high-speed photography of the plume luminescence and shadow. The targets were used to produce nanopowders by laser evaporation. About 200 {mu}s after termination of the pulse, shadowgraph images of the plumes above the YSZ and Nd:YAG targets showed dark straight tracks produced by large particles. The formation of large ({approx}10 {mu}m) particles is tentatively attributed to cracking of the solidified melt at the bottom of the ablation crater. This is supported by the fact that no large particles are ejected from graphite, which sublimes without melting. Further support to this hypothesis is provided by numerical 3D modelling of melt cooling in craters produced by laser pulses of different shapes. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. Determination of femtosecond ablation thresholds by using laser ablation induced photoacoustics (LAIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzi, Daniel J. O.; Alvira, Fernando C.; Bilmes, Gabriel M.

    2013-03-01

    Femtosecond laser material processing as micromachining and nanoparticles fabrication require a careful control of the fluences deposited on the samples. In many cases, best results are obtained by using fluences slightly above the Laser Ablation Threshold (LAT), therefore its accurate determination is an important requirement. LAT can be obtained by measuring the intensity of the acoustic signal generated during the ablation process as a function of the laser fluence. In this work femtosecond laser ablation thresholds of commercially polished stainless steel plates, white high impact polystyrene, frosted glass, antique rag papers and silicon oxynitride thin films were determined by using laser ablation induced photoacoustics (LAIP). Results were compared with similar data previously obtained by using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser.

  14. Mechanism study of skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms in laser tissue ablation is essential to improve clinical laser applications by reducing collateral damage and laser pulse energy requirement. The motive of this dissertation is to study skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses in a wide spectral region from near-infrared to ultraviolet for a clear understanding of the mechanism that can be used to improve future design of the pulsed lasers for dermatology and plastic surgery. Multiple laser and optical configurations have been constructed to generate 9 to 12ns laser pulses with similar profiles at 1064. 532, 266 and 213nm for this study of skin tissue ablation. Through measurements of ablation depth as a function cf laser pulse energy, the 589nm spectral line in the secondary radiation from ablated skin tissue samples was identified as the signature of the occurrence of ablation. Subsequently, this spectral signature has been used to investigate the probabilistic process of the ablation near the threshold at the four wavelengths. Measurements of the ablation probability were conducted as a function of the electrical field strength of the laser pulse and the ablation thresholds in a wide spectral range from 1064nm to 213nm were determined. Histology analysis and an optical transmission method were applied in assessing of the ablation depth per pulse to study the ablation process at irradiance levels higher than threshold. Because more than 70% of the wet weight of the skin tissue is water, optical breakdown and backscattering in water was also investigated along with a nonlinear refraction index measurement using a z-scan technique. Preliminary studies on ablation of a gelatin based tissue phantom are also reported. The current theoretical models describing ablation of soft tissue ablation by short laser pulses were critically reviewed. Since none of the existing models was found capable of explaining the experimental results, a new plasma-mediated model was developed

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation of brass in air and liquid media

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2013-06-07

    Laser ablation of brass in air, water, and ethanol was investigated using a femtosecond laser system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm and a pulse width less than 130 fs. Scanning electron and optical microscopy were used to study the efficiency and quality of laser ablation in the three ablation media at two different ablation modes. With a liquid layer thickness of 3 mm above the target, ablation rate was found to be higher in water and ethanol than in air. Ablation under water and ethanol showed cleaner surfaces and less debris re-deposition compared to ablation in air. In addition to spherical particles that are normally formed from re-solidified molten material, micro-scale particles with varying morphologies were observed scattered in the ablated structures (craters and grooves) when ablation was conducted under water. The presence of such particles indicates the presence of a non-thermal ablation mechanism that becomes more apparent when ablation is conducted under water.

  16. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  17. Influence of ablation wavelength and time on optical properties of laser ablated carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaeni, Hanna, M. Yusrul; Pambudi, A. A.; Murdaka, F. H.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots, which are unique and applicable materials, have been produced using many techniques. In this work, we have fabricated carbon dots made of coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. The purpose of this work is to evaluate two ablation parameters, which are ablation wavelength and ablation time. We used pulsed laser from Nd:YAG laser with emit wavelength at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. We varied ablation time one hour and two hours. Photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence setup were used to study the optical properties of fabricated carbon dots. In general, fabricated carbon dots emit bluish green color emission upon excitation by blue laser. We found that carbon dots fabricated using 1064 nm laser produced the highest carbon dots emission among other samples. The peak wavelength of carbon dots emission is between 495 nm until 505 nm, which gives bluish green color emission. Two hours fabricated carbon dots gave four times higher emission than one hour fabricated carbon dot. More emission intensity of carbon dots means more carbon dots nanoparticles were fabricated during laser ablation process. In addition, we also measured electron dynamics of carbon dots using time-resolved photoluminescence. We found that sample with higher emission has longer electron decay time. Our finding gives optimum condition of carbon dots fabrication from coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. Moreover, fabricated carbon dots are non-toxic nanoparticles that can be applied for health, bio-tagging and medical applications.

  18. Excimer laser ablation of aluminum: influence of spot size on ablation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2016-11-01

    The dependence of ablation rate of an Al alloy on laser beam spot size (10-150 µm) was investigated using an ArF excimer laser operating at a wavelength of 193 nm and pulse width less than 4 ns. Ablation was conducted in air at a fluence of 11 J cm-2 and at a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Surface morphology and depth of craters produced by a variable number of laser pulses were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used as an additional diagnostic technique to estimate the amount of material ablated from craters produced by a laser beam of different diameters. Laser beam spot size and number of laser pulses applied to the same spot were found to influence crater morphology, ablation rate, shape and amount of particles deposited at or around the crater rim. Ablation rate was found to be less dependent on spot size for craters greater than 85 µm. A four-fold increase in ablation rate was observed with decreasing crater size from 150 µm to 10 µm.

  19. Influence of the Liquid on Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, A.; Hoppius, J. S.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    Ultrashort pulse laser ablation has become a very important industrial method for highly precise material removal ranging from sensitive thin film processing to drilling and cutting of metals. Over the last decade, a new method to produce pure nanoparticles emerged from this technique: Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquids (PLAL). By this method, the ablation of material by a laser beam is used to generate a metal vapor within the liquid in order to obtain nanoparticles from its recondensation process. It is well known that the liquid significantly alters the ablation properties of the substrate, in our case iron. For example, the ablation rate and crater morphology differ depending on the used liquid. We present our studies on the efficiency and quality of ablated grooves in water, methanol, acetone, ethanol and toluene. The produced grooves are investigated by means of white-light interferometry, EDX and SEM.

  20. Laser Ablation for Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Fong, Yuman

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablation (LA) is gaining acceptance for the treatment of tumors as an alternative to surgical resection. This paper reviews the use of lasers for ablative and surgical applications. Also reviewed are solutions aimed at improving LA outcomes: hyperthermal treatment planning tools and thermometric techniques during LA, used to guide the surgeon in the choice and adjustment of the optimal laser settings, and the potential use of nanoparticles to allow biologic selectivity of ablative treatments. Promising technical solutions and a better knowledge of laser-tissue interaction should allow LA to be used in a safe and effective manner as a cancer treatment. PMID:28613248

  1. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications.

  2. Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, D.; Gornushkin, I.; Alexiades, V.; Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2013-10-01

    A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm2. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

  3. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  4. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  5. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-02-06

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements.

  6. UV laser ablation of parylene films from gold substrates

    SciTech Connect

    O. R. Musaev, P. Scott, J. M. Wrobel, and M. B. Kruger

    2009-11-19

    Parylene films, coating gold substrates, were removed by laser ablation using 248 nm light from an excimer laser. Each sample was processed by a different number of pulses in one of three different environments: air at atmospheric pressure, nitrogen at atmospheric pressure, and vacuum. The laser-induced craters were analyzed by optical microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Multi-pulse ablation thresholds of gold and parylene were estimated.

  7. Application of Laser Ablation Processing in Electric Power System Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konagai, Chikara; Sano, Yuji; Nittoh, Koichi; Kuwako, Akira

    The present status of laser ablation processing applied in electric power system industries is reviewed. High average power LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers with Q-switch have been developed and currently introduced into various applications. Optical fiber based laser beam delivery systems for Q-switched pulse laser are also being developed these years. Based on such laser and beam delivery technology, laser ablation processes are gradually introduced in maintenance of nuclear power plant, thermal power plant and electrical power distribution system. Cost effectiveness, robustness and reliability of the process is highly required for wide utilization in these fields.

  8. Laser ablation system, and method of decontaminating surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Russell L.; Edelson, Martin C.; Pang, Ho-ming

    1998-07-14

    A laser ablation system comprising a laser head providing a laser output; a flexible fiber optic cable optically coupled to the laser output and transmitting laser light; an output optics assembly including a nozzle through which laser light passes; an exhaust tube in communication with the nozzle; and a blower generating a vacuum on the exhaust tube. A method of decontaminating a surface comprising the following steps: providing an acousto-optic, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light ablation system having a fiber optically coupled output optics assembly; and operating the laser light ablation system to produce an irradiance greater than 1.times.10.sup.7 W/cm.sup.2, and a pulse width between 80 and 170 ns.

  9. Experimental investigation of the laser ablation process on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzner, M.; Wiedemann, G.; Henneberg, K.; Fischer, R.; Wittke, Th.; Dietsch, R.

    1998-05-01

    Processing of wood by conventional mechanical tools like saws or planes leaves behind a layer of squeezed wood only slightly adhering to the solid wood surface. Laser ablation of this layer could improve the durability of coatings and glued joints. For technical applications, thorough knowledge about the laser ablation process is necessary. Results of ablation experiments by excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, and TEA-CO 2 lasers on surfaces of different wood types and cut orientations are shown. The process of ablation was observed by a high-speed camera system and optical spectroscopy. The influence of the experimental parameters are demonstrated by SEM images and measurement of the ablation rate depending on energy density. Thermal effects like melting and also carbonizing of cellulose were found for IR- and also UV-laser wavelengths. Damage of the wood surface after laser ablation was weaker for excimer lasers and CO 2-TEA lasers. This can be explained by the high absorption of wood in the ultraviolet and middle infrared spectral range. As an additional result, this technique provides an easy way for preparing wood surfaces with excellently conserved cellular structure.

  10. Laser Ablation of Polymer Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    Microfluidic technology is ideal for processing precious samples of limited volumes. Some of the most important classes of biological samples are both high in sample complexity and low in concentration. Combining the elements of sample pre-concentration, chemical separation and high sensitivity detection with chemical identification is essential for realizing a functional microfluidic based analysis system. Direct write UV laser ablation has been used to rapidly fabricate microfluidic devices capable of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS. These chip-LC/MS devices use bio-compatible, solvent resistant and flexible polymer materials such as polyimide. A novel microfluidic to rotary valve interface enables, leak free, high pressure fluid switching between multiple ports of the microfluidic chip-LC/MS device. Electrospray tips with outer dimension of 50 um and inner of 15 um are formed by ablating the polymer material concentrically around a multilayer laminated channel structure. Biological samples of digested proteins were used to evaluate the performance of these microfluidic devices. Liquid chromatography separation and similar sample pretreatments have been performed using polymeric microfluidic devices with on-chip separation channels. Mass spectrometry was performed using an Agilent Technologies 1100 series ion trap mass spectrometer. Low fmol amounts of protein samples were positively and routinely identified by searching the MS/MS spectral data against protein databases. The sensitivity and separation performance of the chip-LC devices has been found to be comparable to state of the art nano-electrospray systems.

  11. Carbon nanocrystals produced by pulsed laser ablation of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangione, A.; Torrisi, L.; Picciotto, A.; Caridi, F.; Margarone, D.; Fazio, E.; La Mantia, A.; di Marco, G.

    2005-10-01

    Plasma laser ablation experiments were performed irradiating glassy-carbon targets placed in vacuum through a pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at the second harmonic (532 nm), 9 ns pulse width and 10(9) W/cm(2) density power. Thin films of ablated carbon were deposited on silicon oxide substrates placed at different distances and angles with respect to the target. The analysis of the deposited material was carried out by using surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. Results show the evidence of carbon nanocrystals and nanostructures with dimension of the order of 100 nm deposited on the substrates together with a large amount of amorphous phase. The spectroscopic investigations and the SEM images indicate the formation of nanodiamond seeds as a nucleation process induced on the substrate surface. Nanostructures were investigated as a function of the laser intensity and angle distribution. Experimental results were compared with the literature data coming from nanodiamonds growth with different techniques. Experiments performed at Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS) of Catania (Italy) and data analysis conducted at Dipartimento di Fisica and DFMTA of the Universita of Messina (Italy), CNR-ITIS of Messina and ST-Microelectronics of Catania will be presented and discussed.

  12. Outcomes of ablative fractional laser scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Woo; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) systems are commonly used to treat various scars, and recent reports have indicated that early scar treatment with fractional lasers has good aesthetic results. Some scars respond dramatically to AFL treatment, incurring high levels of patient satisfaction; however, other scars respond poorly or became worse after treatment. This study was designed to clarify prognostic factors that predict AFL scar treatment outcomes. A total of 108 patients were included in this study. The fractional laser treatments were repeated every 4 weeks until the scar site was acceptable and no additional improvement was expected or the patient discontinued the treatment. The scar improvements were defined as changes in the Manchester scar scale (MSS) from before to after laser treatment. A digital camera was used to acquire digital photographs of the scars under the same light source, the same background, exposure, and white balance. This study developed a modification of the MSS for image analysis in which colour assessment was based on L*a*b* colour co-ordinates of the digital images. The mean MSS values prior to and after laser treatments were 11.6 ± 3.6 and 9.5 ± 2.9, respectively (p < 0.01). AFL treatment improved the qualities of each scar, and the improvements were evident in colour and contour. Scar elevation, pigmentation, high vascularity, early onset of treatment, and the number of treatment sessions were directly related to scar improvement after AFL therapy (p < 0.05). AFL treatments were effective methods for scar treatment. Clinicians can use these prognostic factors to determine treatment plans and to estimate scar improvement after AFL treatment.

  13. Investigations on laser hard tissue ablation under various environments.

    PubMed

    Kang, H W; Oh, J; Welch, A J

    2008-06-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of liquid environments upon laser bone ablation. A long-pulsed Er,Cr:YSGG laser was employed to ablate bovine bone tibia at various radiant exposures under dry, wet (using water or perfluorocarbon) and spray environmental conditions. Energy loss by the application of liquid during laser irradiation was evaluated, and ablation performance for all conditions was quantitatively measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Microscope images were also used to estimate thermal side effects in tissue after multiple-pulse ablation. Wet using water and spray conditions equally attenuated the 2.79 microm wavelength laser beam. Higher transmission efficiency was obtained utilizing a layer of perfluorocarbon. Dry ablation exhibited severe carbonization due to excessive heat accumulation. Wet condition using water resulted in similar ablation volume to the dry case without carbonization. The perfluorocarbon layer produced the largest ablation volume but some carbonization due to the poor thermal conductivity. Spray induced clean cutting with slightly reduced efficiency. Liquid-assisted ablation provided significant beneficial effects such as augmented material removal and cooling/cleaning effects during laser osteotomy.

  14. Formation of tribological structures by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Niels; Paschke, Mike; Hendow, Sami T.; Klotzbach, Udo

    2012-03-01

    Many technical applications can benefit from the use of tribological structures in minimizing abrasive material wear and energy consumption without the integration of additional materials in a working assembly. Especially in lubricated friction systems, the tribological character can be significantly improved through the addition of oriented and repetitive microstructure. In this study, experimental tests are discussed for a small range of structure dimensions to verify the effect of optimizing the tribological contact performance. A nanosecond pulsed fiber laser is used to create various test structures with different sizes and form. The quality of the fabricated surface pattern, particularly form correctness, feathering and material modification effects of the ablated area is characterized and optimized. The influence of pulse duration, pulse energy and pulse delay using normal pulsing is presented and compared to various burst modes.

  15. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  16. Amalgam ablation with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Any laser that will be used by dentist to replace the dental drill (handpiece) must remove dental hard tissues safely. These lasers must also have the ability to ablate the restorative dental materials which are present in the teeth being treated. Prior to any laser being used to treat humans a thorough knowledge of the effects of the laser treatment on dental materials must be understood. Cores of dental amalgam were created and sliced into thin wafers for this experiment. Ablation efficiency and thermal changes were evaluated with and without water. It appears as if the Er:YAG laser can effectively ablate amalgam dental material with and without water. The water prevents the temperature from increasing much above baseline and does not reduce efficiency of ablation.

  17. Laser ablation dynamics in metals: The thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzapesa, F. P.; Brambilla, M.; Dabbicco, M.; Scamarcio, G.; Columbo, L. L.; Ancona, A.; Sibillano, T.

    2012-07-02

    We studied the laser ablation dynamics of steel in the thermal regime both experimentally and theoretically. The real-time monitoring of the process shows that the ablation rate depends on laser energy density and ambient pressure during the exposure time. We demonstrated that the ablation efficiency can be enhanced when the pressure is reduced with respect to the atmospheric pressure for a given laser fluence, reaching an upper limit despite of high-vacuum conditions. An analytical model based on the Hertz-Knudsen law reproduces all the experimental results.

  18. Size control of nanoparticles by multiple-pulse laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Nan, Junyi; Zeng, Heping

    2017-04-01

    Bare nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in water have found their application in catalysis, spectroscopy and biomedical research fields. In this perspective, how to efficiently produce stable nanoparticles with controllable size is an important topic and has attracted a lot of interests. Here, we introduce a multiple-pulse laser as the ablation source. By changing the number of sub-pulses, the average size of nanoparticles can be tuned in a broad range from ∼120 nm to ∼4 nm. The demonstration in this article may offer a new approach to fabricate ultrafine nanostructures and also help the scientific study of the mechanism in laser ablation.

  19. Different regimes of viscous melt flow in laser ablation: From "clean" ablation to nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, Vladimir N.; Lazare, Sylvain; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    2006-05-01

    The paper reviews recent results on modeling a viscous liquid flow driven by ablation pressure. Based on the analysis of the Navier-Stokes equation various strongly different manifestations of this phenomenon are explained. These are: (i) a "clean" laser ablation, when laser spot has a clean sharp spot border, free from a re-solidified melt dross; (ii) a new form of material removal in laser ablation - expulsion on a poly(methyl methacrylate) target of long (up to 1 mm) nanofibers with a radius about 150-200 nm to the exterior of the spot under the action of a single pulse of KrF excimer laser; and (iii) a new way of laser surface nanostructuring - the formation of a surface foam having a structure of micro-pores interconnected with nanofilaments of diameters about 100 nm as a result of single pulse KrF laser irradiation of biopolymer films.

  20. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  1. Nanoparticle fabrication of hydroxyapatite by laser ablation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O. R.; Wieliczka, D. M.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.; Dusevich, V.

    2008-10-15

    Synthetic polycrystalline hydroxyapatite was ablated in water with 337 nm radiation from a UV nitrogen pulsed laser. According to transmission electron microscopy micrographs, the ablated particles were approximately spherical and had a size of {approx}80 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that particles had the same structure as the original crystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the surface chemical composition was close to that of the original material. The characteristics of the ablated particles and estimations of the temperature rise of the hydroxyapatite surface under laser irradiation are consistent with the mechanism of explosive boiling being responsible for ablation. The experimental observations offer the basis for preparation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles by laser ablation in water.

  2. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation.

  3. Laser ablation synthesis and spectral characterization of ruby nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, M. S.; Bardina, A. A.; Savelyev, A. G.; Khramov, V. N.; Khaydukov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The laser ablation method was implemented for synthesis of ruby nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were obtained by nanosecond ablation of bulk ruby crystal in 10% ethanol water solution. The nanoparticles enable water colloid stability and exhibit narrow photoluminescent line at 694 nm when pumped at blue-green spectral range. The ruby nanoparticles were characterized by SEM and Z-sizer.

  4. Growth and patterning of laser ablated superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 films on LaAlO3 substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. D.; Bhasin, K. B.; Varaljay, N. C.; Bohman, D. Y.; Chorey, C. M.

    A high quality superconducting film on a substrate with a low dielectric constant is desired for passive microwave circuit applications. In addition, it is essential that the patterning process does not effect the superconducting properties of the thin films to achieve the highest circuit operating temperatures. YBa2Cu3O7 superconducting films were grown on lanthanum aluminate substrates using laser ablation with resulting maximum transition temperature (T sub c) of 90 K. The films were grown on a LaAlO3 which was at 775 C and in 170 mtorr of oxygen and slowly cooled to room temperature in 1 atm of oxygen. These films were then processed using photolithography and a negative photoresist with an etch solution of bromine and ethanol. Results are presented on the effect of the processing on T(sub c) of the film and the microwave properties of the patterned films.

  5. Laser tattoo removal with preceding ablative fractional treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencič, Boris; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-06-01

    A combined laser tattoo removal treatment, first the ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with an Er:YAG laser and then the q-switched (QSW) Nd:YAG laser treatment, was studied. Experiments show that significantly higher fluences can be used for the same tissue damage levels.

  6. Ablation characteristics of quantum square pulse mode dental erbium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Suhovršnik, Tomaž; Lukač, Matjaž; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-01-01

    Erbium lasers are by now an accepted tool for performing ablative medical procedures, especially when minimal invasiveness is desired. Ideally, a minimally invasive laser cutting procedure should be fast and precise, and with minimal pain and thermal side effects. All these characteristics are significantly influenced by laser pulse duration, albeit not in the same manner. For example, high cutting efficacy and low heat deposition are characteristics of short pulses, while vibrations and ejected debris screening are less pronounced at longer pulse durations. We report on a study of ablation characteristics on dental enamel and cementum, of a chopped-pulse Er:YAG [quantum square pulse (QSP)] mode, which was designed to reduce debris screening during an ablation process. It is shown that in comparison to other studied standard Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser pulse duration modes, the QSP mode exhibits the highest ablation drilling efficacy with lowest heat deposition and reduced vibrations, demonstrating that debris screening has a considerable influence on the ablation process. By measuring single-pulse ablation depths, we also show that tissue desiccation during the consecutive delivery of laser pulses leads to a significant reduction of the intrinsic ablation efficacy that cannot be fully restored under clinical settings by rehydrating the tooth using an external water spray.

  7. Laser ablation/Fourier transform mass spectrometry of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, William R.; Brenna, J. T.

    1989-10-01

    Laser ablation/ionization followed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry is used to identify and characterize polymers. The mass spectra of several polymers are discussed, including polyimide, polyamic acid, Dupont Tefzel, and polyphenylene sulfide.

  8. Universal threshold for femtosecond laser ablation with oblique illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Cheng, Weibo; Petrarca, Massimo; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    We quantify the dependence of the single-shot ablation threshold on the angle of incidence and polarization of a femtosecond laser beam, for three dissimilar solid-state materials: a metal, a dielectric, and a semiconductor. Using the constant, linear value of the index of refraction, we calculate the laser fluence transmitted through the air-material interface at the point of ablation threshold. We show that, in spite of the highly nonlinear ionization dynamics involved in the ablation process, the so defined transmitted threshold fluence is universally independent of the angle of incidence and polarization of the laser beam for all three material types. We suggest that angular dependence of ablation threshold can be utilized for profiling fluence distributions in ultra-intense femtosecond laser beams.

  9. Laser ablation of iron: A comparison between femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2013-08-28

    In this study, a comparison between femtosecond (fs) and picosecond (ps) laser ablation of electrolytic iron was carried out in ambient air. Experiments were conducted using a Ti:sapphire laser that emits radiation at 785 nm and at pulse widths of 110 ps and 130 fs, before and after pulse compression, respectively. Ablation rates were calculated from the depth of craters produced by multiple laser pulses incident normally to the target surface. Optical and scanning electron microscopy showed that picosecond laser pulses create craters that are deeper than those created by the same number of femtosecond laser pulses at the same fluence. Most of the ablated material was ejected from the ablation site in the form of large particles (few microns in size) in the case of picosecond laser ablation, while small particles (few hundred nanometers) were produced in femtosecond laser ablation. Thermal effects were apparent at high fluence in both femtosecond and picosecond laser ablation, but were less prevalent at low fluence, closer to the ablation threshold of the material. The quality of craters produced by femtosecond laser ablation at low fluence is better than those created at high fluence or using picosecond laser pulses.

  10. Viscous liquid expulsion in nanosecond UV laser ablation: From ``clean'' ablation to nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, V. N.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews recent results on modeling UV nanosecond laser ablation. Particular attention is given to a viscous liquid flow driven by ablation pressure. Based on the analysis of the Navier-Stokes equation, various strongly different manifestations of this phenomenon are explained. These are (i) a “clean” laser ablation, when the laser spot has a clean sharp spot border free of resolidified melt dross; (ii) a new form of material removal in laser ablation, expulsion on a poly(methyl methacrylate) target of long (up to 1 mm) nanofibers with a radius about 150-200 nm to the exterior of the spot under the action of a single pulse of a KrF excimer laser; and (iii) a new method of laser surface nanostructuring, the formation of a surface foam having a structure of micropores interconnected by nanofilaments with diameters of about 100 nm as a result of single-pulse KrF laser ablation of biopolymer films.

  11. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  12. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of side pumped, preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  13. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  14. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  15. Momentum Transfer by Laser Ablation of Irregularly Shaped Space Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D A; Libby, S B; Rubenchik, A

    2010-02-04

    Proposals for ground-based laser remediation of space debris rely on the creation of appropriately directed ablation-driven impulses to either divert the fragment or drive it into an orbit with a perigee allowing atmospheric capture. For a spherical fragment, the ablation impulse is a function of the orbital parameters and the laser engagement angle. If, however, the target is irregularly shaped and arbitrarily oriented, new impulse effects come into play. Here we present an analysis of some of these effects.

  16. Momentum Transfer by Laser Ablation of Irregularly Shaped Space Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, Duane A.; Libby, Stephen B.; Rubenchik, Alexander

    2010-10-08

    Proposals for ground-based laser remediation of space debris rely on the creation of appropriately directed ablation-driven impulses to either divert the fragment or drive it into an orbit with a perigee allowing atmospheric capture. For a spherical fragment, the ablation impulse is a function of the orbital parameters and the laser engagement angle. If, however, the target is irregularly shaped and arbitrarily oriented, new impulse effects come into play. Here we present an analysis of some of these effects.

  17. Simulation of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, R. V.; Antonov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper a mathematical model for femtosecond laser ablation of metals is proposed, based on standard two-temperature model connected with 1D hydrodynamic equations. Wide-range equation of state has been developed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data for aluminium and copper. A good agreement for both metals with numerical results and experiment shows that this model can be employed for choosing laser parameters to better accuracy in nanoparticles production by ablation of metals.

  18. Tissue morphologic analysis and ablation rates in the UV and visible for laser angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, M.; Henry, P. D.; Roberts, R.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tittel, F. K.

    1986-08-01

    Ablation rates were determined in human and canine aortas subjected to excimer and visible laser radiation. For UV and pulsed frequency doubled Nd:YAG lasers ablation rates were constant and depended linearly on average laser power, while for cw argon lasers ablation rates depended nonlinearly on laser power.

  19. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  20. High Current Cathodes Fabricated by KrF Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Jones, M. C.; Johnston, M. D.; Jordan, N. M.; Hoff, B. W.

    2010-10-08

    In this paper we review several high power laser ablation techniques that have been utilized to fabricate high current (1-80 kA) electron beam cathodes for accelerators and microwave sources: 1) Projection Ablation Lithography (PAL) cathodes, 2) Ablation Line Focus (ALF) cathodes, and 3) Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes. Laser-ablative micromachining techniques (PAL and ALF) have been utilized to generate micron-scale features on metal substrates that provide electric field (beta) enhancement for Fowler-Nordheim emission and plasma cathodes. Since these laser-ablated patterns are directly, laser-written on the substrate metal they exhibit much higher thermal conductivity for higher current capability and increased damage thresholds. Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes exploit the triple-point electron emission that occurs at the interface between metal, insulator and vacuum.The ablation laser is a KrF excimer laser with a pulse energy of 600 mJ and pulselength of 20 ns. Cathode experiments were performed on the MELBA-C accelerator: V = -300 kV, pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. Data will be presented for PAL, ALF and MOJ cathodes.

  1. Laser ablation methods for analysis of urinary calculi: Comparison study based on calibration pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpánková, K.; Novotný, K.; Vašinová Galiová, M.; Kanický, V.; Kaiser, J.; Hahn, D. W.

    2013-03-01

    Methods based on laser ablation, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass/Optical Emission Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS/OES) are particularly suitable for urinary calculi bulk and micro analysis. Investigation of spatial distribution of matrix and trace elements can help to explain their emergence and growth. However, quantification is still very problematic and these methods are often used only for qualitative elemental mapping. There are no commercially available standards, which would correspond to the urinary calculi matrix. Internal standardization is also difficult, mainly due to different crystalline phases in one kidney stone. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the calibration capabilities and examine the limitations of laser ablation based techniques. Calibration pellets were prepared from powdered human urinary calculi with phosphate, oxalate and urate matrix. For this comparative study, the most frequently used laser-ablation based analytical techniques were chosen, such as LIBS and LA-ICP-MS. Moreover, some alternative techniques such as simultaneous LIBS-LA-ICP-OES and laser ablation LA-LIBS were also utilized.

  2. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  3. Far-ultraviolet laser ablation of the cornea: photoacoustic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Dyer, P.E.; Braren, B.

    1987-01-01

    Wide bandwidth piezoelectric transducers made of thin (9 microns) polyvinylidene fluoride film have been used to make time-resolved measurements of the stress-wave generated by far-ultraviolet (193 nm) laser ablation in corneal tissue in vitro. At high fluence (approximately 250 mJ/cm2), ablation commences within 10 ns (+/- 5 ns) of the laser pulse and generates short acoustic impulses (approximately 30 ns). The time profile of the ablation, when coupled to the energy requirements for ablation from earlier work, allows the estimation of a temperature and a half-life for the thermal decomposition of the collagen in cornea. These values do not support a photothermal mechanism for the ablation under the experimental conditions.

  4. Laser ablation with applied magnetic field for electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishcheva, Alla; Batishchev, Oleg; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-10-01

    Using ultrafast lasers with tera-watt-level power allows efficient ablation and ionization of solid-density materials [1], creating dense and hot (˜100eV) plasma. We propose ablating small droplets in the magnetic nozzle configurations similar to mini-helicon plasma source [2]. Such approach may improve the momentum coupling compared to ablation of solid surfaces and facilitate plasma detachment. Results of 2D modeling of solid wire ablation in the applied magnetic field are presented and discussed. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev et al, Ultrafast Laser Ablation for Space Propulsion, AIAA technical paper 2008-5294, -16p, 44th JPC, Hartford, 2008.[0pt] [2] O. Batishchev and J.L. Cambier, Experimental Study of the Mini-Helicon Thruster, Air Force Research Laboratory Report, AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2009-0020, 2009.

  5. Peak pressures and temperatures within laser-ablated tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.; Dmitriev, A. C.; Lekhtsier, Eugeny N.; Orlov, M. Y.; Semyenov, Alexander D.; Tyurin, Vladimir S.

    1991-06-01

    The time-of-flight probing of supersonic motion of ablation products or preceding shock wave was used to extract the maximum values of initial pressure and temperature. Measurements were accomplished at three laser- tissue combinations - the TEA CO2 laser plus artery wall, and the ArF excimer laser or the Q-switched Er:YSGG laser plus pig eye cornea and gave pressures from 1 to 40 MPa and temperatures from 450 to 700 K. These data favor the thermal ablation mechanism for all three cases.

  6. Control of laser-ablation plasma potential with external electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, Fumika Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-15

    The potential of a laser-ablation plasma was controlled stably up to +2 kV by using external ring electrodes. A stable electron sheath was formed between the plasma and the external electrodes by placing the ring electrodes away from the boundary of the drifting plasma. The plasma kept the potential for a few μs regardless of the flux change of the ablation plasma. We also found that the plasma potential changed with the expansion angle of the plasma from the target. By changing the distance between the plasma boundary and the external electrodes, we succeeded in controlling the potential of laser-ablation plasma.

  7. Formation of high mass carbon cluster ions from laser ablation of polymers and thin carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, William R.; Brenna, J. T.

    1990-02-01

    Three materials were studied by laser ablation/Fourier transform mass spectrometry, using 266 nm laser radiation: a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), and a diamond-like carbon film (DLC). In each case, positive ion mass spectra exhibit primarily even-numbered, high mass carbon clusters (``fullerenes'') of the type previously reported for graphite ablation. In the case of ETFE, a large C+60 peak (``buckminsterfullerene'') was observed. The polymer spectra showed a strong dependence on the number of laser pulses on one spot and the laser power density. For ETFE, the fullerene ion relative intensity first increases and then decreases as a function of the number of laser pulses. For the DLC film, fullerenes are observed with a single laser pulse on a fresh spot of the sample. The results are interpreted in terms of a gas phase growth model for the fullerene ion formation.

  8. Subpicosecond and picosecond laser ablation of dental enamel: comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Andrei V.; Madsen, Nathan R.; Kolev, Vesselin Z.; Gamaly, Eugene G.; Luther-Davies, Barry; Dawes, Judith M.; Chan, A.

    2004-06-01

    We report the use of sub-picosecond near-IR and ps UV pulsed lasers for precision ablation of freshly extracted human teeth. The sub-picosecond laser wavelength was ~800nm, with pulsewidth 150 fs and pulse repetition rate of 1kHz; the UV laser produced 10 ps pulses at 266 nm with pulse rate of ~1.2x105 pulses/s; both lasers produced ~1 W of output energy, and the laser fluence was kept at the same level of 10-25 J/cm2. Laser radiation from both laser were effectively absorbed in the teeth enamel, but the mechanisms of absorption were radically different: the near-IR laser energy was absorbed in a plasma layer formed through the optical breakdown mechanism initiated by multiphoton absorption, while the UV-radiation was absorbed due to molecular photodissociation of the enamel and conventional thermal deposition. The rise in the intrapulpal temperature was monitored by embedded thermocouples, and was shown to remain low with subpicosecond laser pulses, but risen up to 30°C, well above the 5°C pain level with the UV-laser. This study demonstrates the potential for ultra-short-pulsed lasers to precision and painless ablation of dental enamel, and indicated the optimal combination of laser parameters in terms of pulse energy, duration, intensity, and repetition rate, required for the laser ablation rates comparable to that of mechanical drill.

  9. MRI-guided laser ablation of neuroendocrine tumor hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Perälä, Jukka; Klemola, Rauli; Kallio, Raija; Li, Chengli; Vihriälä, Ilkka; Salmela, Pasi I; Tervonen, Osmo

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) represent a therapeutically challenging and heterogeneous group of malignancies occurring throughout the body, but mainly in the gastrointestinal system. Purpose To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser ablation of NET liver metastases and assess its role within the current treatment options and methods. Material and Methods Two patients with NET tumor hepatic metastases were treated with MRI-guided interstitial laser ablation (LITT). Three tumors were treated. Clinical follow-up time was 10 years. Results Both patients were successfully treated. There were no local recurrences at the ablation site during the follow-up. Both patients had survived at 10-year follow-up. One patient is disease-free. Conclusion MRI-guided laser ablation can be used to treat NET tumor liver metastases but combination therapy and a rigorous follow-up schedule are recommended. PMID:24778794

  10. Efficient space propulsion engines based on laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent results have shown laser momentum transfer coefficients C{sub m} as large as 700 dynes/J from visible and near-infrared laser pulses with heterogeneous targets. Using inexpensive target materials, it is now possible to deliver a 1-tonne satellite from LEO to GEO in 21 days using a 10-kW onboard laser ablation engine, or to maintain several 1-tonne GEO satellites on station from Earth indefinitely using a laser with 100-W average power.

  11. Improving Consistency in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstwood, Matt; Gehrels, George; Bowring, James

    2010-07-01

    Workshop on Data Handling in LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Geochronology; San Francisco, California, 12-13 December 2009; The use of uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) geochronology involves rapid analysis of U-and Th-rich accessory minerals. It routinely achieves 1-2% precision for U-Th-Pb dates constituting detrital mineral age spectra and for dating igneous and metamorphic events. The speed and low setup and analysis cost of LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb geochronology has led to a proliferation of active laboratories. Tens of thousands of analyses are produced per month, but there is little agreement on how to transform these data into accurate U-Th-Pb dates. Recent interlaboratory blind comparisons of zircon samples indicate that resolvable biases exist among laboratories and the sources of bias are not fully understood. Common protocols of data reduction and reporting are essential for scientists to be able to compare and interpret these data accurately.

  12. Observation of fs-laser spallative ablation using soft X-ray laser probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Noboru; Tomita, Takuro; Minami, Yasuo; Eyama, Takashi; Kakimoto, Naoya; Izutsu, Rui; Baba, Motoyoshi; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Suemoto, Tohru

    2017-03-01

    The initial stages of femtosecond laser ablation of gold were observed by single-shot soft X-ray laser interferometer and reflectometer. The ablation front surface and the spallation shell dome structure were observed from the results of the soft X-ray interferogram, reflective image, and shadowgraph. The formation and evolution of soft X-ray Newton's rings (NRs) were found by reflective imaging at the early stages of the ablation dynamics. The soft X-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer. The spallation layer was kept at the late timing of the ablation dynamics, and the height of that reached over 100 μm. The temporal evolution of the bulk ablated surface was observed in the ablation dynamics. From these results, we have succeeded in obtaining the temporal evolution of the ablation front exfoliated from the gold surface.

  13. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  14. Ultrashort laser ablation of PMMA and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Fabrikesi, E.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Thomson, R. R.; Kar, A. K.

    2008-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOLs) is the most promising method to restore vision after cataract surgery. Several new materials, techniques, and patterns have been studied for forming and etching IOLs to improve their optical properties and reduce diffractive aberrations. This study is aimed at investigating the use of ultrashort laser pulses to ablate the surface of PMMA and intraocular lenses, and thus provide an alternative to conventional techniques. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates (PMMA samples, hydrophobic acrylic IOL, yellow azo dye doped IOL, and hydrophilic acrylic IOL consist of 25% H2O). The irradiation was performed using 100 fs pulses of 800 nm radiation from a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser system. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the ablated patterns by probing the ablation depth using a profilometer. The surface modification was examined using a high resolution optical microscope (IOLs) or atomic force microscope—AFM (PMMA samples). It was found that different polymers exhibited different ablation characteristics, a result that we attribute to the differing optical properties of the materials. In particular, it was observed that the topography of the ablation tracks created on the hydrophilic intraocular lenses was smoother in comparison to those created on the PMMA and hydrophobic lens. The yellow doped hydrophobic intraocular lenses show higher ablation efficiency than undoped hydrophobic acrylic lenses.

  15. Wavelength scaling of silicon laser ablation in picosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, A.; Grojo, D.; Sentis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of silicon has been investigated at 343, 515, and 1030 nm using a laser pulse duration of 50 ps. In this large spectral range, ablation thresholds of silicon vary from 0.01 to 0.83 J/cm2, confirming a strong dependence on the wavelength. By solving the free-carrier density rate equation at threshold conditions, we show that band-to-band linear absorption dominates energy deposition at 343 and 515 nm, whereas at 1030 nm, the energy leading to ablation is primarily absorbed by the generated free-carriers. This allows us to determine the relevant criteria to derive a simple model predicting the wavelength dependence of the ablation threshold in this regime. We obtain an excellent agreement between experimental measurements and calculations by simply considering an averaged energy density required in the absorption depth for surface ablation and accounting for the laser-induced variations of the important thermophysical parameters. On the basis of this analysis, we discuss the optimal wavelength and fluence conditions for maximum removal rate, ablation efficiency, and accuracy. Despite the difference in mechanisms at the different wavelengths, we find that the maximal efficiency remains at around 7 times the ablation threshold fluence for all investigated wavelengths. This work provides guidelines for high-quality and efficient micromachining of silicon in the scarcely explored picosecond regime, while new picosecond sources offer numerous advantages for real throughput industrial applications.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hong, M. H.; Lu, Y. F.; Wu, D. J.; Lan, B.; Chong, T. C.

    2003-05-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (bio-compatible, nonflammable, antiadhesive, and heat resistant). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of PTFE in ambient air by a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs) is investigated. It is found that the pulse number on each irradiated surface area must be large enough for a clear edge definition and the ablated depth increases with the pulse number. The air ionization effect at high laser fluences not only degrades the ablated structures quality but also reduces the ablation efficiency. High quality microstructures are demonstrated with controlling laser fluence below a critical fluence to exclude the air ionization effect. The ablated microstructures show strong adhesion property to liquids and clear edges that are suitable for bio-implantation applications. Theoretical calculation is used to analyze the evolution of the ablated width and depth at various laser fluences.

  17. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  18. Fabrication of pillared PLGA microvessel scaffold using femtosecond laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiao-Wei; Cheng, Chung-Wei; Li, Ching-Wen; Chang, Han-Wei; Wu, Ping-Han; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2012-01-01

    One of the persistent challenges confronting tissue engineering is the lack of intrinsic microvessels for the transportation of nutrients and metabolites. An artificial microvascular system could be a feasible solution to this problem. In this study, the femtosecond laser ablation technique was implemented for the fabrication of pillared microvessel scaffolds of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). This novel scaffold facilitates implementation of the conventional cell seeding process. The progress of cell growth can be observed in vitro by optical microscopy. The problems of becoming milky or completely opaque with the conventional PLGA scaffold after cell seeding can be resolved. In this study, PLGA microvessel scaffolds consisting of 47 μm × 80 μm pillared branches were produced. Results of cell culturing of bovine endothelial cells demonstrate that the cells adhere well and grow to surround each branch of the proposed pillared microvessel networks. PMID:22605935

  19. Analysis of surfaces, films and multilayers by resonant laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.M.; Smith, C.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Anderson, J.E.; Eiden, G.C.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1995-02-01

    In this manuscript we review briefly the history of Resonant Laser Ablation (RLA), and discuss some current ideas regarding sample preparation, laser parameters, and mechanisms. We also discuss current applications including spectral analysis of trace components, depth profiling of thin films and multilayer structures, and the use of RLA with the Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (ITMS).

  20. Formation of nanostructures under femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ashitkov, S I; Romashevskii, S A; Komarov, P S; Burmistrov, A A; Agranat, M B; Zhakhovskii, V V; Inogamov, N A

    2015-06-30

    We present the results of studying the morphology of the modified surface of aluminium, nickel and tantalum after ablation of the surface layer by a femtosecond laser pulse. The sizes of characteristic elements of a cellular nanostructure are found to correlate with thermo-physical properties of the material and the intensity of laser radiation. (superstrong light fields)

  1. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Oraevsky, A.A. |; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D.

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  2. UV solid state laser ablation of intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, A.; Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Commercially available intraocular lenses (IOLs) are manufactured from silicone and acrylic, both rigid (e.g. PMMA) and foldable (hydrophobic or hydrophilic acrylic biomaterials), behaving different mechanical and optical properties. Recently, the use of apodizing technology to design new diffractive-refractive multifocals improved the refractive outcome of these intraocular lenses, providing good distant and near vision. There is also a major ongoing effort to refine laser refractive surgery to correct other defects besides conventional refractive errors. Using phakic IOLs to treat high myopia potentially provides better predictability and optical quality than corneal-based refractive surgery. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of laser ablation on IOL surface shaping, by drilling circular arrays of holes, with a homemade motorized rotation stage, and scattered holes on the polymer surface. In material science, the most popular lasers used for polymer machining are the UV lasers, and, therefore, we tried in this work the 3rd and the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=355 nm and λ=213 nm respectively). The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variations in surface height and, finally, the ablation rates were also mathematically simulated for depicting the possible laser ablation mechanism(s). The experimental results and the theoretical modelling of UV laser interaction with polymeric IOLs are discussed in relation with the physical (optical, mechanical and thermal) properties of the material, in addition to laser radiation parameters (laser energy fluence, number of pulses). The qualitative aspects of laser ablation at λ=213 nm reveal a

  3. Solid sampling with 193-nm excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser ablation in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  4. Ablation behaviors of carbon reinforced polymer composites by laser of different operation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen-Wu; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation mechanism of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composite is of critical meaning for the laser machining process. The ablation behaviors are investigated on the CFRP laminates subject to continuous wave, long duration pulsed wave and short duration pulsed wave lasers. Distinctive ablation phenomena have been observed and the effects of laser operation modes are discussed. The typical temperature patterns resulted from laser irradiation are computed by finite element analysis and thereby the different ablation mechanisms are interpreted.

  5. Preparation of GaN Nanostructures by Laser Ablation of ga Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nadi, Lotfia; Omar, Magdy M.; Mehena, Galila A.; Moniem, Hussien M. A.

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, GaN nanodots (0D) and nanowires (1D) nanostructures were prepared on stainless steal substrates applying laser ablation technique. The target of Ga metal mixed with NaNO2 was introduced in a central bore of a graphite rod of a confined geometry set up. The laser beam was normally focused onto the central bore and the ablated plume of Ga metal was deposited on stainless steal substrate lying below the graphite rod in an atmosphere of slow flow of nitrogen gas with or without ammonia vapor. The pulsed N2 laser beam having a wavelength of 337± 2 nm, pulse duration 15±1 ns and energy per pulse of 15±1 m J, could be focused on the central bore by a cylindrical quartz lens to a spot of dimensions 500 × 700 μm2 t providing target irradiance of 0.2-0.3 GW/cm2 per pulse. The ablated plum was collected after several thousand laser shots. The morphology and structure of the formed nanostructures were investigated by Scanning electron microscope and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The growth mechanism is most likely by Solid-Liquid-Vapor phase during the laser ablation processes. The role of the carbon, the NaNO2 and the flowing gas on the growth of Nanostructures of GaN are discussed.

  6. Optical properties measurement of the laser-ablated tissues for the combined laser ablation with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-03-01

    Laser ablation therapy combined with photodynamic therapy (PDT) is studied for treatment of advanced cancers. The clinical outcome of PDT may be improved by the accurate knowledge about the light distribution within tissue. Optical properties [absorption coefficient (μa), scattering coefficient (μs), anisotropy factor (g), refractive index, etc.] of tissues help us realizing a light propagation through the tissue. It is important to understand of the effect of laser coagulation formed by laser ablation to PDT. The aim of this study is to estimate of influence of coagulated region to PDT for effective PDT combined laser ablation therapy. We evaluated the optical property of mouse tumor tissue in native and coagulated state using a double integrating sphere system and an inverse Monte Carlo method in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. After laser ablation, the μa and reduced scattering coefficient spectra of coagulated tissues were increased in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. The optical penetration depth of coagulated tissues is 1.2-2.9 times lower than the native state in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. The intensity of the light energy inside the coagulated tissue falls to about 60% of its original value at the end of coagulated layer. The evaluation of light energy distribution by the determination of the tissues optical properties could be useful for optimization of the treatment procedure in combined laser ablation with PDT.

  7. Laser ablation of polymeric materials at 157 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costela, A.; García-Moreno, I.; Florido, F.; Figuera, J. M.; Sastre, R.; Hooker, S. M.; Cashmore, J. S.; Webb, C. E.

    1995-03-01

    Results are presented on the ablation by 157 nm laser radiation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyimide, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with 1% of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a crosslinking monomer. Direct photoetching of PHB and undoped PTFE is demonstrated for laser fluences ranging from 0.05 to 0.8 J/cm2. The dependence of the ablation process on the polymer structure is analyzed, and insight into the ablation mechanism is gained from an analysis of the data using Beer-Lambert's law and the kinetic model of the moving interface. Consideration of the absorbed energy density required to initiate significant ablation suggests that the photoetching mechanism is similar for all the polymers studied.

  8. Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue Using Pulsed CO{sub 2} Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hashishin, Yuichi; Sano, Shu; Nakayama, Takeyoshi

    2010-10-13

    Laser scalpels are currently used as a form of laser treatment. However, their ablation mechanism has not been clarified because laser excision of biological tissue occurs over a short time scale. Biological tissue ablation generates sound (laser-induced sound). This study seeks to clarify the ablation mechanism. The state of the gelatin ablation was determined using a high-speed video camera and the power reduction of a He-Ne laser beam. The aim of this study was to clarify the laser ablation mechanism by observing laser excision using the high-speed video camera and monitoring the power reduction of the He-Ne laser beam. We simulated laser excision of a biological tissue by irradiating gelatin (10 wt%) with radiation from a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (wavelength: 10.6 {mu}m; pulse width: 80 ns). In addition, a microphone was used to measure the laser-induced sound. The first pulse caused ablation particles to be emitted in all directions; these particles were subsequently damped so that they formed a mushroom cloud. Furthermore, water was initially evaporated by laser irradiation and then tissue was ejected.

  9. Laser ablation sample transfer for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit K

    2015-01-01

    Infrared laser ablation sample transfer (IR-LAST) is a novel ambient sampling technique for mass spectrometry. In this technique, a pulsed mid-IR laser is used to ablate materials that are collected for mass spectrometry analysis; the material can be a solid sample or deposited on a sample target. After collection, the sample can be further separated or analyzed directly by mass spectrometry. For IR-LAST sample transfer tissue imaging using MALDI mass spectrometry, a tissue section is placed on a sample slide and material transferred to a target slide by scanning the tissue sample under a focused laser beam using transmission-mode (back side) IR laser ablation. After transfer, the target slide is analyzed using MALDI imaging. The spatial resolution is approximately 400 μm and limited by the spread of the laser desorption plume. IR-LAST for MALDI imaging provides several new capabilities including ambient sampling, area to spot concentration of ablated material, multiple ablation and analysis from a single section, and direct deposition on matrix-free nanostructured targets.

  10. Thermal ablation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: radiofrequency, microwave and laser ablation therapies.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Farshid, Parviz; Naguib, Nagy N N; Darvishi, Abbas; Bazrafshan, Babak; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Burkhard, Thorsten; Zangos, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Surgery is currently considered the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) when resectable. The majority of these patients can also benefit from systemic chemotherapy. Recently, local or regional therapies such as thermal ablations have been used with acceptable outcomes. We searched the medical literature to identify studies and reviews relevant to radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in terms of local progression, survival indexes and major complications in patients with CRLM. Reviewed literature showed a local progression rate between 2.8 and 29.7 % of RF-ablated liver lesions at 12-49 months follow-up, 2.7-12.5 % of MW ablated lesions at 5-19 months follow-up and 5.2 % of lesions treated with LITT at 6-month follow-up. Major complications were observed in 4-33 % of patients treated with RF ablation, 0-19 % of patients treated with MW ablation and 0.1-3.5 % of lesions treated with LITT. Although not significantly different, the mean of 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates for RF-, MW- and laser ablated lesions was (92.6, 44.7, 31.1 %), (79, 38.6, 21 %) and (94.2, 61.5, 29.2 %), respectively. The median survival in these methods was 33.2, 29.5 and 33.7 months, respectively. Thermal ablation may be an appropriate alternative in patients with CRLM who have inoperable liver lesions or have operable lesions as an adjunct to resection. However, further competitive evaluation should clarify the efficacy and priority of these therapies in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  11. Photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Minwoo; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Van Phuc, Nguyen; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) over 20 years. Recently, application of high laser power up to 200 W was often reported to swiftly remove a large amount of prostatic tissue. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue vaporization with low laser power. Chicken breast tissue was selected as a target tissue due to minimal optical absorption at the visible wavelength. Four biocompatible photoactive dyes, including amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532 nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm(2) . Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-Vis spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2 ± 0.2 µm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. High aspect ratios up to 7.1 ± 0.4 entailed saturation behavior in the tissue ablation injected with AR and BD, possibly resulting from plume shielding and increased scattering due to coagulation. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33% reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. Due to

  12. Cloth-cutting studies using excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, Robert C.; Johnson, Tamara M.; Sanders, Virgil E.

    2000-08-01

    Laser cutting of textiles with excimer lasers was undertaken for the Amtex program at Los Alamos. These studies were carried out in tandem with laser cutting studies at YAG and copper vapor laser (Green) wavelengths at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at CO2 wavelengths at the Argonne National Laboratory. Laser ablation through the process of photo chemical bond breaking at UV (XeCl at 308 nm) wavelengths proved to be at least a factor of 24 more efficient than thermal ablation at the longer YAG wavelength (1.06 (mu) ). We project that a diffraction limited 100 watt XeCl laser is capable of cutting at a rate of 500 cm/sec (200 in/sec) for all cloths tested with the exception of denim and air bag material.

  13. Ablation Studies of Enamel Tissue Using Pulsed HF Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and enamel has been successful. The reason is thought to be due to high absorption coefficients of hydroxyapatite [Ca10(Po4)6(OH2)] with a total...secondary absorption peak of hydroxyapatite lies, a less violent and cleaner ablation of enamel compared with its main absorption peak at 9.6 µm is...1 of 4 Ablation Studies of Enamel Tissue using Pulsed HF Laser M.E. Khosroshahi, B.A. Ghasemi Amirkabir University of Technology, School of

  14. Cartilage ablation studies using mid-IR free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Jong-In; Peavy, George M.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2005-04-01

    The ablation rate of articular cartilage and fibrocartilage (meniscus), were quantified to examine wavelength and tissue-composition dependence of ablation efficiency for selected mid-infrared wavelengths. The wavelengths tested were 2.9 um (water dominant absorption), 6.1 (protein and water absorption) and 6.45 um (protein dominant absorption) generated by the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Vanderbilt University. The measurement of tissue mass removal using a microbalance during laser ablation was conducted to determine the ablation rates of cartilage. The technique can be accurate over methods such as profilometer and histology sectioning where tissue surface and the crater morphology may be affected by tissue processing. The ablation efficiency was found to be dependent upon the wavelength. Both articular cartilage and meniscus (fibrocartilage) ablations at 6.1 um were more efficient than those at the other wavelengths evaluated. We observed the lowest ablation efficiency of both types of cartilage with the 6.45 um wavelength, possibly due to the reduction in water absorption at this wavelength in comparison to the other wavelengths that were evaluated.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations studies of laser ablation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Johannes; Sonntag, Steffen; Karlin, Johannes; Paredes, Carolina Trichet; Sartison, Marc; Krauss, Armin; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2012-07-30

    An overview of several aspects of our recent molecular dynamics simulations of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. This includes the study of phase diagrams for suitable interactions, analysis of ablated material and bubble formation below threshold, study of two-pulse ablation and the classification of materials with respect to electron properties and electron-phonon coupling in the two-temperature model. A treatment of boundary conditions and of an extended twotemperature model is also included. Most of the results apply to aluminum, others also to copper and iron, and to metals in general.

  16. Simulation of ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Itina, Tatiana E.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Khishchenko, Konstatntin V.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we study the mechanisms of femtosecond double-pulse laser ablation of metals. It was previously shown experimentally that the crater depth monotonically drops when the delay between two successive pulses increases. For delays longer than the time of electron-ion relaxation the crater depth can be even smaller than that produced by a single pulse. The results of the performed hydrodynamic simulation show that the ablation can be suppressed due to the formation of the second shock wave. The modeling results of the double-pulse ablation obtained for different delays correlate with the experimental findings.

  17. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles by laser ablation of an Au foil inside and outside ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wender, Heberton; Andreazza, Marcos L.; Correia, Ricardo R. B.; Teixeira, Sérgio R.; Dupont, Jairton

    2011-03-01

    Stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared by simple laser ablation of an Au foil placed inside or outside four ionic liquids (ILs), without the addition of any external chemical reagent. Irregular spherical AuNPs with a diameter range of 5 to 20 nm were produced after laser ablation of an Au foil located inside or outside the ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMI.BF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMI.PF6) and 1-(3-cyanopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((BCN)MI.NTf2). Additionally, whereas laser ablation inside the IL 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide BMI.N(CN)2 produced flower-like shaped nanoparticles of about 50 nm in size, ablation outside this IL presented similar results to the others ILs studied, as determined by TEM and UV-Vis. The size and shape of the prepared NPs were related to where NP nucleation and growth occurred, i.e., at the IL surface or within the IL. Indeed, the chemical composition of the IL/air interface and surface ion orientation played important roles in the stabilization of the AuNPs formed by laser ablation outside the ILs.

  18. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles by laser ablation of an Au foil inside and outside ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Wender, Heberton; Andreazza, Marcos L; Correia, Ricardo R B; Teixeira, Sérgio R; Dupont, Jairton

    2011-03-01

    Stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared by simple laser ablation of an Au foil placed inside or outside four ionic liquids (ILs), without the addition of any external chemical reagent. Irregular spherical AuNPs with a diameter range of 5 to 20 nm were produced after laser ablation of an Au foil located inside or outside the ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMI·BF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMI·PF6) and 1-(3-cyanopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((BCN)MI·NTf2). Additionally, whereas laser ablation inside the IL 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide BMI·N(CN)2 produced flower-like shaped nanoparticles of about 50 nm in size, ablation outside this IL presented similar results to the others ILs studied, as determined by TEM and UV-Vis. The size and shape of the prepared NPs were related to where NP nucleation and growth occurred, i.e., at the IL surface or within the IL. Indeed, the chemical composition of the IL/air interface and surface ion orientation played important roles in the stabilization of the AuNPs formed by laser ablation outside the ILs.

  19. Pressure generation during inertially confined laser ablation of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzkan, I.; Albagli, D.; Banish, B. J.; Dark, M.; von Rosenberg, C.; Perelman, L. T.; Janes, G. S.; Feld, M. S.

    1993-10-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation of the laser energy density actually deposited in tissue at the onset of pulsed laser ablation revels that, over a wide range of wavelengths and tissue types, it is an order of magnitude lower than that needed for vaporization. An understanding of the thermodynamics of water reveals that under appropriate conditions of laser pulse duration and penetration depth, tremendous pressure can be generated in the tissue at energy densities well below the heat of vaporization and temperatures below 100 °C. The pressure generated in the tissue by the absorption of laser light then plays a significant role in the ablation process. For example, in ablation of aorta using a pulsed excimer laser (a pulse width of 30 nanoseconds at a wavelength of 308 nanometers), we calculate that the instantaneous pressure generated in the tissue will exceed 700 bars. Ablation occurs when these high pressures lead to stresses which exceed the structural properties of the tissue. A survey of results from the literature shows that the characteristic time for the relaxation of these high pressures in soft tissue is much longer than predicted by a simple speed of sound calculation and a more appropriate characteristic time is proposed. These concepts also help in understanding pulsed laser ablation in hard tissue. Some results of a study of hard tissue ablation are described, including some stroboscopic measurements. An experimental determination of the pressure generated by the absorption of short pulsed laser light, using an interferometric monitoring technique, agrees with theoretical predictions of the above theory. We include some relevant information on the properties of biological tissue and conclude with a cautionary note to the new practitioner.

  20. Pulsed laser ablation of dental calculus in the near ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Schoenly, Joshua E; Seka, Wolf; Rechmann, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Pulsed lasers emitting wavelengths near 400 nm can selectively ablate dental calculus without damaging underlying and surrounding sound dental hard tissue. Our results indicate that calculus ablation at this wavelength relies on the absorption of porphyrins endogenous to oral bacteria commonly found in calculus. Sub- and supragingival calculus on extracted human teeth, irradiated with 400-nm, 60-ns laser pulses at ≤8  J/cm2, exhibits a photobleached surface layer. Blue-light microscopy indicates this layer highly scatters 400-nm photons, whereas fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that bacterial porphyrins are permanently photobleached. A modified blow-off model for ablation is proposed that is based upon these observations and also reproduces our calculus ablation rates measured from laser profilometry. Tissue scattering and a stratified layering of absorbers within the calculus medium explain the gradual decrease in ablation rate from successive pulses. Depending on the calculus thickness, ablation stalling may occur at <5  J/cm2 but has not been observed above this fluence.

  1. Influence of water environment on holmium laser ablation performance for hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Li, Zhengjia

    2012-05-01

    This study clarifies the ablation differences in air and in water for hard biological tissues, which are irradiated by fiber-guided long-pulsed holmium lasers. High-speed photography is used to record the dynamic characteristics of ablation plumes and vaporization bubbles induced by pulsed holmium lasers. The ablation morphologies and depth of hard tissues are quantitatively measured by optical coherence microscopy. Explosive vaporization effects in water play a positive role in the contact ablation process and are directly responsible for significant ablation enhancement. Furthermore, water layer depth can also contribute to ablation performance. Under the same laser parameters for fiber-tissue contact ablation in air and water, ablation performances are comparable for a single-laser pulse, but for more laser pulses the ablation performances in water are better than those in air. Comprehensive knowledge of ablation differences under various environments is important, especially in medical procedures that are performed in a liquid environment.

  2. UV-laser ablation of sensory cells in living insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhr, G.; Ronacher, B.; Krahe, R.; Fest, S.; Shirley, S. G.; Rogaschewski, S.

    An experimental set-up for applying pulsed UV-laser ablation to the integument of insects and the high precision of ablation is demonstrated. In order to test for possible detrimental effects on physiological responses, this technique was applied to the ears of migratory locust (Locusta migratoria L.). The handling of living insects, the survival, and physiological response after treatment are described. We selectively interrupted the d-receptor of the tympanal organ, which is the receptor system responsible for the locust's sensitivity in the high-frequency range (>10 kHz). The effects of the laser treatment were tested by determining hearing thresholds in electrophysiological recordings from the tympanal nerves. In agreement with the literature, the interruption of the d-receptors led to a significant shift towards higher values of the thresholds in the high-frequency range. Future perspectives and biological applications of UV-laser ablation are discussed.

  3. Infrared Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for Fingermark Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Camp, Eden E.; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared laser ablation coupled to vacuum capture was employed to collect material from fingermarks deposited on surfaces of different porosity and roughness. Laser ablation at 3 μm was performed in reflection mode with subsequent capture of the ejecta with a filter connected to vacuum. Ablation and capture of standards from fingermarks was demonstrated on glass, plastic, aluminum, and cardboard surfaces. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), it was possible to detect caffeine after spiking with amounts as low as 1 ng. MALDI detection of condom lubricants and detection of antibacterial peptides from an antiseptic cream was demonstrated. Detection of explosives from fingermarks left on plastic surfaces as well as from direct deposition on the same surface using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was shown. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. CO2 laser ablative etching of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, P. E.; Oldershaw, G. A.; Sidhu, J.

    1989-06-01

    Films of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can be successfully etched with 9 μm radiation from a pulsed TEA CO2 laser. The relationship between etch depth and fluence is broadly similar to that observed for excimer laser etching but with a less well-defined threshold. Time-resolved photoacoustic measurements of stress waves generated in the interaction show that at a fluence of 1.8 J cm-2 ablation occurs 100 200 ns after the start of the laser pulse, a time which is consistent with the rate of thermal decomposition of PET. The volatile products of ablation are carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethyne, ethene, benzene, ethanal, and small quantities of other products. For fluences close to and appreciably above the threshold the ablated material consists predominantly of involatile species of relatively high molecular weight, whereas at higher fluences substantial fragmentation of the polymer to small molecules occurs.

  5. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing helps treat restrictive pediatric scar contractures.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Goldenberg, Alina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Murray, Jill-Peck; Shumaker, Peter R

    2014-12-01

    Conventional management of debilitating pediatric scar contractures, including hand therapy and surgery, may often be beset by delayed treatment, suboptimal results, and additional surgical morbidity. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing is an emerging adjunctive procedural option for scar contractures because of its promising efficacy and safety profile. However, its use to improve function has not been studied in the pediatric population. Herein we report 2 pediatric patients with recalcitrant scar contractures, causing persistent functional deficits, treated with an ablative fractional laser protocol. Both patients experienced rapid and cumulative subjective and objective improvements in range of motion and function as measured by an independent occupational therapist without reported complications. We highlight ablative fractional laser resurfacing as a novel and promising tool in the management of function-limiting scar contractures in children and propose that the technique be incorporated into existing scar treatment paradigms, guided by future research.

  6. Aggregation effect on absorbance spectrum of laser ablated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaeni; Irmaniar; Herbani, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Plasmon of gold nanoparticles is one of the hot topics nowadays due to various possible applications. The application is determined by plasmon peak in absorbance spectrum. We have fabricated gold nanoparticles using laser ablation technique and studied the influence of CTAB (Cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) effect on the optical characterization of fabricated gold nanoparticles. We ablated a gold plate using NdYAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 10 Hz pulse frequency at low energy density. We found there are two distinctive plasmon peaks, i.e., primary and secondary peaks, where the secondary peak is the main interests of this work. Our simulation results have revealed that the secondary plasmon peak is affected by random aggregation of gold nanoparticles. Our research leads to good techniques on fabrication of colloidal gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution using laser ablation technique.

  7. Ablative Laser Propulsion Using Multi-Layered Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nehls, Mary; Edwards, David; Gray, Perry; Schneider, T.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental investigations are ongoing to study the force imparted to materials when subjected to laser ablation. When a laser pulse of sufficient energy density impacts a material, a small amount of the material is ablated. A torsion balance is used to measure the momentum produced by the ablation process. The balance consists of a thin metal wire with a rotating pendulum suspended in the middle. The wire is fixed at both ends. Recently, multi-layered material systems were investigated. These multi-layered materials were composed of a transparent front surface and opaque sub surface. The laser pulse penetrates the transparent outer surface with minimum photon loss and vaporizes the underlying opaque layer.

  8. Nanostructures synthesis by femtosecond laser ablation of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipparty, D.; Tan, B.; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2012-10-01

    In this article, we investigate the variations in ablation dynamics that result in diverse nanostructures on SiO2 based glass samples. A three-dimensional fibrous nanoparticle agglomerate was observed on sodalime glass when exposed to femtosecond laser irradiation. The fused nanoparticles have diameters ranging from 30 nm to 70 nm. Long continuous nanofibers of extremely high aspect ratio (certain fibers up to 100 000:1) were obtained by exposing silica glass surface to femtosecond laser irradiation at MHz repetition rate in air. A nanostructure assembly comprising of nanofiber and nanoparticle agglomerates was also observed by ablating silica glass. From our experimental analysis, it was determined that variation in bandgap and material composition alters ablation dynamics and dictates the response of glass to femtosecond laser irradiation, ultimately leading to the formation of structures with varying morphology on silica and sodalime glass. The possible underlying mechanisms that produce such nanostructures on glass specimens have also been explored.

  9. Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, R.; Akturk, S.; Simsek, E.

    2014-02-03

    We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate through femtosecond laser ablation. The pulse fluence is adjusted around the single-pulse ablation threshold of graphene. It is shown that, even though both SiO{sub 2} and Si have more absorption in the linear regime compared to graphene, the substrate can be kept intact during the process. This is achieved by scanning the sample under laser illumination at speeds yielding a few numbers of overlapping pulses at a certain point, thereby effectively shielding the substrate. By adjusting laser fluence and translation speed, 400 nm wide ablation channels could be achieved over 100 μm length. Raster scanning of the sample yields well-ordered periodic structures, provided that sufficient gap is left between channels. Nanoscale patterning of graphene without substrate damage is verified with Scanning Electron Microscope and Raman studies.

  10. Dentin mid-infrared laser ablation at various lasing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Marouan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study a frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) Q-switched and free-running Er:YAG laser, as well as a novel design transversally excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) oscillator-double amplifier corona preionised high beam quality Hydrogen-Fluoride (HF) laser system, all developed in our lab, were used in dentin ablation experiments. In the case of the Er:YAG laser, pulses of 190 ns in Q-switched operation and of 80 μs pulse width in free-running operation at 2.94 μm were used, while HF laser pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.6-3.1 μm in a predominantly TEM00 beam were also used to interact in vitro with dentin tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of 0.4-1.5 mm thick. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue or after being waveguided through suitable mid-IR fiber/waveguide alternatively ended with quartz end-sealing caps. The correlation between the various laser beam parameters, as wavelength, pulse duration, repetition rate, energy and spatial distribution of the beam profile and the ablative characteristics (ablation rates, tissue surface morphology) of dentin surface were investigated.

  11. Visual servoing of a laser ablation based cochleostomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrs, Lüder A.; Raczkowsky, Jörg; Werner, Martin; Knapp, Felix B.; Mehrwald, Markus; Hering, Peter; Schipper, Jörg; Klenzner, Thomas; Wörn, Heinz

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study is a defined, visually based and camera controlled bone removal by a navigated CO II laser on the promontory of the inner ear. A precise and minimally traumatic opening procedure of the cochlea for the implantation of a cochlear implant electrode (so-called cochleostomy) is intended. Harming the membrane linings of the inner ear can result in damage of remaining organ functions (e.g. complete deafness or vertigo). A precise tissue removal by a laser-based bone ablation system is investigated. Inside the borehole the pulsed laser beam is guided automatically over the bone by using a two mirror galvanometric scanner. The ablation process is controlled by visual servoing. For the detection of the boundary layers of the inner ear the ablation area is monitored by a color camera. The acquired pictures are analyzed by image processing. The results of this analysis are used to control the process of laser ablation. This publication describes the complete system including image processing algorithms and the concept for the resulting distribution of single laser pulses. The system has been tested on human cochleae in ex-vivo studies. Further developments could lead to safe intraoperative openings of the cochlea by a robot based surgical laser instrument.

  12. Laser ablated zirconium plasma: A source of neutral zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Dheerendra; Thareja, Raj K.

    2010-10-15

    The authors report spectroscopic investigations of laser produced zirconium (Zr) plasma at moderate laser fluence. At low laser fluence the neutral zirconium species are observed to dominate over the higher species of zirconium. Laser induced fluorescence technique is used to study the velocity distribution of ground state neutral zirconium species. Two-dimensional time-resolved density distributions of ground state zirconium is mapped using planner laser induced fluorescence imaging and total ablated mass of neutral zirconium atoms is estimated. Temporal and spatial evolutions of electron density and temperature are discussed by measuring Stark broadened profile and ratio of intensity of emission lines, respectively.

  13. Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2011-11-04

    Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

  14. Pulsed laser ablation of polymers for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedder, James E. A.; Holmes, Andrew S.; Booth, Heather J.

    2008-02-01

    Laser micromachining by ablation is a well established technique used for the production of 2.5D and 3D features in a wide variety of materials. The fabrication of stepped, multi-level, structures can be achieved using a number of binary mask projection techniques using excimer lasers. Alternatively, direct-writing of complex 2.5D features can easily be achieved with solid-state lasers. Excimer laser ablation using half-tone masks allows almost continuous surface relief and the generation of features with low surface roughness. We have developed techniques to create large arrays of repeating micro-optical structures on polymer substrates. Here, we show our recent developments in laser structuring with the combination of half-tone and binary mask techniques.

  15. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  16. Below-Band-Gap Laser Ablation Of Diamond For TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Foote, Marc C.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Fortier, Edward P.; Posthill, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Thin, electron-transparent layers of diamond for examination in transmission electron microscope (TEM) fabricated from thicker diamond substrates by using laser beam to ablate surface of substrate. Involves use of photon energy below band gap. Growing interest in use of diamond as bulk substrate and as coating material in variety of applications has given rise to increasing need for TEM for characterization of diamond-based materials. Below-band-gap laser ablation method helps to satisfy this need. Also applied in general to cutting and etching of diamonds.

  17. Hydrodynamic simulations of metal ablation by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Colombier, J.P.; Combis, P.; Bonneau, F.

    2005-04-15

    Ablation of Cu and Al targets has been performed with 170 fs laser pulses in the intensity range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. We compare the measured removal depth with 1D hydrodynamic simulations. The electron-ion temperature decoupling is taken into account using the standard two-temperature model. The influence of the early heat transfer by electronic thermal conduction on hydrodynamic material expansion and mechanical behavior is investigated. A good agreement between experimental and numerical matter ablation rates shows the importance of including solid-to-vapor evolution of the metal in the current modeling of the laser matter interaction.

  18. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process.

  19. Endometrial laser ablation in rabbits: A comparative study of three laser types

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, C.; Tadir, Y.; Braslavsky, D.; Fisch, B.; Karni, Z.; Ovadia, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Endometrial laser ablation is one of the alternatives to hysterectomy in cases of intractable uterine bleeding. It is currently performed using the Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 microns. The aim of this study was to compare the tissue effect of three types of laser irradiation (Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 and 1.32 microns and holmium laser at 2.12 microns) on the rabbit endometrium. Crater formation, coagulation necrosis, and muscle necrosis were evaluated at the time of ablation, as well as at 1 week and 4 weeks postablation. The results were assessed by determining the depth and width of the affected portion in the uterine wall (lumen to serosa). It was shown that Nd:YAG laser at 1.32 microns caused more generalized and extended effects as compared with the other laser types examined. Endometrial regeneration was faster after ablation by the Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 microns and the holmium laser than by the Nd:YAG laser at 1.32 microns. The widest range of ablation energy (defined as that causing ablation without muscle damage) was achieved by applying the holmium laser. Further evaluation of the holmium laser for this indication is recommended.

  20. CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion Tractor Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Schlecht, Clifford A.

    2010-05-06

    Manipulation of objects at a distance has already been achieved with no small measure of success in the realm of microscopic objects on the scale size of nanometers to micrometers in applications including laser trapping and laser tweezers. However, there has been relatively little effort to apply such remote control to macroscopic systems. A space tractor beam could be applied to a wide range of applications, including removal of orbital debris, facilitation of spacecraft docking, adjustment of satellite attitude or orbital position, etc. In this paper, an ablative laser propulsion tractor beam is demonstrated based on radiation from a CO{sub 2} laser. Cooperative, layered polymer targets were used for remote impulse generation using a CO{sub 2} laser. The use of a structured ablatant enabling switching between thrust directional parity (i.e., forward or reverse) and imparting torque to a remote target. Fluence-dependent results are presented in the context of polymer ablation modeling work and with consideration of confined ablation effects.

  1. Infrared laser ablation sample transfer for MALDI imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit K

    2012-04-03

    An infrared laser was used to ablate material from tissue sections under ambient conditions for direct collection on a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) target. A 10 μm thick tissue sample was placed on a microscope slide and was mounted tissue-side down between 70 and 450 μm from a second microscope slide. The two slides were mounted on a translation stage, and the tissue was scanned in two dimensions under a focused mid-infrared (IR) laser beam to transfer material to the target slide via ablation. After the material was transferred to the target slide, it was analyzed using MALDI imaging using a tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Images were obtained from peptide standards for initial optimization of the system and from mouse brain tissue sections using deposition either onto a matrix precoated target or with matrix addition after sample transfer and compared with those from standard MALDI mass spectrometry imaging. The spatial resolution of the transferred material is approximately 400 μm. Laser ablation sample transfer provides several new capabilities not possible with conventional MALDI imaging including (1) ambient sampling for MALDI imaging, (2) area to spot concentration of ablated material, (3) collection of material for multiple imaging analyses, and (4) direct collection onto nanostructure assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI) targets without blotting or ultrathin sections.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of cadmium tungstate for scintillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, S.; Baker, M. A.; Wilson, M. D.; Lohstroh, A.; Seller, P.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafast pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a technique to machine CdWO4 single crystal scintillator and segment it into small blocks with the aim of fabricating a 2D high energy X-ray imaging array. Cadmium tungstate (CdWO4) is a brittle transparent scintillator used for the detection of high energy X-rays and γ-rays. A 6 W Yb:KGW Pharos-SP pulsed laser of wavelength 1028 nm was used with a tuneable pulse duration of 10 ps to 190 fs, repetition rate of up to 600 kHz and pulse energies of up to 1 mJ was employed. The effect of varying the pulse duration, pulse energy, pulse overlap and scan pattern on the laser induced damage to the crystals was investigated. A pulse duration of ≥500 fs was found to induce substantial cracking in the material. The laser induced damage was minimised using the following operating parameters: a pulse duration of 190 fs, fluence of 15.3 J cm-2 and employing a serpentine scan pattern with a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. The surface of the ablated surfaces was studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ablation products were found to contain cadmium tungstate together with different cadmium and tungsten oxides. These laser ablation products could be removed using an ammonium hydroxide treatment.

  3. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1-10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He-Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm-2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  4. PbTe quantum dots grown by femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Biggemann, D.; Moya, L.; Pippo, W. A.; Moreira, R. S.; Silva, D.; Cesar, C. L.; Barbosa, L. C.; Schrank, A.; Souza Filho, C. R.; de Oliveira, E. P.

    2008-02-01

    Laser ablation (LA) is a thin film fabrication technique which has generated a lot of interest in the past few years as one of the simplest and most versatile methods for the deposition of a wide variety of materials. With the rapid development experienced in the generation of ultra short laser pulses, new possibilities were opened for the laser ablation technique, using femtosecond lasers as ablation source. It is commonly believed that when the temporal length of the laser pulse became shorter than the several picoseconds required to couple the electronic energy to the lattice of the material, thermal effects could not play a significant role. Since the pulse width is too short for thermal effects to take place, with each laser pulse a few atom layers of material are direct vaporized away from the target surface and a better control in the quantum dots (QDs) fabrication could be achieved. In this work we report the fabrication of PbTe QDs by femtosecond laser ablation of a PbTe target in argon atmosphere. Experiments were carried out using a typical LA configuration comprising a deposition chamber and an ultra short pulsed laser (100 fs; 30 mJ) at a central wavelength of 800 nm. PbTe was chosen because its QDs absorption band can be controlled by its size to fall in the spectral window of interest for optical communications (1.3-1.5 μm). This, together with the QD high optical nonlinearity, makes this material an excellent candidate for development of photonic devices. It was investigated the influence of the number of laser pulses in the formation of the nanoparticles. The structural parameters and the surface density of the nanoparticles were studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  5. Temperature dependent ablation threshold in silicon using ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, Jostein; Erik Foss, Sean

    2012-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the ablation threshold in silicon as a function of temperature when applying ultrashort laser pulses at three wavelengths. By varying the temperature of a silicon substrate from room temperature to 320 °C, we observe that the ablation threshold for a 3 ps pulse using a wavelength of 1030 nm drops from 0.43 J/cm2 to 0.24 J/cm2, a reduction of 43%. For a wavelength of 515 nm, the ablation threshold drops from 0.22 J/cm2 to 0.15 J/cm2, a reduction of 35%. The observed ablation threshold for pulses at 343 nm remains constant with temperature, at 0.10 J/cm2. These results indicate that substrate heating is a useful technique for lowering the ablation threshold in industrial silicon processing using ultrashort laser pulses in the IR or visible wavelength range. In order to investigate and explain the observed trends, we apply the two-temperature model, a thermodynamic model for investigation of the interaction between silicon and ultrashort laser pulses. Applying the two-temperature model implies thermal equilibrium between optical and acoustic phonons. On the time scales encountered herein, this need not be the case. However, as discussed in the article, the two-temperature model provides valuable insight into the physical processes governing the interaction between the laser light and the silicon. The simulations indicate that ablation occurs when the number density of excited electrons reaches the critical electron density, while the lattice remains well below vaporization temperature. The simulated laser fluence required to reach critical electron density is also found to be temperature dependent. The dominant contributor to increased electron density is, in the majority of the investigated cases, the linear absorption coefficient. Two-photon absorption and impact ionization also generate carriers, but to a lesser extent. As the linear absorption coefficient is temperature dependent, we find that the simulated reduction in

  6. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  7. Production of nanoparticles from natural hydroxylapatite by laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Laser ablation of solids in liquids technique has been used to obtain colloidal nanoparticles from biological hydroxylapatite using pulsed as well as a continuous wave (CW) laser. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements revealed the formation of spherical particles with size distribution ranging from few nanometers to hundred nanometers and irregular submicronic particles. High resolution TEM showed that particles obtained by the use of pulsed laser were crystalline, while those obtained by the use of CW laser were amorphous. The shape and size of particles are consistent with the explosive ejection as formation mechanism. PMID:21711800

  8. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser.

  9. Laser ablation of single-crystalline silicon by radiation of pulsed frequency-selective fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the process of destruction of the surface of a single-crystalline silicon wafer scanned by the beam of a pulsed ytterbium-doped fiber laser radiation with a wavelength of λ = 1062 nm. It is established that the laser ablation can proceed without melting of silicon and the formation of a plasma plume. Under certain parameters of the process (radiation power, beam scan velocity, and beam overlap density), pronounced oxidation of silicon microparticles with the formation of a characteristic loose layer of fine powdered silicon dioxide has been observed for the first time. The range of lasing and beam scanning regimes in which the growth of SiO2 layer takes place is determined.

  10. Comparative study on laser tissue ablation between PV and HPS lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Jebens, David; Mitchell, Gerald; Koullick, Ed

    2008-02-01

    Laser therapy for obstructive benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has gained broad adoption due to effective tissue removal, immediate hemostasis, and minor complications. The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare ablation characteristics of PV (Photoselective Vaporization) and the newly introduced HPS (High Performance System) 532 nm lasers. Bovine prostatic tissues were ablated in vitro, using a custom-made scanning system. Laser-induced volume produced by two lasers was quantified as a function of applied power, fiber working distance (WD), and treatment speed. Given the same power of 80 W and speed of 4 mm/s, HPS created up to 50 % higher tissue ablation volume than PV did. PV induced a rapid decrease of ablation volume when WD increased from 0.5 mm to 3 mm while HPS yielded almost constant tissue removal up to 3 mm for both 80 W and 120 W. As the treatment speed increased, both lasers reached saturation in tissue ablation volume. Lastly, both PV and HPS lasers exhibited approximately 1 mm thick heat affected zone (HAZ) in this study although HPS created twice deeper ablation channels with a depth of up to 4 mm. Due to a smaller beam size and a higher output power, HPS maximized tissue ablation rate with minimal thermal effects to the adjacent tissue. Furthermore, more collimated beam characteristics provides more spatial flexibility and may even help to decrease the rate of fiber degradation associated with thermal damage from debris reattachment to the tip.

  11. Setup for functional cell ablation with lasers: coupling of a laser to a microscope.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sean T; Hidalgo, Alicia; de Belle, J Steven; Keshishian, Haig

    2012-06-01

    The selective removal of cells by ablation is a powerful tool in the study of eukaryotic developmental biology, providing much information about their origin, fate, or function in the developing organism. In Drosophila, three main methods have been used to ablate cells: chemical, genetic, and laser ablation. Each method has its own applicability with regard to developmental stage and the cells to be ablated, and its own limitations. The primary advantage of laser-based ablation is the flexibility provided by the method: The operations can be performed in any cell pattern and at any time in development. Laser-based techniques permit manipulation of structures within cells, even to the molecular level. They can also be used for gene activation. However, laser ablation can be expensive, labor-intensive, and time-consuming. Although live cells can be difficult to image in Drosophila embryos, the use of vital fluorescent imaging methods has made laser-mediated cell manipulation methods more appealing; the methods are relatively straightforward. This article provides the information necessary for setting up and using a laser microscope for lasesr ablation studies.

  12. Fast photography of plasma formed by laser ablation of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedanovska, E.; Ivkovic, M.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present results of the temporal and spatial analysis of laser induced plasma performed by use of ICCD fast photography. The plasma is formed by excimer laser ablation of aluminum target in vacuum, air or different pressures of argon and helium. It is shown how the plasma luminous intensity and duration depends on gas pressure. The obtained time dependence of wave propagation distance is also compared with predictions given by the blast wave and drag-force theory also.

  13. Infrared Laser Ablation Sample Transfer for MALDI and Electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit King

    2011-08-01

    We have used an infrared laser to ablate materials under ambient conditions that were captured in solvent droplets. The droplets were either deposited on a MALDI target for off-line analysis by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry or flow-injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer. An infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system at 2.94 μm wavelength and approximately 1 mJ pulse energy was focused onto samples for ablation at atmospheric pressure. The ablated material was captured in a solvent droplet 1-2 mm in diameter that was suspended from a silica capillary a few millimeters above the sample target. Once the sample was transferred to the droplet by ablation, the droplet was deposited on a MALDI target. A saturated matrix solution was added to the deposited sample, or in some cases, the suspended capture droplet contained the matrix. Peptide and protein standards were used to assess the effects of the number of IR laser ablation shots, sample to droplet distance, capture droplet size, droplet solvent, and laser pulse energy. Droplet collected samples were also injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer with a 500 nL injection loop. It is estimated that pmol quantities of material were transferred to the droplet with an efficiency of approximately 1%. The direct analysis of biological fluids for off-line MALDI and electrospray was demonstrated with blood, milk, and egg. The implications of this IR ablation sample transfer approach for ambient imaging are discussed.

  14. Comparative shock wave analysis during corneal ablation with an excimer laser, picosecond laser, and femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Ronald R.; Juhasz, Tibor

    1995-05-01

    With the event of topographic steep central islands following excimer laser surgery and the potential damage to the corneal endothelium, shock waves are playing an increasingly important role in laser refractive surgery. With this in mind, we performed a comparative shock wave analysis in corneal tissue using an excimer laser, picosecond laser, and femtosecond laser. We used a Lambda Physik excimer laser at 308 nm wavelength, a Nd:YLF picosecond laser at 1053 nm wavelength and a synchronously pumped linear cavity femtosecond laser at 630 nm wavelength. The pulse widths of the corresponding lasers were 8 ns, 18 ps, 150 fs, respectively. The energy density of irradiation was 2.5 to 8 times the threshold level being 2 J/cm2 (excimer laser), 86 J/cm2 (picosecond laser) and 10.3 J/cm2 (femtosecond laser). Shock wave dynamics were analyzed using time-resolved photography on a nanosecond time scale using the picosecond laser in corneal tissue, water and air. Shock wave dynamics using the femtosecond laser were studied in water only while the excimer laser induced shock wave during corneal ablation was studied in air only. We found the dynamics of shock waves to be similar in water and corneal tissue indicating that water is a good model to investigate shock wave effects in the cornea. The magnitude of the shock wave velocity and pressure decays over time to that of a sound wave. The distance over which it decays is 3 mm in air with the excimer laser and 600 - 700 micrometers in air with the picosecond laser. In water, the picosecond laser shock wave decays over a distance of 150 micrometers compared to the femtosecond laser shock wave which decays over a distance of 30 micrometers . Overall the excimer laser shock wave propagates 5 times further than that of the picosecond laser and the picosecond laser shock wave propagates 5 times further than that of the femtosecond laser. In this preliminary comparison, the time and distance for shock wave decay appears to be directly

  15. Thermal vapor bubble and pressure dynamics during infrared laser ablation of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Sokolow, Adam; Pearlstein, Robert; Edwards, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Free-electron laser irradiation can superheat tissue water, driving thermal vapor bubbles confined by tissue matrix and leading to mechanical tissue failure (ablation). Acoustic transients propagating from an ablation cavity were recorded with a polarization quadrature, interferometric vibrometer. For 3.0 μm infrared irradiation, the shocklike transients with peak pressures in the megapascal range indicate amplification due to bubble collapse. In contrast, for 6.45 μm irradiation, elastic transients with peak pressures in the 0.1 MPa range indicate tissue failure during bubble growth.

  16. Laser ablation assisted adhesive bonding of automotive structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Warren, C.D.

    1999-07-03

    Laser ablation has been evaluated as a surface pretreatment prior to adhesive bonding. In prior experimental work, it was observed that when adhesively bonded, composite, single lap shear samples fail, the fracture often occurs at either the adhesive/adherend interface or in the resin rich surface layer of the composite. These two areas represent the weakest portion of the joint. Laser ablation pretreatment generates areas where the resin on the composite surface is selectively removed leaving behind exposed reinforcing fibers which are the major load bearing members of the composite. In a subsequent adhesive bonding operation, this allows portions of the fibers to be encapsulated in the adhesive while other portions of the fiber remain in the composite resin. This type of pretreatment permits fibers to bridge and reinforce the interface between adhesive and adherend. A secondary benefit is the removal of surface contaminantes by pyrolysis. Microscopic observation of laser ablated surfaces indicates a prominent, fiber rich area. Results of the mechanical evaluation indicated that the lap shear strength for laser ablated samples was significantly higher than specimens with no pretreatment or with solvent cleaning only, but were slightly lower than specimens that were mechanically roughened and cleaned with solvents prior to bonding.

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  18. Pulsed laser ablation of pepsin on an inorganic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicco, N.; Lopizzo, T.; Marotta, V.; Morone, A.; Verrastro, M.; Viggiano, V.

    2009-03-01

    Pressed pepsin pellets used as targets were ablated with the pulses of the Nd-YAG laser. The activity of the pepsin thin layer, deposited on a glass substrate, was successfully detected by analyzing the proteolytic degradation areas on the polyacrylamide gel (PA-gel) copolymerized with albumin from the hen egg white (ovalbumin), used as an enzymatic substrate.

  19. Aluminum nanoparticles production by laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, V.; Udrea, C.; Bojan, M.; Luculescu, C.; Armaselu, A.; Apostol, I.

    2011-05-01

    Aluminium nanoparticles were produced by pulsed laser ablation of a sample of pure aluminium situated in distilled water. This technique provides the possibility to generate a large variety of nanoparticles that are free of both surfaceactive substances and counter-ions The sample was irradiated by the focused output of the third harmonics of pulsed nanosecond Nd : YAG laser operating at 10 Hz frequency. The typical thickness of the liquid above the target was 10 mm. In order to select the most efficient material removal conditions the irradiation print on the ablated surface was analyzed as a function of the irradiation parameters (incident laser fluence, irradiation pulses number or irradiation time) with optical microscopy and white light interferometry. The presence of the ablated aluminium nanoparticles in the liquid was evidenced by SEM. For SEM measurement, one drop of solution containing Al nanoparticles was placed on a gold coated silicon substrate and dried. The minimum diameter of nanoparticles estimated by SEM was under 100 nm. The SEM results show also clusters of spherical particles together with well-defined singles. In order to improve the quantity of the ablated material the irradiation cell was mounted on a computer-driven X-Y stage and translated during laser exposure.

  20. Laser Ablation of Materials for Propulsion of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Carruth, Ralph; Campbell, Jonathan; Gray, Perry

    2004-01-01

    A report describes experiments performed as part of a continuing investigation of the feasibility of laser ablation of materials as a means of propulsion for small spacecraft. In each experiment, a specimen of ablative material was mounted on a torsion pendulum and irradiated with a laser pulse having an energy of 5 J. The amplitude of the resulting rotation of the torsion pendulum was taken to be an indication of the momentum transferred from the laser beam. Of the ablative materials tested, aluminum foils yielded the smallest rotation amplitudes of the order of 10 degrees. Black coating materials yielded rotation amplitudes of the order of 90 degrees. Samples of silver coated with a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) copolymer yielded the largest rotation amplitudes 6 to 8 full revolutions. The report presents a theory involving heating of a confined plasma followed by escape of the plasma to explain the superior momentum transfer performance of the FEP specimens. It briefly discusses some concepts for optimizing designs of spacecraft engines to maximize the thrust obtainable by exploiting the physical mechanisms of the theory. Also discussed is the use of laser-ablation engines with other types of spacecraft engines.

  1. Laser ablation of GaAs in liquid: the role of laser pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, Angela; Galasso, Agostino; Santagata, Antonio; Teghil, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanoparticles has attracted wide scientific and technological interest due to the possibility of tuning the GaAs NP (nanoparticle) band gap across the visible spectrum and their consequent use in optoelectronic devices. In recent years, laser ablation in liquid (LAL) has been widely used for the preparation of colloidal solutions of semiconducting and metallic nanoparticles, thanks to its flexibility. With the aim of highlighting the key role played by laser pulse duration on the ablation mechanism and on the properties of the obtained materials, laser ablation of a gallium arsenide target in acetone was performed using laser sources operating in two different temporal regimes: Nd:glass laser (λ   =  527 nm, pulse duration of 250 fs and frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz) and Nd:YAG laser (λ   =  532 nm, pulse duration of 7 ns and frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz). The ablation process was studied following the dynamics of the laser induced shock waves (SWs) and cavitation bubbles (CBs) by fast shadowgraphy, showing that CB dimension and lifetime is related to the laser pulse length. A characterization of the obtained materials by TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and microRaman spectroscopy have shown that quite spherical gallium oxide/GaAs nanoparticles can be obtained by nanosecond laser ablation. On the other hand, pure polycrystalline GaAs nanoparticles can be produced by using an ultrashort laser source.

  2. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of thin gold film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, K.; Tan, B.; Ngoi, B. K. A.

    2002-04-01

    Laser micromachining on 1000 nm-thick gold film using femtosecond laser has been studied. The laser pulses that are used for this study are 400 nm in central wavelength, 150 fs in pulse duration, and the repetition rate is 1 kHz. Plano-concave lens with a focal length of 19 mm focuses the laser beam into a spot of 3 μm (1/ e2 diameter). The sample was translated at a linear speed of 400 μm/ s during machining. Grooves were cut on gold thin film with laser pulses of various energies. The ablation depths were measured and plotted. There are two ablation regimes. In the first regime, the cutting is very shallow and the edges are free of molten material. While in the second regime, molten material appears and the cutting edges are contaminated. The results suggest that clean and precise microstructuring can be achieved with femtosecond pulsed laser by controlling the pulse energy in the first ablation regime.

  3. Picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Kar, Ajoy K.; Khabbaz, Marouan

    1996-12-01

    In this study, the interaction of picosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser radiation with human dental tissue was investigated experimentally, as this unexplored field is expected to be a potential alternative in powerful laser processing of biomedical structures. Dentin ablation rate experiments were performed by using teeth sections of different thickness. Dental tissue samples were irradiated in air with i) a regenerative amplifier laser at 1064 nm, pulse duration 110 ps, ii) the second harmonic laser at 532 nm, pulse duration 100 ps, and iii) a picosecond tunable dye amplifier at 595 nm, pulse width 800 fs. In all the experiments the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The ablation rate per pulse at different energy fluence settings was calculated by measuring the time needed for the perforation of the whole dental sample thickness. Short laser pulses can confine thermal energy within the optical zone, which maximizes photothermal and photomechanical mechanisms of interaction. Tissue ablation rates were found to be comparable to or better than other nanosecond lasers, and left smooth surfaces, free of thermal damage.

  4. Thermal Ablation of Colorectal Lung Metastases: Retrospective Comparison Among Laser-Induced Thermotherapy, Radiofrequency Ablation, and Microwave Ablation.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Eckert, Romina; Naguib, Nagy N N; Beeres, Martin; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate local tumor control, time to tumor progression, and survival rates among patients with lung metastatic colorectal cancer who have undergone ablation therapy performed using laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), or microwave ablation (MWA). Data for this retrospective study were collected from 231 CT-guided ablation sessions performed for 109 patients (71 men and 38 women; mean [± SD] age, 68.6 ± 11.2 years; range, 34-94 years) from May 2000 to May 2014. Twenty-one patients underwent LITT (31 ablations), 41 patients underwent RFA (75 ablations), and 47 patients underwent MWA (125 ablations). CT scans were acquired 24 hours after each therapy session and at follow-up visits occurring at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after ablation. Survival rates were calculated from the time of the first ablation session, with the use of Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests. Changes in the volume of the ablated lesions were measured using the Kruskal-Wallis method. Local tumor control was achieved in 17 of 25 lesions (68.0%) treated with LITT, 45 of 65 lesions (69.2%) treated with RFA, and 91 of 103 lesions (88.3%) treated with MWA. Statistically significant differences were noted when MWA was compared with LITT at 18 months after ablation (p = 0.01) and when MWA was compared with RFA at 6 months (p = 0.004) and 18 months (p = 0.01) after ablation. The overall median time to local tumor progression was 7.6 months. The median time to local tumor progression was 10.4 months for lesions treated with LITT, 7.2 months for lesions treated with RFA, and 7.5 months for lesions treated with MWA, with no statistically significant difference noted. New pulmonary metastases developed in 47.6% of patients treated with LITT, in 51.2% of patients treated with RFA, and in 53.2% of patients treated with MWA. According to the Kaplan-Meier test, median survival was 22.1 months for patients who underwent LITT, 24.2 months

  5. Experimental investigation on colloidal alumina nanoparticles produced by collinear nanosecond double-pulse laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, M. H.; Fattahi, B.; Akbari Jafarabadi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we investigated the effect of inter-pulse delay times on production of colloidal alumina nanoparticles by collinear double pulse laser ablation. In comparison to single pulse laser ablation, collinear double pulse laser ablation with inter-pulse delay times of 5, 10, 15 and 20 ns results in production of colloidal nanoparticles with smaller mean size and lower variance size distribution. In the case of 5 ns inter-pulse delay time, the highest concentration of nanoparticles was obtained due to more rapid cooling time of the plasma as a result of higher rate of nuclei generation than particle growth. The results also showed that the main pulse and the pre-pulse with 5 ns delay time have significant overlap and consequently such condition leads to maximum influence on the ablation.

  6. A review of Thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.

    2011-02-01

    The clinical solid-state Holmium:YAG laser lithotripter (λ=2120 nm) is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates during lithotripsy. The diode-pumped experimental Thulium Fiber Laser (λ=1908 nm) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at high pulse rates. This review compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for Ho:YAG and TFL. Laser lithotripsy complications also include optical fiber bending failure resulting in endoscope damage and low irrigation rates leading to poor visibility. Both problems are related to fiber diameter and limited by Ho:YAG laser multimode spatial beam profile. This study exploits TFL spatial beam profile for higher power transmission through smaller fibers. A short taper is also studied for expanding TFL beam at the distal tip of a small-core fiber. Stone mass loss, stone crater depths, fiber transmission losses, fiber burn-back, irrigation rates, and deflection through a flexible ureteroscope were measured for tapered fiber and compared with conventional fibers. The stone ablation threshold for TFL was four times lower than for Ho:YAG. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. TFL beam profile provides higher laser power through smaller fibers than Ho:YAG laser, potentially reducing fiber failure and endoscope damage and allowing greater irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety. Use of a short tapered distal fiber tip also allows expansion of the laser beam, resulting in decreased fiber tip damage compared to conventional fibers, without compromising fiber bending, stone ablation efficiency, or irrigation rates.

  7. Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Johannes; Trebin, Hans-Rainer; Kiselev, Alexander; Rapp, Dennis-Michael

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The method was combined with a two-temperature model to describe the interaction between the laser beam, the electrons, and the atoms. As a first step, electronic parameters for the alloys had to be found and the model developed originally for pure metals had to be generalized to multilayers. The modifications were verified by computing melting depths and ablation thresholds for pure Al and Ni. Here known data could be reproduced. The improved model was applied to the alloys Al_3Ni, AlNi and AlNi_3. While melting depths and ablation thresholds for AlNi behave unspectacular, sharp drops at high fluences are observed for Al_3Ni and AlNi_3. In both cases, the reason is a change in ablation mechanism from phase explosion to vaporization. Furthermore, a phase transition occurs in Al_3Ni. Finally, Al layers of various thicknesses on a Ni substrate have been simulated. Above threshold, 8 nm Al films are ablated as a whole while 24 nm Al films are only partially removed. Below threshold, alloying with a mixture gradient has been observed in the thin layer system.

  8. 308-nm excimer laser ablation of human cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    The XeCl excimer laser was investigated as an ablating tool for human fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Quantitative measurements were made of tissue ablation rates as a function of fluence in meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage. A force of 1.47 Newtons was applied to an 800 micrometers fiber with the laser delivering a range of fluences (40 to 190 mj/mm2) firing at a frequency of 5 Hz. To assess the effect of repetition rate on ablation rate, a set of measurements was made at a constant fluence of 60 mj/mm2, with the repetition rate varying from 10 to 40 Hz. Histologic and morphometric analysis was performed using light microscopy. The results of these studies revealed that the ablation rate was directly proportional to fluence over the range tested. Fibrocartilage was ablated at a rate 2.56 times faster than hyaline cartilage at the maximum fluence tested. Repetition rate had no effect on the penetration per pulse. Adjacent tissue damage was noted to be minimal (10 - 70 micrometers ).

  9. Picosecond laser ablation of nickel-based superalloy C263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Perrie, W.; Cheng, J.; French, P.; Sharp, M.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.

    2010-02-01

    Picosecond laser (10.4 ps, 1064 nm) ablation of the nickel-based superalloy C263 is investigated at different pulse repetition rates (5, 10, 20, and 50 kHz). The two ablation regimes corresponding to ablation dominated by the optical penetration depth at low fluences and of the electron thermal diffusion length at high fluences are clearly identified from the change of the surface morphology of single pulse ablated craters (dimples) with fluence. The two corresponding thresholds were measured as F {th(D1)/1}=0.68±0.02 J/cm2 and F {th(D2)/1}=2.64±0.27 J/cm2 from data of the crater diameters D 1,2 versus peak fluence. The surface morphology of macroscopic areas processed with a scanning laser beam at different fluences is characterised by ripples at low fluences. As the fluence increases, randomly distributed areas among the ripples are formed which appear featureless due to melting and joining of the ripples while at high fluences the whole irradiated surface becomes grainy due to melting, splashing of the melt and subsequent resolidification. The throughput of ablation becomes maximal when machining at high pulse repetition rates and with a relatively low fluence, while at the same time the surface roughness is kept low.

  10. Modeling of multi-burst mode pico-second laser ablation for improved material removal rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with the unique phenomena occurring during the multi-burst mode picosecond (ps) laser ablation of metals through modeling and experimental studies. The two-temperature model (TTM) is used and expanded to calculate the ablation depth in the multi-burst mode. A nonlinear increment of ablation volume is found during the multi-burst laser ablation. The deactivation of ablated material and the application of temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling are demonstrated to be important to provide reliable results. The simulation results based on this expanded laser ablation model are experimentally validated. A significant increase of ablation rate is found in the multi-burst mode, compared with the single-pulse mode under the same total fluence. This numerical model provides a physical perspective into the energy transport process during multi-burst laser ablation and can be used to study the pulse-to-pulse separation time effect on the ablation rate.

  11. Photomechanical ablation of biological tissue induced by focused femtosecond laser and its application for acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Ohta, Mika; Ito, Akihiko; Takaoka, Yutaka

    2013-03-01

    Photomechanical laser ablation due to focused femtosecond laser irradiation was induced on the hind legs of living mice, and its clinical influence on muscle cell proliferation was investigated via histological examination and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis to examine the expression of the gene encoding myostatin, which is a growth repressor in muscle satellite cells. The histological examination suggested that damage of the tissue due to the femtosecond laser irradiation was localized on epidermis and dermis and hardly induced in the muscle tissue below. On the other hand, gene expression of the myostatin of muscle tissue after laser irradiation was suppressed. The suppression of myostatin expression facilitates the proliferation of muscle cells, because myostatin is a growth repressor in muscle satellite cells. On the basis of these results, we recognize the potential of the femtosecond laser as a tool for noncontact, high-throughput acupuncture in the treatment of muscle disease.

  12. Near-infrared laser ablation of poly tetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) sensitized by nanoenergetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yanqiang; Wang Shufeng; Sun Zhaoyong; Dlott, Dana D.

    2004-08-30

    Laser ablation of Teflon doped with size-selected (30-250 nm) Al nanoparticles is studied. Unlike pure Teflon, which requires a vacuum-ultraviolet or femtosecond excimer laser for ablation, this sensitized Teflon can be ablated with a near-infrared laser. Using 100 ps duration pulses, near-infrared ablation thresholds are lower by about a factor of 10 from excimer ablation of pure Teflon. A mechanism is discussed that involves Teflon decomposition by spherical shock fronts originating at each irradiated nanoparticle. Studies of the distance dependence of this process as a function of particle diameter and oxide layer thickness suggest ways of optimizing the ablation process.

  13. Nanoparticle formation in the expansion process of a laser ablated plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiya, T.; Umezu, I.; Yaga, M.; Han, M.

    2007-04-01

    In the present article, we describe the process of nanoparticle formation during pulsed laser ablation in an inert gas atmosphere. We investigated the interaction between laser ablated plumes and shock waves using one dimensional Eulerian fluid dynamics equations combined with a rate equation relating to a classical nucleation model of supersaturated vapors. The initial values for the plume immediately after laser irradiation onto a silicon target were calculated based on stochastic thermodynamics, which was first used by Houle et al. We found a certain case wherein the rate of nanoparticle formation becomes higher when a reflected shock wave passes through the plume. In that particular case, mono-dispersed nanoparticles can be generated by carrying out nucleation and nanoparticle growth as separate processes.

  14. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E{sub abl} normalized to the cohesion energy, {epsilon}{sub abl}=E{sub abl}/E{sub coh}, are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with {+-}30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} means that for metals the melting threshold {epsilon}{sub m} is low, {epsilon}{sub m}<{epsilon}{sub abl}, while for LJ it is high, {epsilon}{sub m}>{epsilon}{sub abl}. This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in {epsilon}{sub abl}, metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation.

  15. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.

  16. Surface Modification of ICF Target Capsules by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Lane C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-06-30

    Topographical modifications of spherical surfaces are imprinted on National Ignition Facility (NIF) target capsules by extending the capabilities of a recently developed full surface (4π) laser ablation and mapping apparatus. The laser ablation method combines the precision, energy density and long reach of a focused laser beam to pre-impose sinusoidal modulations on the outside surface of High Density Carbon (HDC) capsules and the inside surface of Glow Discharge Polymer (GDP) capsules. Sinusoidal modulations described in this paper have sub-micron to 10’s of microns vertical scale and wavelengths as small as 30 μm and as large as 200 μm. The modulated patterns are created by rastering a focused laser fired at discrete capsule surface locations for a specified number of pulses. The computer program developed to create these raster patterns uses inputs such as laser beam intensity profile, the material removal function, the starting surface figure and the desired surface figure. The patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness. Lastly, in this paper, simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces measured using confocal microscopy.

  17. Surface Modification of ICF Target Capsules by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Lane C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-06-30

    Topographical modifications of spherical surfaces are imprinted on National Ignition Facility (NIF) target capsules by extending the capabilities of a recently developed full surface (4π) laser ablation and mapping apparatus. The laser ablation method combines the precision, energy density and long reach of a focused laser beam to pre-impose sinusoidal modulations on the outside surface of High Density Carbon (HDC) capsules and the inside surface of Glow Discharge Polymer (GDP) capsules. Sinusoidal modulations described in this paper have sub-micron to 10’s of microns vertical scale and wavelengths as small as 30 μm and as large as 200 μm. The modulated patterns are created by rastering a focused laser fired at discrete capsule surface locations for a specified number of pulses. The computer program developed to create these raster patterns uses inputs such as laser beam intensity profile, the material removal function, the starting surface figure and the desired surface figure. The patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness. Lastly, in this paper, simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces measured using confocal microscopy.

  18. Surface Modification of ICF Target Capsules by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Lane C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-06-30

    Topographical modifications of spherical surfaces are imprinted on National Ignition Facility (NIF) target capsules by extending the capabilities of a recently developed full surface (4π) laser ablation and mapping apparatus. The laser ablation method combines the precision, energy density and long reach of a focused laser beam to pre-impose sinusoidal modulations on the outside surface of High Density Carbon (HDC) capsules and the inside surface of Glow Discharge Polymer (GDP) capsules. Sinusoidal modulations described in this paper have sub-micron to 10’s of microns vertical scale and wavelengths as small as 30 μm and as large as 200 μm. The modulatedmore » patterns are created by rastering a focused laser fired at discrete capsule surface locations for a specified number of pulses. The computer program developed to create these raster patterns uses inputs such as laser beam intensity profile, the material removal function, the starting surface figure and the desired surface figure. The patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness. Lastly, in this paper, simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces measured using confocal microscopy.« less

  19. Thrust Measurements in Ballistic Pendulum Ablative Laser Propulsion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brazolin, H.; Rodrigues, N. A. S.; Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-28

    This paper describes a setup for thrust measurement in ablative laser propulsion experiments, based on a simple ballistic pendulum associated to an imaging system, which is being assembled at IEAv. A light aluminium pendulum holding samples is placed inside a 100 liters vacuum chamber with two optical windows: the first (in ZnSe) for the laser beam and the second (in fused quartz) for the pendulum visualization. A TEA-CO{sub 2} laser beam is focused to the samples providing ablation and transferring linear moment to the pendulum as a whole. A CCD video camera captures the oscillatory movement of the pendulum and the its trajectory is obtained by image processing. By fitting the trajectory of the pendulum to a dumped sinusoidal curve is possible to obtain the amplitude of the movement which is directly related to the momentum transfered to the sample.

  20. Ultrafast laser ablation of metal films on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallais, L.; Bergeret, E.; Wang, B.; Guerin, M.; Bènevent, E.

    2014-04-01

    For the development of organic electronics on flexible substrates, we study the potentialities of direct laser patterning of conductive films deposited on plastic foils. The materials under study are silver and platinum films (100-nm thick) deposited on Kapton® substrates. The experiments are done using a laser source operating at 1030 nm, 500 fs, under different irradiation conditions: single and multiple pulses at various frequencies. The laser ablation thresholds are measured and the ablation morphologies are analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. The results of these investigations show that photomechanical effects lead to delamination of the film and that depending of the irradiation conditions, incubation or heat accumulation effects can occur. The experimental results are compared to simulations based on the two-temperature model. Particularly we study the heat accumulation effects that can occur in the case of multiple pulses and that are detrimental for plastic substrates.

  1. Preliminary characterization of hard dental tissue ablation with femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    1998-05-01

    Because of low operating speed and excessive collateral damage, lasers have not succeeded in replacing conventional tools in many surgical and dental applications. Recent developments now allow the new generation of amplified ultrashort pulse lasers to operate at high repetition rates and high single pulse energies. A Titanium:sapphire Chirped Pulse Regenerative Amplifier system operating at 1 KHz and 50 fs pulse duration, was used to demonstrate ultrashort pulse ablation of hard and soft tissue. Maximum ablation rates for enamel and dentin were approximately 0.650 micrometers /pulse and 1.2 micrometers /pulse respectively. Temperature measurements at both front and rear surface of a 1 mm dentin and enamel slices showed minimal increases. Scanning electron micrographs clearly show that little thermal damage is generate by the laser system. If an effective delivery system is developed, ultrashort pulse system may offer a viable alternative as a safe, low noise dental tool.

  2. Laser ablation mass spectroscopy of nineteenth century daguerreotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Danel L.; Golovlev, Valerie V.; Gresalfi, Michael J.; Chaney, John A.; Feigerle, Charles S.; Miller, John C.; Romer, Grant; Messier, Paul

    1999-10-01

    Laser desorption mass spectroscopy has been used to characterize both modern and {approx}150-year-old daguerreotypes. Such investigations are a necessary prelude to attempts to clean them of tarnish and other contaminants by laser ablation of the surface layers. Both positive- and negative-ion time-of-flight spectra were obtained following YAG laser ablation/desorption at 1064, 532, and 355 nm. Major peaks obtained from several daguerreotypes reveal expected elements from the substrate (Ag, Cu) as well as the developing (Hg) and gilding (Au) processes. Silver clusters (Ag{sub n}) may reflect surface desorption of molecules or, alternatively, aggregates formed in the ejection process. Silver sulfide molecules observed from old daguerreotypes are the signature of the tarnishing process. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  3. Laser ablation of sub-10 nm silver nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Zinovev, Alexander; Moore, Jerome F.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; ...

    2017-04-13

    Laser ablation of silver nanoparticles (NPs) was studied with laser post-ionization (LPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS). Silver NPs containing ~15 000 Ag atoms (4 nm radius) were deposited by soft landing (energy 3 eV/atom) onto indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass substrates. Laser ablation was performed using frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation at three different wavelengths (371, 401, and 421 nm), whereas for post-ionization, pulses from an F2 laser were used. Laser fluences and time delay dependencies of Ag and In signals were obtained. Using these data, the temperature of the desorption source as well as its time duration weremore » calculated. It was found that the peak temperature of NPs was above their melting point and they cooled down slowly, with temperature decay time of several hundreds of nanoseconds. This anomalous behavior was explained based on a model where the semiconducting ITO substrate is initially transparent to the desorption laser radiation but starts to adsorb it due to the temperature increase arising from heat exchange with NPs. Poor heat conduction in the ITO film creates conditions for long-lived hot spots on the surface and initiates further optical damage of the substrate. No difference in the ablation process due to plasmon resonance was detected, likely due to thermal expansion and melting of NPs during laser irradiation, which then broadens the plasmon absorption band enough to cover all wavelengths used. Here, these results clearly demonstrate that the process of NP interaction with laser radiation is governed not only by initial optical and thermophysical parameters of NPs and the surrounding media, but also by their alteration due to temperature increases during the irradiation process.« less

  4. Ablation of Submicrometer Holes Using an Extreme-Ultraviolet Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossall, Andrew K.; Aslanyan, Valentin; Tallents, Greg J.; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-06-01

    Simulations and experiments are used to study extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser drilling of submicrometer holes. The ablation process is studied with a 2D Eulerian hydrodynamic code that includes bound-free absorption processes relevant to the interaction of EUV lasers with a solid material. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured ablated depths for on-target irradiances of up to 1×10 10 W cm-2 . An increase in the irradiance to 1×10 12 W cm-2 is predicted to ablate material to a depth of 3.8 μ m from a single pulse with a hole diameter 3 to 4 times larger than the focal spot size. The model allows for the simulation of the interaction of a laser pulse with the crater created by a previous shot. Multiple-pulse lower-fluence irradiation configurations under optimized focusing conditions, i.e., approaching the diffraction limit, are shown to be advantageous for applications requiring mesoscale [(100 nm )- (1 μ m ) ] features and a high level of control over the ablation profile.

  5. [Gallbladder ablation with a laser in an animal model].

    PubMed

    Jover Clos, Rafael José; Javurek, Germán Oscar; Alamo, Juan Pablo; Dionisio de Cabalier, María Elisa; Bustos, Héctor Faustino; Gramática, Luis

    2012-02-01

    Attempts to remove the gallbladder by non-surgical means began in the 1980's, by applying chemicals, heat or laser to remove its mucosa and reduce it to an innocuous scar. The aim of this work is to determine whether complete ablation of this organ is possible using total ablation by applying a diode laser. Thirty rabbits were divided into 3 groups of 10 animals. The gallbladder was surgically accessed and a 980 nm diode laser was applied endoluminally using fibre optics until it shrunk. Ethanol was used as a sclerosing agent plus a fibrin tail to seal the gallbladder lumen in one of the control groups, and a physiological solution was used in the rest. The animals were slaughtered at 65 days and the results of the procedure were observed macroscopically and histologically, evaluating the remains of the gallbladder lumen, fibrosis, and areas of re-epithelialisation. Statistical analysis was made using the Fisher test. Eight of the gallbladders treated by laser disappeared leaving a small sub-hepatic scar. There were no complications during or after surgery. The results were successful in only case in the ethanol group, and there was no ablation with physiological solution. The comparison of the results showed a significant positive difference in the group treated with laser compared to those with ethanol plus fibrin tail (P<.0055) and the physiological solution (P<.0007). Ablation of the gallbladder using a diode laser was possible in this experimental model. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Planar laser-driven ablation model for nonlocalized absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmani, F.; Kerdja, T. )

    1991-05-01

    A model for planar laser-driven ablation is presented. Nonlocalized inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of laser energy at a density {ital n}{sub 1}{lt}{ital n}{sub {ital c}} is assumed. A steady-state solution in the conduction zone is joined to a rarefaction wave in the underdense plasma. The calculations relate all steady-state fluid quantities to only the material, absorbed intensity, and laser wavelength. The theory agrees well with results from a computer hydrodynamics code MEDUSA (Comput. Phys. Commun. {bold 7}, 271 (1974)) and experiments.

  7. Next generation Er:YAG fractional ablative laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Vizhanyo, A.; Krammer, P.; Summer, S.; Gross, S.; Bragagna, T.; Böhler, C.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Biosolutions AG presents a portable fractional ablative laser system based on a miniaturized diode pumped Er:YAG laser. The system can operate at repetition rates up to 500 Hz and has an incorporated beam deflection unit. It is smaller, lighter and cost efficient compared to systems based on lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers and incorporates a skin layer detection to guarantee precise control of the microporation process. The pulse parameters enable a variety of applications in dermatology and in general medicine, as demonstrated by first results on transdermal drug delivery of FSH (follicle stimulating hormone).

  8. Isotopic enrichment of Zn particles by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix Pozzi, Marcelo N.; Guidali, Gonzalo; Fernández, Mauricio; Zubillaga, Erica; Rinaldi, Carlos A.

    2017-07-01

    The use of Zn in nuclear reactors reduces the amount of 60Co generated as a consequence of the natural activation of Co. On the other hand, isotopically enriched Zn can be used as a tracer in biological systems. At the present, the enrichment of Zn is obtained using gaseous compounds of the metal by centrifugal force. In this paper, we present a method based on laser ablation of metallic targets of Zn with a Nd-YAG nanosecond laser to produce isotopically enriched Zn particles. Also, the effect of the wavelength irradiation laser on the enrichment factor was studied and a procedure is proposed to collect the different enrichment fractions yield.

  9. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  10. Saturation effects in femtosecond laser ablation of silicon-on-insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hao; Oosten, D. van; Krol, D. M.; Dijkhuis, J. I.

    2011-12-05

    We report a surface morphology study on single-shot submicron features fabricated on silicon on insulator by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses. In the regime just below single-shot ablation threshold nano-tips are formed, whereas in the regime just above single-shot ablation threshold, a saturation in the ablation depth is found. We attribute this saturation by secondary laser absorption in the laser-induced plasma. In this regime, we find excellent agreement between the measured depths and a simple numerical model. When the laser fluence is further increased, a sharp increase in ablation depth is observed accompanied by a roughening of the ablated hole.

  11. Higher Order Chemistry Models in the CFD Simulation of Laser-Ablated Carbon Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greendyke, R. B.; Creel, J. R.; Payne, B. T.; Scott, C. D.

    2005-01-01

    Production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) has taken place for a number of years and by a variety of methods such as laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition, and arc-jet ablation. Yet, little is actually understood about the exact chemical kinetics and processes that occur in SWNT formation. In recent time, NASA Johnson Space Center has devoted a considerable effort to the experimental evaluation of the laser ablation production process for SWNT originally developed at Rice University. To fully understand the nature of the laser ablation process it is necessary to understand the development of the carbon plume dynamics within the laser ablation oven. The present work is a continuation of previous studies into the efforts to model plume dynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The ultimate goal of the work is to improve understanding of the laser ablation process, and through that improved understanding, refine the laser ablation production of SWNT.

  12. Optical properties of tin oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in water: Influence of laser ablation time duration and laser fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Desarkar, Himadri Sankar; Kumbhakar, P. Mitra, A.K.

    2012-11-15

    Colloidal tin oxide nanoparticles are prepared by laser (having a wavelength of 1064 nm) ablation of tin metallic target immersed in pure deionized water. The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence on the size and optical properties of the synthesized nanoparticles are studied. Prepared tin oxide nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The morphology of prepared tin oxide nanoparticles is found to be mostly spherical and with sizes in the nanometric range (mean radius of 3.2 to 7.3 nm). The measured UV-Visible absorption spectra show the presence of absorption peaks in the ultraviolet region. The band gap energy of samples prepared with different laser ablation time duration is calculated and is found to be increased with decrease in size (radius) of the prepared nanoparticles. Photoluminescence emission measurements at room temperature show that all the samples exhibit photoluminescence in the visible region. The peak photoluminescence emission intensity in the sample prepared with 50 min of laser ablation time is 3.5 times larger than that obtained in the sample prepared with 10 min of laser ablation time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles (6.4-14.6 nm) are prepared by laser ablation in liquid technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples are characterized by TEM and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV-Visible absorption spectra exhibit quantum confinement effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples exhibit enhanced photoluminescence emissions in the visible region.

  13. In vitro bioactivity of laser ablation pseudowollastonite coating.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Fernández-Pradas, J M; Serra, P

    2004-05-01

    Pseudowollastonite (psW) coatings on titanium alloys substrates were prepared by laser ablation and immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for different periods in order to investigate the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA)-like formation on their surface. The structure of the coatings before soaking was analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfacial reactions product was examined by thin-film XRD, SEM and transmission electron microscopy at low and high resolution level, both fitted with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Additional changes in ionic concentration, using inductively couple plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, were determined as well as pH right at the psW-coatings/SBF interface using an ion-sensitive field effect transistor. The solution composition changes, increasing the Ca(2+) and Si(4+) concentration and pH as a function of the soaking time while HPO(4)(2-) decreased. The results obtained showed that the coating surfaces were covered by HA-like, which indicated that the psW-coating possesses good bioactivity and also suggested that the mechanism of HA-like layer formation in SBF was similar to that showed in in vitro test by other silica-based materials.

  14. Antibacterial effect of bismuth subsalicylate nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Castañeda, Mariela; Vega-Jiménez, Alejandro L.; Almaguer-Flores, Argelia; Camps, Enrique; Pérez, Mario; Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra; Berea, Edgardo; Rodil, Sandra E.

    2015-11-01

    The antimicrobial properties of bismuth subsalicylate (BSS) nanoparticles against four opportunistic pathogens; E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis were determined. BSS nanoparticles were synthesized by pulse laser ablation of a solid target in distilled water under different conditions. The nanoparticles were characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and absorption spectra and small angle X-ray scattering. The analysis shows that the colloids maintained the BSS structure and presented average particle size between 20 and 60 nm, while the concentration ranges from 95 to 195 mg/L. The antibacterial effect was reported as the inhibition ratio of the bacterial growth after 24 h and the cell viability was measured using the XTT assay. The results showed that the inhibition ratio of E. coli and S. epidermidis was dependant on the NPs size and/or concentration, meanwhile P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were more sensitive to the BSS nanoparticles independently of both the size and the concentration. In general, the BSS colloids with average particle size of 20 nm were the most effective, attaining inhibition ratios >80 %, similar or larger than those obtained with the antibiotic used as control. The results suggest that the BSS colloids could be used as effective antibacterial agents with potential applications in the medical area.

  15. Femtosecond laser for cavity preparation in enamel and dentin: ablation efficiency related factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H.; Li, H.; Sun, YC.; Wang, Y.; Lü, PJ.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of laser fluence (laser energy density), scanning line spacing and ablation depth on the efficiency of a femtosecond laser for three-dimensional ablation of enamel and dentin. A diode-pumped, thin-disk femtosecond laser (wavelength 1025 nm, pulse width 400 fs) was used for the ablation of enamel and dentin. The laser spot was guided in a series of overlapping parallel lines on enamel and dentin surfaces to form a three-dimensional cavity. The depth and volume of the ablated cavity was then measured under a 3D measurement microscope to determine the ablation efficiency. Different values of fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth were used to assess the effects of each variable on ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies for enamel and dentin were maximized at different laser fluences and number of scanning lines and decreased with increases in laser fluence or with increases in scanning line spacing beyond spot diameter or with increases in ablation depth. Laser fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth all significantly affected femtosecond laser ablation efficiency. Use of a reasonable control for each of these parameters will improve future clinical application. PMID:26864679

  16. Femtosecond laser for cavity preparation in enamel and dentin: ablation efficiency related factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Li, H.; Sun, Yc.; Wang, Y.; Lü, Pj.

    2016-02-01

    To study the effects of laser fluence (laser energy density), scanning line spacing and ablation depth on the efficiency of a femtosecond laser for three-dimensional ablation of enamel and dentin. A diode-pumped, thin-disk femtosecond laser (wavelength 1025 nm, pulse width 400 fs) was used for the ablation of enamel and dentin. The laser spot was guided in a series of overlapping parallel lines on enamel and dentin surfaces to form a three-dimensional cavity. The depth and volume of the ablated cavity was then measured under a 3D measurement microscope to determine the ablation efficiency. Different values of fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth were used to assess the effects of each variable on ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies for enamel and dentin were maximized at different laser fluences and number of scanning lines and decreased with increases in laser fluence or with increases in scanning line spacing beyond spot diameter or with increases in ablation depth. Laser fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth all significantly affected femtosecond laser ablation efficiency. Use of a reasonable control for each of these parameters will improve future clinical application.

  17. Laser backwriting process on glass via ablation of metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelo, A.; Nieto, D.; Bao, C.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Pérez, M. V.; Gómez-Reino, C.; López-Gascón, C.; de la Fuente, G. F.

    2007-05-01

    Ablation of metal targets onto pyrex glass substrates, using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser working at 355 nm, was used to study the potential of a laser backwriting process for the fabrication of optical waveguides via an index of refraction change. Metal foils of stainless steel, aluminum, copper, brass and gold have been used as blanks and irradiated by focusing the laser beam through a cylindrical lens under continuous movement in a direction perpendicular to the irradiation. An horizontal setup was found suitable to improve the effect of the plume in the sample. Results were obtained for two different configurations. Transversal profiles were analysed using a contact profilometer, comparing results obtained for the different configurations, traverse speeds and metal targets used. Two ablation regimes were identified, which are related to a critical laser fluence value of 2.7 J/cm 2. Surface micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy are discussed, together with the characteristics of the structures attained, taking into account the optical and thermal properties of the ablated metal blanks.

  18. Excimer laser surface ablation: a review of recent literature.

    PubMed

    O'Brart, David P S

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to review the recently published literature on excimer laser surface ablation procedures, including photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), laser sub-epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK), microkeratome-assisted PRK (epi-LASIK) and trans-epithelial (laser-assisted) PRK, to help elucidate where and how surface ablation may best fit into current refractive surgical practice. The emphasis was on publications within the last three years and included systemic reviews, meta-analyses and randomised controlled trials. Where such evidence did not exist, selective large series cohort studies, case-controlled studies and case series with follow-up preferably greater than six months were examined and included. Refractive and visual outcomes are excellent and comparable to those after LASIK even in complex cases after previous corneal surgery. Indeed, surface ablation combined with corneal collagen cross-linking may be used in selected eyes with biomechanical instability, where LASIK is contraindicated. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that there may be less induction of higher order aberrations with surface techniques. Long-term stability and safety appear to be extremely satisfactory. The literature supports the use of modern excimer laser surface treatments, with outcomes comparable to those after LASIK and evidence of less induction of higher-order aberrations. Follow-up studies at 10 to 20 years indicate excellent stability and safety. © 2013 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2013 Optometrists Association Australia.

  19. Mathematical Modeling of Laser Ablation in Liquids with Applications to Laser Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Conant, R. J.; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Walter, John Bradley

    2002-12-01

    The use of laser ablation as a means of generating ultrasonic waves in liquid metals is studied in this paper. A mathematical model for predicting the onset of ablation is developed, as is a model of the ablation process based on steady state, one-dimensional gas dynamics in which the vapor phase is treated as an ideal gas. The results of this model are then used in a quasi-two-dimensional model of laser ablation that accounts for the spatial distribution of intensity in the laser beam. Model predictions are compared with experiments conducted on liquid mercury and excellent agreement is obtained. Based on these results, a simplified model is developed that shows excellent agreement with both the theory and the experiments.

  20. Laser wavelength effect on nanosecond laser light reflection in ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, O.; de la Cruz May, L.; Mejia, E. B.; Ruz Hernandez, J. A.; Flores Gil, A.

    2016-12-01

    Reflection of nanosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths (1.06 and 0.69 µm) in ablation of titanium in air is studied experimentally. The laser wavelength effect on reflection is essential at low laser fluence values. However, it becomes negligible for laser fluence values by about an order of magnitude higher than the plasma ignition threshold. We speculate that the disappearance of the wavelength effect is explained by counter-acting processes of the laser light absorption in plasma, which increases with laser wavelength, and absorption in the surface layer, which decreases with increasing laser wavelength.

  1. Laser-Ablation (U-Th)/He Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K.; Boyce, J.

    2003-12-01

    Over the past decade, ultraviolet laser microprobes have revolutionized the field of 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. They provide unprecedented information about Ar isotopic zoning in natural crystals, permit high-resolution characterization of Ar diffusion profiles produced during laboratory experiments, and enable targeted dating of multiple generations of minerals in thin section. We have modified the analytical protocols used for 40Ar/39Ar laser microanalysis for use in (U-Th)/He geochronologic studies. Part of the success of the 40Ar/39Ar laser microprobe stems from fact that measurements of Ar isotopic ratios alone are sufficient for the calculation of a date. In contrast, the (U-Th)/He method requires separate analysis of U+Th and 4He. Our method employs two separate laser microprobes for this process. A target mineral grain is placed in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber fitted with a window of appropriate composition to transmit ultraviolet radiation. A focused ArF (193 nm) excimer laser is used to ablate tapered cylindrical pits on the surface of the target. The liberated material is scrubbed with a series of getters in a fashion similar to that used for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and the 4He abundance is determined using a quadrupole mass spectrometer with well-calibrated sensitivity. A key requirement for calculation of the 4He abundance in the target is a precise knowledge of the volume of the ablation pit. This is the principal reason why we employ the ArF excimer for 4He analysis rather than a less-expensive frequency-multiplied Nd-YAG laser; the excimer creates tapered cylindrical pits with extremely reproducible and easily characterized geometry. After 4He analysis, U and Th are measured on the same sample surface using the more familiar technique of laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Our early experiments have been done using a frequency-quintupled Nd-YAG microprobe (213nm), While the need to analyze U+Th and He in separate

  2. Ablative skin resurfacing with a novel microablative CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Gotkin, Robert H; Sarnoff, Deborah S; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Sadick, Neil S; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2009-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin resurfacing has been a mainstay of facial rejuvenation since its introduction in the mid 1990s. Recently, a new generation of fractional or microablative CO2 lasers has been introduced to the marketplace. According to the concept of fractional photothermolysis, these lasers ablate only a fraction of the epidermal and dermal architecture in the treatment area. An array of microscopic thermal wounds is created that ablates the epidermis and dermis within very tiny zones; adjacent to these areas, the epidermis and dermis are spared. This microablative process of laser skin resurfacing has proven safe and effective not only for facial rejuvenation, but elsewhere on the body as well. It is capable of improving wrinkles, acne scars, and other types of atrophic scars and benign pigmented lesions associated with elastotic, sun-damaged skin. Because of the areas of spared epidermis and dermis inherent in a procedure that employs fractional photothermolysis, healing is more rapid compared to fully ablative CO2 laser skin resurfacing and downtime is proportionately reduced. A series of 32 consecutive patients underwent a single laser resurfacing procedure with the a new microablative CO2 laser. All patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months and were asked to complete patient satisfaction questionnaires; a 6 month postoperative photographic evaluation by an independent physician, not involved in the treatment, was also performed. Both sets of data were graded and reported on a quartile scale. Results demonstrated greater than 50% improvement in almost all patients with those undergoing treatment for wrinkles, epidermal pigment or solar elastosis deriving the greatest change for the better (>75%).

  3. Corneal surface morphology following excimer laser ablation with humidified gases.

    PubMed

    Krueger, R R; Campos, M; Wang, X W; Lee, M; McDonnell, P J

    1993-08-01

    To compare the effects of blowing dry (nitrogen or helium) and humidified gases over the corneal surface during photorefractive keratectomy. Excimer laser myopic ablations were performed on porcine eyes (10 per group) using humidified and dry nitrogen and helium gas under ambient conditions. Surface smoothness was quantified with light and electron microscopy. Corneas that were ablated using humidified gas were smooth and equivalent to those ablated under ambient conditions. Dry nitrogen and helium blowing resulted in increased surface irregularity evident on light and electron microscopy (P < .001). The pseudomembranes in the humidified gas and ambient air groups had fewer surface discontinuities than did those in the nonhumdified gas groups and appeared to have a thinner electron-dense surface layer. The blowing of humidified gas during excimer laser corneal ablation produces a smoother surface than does the blowing of dry gas and is comparable to that produced under ambient (no blowing) conditions. Maintaining corneal moisture is important in photorefractive keratectomy. If blowing gas is necessary to remove debris from the surface, the gas should be humidified.

  4. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  5. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation, endovenous radiofrequency ablation and endovenous steam ablation.

    PubMed

    Malskat, W S J; Stokbroekx, M A L; van der Geld, C W M; Nijsten, T E C; van den Bos, R R

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous thermal ablation (EVTA) techniques are very effective for the treatment of varicose veins, but their exact working mechanism is still not well documented. The lack of knowledge of mechanistic properties has led to a variety of EVTA protocols and a commercially driven dissemination of new or modified techniques without robust scientific evidence. The aim of this study is to compare temperature profiles of 980-and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), segmental radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and endovenous steam ablation (EVSA). In an experimental setting, temperature measurements were performed using thermocouples; raw potato was used to mimic a vein wall. Two laser wavelengths (980 and 1,470 nm) were used with tulip-tip fibers and 1,470 nm also with a radial-emitting fiber. Different powers and pullback speeds were used to achieve fluences of 30, 60, and 90 J/cm. For segmental RFA, 1 cycle of 20 s was analyzed. EVSA was performed with two and three pulses of steam per centimeter. Maximum temperature increase, time span of relevant temperature increase, and area under the curve of the time of relevant temperature increase were measured. In all EVLA settings, temperatures increased and decreased rapidly. High fluence is associated with significantly higher temperatures and increased time span of temperature rise. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm EVLA with tulip-tip fibers did not differ significantly. Radial EVLA showed significantly higher maximum temperatures than tulip-tip EVLA. EVSA resulted in mild peak temperatures for longer durations than EVLA. Maximum temperatures with three pulses per centimeter were significantly higher than with two pulses. RFA temperature rises were relatively mild, resulting in a plateau-shaped temperature profile, similar to EVSA. Temperature increase during EVLA is fast with a high-peak temperature for a short time, where EVSA and RFA have longer plateau phases and lower maximum temperatures.

  6. Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-06-07

    Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO{sub 2} lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO{sub 3} at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

  7. Surface nanotexturing of tantalum by laser ablation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A; Barberoglu, M; Zorba, V; Stratakis, E; Fotakis, K

    2009-01-31

    Surface nanotexturing of tantalum by ablation with short laser pulses in water has been studied experimentally using three ablation sources: a neodymium laser with a pulse duration of 350 ps, an excimer laser (248 nm) with a pulse duration of 5 ps and a Ti:sapphire laser with a pulse duration of 180 fs. The morphology of the nanotextured surfaces has been examined using a nanoprofilometer and field emission scanning electron microscope. The results demonstrate that the average size of the hillocks produced on the target surface depends on the laser energy density and is {approx}200 nm at an energy density approaching the laser-melting threshold of tantalum and a pulse duration of 350 ps. Their surface density reaches 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. At a pulse duration of 5 ps, the average hillock size is 60-70 nm. Nanotexturing is accompanied by changes in the absorption spectrum of the tantalum surface in the UV and visible spectral regions. The possible mechanisms of surface nanotexturing and potential applications of this effect are discussed. (nanostructures)

  8. Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 × 104 to 1.7 × 107 K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO2 lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO3 at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

  9. Analysis of fabric materials cut using ultraviolet laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Andrew Yeh, J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ablation technology has widely been applied in the clothing industry in recent years. However, the laser mechanism would affect the quality of fabric contours and its components. Hence, this study examined carbonization and oxidation conditions and contour variation in nonwoven, cotton, and composite leather fabrics cut by using an ultraviolet laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. Processing parameters such as laser power, pulse frequency, scanning speed, and number of pulses per spot were adjusted to investigate component variation of the materials and to determine suitable cutting parameters for the fabrics. The experimental results showed that the weights of the component changed substantially by pulse frequency but slightly by laser power, so pulse frequency of 100 kHz and laser power of 14 W were the approximate parameters for three fabrics for the smaller carbonization and a sufficient energy for rapidly cutting, which the pulse duration of laser system was fixed at 300 μs and laser irradiance was 0.98 J/mm2 simultaneously. In addition, the etiolate phenomenon of nonwoven was reduced, and the component weight of cotton and composite leather was closed to the value of knife-cut fabric as the scanning speed increased. The approximate scanning speed for nonwoven and composite leather was 200 mm/s, and one for cotton was 150 mm/s, respectively. The sharper and firmer edge is obtained by laser ablation mechanism in comparison with traditional knife cutting. Experimental results can serve as the reference for laser cutting in the clothing industry, for rapidly providing smoother patterns with lower carbonization and oxidation edge in the fashion industry.

  10. Laser-ablation-assisted microparticle acceleration for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, V.; Takayama, K.; Ohki, T.; Gopalan, J.

    2005-10-01

    Localized drug delivery with minimal tissue damage is desired in some of the clinical procedures such as gene therapy, treatment of cancer cells, treatment of thrombosis, etc. We present an effective method for delivering drug-coated microparticles using laser ablation on a thin metal foil containing particles. A thin metal foil, with a deposition of a layer of microparticles is subjected to laser ablation on its backface such that a shock wave propagates through the foil. Due to shock wave loading, the surface of the foil containing microparticles is accelerated to very high speeds, ejecting the deposited particles at hypersonic speeds. The ejected particles have sufficient momentum to penetrate soft body tissues, and the penetration depth observed is sufficient for most of the pharmacological treatments. We have tried delivering 1μm tungsten particles into gelatin models that represent soft tissues, and liver tissues of an experimental rat. Sufficient penetration depths have been observed in these experiments with minimum target damage.

  11. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry: Strontium and its isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xianglei; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Choi, Inhee; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-11-01

    The experimental details are reported of Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) and its application for performing optical isotopic analysis of solid strontium-containing samples in ambient atmospheric air at normal pressure. The LAMIS detection method is described for strontium isotopes from samples of various chemical and isotopic compositions. The results demonstrate spectrally resolved measurements of the three individual 86Sr, 87Sr, and 88Sr isotopes that are quantified using multivariate calibration of spectra. The observed isotopic shifts are consistent with those calculated theoretically. The measured spectra of diatomic oxide and halides of strontium generated in laser ablation plasmas demonstrate the isotopic resolution and capability of LAMIS. In particular, emission spectra of SrO and SrF molecular radicals provided clean and well resolved spectral signatures for the naturally occurring strontium isotopes. A possibility is discussed of using LAMIS of strontium isotopes for radiogenic age determination.

  12. CdTe nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Logothetidis, S.; Perrie, W.; Romani, S.; Potter, R. J.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.; Sharp, M.

    2009-07-20

    Nanoparticle generation by laser ablation of a solid target in a liquid environment is an easy, fast, and 'green' method for a large scale production of nanomaterials with tailored properties. In this letter we report the synthesis of CdTe nanoparticles by femtosecond laser [387 nm, 180 fs, 1 kHz, pulse energy=6 {mu}J (fluence=1.7 J/cm{sup 2})] ablation of the target material. Nanoparticles with diameters from {approx}2 up to {approx}25 nm were observed to be formed in the colloidal solution. Their size distribution follows the log-normal function with a statistical median diameter of {approx_equal}7.1 nm. Their crystal structure is the same as that of the bulk material (cubic zincblende) and they are slightly Cd-rich (Cd:Te percentage ratio {approx}1:0.9). Photoluminescence emission from the produced nanoparticles was detected in the deep red ({approx}652 nm)

  13. Particle size dependent chemistry from laser ablation of brass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyi; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Sam S; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E

    2005-10-15

    The proportion of zinc and copper in particles formed by laser ablation of brass was found to vary with the particle diameter. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis showed that smaller particles were zinc enhanced while larger particles were composed mostly of copper. A model based on condensation of vapor onto large droplets ejected from a melted liquid layer is proposed to describe the change in particle composition versus size.

  14. Comparison of kinetic theory models of laser ablation of carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shusser, Michael

    2010-05-15

    The paper compares the predictions of three-dimensional kinetic theory models of laser ablation of carbon. All the models are based on the moment solution of the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary strong evaporation but use different approximations. Comparison of the model predictions demonstrated that the choice of the particular model has very little influence on the results. The influence of the heat conduction from the gas to the solid phase was also found to be negligible in this problem.

  15. Optical feedback signal for ultrashort laser pulse ablation of tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.-M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Mammini, B.M.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-07-01

    An optical feedback system for controlled precise tissue ablation is discussed. Our setup includes an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL), and a diagnostic system using analysis of either tissue fluorescence or plasma emission luminescence. Current research is focused on discriminating hard and soft tissues such as bone and spinal cord during surgery using either technique. Our experimental observations exhibit considerable spectroscopic contrast between hard and soft tissue, and both techniques offer promise for a practical diagnostic system.

  16. Dynamics of multiple plumes in laser ablation: Modeling of the shielding effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinovik, Igor; Povitsky, Alex

    2006-07-01

    The scattering and absorption of laser radiation by previously ablated plumes in laser ablation (known as the shielding effect) dramatically affect the efficiency of laser ablation process. The ablated plumes consisting of water vapor, droplets, and particles are modeled as a gas-particle equilibrium mixture by solution of the Euler equations combined with the transport equation for the ratio of heat capacities. Shielding effect on the overall ablated mass by multiple plumes is studied for a wide range of concentration of particles in vaporized plumes, various laser repetition rates, scattering, and absorption of laser energy. The shielding phenomenon is studied for short sequences of discrete plumes to focus on the shielding effect of individual plumes. The results of numerical modeling were compared to experimental results of laser-induced water explosive vaporization. Ablation rate was calculated for a single ablated plume and for the sequence of six laser pulses at the repetition rates of 0.33 and 1MHz at which gas dynamics interactions between plumes are strong but plumes have not yet form a continuous jet. A single ablated plume has an initial semispherical shape which transforms into mushroomlike cloud with a thin stem and a ring vortex as it was observed in experiments with water and cornea ablation. For the plume with a given ablated mass, the longer ejection of plume with smaller density produces the plume with smaller shielding capacity. For multiple laser pulses, the velocity of ejected mixture increases from the center of the target to its periphery because of the shielding effect. The ablated mass of the current plume depends on the attenuation of the incident laser beam energy caused by the propagation of laser beam through previously ablated plumes. In the case of laser energy absorption, the ablation rate per pulse exceeds 2-2.5 times the rate obtained for the laser energy scattering.

  17. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Petrov, Todor

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry.

  18. Robots and lasers: the future of cardiac tissue ablation?

    PubMed

    Smith, J Michael

    2006-12-01

    The future of medicine is tied-up in robotics and lasers. We've heard the hype for years, but only in the last 10 years has it actually started to come to fruition that robotic systems are beginning to play a role in surgery. Multiple groups have reported over the past 10 years on increasingly complex cardiac surgical procedures being performed with the aid of robotic systems. With an increasing percentage of atrial fibrillation and with insight that atrial fibrillation results in poor long-term survival, attempts have been made to create a surgical cure. Much work has been done in the past several years to develop a less-invasive surgical option than the standard cut-and-sew Maze to achieve pulmonary vein ablation. Laser is a unique energy source for tissue ablation because it is a form of light. While traditional energy sources focus on applying heat-based elements to the tissue's surface allowing temperature to propagate across the thickness of the tissue laser is an innovative, tissue-specific energy for creating tissue ablation. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Interferometric diagnostic suite for ultrafast laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S. A.; Rodriguez, G.; Taylor, Antoinette J.,; Forsman, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the development of a suite of novel techniques to measure important characteristics in intense ultrashort laser solid target experiments such as critical surface displacement, ablation depth, and plasma characteristics. Measurement of these important characteristics on an ultrafast ({approx}50 fs) time scale is important in understanding the primary event mechanisms in laser ablation of metal targets. Unlike traditional methods that infer these characteristics from spectral power shifts, phase shifts in frequency domain interferometry (FDI) or laser breakthrough studies of multiple shots on bulk materials, these techniques directly measure these characteristics from a single ultrafast heating pulse. These techniques are based on absolute displacement interferometry and nanotopographic applications of wavefront sensors. By applying all these femtosecond time-resolved techniques to a range of materials (Al, Au, and Au on plastic) over a range of pulse energies (10{sup 11} to 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and pulse durations (50 to 700 fs), greater insight into the ablation mechanism and its pulse parameter dependencies can be determined. Comparison of these results with hydrocode software programs also reveals the applicability of hydrocode models.

  20. Microscopic and macroscopic modeling of femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Fokin, Vladimir B.; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation of femtosecond laser ablation of a bulk aluminum target is performed using two complementary approaches. The first method is single-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamics (HD) completed with a two-temperature equation of state (EOS). The second approach is a combination of classical molecular dynamics (MD) and a continuum model of a free electron subsystem. In both methods, an identical and accurate description of optical and transport properties of the electron subsystem is based on wide-range models reproducing effects of electron heat wave propagation, electron-phonon/ion coupling and laser energy absorption on a time-dependent profile of the dielectric function. For simulation of homogeneous nucleation in a metastable liquid phase, a kinetic model of nucleation is implemented in the HD approach. The phase diagrams of the EOS and MD potential are in good agreement that gives opportunity to compare the dynamics of laser ablation obtained by both methods directly. Results of simulation are presented in the range of incident fluences 0.1-20 J/cm2 and match well with experimental findings for an ablation crater depth. The MD accurately reproduces nonequilibrium phase transitions and takes into account surface effects on nanoscale. The HD approach demonstrates good qualitative agreement with the MD method in the dynamics of phase explosion and spallation. Other advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are examined and discussed.

  1. Comparison of soft and hard tissue ablation with sub-ps and ns pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Stuart, B.C.; Celliers, P.M.; Feit, M.D.; Glinsky, M.E.; Heredia, N.J.; Herman, S.; Lane, S.M.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D.L.; Perry, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Chang, T.D.; Neev, J.

    1996-05-01

    Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses offers several unique advantages. The nonlinear energy deposition is insensitive to tissue type, allowing this tool to be used for soft and hard tissue ablation. The localized energy deposition lead to precise ablation depth and minimal collateral damage. This paper reports on efforts to study and demonstrate tissue ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser. Ablation efficiency and extent of collateral damage for 0.3 ps and 1000 ps duration laser pulses are compared. Temperature measurements of the rear surface of a tooth section is also presented.

  2. Cultured human cornea healing process after free-electron-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Joos, Karen M.; Shetlar, Debra J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Thind, Gurpreet K.; Edwards, Glenn S.; O'Day, Denis M.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the healing process in cultured human cornea after infrared Free Electron Laser ablation. Fresh human cadaver cornea was ablated using the Free Electron Laser at the amide II band peak (6.45 micrometers ). The cornea was then cultured in an incubator for 18 days. Haze development within the ablated area was monitored during culture. Histologic sections of the cornea showed complete re-epithelialization of the lased area, and ablation of the underlying Bowman's layer and stroma. The endothelium appeared unaffected. Cultured human corneas may provide useful information regarding the healing process following laser ablation.

  3. {bold {ital In situ}} growth of fatigue-free SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} films by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.; Luo, J.; Lin, W.

    1997-04-01

    {ital In situ} growth of SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) films as a function of Bi concentration in the target, substrate temperature, oxygen pressure, and the thickness of bottom Pt electrode by pulsed laser deposition was studied. The SBT phase was initially formed at a temperature of 500{endash}520{degree}C. The SBT films grown from the stoichiometric target generally showed Bi deficiency. A well-crystallized and stoichiometric SBT film could be grown at a temperature of 550{endash}580{degree}C in 300 mTorr of O{sub 2} from the surplus Bi targets, which showed c-axis preferred orientation. The formation temperature of SrTa{sub 4}O{sub 11} (ST) phase was above 600{degree}C, depending on the Bi concentration in the target. Higher oxygen pressure raised the formation temperatures of the SBT and ST phases and concomitantly enriched the Bi concentration of the SBT films. For the bottom Pt electrode 1200 {Angstrom} thick the voids were not observed in the SBT overlayer until the deposition temperatures were above 590{degree}C. Annealing at temperatures above 700{degree}C in an atmosphere of O{sub 2} was required to improve the contact between Pt electrode and the SBT film and hence the ferroelectric properties of the SBT film. In the present study, a smooth, stoichiometric and c-axis oriented SBT film, about 350 nm thick, could be grown on Pt(1200 {Angstrom})/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si at a temperature of 550{endash}580{degree}C in 300 mTorr of O{sub 2} from the Bi surplus targets, which showed remnant polarization (P{sub r}) of 3.0{endash}3.5 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and coercive field (E{sub c}) of 30{endash}40 kV/cm at 4 V. No fatigue was observed up to 10{sup 9} switching cycles. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  4. Production of Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles by Laser Ablation in Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Comesaña, R.; Riveiro, A.

    Calcium phosphate nanoparticles represent an important object of investigation in the field of biomaterials due to the new properties obtainable at nanoscale. In this work calcium phosphate nanoparticles are obtained by laser ablation of hydroxyapatite (HA) targets in water and in ambient conditions; on the other hand particles of HA are reduced to nanoscale by laser-induced fracture. The results show that nanometric particles of calcium phosphate can be obtained. The morphology and the composition of the obtained particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HRTEM).

  5. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A. N. Vasilieva, A. V.

    2015-11-17

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 – 6.45 μm, with a generation pulse length of 50 – 150 ns, and pulse energy of ∼ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage.

  6. Properties of zirconia thin films deposited by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Cancea, V. N.; Filipescu, M.; Colceag, D.; Dinescu, M.; Mustaciosu, C.

    2013-11-13

    Zirconia thin films have been deposited by laser ablation of a ceramic ZrO{sub 2} target in vacuum or in oxygen background at 0.01 mbar. The laser beam generated by an ArF laser (λ=193 nm, ν=40 Hz) has been focalized on the target through a spherical lens at an incident angle of 45°. The laser fluence has been established to a value from 2.0 to 3.4 Jcm{sup −2}. A silicon (100) substrate has been placed parallel to the target, at a distance of 4 cm, and subsequently has been heated to temperatures ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. Thin films morphology has been characterized by atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Biocompatibility of these thin films has been assessed by studying the cell attachment of L929 mouse fibroblasts.

  7. Direct measurement method of specific impulse for pulse laser ablation micro-propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijing; Jin, Xing; Chang, Hao

    2017-05-01

    Laser ablation micro-propulsion technology is the most promising field in laser propulsion. The specific impulse is the important evaluate indicator of the micro propulsion performance. It represents the impulse generation by consuming unit weight of the working medium. Its accurate measurement can not only help to analyze the mechanism of laser ablation matter, but also help the design of micro laser ablation thruster. This paper presents a measurement method, which can not only obtain the impulse by single pulsed laser ablation the working medium, but also measure the ablation mass, which can directly measure the specific impulse. The method is based on the model of torsion pendulum in vertical direction movement, which is the direction of impulse by pulsed laser ablation and the gravitation direction caused by the loss of the ablation mass, to obtain the corresponding impulse and ablative weight. The paper deduced the measuring principle, pointed out the error and analysed the design principle of the torsion balance, the results show that, according to the torsion angle change due to the impulse by pulsed laser ablation and the mass loss by laser ablation, the maximum angle can be used to calculate the impulse and the stable rotation angle can be used to calculate the loss weight when the torsion period is much greater than four times the width of a single pulse.

  8. Efficient Laser Ablation - Project AOARD 044033

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-20

    heating with moderate amount of average laser power. It can be concluded that use of porous plate for feeding liquid propellant is possible. Several...uses a porous material. A basic characteristics of the principle was investigated and described in the second part of the report. Liquid...experimental setup shown in Figure 22. 20 Figure 22 Experimental setup for porous material characterization Four kinds of liquid, diethyl ether

  9. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C.; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process. PMID:25657872

  10. Fractionated ablative carbon dioxide laser for the treatment of rhinophyma.

    PubMed

    Serowka, Kathryn L; Saedi, Nazanin; Dover, Jeffrey S; Zachary, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    Rhinophyma is a progressive and disfiguring proliferative disorder of the nose, which is related to chronic rosacea. Many different treatment modalities have been utilized both alone and in combination including: loop cautery, CO2 laser, argon laser, dermabrasion, cryotherapy, radiotherapy, full-thickness excision, skin graft, flap reconstruction, and cold scalpel. CO2 resurfacing has been considered first line therapy but is often associated with a shiny, scarred appearance, with patulous pores, and with loss of pigmentation. We report a technique using aggressive parameters with the fractionated ablative CO2 laser, resulting in improvement of appearance with very few complications. Five patients who presented with rhinophyma of varying degrees were treated with a series of fractional ablative CO2 laser treatments (Fraxel re:Pair, Solta Medical, Hayward, CA). These patients were treated with settings of up to 70 mJ, 70% density and 16-18 passes. All patients received HSV prophylaxis using either acyclovir 400 mg TID or valacyclovir 500 mg BID. Patients were rendered anesthetic by 1% lidocaine and epinephrine regional perinasal nerve block. All of the patients tolerated the procedure well with reepithelialization at days 4-7 and self-limited edema and erythema. Patients with relatively early to moderate signs of rhinophyma proved optimal candidates for this treatment. There were no adverse events. Patients and physicians noted significant improvement and reduction in the rhinophyma without the typical scarring noted with most other treatments. Rhinophyma treated with fractionated ablative CO2 laser using relatively aggressive parameters achieved good cosmetic outcomes in this group of early to moderate cases of rhinophyma, while still retaining the benefits of a fractionated treatment such as faster healing times and fewer adverse events. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Laser ablation of a platinum target in water. III. Laser-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, William T.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    This is the third paper in our series studying the laser-target-liquid interactions occurring in laser ablation in liquids (LAL). Here, laser ablation of a platinum target in pure water at 355nm wavelength is studied as a function of laser energy. We describe three distinct reaction regimes between the ablated target species and water at different laser focusing conditions. At low laser fluence (<10J/cm2), material removal is caused by laser heating of the platinum surface and the primary products are small clusters with a large percentage of platinum atoms in a nonzero oxidation state. At intermediate fluences (10-70J/cm2), platinum nanoparticles are the primary products. Our previous studies demonstrated that in this fluence regime ablation occurs through both thermal vaporization and explosive ejection of molten droplets. In both cases reactivity is small due to the low reactivity of platinum with water. At high fluences (>70J/cm2), we find large, faceted particles that are attributed to the drying of PtOx gels formed by reactive plasma etching of the target. Taken together these results demonstrate that significant tunability in the target-liquid interaction is possible during nanomaterial synthesis by LAL.

  12. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  13. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong; Tang Zhiping

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  14. Atomistic modeling of nanoparticle generation in short pulse laser ablation of thin metal films in water.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Chengping; Shugaev, Maxim V; Zhigilei, Leonid V

    2017-03-01

    Laser ablation in liquids is actively used for generation of clean colloidal nanoparticles with unique shapes and functionalities. The fundamental mechanisms of the laser ablation in liquids and the key processes that control the nanoparticle structure, composition, and size distribution, however, are not yet fully understood. In this paper, we report the results of first atomistic simulations of laser ablation of metal targets in liquid environment. A model combining a coarse-grained representation of the liquid environment (parameterized for water), a fully atomistic description of laser interactions with metal targets, and acoustic impedance matching boundary conditions is developed and applied for simulation of laser ablation of a thin silver film deposited on a silica substrate. The simulations, performed at two laser fluences in the regime of phase explosion, predict a rapid deceleration of the ejected ablation plume and the formation of a dense superheated molten layer at the water-plume interface. The water in contact with the hot metal layer is brought to the supercritical state and transforms into an expanding low density metal-water mixing region that serves as a precursor for the formation of a cavitation bubble. Two distinct mechanisms of the nanoparticle formation are predicted in the simulations: (1) the nucleation and growth of small (mostly ⩽10nm) nanoparticles in the metal-water mixing region and (2) the formation of larger (tens of nm) nanoparticles through the breakup of the superheated molten metal layer triggered by the emergence of complex morphological features attributed to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the interface between at the superheated metal layer and the supercritical water. The first mechanism is facilitated by the rapid cooling of the growing nanoparticles in the supercritical water environment, resulting in solidification of the nanoparticles located in the upper part of the mixing region on the timescale of nanoseconds

  15. Laser removal of mold growth from paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, C.; Ciofini, D.; Osticioli, I.; Giorgi, R.; Tegli, S.; Siano, S.

    2014-10-01

    The potential of laser ablation in conservation of paper artifacts of cultural interest is under investigation since the second half of nineties. However, the works carried out on the topic are relatively a few as compared with those dedicated to stone, metal and painted artworks. Furthermore, in the latter cases, widespread applications have been successfully carried out, whereas laser cleaning of aged paper is still far from the conservation practice. There are serious risks to produce short- and/or long-term chemical alterations and/or mechanical damages at relatively low fluences. Here, we report a systematic investigation on laser removal of mold growths from prepared and naturally aged paper samples. Fundamental wavelength and second harmonic of QS Nd:YAG laser are tested and compared through optical and spectroscopic characterizations. This allowed defining optimized irradiation conditions and foreseeing further improvements from pulse duration optimization.

  16. On the Feasibility of Depth Profiling of Animal Tissue by Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Milasinovic, Slobodan; Liu, Yaoming; Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Melvin, Blaze M.T.; Gordon, Robert J.; Hanley, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the feasibility of MS depth profiling of animal tissue by ~75 fs, 800 nm laser pulses to expose underlying layers of tissue for subsequent MS analysis. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to analyze phospholipids and proteins from both intact bovine eye lens tissue and tissue ablated by ultrashort laser pulses. Laser desorption postionization (LDPI-MS) with 10.5 eV single photon ionization was also used to analyze cholesterol and other small molecules in the tissue before and after laser ablation. Scanning electron microscopy was applied to examine the ablation patterns in the tissue and estimate the depth of the ablation craters. Ultrashort pulse laser ablation was found able to remove a layer of several tens of micrometers from the surface of eye lens tissue while leaving the underlying tissue relatively undamaged for subsequent MS analysis. MS analysis of cholesterol, phospholipids, peptides, and various unidentified species did not reveal any chemical damage caused by ultrashort pulse laser ablation for analytes smaller than ~6 kDa. However, a drop in intensity of larger protein ions was detected by MALDI-MS following laser ablation. An additional advantage was that ablated tissue displayed up to an order of magnitude higher signal intensities than intact tissue when subsequently analyzed by MS. These results support the use of ultrashort pulse laser ablation in combination with MS analysis to permit depth profiling of animal tissue. PMID:22482364

  17. A study of particle generation during laser ablation with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyi

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  18. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  19. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, Dann J.; Becker, David L.; Beem, William L.; Berry, Tommy C.; Cannon, N. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  20. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  1. Laser ablation of borosilicate glass with high power shaped UV nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Witzendorff, Philipp; Bordin, Andrea; Suttmann, Oliver; Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    The application of thin borosilicate glass as interposer material requires methods for separation and drilling of this material. Laser processing with short and ultra-short laser pulses have proven to enable high quality cuts by either direct ablation or internal glass modification and cleavage. A recently developed high power UV nanosecond laser source allows for pulse shaping of individual laser pulses. Thus, the pulse duration, pulse bursts and the repetition rate can be set individually at a maximum output power of up to 60 W. This opens a completely new process window, which could not be entered with conventional Q-switched pulsed laser sources. In this study, the novel pulsed UV laser system was used to study the laser ablation process on 400 μm thin borosilicate glass at different pulse durations ranging from 2 - 10 ns and a pulse burst with two 10 ns laser pulses with a separation of 10 ns. Single line scan experiments were performed to correlate the process parameters and the laser pulse shape with the ablation depth and cutting edge chipping. Increasing the pulse duration within the single pulse experiments from 2 ns to longer pulse durations led to a moderate increase in ablation depth and a significant increase in chipping. The highest material removal was achieved with the 2x10 ns pulse burst. Experimental data also suggest that chipping could be reduced, while maintaining a high ablation depth by selecting an adequate pulse overlap. We also demonstrate that real-time combination of different pulse patterns during drilling a thin borosilicate glass produced holes with low overall chipping at a high throughput rate.

  2. Ablation of selected conducting layers by fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Ryszard; Tomczyk, Mariusz; Walczak, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Laser Direct Writing (LDW) are used in the manufacture of electronic circuits, pads, and paths in sub millimeter scale. They can also be used in the sensors systems. Ablative laser writing in a thin functional layer of material deposited on the dielectric substrate is one of the LDW methods. Nowadays functional conductive layers are composed from graphene paint or nanosilver paint, indium tin oxide (ITO), AgHTTM and layers containing carbon nanotubes. Creating conducting structures in transparent layers (ITO, AgHT and carbon nanotubes layers) may have special importance e.g. for flexi electronics. The paper presents research on the fabrication of systems of paths and appropriate pattern systems of paths and selected electronic circuits in AgHTTM and ITO layers deposited on glass and polymer substrates. An influence of parameters of ablative fiber laser treatment in nanosecond regime as well as an influence of scanning mode of laser beam on the pattern fidelity and on electrical parameters of a generated circuit was investigated.

  3. Combined fractional ablative and nonablative laser resurfacing treatment: a split-face comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Ross, E Victor

    2013-02-01

    Fractional ablative and nonablative lasers are useful tools for facial rejuvenation; however, ablative lasers require a period of downtime during reepthelialization. A procedure that combines both ablative and nonablative lasers may deliver good cosmetic results and reduce downtime or other side effects of treatment. The purpose of this study was to compare a combined fractional ablative and nonablative laser procedure to ablative-only procedures for facial rejuvenation. A total of 8 subjects in 2 study groups received a single, split-face, facial rejuvenation procedure in this study. In group A, we compared a combined procedure using a fractional nonablative 1,440-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser and a fractional ablative 2,940-nm erbium (Er)-doped YAG laser on one side of the face, and a combined confluent/fractional ablative Er:YAG laser on the other. In group B, we compared the same 1,440/2,940 treatment as group A on one side of the face, and a fractional ablative CO2 laser on the other. Subjects were followed for 3 months to assess side effects and improvement in Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Score and pigmentation. Improvement in wrinkles and pigment were seen with all techniques in both groups, and results were equivalent. Areas treated with combined fractional nonablative and ablative technique demonstrated fewer immediate side effects. Facial rejuvenation using a combination treatment of fractional ablative 2,940 and nonablative 1,440 lasers provides improvement in wrinkles and pigment similar to conservative purely ablative approaches. These purely ablative approaches include the Er:YAG laser used in a sequential confluent fractional manner, or fractional CO2 laser alone. Reduced side effects make the combined procedure an attractive option for facial rejuvenation.

  4. Preparation of nanofluids using laser ablation in liquid technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; Soong, Yee

    2007-06-01

    In this work we report some results on thermal and transport properties of Ag-di water and Al-di water nanofluids that were prepared using Nd:yag laser to ablate Ag and Al in deionized water. The produced nanofluids were characterized using UV-VIS spectroscopy and TEM analysis. Our results on the UV-VIS spectra of the generated nanofluids demonstrated that using laser ablation in liquid we could generate stable colloids containing well-dispersed nanosized particles without use of any dispersants or surface reactive reagents. For Ag-di water nanofluids, the particles were spherical and the majority of the particles were in the 9 – 21 nm range with some big ones 23 - 26nm in size. The results on Al showed that the amplitude of the UV-VIS absorption spectra of Al-di water changed with time indicating that the ablated Al species reacts with water to yield an amorphous gel that transforms to the crystallized aluminum hydroxides with different shapes and sizes. The shapes were fibrous, triangular, rectangular, spherical shapes and joining of two pieces of triangles. In fact, these triangular and rectangular shapes were indeed pyramidal structures and hexagonal prisms, respectively.

  5. Soft x-ray laser ablation of metals and dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.; Ishino, M.; Inogamov, N.; Zhakhovsky, V.; Skobelev, I.; Hasegawa, N.; Nishikino, M.; Kando, M.; Kodama, R.; Kawachi, T.

    2017-05-01

    We present an overview of our systematic studies of the surface modifications resulting from the interactions of both single and multiple picosecond soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses with materials, such as gold (Au), copper (Cu), aluminum (Al), and lithium fluoride (LiF). We show experimentally the possibility of the precise nanometer size structures ( 10-40 nm) formation on their surfaces by ultra-low ( 10-30 mJ/cm2 ) fluencies of single picosecond SXRL pulse. Comparison experimental results with the atomistic model of ablation, which was developed for the single SXRL shot interaction with dielectrics and metals, is provided. Theoretical description of surface nanostructures is considered and is shown that such structures are formed after laser illumination in a process of mechanical spallation of ultrathin surface layer of molten metal. Spallation is accompanied by a strong foaming of melt, breaking of foam, and freezing of foam remnants. Those remnants form chaotic nanostructures, which are observed in experiments. Our measurements show that electron temperature of matter under irradiation of SXRL was lower than 1 eV. The model calculation also predicts that the ablation induced by the SXRL can create the significant low electron temperature. Our results demonstrate that tensile stress created in LiF and metals by short SXRL pulse can produce spallative ablation of target even for drastically small fluencies, which open new opportunities for material nano processing.

  6. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, Roger Alan

    1993-01-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining λ°; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  7. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  8. Investigation of excimer laser ablation threshold of polymers using a microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Jörg; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2002-09-01

    KrF excimer laser ablation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyimide (PI) and polycarbonate (PC) in air was studied by an in situ monitoring technique using a microphone. The microphone signal generated by a short acoustic pulse represented the etch rate of laser ablation depending on the laser fluence, i.e., the ablation "strength". From a linear relationship between the microphone output voltage and the laser fluence, the single-pulse ablation thresholds were found to be 30 mJ cm -2 for PET, 37 mJ cm -2 for PI and 51 mJ cm -2 for PC (20-pulses threshold). The ablation thresholds of PET and PI were not influenced by the number of pulses per spot, while PC showed an incubation phenomenon. A microphone technique provides a simple method to determine the excimer laser ablation threshold of polymer films.

  9. Laser-induced back-ablation of aluminum thin films using picosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK, A B

    1999-05-26

    Experiments were performed to understand laser-induced back-ablation of Al film targets with picosecond laser pulses. Al films deposited on the back surface of BK-7 substrates are ablated by picosecond laser pulses propagating into the Al film through the substrate. The ablated Al plume is transversely probed by a time-delayed, two-color sub-picoseond (500 fs) pulse, and this probe is then used to produce self-referencing interferograms and shadowgraphs of the Al plume in flight. Optical emission from the Al target due to LIBA is directed into a time-integrated grating spectrometer, and a time-integrating CCD camera records images of the Al plume emission. Ablated Al plumes are also redeposited on to receiving substrates. A post-experimental study of the Al target and recollected deposit characteristics was also done using optical microscopy, interferometry, and profilometry. In this high laser intensity regime, laser-induced substrate ionization and damage strongly limits transmitted laser fluence through the substrate above a threshold fluence. The threshold fluence for this ionization-based transmission limit in the substrate is dependent on the duration of the incident pulse. The substrate ionization can be used as a dynamic control of both transmitted spatial pulse profile and ablated Al plume shape. The efficiency of laser energy transfer between the laser pulse incident on the Al film and the ablated Al plume is estimated to be of order 5% and is a weak function of laser pulsewidth. The Al plume is highly directed. Low plume divergence ({theta}{sub divergence} < 5{sup o}) shows the ablated plume temperature to be very low at long time delays ( T << 0.5 eV at delays of 255 ns). Spectroscopic observations and calculations indicate that, in early time (t < 100 ps), the Al film region near the substrate/metal interface is at temperatures of order 0.5 eV. Interferograms of Al plumes produced with 0.1 {micro}m films show these plumes to be of high neutral atom

  10. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

  11. Energy balance in laser ablation of metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.; Bredice, F.

    2005-10-15

    Laser-generated plasma was induced on metallic targets glued to a piezoelectric microphone and placed between the plates of a planar charged capacitor. The plasma generates a temporal redistribution of electric charge on the plates that can easily be measured by a resistor connected to the ground plate; this signal is proportional to the total number of ions removed by breakdown. Both the absorbed and scattered energies were simultaneously monitored by the photoacoustic signal and an energy meter. From these signals it was possible to determine the energy involved in each of the processes. Just above the ablation threshold most of the delivered energy is absorbed and the acoustic signal prevails compared to other contributions. Above this region, the electric signal, which is proportional to the energy involved in the ablation process, becomes dominant.

  12. Lesion Optimization for Laser Ablation: Fluid Evacuation Prior to Laser-Induced Thermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Timothy; Patel, Nitesh V; Feiteiro, Filipe; Danish, Shabbar F; Hanft, Simon

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure for ablating intracranial lesions. The presence of a fluid body can sequester thermal energy generated by the laser catheter, which compromises the performance of MRgLITT, resulting in suboptimal ablation of cystic lesions. We report our use of stereotactic fluid evacuation followed by MRgLITT in 2 patients with cystic brain tumors. This is the first report on lesion optimization by fluid aspiration before MRgLITT. Two cystic tumors in 2 patients were treated. In 1 patient, an external ventricular drain was placed stereotactically to allow drainage of cystic fluid 1 day before laser ablation. In the second patient, a stereotactic biopsy needle was used to aspirate the cystic fluid immediately before laser ablation. The remaining solid portions of the both tumors were ablated using the Visualase system. Both patients were followed clinically and radiologically after the procedures. Stereotactic placement of an external ventricular drain and a biopsy needle both successfully resulted in fluid evacuation. MRgLITT was performed without any complications in both patients after fluid evacuation. Both patients demonstrated clinical and radiologic improvement after the procedure. Cystic fluid evacuation is a promising strategy for optimizing intracranial cystic lesions for MRgLITT. This novel approach may broaden the utility of MRgLITT in the management of various technically demanding lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Controlling the oxidation processes of Zn nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, P.; Messina, F.; Vaccaro, L.; Buscarino, G.; Agnello, S.; Gelardi, F. M.; Cannas, M.

    2016-09-01

    We used online UV-VIS optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra, acquired during and after pulsed laser ablation of a Zinc plate in aqueous solution, to investigate the effect of the laser repetition rate and liquid environment on the oxidation processes of the produced nanoparticles. A transient Zn/ZnO core-shell structure was revealed by the coexistence of an absorption peak around 5.0 eV due to Zn surface plasmon resonance and of an edge at 3.4 eV coming from wurtzite ZnO. The growth kinetics of ZnO at the various repetition rates, selectively probed by the excitonic emission at 3.3 eV, began immediately at the onset of laser ablation and was largely independent of the repetition rate. In addition, we detected an emission at 2.3 eV related to oxygen vacancies, which began to grow after a number of pulses increasing with the used repetition rate. Optical absorption spectra during and after ablation in a mixture of water and ethanol (0%-100%) revealed that the oxidation kinetics of Zn nanoparticles slows down from about 900 s in pure water to at least one week in pure ethanol.

  14. Suppression of melt flows in laser ablation: application to clean laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, Vladimir N.; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    1999-07-01

    It is shown that in laser ablation of materials with large Prandtl numbers (mainly ceramics and polymers) a motion of the melt along the surface caused by the vapour plume pressure is essentially retarded for thin enough melt layers due to the onset of viscous friction. For polymers in nanosecond laser ablation this melt displacement can be obtained to be less than the ablation depth per pulse (which is typically 0.2-1 µm for nanosecond irradiation), when the absorption coefficient, icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/>, and the kinematic viscosity, icons/Journals/Common/nu" ALT="nu" ALIGN="TOP"/>, satisfy the condition icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/>2icons/Journals/Common/nu" ALT="nu" ALIGN="TOP"/>>108 s-1. Thus, clean precise laser ablation for such polymers can be explained simply in terms of the thermal mechanism, without invoking the concept of photochemical decomposition, in terms of absorption coefficient, melt viscosity and pressure of the ablation plume on the irradiated surface. From this point of view, several factors facilitating clean laser ablation in multipulse irradiation are discussed. However, for metals (usually having a very small Prandtl number) the viscous friction has no significant effect on the retardation lateral melt flow to the periphery. The quality of the laser spot border can still be improved by using laser pulses shorter than 1 ps. In this case, in a shallow spot, the alternative (explosive) melt expulsion mechanism becomes predominant, producing material removal mainly transverse to the spot surface. Thus, the lateral (along the surface) component of melt expulsion appears to be strongly suppressed, having no chance to spoil the border of the spot.

  15. Excimer Laser Ablation of Egg Tempera Paints and Varnishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, P. J.; Bordalo, R.; Santos, L. dos; Marques, S. F.; Salgueiredo, E.; Gouveia, H.

    In this work a series of egg tempera paint and varnish systems have been prepared, artificially aged and irradiated with KrF excimer laser at a wavelength of 248 nm. The samples were prepared with pure pigments and selected mixtures. It was found that, for some pigments, the colour changed upon laser irradiation even at low energy densities, below the ablation threshold while for other inorganic pigmented egg temperas the degree of discoloration is very small at moderate fluence of ˜0.30 J cm?2. The varnish systems did not present signs of discoloration. The thickness, superficial roughness and magnitude of the colour changes of the samples were measured. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and UV/visible spectroscopy were used in order to investigate the changes induced by the KrF excimer laser radiation.

  16. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  17. Unsteady motion of laser ablation plume by vortex induced by the expansion of curved shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D. T.; Mori, K.

    2017-02-01

    There are a number of industrial applications of laser ablation in a gas atmosphere. When an intense pulsed laser beam is irradiated on a solid surface in the gas atmosphere, the surface material is ablated and expands into the atmosphere. At the same time, a spherical shock wave is launched by the ablation jet to induce the unsteady flow around the target surface. The ablated materials, luminously working as tracer, exhibit strange unsteady motions depending on the experimental conditions. By using a high-speed video camera (HPV-X2), unsteady motion ablated materials are visualized at the frame rate more than 106 fps, and qualitatively characterized.

  18. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  19. Developments in Laser-Ablation Split-Stream Petrochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylander-Clark, Andrew R.

    2017-04-01

    One of the biggest challenges in assessing the timing and rates of petrogenesis and deformation is having the ability to match the age of a dated mineral to the conditions at which that mineral grew. This is especially challenging for high-temperature chonometers that can grow and remain stable over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The development of the laser-ablation split-stream method has afforded the ability to rapidly aquire chemical and chronologic data that are directly linked; as such, timing and rates of processes are better constrained than before. Several examples are given within: 1) Zircon and monazite from a single, coesite-bearing sample from the Western Gneiss Region in western Norway record the entire 30+ Myr history of metamorphism during Caledonian orogenesis, from intial burial, through ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) conditions, and back to crustal levels. Early monazite ( 425 Ma) contains low concentrations of Sr and HREE, consistent with plagioclase and garnet stability during prograde metamorphism. 420-400 Ma ages from monazite (high Sr, increased Eu/Eu*, low HREE) and zircon (increased Eu/Eu*, low HREE) indicate the timing of HP conditions, and monazite with low Sr and high HREE indicates the breakdown of omphacite and garnet at 390 Ma. 2) Titanite is becoming more widely used as chronometer, primarly because laser ablation has made analysis more feasible. Nevertheless, dates produced from titanite can be difficult to interpret because titanite may alter more easily than zircon and monazite. LASS analyses of titanite, combined with X-ray maps and backscattered electron images provide insight into processes involved in growth, recrystallization and dissolution/reprecipitation, and allow us to better interpret ages and the geologic process that they represent. This study presents recrystallized titanite from metamorphic terranes as well as ocillatory-zoned titanite from igneous rocks, and suggests some possible processes that explain the

  20. Excimer laser ablation of thick SiOx-films: Etch rate measurements and simulation of the ablation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihlemann, J.; Meinertz, J.; Danev, G.

    2012-08-01

    Excimer laser ablation of 4.5 μm thick SiOx-films with x ≈ 1 is investigated at 193 nm, 248 nm, and 308 nm. Strong absorption enables precisely tunable removal depths. The ablation rates correlate with laser penetration depths calculated from low level absorption coefficients. The experimental ablation thresholds are in agreement with numerical simulations on the basis of linear absorption and one-dimensional heat flow. This behaviour is similar to that of strongly UV-absorbing polymers, leading to well controllable micro machining prospects. After laser processing, SiOx can be converted to SiO2, opening a route to laser based fabrication of micro optical components.

  1. Visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) with the prostascope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Stefano; Cremona, M.; Ackaert, K. J.

    1997-12-01

    Introduction: Laser ablation of the prostatic tissue or laser prostatectomy, is used as an alternative method to traditional endoscopic resection of the prostate. The usual side-firing Nd:YAG laser fiber for the treatment of obstructive symptoms has operational difficulties, a high cost and often poor early results. Materials: We describe the laser coagulation of the prostate using a 600-um bare fiber inserted in a modified Albarran bridge which included at the tip, a new gold-plated deflectable reflector. The complete device passes through a 21Fr.rigid cysto- urethroscope. The system and the fiber can be used for several dozen treatments. The dosimetry was 2000 J per 1 cc of prostatic tissue. Methods: VLAP using the prostascope was performed on more than 70 men in one institution, and 150 in a second one, for obstructive symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The parameter included AUA symptom score, flow rate, residual volume and complications. Data were obtained preoperatively and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment. Discussion: According to our data VLAP with this system is a save, minimal invasive and effective treatment. Results are comparable to other non-contact laser devices. As the gold-plated reflector is inexpensive and the standard bare fiber can be used repeatedly, the cost is less than of an usual side-firing laser fiber.

  2. Effects of pulsed CO2 laser in caries selective ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colojoara, Carmen; David, Ion; Marinovici, Mariana

    1995-03-01

    We have evaluated the effect of pulsed carbon dioxide laser in the treatment for deep carious decay. The so called `caries profonda' is still a problem for conservative dentistry. A `Valvfivre' Master 20S carbon dioxide laser was pulsed to determine the effects on dentine and for testing the properties of softened dentine in selective ablation. Laser treatment parameters were from 1 to 2 W, 50 to 150 ms, 200 to 320 Hz. Fifteen human teeth samples were exposed to irradiation: extracted third molar were exposed to CO2 pulsed laser to determine in vitro the effects on pulp morphology. The tissue samples were analyzed histologically and by means of scanning electron microscopy for evidence of thermal damage. Next, we have evaluated the morphologic changes in vivo on 10 cases in patients with deep carious decay. Pulsed infrared lasers are capable of inducing physical and chemical changes in dentine structure. The results showed an artificially sclerosing and micro-hardness on the remaining dentine. CO2 laser can vaporized carious dentine.

  3. Ablation processing of biomedical materials by ultrashort laser pulse ranging from 50 fs through 2 ps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozono, Kazue; Obara, Minoru; Sakuma, Jun

    2003-06-01

    In recent years, femtosecond laser processing of human hard/soft tissues has been studied. Here, we have demonstrated ablation etching of hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is a key component of human tooth and human bone. The human bone is mainly made of hydroxyapatite oriented along the collagen. The micromachining of hydroxyapatite is highly required for orthopedics and dentistry. The important issue is to preserve the chemical property of the ablated surface. If chemical properties of hydroxyapatite change once, the human bone or tooth cannot grow again after laser processing. As for nanosecond laser ablation (for example excimer laser ablation), the relative content of calcium and phosphorus in (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is found to change after laser ablation. We used here pulsewidth tunable output from 50 fs through 2 ps at 820 nm and 1 kpps. We measured calcium spectrum and phosphorus spectrum of the ablated surface of hydroxyapatite by XPS. As a result, the chemical content of calcium and phosphorus is kept unchanged before and after 50-fs - 2-ps laser ablation. We also demonstrated ablation processing of human tooth with Ti:sapphire laser, and precise ablation processing and microstructure fabrication are realized.

  4. Ablation layers to prevent pitting in laser peening

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A

    2016-08-09

    A hybrid ablation layer that comprises a separate under layer is applied to a material to prevent pitting resulting from laser peening. The underlayer adheres to the surface of the workpiece to be peened and does not have bubbles and voids that exceed an acceptable size. One or more overlayers are placed over and in contact with the underlayer. Any bubbles formed under the over layers are insulated from the surface to be peened. The process significantly reduces the incidence of pits on peened surfaces.

  5. New technique using laser ablation blasts into geochemical labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, Paul J.

    Geochemists have long sought a low-cost, reliable instrument for analyzing trace elements in situ. After a quiet start in the mid-1980s, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) has steadily captured the imagination of geochemists all over the world and is now becoming “standard equipment” in the modern geochemical laboratory. In recognition of this phenomenon, a special session on “Analytical methodologies and geochemical applications of LA-ICPMS” was held at the Fall AGU meeting in San Francisco.

  6. Laser ablated hydantoin: A high resolution rotational study.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Elena R; Kolesniková, Lucie; Alonso, José L

    2017-09-28

    Laser ablation techniques coupled with broadband and narrowband Fourier transform microwave spectroscopies have allowed the high resolution rotational study of solid hydantoin, an important target in astrochemistry as a possible precursor of glycine. The complicated hyperfine structure arising from the presence of two (14)N nuclei in non-equivalent positions has been resolved and interpreted in terms of the nuclear quadrupole coupling interactions. The results reported in this work provide a solid base for the interstellar searches of hydantoin in the astrophysical surveys. The values of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been also discussed in terms of the electronic environment around the respective nitrogen atom.

  7. Production and acceleration of ion beams by laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Velardi, L; Siciliano, M V; Delle Side, D; Nassisi, V

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we present a new pulsed laser ablation technique to obtain energetic ion beams. The accelerator we made is a compact device able to extract and accelerate the ionic components of plasma up to 160 keV per charge state. It is composed by a generating chamber containing an expansion chamber used like first electrode. Next, a second electrode connected to ground and a third electrode connected to negative voltage are used. The third electrode is used also as Faraday cup. By the analysis of the ion signals we studied the plume parameters such as TOF accelerated signals, charge state, and divergence.

  8. Fractionated ablative carbon dioxide laser treatment of steatocystoma multiplex.

    PubMed

    Kassira, Sama; Korta, Dorota Z; de Feraudy, Sebastien; Zachary, Christopher B

    2016-11-01

    Steatocystoma multiplex is a well-recognized condition in which subjects develop dermal cysts generally inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, though these can occur sporadically. This case report describes the successful treatment of a 51-year-old woman with steatocystomata limited to the face, who after two treatments with a fractionated ablative carbon dioxide laser remained free of cysts for three years. We conclude that this treatment should be considered as an efficient and effective treatment option for patients with steatocystoma multiplex.

  9. Laser ablation synthesis of gold nanoparticles in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Polizzi, Stefano; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2006-04-13

    Free and functionalized gold nanoparticles are synthesized by laser ablation of a gold metal plate immersed in dimethyl sulfoxide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Functionalized gold nanoparticles are synthesized in a one-step process thanks to the solubility of the ligands in these solvents. It is possible to have significant control of the concentration, aggregation, and size of the particles by varying a few parameters. UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are used for the characterization of the nanoparticles. The Mie model for spherical particles and the Gans model for spheroids allow a fast and reliable interpretation of experimental UV-vis spectra.

  10. In vitro investigation on Ho:YAG laser-assisted bone ablation underwater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Chen, Chuanguo; Chen, Faner; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Liquid-assisted hard tissue ablation by infrared lasers has extensive clinical application. However, detailed studies are still needed to explore the underlying mechanism. In the present study, the dynamic process of bubble evolution induced by Ho:YAG laser under water without and with bone tissue at different thickness layer were studied, as well as its effects on hard tissue ablation. The results showed that the Ho:YAG laser was capable of ablating hard bone tissue effectively in underwater conditions. The penetration of Ho:YAG laser can be significantly increased up to about 4 mm with the assistance of bubble. The hydrokinetic forces associated with the bubble not only contributed to reducing the thermal injury to peripheral tissue, but also enhanced the ablation efficiency and improve the ablation crater morphology. The data also presented some clues to optimal selection of irradiation parameters and provided additional knowledge of the bubble-assisted hard tissue ablation mechanism.

  11. Endovenous Laser Ablation of Incompetent Perforator Veins: A New Technique in Treatment of Chronic Venous Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, Ugur

    2009-09-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of endovenous laser ablation of incompetent perforator veins in a patient with incompetency of the small saphenous vein and multiple perforator veins. Two different methods were used to ablate seven perforator veins with a laser giving 50-60 J/cm energy. Total occlusion was observed in six perforators, and partial ablation in one perforator, at 1-month follow-up. To our knowledge, endovenous laser ablation of incompetent perforator veins is easy and a good therapeutic method.

  12. Thermal ablation of an aluminium film upon absorption of a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bezhanov, S G; Kanavin, A P; Uryupin, S A

    2016-02-28

    We have found the time dependence of the ablation depth of aluminium irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse. It is shown to what extent an increase in the radiation energy flux density leads to an increase in the quasi-stationary value of the ablation depth. By reducing the aluminium film thickness down to one hundred nanometres and less, the ablation depth significantly increases. At the same time, the quasi-stationary value of the ablation depth of a thin film is obtained due to the removal of heat from the focal spot region. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. Ultra-fast movies of thin-film laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P.

    2012-11-01

    Ultra-short-pulse laser irradiation of thin molybdenum films from the glass substrate side initiates an intact Mo disk lift off free from thermal effects. For the investigation of the underlying physical effects, ultra-fast pump-probe microscopy is used to produce stop-motion movies of the single-pulse ablation process, initiated by a 660-fs laser pulse. The ultra-fast dynamics in the femtosecond and picosecond ranges are captured by stroboscopic illumination of the sample with an optically delayed probe pulse of 510-fs duration. The nanosecond and microsecond delay ranges of the probe pulse are covered by an electronically triggered 600-ps laser. Thus, the setup enables an observation of general laser ablation processes from the femtosecond delay range up to the final state. A comparison of time- and space-resolved observations of film and glass substrate side irradiation of a 470-nm molybdenum layer reveals the driving mechanisms of the Mo disk lift off initiated by glass-side irradiation. Observations suggest that a phase explosion generates a liquid-gas mixture in the molybdenum/glass interface about 10 ps after the impact of the pump laser pulse. Then, a shock wave and gas expansion cause the molybdenum layer to bulge, while the enclosed liquid-gas mixture cools and condenses at delay times in the 100-ps range. The bulging continues for approximately 20 ns, when an intact Mo disk shears and lifts off at a velocity of above 70 m/s. As a result, the remaining hole is free from thermal effects.

  14. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: afterthoughts.

    PubMed

    Neumann, H A Martino; van Gemert, Martin J C

    2014-03-01

    Physicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the laser. He should understand what is going on in the varicose vein. On the other hand, the physicist is usually not aware what problems the doctor finds on his road towards improving a new technique. We have tried to bring both languages together in the special on Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation published in this issue of Lasers in Medical Science. The 13 articles include endovenous related clinical (de Roos 2014; Kockaert and Nijsten 2014; van den Bos and Proebstle 2014) and socioeconomical articles (Kelleher et al 2014), the first paper on the molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms (Heger et al 2014), fiber tips (Stokbroekx et al 2014), the future of EVLA (Rabe 2014), a review of EVLA with some important issues for debate (Malskat et al 2014), an excellent paper on transcutaneous laser therapies of spider and small varicose veins (Meesters et al 2014), as well as several scientific modeling articles, varying from a mathematical model of EVLA that includes the carbonized blood layer on the fiber tip (van Ruijven et al 2014) and its application to the simulation of clinical conditions (Poluektova et al 2014) via experimental measurements of temperature profiles in response to EVLA, radiofrequency waves, and steam injections (Malskat et al 2014) to a literature review and novel physics approach of the absorption and particularly scattering properties of whole blood also including the infrared wavelengths used by EVLA (Bosschaart et al 2014). The aim of our afterthoughts, the 14th article in this special, is to try to amalgamate the clinical and physical contents of these contributions, providing the reader with the bridge that overlaps these different backgrounds.

  15. Hyperthermia-enhanced indocyanine green delivery for laser-induced thermal ablation of carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Klressa D; Shafirstein, Gal; Webber, Jessica S; Koonce, Nathan A; Harris, Zachary; Griffin, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Intravenous administration of indocyanine green (ICG) dye can effectively convert near-infrared (NIR) laser light into heat and enhance thermal injury of blood vessels; however, there is no selective uptake of ICG by the tumour compared to the other tissues, which impacts the therapeutic ratio of this strategy unless uptake can be selectively increased in tumour tissue. Here we investigated the use of local hyperthermia prior to intravenous ICG administration to enhance ICG uptake in tumour tissue, thereby enhancing laser thermal ablation of solid tumours. Murine SCK breast or SCCVII head and neck tumours were treated with a 755-nm laser light either alone or with prior intravenous administration of 4 mg/kg ICG and/or local tumour hyperthermia at 42.5 °C for 60 min. Retention of ICG was quantified using a NIR animal imaging system. Treatment effects were assessed by growth delay and histology. ICG accumulation in the heated tumours was 1.23-fold greater on average compared to non-heated tumours, in both models. In SCK tumours, animals receiving either laser irradiation alone or in conjunction with ICG had a 1.86- or 3.91-fold increase in tumour growth delay, respectively. The addition of local hyperthermia before ICG injection resulted in complete regression of SCK tumours. Uptake of ICG increased in SCCVII tumours; however, little change in tumour growth delay was observed. Using local hyperthermia may improve the delivery of ICG to the tumour and thereby increase the extent of laser thermal ablation of smaller superficial malignancies that can be effectively exposed to laser therapy.

  16. Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-05-15

    The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (n{sub e}) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d{sup 10}4d{sup 1} {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}-3d{sup 10}4p{sup 1} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ∼590 nm.

  17. Process and structures for fabrication of solar cells with laser ablation steps to form contact holes

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D; Dennis, Tim; Waldhauer, Ann; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-11-19

    Contact holes of solar cells are formed by laser ablation to accomodate various solar cell designs. Use of a laser to form the contact holes is facilitated by replacing films formed on the diffusion regions with a film that has substantially uniform thickness. Contact holes may be formed to deep diffusion regions to increase the laser ablation process margins. The laser configuration may be tailored to form contact holes through dielectric films of varying thickness.

  18. Multidiagnostic analysis of ultrafast laser ablation of metals with pulse pair irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Wang, X.; O'Connell, G.; Lunney, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Copper targets are irradiated in the ablation regime by pairs of equal, time-delayed collinear laser pulses separated on a timescale going from ≈2 ps to ≈2 ns. The ablation plume is characterized by ion probe diagnostic, fast imaging, and temporally and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The variation in the ablation efficiency with the delay between the pulses is analyzed by measuring the ablation crater profile with a contact profilometer. The second laser pulse modifies the characteristics of the plasma plume produced by the first pulse and the ablation efficiency. The different mechanisms involved in double pulse ultrafast laser ablation are identified and discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in the frame of a simple model of the interaction of the second pulse with the nascent ablation plume produced by the first pulse. This model yields consistent and quantitative agreement with the experimental findings predicting the observed experimental trends of the ablation depth reduction and ion yield increase with the delay between the pulses, as well as the characteristic timescale of the observed changes. The possibility of controlling the characteristics of the plumes produced during ultrafast laser ablation via an efficient coupling of the energy of the second pulse to the various ablation components produced by the first pulse is of particular interest in ultrafast pulsed laser deposition and microprobe analyses of materials.

  19. Approximate theory of highly absorbing polymer ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, N. P.

    1990-04-01

    Surface interference, nonlinearly saturated instability of laser-induced thermodestruction, and subsequent oscillation of absorption mode permit the description of analytical ablation thresholds and depths per pulse of polymers having high absorption at laser wavelengths, e.g., polyimide and poly(ethylene terephtalate). Inverse problem solution for polycarbonate and ablation invariant designing are also realized.

  20. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation:Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2006-05-06

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume.

  1. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  2. Effect of nanosecond pulse laser ablation on the surface morphology of Zr-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunhu; Fu, Jie; Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the ripple patterns formation on the surface of Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (vit1) bulk metallic glass using a nanosecond pulse laser ablation in air with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The strong thermal ablation phenomenon could be observed on vit1 BMG surface at laser energy of 200 mJ as a result of the adhibition of confining overlay. Many periodic ripples had formed on the edge of the ablated area at laser energy of 400 mJ because of the high intensity pulsed laser beam. The underlying mechanism of the periodic ripples formation could be explained by the K-H hydrodynamic instability theory. It had been shown that laser ablation with 600 mJ and 200 pulses results in the formation of many micro-cracks on the ablated area. Further analysis showed that the spatial occupation of the laser ablated area and the spacing between two adjacent ripples increased as the laser energy and the number of incident laser pulses increasing. The surface ripples feature on the edge of ablated area became more obvious with increasing laser pulses, but it was not correlated closely with the laser energies variation.

  3. Heat generation during ablation of porcine skin with erbium:YAG laser vs a novel picosecond infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Nathan; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Mlynarek, Alex M; Wiseman, Paul; Segal, Bernard; Franjic, Kresimir; Krötz, Peter; Böttcher, Arne; Knecht, Rainald; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2013-08-01

    Despite significant advances in surgery, most surgical tools remain basic. Lasers provide a means of precise surgical ablation, but their clinical use has remained limited because of undesired thermal, ionizing, or acoustic stress effects leading to tissue injury. A novel ultrafast, nonionizing, picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) system has recently been developed and is capable, in theory, of ablation with negligible thermal or acoustic stress effects. To measure and compare heat generation by means of thermography during ablation of ex vivo porcine skin by conventional microsecond-pulsed erbium:YAG (Er:YAG) laser and picosecond infrared laser (PIRL). This study was conducted in an optics laboratory and used a pretest-posttest experimental design comparing 2 methods of laser ablation of tissue with each sample acting as its own control. Ex vivo porcine skin was ablated in a 5-mm line pattern with both Er:YAG laser and PIRL at fluence levels marginally above ablation threshold (2 J/cm² and 0.6 J/cm², respectively). Peaks and maxima of skin temperature rises were determined using a thermography camera. Means of peak temperature rises were compared using the paired sample t test. Ablation craters were assessed by means of digital microscopy. RESULTS Mean peak rise in skin surface temperature for the Er:YAG laser and PIRL was 15.0°C and 1.68°C, respectively (P < .001). Maximum peak rise in skin surface temperature was 18.85°C for the Er:YAG laser and 2.05°C for the PIRL. Ablation craters were confirmed on digital microscopy. Picosecond infrared laser ablation results in negligible heat generation, considerably less than Er:YAG laser ablation, which confirms the potential of this novel technology in minimizing undesirable thermal injury associated with lasers currently in clinical use.

  4. Characterization of laser ablation of carbon-doped glycerol at different laser wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Y.; Zhang, S. Q.; Liang, T.; Tang, W. C.; Xiao, K.; Liang, W. F.; Gao, L.; Gao, H.; Xing, J.; Wu, X. W.; Zhang, Z. L.

    2016-12-01

    Laser ablation of carbon-doped glycerol at laser wavelengths of 1064 and 532 nm are characterized in laser plasma propulsion. The coupling coefficient, specific impulse and the plasma luminescence are measured. It is found that the coupling coefficient and the specific impulse are much related to the wavelength and the carbon content. A long wavelength and a high carbon content can enhance the coupling coefficient and specific impulse due to the prolonging coupling time of laser pulse with plasma. However, an optimal propulsion also relates with the un-ionized splashing liquids.

  5. Laser Ablation of Dental Calculus Around 400 nm Using a Ti:Sapphire Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenly, J.; Seka, W.; Rechmann, P.

    2009-10-19

    A Nd:YAG laser-pumped, frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is used for selective ablation of calculus. The laser provides ≤25 mJ at 400 nm (60-ns pulse width, 10-Hz repetition rate). The laser is coupled into an optical multimode fiber coiled around a 4-in.-diam drum to generate a top-hat output intensity profile. With coaxial water cooling, this is ideal for efficient, selective calculus removal. This is in stark contrast with tightly focused Gaussian beams that are energetically inefficient and lead to irreproducible results. Calculus is well ablated at high fluences ≥2 J/cm^2; stalling occurs below this fluence because of photobleaching. Healthy hard tissue is not removed at fluences ≤3 J/cm^2.

  6. Photoselective laser ablation of the prostate: a review of the current 2015 tissue ablation options.

    PubMed

    Tholomier, Côme; Valdivieso, Roger; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Zorn, Kevin C

    2015-10-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is still considered the gold standard to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has gained widespread acceptance as an alternative option requiring preoperative patient selection. Four laser systems are currently in use: holmium, thulium, diode and GreenLight. The goal of this article is to review the physics and the basics behind laser prostatectomies, as well as to present the most current literature concerning the results, advantages, disadvantages and international recommendations for each vaporization procedure. Holmium laser ablation of the prostate (HoLAP) and GreenLight photoselective vaporization of the prostate are an alternative to TURP for small to medium-sized prostates, providing equivalent efficacy and safety. GreenLight is also safe and effective in large-sized prostates and especially beneficial in anti-coagulated individuals compared to TURP. Thulium vaporization of the prostate (ThuVAP) and diode vaporization both require additional randomized trials and long term studies before conclusion is made, despite promising initial results. Diode vaporization provides the best hemostasis overall, but at the cost of increased complication and re-treatment rate, and thus is not recommended except in severely anti-coagulated patients. Laser vaporization is a safe and effective alternative to TURP in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) for carefully selected patients. However, further research is still needed to assess the durability of each technology.

  7. Benign thyroid nodules treatment using percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA).

    PubMed

    Mauri, Giovanni; Cova, Luca; Monaco, Cristian Giuseppe; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Corbetta, Sabrina; Benedini, Stefano; Ambrogi, Federico; Milani, Valentina; Baroli, Alberto; Ierace, Tiziana; Solbiati, Luigi

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the reduction over time of benign thyroid nodules treated using percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by the same equipe. Ninety patients (age 55.6 ± 14.1 years) underwent ablation for benign thyroid nodule causing compression/aesthetic dissatisfaction from 2011. Fifty-nine (age 55.8 ± 14.1 years) underwent RFA and 31 (age 55.2 ± 14.2 years) PLA, ultrasound guided. Technical success, complications, duration of ablation and treatment, energy deployed, volumetric percentage reduction at 1, 6 and 12 months were derived. A regression model for longitudinal measurements was used with random intercept and random slope. Values are expressed as mean ± standard deviation or N (%). Technical success was always obtained. No major complications occurred. Mean ablation time was 30.1 ± 13.8 vs. 13.9 ± 5.9 min (p < .0001) and mean energy deployment was 5422.3 ± 2484.5 J vs. 34 662.7 ± 15 812.3 J in PLA vs. RFA group. Mean volume reduced from 20.3 ± 16.4 ml to 13.17 ± 10.74 ml (42% ± 17% reduction) at 1st month, 8.7 ± 7.4 ml (60% ± 15% reduction) at 6th month and 7.1 ± 7.7 ml (70%% ± 16% reduction) at 12th month, in PLA group, and from 32.7 ± 19.5 ml to 17.2 ± 12.9 ml (51%±15% reduction) at 1st month, 12.8 ± 9.6 ml (64 ± 14% reduction) at 6th month and 9.9 ± 9.2 ml (74% ± 14% reduction) at 12th month in RFA group. No difference in time course of the relative volume reduction between the two techniques was found. RFA and PLA are similarly feasible, safe and effective in treating benign thyroid nodules when performed by the same equipe. RFA is faster than PLA but require significantly higher energy.

  8. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  9. An observation of ablation effect of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin

    2007-02-01

    Because of the unique properties with regard to the absorption in organic tissue, pulsed Er:YAG laser has found most interest for various application in medicine, such as dermatology, dentistry, and cosmetic surgery. However, consensus regarding the optimal parameters for clinical use of this tool has not been reached. In this paper, the laser ablation characteristics of soft tissue by Er:YAG laser irradiation was studied. Porcine skin tissue in vitro was used in the experiment. Laser fluences ranged from 25mJ/mm2 to 200mJ/mm2, repetition rates was 5Hz, spot sizes on the tissue surface was 2mm. The ablation effects were assessed by the means of optical microscope, ablation diameters and depths were measured with reading microscope. It was shown that the ablation of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser was a threshold process. With appropriate choice of irradiation parameters, high quality ablation with clean, sharp cuts following closely the spatial contour of the incident beam can be achieved. The curves of ablation crater diameter and depth versus laser fluence were obtained, then the ablation threshold and ablation yield were calculated subsequently, and the influence of the number of pulses fired into a crater on ablation crater depth was also discussed.

  10. Specifications of nanosecond laser ablation with solid targets, aluminum, silicon rubber, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshedian, Nader

    2017-09-01

    The ablation parameters such as threshold fluence, etch depth, ablation rate and the effect of material targets were investigated under the interaction of laser pulse with low intensity. The parameters of the laser system are: laser pulse energy in the range of 110-140 mJ, wavelength 1064 nm and pulse duration 20 ns. By macroscopic estimation of the outward images of the ablation and data obtained, we can conclude that the photothermal and photoionization processes have more influence for aluminum ablation. In contrast, for polymer samples, from the macroscopic observation of the border pattern at the irradiated spot, and also the data obtained from the experiment results, we deduce that both chemical change due to heating and photochemical dissociation were effective mechanisms of ablation. However, concerning the two polymer samples, apart from considering the same theoretical ablation model, it is conceived that the photomehanical specifications of PMMA are involved in the ablation parameters. The threshold fluence for an ablation rate of 30 laser shots were obtained as 12.4, 24.64, and 11.71 J cm-2, for aluminum, silicon rubber and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) respectively. The ablation rate is exponentially decreased by the laser-shot number, especially for aluminum. Furthermore, the etch depth after 30 laser shots was measured as 180, 630 and 870 μm, for aluminum, silicon rubber and PMMA, respectively.

  11. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Richard L; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (∼10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J∕cm(2), respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern.

  12. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern.

  13. Endometrial ablation using SideFire laser fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Royice B.

    1996-05-01

    The first successful report using the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) Laser to control hypermenorrhea was reported in 1981. Variations on the treatment technique have been attempted to improve the amenorrhea rate. Reports using the Nd:YAG laser with the blanching or non-touch technique seem to result in a better outcome and higher rate of total amenorrhea than using the dragging technique. Due to the report of improved rates of amenorrhea when using the blanching technique and the Nd:YAG laser, a fiber was developed to direct the laser energy at right angles to the axis of the fiber, therefore allowing a total treatment of the entire uterus in a perpendicular fashion. The theoretic benefit of this would be a more complete and predictable destruction of the endometrial lining, avoiding fluid overload by coagulating and sealing of the vessels and lymphatic. After a follow-up of 12 to 36 months, 56 of the 60 patients (93%) who underwent complete endometrial ablation with the SideFireTM technique had excellent results. Total absolute amenorrhea resulted in 50 patients (83%). Contrary to earlier reports, using the rollerball electrode, this procedure technique resulted in no decrease in results in younger patients. In conclusion, this seems to be a reasonable alternative which offers improved results when compared to previously available methods using electrosurgery or the Nd:YAG laser without the use of the SideFireTM device.

  14. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, Andrei; Kasuya, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present results of study interaction of nanosecond EUV laser pulses at wavelength of 46.9 nm with silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo). As a source of laser radiation was used discharge-plasma driver CAPEX (CAPillary EXperiment) based on high current capillary discharge in argon. The laser beam is focused with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer-coated mirror on samples. Experimental study has been performed with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 laser pulses ablation of SiC, W and Mo at various fluence values. Firstly, sample surface modification in the nanosecond time scale have been registered by optical microscope. And the secondly, laser beam footprints on the samples have been analyzed by atomic-force microscope (AFM). This work supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Contract GA14-29772S and by the Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under Contract LG13029.

  15. Picosecond laser ablation of nano-sized WTi thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Gaković, B.; Peruško, D.; Desai, T.; Batani, D.; Čekada, M.; Radak, B.; Trtica, M.

    2009-08-01

    Interaction of an Nd:YAG laser, operating at 532 nm wavelength and pulse duration of 40 ps, with tungsten-titanium (WTi) thin film (thickness, 190 nm) deposited on single silicon (100) substrate was studied. Laser fluences of 10.5 and 13.4 J/cm2 were found to be sufficient for modification of the WTi/silicon target system. The energy absorbed from the Nd:YAG laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following WTi/silicon surface morphological changes were observed: (i) ablation of the thin film during the first laser pulse. The boundary of damage area was relatively sharp after action of one pulse whereas it was quite diffuse after irradiation with more than 10 pulses; (ii) appearance of some nano-structures (e.g., nano-ripples) in the irradiated region; (iii) appearance of the micro-cracking. The process of the laser interaction with WTi/silicon target was accompanied by formation of plasma.

  16. Positioning for Endovenous Laser Ablation: Comparative Study with Thigh Stripping

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Hisao; Yunoki, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Yoshiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yamasawa, Takahiko; Takiuchi, Hiroki; Honda, Takeshi; Kuwada, Noriaki; Kojima, Kenji; Tanemoto, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We performed a comparative study of surgical outcomes and venous functions between endovenous laser ablation with a 980-nm diode laser (EV group) and thigh stripping (ST group). There were no severe complications and initial success rates were 100% in both groups. In the EV group, preoperative symptoms improved in 94.3% of cases, the venous occlusion rate was 98%, and endovenous heat induced thrombosis had occurred in 11.9% (Class 3: 0.7%) at 12 months after the operation. Although comparative study of postoperative venous function by air plethysmography showed significant improvement in both groups, there was less recovery of postoperative venous function in the EV than in the ST group. (This article is a translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2015; 55: 13–20.) PMID:27738455

  17. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  18. Effects of Liquid Medium and Ablation Wavelength on the Properties of Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles Formed by Pulsed-Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    García Guillén, Grisel; Zuñiga Ibarra, Veronica Anahi; Mendivil Palma, Maria Isabel; Krishnan, Bindu; Avellaneda Avellaneda, David; Shaji, Sadasivan

    2017-05-05

    Pulsed-laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) is a green synthesis technique to obtain semiconductor nanomaterials in colloidal form. Herein, cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles were synthesized by the pulsed-laser ablation of a CdS target in different liquid media by using λ=532 and 1064 nm outputs from a pulsed (10 ns, 10 Hz) Nd:YAG laser at different ablation fluence values. The morphology, structure, crystalline phase, elemental composition, optical, and luminescent properties of CdS nanomaterials were analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. By changing the liquid medium and ablation wavelength, CdS nanoparticles with different morphology and size were formed, as demonstrated by using TEM analysis. The crystallinity and chemical states of the ablation products were confirmed by using XRD and XPS analyses. The optical bandgap of the CdS nanoparticles was dependent on the ablation wavelength and the fluence. These nanocolloids presented different green emissions, which implied the presence of several emission centers. CdS nanocolloids in distilled water catalyzed the photocatalytic decay of methylene blue dye under light irradiation from a solar simulator. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Laser ablation with resonance ionization for determination of hydrogen in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Grant A.; McRae, Glenn A.; Green, Lawrence W.

    1993-10-01

    Corrosion and hydrogen ingress in zirconium alloys can lead to hydride blister formation at localized areas and possible delayed hydride cracking. Laser ablation is being investigated in our laboratory as a method to determine the content with the 1.06 μm or 355 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser. The elemental H and D in the ablation plume are detected in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer following photo-ionization via the two-photon resonance near 243 nm. The ablation is accurately described by a simple laser-heating model for fluences below 3 J/cm2 at beam center. Ablation rates were found to range from a few to hundreds of Å per shot, varying exponentially with fluence. Laser ablation depth profiling in thin oxide films has yielded qualitative information about the H distribution. Various surface techniques such as Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and laser profilometry are used to support these conclusions.

  20. Laser Direct Ablation of Indium Tin Oxide Films on Both Sides of Various Substrates.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gi Taek; Kwon, Sang Jik; Han, Jae-Hee; Cho, Eou Sik

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate ablation of indium tin oxide (ITO) films onto both glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates, using a Q-switched diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate laser (Nd:YVO4, λ = 1064 nm) incident on both the front and back sides of the substrate. From scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and depth profile data, ITO patterns that were laser-ablated onto glass from the back side showed a larger abrupt change in the ablated line width than those ablated from the front. However, there were only slight differences in ablated line widths due to the direction of the incident laser beam. We provide a possible explanation in terms of several factors: dispersion of laser beam energy through the substrate, overlapping of each laser beam spot due to scanning speed, and the thickness of glass and PET substrates.

  1. Review of Laser Ablation Process for Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    seem to help the conversion of the carbon from target into vapor phase to improve formation of nanotubes. The use of CW far infrared lasers reduced the need for the oven, at the expense of controlled ablation. Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts (Nickel with Cobalt, Iron, Palladium and Platinum) different buffer gases (e.g. Helium); with different oven temperatures (Room temperature to 1473K); under different flow conditions (1 to 1000 kPa) and even different porosities of the graphite targets. It is to be noted that the original Cobalt and Nickel combination worked best, possibly because of improved carbonization with stable crystalline phases. The mean diameter and yield seemed to increase with increasing oven temperatures. Thermal conductivity of the buffer gas and flow conditions dictate the quality as well as quantity of the SWCNTs. Faster flows, lower pressures and heavier gases seem to increase the yields. This review will attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  2. Skin-tightening effect of fractional lasers: comparison of non-ablative and ablative fractional lasers in animal models.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Ha; Kim, Deok-Woo; Jeong, Taewon

    2012-10-01

    This experimental study was performed to demonstrate the effects of non-ablative fractional laser (NAFL) and ablative fractional laser (AFL). Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the study. Three 2×2-cm-sized squares were tattooed on the abdomen of the animals. Each tattooed square was used for NAFL, AFL and control experiments. The NAFL and AFL treatment were performed with the same total energy of 12,000 mJ cm(-2). The laser treatments consisted of four sessions, with an interval of 3 weeks between sessions. The areas of tattooed skin were serially measured, and skin samples were obtained for histologic examination after 4 months of treatment. NAFL did not cause immediate skin shrinkage, but the size of the NAFL-treated skin was reduced by 4.3% after 4 months. In contrast, AFL caused immediate skin shrinkage (11.5% reduction), and the size was maintained at 9% reduction after 4 months. In histologic examination, the dermal collagen was arranged flat and parallel to the skin surface in the upper dermis, and regenerated collagen fibres were clearly noticed in both NAFL-and AFL-treated skin samples. Immunohistochemical stains showed well-regenerated type I and III collagen fibres. Western blot analysis of skin samples showed that type I/III collagen ratio was not significantly changed after fractional laser treatment. Electron microscopic studies aimed to evaluate the long-term micro-architecture of the collagen fibrils. AFL treatment reduced D-band periodicity by 5.2% and fibril diameter by 14.8%, although there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). Fractional laser treatment shrinks the skin surface area and regenerates collagen. The AFL treatment showed more profound skin changes than NAFL. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Noncontact Er:YAG laser ablation: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dostálová, T; Jelínková, H; Kucerová, H; Krejsa, O; Hamal, K; Kubelka, J; Procházka, S

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of laser ablation in comparison with the classical drilling preparation. For the experiment, the Er:YAG laser drilling machine was used. The system had a laser head, water cooler, and power supply with automatic control. Spot size of 300-350 microns was used for the preparation. Repetition rate of 1-4 Hz, and pulse energies of 100-400 mJ with water spray were chosen. Cavity shape in comparison with classical drill, time of preparation, and influence of cavity shape on filling materials retention in accordance with the U.S. Public Health Service System were used. The evaluation criteria for noncontact Er:YAG ablation were done. The cavity shape is irregular, but spot surface has larger area and microretentive appearance. Caries of enamel and dentin were treated with a noncontact preparation. It was possible to remove the old insufficient fillings, except for amalgam or metal alloys. The average number of pulses was 111.22 (SE 67.57). Vibrations of microexplosions during preparation were felt by patients on 14 cavities; however, nobody felt unpleasant pain. The qualities of filling materials in laser cavities were very stable; however, cavo surface margin discoloration of 82-86% of Alfa rating could be a problem. Changes of the color and anatomic form of the tooth were observed in 4-8%. In comparison with the classical treatment, it could be said that the retention and quality of filling materials is the same or very similar.

  4. Laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas guided by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Heidy; Cordova, Miguel; Nehal, Kishwer; Rossi, Anthony; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Laser ablation offers precise and fast removal of superficial and early nodular types of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Nevertheless, the lack of histological confirmation has been a limitation. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging combined with a contrast agent can offer cellular-level histology-like feedback to detect the presence (or absence) of residual BCC directly on the patient. We conducted an ex vivo bench-top study to provide a set of effective ablation parameters (fluence, number of passes) to remove superficial BCCs while also controlling thermal coagulation post-ablation to allow uptake of contrast agent. The results for an Er:YAG laser (2.9 um and pulse duration 250us) show that with 6 passes of 25 J/cm2, thermal coagulation can be effectively controlled, to allow both the uptake of acetic acid (contrast agent) and detection of residual (or absence) BCCs. Confirmation was provided with histological examination. An initial in vivo study on 35 patients shows that the uptake of contrast agent aluminum chloride) and imaging quality is similar to that observed in the ex vivo study. The detection of the presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was confirmed in 10 wounds with (additional) histology and in 25 lesions with follow-up imaging. Our results indicate that resolution is sufficient but further development and use of appropriate contrast agent are necessary to improve sensitivity and specificity. Advances in RCM technology for imaging of lateral and deep margins directly on the patient may provide less invasive, faster and less expensive image-guided approaches for treatment of BCCs.

  5. Photonic Doppler velocimetry of laser-ablated ultrathin metals.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, A R; Rodriguez, G; Clarke, S A; Thomas, K A

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining velocity information from the interaction of a laser pulse on a metal layer provides insight into the rapid dynamics of material removal and plasma plume physics during ablation. A traditional approach involves using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) on a reflective metal surface. However, when the target is a thin metal layer, the cohesion of the surface is quickly lost resulting in a large spread of particle velocities that cannot be easily resolved by VISAR. This is due to material ejection"confusing" the VISAR measurement surface, effectively washing out the spatial fringe visibility in the VISAR interferometer. A new heterodyne-based optical velocimeter method is the photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). Because PDV tracks motion in a frequency encoded temporal electro-optical signal, velocity information is preserved and allows for multiple velocity components to be recorded simultaneously. The challenge lies in extracting PDV velocity information at short (nanosecond) laser ablation time scales with rapidly varying heterodyne beats by using electronic, optical, and analytical techniques to recover the velocity information from a fleeting signal. Here we show how we have been able to obtain velocity information on the nanosecond time scale and are able to compare it to hydrodynamic simulations. Also, we examine refinements to our PDV system by increasing the bandwidth, utilizing different probes, and sampling different analysis techniques.

  6. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  7. Neutral atomic jet generation by laser ablation of copper targets

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J. B. de; Rodrigues, N. A. S.

    2014-08-15

    This work aimed the obtainment of a neutral atomic jet departing from a plume generated by laser ablation of copper targets. A pair of electrodes together with a transducer pressure sensor was used to study the ablated plume charge composition and also to measure the ion extraction from the plasma plume. The neutral beam was produced with this setup and the relative abundance of neutrals in the plasma was measured, it decreases from 30% to 8% when the laser fluence is varied from 20 J/cm{sup 2} to 32 J/cm{sup 2}. The necessary voltage to completely remove the ions from the plume varied from 10 V to 230 V in the same fluence range. TOF analysis resulted in center of mass velocities between 3.4 and 4.6 km/s, longitudinal temperature in the range from 1 × 10{sup 4} K to 2.4 × 10{sup 4} K and a Mach number of M = 2.36, calculated using purely hydrodynamic expansion approximation.

  8. Photonic Doppler velocimetry of laser-ablated ultrathin metals

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, A. R.; Rodriguez, G.; Clarke, S. A.; Thomas, K. A.

    2007-01-15

    Obtaining velocity information from the interaction of a laser pulse on a metal layer provides insight into the rapid dynamics of material removal and plasma plume physics during ablation. A traditional approach involves using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) on a reflective metal surface. However, when the target is a thin metal layer, the cohesion of the surface is quickly lost resulting in a large spread of particle velocities that cannot be easily resolved by VISAR. This is due to material ejection 'confusing' the VISAR measurement surface, effectively washing out the spatial fringe visibility in the VISAR interferometer. A new heterodyne-based optical velocimeter method is the photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). Because PDV tracks motion in a frequency encoded temporal electro-optical signal, velocity information is preserved and allows for multiple velocity components to be recorded simultaneously. The challenge lies in extracting PDV velocity information at short (nanosecond) laser ablation time scales with rapidly varying heterodyne beats by using electronic, optical, and analytical techniques to recover the velocity information from a fleeting signal. Here we show how we have been able to obtain velocity information on the nanosecond time scale and are able to compare it to hydrodynamic simulations. Also, we examine refinements to our PDV system by increasing the bandwidth, utilizing different probes, and sampling different analysis techniques.

  9. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser.

    PubMed

    Kang, H W; Rizoiu, I; Welch, A J

    2007-12-21

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment.

  10. Laser ablation and high precision patterning of biomaterials and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2010-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOL) is the most promising method for restoring excellent vision in cataract surgery. In addition, multifocal intraocular lenses for good distant and near vision are investigated. Several new materials, techniques and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses in order to improve their optical properties and reduce the diffractive aberrations. As pulsed laser ablation is well established as a universal tool for surface processing of organic polymer materials, this study was focused in using laser ablation with short and ultra short laser pulses for surface modification of PMMA and intraocular lenses, instead of using other conventional techniques. The main advantage of using very short laser pulses, e.g. of ns, ps or fs duration, is that heat diffusion into the polymer material is negligible. As a result high precision patterning of the sample, without thermal damage of the surroundings, becomes possible. In this study, laser ablation was performed using commercially available hydrophobic acrylic IOLs, hydrophilic acrylic IOLs, and PMMA IOLs, with various diopters. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the etched patterns by testing the ablation rate, versus laser energy fluence, at several wavelengths and the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The irradiated polymers have different optical properties, at the applied wavelengths, and therefore, present different ablation behaviour and morphology of the laser ablated crater walls and surrounding surfaces. The experimental results, some theoretical assumptions for mathematical modeling of the relevant ablation mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Experimental study on 800 nm femtosecond laser ablation of fused silica in air and vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shi-zhen; Yao, Cai-zhen; Liao, Wei; Yuan, Xiao-dong; Wang, Tao; Zu, Xiao-tao

    2016-10-01

    Ablation rates of fused silica were studied as a function of femtosecond laser pulse fluences (0.7-41 J/cm2) in air and vacuum. The experiment was conducted by using a Ti:sapphire laser that emits radiation at 800 nm with a pulse width of 35 fs and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The morphology and ablation depth of laser-induced damage crater were evaluated by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ablation rates were calculated from the depth of craters induced by multiple laser pulses. Results showed that two ablation regimes, i.e. non-thermal and thermal ablation co-existed in air and vacuum at low and moderate fluences. A drop of ablation rate was observed at high fluence (higher than 9.5 J/cm2) in air. While in vacuum, the ablation rate increased continuously with the increasing of laser fluence and much higher than that in air. The drop of ablation rate observed at high fluence in air was due to the strong defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air. Furthermore, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), which was determined from the relationship between crater area and the logarithm of laser energy, was found to depend on the number of incident pulses on the same spot, and similar phenomenon was observed in air and vacuum.

  12. Influence of solvent mixture on the ablation rate of iron using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, Alexander; Hoppius, Jan S.; Ostendorf, Andreas; Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrashort pulse laser ablation has become an important tool for material processing. Adding liquids to the process can be beneficial for a reduced debris and heat affected zone width. Another application is the production of ligand-free nanoparticles. By measuring the ablation rate of iron for femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in different solvents and solvent-mixtures, the influence of the solvent properties on the ablation process is studied. The ablation efficiency is quantified by measuring the ablation rate in dependency of the fluence from 0.05 J/cm2 up to 5 J/cm2 in water-ethanol and water-acetone mixtures which are varied in 25 % steps. The ablation rate is significantly influenced by the solvent-mixtures.

  13. Micropillar fabrication on bovine cortical bone by direct-write femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yong C.; Altman, Katrina J.; Farson, Dave F.; Flores, Katharine M.

    2009-11-01

    We investigated fabrication of cylindrical micropillars on bovine cortical bone using direct-write femtosecond laser ablation. The ablation threshold of the material was measured by single-pulse ablation tests, and the incubation coefficient was measured from linear scanned ablation tests. A motion system was programmed to apply multiple layers of concentric rings of pulses to machine pillars of various diameters and heights. The diameter of the top surface of the pillar was found to steadily decrease due to incubation of damage from successive layers of pulses during the machining process. Pillar top diameter was predicted based on a paraxial beam fluence approximation and single-pulse ablation threshold and incubation coefficient measurements. Pillar diameters predicted as successive layers of pulses were applied were well-matched to experiments, confirming that femtosecond laser ablation of the cortical bone was well-modeled by single-pulse ablation threshold measurements and an incubation coefficient.

  14. Morphology of Si nanowires synthesized by high-temperature laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. F.; Wang, N.; Lee, C. S.; Han, X. D.; Bello, I.; Lee, S. T.

    1999-06-01

    Silicon nanowires have been synthesized by laser ablation of Si powder targets at 1200 °C. Transmission electron microscopy study showed that most Si nanowires had smooth surfaces and nearly the same diameter of about 16 nm. Beside the most abundant smooth-surface nanowires, four other forms of nanowires, named spring-shaped, fishbone-shaped, frog-egg-shaped, and necklace-shaped nanowires, were observed. The formation of nanowires into different shapes was explained by the two-step growth model based on the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism.

  15. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  16. Laser Ablation Increases PEM/Catalyst Interfacial Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitacre, Jay; Yalisove, Steve

    2009-01-01

    An investigational method of improving the performance of a fuel cell that contains a polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) is based on the concept of roughening the surface of the PEM, prior to deposition of a thin layer of catalyst, in order to increase the PEM/catalyst interfacial area and thereby increase the degree of utilization of the catalyst. The roughening is done by means of laser ablation under carefully controlled conditions. Next, the roughened membrane surface is coated with the thin layer of catalyst (which is typically platinum), then sandwiched between two electrode/catalyst structures to form a membrane/ele c t - rode assembly. The feasibility of the roughening technique was demonstrated in experiments in which proton-conducting membranes made of a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, protonconducting polymer were ablated by use of femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that when proper combinations of the pulse intensity, pulse-repetition rate, and number of repetitions was chosen, the initially flat, smooth membrane surfaces became roughened to such an extent as to be converted to networks of nodules interconnected by filaments (see Figure 1). In further experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed on a pristine (smooth) membrane and on two laser-roughened membranes after the membranes were coated with platinum on both sides. Some preliminary EIS data were interpreted as showing that notwithstanding the potential for laser-induced damage, the bulk conductivities of the membranes were not diminished in the roughening process. Other preliminary EIS data (see Figure 2) were interpreted as signifying that the surface areas of the laser-roughened membranes were significantly greater than those of the smooth membrane. Moreover, elemental analyses showed that the sulfur-containing molecular groups necessary for proton conduction remained intact, even near the laser-roughened surfaces. These preliminary results can be taken

  17. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water.

    PubMed

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-27

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating-melting-vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process.

  18. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-01

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating-melting-vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process.

  19. 3D photomechanical model of tooth enamel ablation by Er-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.

    2014-02-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) photomechanical model of human tooth enamel ablation is described. It takes into account: the structural peculiarities of enamel, Er-laser beam energy spatial distribution and laser radiation attenuation in the tissue. Dynamics change of enamel coefficient of absorption during ablation is also discussed. We consider the 3D photomechanical model of incomplete removal (modification) of the enamel rods by the pressure of water contained in the enamel pores and heated by laser radiation, and complete removal (ablation) of the enamel rods as result of hydroxyapatite heated by laser radiation and evaporation. Modeling results are in close agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Myocardial tissue ablation by single high-energy laser pulses for ELR and TMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Dirk; Brinkmann, Ralf; Stubbe, Hans-Martin; Birngruber, Reginald

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the ablation sites induced by two different laser and application systems for myocardial laser revascularization. One system used was an 800 W CO2 laser, which is clinically established for transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR). The second system was a self-designed Holmium laser emitting single high energy pulses for the minimal invasive approach of endocardial laser revascularization (ELR), whereby the laser light is transmitted via optical fiber into the left ventricle to ablate the myocardial channels from the inside. The laser energy was applied to Polyacrylamide (PAA) as transparent tissue phantom and in water as blood phantom. The ablation dynamics were investigated by high speed flash photography recording a picture series of a single event. Reperfused ex- vivo porcine hearts were treated to quantify differences in the thermal-mechanical damage ranges by polarization light microscopy. Ablation dynamics in water revealed oscillatory changes of the axial length of the steam bubbles between 3 mm and 12 mm during the CO2 laser pulse. For the Holmium laser pulse a maximal axial and lateral length of 5 mm was observed. The lateral dimensions of the bubbles were maximal 1 mm with the CO2- and 3.5 mm with the Holmium laser system. In PAA bubbles also collapse during the laser pulse which affects the size of the ablated channels. Using 12 J Holmium laser pulses for ablation of PAA, channel depths around 7 mm were found. Single Holmium laser pulses demonstrate ablations comparable in size and thermal- mechanical collateral damage to those achieved with the standard CO2 laser. The results are very encouraging for single pulse ELR and demonstrate the potential of a catheter based minimal invasive procedure for laser heart reperfusion.

  1. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  2. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  3. Shock pressures induced in condensed matter by laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damian C; Tierney, Thomas E; Kopp, Roger A; Gammel, J Tinka

    2004-03-01

    The Trident laser was used to induce shock waves in samples of solid elements, with atomic numbers ranging from Be to Au, using pulses of 527 nm light around 1 ns long with irradiances of the order of 0.1 to 10 PW/m(2). States induced by the resulting ablation process were investigated using laser Doppler velocimetry to measure the velocity history of the opposite surface. By varying the energy in the laser pulse, relations were inferred between the irradiance and the induced pressure. For samples in vacuo, an irradiance constant in time does not produce a constant pressure. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations were used to investigate the relationship between the precise pulse shape and the pressure history. In this regime of time and irradiance, it was possible to reproduce the experimental data to within their uncertainty by including conductivity-dependent deposition of laser energy, heat conduction, gray radiation diffusion, and three temperature hydrodynamics in the treatment of the plasma, with ionizations calculated using the Thomas-Fermi equation. States induced in the solid sample were fairly insensitive to the details of modeling in the plasma, so Hugoniot points may be estimated from experiments of this type given a reasonable model of the plasma. More useful applications include the generation of dynamic loading to investigate compressive strength and phase transitions, and for sample recovery.

  4. Femtosecond laser ablation of cemented carbides: properties and tribological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Gerbig, Y.; Haefke, H.; Bruneau, S.; Hermann, J.; Sentis, M.

    Laser ablation with fs laser pulses was performed in air on cobalt cemented tungsten carbide by means of a Ti : sapphire laser (800 nm, 100 fs). Small and moderate fluences (2, 5, 10 J/cm2) and up to 5×104 pulses per irradiated spot were used to drill holes with aspect ratios up to 10. Cross-section cuts from laser-irradiated samples were produced and they were analysed with optical microscopy and SEM. EDX analyses were carried out on selected zones. Quasi-cylindrical holes were found for 2 J/cm2, whereas for 5 and 10 J/cm2 irregular shapes (lobes, bottoms wider than hole entrances) were found to occur after a given number of incident pulses. Layers with modified structure were evidenced at pore walls. SEM revealed a denser structure, while EDX analyses showed uniform and almost similar contents of W, C, and Co in these layers. As a direct application, patterning of coated WC-Co was carried out with 2 J/cm2 and 100 pulses per pore. The resulted surfaces were tribologically tested and these tests revealed an improved friction and wear behaviour.

  5. Laser ablation of FOX-7: proposed mechanism of decomposition.

    PubMed

    Civis, Martin; Civis, Svatopluk; Sovová, Kristýna; Dryahina, Kseniya; Spanel, Patrik; Kyncl, Martin

    2011-02-01

    A novel high-energy explosive material, FOX-7 (1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene), was studied using a combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). The LIBS technique uses short laser pulses (an ArF excimer laser) as the energy source to convert small quantities of a sample into plasma and to induce the emission of its molecular fragments or atoms. SIFT-MS is a novel method for absolute quantification based on chemical ionization using three reagent ions, with the ability to determine concentrations of trace gases and vapors of volatile organic compounds in real time. SIFT-MS was used to study the release of NO, NO(2), HCN, HONO, HCHO, CH(3)CH(2)OH, and C(2)H(2) after laser ablation of the explosive compound FOX-7 in solid crystalline form. The radiation emitted after excitation was analyzed using a time-resolved UV-vis spectrometer with an ICCD detector. The electronic bands of CN (388 nm), OH (308.4 nm), and NO (237.1 nm) radicals and the atomic lines of C, N, and H were identified.

  6. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  7. Proton extraction by laser ablation of transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Krása, J.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-07-01

    A study on the proton beams extraction from a plasma generated by pulsed laser ablation by targets containing transition metals is presented. The targets used were pure disks of titanium and tantalum and disks of TiH2, obtained by compression of TiH2 powder. The plasma was produced by means of a nanosecond excimer KrF laser operating at low irradiance (109-1010 W/cm2). The proton and ions emission was analyzed by the time-of-flight technique using a Faraday cup as ion collector. Studies on the produced protons and ions at different laser irradiances from 2 to 15 GW/cm2 were performed. The characterization showed that it is possible to obtain good proton fluxes from these targets, up to 1011 proton/pulse. The results obtained are very interesting if compared with those available in literature where proton fluxes per pulse ranging from 108 to 109 by hydride targets were obtained, at the same laser irradiances.

  8. Bromide (Br-) ion-mediated synthesis of anisotropic palladium nanocrystals by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, M. P.; Soni, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    Anisotropic growth of Pd nanoparticles in bromine (Br) containing solution has been studied by pulsed laser ablation. For size and shape control different solutions like water, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) (anionic surfactant), and (Br-) ion containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) (cationic surfactant) and electrolyte (KBr) were used. In laser ablation surrounding liquid plays a dominant role in controlling size and directional growth. Absorption spectra of as-generated Pd nanoparticles undergo modification with time in different solutions due to Br- ion-mediated directional growth. In water and SDS quasi-spherical and spherical Pd nanoparticles with mean size of 14 and 8 nm, respectively, and in CTAB decahedron and icosahedron shape Pd nanocrystals with mean size 65 nm were observed. When strong Br- ion source KBr was used sharp edged cuboid shaped large Pd nanoparticles were observed. Surface energy modification due to preferential chemisorption of Br- ions onto {100} planes of Pd resulted in formation anisotropic Pd nanostructures enclosed with {100} planes. The nanocubes exhibit broad plasmon resonance around 250-280 nm. Further, size of nanocuboids were controlled by using mixed solutions of KBr with SDS and CTAB for tunable plasmon resonance wavelength from 230 to 550 nm.

  9. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daiem, A. M.; Ansari, M. Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S.; Salah, Numan A.; Al-Mujtaba, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  10. Ablation of carbon-doped liquid propellant in laser plasma propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Y.; Liang, T.; Zhang, S. Q.; Gao, L.; Gao, H.; Zhang, Z. L.

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-doped liquid glycerol ablated by nanosecond pulse laser is investigated in laser plasma propulsion. It is found that the propulsion is much more correlated with the carbon content. The doped carbon can change the laser intensity and laser focal position so as to reduce the splashing quantity of the glycerol. Less consumption of the liquid volume results in a high specific impulse.

  11. Imaging spectroscopy of polymer ablation plasmas for laser propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Long; Truscott, Benjamin S.; Liu, Hao; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Ma, Honghao

    2017-01-01

    A number of polymers have been proposed for use as propellants in space launch and thruster applications based on laser ablation, although few prior studies have either evaluated their performance at background pressures representative of the upper atmosphere or investigated interactions with ambient gases other than air. Here, we use spatially and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy to compare three polymers, poly(ethylene), poly(oxymethylene), and glycidyl azide polymer, ablated using a 532 nm, nanosecond pulsed laser under Ar and O2 at pressures below 1 Torr. Emission lines from neutrally and positively charged atoms are observed in each case, along with the recombination radiation at the interaction front between the plasma plume and the background gas. C2 radicals arise either as a direct fragmentation product or by a three-body recombination of C atoms, depending on the structure of the polymer backbone, and exhibit a rotational temperature of ≈5000 K. The Sedov-Taylor point blast model is used to infer the energy release relative to the incident laser energy, which for all polymers is greater in the presence of O2, as to be expected based on their negative oxygen balance. Under Ar, plume confinement is seen to enhance the self-reactivity of the ejecta from poly(oxymethylene) and glycidyl azide polymer, with maximum exothermicity close to 0.5 Torr. However, little advantage of the latter, widely considered one of the most promising energetic polymers, is apparent under the present conditions over the former, a common engineering plastic.

  12. Atomistic investigation of ablation of amorphous polystyrene under femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, YanHua; Song, ChengWei; Zhang, JunJie; Sun, Tao

    2015-03-01

    In the present work we elucidate the thermodynamic mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of amorphous polystyrene by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of extrinsic parameter of laser pulse intensity and intrinsic parameter of molecular architecture on the laser ablation are further studied. Simulation results show that the laser ablation-induced polymeric material removal is achieved by evaporation from the surface and expansion within the bulk. Furthermore, inter-chain sliding and intra-chain change also play important roles in the microscopic deformation of the material. It is found that both the laser pulse intensity and the arrangement of phenyl groups have significant influence on the fs laser ablation of polystyrene.

  13. Low-order harmonic generation in metal ablation plasmas in nanosecond and picosecond laser regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Arias, M.; Oujja, M.; Sanz, M.; Castillejo, M.; Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Satlikov, N. Kh.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-02-15

    Low-order harmonics, third and fifth, of IR (1064 nm) laser emission have been produced in laser ablation plasmas of the metals manganese, copper and silver. The harmonics were generated in a process triggered by laser ablation followed by frequency up-conversion of a fundamental laser beam that propagates parallel to the target surface. These studies were carried out in two temporal regimes by creating the ablation plasma using either nanosecond or picosecond pulses and then probing the plasma plume with pulses of the same duration. The spatiotemporal behavior of the generated harmonics was characterized and reveals the distinct composition and dynamics of the plasma species that act as nonlinear media, allowing the comparison of different processes that control the generation efficiency. These results serve to guide the choice of laser ablation plasmas to be used for efficient high harmonic generation of laser radiation.

  14. Corneal morphology after ex-vivo UV and mid-infrared laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Voloudakis, G. E.; Moutsouris, K.; Asproudis, I.; Baltatzis, S.; Makropoulou, M.; Bacharis, C.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, ablation experiments of ex vivo porcine cornea tissue were conducted with two solid state lasers (an Er:YAG laser and the 4th harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser, both in the ns pulse width range) emitting in mid infrared and ultraviolet part of the spectrum respectively, at moderate laser fluences. The cornea epithelium of each porcine eye was manually removed before the ablation. Histology analysis of the specimens was performed, in order to examine the microscopic appearance of the ablated craters and the existence of any thermal or mechanical damage caused by the midinfrared and the UV laser irradiation. For a detailed and complete examination of the morphology of the laser ablated corneal tissue, the surface roughness was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  15. ["Skin rejuvenation" by non-ablative laser and light systems. Literature research and overview].

    PubMed

    Grema, H; Raulin, C; Greve, B

    2002-06-01

    Currently, ablative laser therapy (with CO2/Er:YAG lasers) and deep chemical peeling are effective and promising methods of skin rejuvenation. The induction of collagen synthesis was observed after peelings with trichloroacetic acid or phenol as well as after treatments with the CO2 laser. In past years, the undesirable side effects and risks of these methods have led to intensified research in the fields of non-ablative facial rejuvenation and subsurfacing by means of ablative laser systems and intense pulsed light systems. The objective is to achieve selective, heat-induced denaturalisation of dermal collagen that leads to subsequent reactive synthesis but does not damage the epidermis. Recently, the results of numerous clinical and histological studies have indicated that these new technologies are successful. After critical review and assessment of current literature, we can say that in terms of their efficacy, non-ablative methods are not a comparable alternative to ablative skin resurfacing.

  16. On the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts in strongly radiating plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basko, M. M.; Novikov, V. G.; Grushin, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of strong thermal radiation on the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts is investigated under the assumption that all the laser flux is absorbed at the critical surface. Special attention is paid to adequate formulation of the boundary-value problem for a steady-state planar ablation flow. The dependence of the laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiency ϕ r on the laser intensity IL and wavelength λL is analyzed within the non-equilibrium diffusion approximation for radiation transfer. The scaling of the main ablation parameters with IL and λL in the strongly radiative regime 1 - ϕ r ≪ 1 is derived. It is demonstrated that strongly radiating ablation fronts develop a characteristic extended cushion of "radiation-soaked" plasma between the condensed ablated material and the critical surface, which can efficiently suppress perturbations from the instabilities at the critical surface.

  17. Solids sampling using double-pulse laser ablation inductivelycoupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Jhanis; Liu, Chunyi; Yoo, Jong; Mao, Xianglei; Russo,RickRick

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the use of double-pulse laser ablation to improve ICP-MS internal precision (temporal relative standard deviation, %TRSD). Double pulse laser ablation offers reduced fractionation, increased sensitivity, and improved signal to noise ratios. The first pulse is used to ablate a large quantity of mass from the sample surface. The second pulse is applied with a variable time delay after the first pulse to break the ablated mass into a finer aerosol, which is more readily transported to and digested in the ICP-MS.

  18. Ultrafast properties of femtosecond-laser-ablated GaAs and its application to terahertz optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Madéo, Julien; Margiolakis, Athanasios; Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Hale, Peter J; Man, Michael K L; Zhao, Quan-Zhong; Peng, Wei; Shi, Wang-Zhou; Dani, Keshav M

    2015-07-15

    We report on the first terahertz (THz) emitter based on femtosecond-laser-ablated gallium arsenide (GaAs), demonstrating a 65% enhancement in THz emission at high optical power compared to the nonablated device. Counter-intuitively, the ablated device shows significantly lower photocurrent and carrier mobility. We understand this behavior in terms of n-doping, shorter carrier lifetime, and enhanced photoabsorption arising from the ablation process. Our results show that laser ablation allows for efficient and cost-effective optoelectronic THz devices via the manipulation of fundamental properties of materials.

  19. Fabrication of silver nanoparticles dispersed in palm oil using laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Zamiri, Reza; Zakaria, Azmi; Ahangar, Hossein Abbastabar; Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2010-11-22

    In this study we used a laser ablation technique for preparation of silver nanoparticles. The fabrication process was carried out by ablation of a silver plate immersed in palm oil. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm was used for ablation of the plate at different times. The palm coconut oil allowed formation of nanoparticles with very small and uniform particle size, which are dispersed very homogeneously within the solution. The obtained particle sizes for 15 and 30 minute ablation times were 2.5 and 2 nm, respectively. Stability study shows that all of the samples remained stable for a reasonable period of time.

  20. Analysis of the PMMA and cornea temperature rise during excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arba-Mosquera, Samuel; Shraiki, Mario

    2010-03-01

    A general method to analyze the ablation temperature for different materials (in particular in the human cornea and poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA)) is provided. The model is comprehensive and provides directly laser beam characteristics and ablative spot properties. The model further provides a method to convert the temperature rise during ablation observed in PMMA to equivalent temperature rises in the cornea. The proposed model can be used for calibration, verification and validation purposes of laser systems used for ablation processes at relatively low cost and would directly improve the quality of results.

  1. Modification of polyimide wetting properties by laser ablated conical microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Least, Brandon T.; Willis, David A.

    2013-05-01

    Laser texturing of Kapton® HN polyimide was performed by low-fluence ablation using a pulsed, frequency tripled (349 nm) Nd:YLF laser. The laser was scanned in two dimensions in order to generate texture over a large area. The laser overlap percentage and fluence were varied and the resulting texture was studied. The texture features were inspected by electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDS), while the static contact angle of de-ionized water was measured by a contact angle goniometer. Rounded bump features were formed at all fluences, which decreased in areal density with fluence and number of laser pulses. Conical microstructures or "cones" were also formed at most fluences. Cones were larger than the bumps and thus had lower areal density, which increased as a function of the number of laser pulses. The polyimide was hydrophilic before texturing, with a contact angle of approximately 76°. For most of the experimental conditions the contact angle increased as a result of texturing, with the contact angle exceeding 90° for some textured surfaces, and reaching values as high as 118°. In general, the surfaces with significant increases in contact angle had high density of texture features, either bumps or cones. The surfaces that experienced a decrease in contact angle generally had low density of texture features. The increase in contact angle from a wetting (θ < 90°) to a nonwetting surface (θ > 90°) cannot be explained by texturing alone. EDS measurements indicate that textured regions had higher carbon content than the untextured regions due to depletion of oxygen species. The increase in carbon content relative to the oxygen content increased the native contact angle of the surface, causing the transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic behavior. The contact angle of a textured surface increased as the relative spacing of features (diameter to spacing) decreased.

  2. Simulation of Laser Interaction with Ablative Plasma and ydrodynamic of Laser Supported Plasma(LSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huifeng, Tong; Zhiping, Tang

    2011-06-01

    A general Godunov finite difference schemes-WENO(Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) Schemes which have fifth-order accuracy was used to make a numerical calculation for 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field under laser ablated solid target. The models of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma and the simplified eos(equation of state) of plasma were considered in the simulation. The plasma field parameters during and after laser duration variation with time are also obtained. The simulation results show that the laser beam power was strong absorbed by plasma of target surface, and the velocity of LSD(Laser Supported Detonation) wave is half of ideal LSD value which derived from C-J detonation theory.

  3. Outcome of Endovenous Laser Ablation of Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Rustempasic, Nedzad; Cvorak, Alemko; Agincic, Alija

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: In Bosnia and Herzegovina according to available data, treatment of incompetent superficial lower extremity varicose veins by endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) has been introduced two years ago and so far no paper has been published regarding results of EVLA treatment of patients from our country. We wanted to present our results with EVLA treatment. Aim of study: to evaluate and compare primary posttreatment outcomes of endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) with classical surgical method of varicose vein treatment. Patients and methods: The study was clinical and prospective. It was carried out at Clinic for vascular surgery in Sarajevo where fifty-eight (58) patients received surgical treatment for varicose veins and in Aesthetic Surgery Center “Nasa mala klinika” in Sarajevo were sixty-one (61) patients with varicose veins were treated by endovenous laser ablation. Total 119 patients (limbs) with pathologic reflux only in great saphenous vein were evaluated between 1st of January 2013 and 31st of April 2014. Following primary outcome endpoints were evaluated smean day of return to normal everyday activities, patient subjective quantification of pain during first seven days after intervention, incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT), incidence of wound bleeding requiring surgical intervention, incidence of peri-saphenous vein hematoma and infection rate. Results: Mean of return to normal activities (expressed in days after intervention); EVLA vs. stripping (surgery) =1.21vs12.24, T test 13,619; p=0, 000, p<0,05. T test was used for comparing Mean value of visual pain analog scale for the first 7 days between groups, for all seven days pain was significantly higher in surgical group of patients as compared to EVLA group; p<0,05. Incidence of hematoma greater than 1% of total body surface area was significantly higher in patients receiving surgical treatment; Pearson Chi Square=23,830, p<0,05; odds ratio:10,453. Incidences of infection, deep

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser ablation plume dynamics in nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. V.; Platonov, V. V.; Lisenkov, V. V.

    2009-06-01

    The dynamics of the plume ejected from the surface of solid targets (YSZ, Nd:YAG and graphite) by a CO2 laser pulse with a duration of ~500 μs (at the 0.03 level), energy of 1.0-1.3 J and peak power of 6-7 kW have been studied using high-speed photography of the plume luminescence and shadow. The targets were used to produce nanopowders by laser evaporation. About 200 μs after termination of the pulse, shadowgraph images of the plumes above the YSZ and Nd:YAG targets showed dark straight tracks produced by large particles. The formation of large (~10 μm) particles is tentatively attributed to cracking of the solidified melt at the bottom of the ablation crater. This is supported by the fact that no large particles are ejected from graphite, which sublimes without melting. Further support to this hypothesis is provided by numerical 3D modelling of melt cooling in craters produced by laser pulses of different shapes.

  5. Alternatives to excimer laser refractive surgery: UV and mid-infrared laser ablation of intraocular lenses and porcine cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.

    2007-03-01

    Despite the fact that the laser applications in human ophthalmology are well established, further research is still required, for better and predictable ablation dosimetry on both cornea tissue and intraocular lenses. Further studies for alternative laser sources to the well established excimer lasers, such as UV or mid-infrared solid state lasers, have been proposed for refractive surgery. The precise lens ablation requires the use of laser wavelengths possessing a small optical penetration depth in the cornea and in the synthetic lenses, in order to confine the laser energy deposition to a small volume. In order to eliminate some very well known problems concerning the reshaping of cornea and the modification of the optical properties of the intraocular lenses, ablation experiments of ex vivo porcine cornea, acrylic PMMA and hydrophilic lenses were conducted with an Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm) and the fifth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (213 nm). The morphology of cornea was recorded using a cornea topography system before and immediately after the ablation. Histology analysis of the specimens was obtained, in order to examine the microscopic appearance of the ablated craters and the existence of any thermal damage caused by the mid-infrared and UV laser irradiation. The macroscopic morphology of the intraocular lens craters was inspected with an optical transmission microscope. Measurements of the ablation rates of the lenses were performed and simulated by a mathematical model.

  6. Measurements of erbium laser-ablation efficiency in hard dental tissues under different water cooling conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuščer, Lovro; Diaci, Janez

    2013-10-01

    Laser triangulation measurements of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated volumes in hard dental tissues are made, in order to verify the possible existence of a "hydrokinetic" effect that has been proposed as an alternative to the "subsurface water expansion" mechanism for hard-tissue laser ablation. No evidence of the hydrokinetic effect could be observed under a broad range of tested laser parameters and water cooling conditions. On the contrary, the application of water spray during laser exposure of hard dental material is observed to diminish the laser-ablation efficiency (AE) in comparison with laser exposure under the absence of water spray. Our findings are in agreement with the generally accepted principle of action for erbium laser ablation, which is based on fast subsurface expansion of laser-heated water trapped within the interstitial structure of hard dental tissues. Our measurements also show that the well-known phenomenon of ablation stalling, during a series of consecutive laser pulses, can primarily be attributed to the blocking of laser light by the loosely bound and recondensed desiccated minerals that collect on the tooth surface during and following laser ablation. In addition to the prevention of tooth bulk temperature buildup, a positive function of the water spray that is typically used with erbium dental lasers is to rehydrate these minerals, and thus sustaining the subsurface expansion ablation process. A negative side effect of using a continuous water spray is that the AE gets reduced due to the laser light being partially absorbed in the water-spray particles above the tooth and in the collected water pool on the tooth surface. Finally, no evidence of the influence of the water absorption shift on the hypothesized increase in the AE of the Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is observed.

  7. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  8. Research and application of surface heat treatment for multipulse laser ablation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Song; Chen, Genyu; Zhou, Cong

    2015-11-01

    This study analysed a laser ablation platform and built heat transfer equations for multipulse laser ablation of materials. The equations include three parts: laser emission after the material melt and gasification; end of laser emission after the material melts and there is the presence of a super-hot layer and solid-phase heat transfer changes during material ablation. For each of the three parts, the effects of evaporation, plasma shielding and energy accumulation under the pulse interval were considered. The equations are reasonable, and all the required parameters are only related to the laser parameters and material properties, allowing the model to have a certain versatility and practicability. The model was applied for numerical simulation of the heat transfer characteristics in the multipulse laser ablation of bronze and diamond. Next, experiments were conducted to analyse the topography of a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel after multipulse laser ablation. The theoretical analysis and experimental results showed that multipulse laser can merge the truing and dressing on a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. This study provides theoretical guidance for optimising the process parameters in the laser ablation of a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. A comparative analysis showed that the numerical solution to the model is in good agreement with the experimental data, thus verifying the correctness and feasibility of the heat transfer model.

  9. Physical mechanisms of SiN{sub x} layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, S.; Heinrich, G.; Wollgarten, M.; Huber, H. P.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-03-14

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN{sub x} layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN{sub x} island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates.

  10. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach.

  11. Ablation Front Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Experiments in Spherically Convergent Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Cherfils, C.; Colvin, J.; Divol, L.; Galmiche, D.; Haan, S.; Marinak, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.L.; Wallace, R.

    1999-11-03

    Experiments were performed on the Nova laser, using indirectly driven capsules mounted in cylindrical gold hohlraums, to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front by time-resolved radiography. Modulations were preformed on the surface of Ge-doped plastic capsules. With initial modulations of 4 {micro}m, growth factors of about 6 in optical depth were seen, in agreement with simulations using the radiation hydrocode FCI2. With initial modulations of 1 {micro}m, growth factors of about 100-150 in optical depth were seen. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation front in an inertial confinement fusion capsule has been the subject of considerable investigation. Much of this research has been concentrated on planar experiments, in which RT growth is inferred from radiography. The evolution is somewhat different in a converging geometry; the spatial wavelength decreases (affecting the onset of nonlinear saturation), and the shell thickens and compresses rather than decompressing as in a planar geometry. In a cylindrically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius, while in spherically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius squared. Experiments were performed on the Nova and Omega lasers in cylindrical geometry (using both direct and indirect drive) and have been performed in spherical geometry using direct drive.

  12. Co:MgF2 laser ablation of tissue: effect of wavelength on ablation threshold and thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Schomacker, K T; Domankevitz, Y; Flotte, T J; Deutsch, T F

    1991-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the ablation threshold of a variety of tissues has been studied by using a tunable pulsed Co:MgF2 laser to determine how closely it tracks the optical absorption length of water. The Co:MgF2 laser was tuned between 1.81 and 2.14 microns, a wavelength region in which the absorption length varies by a decade. For soft tissues the ablation threshold tracks the optical absorption length; for bone there is little wavelength dependence, consistent with the low water content of bone. Thermal damage vs. wavelength was also studied for cornea and bone. Thermal damage to cornea has a weak wavelength dependence, while that to bone shows little wavelength dependence. Framing-camera pictures of the ablation of both cornea and liver show explosive removal of material, but differ as to the nature of the explosion.

  13. Synthesis of stable silver colloids by laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurnina, Anastasiya E.; Shur, Vladimir Y.; Kozin, Roman V.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry K.; Mingaliev, Evgeny A.

    2013-11-01

    The stable colloid with silver nanoparticles has been produced by irradiation of metal target in deionized water by pulse 1064 nm laser. The dependences of the nanoparticle size and colloid stability on fluence, ablation time, surface conditions of the target, and thickness of the water layer have been studied. The sizes and shape of nanoparticles have been measured by dynamic light scattering and by scanning electron microscopy. It has been shown that decrease of the water layer thickness above the target surface leads to increase of the colloid stability. The proper number of treatment cycles allowed to prepare the target surface for production of the nanoparticles with average size about 34 nm obtained by statistical analysis of the scanning electron microscope images. Several methods have been used to increase the colloid stability: (1) increase of the laser fluence, (2) decrease of the water layer thickness above the target surface, (3) the treatment of the target surface by laser beam scanning. The subsequent increase of the colloid concentration by partial drying slightly enhanced the nanoparticle size. The optimized synthesis conditions and drying parameters allowed to produce the pure colloid with concentration about 0.5 g/l and stability over a month of almost spherical silver nanoparticles with typical size 45±5 nm.

  14. Investigation of gradient structures prepared by laser ablation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciosek, Jerzy; Budner, Boguslaw; Burdynska, Sylwia; Jedynski, Marcin; Minikayev, Roman; Prokopiuk, Artur; Mroz, Waldemar

    2010-12-01

    Gradient structures are very important for sensors, laser and wave-guide techniques, telecommunications and other techniques which employ radiation propagation and conversion. By varying admixture concentration, the stress occurring in the structure may increase or reduce, which is vital for charge carrier movement velocity. We discusse two kind of gradient structures of thin TiNx layer with a total thickness of approximately 22 nm deposited on the Si(100) substrate and multi-layer structures with a Si-Pd and Si-Mg bi-layer periods. The gradient structures were deposited using a laser ablation of target-compound materials. A Lambda Physics excimer laser (model LPX 305i; t ~ 15 ns, λ = 193 nm) with f = 5 Hz operating frequency was used for layer depositing. The analyses confirmed the presence of the gradient distribution of deposited materials. The gradient structures proved highly sensitive to both thermal effects and strong adsorption of ambient gases. The usefulness of titanium-containing structures for gas, especially hydrogen and oxygen, sensors was confirmed. Due to the strong gas adsorption, the gradient structures used in radiation conversion or waveguide technology should be adequately protected against ambient conditions.

  15. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Ablative and Non-Ablative Fractional Laser Treatments for Early Stage Thyroidectomy Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jin-Uk; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Woo-Kyung; Park, Seung-Ha; Lee, Byung-Il; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Open thyroidectomy is conventionally performed at the anterior side of neck, which is a body part with a comparatively great degree of open exposure; due to this, postoperative scarring may cause distress in patients. We aimed to compare the effects of ablative and nonablative fractional laser treatments on thyroidectomy scars. We examined medical records in a retrospective manner and analyzed scars based on their digital images by using the modified Manchester Scar Scale (mMSS). Methods Between February 2012 and May 2013, 55 patients with thyroidectomy scars were treated with ablative (34 patients) or nonablative (21 patients) fractional laser. Each patient underwent 4 laser treatment sessions in 3–4 week intervals, 1–2 months postoperatively. Scar improvement was assessed using patient images and the mMSS scale. Results The mean decrease in scar score was 3.91 and 3.47 in the ablative and nonablative groups, respectively; the reduction between 2 groups did not exhibit any significant difference (P=0.16). We used the scale once again to individually evaluate scar attributes. The nonablative group accounted for a considerably higher color score value (P=0.03); the ablative group accounted for a considerably higher contour score value (P<0.01). Patient satisfaction was high and no complications occurred. Conclusions Both types of fractional laser treatments can be used successfully for thyroidectomy scar treatment with minimal complications; however, results indicate that higher effectiveness may be obtained from the use of ablative and nonablative lasers for hypertrophic scars and early erythematous scars, respectively. Therefore, the appropriate laser for scar treatment should be selected according to its specific characteristics. PMID:27896191

  16. Evaluation of ablation efficiency and surface morphology of human teeth upon irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates changes in ablation efficiency and surface morphology induced in human dental enamel and dentin upon interaction with femtosecond laser pulses at variable energies and number of laser pulses. Craters were created using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser ablation system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, pulse width of 130 fs, and repetition rate of 20 Hz. Various techniques, such as optical and scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were used to evaluate ablation depth, amount of material ablated, and surface morphology of the craters. Ablation rate (ablation depth per pulse) was found to be lower in enamel than dentin with the maximum rate occurring at fluence of 12.4 J cm-2 in both materials. A drop in ablation rate was observed for fluence greater than 12.4 J cm-2 and was attributed to attenuation of laser energy due to interaction with the laser-generated particles. Above this fluence, signs of thermal effects, such as melting and formation of droplets of molten material at the sample surface, were observed. The response of the ICP-MS indicated that the amount of ablated material removed from dentin is greater than that removed from enamel by a factor of 1.5 or more at all investigated fluence.

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation characteristics of nickel-based superalloy C263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Perrie, W.; French, P.; Sharp, M.; Dearden, G.; Logothetidis, S.; Watkins, K. G.

    2009-03-01

    Femtosecond laser (180 fs, 775 nm, 1 kHz) ablation characteristics of the nickel-based superalloy C263 are investigated. The single pulse ablation threshold is measured to be 0.26±0.03 J/cm2 and the incubation parameter ξ=0.72±0.03 by also measuring the dependence of ablation threshold on the number of laser pulses. The ablation rate exhibits two logarithmic dependencies on fluence corresponding to ablation determined by the optical penetration depth at fluences below ˜5 J/cm2 (for single pulse) and by the electron thermal diffusion length above that fluence. The central surface morphology of ablated craters (dimples) with laser fluence and number of laser pulses shows the development of several kinds of periodic structures (ripples) with different periodicities as well as the formation of resolidified material and holes at the centre of the ablated crater at high fluences. The debris produced during ablation consists of crystalline C263 oxidized nanoparticles with diameters of ˜2-20 nm (for F=9.6 J/cm2). The mechanisms involved in femtosecond laser microprocessing of the superalloy C263 as well as in the synthesis of C263 nanoparticles are elucidated and discussed in terms of the properties of the material.

  18. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian J; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W J; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391  mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser.

  19. Production of silver nanoparticles by laser ablation in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; del Val, J.; Pou, J.

    2015-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted much attention as a subject of investigation due to their well-known properties, such as good conductivity, antibacterial and catalytic effects, etc. They are used in many different areas, such as medicine, industrial applications, scientific investigation, etc. There are different techniques for producing Ag nanoparticles, chemical, electrochemical, sonochemical, etc. These methods often lead to impurities together with nanoparticles or colloidal solutions. In this work, laser ablation of solids in open air conditions (LASOA) is used to produce silver nanoparticles and collect them on glass substrates. Production and deposition of silver nanoparticles are integrated in the same step to reduce the process. The obtained particles are analysed and the nanoparticles formation mechanism is discussed. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. The obtained nanoparticles consisted of Ag nanoparticles showing rounded shape with diameters ranging from few to 50 nm

  20. Laser Ablation of Gallium Arsenide in Different Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R.A.; Kuroda, H.; Ryasnyanskii, A.I.

    2005-12-15

    The optical, structural, and nonlinear optical characteristics of GaAs nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in different liquids were investigated. Thermally induced self-defocusing in GaAs solutions was observed using both a high pulse repetition rate and nanosecond pulses. In studying the nonlinear optical characteristics of GaAs solutions using picosecond and femtosecond pulses, two-photon absorption was observed. The nonlinear absorption coefficient of an aqueous GaAs solution measured by the Z-scan technique and the nonlinear susceptibility of GaAs nanoparticles were, respectively, 0.7 x 10{sup -9} cm W{sup -1} and 2 x 10{sup -9} esu at a wavelength of 795 nm.

  1. Laser ablation analysis of novel perfluoroalkyl-coated aluminum nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Jouet, R. Jason; Carney, Joel R.; Lightstone, James M.; Warren, Andrea D.

    2007-12-12

    The evolution and decay of aluminum and aluminum monoxide emission signatures following a laser ablation event were used to compare the relative reaction rates of three aluminum based materials. Time-resolved emission results of oxide-free, C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H-passivated materials were compared with uncoated, oxide passivated aluminum nanoparticles and those coated with the same acid used in for passivation C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H. Excited state Al and AlO emission is reduced in time for the oxide free material when compared to coated, 50 nm, oxide passivated particles mixed on an equal active Al: C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H ratio. This is interpreted as an increase in the reaction rate afforded by the elimination of the oxide coating and proximity of oxidizing species in the SAM-based nanocomposite.

  2. Pulsed laser ablation synthesis of carbon nanoparticles in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemizadeh, Fatemeh; Malekfar, Rasoul; Parvin, Parviz

    2017-05-01

    Crystalline carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) with narrow size distribution were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of graphite in vacuum under a slow flow of argon gas. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate the formation of interconnected carbon particles that exhibit a graphitic nanostructure in X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) characterization. Photoluminescence (PL) was observed after acid treatment and surface passivation on synthesized CNPs. PL spectra indicated the existence of narrow size distribution of particles that is confirmed by TEM image, XRD pattern and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, TEM image, Raman spectra and XRD patterns of surface passivated CNPs show that raw CNPs in an interconnected structure are fragmented into distinct particles that leads to surface to volume ratio increase and photoluminescence enhancement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that in addition to the size confinement, the surface modification of CNPs by carboxylate and methyl groups after surface passivation is also a reason for photoluminescence.

  3. Pseudo line tension in pressurized liquid-phase laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Wafaa

    2017-06-01

    In pressurized liquid-phase laser ablation, the ratio between the pseudo line tension and the artificial surface tension (σ/S) is evaluated for the first time. It is treated as an adjusting parameter in the solution of Rayleigh-Plesset model to obtain the best fitting with the experimental observations of the dynamics of the cavitation bubble. It is found that σ/S satisfies the relationship σ/S ∝P0(-1/3k), where k is the adiabatic constant. The occupation of the cavitation bubble with nanoparticles, that observed experimentally, deviates the normal magnitudes of σ/S to anomalous values. At water pressure P0=0.1 MPa, σ and S are estimated as 1.9×10-3 N and 4.2 N/m respectively.

  4. Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny; Beland, Laurent Karim; Deryng, Delphine; Lewis, Laurent J.; Meunier, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The ablation by ultrashort laser pulses at relatively low fluences (i.e., in the thermal regime) of solids wetted by a thin liquid film is studied using a generic numerical model. In comparison with dry targets, the liquid is found to significantly affect ablation by confining the solid and slowing down the expansion of the laser-heated material. These factors affect the relative efficiency of the various ablation mechanisms, leading, in particular, to the complete inhibition of phase explosion at lower fluences, a reduced ablation yield, and significant changes in the composition of the plume. As a consequence, at fluences above the ablation threshold, the size of the ejected nanoclusters is lower in presence of the liquid. Our results provide a qualitative understanding of the effect of wetting layers on the ablation process.

  5. Q-switched 1064nm laser source for photomechanical ablation in obsidianus lapis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Morales, A. I.; Álvarez-Chávez, J. A.; Morales-Ramírez, A. J.; Panzner, Michael; Ortega-Delgado, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The process of ablation in obsidianus lapis is mainly governed by pulse energy from the laser source and scanning speed. The rate of material ablation is influenced by chemical and physical properties. In this work, laser energy at 1064 nm, has been used for ablation behavior in Q-switch regime. A >40 W, average power Nd:YAG source with pulse energies ranging from 3mJ to nearly 7 mJ, achieved surface damages up to 160 μm of depth. Photo-mechanical ablation in terms of scan speed showed a maximum depth of nearly 500 μm at 130 mm/s. The maximum pulse energy of 12 mJ resulted in ablation of 170 μm depth. Highly efficient ablation in obsidianus lapis for artistic work is an interesting field of application.

  6. Chemical models for simulating single-walled nanotube production in arc vaporization and laser ablation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical kinetic models for the nucleation and growth of clusters and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth are developed for numerical simulations of the production of SWNTs. Two models that involve evaporation and condensation of carbon and metal catalysts, a full model involving all carbon clusters up to C80, and a reduced model are discussed. The full model is based on a fullerene model, but nickel and carbon/nickel cluster reactions are added to form SWNTs from soot and fullerenes. The full model has a large number of species--so large that to incorporate them into a flow field computation for simulating laser ablation and arc processes requires that they be simplified. The model is reduced by defining large clusters that represent many various sized clusters. Comparisons are given between these models for cases that may be applicable to arc and laser ablation production. Solutions to the system of chemical rate equations of these models for a ramped temperature profile show that production of various species, including SWNTs, agree to within about 50% for a fast ramp, and within 10% for a slower temperature decay time.

  7. Chemical models for simulating single-walled nanotube production in arc vaporization and laser ablation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical kinetic models for the nucleation and growth of clusters and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth are developed for numerical simulations of the production of SWNTs. Two models that involve evaporation and condensation of carbon and metal catalysts, a full model involving all carbon clusters up to C80, and a reduced model are discussed. The full model is based on a fullerene model, but nickel and carbon/nickel cluster reactions are added to form SWNTs from soot and fullerenes. The full model has a large number of species--so large that to incorporate them into a flow field computation for simulating laser ablation and arc processes requires that they be simplified. The model is reduced by defining large clusters that represent many various sized clusters. Comparisons are given between these models for cases that may be applicable to arc and laser ablation production. Solutions to the system of chemical rate equations of these models for a ramped temperature profile show that production of various species, including SWNTs, agree to within about 50% for a fast ramp, and within 10% for a slower temperature decay time.

  8. Infra-red femtosecond laser ablation: Benefit for LA-ICP-MS elemental analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson, F.; d'Abzac, F.; Freydier, R.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A.; Chmeleff, J.; Chatel, B.

    2011-12-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser ablation systems have now been used for about a decade for elemental analysis in chemical and geosciences laboratories. Published studies investigated the influence of various analytical parameters, such as laser pulsewidth, wavelength, energy or ablation duration, on the quality of the analytical data produced by fs Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). It was rapidly found that under comparable analytical conditions, chemical fractionation effects that may occur during laser-induced particle production, transport and/or decomposition in the ICP-MS plasma torch become negligible in the fs laser ablation regime under 300 fs laser pulsewidth. Another major benefit of fs laser ablation is its restricted matrix-sensitive nature compared to ns laser ablation, thereby facilitating greatly LA-ICP-MS calibration for chemical analysis with a reference material having completely different optical and chemical properties compared to the sample to be analyzed (e.g., a standard glass to calibrate analyses of a phosphate mineral). This effect is particularly remarkable as it can be stated from both UV and IR fs laser ablation studies. Reproducible laser ablations of optical quality quartz can also be produced using such an IR laser. Precise, accurate and reproducible chemical analyses may be obtained using ns laser ablation systems. However, this is achieved under carefully controlled analytical conditions using state of the art ablation cells. Instead, it appears that fs laser ablation is making LA-ICP-MS analyses more reliable. More recently, analytical studies combined with high spatial resolution microscopic techniques allowed us to understand better the nature of fs laser-matter interaction through the direct examination of the laser-induced craters and of the particles produced. These investigations have shown the dominance of mechanical over thermal effects on the solids ablated using a fs laser. Whatever the

  9. The effect of polarization on ultrashort pulsed laser ablation of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, K.; Tan, B.; Stanley, P.; Sivakumar, N. R.

    2002-08-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers have proven to have superior advantages over conventional continuous wave and long pulse lasers for ablation of thin metal films. Though several investigations have been carried out to understand the phenomena of ultrashort pulse laser machining, the effect of the beam polarization on ablation of thin metal films has been seldom investigated. In this article, we report our recent observations on how the shape of the machined feature and also the damage threshold of the material varies according to the polarization of the ultrashort pulse laser beam. Based on this we have explained how the polarization of the beam controls the laser cutting rate, kerf width, edge quality, and ablation depth of the ablated feature.

  10. Survey Of CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion With Polyoxymethylene Propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-05-06

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) has been widely studied as a laser propulsion propellant paired to CO{sub 2} laser radiation. POM is a good test case for studying ablation properties of polymer materials, and within limits, for study of general trends in laser ablation-induced impulse. Despite many studies, there is no general understanding of POM ablation that takes into account the ambient pressure, spot area, fluence, and effects from confinement and combustion. This paper reviews and synthesizes CO{sub 2} laser ablation propulsion research using POM targets. Necessary directions for future study are indicated to address incomplete regions of the various parameter spaces. Literature data is compared in terms of propulsion parameters such as momentum coupling coefficient and specific impulse, within a range of fluences from about 1-500 J/cm{sup 2}, ambient pressures from about 10{sup -2}-10{sup 5} Pa, and laser spot areas from about 0.01-10 cm{sup 2}.

  11. Development of a Laser Ablation ICPMS Rutile Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, M. L.; Kohn, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Rutile is a common accessory mineral in igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks and igneous, with many applications in geosciences. Rutile geochemistry, especially the high field strength elements (i.e., Nb and Ta), monitors many geological processes including subduction-zone metamorphism, while Zr provides temperature information in buffering assemblages. Rutile can also be used for U-Pb geochronology, but typically low U concentrations can make age dating difficult. Many applications of rutile now rely on laser ablation ICPMS (LA-ICPMS) analysis, a major disadvantage of this technique is the lack of reliable rutile standards. Here, we present laser ablation data of several rutile megacrysts from around the world, illustrating typical geochemical characteristics of potential standards. Whole-grain transects and depth profiles were collected on several rutiles, including Graves Mountain, Kragerø, Madagascar, Mozambique, Quebec, and Diamantina. Most transects, particularly across Graves Mountain and Diamantina, show dramatic zoning in Zr (up to 100 ppm), U (up to 10 ppm), and Nb (up to 1000 ppm). Rutile grains from Mozambique and Kragerø show little variation in concentration in Zr, U, and Nb. However, U concentrations generally range from 1ppm (Graves Mountain) to 45ppm (Kragero). Depth profiles (30-80s analysis; 15-40 μm) showed a combination of slight surface contamination plus minor to significant near-rim zoning. Some samples, such as Mozambique, show minor concentration changes in Zr, Nb, and Ta over the outer 10 μm but are otherwise unzoned, whereas U concentrations decrease for 25 μm then are constant. Kragero shows depth zoning throughout for Zr, Ta, and U but Nb is unzoned. Some rutile megacrysts show promise as standards (e.g. Mozambique and Kragero), but must be prepared to eliminate crystal surfaces. Other megacrysts would have to be subsampled within specific crystals to isolate chemical homogeneous domains.

  12. [A comparative analysis of tonsillectomy and ablation of the palatine tonsils with CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Zbyshko, Ia B

    2007-01-01

    Efficacy and toletance of two methods were compared: ablation of the palatine tonsils with CO2 laser and tonsillectomy. 270 case histories (118 after tonsillectomy and 152 after laser ablation of the palatine tonsils) have been analysed and 50 patients from each group have been examined. The comparison of the methods leads to conclusion that laser ablation of the palatine tonsils prevents intraoperative and postoperative complications; makes postoperative hemostatic therapy unnecessary; allows conduction of the operations in outpatient clinics or day hospitals; causes minimal pain in the postoperative period; shortens duration of disability.

  13. Study of visible and mid-infrared laser ablation mechanism of PMMA and intraocular lenses: experimental and theoretical results.

    PubMed

    Spyratou, E; Makropoulou, M; Serafetinides, A A

    2008-04-01

    Laser-polymer interactions have attracted extensive attention both for understanding the inherent basic ablation mechanism and for development of tissue simulators in several biomedical laser applications such as in human ophthalmology. Ablation experiments were performed on polymethylmethacrylate used as cornea tissue simulator and PMMA intraocular lenses. The polymer-ablation mechanism was examined with two different wavelengths and pulse durations. The experiments were conducted with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG solid-state lasers, and the ablation rates were simulated by a mathematical model in each case. Furthermore, to investigate the role of tissue hydration during laser ablation, we performed a set of experiments in which Er:YAG laser ablation of hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lenses, with different H(2)O and D(2)O concentrations, was studied. The hydrophilic acrylic lenses with the higher concentration of H(2)O gave the most satisfactory results regarding both the ablation efficiency and the quality of the ablated craters.

  14. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  15. Ablation of hard dental tissues with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Vicki A.; Jacques, Steven L.; Schwartz, Jon A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Rastegar, Sohi; Martin, J. W.

    1992-08-01

    The Er:YAG laser ablation of hard dental tissues and artificial dental stones was studied. The hole depth after ablation was measured as a function of pulse energy and pulse number. The dental gypsum products allowed systematic study of how pulse energy, pulse number, and water content affected ablation. The studies on human teeth compared teeth stored in saline vs teeth stored in formalin.

  16. Improved model for the angular dependence of excimer laser ablation rates in polymer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pedder, J. E. A.; Holmes, A. S.; Dyer, P. E.

    2009-10-26

    Measurements of the angle-dependent ablation rates of polymers that have applications in microdevice fabrication are reported. A simple model based on Beer's law, including plume absorption, is shown to give good agreement with the experimental findings for polycarbonate and SU8, ablated using the 193 and 248 nm excimer lasers, respectively. The modeling forms a useful tool for designing masks needed to fabricate complex surface relief by ablation.

  17. Investigation of laser-induced ablation of ceramic materials for spaceborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, H.; Hippler, M.; Allenspacher, P.; Riede, W.; Ciapponi, A.; Mateo, A. B.; Ivanov, T.; Alves, J.; Piris, J.; Heese, C.; Wernham, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this work tests for determination of ablation thresholds of various ceramic materials for pulsed laser irradiations at wavelengths of 355 nm and 1064 nm in vacuum are presented. For comparison tests with copper and aluminium are also reported. The ablation process was monitored insitu by long-distance microscopy. The morphology of ablation spots was exsitu inspected by scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, the redeposition of potentially released particles on optics in the vicinity to the target was examined.

  18. The ablation threshold of Er;Cr:YSGG laser radiation in bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Carolina; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    In laser cut clinical applications, the use of energy densities lower than the ablation threshold causes increase of temperature of the irradiated tissue, which might result in an irreversible thermal damage. Hence, knowing the ablation threshold is crucial for insuring the safety of these procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the ablation threshold of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser in bone tissue. Bone pieces from jaws of New Zealand rabbits were cut as blocks of 5 mm × 8 mm and polished with sandpaper. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser used in this study had wavelength of 2780 nm, 20 Hz of frequency, and the irradiation condition was chosen so as to simulate the irradiation during a surgical procedure. The laser irradiation was performed with 12 different values of laser energy densities, between 3 J/cm2 and 42 J/cm2, during 3 seconds, resulting in the overlap of 60 pulses. This process was repeated in each sample, for all laser energy densities. After irradiation, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and it was measured the crater diameter for each energy density. By fitting a curve that related the ablation threshold with the energy density and the corresponding diameter of ablation crater, it was possible to determine the ablation threshold. The results showed that the ablation threshold of the Er,Cr:YSGG in bone tissue was 1.95+/-0.42 J/cm2.

  19. Manufacturing of Medical Implants by Combination of Selective Laser Melting and Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallmann, S.; Glockner, P.; Daniel, C.; Seyda, V.; Emmelmann, C.

    2015-09-01

    The perfect fit of hip stem prostheses is supposed to have positive effects on their lifetime performance. Moreover, the ingrowth of tissue into the surface of the implant has to be assured to create a firm and load bearing contact. For the manufacturing of customized hip stem prostheses, the technology of Selective Laser Melting has shown promising results. Poor surface quality, however, makes it necessary to finish up the part by e.g., sand blasting or polishing. With the use of laser ablation for post-processing, reproducible and functionalized surface morphologies might be achievable. Hence, with the motive to produce customized hip stem prostheses, a combined process chain for both mentioned laser technologies is developed. It is examined what type of surface should be produced at which part of the process chain. The produced implants should contain the demanded final surface characteristics without any conventional post-processing. Slight advantages for the Selective Laser Melting regarding the accuracy for different geometrical structures of 400 μm depth were observed. However, an overall improvement of surface quality after the laser ablation process in terms of osseointegration could be achieved. A complete laser based production of customized hip stem implants is found to be with good prospects.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Effect of the pulse duration on graphitisation of diamond during laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, Vitalii V.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Pimenov, S. M.; Sinyavskii, M. N.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Dausinger, F.

    2005-03-01

    Processes of graphitisation of laser-irradiated polycrystalline diamond surface exposed to multipulse irradiation are studied experimentally. The thickness of the laser-modified layer as a function of the laser-pulse duration ranging from 100 fs to 1.5 μs and the effect of the radiation wavelength on this thickness are studied. It is shown that the diamond graphitisation during multipulse laser ablation is a thermally stimulated process. The dependences of the diamond-ablation rates on the radiation energy density under the action of laser pulses of various durations are presented.

  1. Spectrum of laser light scattered by nanoparticles in an ablation-induced cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Masato; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the laser light scattered by nanoparticles in a cavitation bubble, which was induced by laser ablation of a titanium target in water, was measured using a triple-grating spectrograph. The scattered laser light observed at 100 \\upmu s after laser ablation had no wavelength-shifted component, suggesting that nanoparticles at this delay time were metallic. The wavelength-shifted component was observed in the spectrum at a delay time of 200 \\upmu s, suggesting the formation of oxidized nanoparticles. However, we observed no peaks in the spectrum of the scattered laser light in the present in situ laser-light scattering experiment. On the other hand, we observed clear peaks in the Raman spectrum of synthesized nanoparticles. The experimental results suggest slow crystallization of nanoparticles in liquid in liquid-phase laser ablation.

  2. On-line isotope dilution in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a microflow nebulizer inserted in the laser ablation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickhardt, Carola; Izmer, Andrej V.; Zoriy, Miroslav V.; Schaumlöffel, D.; Sabine Becker, J.

    2006-02-01

    Laser ablation ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) is becoming one of the most important analytical techniques for fast determination of trace impurities in solid samples. Quantification of analytical results requires matrix-matched standards, which are in some cases (e.g., high-purity metals, proteins separated by 2D gel electrophoresis) difficult to obtain or prepare. In order to overcome the quantification problem a special arrangement for on-line solution-based calibration has been proposed in laser ablation ICP-MS by the insertion of a microflow nebulizer in the laser ablation chamber. This arrangement allows an easy, accurate and precise quantification by on-line isotope dilution using a defined standard solution with an isotope enriched tracer nebulized to the laser-ablated sample material. An ideal matrix matching in LA-ICP-MS is therefore obtained during the measurement. The figures of merit of this arrangement with a microflow nebulizer inserted in the laser ablation chamber and applications of on-line isotope dilution in LA-ICP-MS on two different types of sample material (NIST glass SRM 612 and NIST apple leaves SRM 1515) will be described.

  3. CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Area Scaling And Redeposition On Flat Polyoxymethylene Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tsukiyama, Yosuke; Umehara, Noritsugu; Ichihashi, Katsuhiro; Ogita, Naoya; Sasoh, Akihiro; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2010-10-08

    One of the remaining unknown subjects of laser propulsion involves whether special benefits or challenges exist for applying laser ablation propulsion to targets with particularly large or small spot areas. This subject is of high importance for a wide range of topics ranging from laser removal of space debris to micropropulsion for laser propulsion vehicles. Analysis is complex since different ablation phenomena are dominant between atmosphere and vacuum conditions. Progress has also been impeded by the difficulty of setting control parameters (particularly fluence) constant while the spot area is adjusted. It is also usually difficult for one group to address small- and large-area effects using a single high-power laser system. Recent collaborative experiments on laser ablation area scaling at several institutions, using 100-J class and 10-J class CO{sub 2} lasers, have advanced the understanding of laser propulsion area scaling. The spot area-dependence of laser propulsion parameters has been investigated over an area range covering approximately 0.05-50 cm{sup 2} at low fluence of about 0.6 J/cm{sup 2}. The experiments were conducted well below the threshold for plasma formation, and provide an estimate of the ablation threshold for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of POM.

  4. Mechanism of water augmentation during IR laser ablation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Fried, Daniel; Ashouri, Nahal; Breunig, Thomas; Shori, Ramesh

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of water augmentation during IR laser ablation of dental hard tissues is controversial and poorly understood. The influence of an optically thick applied water layer on the laser ablation of enamel was investigated at wavelengths in which water is a primary absorber and the magnitude of absorption varies markedly. Q-switched and free running Er: YSGG (2.79 microm) and Er:YAG (2.94 microm), free running Ho:YAG and 9.6 microm TEA CO(2) laser systems were used to produce linear incisions in dental enamel with and without water. Synchrotron-radiation IR spectromicroscopy with the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to determine the chemical changes across the laser ablation profiles with a spatial resolution of 10-microm. The addition of water increased the rate of ablation and produced a more desirable surface morphology during enamel ablation with all the erbium systems. Moreover, ablation was markedly more efficient for Q-switched (0.15 microsecond) versus free-running (150 microsecond) erbium laser pulses with the added water layer. Although the addition of a thick water layer reduced the rate of ablation during CO(2) laser ablation, the addition of the water removed undesirable deposits of non-apatite mineral phases from the crater surface. IR spectromicroscopy indicates that the chemical composition of the crater walls deviates markedly from that of hydroxyapatite after Er:YAG and CO(2) laser irradiation without added water. New mineral phases were resolved that have not been previously observed using conventional IR spectroscopy. There was extensive peripheral damage after irradiation with the Ho:YAG laser with and without added water without effective ablation of enamel. We postulate that condensed mineral phases from the plume are deposited along the crater walls after repetitive laser pulses and such non-apatitic phases interfere with subsequent laser pulses during IR laser irradiation reducing the rate and

  5. Formation of periodic structures upon laser ablation of metal targets in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Pavel V; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2005-09-30

    Experimental data on the formation of ordered microstructures produced upon ablation of metal targets in liquids irradiated by a copper vapour laser or a pulsed Nd:YAG laser are presented. The structures were obtained on brass, bronze, copper, and tungsten substrates immersed in distilled water or ethanol. As a result of multiple-pulse laser ablation by a scanning beam, ordered microcones with pointed vertexes are formed on the target surface. The structures are separated by deep narrow channels. The structure period was experimentally shown to increase linearly with diameter of the laser spot on the target surface. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  6. Cavitation-free CW laser ablation from a solid target to synthesize low size-dispersed Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kabashin, Andrei V; Kucherik, Alexei; Ryabchikov, Yury; Kutrovskaya, Stella; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Arakelyan, Sergei; Itina, Tatiana

    2017-02-27

    Continuous wave (CW) radiation from Yb-fiber laser (central wave length is 1064 nm, power 1-200 W) is used to initiate ablation of material Au target in deionized water and synthesize bare (unprotected) Au nanoparticles. We show that the formed nanoparticles present a single low-size-dispersed population with the mean size of the order of 10 nm, which contrasts to previously reported data on dual populations of nanoparticles during pulsed laser ablation in liquids. The lacking second population of nanoparticles is explained by the absence of cavitation-related mechanism of material ablation, which typically takes place under pulsed laser action on a solid target in liquid ambience, and this supposition is confirmed by plume visualization tests. We also observe a gradual growth of mean nanoparticles size from 8-10 to 20-25 nm under the increase of laser power for 532 nm pumping wavelength, while for 1064 nm pumping wavelength the mean size 8-10 nm is independent of radiation power. The growth of the nanoparticles observed for 532 nm wavelength is attributed to the enhanced target melting and splashing followed by an additional heating due to an efficient excitation of plasmons over Au nanoparticles. Bare, low-size-dispersed Au nanoparticles are of importance for a variety of applications, including biomedicine, catalysis, photovoltaics etc., whereas the employment of CW radiation for nanomaterial production promises an improvement of cost-efficiency of this technology.

  7. Effect of Pulsed Laser Ablation and Continuous Laser Heating on the Adhesion and Cohesion of Cold Sprayed Ti-6Al-4V Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perton, M.; Costil, S.; Wong, W.; Poirier, D.; Irissou, E.; Legoux, J.-G.; Blouin, A.; Yue, S.

    2012-12-01

    The individual and cumulative effects of in situ pulsed laser ablation and continuous laser pre-heating on adhesion and cohesion strength of cold sprayed Ti-6Al-4V coatings are investigated. Laser beams were coupled to a cold spray gun in order to ablate and pre-heat the substrate surface a few milliseconds prior to the impact of the spray particles. Cohesion and adhesion strength were evaluated by scratch test, standard ASTM C633 pull test and laser shock (LASAT) technique. The effects of laser ablation before and during cold spray operations were investigated. Results demonstrate that laser ablation of the substrate before cold spraying led to a smooth surface which improved adhesion strength. However, when laser ablation was maintained throughout the cold spray process, i.e., in between the coating layers, a reduction of cohesion and adhesion was observed. These negative effects were circumvented when laser ablation and laser pre-heating were combined.

  8. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchick, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrown, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using ultrashort pulse laser (USPL). Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  9. A study of structure formation on PET, PBT, and PS surfaces by excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongdae

    Usually polymer surface treatment is performed to modify surface layers by inserting some functional group and/or by inducing roughness on surfaces to improve their wettability, printability, and adhesion to other polymers or metals. In this work, different polymer surfaces were treated using an excimer laser (LPX 240i, Lambda Physik). Polystyrene, polyethylene terephtalate, and polybutylene terephtalate were chosen as model materials for this study. Films were made by cast film processing and stretched with biaxial stretching machine. With excimer laser treatment on polymer surfaces, it was found that we could produce 1--2 micron size structures depending on material properties and film processing conditions. Materials with lower UV absorption coefficient produced double digit micron size structures, while those with higher UV absorption coefficients produced single digit micron size structures. In all these cases the structures formed only on stretched films. In addition to those microstructure developments, the determination of ablation threshold fluence was of interest mainly for understanding fundamentals of ablation behavior and technical applications. In this study, ablation thresholds were measured by various methods including ablation depth, ablation weight, and ablation sound level measurements. Among these methods, we confirmed that the measurement by ablation sound level gives the most reliable results, because this method is based on single pulse ablation. To understand the ablation phenomenon, and how microstructures can be developed during ablation, different material processing and excimer laser conditions were chosen for experimentation. During our experiments, we observed incubation phenomenon during laser ablation and showed that this incubation was significant for materials with low UV absorption coefficients. Based on UV absorption value change after excimer laser irradiation, we proposed a mechanism to explain the ablation of PS films. From

  10. KrF laser-induced ablation and patterning of Y--Ba--Cu--O films

    SciTech Connect

    Heitz, J.; Wang, X.Z.; Schwab, P.; Baeuerle, D. ); Schultz, L. )

    1990-09-01

    The ablation and patterning of Y--Ba--Cu--O films on (100) SrTiO{sub 3} and (100) MgO substrates by KrF excimer-laser light projection was investigated. Three different regimes of laser-material interactions were observed. Transition temperatures and critical current densities in laser-fabricated strip lines were investigated.

  11. Experimental investigation on thermal ablation of carbon-fiber/epoxy composite irradiated by continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Minbo; Ma, Zhiliang; Chen, Linzhu; Lin, Xinwei; Zhou, Menglian

    2015-05-01

    The tests of carbon-fiber/epoxy composite laminates, subjected to a tangential gas-flow and 1070 nm continuous wave laser are carried out to acquire the ablation laws of samples on the conditions of different gas-flow. Simultaneously, considered the images from camera of large dynamic range, the damage laws of samples are also obtained for various laser power densities. Experimental results reveal that, without airflow on sample surface, the smoke caused by laser heating can be quickly on fire which causes a burn damage on the surface of samples so that the mass loss is most of all. However, the tangential airflow can remove away the smoke which has a weakening effect on the energy of incidence laser. So the ablation depth has an obvious increase in laser irradiation area. Unlike airflow, nitrogen flow can obviously restrain oxidation ablation on surface so that the ablation damage in laser irradiation area is relatively not severe. On the other hand, as laser power density increases, the mass loss of samples continues to rise but isn't proportional. And the ablation heat with the increase of power density shows a complex change. Below power density of 390 W/cm2, the mass loss mainly depends on the pyrolysis of epoxy while the ablation heat has a gradual decrease. Along with power density increasing but less than 1330 W/cm2 , the oxidation ablation of carbon fibers will be a leading factor and the ablation heat shows a little increase. Above power density of 1330 W/cm2 , the carbon fibers turn up the phenomenon of sublimation. What's more, airflow removed effects will be enhanced in high temperature. In this case, the ablation heat again has a trend of decrease.

  12. XPS investigation on Upilex-S polyimide ablated by pulse TEA CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, D. W.; Yung, K. C.

    2001-08-01

    Laser ablation of Upilex-S polyimide films 80 μm thick was performed in air using a pulse TEA CO 2 laser with wavelength 9.3 μm. A halo surrounding the hole was observed, which is covered with sub-micro particles. Pieces of ablation products protrude from the ablated surface, leading to considerable roughness of the ablated area. Chemical and structural changes of Upilex-S polyimide film surface irradiated by the pulse TEA CO 2 laser in air were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relative C content in the ablated area was found to be higher, whilst both O and N contents were lower than in the untreated area. This means that TEA CO 2 laser ablation released both the O and N atoms. Also, the peak areas corresponding with carbonyl group (CO) in the imide system were reduced much more and a new component at 287.0 eV assigned to the amide structure (NCO) was detected after laser ablation. These suggest that the pyrolysis of the Upilex-S polyimide was the decomposition of the imide ring between the nitrogen/aromatic carbon atom and carbonyl carbon atom. In addition, another new component arising from >CO groups was also detected for higher fluence (7.83 J/cm 2), and its peak areas is very small. This result indicates that the slight oxidation may take place with higher fluence during laser ablation in air. Based on above-mentioned experimental results, a possible thermally-induced decomposition path of Upilex-S polyimide ablated by TEA CO 2 laser is presented.

  13. Laser ablation of powdered samples and analysis by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctvrtnickova, T.; Cabalin, L.; Laserna, J.; Kanicky, V.; Nicolas, G.

    2009-03-01

    The presented work proves the capacities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a fast, universal, and versatile technique for analysis of complex materials as ceramics. This paper reports on the analysis of ceramic raw materials (brick clays and kaolin) submitted to laser ablation in the form of pressed pellets. Spectrographic study was provided by standard single-pulse LIBS technique and orthogonal reheating double-pulse LIBS. It was found that both methods are comparable in terms of analytical performance, if adequate experimental parameters and signal detection systems are used.

  14. Density Profile of a Foil Accelerated by Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Haberberger, D.

    2016-10-01

    An experiment to measure the density profile of a foil accelerated by laser ablation has been designed and is underway. High-density material is measured with x-ray radiography and low-density plasma is measured using 251-nm interferometry. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation results from the code DRACO will be compared to these data. The accelerated foil is an 80- μm-thick CH target with Ge and Si-doped layers. The incident laser is a 351-nm, 5-ns pulse with a total energy of 6.2 kJ. Si and Ti x rays are used for the radiography measurement. A 1-D image versus time data are recorded with an x-ray streak camera and 2-D image data at specific times are recorded with an x-ray framing camera using point-projection backlighting. Foil acceleration is measured with the 1-D data. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Excimer laser ablation for spatially controlled protein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, Helmut; Hayes, Jason P.; Kingshott, Peter; Johnson, Graham; Harvey, Erol C.; Griesser, Hans J.

    2001-11-01

    Two-dimensional control over the location of proteins on surfaces is desired for a number of applications including diagnostic tests and tissue engineered medical devices. Many of these applications require patterns of specific proteins that allow subsequent two-dimensionally controlled cell attachment. The ideal technique would allow the deposition of specific protein patterns in areas where cell attachment is required, with complete prevention of unspecific protein adsorption in areas where cells are not supposed to attach. In our study, collagen I was used as an example for an extracellular matrix protein known to support the attachment of bovine corneal epithelial cells. An allylamine plasma polymer was deposited on a silicon wafer substrate, followed by grafting of poly(ethylene oxide). Two-dimensional control over the surface chemistry was achieved using a 248 nm excimer laser. Results obtained by XPS and AFM show that the combination of extremely low-fouling surfaces with excimer laser ablation can be used effectively for the production of spatially controlled protein patterns with a resolution of less than 1 micrometers . Furthermore, it was shown that bovine corneal epithelial cell attachment followed exactly the created protein patterns. The presented method is an effective tool for a number of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  16. A novel laser ablation plasma thruster with electromagnetic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; He, Zhen; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    A novel laser ablation plasma thruster accelerated by electromagnetic means was proposed and investigated. The discharge characteristics and thrust performance were tested with different charged energy, structural parameters and propellants. The thrust performance was proven to be improved by electromagnetic acceleration. In contrast with the pure laser propulsion mode, the thrust performance in electromagnetic acceleration modes was much better. The effects of electrodes distance and the off-axis distance between ceramic tube and cathode were tested, and it's found that there were optimal structural parameters for achieving optimal thrust performance. It's indicated that the impulse bit and specific impulse increased with increasing charged energy. In our experiments, the thrust performance of the thruster was optimal in large charged energy modes. With the charged energy 25 J and the use of metal aluminum, a maximal impulse bit of 600 μNs, a specific impulse of approximate 8000 s and thrust efficiency of about 90% were obtained. For the PTFE propellant, a maximal impulse bit of about 350 μNs, a specific impulse of about 2400 s, and thrust efficiency of about 16% were obtained. Besides, the metal aluminum was proven to be the better propellant than PTFE for the thruster.

  17. A spectroscopic study of laser ablation plasma from Mo target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Kubkowska, Monika; Blagoev, Alexander; Rosiński, Marcin; Parys, Piotr; Gąsior, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this contribution is to present time-resolved optical spectroscopy studies of laser ablation of the Mo target with ˜ 3.5 ns, 0.4 J pulses delivered by the Nd-YAG laser system at 1.06 μm. The sample was placed in a vacuum chamber under 5 × 10-5 mbar pressure and irradiated, with power densities varied up to 22.7 GW cm-2. The ion emission from the plasma plume was measured using an electrostatic ion energy analyzer (IEA) and ion collector, which allowed us to estimate the ion kinetic energy and charge independent of the applied power densities. The signal collected by the IEA indicated the presence of molybdenum ions up to eight-ion charge. Simultaneously after the ion emission, the optical spectra acquired within 2 μs of exposure time were observed in the wavelength range from 200 to 1000 nm with a Mechelle 5000 spectrometer equipped with an iCCD (iStar) detector. The plasma electron temperature was estimated from a Boltzmann plot based on the registered spectra as well as from the ion measurements.

  18. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-06-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization.

  20. Precise ablation milling with ultrashort pulsed Nd:YAG lasers by optical and acoustical process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Volker; Weber, Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Laser ablation milling with ultra short pulsed Nd:YAG lasers enables micro structuring in nearly all kinds of solid materials like metals, ceramics and polymers. A precise machining result with high surface quality requires a defined ablation process. Problems arise through the scatter in the resulting ablation depth of the laser beam machining process where material is removed in layers. Since the ablated volume may change due to varying absorption properties in single layers and inhomogeneities in the material, the focal plane might deviate from the surface of the work piece when the next layer is machined. Thus the focal plane has to be adjusted after each layer. A newly developed optical and acoustical process control enables an in-process adjustment of the focal plane that leads to defined process conditions and thus to better ablation results. The optical process control is realized by assistance of a confocal white light sensor. It enables an automated work piece orientation before machining and an inline ablation depth monitoring. The optical device can be integrated for an online or offline process control. Both variants will be presented and discussed. A further approach for adjustment of the focal plane is the acoustical process control. Acoustic emissions are detected while laser beam machining. A signal analysis of the airborne sound spectrum emitted by the process enables conclusions about the focal position of the laser beam. Based on this correlation an acoustic focus positioning is built up. The focal plane can then be adjusted automatically before ablation.