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Sample records for laser applications final

  1. Laser applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, R.T.

    1980-07-01

    Processes were developed that use lasers as manufacturing tools. These processes were stripping of insulation from cables and wires, machining of quartz, microdrilling and welding of reflective metals, and precision alignment of curved surfaces before machining. A technological basis also was formed which resulted in a process for automatic surface inspection of parts and aided development of machining processes for Kevlar parts.

  2. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. )

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  3. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report, December 1, 1994--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland OR, Houston TX, and Galveston TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulant of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  4. Compact, lightweight CO/sub 2/ lasers for SDIO applications. Final report, 30 September 1988-31 March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J.

    1989-04-11

    During the past decade, substantial investments have been made in the development of gas-discharge-pumped CO/sub 2/ lasers for military and civilian applications. The DoD community and SDIO in particular is developing compact, lightweight CO/sub 2/ lasers for airborne and spaced-based radar applications directed toward target ranging, imaging, and discrimination. These CO/sub 2/ laser systems are being developed under the SDIO Lowkater Program, in the Airborne Laser Experiment (ALE) Program by the Army/SDC and in Lincoln Laboratory's space based CO/sub 2/ laser radar research and development program. The three major components of a CO/sub 2/ laser radar are the laser head and flow loop, the pulsed-power system and the optics and beam-control system. In this report, SRL presents a novel self-sustained discharge concept that should result in the stable and efficient extraction of large specific energies (50 J/liter atmosphere) for pulse lengths as long as 100 micro s.

  5. Laser applications in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Leonard J.

    1985-09-01

    beam makes the laser superior to all conventional destructive instruments. 4)|The coagulative properties of certain chromophoric lasers has allowed a new attack on certain vascular tumors and malformations of the brain and spinal cord which had been operated only with trepidation or not at all. Early reports are sobering but encouraging. 5)|Finally, the use of the laser with tissue photosensitization, albeit it in its infancy, offers great promise. This is particularly true in the case of primary brain cancer, where the infiltration of tumorous tissue among normal pathways precludes the classical oncologic surgery practice of resection of a "safe margin". The ability to track and destroy these cells, without affecting adjacent cells, may be the greatest single contribution of the laser to neurosurgery in the future. The present applications of the laser are relatively crude by comparison with what is expected. Endoscopic laser surgery, both vascular and subarachnoid, will diminish morbidity and improve results. From the exotic treatment of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations of the brain to the mundane care of herniated disks of the spine, it is anticipated that the laser will play an important role. The use of a laser, coupled with computerized imagining devices, will allow increasing precision in arrival to and treatment of deep seated lesions of the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord. The use of different wavelengths, perhaps in the X-ray and ultraviolet spectra, will allow increasing precision with decreasing invasion. Manipulation of wavelength, time, and treatment area will allow subcellular surgery, perhaps in the treatment of personality disorders and movement disorders as well as epilepsy. Tissue welding will allow heightened regenerative and recuperative powers to be exploited. The possibility of laser biostimulation must also be considered. In short, it appears that the future of the laser in neurosurgery is limited only by the imagination of the

  6. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field. PMID:25606324

  7. Laser applications in phlebology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Mancini, S.; Postiglione, Marco; Postiglione, M. G.

    2001-06-01

    PURPOSE: review of laser used in phlebology METHOD: critical analysis of scientific data taken from the literature and based on 25 years personal experience. RESULTS: we have three groups of laser applications in phlebology: for the diagnosis, as physical therapy and as surgical therapy. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: the laser-doppler studies the microcirculations, the no-surgical therapy shown positive results in the treatment of venous ulcers and for the wound healing. It could be indicate also as antiphlogistic and anti-edema therapy, in superficial thrombophlebitis. The surgical laser is useful for the surgical cleaning of ulcers, for haemorroids, angiomas and telangiectases.

  8. New laser materials: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the Interim Report No. 1, it was reported that the fluorescence lifetime (greater than or equal to 750..mu..s) in Nd doped Y(PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ was longer by a factor of three as compared to YAG. This means potentially three times as much energy storage and consequently more efficient for flashlamp pumping. It also makes diode pumping easier. In addition, since the Y site is octahedrally coordinated, there is a possibility of energy transfer using Cr as the sensitizing element. As suggested by W. Krupke, we decided to explore the trivalent cation metaphosphates systematically. The compounds investigated can be represented by the general formula A(PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ where A = Y, Lu, In, Sc, GA and Al. The object is to study the fluorescence characteristics of Nd and Cr as well as the effectiveness of energy transfer from Cr to Nd. In addition, we also investigated other possible laser host crystals, notably CaMgSi/sub 2/O/sub 6/ (diopside), LaBO/sub 3/ and La(BO/sub 2/)/sub 3/. Results on these materials will also be discussed.

  9. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  10. Laser diode initiated detonators for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewick, David W.; Graham, J. A.; Hawley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ensign Bickford Aerospace Company (EBAC) has over ten years of experience in the design and development of laser ordnance systems. Recent efforts have focused on the development of laser diode ordnance systems for space applications. Because the laser initiated detonators contain only insensitive secondary explosives, a high degree of system safety is achieved. Typical performance characteristics of a laser diode initiated detonator are described in this paper, including all-fire level, function time, and output. A finite difference model used at EBAC to predict detonator performance, is described and calculated results are compared to experimental data. Finally, the use of statistically designed experiments to evaluate performance of laser initiated detonators is discussed.

  11. Laser applications in surgery

    PubMed Central

    Azadgoli, Beina

    2016-01-01

    In modern medicine, lasers are increasingly utilized for treatment of a variety of pathologies as interest in less invasive treatment modalities intensifies. The physics behind lasers allows the same basic principles to be applied to a multitude of tissue types using slight modifications of the system. Multiple laser systems have been studied within each field of medicine. The term “laser” was combined with “surgery,” “ablation,” “lithotripsy,” “cancer treatment,” “tumor ablation,” “dermatology,” “skin rejuvenation,” “lipolysis,” “cardiology,” “atrial fibrillation (AF),” and “epilepsy” during separate searches in the PubMed database. Original articles that studied the application of laser energy for these conditions were reviewed and included. A review of laser therapy is presented. Laser energy can be safely and effectively used for lithotripsy, for the treatment of various types of cancer, for a multitude of cosmetic and reconstructive procedures, and for the ablation of abnormal conductive pathways. For each of these conditions, management with lasers is comparable to, and potentially superior to, management with more traditional methods. PMID:28090508

  12. Novel oral laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-03-01

    In dental hard tissue ablation, ultra-short laser pulses have proven sufficiently their potential for material ablation with negligible collateral damage providing many advantages. The absence of micro-cracks and the possibility to avoid overheating of the pulp during dental cavity preparation may be among the most important issues, the latter opening up an avenue for potential painless treatment. Beside the evident short interaction time of laser radiation with the irradiated tissue, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of required quality and shape. Additionally, long-pulsed laser systems have demonstrated successfully their suitability for decontamination purposes. In this paper, an overview of different indications for laser application in dental therapies in both pulse regimes is presented. A special focus is set on the decontamination of dental implants in periimplantitis therapy. Having employed commercially available long pulse systems for dental applications and ultra-short 330 fs pulses, we present first results for temperature development and corresponding ablation thresholds for dental implants, as in the future more gentle implant cleaning by ultra-short laser pulses could become of interest.

  13. Medical Applications of Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, S.

    1989-01-01

    Lasers are finding many applications in medicine and biology. While most laser use focuses on the heat generation of the laser beam interacting with tissue, spectroscopic aspects play a more dominating part in a number of emerging applications. Tumour-seeking agents, such as hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), in combination with laser radiation provide new possibilities for cancer tumour detection and treatment. The fluorescence emission from tissue irradiated with UV light can be used for tumour localization. Natural tissue fluorescence as well as fluorescence due to injected HPD can be utilized. Results from studies on animals and from clinical applications are reported. The use of fluorescence for identifying atherosclerotic plaque in human vessels is illustrated. Spectroscopic analysis of the laser-induced plasma obtained when a high-power, pulsed laser beam interacts with tissue is also discussed with applications to plaque removal and laser fragmentation of kidney- and gall-stones.

  14. Surgical applications of femtosecond lasers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Samuel H; Mazur, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation permits non-invasive surgeries in the bulk of a sample with submicrometer resolution. We briefly review the history of optical surgery techniques and the experimental background of femtosecond laser ablation. Next, we present several clinical applications, including dental surgery and eye surgery. We then summarize research applications, encompassing cell and tissue studies, research on C. elegans, and studies in zebrafish. We conclude by discussing future trends of femtosecond laser systems and some possible application directions.

  15. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra.

  16. Laser sources for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilmer, J.; Iadevaia, A.; Yin, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Advanced LIDAR applications such as next gen: Micro Pulse; Time of Flight (e.g., Satellite Laser Ranging); Coherent and Incoherent Doppler (e.g., Wind LIDAR); High Spectral Resolution; Differential Absorption (DIAL); photon counting LIDAR (e.g., 3D LIDAR); are placing more demanding requirements on conventional lasers (e.g., increased rep rates, etc.) and have inspired the development of new types of laser sources. Today, solid state lasers are used for wind sensing, 2D laser Radar, 3D scanning and flash LIDAR. In this paper, we report on the development of compact, highly efficient, high power all-solidstate diode pulsed pumped ns lasers, as well as, high average power/high pulse energy sub nanosecond (<1ns) and picosecond (<100ps) lasers for these next gen LIDAR applications.

  17. Laser scribe optimization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wannamaker, A.L.

    1996-09-01

    The laser scribe characterization/optimization project was initiated to better understand what factors influence response variables of the laser marking process. The laser marking system is utilized to indelibly identify weapon system components. Many components have limited field life, and traceability to production origin is critical. In many cases, the reliability of the weapon system and the safety of the users can be attributed to individual and subassembly component fabrication processes. Laser beam penetration of the substrate material may affect product function. The design agency for the DOE had requested that Federal Manufacturing and Technologies characterize the laser marking process and implement controls on critical process parameters.

  18. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  19. Application of lasers in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertl, Thomas P.; Benthin, Hartmut; Majaron, Boris; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1997-12-01

    Root canal treatment is still a problem in dentistry. Very often the conventional treatment fails and several treatment sessions are necessary to save the tooth from root resection or extraction. Application of lasers may help in this situation. Bacteria reduction has been demonstrated both in vitro and clinically and is either based on laser induced thermal effects or by using an ultraviolet light source. Root canal cleansing is possible by Er:YAG/YSGG-Lasers, using the hydrodynamic motion of a fluid filled in the canals. However root canal shaping using lasers is still a problem. Via falsas and fiber breakage are points of research.

  20. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  1. Applications of Laser Scattering Probes to Turbulent Diffusion Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    APPLICATIONS OF LASER SCATTERING PROBES TO TURBULENT DIFFUSION FLAMES u ^ j FINAL REPORT Contract N00014-80-C-0882 Submitted to Office of...Include Security Classification) Applications of Laser Scattering Probes to Turbulent Diffusion Flames PROJECT NO. TASK NO. WORK UNIT NO. 12...for a co-flowing jet turbulent diffusion flame, and planar laser-induced fluorescence to provide two- dimensional instantaneous images of the flame

  2. Applications of Laser Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    sonics Phantom v5.0 Photron FASTCAM- Ultima SE 1 6 PDE Exhaust Exhaust Flow from High-Speed Camera (18,000 fps) Image from Conventional Video Camera...employing DCM laser dye) with a second frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser; this results in laser radiation at 640 nm (40 mJ/pulse at the...digital imaging at rates up to 62,500 frames-per-second (fps) is employed using a Phantom v5.0 CMOS-based digital camera. At this framing rate, it

  3. Ultrafast fiber lasers: practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastirk, Igor; Sell, Alexander; Herda, Robert; Brodschelm, Andreas; Zach, Armin

    2015-05-01

    Over past three decades ultrafast lasers have come a long way from the bulky, demanding and very sensitive scientific research projects to widely available commercial products. For the majority of this period the titanium-sapphire-based ultrafast systems were the workhorse for scientific and emerging industrial and biomedical applications. However the complexity and intrinsic bulkiness of solid state lasers have prevented even larger penetration into wider array of practical applications. With emergence of femtosecond fiber lasers, based primarily on Er-doped and Yb-doped fibers that provide compact, inexpensive and dependable fs and ps pulses, new practical applications have become a reality. The overview of current state of the art ultrafast fiber sources, their basic principles and most prominent applications will be presented, including micromachining and biomedical implementations (ophthalmology) on one end of the pulse energy spectrum and 3D lithography and THz applications on the other.

  4. Space tug applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This article is the final report of the conceptual design efforts for a `space tug`. It includes preliminary efforts, mission analysis, configuration analysis, impact analysis, and conclusions. Of the several concepts evaluated, the nuclear bimodal tug was one of the top candidates, with the two options being the NEBA-1 and NEBA-3 systems. Several potential tug benefits were identified during the mission analysis. The tug enables delivery of large (>3,500 kg) payloads to the outer planets and it increases the GSO delivery capability by 20% relative to current systems. By providing end of life disposal, the tug can be used to extend the life of existing space assets. It can also be used to reboost satellites which were not delivered to their final orbit by the launch system. A specific mission model is the key to validating the tug concept. Once a mission model can be established, mission analysis can be used to determine more precise propellant quantities and burn times. In addition, the specific payloads can be evaluated for mass and volume capability with the launch systems. Results of the economic analysis will be dependent on the total years of operations and the number of missions in the mission model. The mission applications evaluated during this phase drove the need for large propellant quantities and thus did not allow the payloads to step down to smaller and less expensive launch systems.

  5. Laser Science and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nadi, Lotfia M.; Mansour, Mohy S.

    2010-04-01

    Attosecond high harmonic pulses: generation and characterization / C. H. Nam and K. T. Kim -- High power lasers and interactions / C. Chatwin and R. Young -- Laser accelerators / L. M. El-Nadi ... [et al.] -- Energy levels, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, and gain distributions of S VII, CI VIII, and Ar IX / Wessameldin. S. Abdelaziz and Th. M. El-Sherbini -- The gain distribution according to theoretical level structure and decay dynamics of W[symbol] / H. M. Hamed ... [et al.] -- Raman spectroscopy and low temperature photoluminescence ZnSe[symbol]Te[symbol] ternary alloys / A. Salah ... [et al.] -- Automated polarization-discrimination technique to minimize lidar detected skylight background noise, part I / Y. Y. Hassebo, K. Elsayed and S. Ahmed -- Laser interferometric measurements of the physical properties for He, Ne gases and their mixture / N. M. Abdel-Moniem ... [et al.] -- Analytical studies of laser beam propagation through the atmosphere / M. I. El-Saftawy, A. M. Abd El-Hamed and N. Sh. Kalifa -- Laser techniques in conservation of artworks: problems and breakthroughs / R. Salimbeni and S. Siano -- Technology-aided heritage conservation laser cleaning for buildings / M. S. Nada -- Technology significance in conservation of the built heritage 3D visualization impact / M. S. Nada -- Simulation of optical resonators for Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSEL) / M. S. Mansour ... [et al.] -- Optical design alternatives: a survey study / A. A. K. Ismail, I. A. S. Ismail and S. H. Ahmed -- Materials for digital optical design; a survey study / A. A. K. Ismail, I. A. S. Ismail and S. H. Ahmed -- Proposed design for optical digital circuits / A. A. K. Ismail, I. A. S. Ismail and S. H. Ahmed -- Photo-induced effect on bacterial cells / M. H. El Batanouny ... [et al.] -- Laser and non-coherent light effect on peripheral blood normal and acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells by using different types of photosensitizers / M. H. El Batanouny ... [et al

  6. Laser applications in wood processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broenstad, B. M.; Auman, N.; Toennessen, K.

    1993-08-01

    Lasers have been used for special woodprocessing purposes for more than twenty years. Besides dieboard manufacturing, which was one of the earliest applications, CO2 lasers are also used for different cutting, marking and engraving operations. High quality slots in varying depths are produced in wood and different plywood materials at high cutting speeds and with excellent accuracy. Decorative marking operations are performed by means of masking techniques, or by moving a defocused beam over the workpiece. Formerly collected and stored data is directly used for laser cutting of card-board and 3D map modeling. Examples of products are shown, processing data given and limitations discussed.

  7. Optofluidic lasers and their applications in bioanalysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xudong

    2016-03-01

    The optofluidic laser is an emerging technology that integrates microfluidics, miniaturized laser cavity, and laser gain medium in liquid. It is unique due to its biocompatibility, thus can be used for unconventional bioanalysis, in which biointeraction or process takes place within the optical cavity mode volume. Rather than using fluorescence, the optofluidic laser based detection employs laser emission, i.e., stimulated emission, as the sensing signal, which takes advantage of optical amplification provided by the laser cavity to achieve much higher sensitivity. In this presentation, I will first introduce the concept of optofluidic laser based bioanalysis. Then I will discuss each of the three components (cavity, gain medium, and fluidics) of the optofluidic laser and describe how to use the optofluidic laser in bioanalysis at the molecular, cellular, and tissue level. Finally, I will discuss future research and application directions.

  8. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  9. Argon laser application to endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenau, Richard J.; Ludlow, Marvin; Anderson, David

    1993-07-01

    The application of laser technology to endodontics has been studied for some time. At the present time several major problems are being investigated: (1) removal of infected tissues, (2) sterilization of canals, (3) obturation of canals, and (4) preservation of the vitality of supporting tissues. This list is not intended to imply other problems do not exist or have been solved, but it is a starting point. This paper reviews some of the literature that relates to laser applications to endodontics and concludes with some of the findings from our investigation.

  10. Semiconductor laser applications in rheumatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Suteanu, S.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of laser diode (LD) based equipment for rheumatology are introduced. The first is a portable device which contains single LD emitting at 890 nm laser pulses (time full width 100 nsec) of reprate tunable within (0.5 - 1.5) kHz; the laser beam average power is 0.7 mW at 1 kHz reprate. The second is computer controlled, contains one HeNe laser and 5 LD allowing 6 modes of patient irradiation (placebo effect evaluation included). HeNe laser works in cw at 632.8 nm; the LD works each as described for the portable equipment. HeNe and LD beams are superposed so that HeNe laser spot in the irradiation plane has a 60 mm diameter and the LD spots covers a 50 mm diameter disc centered on the HeNe laser spot. Clinical applications using the second type of equipment are reported; 1287 patients were treated between October 1991 and October 1994. Female/male ratio was 4:1 and their age distribution was between 18 and 85 years. The average number of exposures was 10 and the mean exposure time was 7 minutes. Studies were made on the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative arthritis, degenerative joint diseases, abarticular rheumatism, osteoporosis pain and pains and edema after fractures.

  11. Laser Applications: Implications for Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Jeannette L.

    Recent and projected advances in and commercial applications of lasers and laser technology were examined in order to assist vocational planners in responding to skill needs that will be created by lasers in the next few years. Until recently, most laser applications were in research and development settings; however, in the last several years…

  12. Applications of lasers and electro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B. C.; Low, K. S.; Chen, Y. H.; Ahmad, Harith; Tou, T. Y.

    Supported by the IRPA Programme on Laser Technology and Applications, many types of lasers have been designed, constructed and applied in various areas of science, medicine and industries. Amongst these lasers constructed were high power carbon dioxide lasers, rare gas halide excimer lasers, solid state Neodymium-YAG lasers, nitrogen lasers, flashlamp pumped dye lasers and nitrogen and excimer laser pumped dye lasers. These lasers and the associated electro-optics system, some with computer controlled, are designed and developed for the following areas of applications: (1) industrial applications of high power carbon dioxide lasers for making of i.c. components and other materials processing purposes -- prototype operational systems have been developed; (2) Medical applications of lasers for cancer treatment using the technique of photodynamic therapy -- a new and more effective treatment protocol has been proposed; (3) agricultural applications of lasers in palm oil and palm fruit-fluorescence diagnostic studies -- fruit ripeness signature has been developed and palm oil oxidation level were investigated; (4) development of atmospheric pollution monitoring systems using laser lidar techniques -- laboratory scale systems were developed; and (5) other applications of lasers including laser holographic and interferometric methods for the non destructive testing of materials.

  13. Experimental support for KrF laser modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-19

    This paper is the final report for a project to do characterization studies on the KrF laser system. The project did experimental work on KrF lasers in support of modeling studies, with the objective being to see if this technology could be competitive for use in the ICF program. This program has provided LANL with data critical for their model development. Section 2 describes the laser extraction experiments together with the calibration of the diagnostics and the re-examination of the analysis procedure. Section 3 discusses the gain and transient absorption measurements, and Section 4 gives the conclusion for this program.

  14. FY 2005 Quantum Cascade Laser Alignment System Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hatchell, Brian K.

    2006-01-11

    The Alignment Lasers Task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Project PL211I) is a co-funded project between DOE NA-22 and a Classified Client. This project, which began in the second half of FY03, involved building and delivering a Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser Alignment System to be used for testing the pupil alignment of an infrared sensor by measuring the response from four pairs of diametrically opposed QC lasers. PNNL delivered the system in FY04 and provided technical assistance in FY05 culminating into a successful demonstration of the system. This project evolved from the Laser Development Task of PL211I, which is involved in developing novel laser technology to support development of advanced chemical sensors for detecting the proliferation of nuclear weapons. The laser systems are based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers, a new semiconductor source in the infrared. QC lasers can be tailored to emit light throughout the infrared region (3.5 ? 17 ?m) and have high output power and stability. Thus, these lasers provide an infrared source with superb power and spectral stability enabling them to be used for applications such as alignment and calibration in addition to chemical sensing.

  15. Expanded mode lasers for telecommunications applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lealman, Ian F.

    This thesis describes the development of a long wavelength (1.55 μm) expanded mode semiconductor laser. The increased spot size of the laser improves both the coupling efficiency to cleaved fibre and fibre alignment tolerances and reduces packaging cost. In this type of device the strength of the waveguide is gradually reduced towards the front facet allowing the mode to adiabatically expand so that the laser mode is better matched in size to that of a cleaved fibre. This can be achieved by either reducing the refractive index of the guide or reducing the amount of material in the core. The structure chosen was a buried heterostructure laser that utilised a twin guide consisting of an upper higher refractive index guide (the active region of the laser) above a weak passive guide. The width of the active region was reduced along part of the device allowing the mode to expand into the weak underlying guide. The guide structure was optimised using a variable grid finite difference mode solver, and the taper length calculated by an approximation to Love's method. Detailed results are presented for the measured light-current characteristic, farfield and coupling loss to cleaved fibre. These coupling losses were compared to the calculated data thus allowing the waveguide design to be optimised. Several iterations in the design of the device were undertaken, with the aim of reducing the coupling loss to cleaved single mode fibre without significantly compromising the laser performance. The final device design had extremely low coupling losses as low as 1.2 dB to cleaved fibre. Finally, the positive impact this device had on passive alignment using a silicon motherboard is examined, and the application this technology to a range of other optoelectronic components is discussed.

  16. Laser Weapons for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    IPG fiber lasers , 10 kW/ fiber 7 • Output wavelength is tunable (can operate in atmospheric window) Free Electron Lasers ...Multiple kilowatts over multiple kilometers • Laser power converters can be highly efficient, > 60 % • Fiber lasers are highly compact and... lasers - Free electron lasers • Background • Laser candidates • Additional capabilities - Power beaming 3 Laser Lethality -

  17. Mechanism and clinical application of laser acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhaobing

    1994-08-01

    Low energy laser irradiation in clinical practice can be divided into two categories: irradiation of located parts of the body and laser acupuncture therapy. If the laser with fixed wavelength and proper power is input into certain particular points of the body, it may produce good systemic physiologic effects. This has been proved by many tests on animals and in clinical practice. Some clinical applications are discussed as representative of the therapy. According to the TCM theory on `Ching-lo' (channels), we used the 2 mW - 5 mW laser to treat experimentally more than 30 patients for leuckocytopenia, decreasing of platelets and a lot of inflammatory masses. The effects are dramatic. About the mechanism, we realize that first, the human body is irradiated by the laser, the photon is absorbed by cells, and the cells are polarized and activated. In the next step, the activated energy is transported along the resonance dipoles of the human body. Various physiological functions of the organism and the clinical effects are shown as the final results.

  18. [The application of laser in endodontics].

    PubMed

    He, W X; Liu, N N; Wang, X L; He, X Y

    2016-08-01

    Since laser was introduced in the field of medicine in 1970's, its application range has continuously expanded. The application of laser in endodontics also increased due to its safety and effectiveness in dental treatments. The majority of the laser application researches in dentistry focused on dentin hypersensitivity, removal of carious tissues, tooth preparations, pulp capping or pulpotomy, and root canal treatment. In this article, we reviewed literature on the effects of laser in the treatments of dental and pulp diseases.

  19. The ion acoustic decay instability in a large scale, hot plasma relevant to direct drive laser fusion -- Application to a critical surface diagnostic. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have studied the ion acoustic decay instability in a large ({approximately} 1 mm) scale, hot ({approximately} 1 keV) plasma, which is relevant to a laser fusion reactor target. They have shown that the instability threshold is low. They have developed a novel collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at a 90{degree} scattering angle. The scattering is nonetheless coherent, because of the modest ratio of the frequency of the probe laser to that of the pump laser, such that even for such a large angle, (k{lambda}{sub De}){sup 2} is much less than one. With this system they have measured the electron plasma wave excited by the ion acoustic decay instability near the critical density (n{sub e} {approximately} 0.86 n{sub c}). This allows them to use the frequency of the detected wave to measure the electron temperature in the interaction region, obtaining a result reasonably close to that predicted by the SAGE computer code.

  20. Medical laser application: translation into the clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Hennig, Georg; Brittenham, Gary M.; Rühm, Adrian; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-06-01

    Medical laser applications based on widespread research and development is a very dynamic and increasingly popular field from an ecological as well as an economic point of view. Conferences and personal communication are necessary to identify specific requests and potential unmet needs in this multi- and interdisciplinary discipline. Precise gathering of all information on innovative, new, or renewed techniques is necessary to design medical devices for introduction into clinical applications and finally to become established for routine treatment or diagnosis. Five examples of successfully addressed clinical requests are described to show the long-term endurance in developing light-based innovative clinical concepts and devices. Starting from laboratory medicine, a noninvasive approach to detect signals related to iron deficiency is shown. Based upon photosensitization, fluorescence-guided resection had been discovered, opening the door for photodynamic approaches for the treatment of brain cancer. Thermal laser application in the nasal cavity obtained clinical acceptance by the introduction of new laser wavelengths in clinical consciousness. Varicose veins can be treated by innovative endoluminal treatment methods, thus reducing side effects and saving time. Techniques and developments are presented with potential for diagnosis and treatment to improve the clinical situation for the benefit of the patient.

  1. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Joel

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  2. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  3. Development and Application of XUV Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this program is the development of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) lasers and their application to scientific problems. Laser development concentrates...techniques. Such techniques should have a number of applications and be particularly useful in the life sciences. This report presents recent progress on XUV laser development

  4. The clinical application of laser in otorhinolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guo Zhen; Meng, Zhao-He; Zhang, Zhi Hua

    2005-07-01

    Objective: The paper presented the current application of laser in Otolaryngology in our hospital. Methods: We have applied the carbon dioxide, the YAG, the He-Ne and the Ho:YAG lasers to coagulate or vaporize treated Otolaryngology disease. Results: After treatment, we have a satisfying result. Conclusion: The paper presented the current application of laser respectively in otology, rhinology and pharynolaryngology and some representative of the treated diseases. It also demonstrated that long-term effectiveness of some diseases, such as allergic rhinitis and laryngeal stenosis treated by laser was not satisfying and further studies were expected, laser excision of tonsile was only used in the cases which traditional tonsillectomy was not available. Therefore, to improve clinical laser application greatly, further more research works and cooprations between investors of laser instrument and surgeons of oto-laryngology were necessary. Theory and Clinics of laser application should be improved also.

  5. Catadioptric Optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    In the design of a laser velocimeter system, attention must be given to the performance of the optical elements in their two principal tasks: focusing laser radiation into the probe volume, and collecting the scattered light. For large aperture applications, custom lens design and fabrication costs, long optical path requirements, and chromatic aberration (for two color operation) can be problematic. The adaptation of low cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform these laser beam manipulation and scattered light collection tasks is examined. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray tracing and Gaussian beam propagation theory, and a simple modification procedure for converting from infinite to near unity conjugate ratio operation with image quality near the diffraction limit was identified. Modification requirements and performance are predicted for a range of geometries. Finally, a 200-mm-aperture telescope was modified for f/10 operation; performance data for this modified optic for both laser beam focusing and scattered light collection tasks agree well with predictions.

  6. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  7. Laser ignition application in a space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Larry C.; Culley, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    A laser ignition system is proposed for the Combustion Experiment Module on an orbiting spacecraft. The results of a design study are given using the scheduled 'Flame Ball Experiment' as the design guidelines. Three laser ignition mechanisms and wavelengths are evaluated. A prototype laser is chosen and its specifications are given, followed by consideration of the beam optical arrangement, the ignition power requirement, the laser ignition system weight, size, reliability, and laser cooling and power consumption. Electromagnetic interference to the onboard electronics caused by the laser ignition process is discussed. Finally, ground tests are suggested.

  8. Application of lasers in laparoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanowski, Edward; Domaniecki, Janusz

    1995-03-01

    The application of laser light and laparoscopy attenuates operative trauma owing to the use of small incisions for introducing the trochars necessary for conveying the surgical instruments and fiber optics which allow for precise cutting and coagulation of small vessels under control of the image on a TV monitor. The present, most remarkable development of laparoscopic surgery is due to the fascination of physicians and patients by this procedure. The method enables the physician to operate with great precision and to take advantage of the most recent attainments of electronics and laser technique, as well as of his own ability. The patients profit by attenuation of postoperative pain, limitation of the probability of infection, reduced blood loss, decreased number of postoperative complications, shortening of the hospitalization period, and rapid return to physical fitness and work.

  9. Applications analysis of high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, R. D.; Mackay, J. S.; Nishioka, K.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis and comparison of laser technology with competing technologies were made to determine possible laser applications. The analysis was undertaken as follows: (1) possible applications were listed and categorized; (2) required components were enumerated and the characteristics of these components were extrapolated; (3) complete system characteristics were calculated parametrically for selected applications using the postulated component characteristics; and (4) where possible and appropriate, comparisons were made with competing systems. It was found that any large scale replacement of existing systems and methods by lasers requires many technological advances in laser and associated systems. However, several applications appear feasible, such as low orbit drag make-up, orbit changing, communications, and illumination applications.

  10. Application of laser in obstetrics and gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ai-Hua

    1998-11-01

    Mainman developed the first ruby laser in 1960 and after 13 Kaplan successfully reported the use of CO2 laser in the treatment of cervicitis. Soon after, Chinese gynecologists started to use the laser for diagnosis and therapy. It had been proved that more than 30 kinds of gynecological diseases could be treated effectively by laser. The remarkable laser treatment technique partially replaced with conventional methods used in that century. However, the application of laser had shown a broad prospect along with its further investigation.

  11. A review of laser applications in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yunlong; Rabie, A B M; Wong, R W K

    2014-01-01

    Laser technique now is widely applied in orthodontic treatment and proved to have many benefits. Soft tissue lasers can be used to perform gingivectomy, frenectomy and surgical exposure of tooth with less bleeding and swelling, improved precision, reduced pain and less wound contraction. Other laser applications include enamel etching and bonding and bracket debonding. Lower level lasers have the potential effects of pain control and accelerating tooth movement. Clinicians must be aware of the safety issues and risks associated with laser and receive proper training before the laser treatment is started.

  12. Laser technology and applications in gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Adelman, M R; Tsai, L J; Tangchitnob, E P; Kahn, B S

    2013-04-01

    The term 'laser' is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers are commonly described by the emitted wavelength, which determines the colour of the light, as well as the active lasing medium. Currently, over 40 types of lasers have been developed with a wide range of both industrial and medical uses. Gas and solid-state lasers are frequently used in surgical applications, with CO2 and Ar being the most common examples of gas lasers, and the Nd:YAG and KTP:YAG being the most common examples of solid-state lasers. At present, it appears that the CO2, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers provide alternative methods for achieving similar results, as opposed to superior results, when compared with traditional endoscopic techniques, such as cold-cutting monopolar and bipolar energy. This review focuses on the physics, tissue interaction, safety and applications of commonly used lasers in gynaecological surgery.

  13. Laser Development for Laser Fusion Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    the Z-80 microprocessor to process the fringe pattern, incorporating items 2 and 3 above. Currently, the Reticon data can be read and processed...COLLIMATING TELESCOPE RETICON PHOTODIODE ARRAY ADC ^PROCESSOR SUBSYSTEM FIZEAU COMPENSATING WEDGE PLATE TO WAVELENGTH CONTROLLER Fig. 59...incidence was ~4 degrees, with the Reticon array 30 cm from the wedge. The light source was a single wavelength, from a cw HeNe laser, so no

  14. Microwave modeling of laser plasma interactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    For a large laser fusion targets and nanosecond pulse lengths, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and self-focusing are expected to be significant problems. The goal of the contractual effort was to examine certain aspects of these physical phenomena in a wavelength regime (lambda approx.5 cm) more amenable to detailed diagnostics than that characteristic of laser fusion (lambda approx.1 micron). The effort was to include the design, fabrication and operation of a suitable experimental apparatus. In addition, collaboration with Dr. Neville Luhmann and his associates at UCLA and with Dr. Curt Randall of LLNL, on analysis and modelling of the UCLA experiments was continued. Design and fabrication of the TRW experiment is described under ''Experiment Design'' and ''Experimental Apparatus''. The design goals for the key elements of the experimental apparatus were met, but final integration and operation of the experiment was not accomplished. Some theoretical considerations on the interaction between Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Self-Focusing are also presented.

  15. The ion acoustic decay instability, and anomalous laser light absorption for the OMEGA upgrade, large scale hot plasma application to a critical surface diagnostic, and instability at the quarter critical density. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Seka, W.

    1996-11-01

    It is shown that laser light can be anomalously absorbed with a moderate intensity laster (I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}-{mu}m{sup 2}) in a large scale, laser produced plasma. The heating regime, which is characterized by a relatively weak instability in a large region, is different from the regime studied previously, which is characterized by a strong instability in a narrow region. The two dimensional geometrical effect (lateral heating) has an important consequence on the anomalous electron heating. The characteristics of the IADI, and the anomalous absorption of the laser light were studied in a large scale, hot plasma applicable to OMEGA upgrade plasma. These results are important for the diagnostic application of the IADI.

  16. Laser-induced periodic surface structures, modeling, experiments, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, G. R. B. E.; Skolski, J. Z. P.; Oboňa, J. Vincenc; Ocelík, V.; de Hosson, J. T. M.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) consist of regular wavy surface structures, or ripples, with amplitudes and periodicity in the sub-micrometer range. A summary of experimentally observed LIPSSs is presented, as well as our model explaining their possible origin. Linearly polarized continuous wave (cw) or pulsed laser light, at normal incidence, can produce LIPSSs with a periodicity close to the laser wavelength, and direction orthogonal to the polarization on the surface of the material. Ripples with a periodicity (much) smaller than the laser wavelength develop when applying laser pulses with ultra-short durations in the femtosecond and picosecond regime. The direction of these ripples is either parallel or orthogonal to the polarization direction. Finally, when applying numerous pulses, structures with periodicity larger than the laser wavelength can form, which are referred to as "grooves". The physical origin of LIPSSs is still under debate. The strong correlation of the ripple periodicity to the laser wavelength, suggests that their formation can be explained by an electromagnetic approach. Recent results from a numerical electromagnetic model, predicting the spatially modulated absorbed laser energy, are discussed. This model can explain the origin of several characteristics of LIPSSs. Finally, applications of LIPSSs will be discussed.

  17. Soft x-ray laser microscope. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL`s 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  18. Safe laser application requires more than laser safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frevel, A.; Steffensen, B.; Vassie, L.

    1995-02-01

    An overview is presented concerning aspects of laser safety in European industrial laser use. Surveys indicate that there is a large variation in the safety strategies amongst industrial laser users. Some key problem areas are highlighted. Emission of hazardous substances is a major problem for users of laser material processing systems where the majority of the particulate is of a sub-micrometre size, presenting a respiratory hazard. Studies show that in many cases emissions are not frequently monitored in factories and uncertainty exists over the hazards. Operators of laser machines do not receive adequate job training or safety training. The problem is compounded by a plethora of regulations and standards which are difficult to interpret and implement, and inspectors who are not conversant with the technology or the issues. A case is demonstrated for a more integrated approach to laser safety, taking into account the development of laser applications, organizational and personnel development, in addition to environmental and occupational health and safety aspects. It is necessary to achieve a harmonization between these elements in any organization involved in laser technology. This might be achieved through establishing technology transfer centres in laser technology.

  19. Cascade laser applications: trends and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Humières, B.; Margoto, Éric; Fazilleau, Yves

    2016-03-01

    When analyses need rapid measurements, cost effective monitoring and miniaturization, tunable semiconductor lasers can be very good sources. Indeed, applications like on-field environmental gas analysis or in-line industrial process control are becoming available thanks to the advantage of tunable semiconductor lasers. Advances in cascade lasers (CL) are revolutionizing Mid-IR spectroscopy with two alternatives: interband cascade lasers (ICL) in the 3-6μm spectrum and quantum cascade lasers (QCL), with more power from 3 to 300μm. The market is getting mature with strong players for driving applications like industry, environment, life science or transports. CL are not the only Mid-IR laser source. In fact, a strong competition is now taking place with other technologies like: OPO, VCSEL, Solid State lasers, Gas, SC Infrared or fiber lasers. In other words, CL have to conquer a share of the Mid-IR application market. Our study is a market analysis of CL technologies and their applications. It shows that improvements of components performance, along with the progress of infrared laser spectroscopy will drive the CL market growth. We compare CL technologies with other Mid-IR sources and estimate their share in each application market.

  20. Chirped Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy: Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Genevieve B.

    The subject of this thesis is the fundamentals, implementation, and applications of Chirped Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (CLaDS), an alternative dispersion spectroscopy technique that aims to overcome some limitations of absorption-based sensing. CLaDS preserves many of the benefits of dispersion sensing, namely baseline-free operation, immunity to received intensity, and linearity with sample concentration, and is fairly easy to implement without the need for stabilized interferometers, mode-locked lasers, and complex optical configurations required by many other dispersion-based sensors. First an introduction to CLaDS and a derivation of the spectroscopic signals are provided, highlighting fundamental similarities and differences to absorption-based sensing. Next the fundamental limit of CLaDS is investigated through analysis of the shot-noise limited performance under ideal operating conditions. This in turn allows for a theoretical and direct comparison to the shot-noise-limited performance of direct laser absorption spectroscopy (DLAS). This investigation shows that when full spectral scan fitting of realistic unknown parameters for each technique is used, both techniques demonstrate the same efficiency of parameter extraction. Following this theoretical investigation of ideal CLaDS performance, the technical details, methods of implementation, and component-introduced limitations of real-world CLaDS systems are discussed. Also included is a discussion of the first demonstration of an optical heterodyne enhanced CLaDS technique (HE-CLaDS). To overcome some of the technical limitations imposed by system instability, a modulation based technique (CM-CLaDS) was developed; the theory, optimization and noise characteristics of which are detailed. Finally, several applications of CLaDS are provided. These include atmospheric sensing, distributed sensor networks, and fiber dispersion characterization, all of which aim at demonstrating the technical advantages of the

  1. Fiber lasers and their applications [Invited].

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Fang, Qiang; Zhu, Xiushan; Norwood, R A; Peyghambarian, N

    2014-10-01

    Fiber lasers have seen progressive developments in terms of spectral coverage and linewidth, output power, pulse energy, and ultrashort pulse width since the first demonstration of a glass fiber laser in 1964. Their applications have extended into a variety of fields accordingly. In this paper, the milestones of glass fiber laser development are briefly reviewed and recent advances of high-power continuous wave, Q-switched, mode-locked, and single-frequency fiber lasers in the 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 μm regions and their applications in such areas as industry, medicine, research, defense, and security are addressed in detail.

  2. Surgical application of lasers. 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Lasers have been successfully used in several new clinical areas such as cardiovascular, orthopedic, and pulmonary surgery as well as in specialties covered in the first edition including otorhinolaryngology, dermatology and plastic surgery, gastroenterology, and urology. These advances are all discussed in this text. Introductory chapters cover the background of laser surgery, techniques and instrumentation and safety procedures. The remaining chapters cover lasers in specific fields such as endoscopic surgery, gynecology, neurosurgery and many more. The final chapters provide an overview of photodynamic therapy and the future of laser surgery.

  3. Current status of laser applications in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipper, Ansgar; Thomas, Stephen; Durek, C.; Jocham, Dieter

    1993-05-01

    The overall development of laser use in urology is recessing. The reasons are the refinement of methods of radical surgery and the continuing development of alternative technologies involving electric current. Taking the cost factor into account, are lasers still opportune in medicine? The answer is definitely yes. Cost reduction in medical practice without quality loss is only possible with effective methods of minimally invasive surgery. Continuing investigation of cutting, welding, coagulating and ablating instruments is justified. Competition of lasers to other technologies can only be beneficial to the cause. But where are the highlights of laser applications? The unsurpassed utilization of optical properties of lasers lie in the concept of photodynamic therapies and in optical feedback mechanisms for laser applications. The combination of lasers with three dimensional visualization of the treatment area by ultrasound (TULIP-procedure for benign prostatic hyperplasia) is a novel approach in laser application. The further development of these treatment modalities will reveal the true benefit of laser technology in urological applications.

  4. Advantages of laser application in endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J G

    1993-08-01

    This article discusses the various kinds of laser therapy used in endoscopic surgery and their respective indications. Following a brief introduction into the basics of laser-tissue-interaction it is shown how less expensive treatment modalities have narrowed the range of laser applications to very specific purposes. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding argon and KTP lasers are mainly used for treatment of pigmented gut lesions. In malignant disease the combined use of balloon dilatation and laser irradiation has proved efficient in restoring patency to the gastrointestinal tract. Argon and CO2 lasers are used by gynaecologists for ablation of endometrioma. In an assessment of future prospects it is concluded that the lasting value of the laser lies in its ability to selectively destroy pigmented pathologic tissues.

  5. Laser applications in ophthalmology: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soederberg, Per G.

    1992-03-01

    In 1961, one year after its invention, the laser was used for experimental photocoagulation in animals. In 1963 it was tried for treatment of human eyes. Due to the fact that the optical media in the eye are transmissible to light, the laser offers the unique possibility of measuring and manipulating within a very strict localization without opening the eye. The properties of laser light are increasingly exploited for diagnostics in ophthalmic disease. The introduction of the laser as a tool in ophthalmology has revolutionized ophthalmic treatment. Unfortunately, it has been pointed out in international peace meetings that the biological effect evoked by lasers can also be used for intentional destruction of the vision of enemy soldiers. To prevent such an abuse of lasers against eyes, a strong formal international anti-laser weapon movement has been initiated.

  6. Short Pulse Laser Applications Design

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Clark, D S; Kemp, A J; Lasinski, B F; Tabak, M

    2008-02-11

    We are applying our recently developed, LDRD-funded computational simulation tool to optimize and develop applications of Fast Ignition (FI) for stockpile stewardship. This report summarizes the work performed during a one-year exploratory research LDRD to develop FI point designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These results were sufficiently encouraging to propose successfully a strategic initiative LDRD to design and perform the definitive FI experiment on the NIF. Ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will begin in 2010 using the central hot spot (CHS) approach, which relies on the simultaneous compression and ignition of a spherical fuel capsule. Unlike this approach, the fast ignition (FI) method separates fuel compression from the ignition phase. In the compression phase, a laser such as NIF is used to implode a shell either directly, or by x rays generated from the hohlraum wall, to form a compact dense ({approx}300 g/cm{sup 3}) fuel mass with an areal density of {approx}3.0 g/cm{sup 2}. To ignite such a fuel assembly requires depositing {approx}20kJ into a {approx}35 {micro}m spot delivered in a short time compared to the fuel disassembly time ({approx}20ps). This energy is delivered during the ignition phase by relativistic electrons generated by the interaction of an ultra-short high-intensity laser. The main advantages of FI over the CHS approach are higher gain, a lower ignition threshold, and a relaxation of the stringent symmetry requirements required by the CHS approach. There is worldwide interest in FI and its associated science. Major experimental facilities are being constructed which will enable 'proof of principle' tests of FI in integrated subignition experiments, most notably the OMEGA-EP facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory of Laser Energetics and the FIREX facility at Osaka University in Japan. Also, scientists in the European Union have recently proposed the construction of a new FI

  7. Laser Application on Orthopaedic Bone Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Body weight gain in the laser-treated animals was similar to that in non -laser treated animals during the healing period. These results showed a...technology to replace bone loss. However, major complications reported for grafting procedures are infection, bone graft fracture, non -union at the graft...Recent reports indicates Er:YAG laser provides; (1) advantageous bone surface for bone tissue repair; (2) bactericidal effect; (3) applications for

  8. Laser applications in advanced chip packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Dirk; Held, Andrew; Pätzel, Rainer; Clark, Dave; van Nunen, Joris

    2016-03-01

    While applications such as drilling μ-vias and laser direct imaging have been well established in the electronics industry, the mobile device industry's push for miniaturization is generating new demands for packaging technologies that allow for further reduction in feature size while reducing manufacturing cost. CO lasers have recently become available and their shorter wavelength allows for a smaller focus and drilling hole diameters down to 25μm whilst keeping the cost similar to CO2 lasers. Similarly, nanosecond UV lasers have gained significantly in power, become more reliable and lower in cost. On a separate front, the cost of ownership reduction for Excimer lasers has made this class of lasers attractive for structuring redistribution layers of IC substrates with feature sizes down to 2μm. Improvements in reliability and lower up-front cost for picosecond lasers is enabling applications that previously were only cost effective with mechanical means or long-pulsed lasers. We can now span the gamut from 100μm to 2μm for via drilling and can cost effectively structure redistribution layers with lasers instead of UV lamps or singulate packages with picosecond lasers.

  9. Advanced photoinjector laser and microwave technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F.V.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Talley, W.K.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of the design parameters of the compact, high gradient, high luminosity X-band (8.568 GHz) photoinjector facility currently being developed as a collaborative effort between LLNL and UC Davis, is followed by a more detailed description of each of its major subsystems : X-band rf gun, GHz repetition rate synchronously modelocked AlGaAs quantum well laser oscillator, and 8-pass Ti: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} chirped pulse laser amplifier. The photoinjector uses a high quantum efficiency ({approx}5%) Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode, and will be capable of producing high charge (> 1 nC), relativistic (5 MeV), ultrashort (< 1 ps) electron bunches at 2.142 GHz repetition rate in burst mode (100 photoelectron bunches). Design studies indicate that a normalized rms transverse emittance {epsilon}{sub n} = 0.75 {pi} mm-mrad is possible at 0.1 nC charge, while 2.5 {pi} mm-mrad can be obtained at 1 nC. A complete status report of our progress in the development and implementation of the design discussed herein is then given, together with initial experimental data concerning the performance of the 15 MW SLAC X-band klystron amplifier. Finally, the phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of the high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. In this case, the laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT. A comparison between the TWT phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q cavity resonant structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a magnetron or a cross-field amplifier.

  10. Fiber optic applications for laser polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1997-10-01

    For the past two years, the laser polarized target group at Argonne has been used multi-mode fiber optic patch cords for a variety of applications. In this paper, the authors describe the design for transporting high power laser beams with optical fibers currently in use at IUCF.

  11. Lasers '92; Proceedings of the International Conference on Lasers and Applications, 15th, Houston, TX, Dec. 7-10, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Charles P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented, and the topics covered include the following: x-ray lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, high power lasers, blue-green lasers, dye lasers, solid state lasers, semiconductor lasers, gas and discharge lasers, carbon dioxide lasers, ultrafast phenomena, nonlinear optics, quantum optics, dynamic gratings and wave mixing, laser radar, lasers in medicine, optical filters and laser communication, optical techniques and instruments, laser material interaction, and industrial and manufacturing applications.

  12. GAS LASERS FOR STRONG-FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2004-09-15

    Atomic-, molecular- and excimer-gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers can produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer- and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for generating pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are underway and prospects are opening up to bring ultrafast gas laser technology to the front lines of advanced accelerator applications.

  13. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  14. Final report for miniature laser ignited bellows motor

    SciTech Connect

    Renfro, S.L.

    1994-02-18

    A miniature optically ignited actuation device has been demonstrated using a laser diode as an ignition source. This pyrotechnic driven motor provides between 4 and 6 lbs of linear force across a 0.090 inch diameter surface. The physical envelope of the device is 1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch diameter. This unique application of optical energy can be used as a mechanical link in optical arming systems or other applications where low shock actuation is desired and space is limited. An analysis was performed to determine pyrotechnic materials suitable to actuate a bellows device constructed of aluminum or stainless steel. The aluminum bellows was chosen for further development and several candidate pyrotechnics were evaluated. The velocity profile and delivered force were quantified using an non-intrusive optical motion sensor.

  15. Laser-based nanoengineering of surface topographies for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlie, Sabrina; Fadeeva, Elena; Koroleva, Anastasia; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Koch, Jürgen; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Chichkov, Boris. N.

    2011-04-01

    In this study femtosecond laser systems were used for nanoengineering of special surface topographies in silicon and titanium. Besides the control of feature sizes, we demonstrated that laser structuring caused changes in material wettability due to a reduced surface contact area. These laser-engineered topographies were tested for their capability to control cellular behavior of human fibroblasts, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and MG-63 osteoblasts. We found that fibroblasts reduced cell growth on the structures, while the other cell types proliferated at the same rate. These findings make laser-surface structuring very attractive for biomedical applications. Finally, to explain the results the correlation between topography and the biophysics of cellular adhesion, which is the key step of selective cell control, is discussed.

  16. Medical applications of ultra-short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B M; Marion, J E

    1999-06-08

    The medical applications for ultra short pulse lasers (USPLs) and their associated commercial potential are reviewed. Short pulse lasers offer the surgeon the possibility of precision cutting or disruption of tissue with virtually no thermal or mechanical damage to the surrounding areas. Therefore the USPL offers potential improvement to numerous existing medical procedures. Secondly, when USPLs are combined with advanced tissue diagnostics, there are possibilities for tissue-selective precision ablation that may allow for new surgeries that cannot at present be performed. Here we briefly review the advantages of short pulse lasers, examine the potential markets both from an investment community perspective, and from the view. of the technology provider. Finally nominal performance and cost requirements for the lasers, delivery systems and diagnostics and the present state of development will be addressed.

  17. Application of Laser Irradiation for Restorative Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Amin; Sanei, Maryam; Badrian, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, lasers are widely used in many fields of medicine. Also, they can be applied at many branches of dental practice such as diagnosis, preventive procedures, restorative treatments, and endodontic therapies. Procedures like caries removal, re-mineralization, and vital pulp therapy are the most noticeable effects of laser irradiation which has gained much attention among clinicians. With controlled and appropriate wavelength, they can help stimulating dentinogenesis, controlling pulpal hemorrhage, sterilization, healing of collagenic proteins, formation of a fibrous matrix, and inducing hard tissue barrier. Nevertheless, there are many controversies in literatures regarding their effects on the quality of bonded restorations. It hampered a wide application of lasers in some aspects of restorative dentistry and requirements to identify the best way to use this technology. The aim of this mini review is to explain special characteristics of laser therapy and to introduce the possible applications of laser devices for dental purposes. PMID:27990188

  18. Laser power beaming for satellite applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.

    1993-09-22

    A serious consideration of laser power beaming for satellite applications appears to have grown out of a NASA mission analysis for transmitting power to lunar bases during the two week dark period. System analyses showed that laser power beaming to the moon in conjunction with efficient, large area solar cell collection panels, were an attractive alternative to other schemes such as battery storage and nuclear generators, largely because of the high space transportation costs. The primary difficulty with this scheme is the need for very high average power visible lasers. One system study indicated that lasers in excess of 10 MW at a wavelength of approximately 850 nm were required. Although such lasers systems have received much attention for military applications, their realization is still a long term goal.

  19. Electro-Optical Laser Technology. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawn, John H.

    This report describes a program to prepare students for employment as laser technicians and laser operators and to ensure that they have the necessary skills required by the industry. The objectives are to prepare a curriculum and syllabus for an associate degree program in Electro-Optical Laser Technology. The 2-year Electro-Optical Laser program…

  20. Polymers in lens design for laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasarova, Stefka N.; Sultanova, Nina G.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2015-01-01

    Successful application of optical materials in lens design is based on the knowledge of their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have obtained precise refractometric data of various optical polymers in the visible and near-infrared area. Different refractive index measuring techniques have been used. On base of the detailed study of refractive, dispersive, thermal and other important material characteristics of polymers, optical design of all-plastic systems for laser applications is proposed: a laser expander for 532 nm emission wavelength and a focusing microlens intended for reading/recording laser heads of DVD discs at 650 nm. Geometric and wave aberrations are computed and minimised.

  1. Applications of spaceborne laser ranger on EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; Cohen, Steven C.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the design concept and potential applications in science and engineering of the spaceborne laser ranging and altimeter apparatus employed by the Geodynamics Laser Ranging System; this is scheduled for 1997 launch as part of the multiple-satellite Earth Observing System. In the retrograding mode for geodynamics, the system will use a Nd:YAG laser's green and UV output for distance determination to ground retroreflectors. Engineering applications encompass land management and long-term ground stability studies relevant to nuclear power plant, pipeline, and aqueduct locations.

  2. Lasers and their therapeutic application in chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Fitz-Ritson, Don

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review some of the applications of laser therapy and its reported effects on tissue healing, pain relief and other effects. Several musculoskeletal and low back pain studies are highlighted to show the efficacy of laser therapy and its' applicability as an adjunct to chiropractic treatment. Information is also presented which highlights the necessary information the clinician should be aware of in order to develop specific protocols for musculoskeletal pathologies. The parameters, which are now available on lasers, include power, frequency, duty cycle and cadence. When these are manipulated, different effects are achieved on tissues, which may enhance chiropractic treatment. Imagesp34-a

  3. Laser-light delivery microtools based on laser technology: design, fabrication, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim P.; Voznesensky, Nikolay B.

    2001-06-01

    A set of new laser-light delivery microtools (LDM) based on laser technology is investigated and discussed. Wide application of LDM in different fields of science, medicine, biology, industry and information processing is considered. Fiber optical networks in medical diagnostics and technical, civil engineering and other technological areas are discussed. The general approach based on electromagnetic field equations-transformation for all range of dimensions (mini-, micro and nanodomain) is given. Laser-assisted technology for drawing-out and for microstructuring optical tools is investigated, high-speed movie has been applied to study the process and compared with theoretical description. Finally a number of fibers and micropipettes-based medical tools and SNOM-tips has been fabricated and tested. Applications of some tools for medical operations (thermocoagulation), protein rasters preparing, SNOM-microscopy investigation have been demonstrated.

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy expands into industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Reinhard; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Brunk, Markus; Connemann, Sven; Meinhardt, Christoph; Scharun, Michael; Sturm, Volker; Makowe, Joachim; Gehlen, Christoph

    This paper presents R&D activities in the field of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for industrial applications and shows novel LIBS systems running in routine operation for inline process control tasks. Starting with a comparison of the typical characteristics of LIBS with XRF and spark-discharge optical emission spectrometry, the principal structure of LIBS machines embedded for inline process monitoring will be presented. A systematic requirement analysis for LIBS systems following Ishikawa's scheme was worked out. Stability issues are studied for laser sources and Paschen-Runge spectrometers as key components for industrial LIBS systems. Examples of industrial applications range from handheld LIBS systems using a fiber laser source, via a set of LIBS machines for inline process control tasks, such as scrap analysis, coal analysis, liquid slag analysis and finally monitoring of drill dust.

  5. Laser application for hypertrophic rhinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, Tetsuzo; Tanabe, Tetsuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Ogura, Masami

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 and KTP/532 lasers have been used in the treatment of an allergic and hypertrophic rhinitis for the past several years. As we know, the laser enables a surgeon to perform the operation with minimum hemorrhage and minimized pain, during and after the procedure. Additionally many of these operations can be performed under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia, on an outpatient basis. The laser is used to irradiate the mucous membranes of the inferior turbinates. Vaporization and cutting is easily done. Post operative management of the local operated area is easy. The advantages of laser surgery over regular surgical techniques are supreme for intranasal operations when performed under local anesthesia.

  6. Fiber laser performance in industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, S.; Hassey, A.; Harrison, P.

    2013-02-01

    Fiber lasers are competing with the traditional CO2 Laser, Plasma, Water Jet and Press Punch technology. This paper concentrates on the drivers behind the progress that <=500W CW fiber lasers have made in the thin metal cutting and welding market. Thin metal cutting in this case is defined as below 4mm and the dominant technology has been the Press Punch for higher quality, large volume components and Plasma for lower quality, small quantities. Up until the fiber lasers were commercially available many machine manufacturers were deterred from incorporating lasers due to the technical barriers posed by the lasers available at that time. In particular fiber laser requires no maintenance does not necessitate a beam path to be aligned and kept free of contaminant so have encouraged many traditionally non-laser machine builders to integrate fiber sources into a variety of applications and push the performance envelope. All of the components to build a fibre laser cutting or welding system are now available "off-the shelf" which is even allowing end users to design and build their own systems directly in production environments.

  7. Lasers '87; Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Lasers and Applications, Lake Tahoe, NV, Dec. 7-11, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, F. J.

    Various papers on lasers are presented. The general topics addressed include: laser physics and theory, VUV and X-ray lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, nuclear pumped lasers, blue-green and metal-vapor lasers, dye lasers, solid-state lasers, semiconductor and diode lasers, CO2 lasers, FIR lasers, ultrafast phenomena, nonlinear phenomena, wave mixing and dynamic gratings, and phase conjugation. Also considered are: laser radars and remote sensing, adaptive optics and propagation, imaging, fiber optics, laser spectroscopy, laser dyes, lasers in medicine, optical devices and measuring technique, laser industrial applications, lasers in strategic defense.

  8. Biomedical applications of laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    1999-07-01

    Very soon after the invention of the laser, the use of the thermal effects of the radiation was introduced. Such techniques have been refined and the laser is now routinely used for treatment in many specialities. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-thermal modality employing the combination of a tumor-seeking agent and activating laser light. During the last 15 years laser spectroscopic techniques have also been developed providing powerful means for non-intrusive medical diagnostics of tissue in real time. At the beginning only few groups were involved in exploratory work, but successively the field has developed now to occupy a large number of research teams, which meet at large specialized conferences. We will here consider three aspects of laser diagnostics: fluorescence, Raman and near-IR, and elastic scattering spectroscopy, and we will also briefly discuss PDT. The activity in the field is very extensive, and rather than trying to give a full overview, illustrations from work performed at the Lund University Medical Laser Center will be given.

  9. LDRD Final Report: Adaptive Methods for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M R; Garaizar, F X; Hittinger, J A

    2003-01-29

    effective means of achieving adequate resolution in the crossing region while avoiding the expense of using the same fine grid everywhere, including the region between the beams where no LPI occurs. We applied ALPS to a suite of problems modeling crossed beam experiments performed on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester. Our simulations contributed to the theoretical interpretation of these experiments, which was recently published in Physical Review Letters [4]. This project has advanced the Laboratory's computational capabilities in the area of AMR algorithms and their application to LPI problems. The knowledge gained and software developed will contribute to the computational tools available for use in the design and interpretation of experiments to be performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of Laboratory missions in stockpile stewardship, energy research and high energy density science.

  10. 78 FR 32424 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Monochrome Laser Printers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... unit, laser scanning unit, main drive unit, motor drive board, high voltage power supply board, low... Laser Printers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION... laser printers. Based upon the facts presented, CBP has concluded in the final determination that...

  11. Solid state laser systems for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Since the last report several things have happened to effect the research effort. In laser metrology, measurements using Michelson type interferometers with an FM modulated diode laser source have been performed. The discrete Fourier transform technique has been implemented. Problems associated with this technique as well as the overall FM scheme were identified. The accuracy of the technique is not at the level we would expect at this point. We are now investigating the effect of various types of noise on the accuracy as well as making changes to the system. One problem can be addressed by modifying the original optical layout. Our research effort was also expanded to include the assembly and testing of a diode pumped\\Nd:YAG laser pumped\\Ti sapphire laser for possible use in sounding rocket applications. At this stage, the diode pumped Nd:YAG laser has been assembled and made operational.

  12. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  13. Solar driven lasers for power satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taussio, R.; Cassady, P.; Klosterman, E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological feasibility of using multimagawatt lasers for space power transmission is discussed. Candidate lasers include electric discharge lasers, direct optically pumped lasers, and free electron lasers.

  14. Metal Vapour Lasers: Physics, Engineering and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher E.

    1999-03-01

    Metal Vapour Lasers Christopher E. Little University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland Since the first successful demonstration of a metal vapour laser (MVL) in 1962, this class of laser has become widely used in a broad range of fields including precision materials processing, isotope separation and medicine. The MVLs that are used today have a range of impressive characteristics that are not readily available using other technologies. In particular, the combination of high average output powers, pulse recurrence frequencies and beam quality available from green/yellow Cu vapour lasers (CVLs) and Cu bromide lasers, coupled with the high-quality, multiwatt ultraviolet (265-289 nm) radiation that can be produced using simple nonlinear optical techniques, means that Cu lasers will continue to be important for many years. Metal Vapour Lasers covers all the most commercially important and scientifically interesting pulsed and continuous wave (CW) gas-discharge MVLs, and includes device histories, operating characteristics, engineering, kinetics, commercial exploitation and applications. Short descriptions of gas discharges and excitation techniques make this volume self-consistent. A comprehensive bibliography is also provided. The greater part of this book is devoted to CVLs and their variants, including new sealed-off, high-power 'kinetically enhanced' CVLs and Cu bromide lasers. However, many other self-terminating MVLs are also discussed, including the red AuVL, green/infrared MnVL and infrared BaVL. Pulsed, high-gain, high average power lasers in the UV/violet (373.7, 430.5 nm) spectral regions are represented by Sr¯+ and Ca¯+ discharge-afterglow recombination lasers. The most commercially successful of the MVLs - the CW, UV/blue cataphoretic He-Cd¯+ ion laser - is described. Hollow cathode lasers are represented in two guises: 'white light' (blue/green/red) He-Cd¯+ ion lasers and UV/infrared Ne/He-Cu¯+ ion lasers. This unique volume is an

  15. Forensic Applications Of Copper Laser Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, Edward R.

    1987-04-01

    Copper vapor lasers are being used in forensic applications at more than thirty regional, state and national level forensic science laboratories (crime labs) in the United States, Israel and Japan. These high gain lasing medium systems provide desirable operational and maintenance features. The green line produced by copper vapor lasers allows use of latent fingerprint inherent and chemically induced luminescence techniques developed for argon ion lasers. The yellow line has developed latent fingerprints which would not luminesce at blue-green wavelengths, and is better suited for some forensic examinations such as ink differentiation involving forgeries and document alterations.

  16. Supercontinuum fiber lasers: new developments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, Adam; Hooper, Lucy; Clowes, John

    2016-05-01

    In this talk we give an overview of recent advances in the development of high power supercontinuum fiber lasers with powers exceeding 50W and spectral brightness of tens of mW/nm. We also discuss the fundamental limitations of power scaling and spectral broadening and review the existing and emerging applications of this unique light source which combines the broadband properties of a light bulb with the spatial properties of a laser.

  17. Space Applications Industrial Laser System (SAILS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Bible, J. B.; Mueller, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    A program is underway to develop a YAG laser based materials processing workstation to fly in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. This workstation, called Space Applications Industrial Laser System (SAILS), will be capable of cutting and welding steel, aluminum, and Inconel alloys of the type planned for use in constructing the Space Station Freedom. As well as demonstrating the ability of a YAG laser to perform remote (fiber-optic delivered) repair and fabrication operations in space, fundamental data will be collected on these interactions for comparison with terrestrial data and models. The flight system, scheduled to fly in 1996, will be constructed as three modules using standard Get-Away-Special (GAS) canisters. The first module holds the laser head and cooling system, while the second contains a high peak power electrical supply. The third module houses the materials processing workstation and the command and data acquisition subsystems. The laser head and workstation cansisters are linked by a fiber-optic cable to transmit the laser light. The team assembled to carry out this project includes Lumonics Industrial Products (laser), Tennessee Technological University (structural analysis and fabrication), Auburn University Center for Space Power (electrical engineering), University of Waterloo (low-g laser process consulting), and CSTAR/UTSI (data acquisition, control, software, integration, experiment design). This report describes the SAILS program and highlights recent activities undertaken at CSTAR.

  18. Space Applications Industrial Laser System (SAILS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCay, T. D.; Bible, J. B.; Mueller, R. E.

    1993-10-01

    A program is underway to develop a YAG laser based materials processing workstation to fly in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. This workstation, called Space Applications Industrial Laser System (SAILS), will be capable of cutting and welding steel, aluminum, and Inconel alloys of the type planned for use in constructing the Space Station Freedom. As well as demonstrating the ability of a YAG laser to perform remote (fiber-optic delivered) repair and fabrication operations in space, fundamental data will be collected on these interactions for comparison with terrestrial data and models. The flight system, scheduled to fly in 1996, will be constructed as three modules using standard Get-Away-Special (GAS) canisters. The first module holds the laser head and cooling system, while the second contains a high peak power electrical supply. The third module houses the materials processing workstation and the command and data acquisition subsystems. The laser head and workstation cansisters are linked by a fiber-optic cable to transmit the laser light. The team assembled to carry out this project includes Lumonics Industrial Products (laser), Tennessee Technological University (structural analysis and fabrication), Auburn University Center for Space Power (electrical engineering), University of Waterloo (low-g laser process consulting), and CSTAR/UTSI (data acquisition, control, software, integration, experiment design). This report describes the SAILS program and highlights recent activities undertaken at CSTAR.

  19. Solar Pumped Lasers and Their Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1980, NASA has been pursuing high power solar lasers as part of the space power beaming program. Materials in liquid, solid, and gas phases have been evaluated against the requirements for solar pumping. Two basic characteristics of solar insolation, namely its diffuse irradiance and 5800 K blackbody-like spectrum, impose rather stringent requirements for laser excitation. However, meeting these requirements is not insurmountable as solar thermal energy technology has progressed today, and taking advantage of solar pumping lasers is becoming increasingly attractive. The high density photons of concentrated solar energy have been used for mainly electric power generation and thermal processing of materials by the DOE Solar Thermal Technologies Program. However, the photons can interact with materials through many other direct kinetic paths, and applications of the concentrated photons could be extended to processes requiring photolysis, photosynthesis, and photoexcitation. The use of solar pumped lasers on Earth seems constrained by economics and sociopolitics. Therefore, prospective applications may be limited to those that require use of quantum effects and coherency of the laser in order to generate extremely high value products and services when conventional and inexpensive means are ineffective or impossible. The new applications already proposed for concentrated solar photons, such as destruction of hazardous waste, production of renewable fuel, production of fertilizer, and air/water pollution controls, may benefit from the use of inexpensive solar pumped laser matched with the photochemical kinetics of these processes.

  20. Biomedical applications of laser photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Moore, Larry J.; Fassett, John R.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    1991-07-01

    Trace elements are important for many essential metabolic functions. Zinc is a structural/functional component in more than 200 enzymes active in the biochemistry of cell division and tissue growth, neurology and endocrine control. Calcium is involved in intracellular control mechanisms and in skeletal bone building and resorption processes related to osteoporosis. Sensitive and selective laser photoionization is being developed to understand mechanisms in smaller samples and biological units approaching the cellular domain. Zinc has an ionization potential of 9.4 eV, or 75766.8 cm-1. Several processes are being explored, including two-photon resonant, three- photon ionization utilizing sequential UV transitions, e.g., 4s2 1S0 yields 4s4p 3P1 and 4s4p 3P1 yields 4s5d 3D1. Preliminary zinc stable isotope ratio data obtained by thermal atomization and laser photoionization agree with accepted values within 2 to 5%, except for anomalous 67Zn. Photoionization of calcium is being studied for isotope enrichment and ratio measurement using narrow and medium bandwidth lasers. Several ionization pathways, e.g., 4s2 1S0 - 2hv1 yields 4s10s - hv2 yields Ca+ (4s2S), are being investigated for isotopically selective ionization. Auto-ionization pathways are explored for greater efficiency in isotopic analysis. All studies have utilized a Nd:YAG- pumped laser system with one or two frequency-doubled tunable dye lasers coupled either to a magnetic sector or time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

  1. Atmospheric applications of high-energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joung R.

    2005-03-01

    It has been over forty years since the invention of the laser, which has inspired the imagination of scientists and science fiction writers alike. Many ideas have been realized, many still remain as dreams, and new ones are still being conceived. The High Energy Laser (HEL) has been associated with weapon applications during the past three decades. Much of the same technology can be directly applied to power beaming, laser propulsion, and other potential remote energy and power transfer applications. Economically, these application areas are becoming increasingly more viable. This paper reviews the evolutionarey history of the HEL device technologies. It points out the basic system components and layouts with associated key technologies that drive the effectiveness and efficiency of the system level performance. It describes the fundamental properties and wavelength dependencies of atmospheric propagation that in turn have become the prescription for wavelength properties that are desired from the device.

  2. Novel atmospheric extinction measurement techniques for aerospace laser system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Novel techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements, suitable for manned and unmanned aerospace vehicle applications, are presented in this paper. Extinction measurements are essential to support the engineering development and the operational employment of a variety of aerospace electro-optical sensor systems, allowing calculation of the range performance attainable with such systems in current and likely future applications. Such applications include ranging, weaponry, Earth remote sensing and possible planetary exploration missions performed by satellites and unmanned flight vehicles. Unlike traditional LIDAR methods, the proposed techniques are based on measurements of the laser energy (intensity and spatial distribution) incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Various laser sources can be employed with wavelengths from the visible to the far infrared portions of the spectrum, allowing for data correlation and extended sensitivity. Errors affecting measurements performed using the proposed methods are discussed in the paper and algorithms are proposed that allow a direct determination of the atmospheric transmittance and spatial characteristics of the laser spot. These algorithms take into account a variety of linear and non-linear propagation effects. Finally, results are presented relative to some experimental activities performed to validate the proposed techniques. Particularly, data are presented relative to both ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 kHz PRF NIR laser systems in a large variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft.

  3. Review of laser-driven ion sources and their applications.

    PubMed

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Pirozhkov, Alexander S

    2012-05-01

    scientific, industrial and medical applications of laser-driven proton or ion sources, some of which have already been established, while the others are yet to be demonstrated. In most applications, the laser-driven ion sources are complementary to the conventional accelerators, exhibiting significantly different properties. Finally, we summarize the paper.

  4. Laser pulse peak holding circuit for low cost laser tracking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, He; Zhang, Xiangjin; Chen, Yong

    2016-10-01

    In the low cost laser tracking applications, the width of the laser echo pulses received by four-quadrant photodetector from an illuminated target are narrow, and are only a few hundred or dozens of nanoseconds. In order to obtain the peak of these narrow laser pulses of nS level, by using peak holding technique, a simplified transconductance peak holding circuit model is constructed, taking into account of low cost applications with large number of requirements. The key parameters of the transconductance peak holding circuit such as response time, droop rate and bandwidth are analyzed for narrow laser pulse signals. The transconductance peak holding circuit is designed using a low-cost integrated chip OPA615, then is simulated by the software PSpice tools. Finally, a circuit board is manufactured for further tests. The results show that: the bandwidth of the circuit is about 76.4 MHz, response time is about 7 ns, and droop rate is about 5.7 mV/μs. The peaks of narrow laser pulses are effectively acquired, meeting the needs for the subsequent low speed and low cost A/D converter.

  5. Optical resonator and laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  6. High energy laser demonstrators for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Riesbeck, Th.; Schmitz, J.; Baumgärtel, Th.; Ludewigt, K.; Graf, A.

    2017-01-01

    Rheinmetall Waffe Munition has worked since 30 years in the area of High Energy Laser (HEL) for defence applications, starting from pulsed CO2 to pulsed glass rods lasers. In the last decade Rheinmetall Waffe Munition changed to diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and has successfully developed, realised and tested a variety of versatile HEL weapon demonstrators for air- and ground defence scenarios like countering rocket, artillery, mortar, missile (RAMM), unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and unexploded ordnances clearing. By employing beam superimposing technology and a modular laser weapon concept, the total optical power has been successively increased. Stationary weapon platforms, military vehicles and naval platforms have been equipped with high energy laser effectors. The contribution gives a summary of the most recent development stages of Rheinmetalls HEL weapon program. In addition to the stationary 30 kW laser weapon demonstrator, we present vehicle based HEL demonstrators: the 5 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Track V, the 20 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Wheel XX and the 50 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Container L and the latest 10 kW HEL effector integrated in the naval weapon platform MLG 27. We describe the capabilities of these demonstrators against different potential targets. Furthermore, we will show the capability of the 30 kW stationary Laser Weapon Demonstrator integrated into an existing ground based air defence system to defeat saturated attacks of RAMM and UAS targets.

  7. Ophthalmic applications of femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Ron M.; Spooner, Greg J. R.; Sletten, Karin R.; Yen, Kimberly G.; Sayegh, Samir I.; Loesel, Frieder H.; Horvath, Christopher; Liu, HsiaoHua; Elner, Victor; Cabrera, Delia; Muenier, Marie-Helene; Sacks, Zachary S.; Juhasz, Tibor; Miller, Doug L.; Williams, A. R.

    1999-06-01

    We investigated three potential femtosecond laser ophthalmic procedures: intrastromal refractive surgery, transcleral photodisruptive glaucoma surgery and photodisruptive ultrasonic lens surgery. A highly reliable, all-solid-state system was used to investigate tissue effects and demonstrate clinical practicality. Compared with longer duration pulses, femtosecond laser-tissue interactions are characterized by smaller and more deterministic photodisruptive energy thresholds, smaller shock wave and cavitation bubble sizes. Scanning a 5 (mu) spot below the target tissue surface produced contiguous tissue effects. Various scanning patterns were used to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and stability of three intrastromal refractive procedures in animal eyes: corneal flap cutting, keratomileusis, and intrastromal vision correction (IVC). Superior dissection and surface quality results were obtained for the lamellar procedures. IVC in rabbits revealed consistent, stable pachymetric changes, without significant inflammation or corneal transparency degradation. Transcleral photodisruption was evaluated as a noninvasive method for creating partial thickness scleral channels to reduce elevated intraocular pressure associated with glaucoma. Photodisruption at the internal scleral surface was demonstrated by focusing through tissue in vitro without collateral damage. Femtosecond photodisruptions nucleated ultrasonically driven cavitation to demonstrate non-invasive destruction of in vitro lens tissue. We conclude that femtosecond lasers may enable practical novel ophthalmic procedures, offering advantages over current techniques.

  8. Laser application in tracheobronchial tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, B. Krishna; Krishna, Sharon

    2004-09-01

    Ninety three patients with obstructing tracheobronchial tumors were treated with Neodymium: Yttrium - Aluminum - Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser photocoagulation over a period of six years. There were sixty seven Males and 26 Females with a mean age of 44.3 years (range 6- 79 years). 21 benign and 72 malignant lesions were treated with a total 212 sessions of laser photocoagulation (mean 2.4 sessions). The anatomical distribution of lesions were as follows; larynx 9 (three benign and 6 malignant) trachea 39 (27 benign and 12 malignant) left main bronchus 27 (14 malignant) right main bronchus 24 (14 malignant) and vocal cords - 9 (three malignant). There were 21 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, two adenocarcinomas, one adenoid cystic carcinoma, 7 cases of locally infiltrating tumors from thyroid and esophagus, 6 cases of carcinoid tumor and 16 benign lesions. Twenty one patients had a tracheostomy tube in place when treatment was started. Eighteen of the 21 patients with tracheostomy were weaned off the tube in a mean of 5.5 days from the start of treatment. Lumen was restored in 31 (79.4%) patients. In the other eight (20.6%), lumen was achieved, but not sustained. Complications included bleeding in three cases which were managed conservatively, two cases of pneumothorax, and four cases of bronchospasm. There were six deaths during the follow up but none attributable to the procedure. Laser photocoagulation offered effective treatment in the majority of patients with obstructing tracheobronchial tumors, with acceptable morbidity.

  9. Ultraintense lasers: relativistic nonlinear optics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourou, Gérard A.

    Traditional optics and nonlinear optics are related to laser-matter interaction with eV characteristic energy. Recent progresses in ultrahigh intensity makes it possible to drive electrons with relativistic energy opening up the field of relativistic nonlinear optics. In the last decade, lasers have undergone orders-of-magnitude jumps in peak power, with the invention of the technique of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) and the refinements of femtosecond techniques. Modern CPA lasers can produce intensities greater than 10 21 W/cm 2, one million times greater than previously possible. These ultraintense lasers give researchers a tool to produce unprecedented pressures (terabars), magnetic fields (gigagauss), temperatures (10 10 K), and accelerations (10 25 g) with applications in fusion energy, nuclear physics (fast ignition), high-energy physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. They promote the optics field from the eV to the GeV.

  10. Modeling Laser Effects on the Final Optics in Simulated IFE Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr Ghoniem

    2004-08-14

    When laser light interacts with a material's surface, photons rapidly heat the electronic system, resulting in very fast energy transfer to the underlying atomic crystal structure. The intense rate of energy deposition in the shallow sub-surface layer creates atomic defects, which alter the optical characteristics of the surface itself. In addition, the small fraction of energy absorbed in the mirror leads to its global deformation by thermal and gravity loads (especially for large surface area mirrors). The aim of this research was to model the deformation of mirror surfaces at multiple length and time scales for applications in advanced Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) systems. The goal is to control micro- and macro-deformations by material system and structural design. A parallel experimental program at UCSD has been set up to validate the modeling efforts. The main objective of the research program was to develop computer models and simulations for Laser-Induced Damage (LID) in reflective and transmissive final optical elements in IFE laser-based systems. A range of materials and material concepts were investigated and verified by experiments at UCSD. Four different classes of materials were considered: (1) High-reflectivity FCC metals (e.g. Cu, Au, Ag, and Al), (2) BCC metals (e.g. Mo, Ta and W), (3) Advanced material concepts (e.g. functionally graded material systems, amorphous coatings, and layered structures), and (4) Transmissive dielectrics (e.g. fused SiO2). In this report, we give a summary of the three-year project, followed by details in three areas: (1) Characterization of laser-induced damage; (2) Theory development for LIDT; and (3) Design of IFE reflective laser mirrors.

  11. Secure key distribution applications of chaotic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning; Xue, Chenpeng; Lv, Yunxin; Qiu, Kun

    2016-11-01

    Chaotic semiconductor laser is a good candidate for secure communication and high-speed true random bit generator, for its characteristics of broad bandwidth and prominent unpredictability. Based on the synchronization property and true random bit generation characteristic of chaotic semiconductor lasers, physical secure key distribution is available. In this work, we majorly show three key distribution schemes stemming from synchronized chaotic semiconductor lasers or chaos-based key exchange protocol. The numerical results demonstrate that the security of the chaos-synchronization-based key distribution scheme can be physically enhanced by adopting dynamic synchronization scheme or encrypted key generation, and that of key distribution with chaos-based key exchange protocol is dependent on the security of the exchange protocol and finally determined by the difficulty of regeneration the chaos system accurately.

  12. Tailored ceramics for laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Joel Philip

    Transparent ceramics have many features that recommend them over single crystals for use as laser amplifiers. Some features, such as greater mechanical toughness and an absence of extended crystalline defects, are intrinsic to polycrystalline materials. Other advantages accrue from ceramic processing: ceramics sinter more rapidly than crystals grow from a melt, at lower temperatures. Ceramic processes are more readily scaled than Czochralski growth, facilitating larger apertures. Unlike a uniform melt, a ceramic green structure can have controlled concentration gradients, resulting in a multifunctional device upon sintering. Identifying diffusion mechanisms in a suitable host material and quantifying diffusion for a dopant with appropriate energy levels are key steps toward tailoring laser ceramics to the specifications of device designers. Toward that end, this study was the first to identify the mechanism and rate of Nd diffusion in YAG. Grain boundary diffusion was shown to dominate Nd transport under conditions relevant to laser ceramics fabrication. Based on a definition of grain boundary width as 1 A, this process occurs at a rate of DGB = 6.4 x 105 +/- 2.0 x 105 exp(-491 +/- 64 kJ/(mol K))m 2/s. Mechanism identification and the first published kinetics measurement were made possible by the introduction of a heat treatment method that isolates microstructural change from dopant diffusion: the concentration of grain boundaries was kept great enough to allow rapid diffusion, but low enough to limit the driving force for coarsening. Sintering of fine-grained and phase-pure precursor powder for 4 min at 1700 °C produced 0.8 mum grains; subsequent diffusion heat treatments at up to 1650 °C for up to 64 h caused negligible coarsening, while achieving diffusion distances of up to 23 mum.

  13. Laser processing for bio-microfluidics applications (part II).

    PubMed

    Khan Malek, Chantal G

    2006-08-01

    This paper reviews applications of laser-based techniques to the fabrication of microfluidic devices for biochips and addresses some of the challenges associated with the manufacture of these devices. Special emphasis is placed on the use of lasers for the rapid prototyping and production of biochips, in particular for applications in which silicon is not the preferred material base. This review addresses applications and devices based on ablation using femtosecond lasers, infrared lasers as well as laser-induced micro-joining, and the laser-assisted generation of micro-replication tools, for subsequent replication of polymeric chips with a technique like laser LIGA.

  14. Laser Applications on Orthopaedic Bone Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0627 TITLE:“Laser Applications on Orthopaedic Bone Repair” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kotaro Sena , D.D.S., Ph.D...6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Kotaro Sena , D.D.S., Ph.D.; Amarjit S. Virdi, Ph.D. 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  15. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  16. Advances in laser diodes for pyrotechnic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    Background information concerning the use of laser diodes in pyrotechnic applications is provided in viewgraph form. The following topics are discussed: damage limits, temperature stability, fiber coupling issues, and small (100 micron) and large (400 micron) fiber results. The discussions concerning fiber results concentrate on the areas of package geometry and electro-optical properties.

  17. New Medical Applications Of Metal Vapor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert S.; McIntosh, Alexander I.

    1989-06-01

    The first medical application for metal vapor lasers has been granted marketing approval by the FDA. This represents a major milestone for this technology. Metalaser Technologies recently received this approval for its Vasculase unit in the treatment of vascular lesions such as port wine stains, facial telangiectasia and strawberry hemangiomas.

  18. Industrial applications of laser methods profilometry

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Laser-based profilometry has evolved rapidly over the past ten years. During that period, QUEST Integrated Inc. has been actively involved in the development of systems for a wide variety of NDE applications. The measurement method is based on the principle of optical triangulation. The sensor includes a diode laser which generates the collimated laser beam that is projected orthogonally onto a target surface. Receiving optics, positioned at an oblique angle to the beam, image the reflected light onto a lateral-effect photodetector. Depending on the packaging constraints and resolution requirements, probes use either a single or dual-axis lateral-effect photodetector. As the target surface moves toward or away from the laser source, the imaged light moves across the photodetector in a predictable and repeatable manner. Since the laser beam can be focused to a ``footprint`` as small as a few microns in diameter, this method provides unparalleled spatial resolution. In addition, lateral effect photodetectors are composed or a single silicon element that provides almost infinite lateral resolution. This method was applied to two applications in this paper. The first was to locate and identify flows caused by pitting corrosion in steam generator tubes at nuclear power plants. The second was for inspection of gun tubes by the US army.

  19. Urological applications of the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Stewart, Steven C.; Weil, Dane

    1998-07-01

    While the role of endoscopy was initially diagnostic, the advent of improved endoscopes and working instruments have increased its therapeutic applications. One of the most recent advances is the holmium laser. It has a broad range of urological applications due to its ability to fragment all urinary calculi and its soft tissue effects. This laser is based on laser energy delivered in a pulsatile fashion at 2100 nm. The purpose of this study is to report our experience with the holmium laser. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. One hundred and forty patients underwent 157 procedures. The holmium laser was used for the treatment of urinary calculi in 122 patients. Stone location included 61 renal, 64 ureteral, and 17 bladder stones. Renal stone burden was 17 mm (range 3-50), ureteral stone size averaged 10 mm (range 3 - 35), and mean bladder stone size was 31 mm (range 10 - 60). Other uses included treatment of transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis, ureter, and bladder, incision of ureteral strictures, ureterocele, and prostate, and ablation of renal hemangiomas. Intraoperative and post operative complications were noted. Follow-up for calculi consisted of a plain film of the abdomen at one week and an ultrasound or intravenous pyelogram at six to eight weeks post procedure. No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The Holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. No complications were directly attributable to the Holmium laser. In our initial experience, the Holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of urinary pathology. It is the most effective lithotrite available and is able to incise and coagulate soft tissue as well. This combination allows the urologist to treat a variety of urinary pathology using a single modality. Its main limitation is the ability to access lower pole lesions in the upper urinary tract due to the fiber

  20. High power gas laser - Applications and future developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1977-01-01

    Fast flow can be used to create the population inversion required for lasing action, or can be used to improve laser operation, for example by the removal of waste heat. It is pointed out that at the present time all lasers which are capable of continuous high-average power employ flow as an indispensable aspect of operation. High power laser systems are discussed, taking into account the gasdynamic laser, the HF supersonic diffusion laser, and electric discharge lasers. Aerodynamics and high power lasers are considered, giving attention to flow effects in high-power gas lasers, aerodynamic windows and beam manipulation, and the Venus machine. Applications of high-power laser technology reported are related to laser material working, the employment of the laser in controlled fusion machines, laser isotope separation and photochemistry, and laser power transmission.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  2. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  3. Studies of a laser/nuclear thermal-hardened body armor. Final report, 31 Jan 91-30 Sep 91

    SciTech Connect

    Misconi, N.Y.; Caldarella, G.J.; Roach, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    The problem of laser/nuclear hardening of body armors and other applications, such as rigid wall, etc, has been investigated in this study. Earlier results from studies of hardening against space systems, which were supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and carried out by the Principal Investigator during 1984 to 1989 are summarized. The concepts of particle layer and photon multiple scattering inside the layers were utilized in developing a laser shield to protect against laser weapons in the 0.22 to 2.4 micrometer region of the spectrum. Protection against the threats from C02 laser weapons are addressed, and the development of a protective shield is detailed. It is now possible to apply a coating that will protect against laser/nuclear threats and reduction of solar loads for 0.22 to 16 micrometers of the spectrum. Applications are expected for rigid walls (Army containers), human body armor, thermal jackets for military hardware, etc. Finally, a mathematical model was created to help predict how the laser hardening material will behave under specific constraints that have not yet been tested in the laboratory. Also, this model can be used to extrapolate the performance of similar materials/coatings in the mid- to far-infrared wavelengths and also predict the broadband performance.

  4. Lasers '86; Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Lasers and Applications, Orlando, FL, Nov. 3-7, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Mcmillan, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Laser physics, technology, and applications are examined in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include VUV and X-ray lasers, vibrational energy transfer and kinetics, medical applications, ultrashort lasers and spectroscopy, surface and material interactions, lasers in atmospheric physics, and fiber-optic systems. Consideration is given to alexandrite lasers, four-wave mixing and nonlinear optics, chemical lasers, semiconductor lasers, photothermal and photoacoustic spectroscopy, dye lasers, optical phase conjugation and SBS, excimer lasers, SDI laser applications, remote-sensing with lasers, FELs, and applications in chemistry. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  5. Ultrafast laser pulses for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Will, Fabian; Serbin, Jesper; Bauer, Thorsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Welling, Herbert; Mueller, Wiebke; Schwab, Burkard; Singh, Ajoy I.; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2002-04-01

    Ultrafast lasers have become a promising tool for micromachining and extremely precise ablation of all kinds of materials. Due to the low energy threshold, thermal and mechanical side effects are limited to the bu micrometers range. The neglection of side effects enables the use of ultrashort laser pulses in a broad field of medical applications. Moreover, the interaction process based on nonlinear absorption offers the opportunity to process transparent tissue three dimensionally inside the bulk. We demonstrate the feasibility of surgical procedures in different fields of medical interest: in ophthalmology intrastromal cutting and preparing of cornael flaps for refractive surgery in living animals is presented. Besides, the very low mechanical side effects enables the use of fs- laser in otoralyngology to treat ocecular bones. Moreover, the precise cutting quality can be used in fields of cardiovascular surgery for the treatment of arteriosklerosis as well as in dentistry to remove caries from dental hard tissue.

  6. Laser applications to atmospheric sciences: A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography is given of 1460 references of the applications of lasers to atmospheric sciences. The subjects covered include: aerosols; clouds; the distribution and motion of atmospheric natural and man-made constituents; winds; temperature; turbulence; scintillation; elastic, Raman and resonance scattering; fluorescence; absorption and transmission; the application of the Doppler effect and visibility. Instrumentation, in particular lidar, is included, also data handling, and interpretation of the data for meteorological processes. Communications, geodesy and rangefinding are not included as distinct areas. The application to the atmosphere is covered, but not the ocean or its surface.

  7. Semiconductor Lasers and Their Application in Optical Fiber Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Govind P.

    1985-01-01

    Working principles and operating characteristics of the extremely compact and highly efficient semiconductor lasers are explained. Topics include: the p-n junction; Fabry-Perot cavity; heterostructure semiconductor lasers; materials; emission characteristics; and single-frequency semiconductor lasers. Applications for semiconductor lasers include…

  8. Development of a Curriculum in Laser Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, William J.

    A Seattle Central Community College project visited existing programs, surveyed need, and developed a curriculum for a future program in Laser-Electro-Optics (LEO) Technology. To establish contacts and view successful programs, project staff made visits to LEO technology programs at San Jose City College and Texas State Technical Institute, Center…

  9. Femtosecond laser application in biotechnology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten

    2004-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) 80 MHz nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses of low sub-nanojoule and nJ pulse energies in combination with focusing optics of high numerical aperture can be used as versatile multiphoton tools in nanobiotechnology and nano/micro-medicine. Novel diagnostic applications include gene imaging by multiphoton multicolor FISH (MM-FISH) and high-resolution multiphoton tomography of skin as well as tissue engineered cardiovascular structures based on two-photon autofluorescence excitation and second harmonic generation (SHG) of endogenous biomolecules. Using high-intense (1011 - 1012 W/cm2) 80 MHz femtosecond laser beams, non-invasive targeted transfection of mammalian cells with DNA can be realized by creation of highly localized membrane perforations. Nanosurgery can be performed by optical knocking out of intracellular and intratissue structures. Potential applications include gene and cancer therapy, eye and brain surgery as well as optical engineering of single DNA molecules as key elements in bionanotechnology.

  10. Optical polymers for laser medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanova, Nina G.; Kasarova, Stefka N.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2016-01-01

    In medicine, optical polymers are used not only in ophthalmology but in many laser surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic systems. The application in lens design is determined by their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have used different measuring techniques to obtain precise refractometric data in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Dispersive, thermal and other important optical characteristics of polymers have been studied. Design of a plastic achromatic objective, used in a surgical stereo-microscope at 1064 nm laser wavelength, is accomplished. Geometrical and wavefront aberrations are calculated. Another example of application of polymers is the designed all-mirror apochromatic micro-lens, intended for superluminescent diode fiber coupling in medical systems.

  11. Nanodiamonds of Laser Synthesis for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Perevedentseva, E; Peer, D; Uvarov, V; Zousman, B; Levinson, O

    2015-02-01

    In recent decade detonation nanodiamonds (DND), discovered 50 years ago and used in diverse technological processes, have been actively applied in biomedical research as a drug and gene delivery carrier, a contrast agent for bio-imaging and diagnostics and an adsorbent for protein separation and purification. In this work we report about nanodiamonds of high purity produced by laser assisted technique, compare them with DND and consider the prospect and advantages of their use in the said applications.

  12. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  13. Laser beamed power: Satellite demonstration applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Westerlund, Larry H.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible to use a ground-based laser to beam light to the solar arrays of orbiting satellites, to a level sufficient to provide all or some of the operating power required. Near-term applications of this technology for providing supplemental power to existing satellites are discussed. Two missions with significant commercial pay-off are supplementing solar power for radiation-degraded arrays and providing satellite power during eclipse for satellites with failed batteries.

  14. Application of Low level Lasers in Dentistry (Endodontic)

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Low level lasers, cold or soft lasers: These lasers do not produce thermal effects on tissues and induce photoreactions in cells through light stimulation which is called photobiostimulation. Power of these lasers is usually under 250mW. The main point differentiating low level lasers and high power ones is the activation of photochemical reactions without heat formation. The most important factor to achieve this light characteristic in lasers is not their power, but their power density for each surfa ceunit (i.e cm2). Density lower than 670mW/cm2, can induce the stimulatory effects of low level lasers without thermal effects. Low level lasers (therapeutic) used today as treatment adjunctive devices in medicine and dentistry. Numerous studies have been performed on the applications of low level lasers in patient pain reduction. Mechanisms of pain reduction with therapeutic lasers and their application are expressed, and the studies realized in this field are presented. PMID:25606308

  15. Applications for reactor-pumped lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; McArthur, D.A.

    1994-10-01

    Nuclear reactor-pumped lasers (RPLs) have been developed in the US by the Department of Energy for over two decades, with the primary research occurring at Sandia National Laboratories and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The US program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at wavelengths of 585, 703, 725, 1,271, 1,733, 1,792, 2,032, 2,630, 2,650, and 3,370 nm with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. The major strengths of a reactor-pumped laser are continuous high-power operation, modular construction, self-contained power, compact size, and a variety of wavelengths (from visible to infrared). These characteristics suggest numerous applications not easily accessible to other laser types. The continuous high power of an RPL opens many potential manufacturing applications such as deep-penetration welding and cutting of thick structures, wide-area hardening of metal surfaces by heat treatment or cladding application, wide-area vapor deposition of ceramics onto metal surfaces, production of sub-micron sized particles for manufacturing of ceramics, and 3-D ceramic lithography. In addition, a ground-based RPL could beam its power to space for such activities as illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth`s shadow to extend their lives, beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, removing space debris, and providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night.

  16. Current applications of lasers in heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Garrett; Chan, Ming C.; Mason, Dean T.

    1993-03-01

    Although the laser has been in existence for abut 30 years, its application in heart disease has only been examined in the past decade. Much attention has been given its exciting potential in treating coronary artery disease. Transmitted through a catheter comprised of one or more thin optical fibers which can be threaded nonsurgically into the coronary artery, the laser can ablate atherosclerotic plaque that obstructs the artery and diminishes blood flow to the myocardium. In clinical studies, the laser can treat some obstructive lesions that are not suitable for balloon angioplasty (i.e., long and diffuse lesions, very tight stenoses, ostial lesions, calcified lesions). In patients who failed balloon angioplasty due to severe dissection or abrupt closure, the laser may seal up the dissections and restore antegrade blood flow. In addition, the laser may have other applications and treatment modalities that are still under investigation. It may ablate ectopic ventricular foci, or terminate supraventricular tachyrhythmia by destroying the heart's abnormal conduction pathways. It can cut the hypertrophied septum that is associated with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, or create a channel in the atrial septum as a palliative procedure in newborns with transposition of the great vessels. It may provide a wider orifice for blood flow within the heart in infants with pulmonary outflow obstruction and in adults with aortic valvular stenosis. It is also capable of fusing small thin-walled blood vessels together. Further, a more intriguing possibility is its use to bore several tiny channels in the myocardium to allow oxygenated blood from within the ventricular chamber to perfuse the ischemic heart tissue.

  17. Wide spectrum antireflective coating for laser fusion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoldas, B.E; Partlow, D.P.; Smith, H.D.; Mattox, D.M.

    1984-01-13

    A method of depositing a laser damage resistant, wide-spectrum antireflective coating on fused silica has been developed. This work was sponsored under a subcontract with the University of California, with technical direction from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The coating is applied from a specific silanol polymer solution and converted to a porous SiO/sub 2/ film. The pore size of the film is first reduced by a heat treatment to prevent uv scattering. Then gradation of the pore volume is achieved by a mild etching to a sufficient depth to prevent a smoother index transition from air to the substrate glass. The resulting antireflectivity covers the entire transmission range of silica and may be extended to a wavelength as short as 250 nm. Laser damage thresholds as high as 9 j/cm/sup 2/ have been demonstrated on processed samples.

  18. Future applications of lasers in surgery and medicine: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Sliney, D H; Wolbarsht, M L

    1989-01-01

    The experimental use of lasers in surgery and medicine began only shortly after the development of the first working laser system. However, the development of practical, effective, and safe surgical lasers has been lengthy with many obstacles and delays. Today the laser is used for a wide variety of surgical operations. The fundamental limits and potential for future applications of lasers in surgery and medicine are discussed. PMID:2666663

  19. High Power Fiber Lasers and Applications to Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin; McComb, Timothy; Sudesh, Vikas

    2008-09-01

    We summarize recent developments in high power fiber laser technologies and discuss future trends, particularly in their current and future use in manufacturing technologies. We will also describe our current research programs in fiber laser development, ultra-fast and new lasers, and will mention the expectations in these areas for the new Townes Laser Institute. It will focus on new core laser technologies and their applications in medical technologies, advanced manufacturing technologies and defense applications. We will describe a program on large mode area fiber development that includes results with the new gain-guiding approach, as well as high power infra-red fiber lasers. We will review the opportunities for high power fiber lasers in various manufacturing technologies and illustrate this with applications we are pursuing in the areas of femtosecond laser applications, advanced lithographies, and mid-IR technologies.

  20. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2012-03-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  1. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2011-11-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  2. Ultrafast pulse lasers jump to macro applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griebel, Martin; Lutze, Walter; Scheller, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast Lasers have been proven for several micro applications, e.g. stent cutting, for many years. Within its development of applications Jenoptik has started to use ultrafast lasers in macro applications in the automotive industry. The JenLas D2.fs-lasers with power output control via AOM is an ideal tool for closed loop controlled material processing. Jenoptik enhanced his well established sensor controlled laser weakening process for airbag covers to a new level. The patented process enables new materials using this kind of technology. One of the most sensitive cover materials is genuine leather. As a natural product it is extremely inhomogeneous and sensitive for any type of thermal load. The combination of femtosecond pulse ablation and closed loop control by multiple sensor array opens the door to a new quality level of defined weakening. Due to the fact, that the beam is directed by scanning equipment the process can be split in multiple cycles additionally reducing the local energy input. The development used the 5W model as well as the latest 10W release of JenLas D2.fs and achieved amazing processing speeds which directly fulfilled the requirements of the automotive industry. Having in mind that the average cycle time of automotive processes is about 60s, trials had been done of processing weakening lines in genuine leather of 1.2mm thickness. Parameters had been about 15 cycles with 300mm/s respectively resulting in an average speed of 20mm/s and a cycle time even below 60s. First samples had already given into functional and aging tests and passed successfully.

  3. Hybrid laser beam steerer for laser communications applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofka, Jozef; Nikulin, Vladimir V.; Skormin, Victor A.; Nicholson, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    Omniwrist is a new sensor mount developed under the Air Force funding that emulates the kinematics of a human wrist. Driven by two linear motors and equipped with a dedicated computer implementing advanced control laws, it is capable of a full 180° hemisphere of pitch/yaw motion and demonstrates performance characteristics comparable with an electro-mechanical beam steering system. While exceeding the bandwidth requirements for the coarse beam steering task, Omniwrist"s dynamic response is much slower than the one of the acousto-optic device (Bragg cell) that is virtually inertia-free. At the same time, the steering range of a Bragg cell, +/- .5°, is too small for many applications. The authors have been successful in the enhancement of the design and development of control laws improving its dynamic characteristics of a Bragg cell. This paper presents the research aimed at the development of a hybrid laser beam steering system comprising Bragg cells installed on the Omniwrist platform. An optimal control strategy facilitating such applications as scanning, search, rapid repositioning, tracking, feedback and feedforward compensation of environmental vibration of the optical platform (satellite-based and airborne) has been developed, implemented and tested. This includes the solution of such underlying problems as mathematical description of the hybrid system, optimal task distribution between the "coarse" and the "fine" positioning tasks, coordination of the operation of the "coarse" and "fine" system controllers. The efficiency of the developed system in various applications will be investigated further and compared against known designs.

  4. XeF pump laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The goal of this program was to demonstrate operation of an XeF laser of adequate energy, efficiency and beam quality at high repetition rates. The specific design goals were: PRF greater than or equal to 10 kHz, energy output greater than or equal to 50 mJ/pulse, efficiency greater than or equal to 0.3%, and beam divergence angle less than or equal to 20x diffraction limited. In the following sections of this report we will discuss how these goals have been met.

  5. Laser velocimeter application to oscillatory liquid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A laser velocimeter technique was used to measure the mean velocity and the frequency characteristics of an oscillatory flow component generated with a rotating flapper in liquid flow system at Reynolds numbers approximating 93,000. The velocity information was processed in the frequency domain using a tracker whose output was used to determine the flow spectrum. This was accomplished with the use of an autocorrelator/Fourier transform analyzer and a spectrum averaging analyzer where induced flow oscillations up to 40 Hz were detected. Tests were conducted at a mean flow velocity of approximately 2 m/s. The experimental results show that the laser velocimeter can provide quantitative information such as liquid flow velocity and frequency spectrum with a possible application to cryogenic fluid flows.

  6. Imploding plasma x-ray laser research. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.; Koppel, L.; Burr, L.; Rodenburg, R.; Fortner, R.; Stewart, R.; Dietrich, D.; Egan, P.; Young, B.; Dukart, R.

    1984-09-01

    The population inversion mechanisms and gain estimates for the Ne-like Kr x-ray laser scheme are discussed. An experimental configuration has been developed which produces stable plasmas with conditions close to the optimum for lasing. By imploding a coaxial argon plasma on an inner krypton plasma (the puff-on-puff configuration), a quiescent krypton center plasma was produced with an electron temperature of about 600 eV and an electron density of about 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/. The center plasma was stable and linear, with little evidence of kink instabilities. Nozzle development work was also performed. X-ray measurements of electron temperature and density as well as XUV linewidths are presented. (LEW)

  7. Laser scattering from long scalelength plasmas on Omega. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Bauer, B.S.

    1998-12-31

    In this project, the authors accomplished the tasks called for in the revised statement of work associated with this grant. Specifically, they accomplished: (1) active participation in the design of long-scalelength plasmas for Omega and in experiments to characterize these plasmas; (2) development of software that permits the rapid evaluation of laser-scattering diagnostic possibilities involving the standard parametric instabilities. It must be able to account for all 60 beams in Omega in addition to a probe beam and variable detector locations; and (3) design, purchase of components for, and assembly of instrumentation to make such measurements, providing for long-term versatility in the type of measurement. The project background and these accomplishments are discussed.

  8. Laser fusion driven breeder design study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berwald, D.H.; Massey, J.V.

    1980-12-01

    The results of the Laser Fusion Breeder Design Study are given. This information primarily relates to the conceptual design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) breeder reactor (or fusion-fission hybrid) based upon the HYLIFE liquid metal wall protection concept developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The blanket design for this breeder is optimized to both reduce fissions and maximize the production of fissile fuel for subsequent use in conventional light water reactors (LWRs). When the suppressed fission blanket is compared with its fast fission counterparts, a minimal fission rate in the blanket results in a unique reactor safety advantage for this concept with respect to reduced radioactive inventory and reduced fission product decay afterheat in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident.

  9. Applications of laser printing for organic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Ainsebaa, A.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Benetti, M.; Boutopoulos, C.; Cannata, D.; Di Pietrantonio, F.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.; Dutroncy, J.; Eason, R.; Feinaugle, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J.-M.; Grisel, A.; Kaur, K.; Lehmann, U.; Lippert, T.; Loussert, C.; Makrygianni, M.; Manfredonia, I.; Mattle, T.; Morenza, J.-L.; Nagel, M.; Nüesch, F.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rapp, L.; Rizvi, N.; Rodio, G.; Sanaur, S.; Serra, P.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Sones, C. L.; Verona, E.; Zergioti, I.

    2013-03-01

    The development of organic electronic requires a non contact digital printing process. The European funded e-LIFT project investigated the possibility of using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique to address this field of applications. This process has been optimized for the deposition of functional organic and inorganic materials in liquid and solid phase, and a set of polymer dynamic release layer (DRL) has been developed to allow a safe transfer of a large range of thin films. Then, some specific applications related to the development of heterogeneous integration in organic electronics have been addressed. We demonstrated the ability of LIFT process to print thin film of organic semiconductor and to realize Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) with mobilities as high as 4 10-2 cm2.V-1.s-1 and Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.8 105. Polymer Light Emitting Diodes (PLED) have been laser printed by transferring in a single step process a stack of thin films, leading to the fabrication of red, blue green PLEDs with luminance ranging from 145 cd.m-2 to 540 cd.m-2. Then, chemical sensors and biosensors have been fabricated by printing polymers and proteins on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices. The ability of LIFT to transfer several sensing elements on a same device with high resolution allows improving the selectivity of these sensors and biosensors. Gas sensors based on the deposition of semiconducting oxide (SnO2) and biosensors for the detection of herbicides relying on the printing of proteins have also been realized and their performances overcome those of commercial devices. At last, we successfully laser-printed thermoelectric materials and realized microgenerators for energy harvesting applications.

  10. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Driven by a CO2 Laser (STELLA-LW) - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Wayne D

    2008-06-27

    The original goals of the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration – Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) program were to investigate two new methods for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). In pseudo-resonant LWFA (PR-LWFA), a laser pulse experiences nonlinear pulse steepening while traveling through the plasma. This steepening allows the laser pulse to generate wakefields even though the laser pulse length is too long for resonant LWFA to occur. For the conditions of this program, PR-LWFA requires a minimum laser peak power of 3 TW and a low plasma density (10^16 cm^-3). Seeded self-modulated LWFA (seeded SM-LWFA) combines LWFA with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). An ultrashort (~100 fs) electron beam bunch acts as a seed in a plasma to form a wakefield via PWFA. This wakefield is subsequently amplified by the laser pulse through a self-modulated LWFA process. At least 1 TW laser power and, for a ~100-fs bunch, a plasma density ~10^17 cm^-3 are required. STELLA-LW was located on Beamline #1 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF TW CO2 laser served as the driving laser beam for both methods. For PR-LWFA, a single bunch was to probe the wakefield produced by the laser beam. For seeded SM-LWFA, the ATF linac would produce two bunches, where the first would be the seed and the second would be the witness. A chicane would compress the first bunch to enable it to generate wakefields via PWFA. The plasma source was a short-length, gas-filled capillary discharge with the laser beam tightly focused in the center of the capillary, i.e., no laser guiding was used, in order to obtain the needed laser intensity. During the course of the program, several major changes had to be made. First, the ATF could not complete the upgrade of the CO2 laser to the 3 TW peak power needed for the PR-LWFA experiment. Therefore, the PR-LWFA experiment had to be abandoned leaving only the seeded SM-LWFA experiment. Second, the ATF discovered that the

  11. Laser applications in the electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washio, Kunihiko

    1999-07-01

    This paper explains current status and technological trends in laser materials processing applications in electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan. Various laser equipment based on solid state lasers or gas lasers such as excimer lasers or CO2 lasers has been developed and applied in manufacturing electronic and optoelectronic devices to meet the strong demands for advanced device manufacturing technologies for high-performance, lightweight, low power-consumption portable digital electronic appliances, cellular mobile phones, personal computers, etc. Representative applications of solid-state lasers are, opaque and clear defects repairing of photomasks for LSIs and LCDs, trimming of thick-film chip resistors and low resistance metal resistors, laser cutting and drilling of thin films for high-pin count semiconductor CSP packages, laser patterning of thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells, and laser welding of electronic components such as hard-disk head suspensions, optical modules, miniature relays and lithium ion batteries. Compact and highly efficient diode- pumped and Q-switched solid-state lasers in second or third harmonic operation mode are now being increasingly incorporated in various laser equipment for fine material processing. Representative applications of excimer lasers are, sub-quarter micron design-rule LSI lithography and low- temperature annealing of poly-silicon TFT LCD.

  12. Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

  13. Application of high power lasers to space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nored, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The transmission of laser power over long distances for applications such as direct conversion to propulsive thrust or electrical power is considered. Factors discussed include: problems inherent in transmitting, propagating, and receiving the laser beam over long ranges; high efficiency, closed-cycle, continuous wave operation; advancement of CO2 laser technology; and compatibility with photovoltaic power conversion devices.

  14. Diode pumped solid-state laser oscillators for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Basu, S.; Fan, T. Y.; Kozlovsky, W. J.; Nabors, C. D.; Nilsson, A.; Huber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid improvement in diode laser pump sources has led to the recent progress in diode laser pumped solid state lasers. To date, electrical efficiencies of greater than 10 percent were demonstrated. As diode laser costs decrease with increased production volume, diode laser and diode laser array pumped solid state lasers will replace the traditional flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser sources. The use of laser diode array pumping of slab geometry lasers will allow efficient, high peak and average power solid state laser sources to be developed. Perhaps the greatest impact of diode laser pumped solid state lasers will be in spectroscopic applications of miniature, monolithic devices. Single-stripe diode-pumped operation of a continuous-wave 946 nm Nd:YAG laser with less than 10 m/w threshold was demonstrated. A slope efficiency of 16 percent near threshold was shown with a projected slope efficiency well above a threshold of 34 percent based on results under Rhodamine 6G dye-laser pumping. Nonlinear crystals for second-harmonic generation of this source were evaluated. The KNbO3 and periodically poled LiNbO3 appear to be the most promising.

  15. High-power laser applications in Nippon Steel Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamida, Katsuhiro

    2000-02-01

    The laser, which was invented in 1960, has been developed using various substances of solids, liquids, gases and semiconductors as laser active media. Applications of laser utilizing the coherent properties of laser light and the high power density light abound in many industries and in heavy industries respectively. The full-scale use of lasers in the steel industry began nearly 23 years ago with their applications as controllable light sources. Its contribution to the increase in efficiency and quality of the steel making process has been important and brought us the saving of the energy, the resource and the labor. Laser applications in the steel making process generally require high input energy, so it is essential to consider the interaction between the laser beam and the irradiated material. In particular, the reflectivity of the laser beam on the surface of material and the quantity of the laser-induced plasma are critical parameters for high efficient processes with low energy losses. We have developed plenty of new laser systems for the steel making process with their considerations in mind. A review of the following high-power-laser applications is given in the present paper: (1) Use of plasma as a secondary heat source in CO2 laser welding for connecting steel sheets of various grades. (2) Laser-assisted electric resistance welding of pipes. (3) New type all-laser-welded honeycomb panels for high-speed transport. (4) Laser flying welder for continuous hot rolling mill using two 45 kW CO2 lasers.

  16. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matt; Bossard, John; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of laser ignition technology for bipropellant rocket engines applications. The objectives of this project include: (1) the selection test chambers and flows; (2) definition of the laser ignition setup; (3) pulse format optimization; (4) fiber optic coupled laser ignition system analysis; and (5) chamber integration issues definition. The testing concludes that rocket combustion chamber laser ignition is imminent. Support technologies (multiplexing, window durability/cleaning, and fiber optic durability) are feasible.

  17. High-power YAG laser and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Tsuchiya, Kazuyuki; Owaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro

    2000-02-01

    Laser beams have been noticed as new heat resources with high energy concentration, which are different from plasma and arc. Conventionally, the only kW class industrial laser has been a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser. However, recently, several new high power lasers other than CO2 laser have been developed so that new methods of laser material processing have come out. As for YAG lasers, formerly, cw or pulse YAG lasers of several hundreds W class were used for welding or cutting of electrical appliants or cutting of thin metal plates. Now, the power has been raised to 5 - 6 kW, which enables YAG lasers to apply wider applications of material processing in many industrial fields, such as automobile industries, heavy industries and so on. It is a flexible fiber delivery that is the most remarkable advantage of YAG laser, which can be applied to ordinary machinery tools and robotic systems and makes it possible to deliver laser power to remote locations. Moreover, a shorter wavelength (1.06 micrometer) of YAG lasers than that of CO2 lasers is appropriate to metal processing. Figure 1 shows an example of YAG laser processing system utilizing those advantages. Also in IHI, the processing with YAG lasers has been studied for their practical application which has already succeeded in some sections such as cladding, repair welding and subdividing of nuclear power plants making use of YAG lasers' properties of fiber delivery of beam. Moreover, underwater processing technique is studied for practical use. In this paper, the examples of YAG laser application technology were described.

  18. Microgravity Spray Cooling Research for High Powered Laser Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zivich, Chad P.

    2004-01-01

    An extremely powerful laser is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center for use on a satellite. This laser has several potential applications. One application is to use it for upper atmosphere weather research. In this case, the laser would reflect off aerosols in the upper atmosphere and bounce back to the satellite, where the aerosol velocities could be calculated and thus the upper atmosphere weather patterns could be monitored. A second application would be for the US. Air Force, which wants to use the laser strategically as a weapon for satellite defense. The Air Force fears that in the coming years as more and more nations gain limited space capabilities that American satellites may become targets, and the laser could protect the satellites. Regardless of the ultimate application, however, a critical step along the way to putting the laser in space is finding a way to efficiently cool it. While operating the laser becomes very hot and must be cooled to prevent overheating. On earth, this is accomplished by simply running cool tap water over the laser to keep it cool. But on a satellite, this is too inefficient. This would require too much water mass to be practical. Instead, we are investigating spray cooling as a means to cool the laser in microgravity. Spray cooling requires much less volume of fluid, and thus could be suitable for use on a satellite. We have inherited a 2.2 second Drop Tower rig to conduct our research with. In our experiments, water is pressurized with a compressed air tank and sprayed through a nozzle onto our test plate. We can vary the pressure applied to the water and the temperature of the plate before an experiment trial. The whole process takes place in simulated microgravity in the 2.2 second Drop Tower, and a high speed video camera records the spray as it hits the plate. We have made much progress in the past few weeks on these experiments. The rig originally did not have the capability to heat the test plate, but I did

  19. Active filter application guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear loads interacting with a utility can cause harmonic currents and voltages. Nonlinear loads include arcing loads, power converters that use switching devices, and saturable transformers and reactors. When reactive loads interact with harmonic sources, the results can be harmonic distortion, malfunction of harmonic sensitive equipment, and capacitor overload. To solve these harmonic disturbances, most passive harmonic filters must be custom designed to operate with site-specific conditions. Active filters, on the other hand, offer the potential of a single black-box solution that is relatively independent of system parameters. Power quality problems attributable to harmonic voltages and currents are increasing. Traditionally, passive harmonic filters have been used to solve these problems. A more recent approach for harmonic compensation uses active filters. The Active Filter Application Guide covers fundamentals of harmonics, discusses harmonic producing loads, presents harmonic filtering principles (both active and passive), and provides a step-by-step application guide for analyzing and specifying an active filter. Also included in the Guide are two active-filter case studies. Each demonstrates how the application guide can be used to select and specify solutions for both single harmonic load and multiple harmonic producing loads at a clustered site.

  20. Low-power photolytically pumped lasers: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, I.; Lorents, D.C.; Eckstrom, D.J.

    1987-08-01

    We have carried out an extensive series of measurements of the time-resolved Xe/sub 2/* emission spectra following optical pumping by a short-pulse F/sub 2/ laser at 157.6 nm. Most measurements were performed using a gated Optical Multichannel Analyzer detector; we also made measurements using a scanning monochromator fitted with a photomultiplier and using a boxcar integrator for time resolution. The two sets of results agree well and show that both the singlet and triplet emission bands are broader than expected and have center wavelengths closer together than expected. Measurements were performed both at room temperature and at elevated (140/sup 0/C) and reduced (-27/sup 0/C) temperatures. The broad bandwidth of the individual spectral bands was unexpected and conflicted with a previous spectral measurement using optical pumping by the Xe* resonance line from a microwave discharge lamp. Therefore, we also performed a series of spectral measurements using this type of optical pumping. We achieved good agreement with some previous results in the literature, but not with the result in question. We conclude that the present results are reliable. The results presented in this report provide the first definitive measurement of the individual excimer emissions from each of the Xe/sub 2/(0/sub u//sup +/) and Xe/sub 2/(1/sub u/) states. From these measurements and the known ground state potential, we derived a 1/sub u/ potential that reproduces the emission band very well. However, the 1/sub u/ potential is in substantial disagreement with the recent 1/sub u/ potential derived by the Toronto group. 13 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted great interest over past decades owing to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this article, we review recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS). Various types of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon nanodots, nanodiamond, nanofibers, nanohorns, and their derivative forms, are involved. The applications of these materials as new matrices or probes in matrix-assisted or surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI or SELDI MS) are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges and give our perspectives on the future of applications of carbon nanomaterials in LDI MS.

  2. Ion Deflection for Final Optics In Laser Inertial Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, R P; Latkowski, J F

    2006-11-17

    Left unprotected, both transmissive and reflective final optics in a laser inertial fusion power plant would quickly fail from melting, pulsed thermal stresses, or degradation of optical properties as a result of ion implantation. One potential option for mitigating this threat is to magnetically deflect the ions such that they are directed into a robust energy dump. In this paper we detail integrated studies that have been carried out to asses the viability of this approach for protecting final optics.

  3. Ion Deflection for Final Optics in Laser Inertial Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Ryan P.

    2005-12-01

    Left unprotected, both transmissive and reflective final optics in a laser-driven inertial fusion power plant would quickly fail from melting, pulsed thermal stress, or degradation of optical properties as a result of ion implantation. One potential option for mitigating this threat is to magnetically deflect the ions such that they are directed to a robust energy dump. In this paper we detail integrated studies that have been carried out to assess the viability of this approach for protecting final optics.

  4. Development of cryotribological theories & application to cryogenic devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2001-03-12

    This is the final report of a research program on low-temperature friction and wear, primarily focused on development of cryotribological theories and application to cryogenic devices, particularly superconducting magnets.

  5. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Thomas, A. G.; Mangles, S. P.D.; Banerjee, S.; Corde, S.; Flacco, A.; Litos, M.; Neely, D.; Viera, J.; Najmudin, Z.; Bingham, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  6. Development of high damage threshold laser-machined apodizers and gain filters for laser applications

    DOE PAGES

    Rambo, Patrick; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark; ...

    2016-09-27

    We have developed high damage threshold filters to modify the spatial profile of a high energy laser beam. The filters are formed by laser ablation of a transmissive window. The ablation sites constitute scattering centers which can be filtered in a subsequent spatial filter. Finally, by creating the filters in dielectric materials, we see an increased laser-induced damage threshold from previous filters created using ‘metal on glass’ lithography.

  7. Workshop on scientific and industrial applications of free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C. ); Perez, R.B. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1990-05-01

    A Workshop on Scientific and Industrial Applications of Free Electron Lasers was organized to address potential uses of a Free Electron Laser in the infrared wavelength region. A total of 13 speakers from national laboratories, universities, and the industry gave seminars to an average audience of 30 persons during June 12 and 13, 1989. The areas covered were: Free Electron Laser Technology, Chemistry and Surface Science, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Condensed Matter, and Biomedical Applications, Optical Damage, and Optoelectronics.

  8. Tenth Biennial Coherent Laser Radar Technology and Applications Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The tenth conference on coherent laser radar technology and applications is the latest in a series beginning in 1980 which provides a forum for exchange of information on recent events current status, and future directions of coherent laser radar (or lidar or lader) technology and applications. This conference emphasizes the latest advancement in the coherent laser radar field, including theory, modeling, components, systems, instrumentation, measurements, calibration, data processing techniques, operational uses, and comparisons with other remote sensing technologies.

  9. Application of high-performance OEM fibre lasers in manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, S.; Appleyard, A.; Harrison, P.; Hassey, A.

    2012-02-01

    Medium and high-power fiber lasers operating in the 1um region have proven their capabilities for cutting and welding in industrial manufacturing applications. This paper reviews the process performance capabilities of medium power (up to 500W) fiber lasers in a range of precision cutting, fusion-welding and additive manufacturing applications.

  10. Manufacturing applications of lasers; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23, 24, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheo, Peter K.

    1986-01-01

    The present conference encompasses topics in laser material processing for industrial applications, laser applications in microelectronics, laser inspection and quality control, and laser diagnostics and measurements. Attention is given to the laser welding of cylinders, production laser hardfacing of jet engine turbine blades, production laser welding of gears, electric arc augmentation for laser cutting of mild steel, laser-assisted etching for microelectronics, and laser fabrication of interconnect structures on CMOS gate arrays. Also discussed are angle-scanning laser interferometry for film thickness measurements, the application of heterodyne interferometry to disk drive technology, and CARS applications to combustion diagnostics.

  11. Imaging systems for biomedical applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Radparvar, M.

    1995-06-06

    Many of the activities of the human body manifest themselves by the presence of a very weak magnetic field outside the body, a field that is so weak that an ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor is needed for specific biomagnetic measurements. Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are extremely sensitive detectors of magnetic flux and have been used extensively to detect the human magnetocardiogram, and magnetoencephalogram. and other biomagnetic signals. In order to utilize a SQUID as a magnetometer, its transfer characteristics should be linearized. This linearization requires extensive peripheral electronics, thus limiting the number of SQUID magnetometer channels in a practical system. The proposed digital SQUID integrates the processing circuitry on the same cryogenic chip as the SQUID magnetometer and eliminates the sophisticated peripheral electronics. Such a system is compact and cost effective, and requires minimal support electronics. Under a DOE-sponsored SBIR program, we designed, simulated, laid out, fabricated, evaluated, and demonstrated a digital SQUID magnetometer. This report summarizes the accomplishments under this program and clearly demonstrates that all of the tasks proposed in the phase II application were successfully completed with confirmed experimental results.

  12. 76 FR 81518 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Laser-Based Multi-Function Office Machines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Laser... laser-based multi-function office machines. Based upon the facts presented, CBP has concluded in the... of the laser-based multi-function office machine, and it is at their assembly and programming...

  13. Tunable lasers and their application in analytical chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The impact that laser techniques might have in chemical analysis is examined. Absorption, scattering, and heterodyne detection is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the advantages of using frequency-tunable sources, and dye solution lasers are regarded as the outstanding example of this type of laser. Types of spectroscopy that can be carried out with lasers are discussed along with the ultimate sensitivity or minimum detectable concentration of molecules that can be achieved with each method. Analytical applications include laser microprobe analysis, remote sensing and instrumental methods such as laser-Raman spectroscopy, atomic absorption/fluorescence spectrometry, fluorescence assay techniques, optoacoustic spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. The application of lasers to spectroscopic methods of analysis would seem to be a rewarding field both for research in analytical chemistry and for investments in instrument manufacturing.

  14. Diode Laser Application in Soft Tissue Oral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Ehsan; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Diode laser with wavelengths ranging from 810 to 980 nm in a continuous or pulsed mode was used as a possible instrument for soft tissue surgery in the oral cavity. Discussion: Diode laser is one of laser systems in which photons are produced by electric current with wavelengths of 810, 940 and 980nm. The application of diode laser in soft tissue oral surgery has been evaluated from a safety point of view, for facial pigmentation and vascular lesions and in oral surgery excision; for example frenectomy, epulis fissuratum and fibroma. The advantages of laser application are that it provides relatively bloodless surgical and post surgical courses with minimal swelling and scarring. We used diode laser for excisional biopsy of pyogenic granuloma and gingival pigmentation. Conclusion: The diode laser can be used as a modality for oral soft tissue surgery PMID:25606331

  15. Reliability of Semiconductor Laser Packaging in Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gontijo, Ivair; Qiu, Yueming; Shapiro, Andrew A.

    2008-01-01

    A typical set up used to perform lifetime tests of packaged, fiber pigtailed semiconductor lasers is described, as well as tests performed on a set of four pump lasers. It was found that two lasers failed after 3200, and 6100 hours under device specified bias conditions at elevated temperatures. Failure analysis of the lasers indicates imperfections and carbon contamination of the laser metallization, possibly from improperly cleaned photo resist. SEM imaging of the front facet of one of the lasers, although of poor quality due to the optical fiber charging effects, shows evidence of catastrophic damage at the facet. More stringent manufacturing controls with 100% visual inspection of laser chips are needed to prevent imperfect lasers from proceeding to packaging and ending up in space applications, where failure can result in the loss of a space flight mission.

  16. CO2 laser oscillators for laser radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the spectral purity, frequency stability, and long-term stabilization of newly developed CO2 isotope lasers. Extremely high spectral purity, and short-term stability of less than 1.5 x 10 to the -13th have been achieved. A brief description on using CO2 isotope lasers as secondary frequency standards and in optical radar is given. The design and output characteristics of a single frequency, TEM00q mode, variable pulse width, hybrid TE CO2 laser system is also described. The frequency chirp in the output has been measured and almost completely eliminated by means of a novel technique.

  17. Novel Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Amy J Ray; Buckley, Steven G

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this review article is to provide a description of recent and novel laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) applications and developments, especially those discussed during the NASLIBS Conference, held during SciX in Providence, RI, in September 2015. This topic was selected in view of the numerous recent overall review papers that have successfully given a broad view of the current understanding of laser-material interactions and plasma development and have also discussed the wide landscape of analytical applications of LIBS. This paper is divided into sections that focus on a few of the many applications under development in the LIBS community. We provide a summary of updates to calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS) and associated developments using plasma characteristics to improve quantification in LIBS output, both in a dedicated section and as applications are discussed. We have also described the most recent publications studying the sources, generation, and use of molecular features in LIBS, including those naturally present in the spectra of organic materials, and those induced with the addition of salts to enable the measurement of halogens, not typically present in LIBS signals. In terms of development of applications of LIBS, we focused on the use of LIBS for indirect measurements such as pH and degree of humification in soil and heating value in coal. We also reviewed the extant literature on LIBS analysis of agricultural materials, coal, minerals, and metals. Finally, we discuss the nascent developments of spatially heterodyne spectroscopy, a method that seeks to circumnavigate a serious drawback of most spectrometers - very small optical throughput - through the use of interferometers.

  18. CHRONICLE: International forum on advanced high-power lasers and applications (AHPLA '99)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, Yurii V.; Zavestovskaya, I. N.; Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Senatsky, Yu V.; Starodub, Aleksandr N.

    2000-05-01

    A review of reports made on the International Forum on Advanced High-Power Lasers and Applications, which was held at the beginning of November 1999 in Osaka (Japan), is presented. Five conferences were held during the forum on High-Power Laser Ablation, High-Power Lasers in Energy Engineering, High-Power Lasers in Civil Engineering and Architecture, High-Power Lasers in Manufacturing, and Advanced High-Power Lasers. The following trends in the field of high-power lasers and their applications were presented: laser fusion, laser applications in space, laser-triggered lightning, laser ablation of materials by short and ultrashort pulses, application of high-power lasers in manufacturing, application of high-power lasers in mining, laser decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear reactors, high-power solid-state and gas lasers, x-ray and free-electron lasers. One can find complete information on the forum in SPIE, vols. 3885-3889.

  19. Process and quality control for automotive laser welding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Toenshoff, H.K.; Overmeyer, L.; Schumacher, J.

    1996-12-31

    Laser welding applications using CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG-Lasers are of growing importance for the production of car bodies. Especially for parts influencing the safety of the product, it would be advantageous to control the welding result which is, in practical applications, influenced by many process parameters. In this paper, an innovative process monitoring and quality control system with a closed loop control of the laser output power will be described, which is based on monitoring and evaluating the light emission from the welding process. In contrast to systems which have been developed in the past, the sensors which detect the light emission were integrated into the beam guidance system for CO{sub 2} lasers, and into the laser source for Nd:YAG lasers. The optical set-up of this system, together with the automatic detection of welding failures, will be described, and the results of the system for industrial applications will be evaluated.

  20. Laser Doppler vibrometry: new ENT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasche, Norbert; Baermann, M.; Kempe, C.; Hoermann, Karl; Foth, Hans-Jochen

    1996-12-01

    Common audiometry often does not really allow a reliable and objective differential diagnosis of hearing disorders such as otosclerosis, adhesive otitis, ossicular interruption or tinnitus, even though several methods might be used complementarily. In recent years, some experimental studies on middle ear mechanics established laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) as a useful method allowing objective measurement of human tympanic membrane displacement. The present study on LDV investigated the clinical use of this new method under physiological conditions. LDV proved to be a fast, reproducible, non-invasive and very sensitive instrument to characterize ear-drum vibrations in various middle ear dysfunctions, except in tinnitus patients. For future applications, improved optical characteristics of the vibrometer might result in a better differential diagnosis of subjective and objective tinnitus, otoacoustic emissions or Morbus Meniere.

  1. Applications of Ultra-Intense, Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledingham, Ken W. D.

    The high intensity laser production of electron, proton, ion and photon beams is reviewed particularly with respect to the laser-plasma interaction which drives the acceleration process. A number of applications for these intense short pulse beams is discussed e.g. ion therapy, PET isotope production and laser driven transmutation studies. The future for laser driven nuclear physics at the huge new, multi-petawatt proposed laser installation ELI in Bucharest is described. Many people believe this will take European nuclear research to the next level.

  2. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  3. Final LDRD report : science-based solutions to achieve high-performance deep-UV laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Alessi, Leonard J.; Smith, Michael L.; Henry, Tanya A.; Westlake, Karl R.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Lee, Stephen Roger

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project that has focused on overcoming major materials roadblocks to achieving AlGaN-based deep-UV laser diodes. We describe our growth approach to achieving AlGaN templates with greater than ten times reduction of threading dislocations which resulted in greater than seven times enhancement of AlGaN quantum well photoluminescence and 15 times increase in electroluminescence from LED test structures. We describe the application of deep-level optical spectroscopy to AlGaN epilayers to quantify deep level energies and densities and further correlate defect properties with AlGaN luminescence efficiency. We further review our development of p-type short period superlattice structures as an approach to mitigate the high acceptor activation energies in AlGaN alloys. Finally, we describe our laser diode fabrication process, highlighting the development of highly vertical and smooth etched laser facets, as well as characterization of resulting laser heterostructures.

  4. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  5. Biophysics applications of free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert H.

    1993-07-01

    There has been a significant financial effort poured into the technology of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) over the last 15 years or so. Much of that money was spent in the hopes that the FEL would be a key element in the Strategic Defense Initiative, but a small fraction of money was allocated for the Medical FEL program. The Medical FELs program was aimed at exploring how the unique capabilities of the FEL could be utilized in medical applications. Part of the Medical FEl effort has been in clinical applications, but some of the effort has also been put into exploring applications of the FEL for fundamental biological physics. It is the purpose of this brief text to outline some of the fundamental biophysics I have done, and some plans we have for the future. Since the FEL is (still) considered to be an avant garde device, the reader should not be surprised to find that much of the work proposed here is also rather radical and avant garde.

  6. Commercial applications of high-powered laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, David L.; Jacobs, Richard D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of high power laser diodes using surface emitting distributed feedback (SEDFB) techniques has matured to the point where serious marketing analyses have been conducted. While development of the base technology continues, the initiation of systems applications and manufacturing engineering has begun. This effort, in direct response to growing market demand, is the critical bridge between research and the development of viable products for commercial applications. This paper addresses the history of laser technology development, the current status of high powered laser diode development, the forces defining current and future markets and the role of `conventional wisdom' in laser technology and market development.

  7. Ultra-intense Laser Applications to the Industries at GPI

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Mori, Yoshitaka; Ootsuka, Shuji; Makino, Takahiro; Ohta, Mari; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Kuwabara, Hajime

    2009-01-22

    The laser accelerator provides us not only ultra high field, but also extremely short pulse radiation sources, the laser-produced X-rays. Using a 1.2 TW table-top Ti:sap laser, we are pursuing the activities for the industrial application. First we proposed a new injection acceleration scheme using the ultra short beat-wave accelerator for the economical radiation source. Then we proposed two applications both on the backward see-through vision of distant objects using the laser X-rays, and on the X-ray illumination on Aspergillus awamori spores, which is 100 times effective of the current X-ray tube cases.

  8. Plasma physics applications to intense radiation sources, pulsed power and space physics. Short pulse ultra intense laser-plasma interaction experiment. Final report, 1 January 1990-31 May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-05-31

    Intense bright x-ray sources from dense z-pinch and x-pinch plasmas are being investigated for photo-pumping x-ray laser media. Crossed Aluminum wire X-pinches with mass line density up to hundreds of micrograms per centimeter have been imploded by up to 600 kA current for 40 ns using a 0.5 TW pulsed power generator. High density bright spots are observed. Soft x-ray spectroscopy was used to infer plasma density of up to approx. 10 to the 20th power per cubic cm and temperature of 100 -300 eV. The optimum mass loading for different ionization stages of Aluminum ions was examined. Parallel wire z-pinches yielded both lower density up to approx. 10(19)cm-3, and lower temperatures (70 - 200 eV), than the X-pinch plasmas.

  9. Laser application in otology for hearing restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Igino

    1994-09-01

    Prior to the development of the stapes replacement prosthesis in the early 1950s, loss of hearing due to otosclerosis remained an untreatable disease. Today, loss of hearing due to otosclerosis can be restored in the majority of cases to near normal levels. Since 1980 the laser has played a major and important role in otosclerosis surgery. This paper explores the use of lasers for hearing restoration and compares the results of laser surgery to non-laser surgery.

  10. High-power lasers for directed-energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman; Ting, Antonio; Fischer, Richard

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we review and discuss the research programs at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) on high-power lasers for directed-energy (DE) applications in the atmosphere. Physical processes affecting propagation include absorption/scattering, turbulence, and thermal blooming. The power levels needed for DE applications require combining a number of lasers. In atmospheric turbulence, there is a maximum intensity that can be placed on a target that is independent of the initial beam spot size and laser beam quality. By combining a number of kW-class fiber lasers, scientists at the NRL have successfully demonstrated high-power laser propagation in a turbulent atmosphere and wireless recharging. In the NRL experiments, four incoherently combined fiber lasers having a total power of 5 kW were propagated to a target 3.2 km away. These successful high-power experiments in a realistic atmosphere formed the basis of the Navy's Laser Weapon System. We compare the propagation characteristics of coherently and incoherently combined beams without adaptive optics. There is little difference in the energy on target between coherently and incoherently combined laser beams for multi-km propagation ranges and moderate to high levels of turbulence. Unlike incoherent combining, coherent combining places severe constraints on the individual lasers. These include the requirement of narrow power spectral linewidths in order to have long coherence times as well as polarization alignment of all the lasers. These requirements are extremely difficult for high-power lasers.

  11. Laser enhanced microwave plasma isotope separation. Final report, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, M.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1996-06-01

    The experimental research was to focus on laser excitation of a low abundance isotope and then ionize and separate the isotope of low abundance using a microwave/ECR discharge at 2.45 GHz. A small compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source, which uses permanent magnets, was constructed during this project. The dye laser was purchased and later an excimer laser had to also be purchased because it turned out that the dye laser could not be pumped by our copper laser. It was intended that the dye laser be tuned to a wavelength of 670.8 nm, which would excite {sup 6}Li which would then be preferentially ionized by the ECR source and collected with a charged grid. The degree of enrichment was to be determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The final objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of this system to large-scale production of stable isotopes. However the funding of this project was interrupted and we were not able to achieve all of our goals.

  12. Future prospects in dermatologic applications of lasers, nanotechnology, and other new technologies.

    PubMed

    Boixeda, P; Feltes, F; Santiago, J L; Paoli, J

    2015-04-01

    We review novel technologies with diagnostic and therapeutic applications in dermatology. Among the diagnostic techniques that promise to become part of dermatologic practice in the future are optical coherence tomography, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermography, and 7-T magnetic resonance imaging. Advances in therapy include novel light-based treatments, such as those applying lasers to new targets and in new wavelengths. Devices for home therapy are also appearing. We comment on the therapeutic uses of plasma, ultrasound, radiofrequency energy, total reflection amplification of spontaneous emission of radiation, light stimulation, and transepidermal drug delivery. Finally, we mention some basic developments in nanotechnology with prospects for future application in dermatology.

  13. The NASA high power carbon dioxide laser: A versatile tool for laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancashire, R. B.; Alger, D. L.; Manista, E. J.; Slaby, J. G.; Dunning, J. W.; Stubbs, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A closed-cycle, continuous wave, carbon dioxide high power laser has been designed and fabricated to support research for the identification and evaluation of possible high power laser applications. The device is designed to generate up to 70 kW of laser power in annular shape beams from 1 to 9 cm in diameter. Electric discharge, either self sustained or electron beam sustained, is used for excitation. This laser facility provides a versatile tool on which research can be performed to advance the state-of-the-art technology of high power CO2 lasers in such areas as electric excitation, laser chemistry, and quality of output beams. The facility provides a well defined, continuous wave beam for various application experiments, such as propulsion, power conversion, and materials processing.

  14. Laser polishing of niobium for SRF applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, J. Michael; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Smooth interior surfaces are desired for niobium SRF cavities, now obtained by buffered chemical polish (BCP) and/or electropolish (EP). Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from chemistry and in-process inspection. Here we show that laser polishing can produce smooth topography with Power Spectral Density (PSD) measurements similar to that obtained by EP. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damaging it. Computational modeling was used to simulate the surface temperature and explain the mechanism of laser polishing.

  15. Application of laser Doppler velocimeter to chemical vapor laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Luther R.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Lee, Ja H.; Fletcher, Mark T.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1993-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was used to measure iodide vapor flow fields inside two different-sized tubes. Typical velocity profiles across the laser tubes were obtained with an estimated +/-1 percent bias and +/-0.3 to 0.5 percent random uncertainty in the mean values and +/-2.5 percent random uncertainty in the turbulence-intensity values. Centerline velocities and turbulence intensities for various longitudinal locations ranged from 13 to 17.5 m/sec and 6 to 20 percent, respectively. In view of these findings, the effects of turbulence should be considered for flow field modeling. The LDV system provided calibration data for pressure and mass flow systems used routinely to monitor the research laser gas flow velocity.

  16. Applications of Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roorda, Austin

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) describes a set of tools to correct or control aberrations in any optical system. In the eye, AO allows for precise control of the ocular aberrations. If used to correct aberrations over a large pupil, for example, cellular level resolution in retinal images can be achieved. AO systems have been demonstrated for advanced ophthalmoscopy as well as for testing and/or improving vision. In fact, AO can be integrated to any ophthalmic instrument where the optics of the eye is involved, with a scope of applications ranging from phoropters to optical coherence tomography systems. In this paper, I discuss the applications and advantages of using AO in a specific system, the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, or AOSLO. Since the Borish award was, in part, awarded to me because of this effort, I felt it appropriate to select this as the topic for this paper. Furthermore, users of AOSLO continue to appreciate the benefits of the technology, some of which were not anticipated at the time of development, and so it is time to revisit this topic and summarize them in a single paper. PMID:20160657

  17. Injection seeded single mode alexandrite ring laser for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. Sang; Notari, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Along with many spectroscopic applications, atmospheric lidar measurements require a tunable, narrow band laser with a very high degree of spectral purity. A standing wave pulsed alexandrite laser tuned by injection seeding with an AlGaAs laser diode has demonstrated high stability. The standing wave cavity, however, poses several difficulties in light of the single mode operation and efficient seeding beam into the cavity. In order to overcome these problems and to operate the high power alexandrite laser in a single axial mode with a high spectral purity, a new ring laser system is being developed. The design features of the ring laser and some measurements of the laser characteristics are presented.

  18. Laser applications in machining slab materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoping

    1990-10-01

    Since the invention of the laser back in 1960, laser technology has been extensively applied in many fields of science and technology. These has been a history of nearly two decades of using lasers as an energy source in machining materials, such as cutting, welding, ruling and boring, among other operations. With the development of flexible automation in production, the advantages of laser machining have has grown more and more obvious. The combination of laser technology and computer science further promotes the enhancement and upgrading of laser machining and related equipment. At present, many countries are building high quality laser equipment for machining slab materials, such as the Coherent and Spectra Physics corporations in the United States, the Trumpf Corporation in West Germany, the Amada Corporation in Japan, and the Bystronic Corporation in Switzerland, among other companies.

  19. Laser anemometry techniques for turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Oberle, Lawrence G.

    1987-01-01

    Laser anemometry offers a nonintrusive means for obtaining flow field information. Current research at NASA Lewis Research Center is focused on instrumenting a warm turbine facility with a laser anemometer system. In an effort to determine the laser anemometer system best qualified for the warm turbine environment, the performance of a conventional laser fringe anemometer and a two spot time of flight system were compared with a new, modified time of flight system, called a Four Spot laser anemometer. The comparison measurements were made in highly turbulent flows near walls. The Four Spot anemometer uses elliptical spots to increase the flow acceptance angle to be comparable to that of a Laser Fringe Anemometer. Also, the Four Spot uses an optical code that vastly simplifies the pulse detection processor. The results of the comparison measurements will exemplify which laser anemometer system is best suited to the hostile environment typically encountered in warm rotating turbomachinery.

  20. Clinical application of erbium:YAG laser in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Isao; Aoki, Akira; Takasaki, Aristeo Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Various lasers have been introduced for the treatment of oral diseases and their applications in dental clinics have become a topic of much interest among practitioners. Technological advances and improvements have increased the choices of the available laser systems for oral use. Among them, a recently developed erbium-doped:yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser system possesses suitable characteristics for oral soft and hard tissue ablation. Due to its high absorption in water, an effective ablation with a very thin surface interaction occurs on the irradiated tissues without any major thermal damage to the irradiated and surrounding tissues. In the field of periodontics, the application of Er:YAG laser for periodontal hard tissue has begun with studies from Japanese and German researchers. Several in vitro and clinical studies have already demonstrated an effective application of the Er:YAG laser for calculus removal and decontamination of the diseased root surface in periodontal non-surgical and surgical procedures. However, further studies are required to better understand the various effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation on biological tissues for its safe and effective application during periodontal and implant therapy. Randomized controlled clinical trials and more basic studies have to be encouraged and performed to confirm the status of Er:YAG laser treatment as an adjunct or alternative to conventional mechanical periodontal therapy. In this paper, the advantages and current clinical applications of this laser in periodontics and implant dentistry are summarized based on current scientific evidence.

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, S. L.; Welch, A. J.; Motamedi, M.; Rastegar, S.

    1992-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the colloborating engineering centers at Rice University, UT-Austin, and Texas A&M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the Naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  2. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L.; Welch, A.J.; Motamedi, M.; Rastegar, S.; Tittel, F.; Esterowitz, L.

    1992-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the colloborating engineering centers at Rice University, UT-Austin, and Texas A&M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the Naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  3. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. . Cancer Center); Welch, A.J. ); Motamedi, M. . Medical Branch); Rastegar, S. ); Tittel, F. ); Esterowitz, L. )

    1992-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the colloborating engineering centers at Rice University, UT-Austin, and Texas A M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the Naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  4. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L.; Welch, A.J.; Motamedi, M.; Rastegar, S.; Tittel, F.; Esterowitz, L.

    1993-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the collaborating engineering enters at Rice University, UT-Austin, Texas A&M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  5. High Power Laser Diode Arrays for 2-Micron Solid State Coherent Lidars Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra; Sudesh, Vikas; Baker, Nathaniel

    2003-01-01

    Laser diode arrays are critical components of any diode-pumped solid state laser systems, constraining their performance and reliability. Laser diode arrays (LDAs) are used as the pump source for energizing the solid state lasing media to generate an intense coherent laser beam with a high spatial and spectral quality. The solid state laser design and the characteristics of its lasing materials define the operating wavelength, pulse duration, and power of the laser diodes. The pump requirements for high pulse energy 2-micron solid state lasers are substantially different from those of more widely used 1-micron lasers and in many aspects more challenging [1]. Furthermore, the reliability and lifetime demanded by many coherent lidar applications, such as global wind profiling from space and long-range clear air turbulence detection from aircraft, are beyond the capability of currently available LDAs. In addition to the need for more reliable LDAs with longer lifetime, further improvement in the operational parameters of high power quasi-cw LDAs, such as electrical efficiency, brightness, and duty cycle, are also necessary for developing cost-effective 2-micron coherent lidar systems for applications that impose stringent size, heat dissipation, and power constraints. Global wind sounding from space is one of such applications, which is the main driver for this work as part of NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program. This paper discusses the current state of the 792 nm LDA technology and the technology areas being pursued toward improving their performance. The design and development of a unique characterization facility for addressing the specific issues associated with the LDAs for pumping 2-micron coherent lidar transmitters and identifying areas of technological improvement will be described. Finally, the results of measurements to date on various standard laser diode packages, as well as custom-designed packages with potentially longer lifetime, will be reported.

  6. Diode Lasers used in Plastic Welding and Selective Laser Soldering - Applications and Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinl, S.

    Aside from conventional welding methods, laser welding of plastics has established itself as a proven bonding method. The component-conserving and clean process offers numerous advantages and enables welding of sensitive assemblies in automotive, electronic, medical, human care, food packaging and consumer electronics markets. Diode lasers are established since years within plastic welding applications. Also, soft soldering using laser radiation is becoming more and more significant in the field of direct diode laser applications. Fast power controllability combined with a contactless temperature measurement to minimize thermal damage make the diode laser an ideal tool for this application. These advantages come in to full effect when soldering of increasingly small parts in temperature sensitive environments is necessary.

  7. [Use of the thermal laser effect of laser irradiation for cardiovascular applications exemplified by the Nd:YAG laser].

    PubMed

    Ischinger, T; Coppenrath, K; Weber, H; Enders, S; Unsöld, E; Hessel, S

    1989-11-01

    Techniques of percutaneous transluminal application of laser energy for vessel recanalization have been used clinically since 1983. The commonly used Nd:YAG and argon lasers achieve ablation of atherosclerotic plaques by thermal action (vaporization). In order to reduce undesirable thermal damage in the neighborhood of the target tissue and to avoid vessel perforation, optimal irradiation parameters, modified (atraumatic) fiber tips (hot tips, sapphires), and steerable catheter systems needed to be implemented. Favorable results from peripheral application have encouraged use in the coronary circulation. More recently, coagulative tissue effects of circumferential irradiation of the vessel wall during balloon dilatation have been used for stabilization of acute and late results after mechanical balloon angioplasty. Enhancement of the differential light absorption of atherosclerotic plaque by use of biological dyes may further improve selective intravascular laser application. Intraoperative ECG-guided laser coagulation of arrhythmogenic areas of myocardium is a method for treatment of malignant arrhythmias. Transluminal non-operative application of myocardial laser photocoagulation has now been tested experimentally and shown to be safe and effective. There was no arrhythmogenicity or thermal damage of coronary arteries associated with this method. Innovative techniques such as nanosecond pulsed excimer lasers (athermal action) and development of "intelligent" lasers--which are equipped with spectroscopy-guided feedback systems for plaque recognition--have opened new perspectives and will further improve safety and efficacy of clinical laser application. However, according to current experience, the thermally acting Nd:YAG laser is an effective and versatile mode of laser therapy for selected cardiovascular indications.

  8. Applications of high power lasers in the battlefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisky, Yehoshua

    2009-09-01

    Laser weapon is currently considered as tactical as well as strategic beam weapons, and is considered as a part of a general layered defense system against ballistic missiles and short-range rockets. This kind of weapon can disable or destroy military targets or incoming objects used by small groups of terrorists or countries, at the speed of light. Laser weapon is effective at long or short distances, owing to beam's unique characteristics such as narrow bandwidth, high brightness, coherent both in time and space, and it travels at the speed of light. Unlike kinetic weapon, laser weapon converts the energy stored in an electromagnetic laser beam into a large amount of heat aimed on a small area spot at the skin of the missile, usually close to the liquid fuel storage tank, warhead case or engine area, following by a temperature increase and finally-catastrophic failure by material ablation or melt. The usefulness of laser light as a weapon has been studied for decades but only in recent years became feasible. There are two types of lasers being used: gas lasers and solid state lasers, including fiber lasers. All these types of lasers will be discussed below.

  9. Analytical application of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikechi, Noureddine; Markushin, Yuri

    2015-05-01

    We report on significant advantages provided by femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analytical applications in fields as diverse as protein characterization and material science. We compare the results of a femto- and nanosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of dual-elemental pellets in terms of the shot-to-shot variations of the neutral/ionic emission line intensities. This study is complemented by a numerical model based on two-dimensional random close packing of disks in an enclosed geometry. In addition, we show that LIBS can be used to obtain quantitative identification of the hydrogen composition of bio-macromolecules in a heavy water solution. Finally, we show that simultaneous multi-elemental particle assay analysis combined with LIBS can significantly improve macromolecule detectability up to near single molecule per particle efficiency. Research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (0630388), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NX09AU90A). Our gratitude to Dr. D. Connolly, Fox Chase Cancer Center.

  10. Scientific applications of frequency-stabilized laser technology in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumaker, Bonny L.

    1990-01-01

    A synoptic investigation of the uses of frequency-stabilized lasers for scientific applications in space is presented. It begins by summarizing properties of lasers, characterizing their frequency stability, and describing limitations and techniques to achieve certain levels of frequency stability. Limits to precision set by laser frequency stability for various kinds of measurements are investigated and compared with other sources of error. These other sources include photon-counting statistics, scattered laser light, fluctuations in laser power, and intensity distribution across the beam, propagation effects, mechanical and thermal noise, and radiation pressure. Methods are explored to improve the sensitivity of laser-based interferometric and range-rate measurements. Several specific types of science experiments that rely on highly precise measurements made with lasers are analyzed, and anticipated errors and overall performance are discussed. Qualitative descriptions are given of a number of other possible science applications involving frequency-stabilized lasers and related laser technology in space. These applications will warrant more careful analysis as technology develops.

  11. Investigation of gigawatt millimeter wave source applications. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) investigated potential applications of millimeter wave (MMW) sources with peak powers on the order of a gigawatt. This power level is representative of MMW devices such as the free electron laser (FEL) and the cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) that are under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition to determining the technical requirements for these applications, the investigation considered potential users and how a high power MMW system would expand their current capabilities. Two of the more promising applications were examined in detail to include trade-off evaluations system parameters. The trade-off evaluations included overall system configuration, frequency and coherence, component availability, and performance estimates. Brainstorming sessions were held to try and uncover additional applications for a gigawatt MMW source. In setting up guidelines for the session, the need to attempt to predict applications for the years 2000 to 2030 was stressed. Also, possible non-DoD applications needed to be considered. While some of these applications could not in themselves justify the costs involved in the development of the radar system, they could be considered potential secondary applications of the system. As a result of the sessions, a number of interesting potential applications evolved including: space object identification; low angle tracking; illuminator for space-based radar; radio astronomy; space vehicle navigation; space debris location; atmospheric research; wind shear detection; electronic countermeasures; low observable detection; and long range detection via ducting.

  12. Trends in high power laser applications in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignarajah, Sivakumaran; Sugimoto, Kenji; Nagai, Kaori

    2005-03-01

    This paper reviews the research and development efforts made on the use of lasers for material processing in the civil engineering industry. Initial investigations regarding the possibility of using lasers in civil engineering were made in the 1960s and '70s, the target being rock excavation. At that time however, the laser powers available were too small for any practical application utilization. In the 1980's, the technology of laser surface cleaning of historically important structures was developed in Europe. In the early 1990s, techniques of laser surface modification, including glazing and coloring of concrete, roughening of granite stones, carbonization of wood were pursued, mainly in Japan. In the latter part of the decade, techniques of laser decontamination of concrete surfaces in nuclear facilities were developed in many countries, and field tests were caried out in Japan. The rapid advances in development of diode lasers and YAG lasers with high power outputs and efficiencies since the late 1990's have led to a revival of worldwide interest in the use of lasers for material processing in civil engineering. The authors believe that, in the next 10 years or so, the advent of compact high power lasers is likely to lead to increased use of lasers of material processing in the field of civil engineering.

  13. Laser Printing for a Variety of Library Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Glen J.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes the current status of laser printers in terms of cost, hardware and software requirements, measurement and operational considerations, ease of use, and maintenance. The cost effectiveness of laser printing in libraries for applications such as spine labels, purchase orders, and reports, is explored. (9 notes with references) (CLB)

  14. Industrial applications of high-power copper vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, B.E.; Boley, C.D.; Chang, J.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Havstad, M.A.; Martinez, M.; McLean, W. II

    1995-08-01

    A growing appreciation has developed in the last several years for the copper vapor laser because of its utility in ablating difficult materials at high rates. Laser ablation at high rates shows promise for numerous industrial applications such as thin film deposition, precision hole drilling, and machining of ceramics and other refractories.

  15. Solid state dye laser for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldag, Henry R.

    1994-06-01

    The development of solid state dye lasers could lead to a major breakthrough in the cost and compactness of a medical device. Advantages include: elimination of the flow system for the gain medium; ease with which to implement wavelength agility or the replacement of a degraded rod or sheet; and toxicity and flammability become a non-issue. Dye lasers have played a role in cardiology, dermatology, and urology. Of these cardiology is of interest to Palomar. The Palomar Model 3010 flashlamp-pumped dye laser medical device was used during phase 1 FDA clinical trials to break-up blood clots that cause heart attacks, a process known as coronary laser thrombolysis. It is the objective of this research and development effort to produce solid matrix lasers that will replace liquid dye lasers in these medical specialties.

  16. Holmium laser applications of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Lori B; Tyson, Mark D

    2009-11-01

    The high-powered holmium laser is an excellent tool for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This article discusses the background of holmium use in the prostate and describes the surgical techniques of holmium laser ablation of the prostate and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate. Operative challenges are reviewed with suggestions as to how to avoid these problems or deal with them when they arise. Surgical outcomes and a thorough literature review are both presented.

  17. Laser Material Processing for Microengineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helvajian, H.

    1995-01-01

    The processing of materials via laser irradiation is presented in a brief survey. Various techniques currently used in laser processing are outlined and the significance to the development of space qualified microinstrumentation are identified. In general the laser processing technique permits the transferring of patterns (i.e. lithography), machining (i.e. with nanometer precision), material deposition (e.g., metals, dielectrics), the removal of contaminants/debris/passivation layers and the ability to provide process control through spectroscopy.

  18. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C{sub 3}F{sub 7}I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation.

  19. Ophthalmic applications of ultrashort pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Tibor; Spooner, Greg; Sacks, Zachary S.; Suarez, Carlos G.; Raksi, Ferenc; Zadoyan, Ruben; Sarayba, Melvin; Kurtz, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses can be used to create high precision incision in transparent and translucent tissue with minimal damage to adjacent tissue. These performance characteristics meet important surgical requirements in ophthalmology, where femtosecond laser flap creation is becoming a widely used refractive surgery procedure. We summarize clinical findings with femtosecond laser flaps as well as early experiments with other corneal surgical procedures such as corneal transplants. We also review laser-tissue interaction studies in the human sclera and their consequences for the treatment of glaucoma.

  20. Laser reduced graphene for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongfang; Bock, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Graphene was prepared by excimer laser irradiation reduction of graphite oxide dissolved in an aqueous solution at different laser energies and irradiation time. The morphologies and structure of the laser reduced graphene were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The XRD results confirm that the deoxygenation of the graphite oxide sheets occurred almost completely for all laser irradiation conditions used. The graphene fabricated by laser irradiation reduction appears to be randomly aggregated, crumpled, disordered and small sheet solid material. The total amount of oxygen functional groups reduced significantly and the CC/CO intensity ratio increased, however, the atomic percentages of the Cdbnd O double bond were increased after laser reduction. The laser reduced graphene was used as the electrode active material for supercapacitors and its specific capacitance was evaluated in a two electrode cell in either a 0.5 M Na2SO4 aqueous or a 1 M Tetraethylammoniumtetrafluoroborate acetonitrile based electrolyte. The specific capacitance of the laser fabricated graphene was found to depend on the energy and irradiation time of the laser. The highest specific capacitance was determined to be 141 F/g at 1.04 A/g and 84 F/g at 1.46 A/g in the aqueous and ACN electrolytes, respectively.

  1. Microhardness of enamel adjacent to orthodontic brackets after CO2 laser irradiation and fluoride application.

    PubMed

    Stangler, Leonardo Pucci; Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Shirozaki, Mariana Umekita; Galo, Rodrigo; Afonso, Alessandra Marques Correa; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of carbon dioxide (CO2) laser combined or not with fluoride application on the surface microhardness of enamel adjacent to orthodontic brackets. Fifteen human molars were selected from which 30 enamel fragments measuring 4 mm2 were obtained. The fragments were embedded in PCV tubes with acrylic resin and prepared using water abrasive paper, felt disks and alumina. Orthodontic brackets cut in half were bonded to enamel and 3 microhardness readings were performed on the adjacent surface, as follows: initial, after cariogenic challenge and final. The specimens were divided into the following 3 groups (n=10): Group C: control, Group L: irradiated with CO2 laser, and Group FL: topical fluoride application and CO2 laser irradiation. After initial reading, the specimens were placed in a demineralizing solution for 32 h and the second reading was to verify if demineralization was uniform in all groups. After the treatments, the specimens were submitted to DES-RE cycling for 8 days followed by final surface microhardness reading. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Duncan test (α=0.05). At the final measurement Group FL obtained higher microhardness value than Groups C and L (p<0.05). Groups L and FL were statistically superior to Group C (p<0.05). Irradiation with CO2 laser around orthodontic brackets combined or not with topical fluoride application was effective to increase the surface microhardness of enamel.

  2. Laser radar technology and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Quebec, Canada, June 3-5, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshank, James M.; Harney, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on laser radar technology and applications are presented. The topics considered include: eye-safe solid lasers for lidar applications, practical DF laser for ranging applications, ultrafast surface barrier photodetectors, performance analyses for peak-detecting laser radars, multiple scattering for laser beams propagating in a layered atmosphere, laser radar cross section of objects immersed in the earth's atmosphere, measurements of pulse coherence in mode-locked TEA-CO2 lasers, and single longitudinal mode operation of a continuously tunable high pressure TE-CO2. Also discussed are: amplitude-modulated laser system for distance and displacement measurement, minilaser rangefinder, laser docking system radar flight experiment, improved optical resonator for laser radars, design of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers, HgCdTe photodiodes for heterodyne applications, acoustooptic spectrum analyzer for laser radar applications, laser cloud mapper and its applications, scanning lidar bathymeter for water depth measurement, and fluorescence lidar for land and sea remote sensing.

  3. Industrial applications of high power diode lasers in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich

    2003-03-01

    Diode lasers are widely used in communication, computer and consumer electronics technology. These applications are based on systems, which provide power in the milliwatt range. However, in the mean time high power diode lasers have reached the kilowatt power range. This became possible by special cooling and mounting as well as beam combination and beam forming technologies. Such units are nowadays used as a direct source for materials processing. High power diode lasers have entered the industrial manufacturing area [Proceedings of the Advanced Laser Technologies Conference 2001, Proc. SPIE, Constanta, Romania, 11-14 September 2001].

  4. Review of soft x-ray lasers and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1991-03-01

    The emerging technology of soft x-ray lasers is in a transition phase between the first laboratory demonstrations of gain and the acceptance of soft x-ray lasers as practical tools for novel applications. Current research is focused on several fronts. The operational wavelength range has been extended to the water window'', important for applications in the life sciences. Gain has also been generated with substantially simpler technology (such as a 6J laser) and this augurs well for the commercially availability in the near future of soft x-ray lasers for a variety of applications. Advanced soft x-ray laser concepts are being developed from investigations into ultra-high intensity laser/matter interactions. The first paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray microscopy and holography have begun. In this paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray laser development will be followed by a review of recent advances in recombination, collisional and photo-pumped systems and applications. A summary of current gain-length performance achieved in laboratories worldwide is presented. Near term prospects for applications to novel fields are discussed. 81 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Final report: Compiled MPI. Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, William Douglas

    2015-12-21

    This is the final report on Compiled MPI: Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development, and summarizes the results under this project. The project investigated runtime enviroments that improve the performance of MPI (Message-Passing Interface) programs; work at Illinois in the last period of this project looked at optimizing data access optimizations expressed with MPI datatypes.

  6. High-power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Ryba, Tracey; Holzer, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With about 2,000 high power disk lasers installations, and a demand upwards of 1,000 lasers per year, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain recent advances in disk laser technology and process relevant features of the laser, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  7. Femtosecond lasers in ophthalmology: clinical applications in anterior segment surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Tibor; Nagy, Zoltan; Sarayba, Melvin; Kurtz, Ronald M.

    2010-02-01

    The human eye is a favored target for laser surgery due to its accessibility via the optically transparent ocular tissue. Femtosecond lasers with confined tissue effects and minimized collateral tissue damage are primary candidates for high precision intraocular surgery. The advent of compact diode-pumped femtosecond lasers, coupled with computer controlled beam delivery devices, enabled the development of high precision femtosecond laser for ophthalmic surgery. In this article, anterior segment femtosecond laser applications currently in clinical practice and investigation are reviewed. Corneal procedures evolved first and remain dominant due to easy targeting referenced from a contact surface, such as applanation lenses placed on the eye. Adding a high precision imaging technique, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), can enable accurate targeting of tissue beyond the cornea, such as the crystalline lens. Initial clinical results of femtosecond laser cataract surgery are discussed in detail in the latter portion part of the article.

  8. Solid state lasers for field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motenko, Boris N.; Ermakov, Boris A.; Berezin, Boris

    1991-03-01

    Lazer heads without forced cooling and of simple design used phosphate neodymium glass of laser rods for pulse rangfinders have been investigated.The headsensure laser performance for 20 years under adverse climatic conditions (t+50 C, relative humiditi of 98%) with an operating time of 4.10

  9. Laser power transmission concepts for Martian applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Young, R. J.; Conway, E. J.; Meador, W. E.; Humes, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    Long-term, highly reliable, flexible power will be required to support many diverse activities on Mars and for rapid development of the Mars environment. The potential of laser power transmission for supporting science, materials processing, transportation, and human habitats is discussed. Some advantageous locations for laser power stations in Mars orbit are developed.

  10. Application of Laser in Oral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Zadsirjan, Saeede

    2014-01-01

    In this review collected from the literature on usage of laser in oral minor surgery based on a Medline search in the time period between the years: 2008 and 2013, the most current evidence on laser-assisted oral minor surgery is going to be surveyed. PMID:25653807

  11. Polymer pixel enhancement by laser-induced forward transfer for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, V.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinescu, M.; Shaw Stewart, J.; Lippert, T. K.; di Pietrantonio, F.; Cannata, D.; Benetti, M.; Verona, E.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents polymer pixel printing for applications in chemoselective sensors where nanosecond laser direct transfer methods, with a triazene polymer (TP) acting as a Dynamic Release Layer (DRL), are used. A systematic study of laser fluence, donor film morphology and both single- and multiple-pixel deposition were optimized with the final goal to obtain continuous pixels of sensitive polymers, polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyisobutylene (PIB), on SAW surfaces. Morphology characterization after the laser transfer has been performed by Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The responses of the coated transducers were measured after deposition with different laser fluences and it was found that a fluence under 625 mJ/cm2 was required in order to prevent damage of the interdigital transducers (IDT) of the sensor devices. The sensitivity of the polymer coated devices to acetone concentrations gives an indication that LIFT can be used for printing sensitive polymer pixels onto transducer devices.

  12. Scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

  13. Clinical dental application of Er:YAG laser for Class V cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Nakamura, Y; Mazeki, K; Kimura, Y

    1996-06-01

    Following the development of the ruby laser by Maiman in 1960, the Nd:YAG laser, the CO2 laser, the semiconductor laser, the He-Ne laser, excimer lasers, the argon laser, and finally the Er:YAG laser capable of cutting hard tissue easily were developed and have come to be applied clinically. In the present study, the Er:YAG laser emitting at a wavelength of 2.94 microns developed by Luxar was used for the clinical preparation of class V cavities. Parameters of 8 Hz and approx. 250 mJ/pulse maximum output were used for irradiation. Sixty teeth of 40 patients were used in this clinical study. The Er:YAG laser used in this study was found to be a system suitable for clinical application. No adverse reaction was observed in any of the cases. Class V cavity preparation was performed without inducing any pain in 48/60 cases (80%). All of the 12 cases that complained of mild or severe intraoperative pain had previously complained of cervical dentin hypersensibility during the preoperative examination. Cavity preparation was completed with this laser system in 58/60 cases (91.7%). No treatment-related clinical problems were observed during the follow-up period of approx. 30 days after cavity preparation and resin filling. Cavity preparation took between approx. 10 sec and 3 min and was related more or less to cavity size and depth. Overall clinical evaluation showed no safety problem with very good rating in 49 cases (81.7%).

  14. LDRD Final Report for''Tactical Laser Weapons for Defense'' SI (Tracking Code 01-SI-011)

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Zapata, L

    2002-01-30

    The focus of this project was a convincing demonstration of two new technological approaches to high beam quality; high average power solid-state laser systems that would be of interest for tactical laser weapon applications. Two pathways had been identified to such systems that built on existing thin disk and fiber laser technologies. This SI was used as seed funding to further develop and vet these ideas. Significantly, the LLNL specific enhancements to these proposed technology paths were specifically addressed for devising systems scaleable to the 100 kW average power level. In the course of performing this work we have established an intellectual property base that protects and distinguishes us from other competitive approaches to the same end.

  15. Laser trimming of graphene oxide for functional photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaorui; Lin, Han; Yang, Tieshan; Jia, Baohua

    2017-02-01

    This article reviews the recent photonic applications on graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide films via the direct laser printing method. Attention has been paid to the unique optical property modulations of graphene oxide films during the laser reduction process, which enable a wide range of functional photonic and optoelectronic devices. The exotic properties of graphene oxide during the laser reduction process, including the tunable dispersion relation, flexible patterning capability, surface functionalization possibility, wavefront shaping ability, and the mechanical robustness and strength, make it a promising integratable platform for the next-generation ultrathin, light-weight and flexible photonic and optoelectronic applications.

  16. Short Pulse Nd: YAG Laser for Optical Fuze Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    guidance systems or optical communications links. The primary concern of this work was optical proximity fuze systems, so the Nd:YAG laser system has been...AD-A099 042 HARRY DIAMOND LASS AOELPMI MO F/6 19/1 SHORT PULSE NO: YAG LASER FOR OPTICAL FUZE APPLICATIONS.(U) FEB 81 R WELLMAN, 4 NEMARICH...Subtitle) S TYPE OF I IPoRT & PERIOD COVERED Short Pulse Nd:YAG Laser for Optical Fuze Applications& _Technical t .,-Itp -PERFORMING OR;5. REPO*T NIUBER

  17. Silicon PV module customization using laser technology for new BIPV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ballesteros, Juan José; Lauzurica, Sara; Morales, Miguel; del Caño, Teodosio; Valencia, Daniel; Casado, Leonardo; Balenzategui, José Lorenzo; Molpeceres, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that lasers have helped to increase efficiency and to reduce production costs in the photovoltaic (PV) sector in the last two decades, appearing in most cases as the ideal tool to solve some of the critical bottlenecks of production both in thin film (TF) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) technologies. The accumulated experience in these fields has brought as a consequence the possibility of using laser technology to produce new Building Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) products with a high degree of customization. However, to produce efficiently these personalized products it is necessary the development of optimized laser processes able to transform standard products in customized items oriented to the BIPV market. In particular, the production of semitransparencies and/or freeform geometries in TF a-Si modules and standard c-Si modules is an application of great interest in this market. In this work we present results of customization of both TF a-Si modules and standard monocrystalline (m-Si) and policrystalline silicon (pc-Si) modules using laser ablation and laser cutting processes. A discussion about the laser processes parameterization to guarantee the functionality of the device is included. Finally some examples of final devices are presented with a full discussion of the process approach used in their fabrication.

  18. Final Report: Laser-Based Optical Trap for Remote Sampling of Interplanetary and Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stysley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Applicability to Early Stage Innovation NIAC Cutting edge and innovative technologies are needed to achieve the demanding requirements for NASA origin missions that require sample collection as laid out in the NRC Decadal Survey. This proposal focused on fully understanding the state of remote laser optical trapping techniques for capturing particles and returning them to a target site. In future missions, a laser-based optical trapping system could be deployed on a lander that would then target particles in the lower atmosphere and deliver them to the main instrument for analysis, providing remote access to otherwise inaccessible samples. Alternatively, for a planetary mission the laser could combine ablation and trapping capabilities on targets typically too far away or too hard for traditional drilling sampling systems. For an interstellar mission, a remote laser system could gather particles continuously at a safe distance; this would avoid the necessity of having a spacecraft fly through a target cloud such as a comet tail. If properly designed and implemented, a laser-based optical trapping system could fundamentally change the way scientists designand implement NASA missions that require mass spectroscopy and particle collection.

  19. Photodetachment neutralizer development: Laser window design study: Volume 1, Summary: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-30

    Photodetachment neutralization (PDN) has been proposed as a major improvement to the gas cell neutralization utilized on current neutral beam heating systems for magnetic containment fusion devices. This PDN system will use a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) to produce a light beam with photons of a near optimal wavelength which can be reflected back and forth across the path of the ion beam to create the necessary high density light ''cloud'' required for the photodetachment process. In a fusion device the neutral beam goes directly into the process vacuum chamber and therefore the oxygen iodine gas mixture in the laser must be isolated by a window from the neutral beam channel without loss of too much light or leakage of miniscule quantities of laser gas. The aerodynamic windows that have traditionally been used with chemical lasers are viewed as undesirable for the fusion application where any contamination of the fusion vacuum chamber by laser gas would be a big problem. It was concluded that the technological issues were uncertain enough that a verification by designing, fabricating, and testing of a demonstration window would be required before feasibility of such a window could be considered certain. The statement of work defined for this study consisted of two tasks: determination of the absorption characteristics of the proposed sapphire window material and the fluorocarbon coolant, and design and analysis of the proposed double disk heat exchanger window and demonstration test hardware.

  20. Final optics protection in laser inertial fusion with cryogenic liquid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W

    2000-08-31

    A burst of x rays and vaporized debris from high yield targets can damage the final optics in laser inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants and in laboratory experimental facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Noble gases such as Xe or Kr have been proposed to protect final optics from target-produced x rays and debris. Some problems with the use of such ambient gas fills are the large amount of gas involved, heat transfer to a cryogenic target, potential resonant reradiation of x rays absorbed, and a nonuniform index of refraction due to turbulence interfering with the focusing of laser light. Also the fast igniter laser intensity may be too great for propagation through an ambient gas. We propose to provide the gas in the form of many small closely spaced liquid droplets injected in front of the optics. In the case of NIF, the droplets would be injected only when needed just before a high yield shot. The laser light that is absorbed will cause evaporation of the liquid and spreading of this gas. The liquid droplets intercept only {approx}5% of the laser light allowing {approx}95% to pass through to the target. The light absorbed in the NIF example (assumed to be 50% of the intercepted light, whose intensity is 3.6 x 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}) would cause the xenon droplets to evaporate and spread uniformly such that the x rays from 10 eV to 2 keV are appreciably attenuated when they arrive 40 to 70 ns later at the optical surface. X rays above 3 keV and below 10 eV are not attenuated very much but their intensities are rapidly falling off in this range anyway. Typical droplet sizes are {approx}10 {micro}m radius with a spacing of {approx}0.4 mm. The gas would also protect vaporized target debris from condensing on the optics due to the 0.2 mg/cm{sup 2} of xenon (5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} or 8 Torr-cm for l-e-folding of 1 keV x-rays). These droplets might be produced with technology similar to ink jet technology and photo

  1. Proposed Physics Experiments for Laser-Driven Electron Linear Acceleration in a Dielectric Loaded Vacuum, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Byer, Robert L.

    2016-07-08

    This final report summarizes the last three years of research on the development of advanced linear electron accelerators that utilize dielectric wave-guide vacuum channels pumped by high energy laser fields to accelerate beams of electrons.

  2. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, Michael C.

    2014-04-30

    Particle accelerators enable scientists to study the fundamental structure of the universe, but have become the largest and most expensive of scientific instruments. In this project, we advanced the science and technology of laser-plasma accelerators, which are thousands of times smaller and less expensive than their conventional counterparts. In a laser-plasma accelerator, a powerful laser pulse exerts light pressure on an ionized gas, or plasma, thereby driving an electron density wave, which resembles the wake behind a boat. Electrostatic fields within this plasma wake reach tens of billions of volts per meter, fields far stronger than ordinary non-plasma matter (such as the matter that a conventional accelerator is made of) can withstand. Under the right conditions, stray electrons from the surrounding plasma become trapped within these “wake-fields”, surf them, and acquire energy much faster than is possible in a conventional accelerator. Laser-plasma accelerators thus might herald a new generation of compact, low-cost accelerators for future particle physics, x-ray and medical research. In this project, we made two major advances in the science of laser-plasma accelerators. The first of these was to accelerate electrons beyond 1 gigaelectronvolt (1 GeV) for the first time. In experimental results reported in Nature Communications in 2013, about 1 billion electrons were captured from a tenuous plasma (about 1/100 of atmosphere density) and accelerated to 2 GeV within about one inch, while maintaining less than 5% energy spread, and spreading out less than ½ milliradian (i.e. ½ millimeter per meter of travel). Low energy spread and high beam collimation are important for applications of accelerators as coherent x-ray sources or particle colliders. This advance was made possible by exploiting unique properties of the Texas Petawatt Laser, a powerful laser at the University of Texas at Austin that produces pulses of 150 femtoseconds (1 femtosecond is 10

  3. The NASA high-power carbon dioxide laser - A versatile tool for laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancashire, R. B.; Alger, D. L.; Manista, E. J.; Slaby, J. G.; Dunning, J. W.; Stubbs, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has designed and fabricated a closed-cycle, continuous wave (CW), carbon dioxide (CO2) high-power laser to support research for the identification and evaluation of possible high-power laser applications. The device is designed to generate up to 70 kW of laser power in annular-shape beams from 1 to 9 cm in diameter. Electric discharge, either self-sustained or electron-beam-sustained, is used for excitation. This laser facility can be used in two ways. First, it provides a versatile tool on which research can be performed to advance the state-of-the-art technology of high-power CO2 lasers in such areas as electric excitation, laser chemistry, and quality of output beams, all of which are important whether the laser application is government or industry oriented. Second, the facility provides a well-defined, continuous wave beam for various application experiments, such as propulsion, power conversion, and materials processing.

  4. Applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Emanuel, M.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The ability to condition the radiance of laser diodes using shaped-fiber cylindrical-microlens technology has dramatically increased the number of applications that can be practically engaged by diode laser arrays. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has actively pursued optical efficiency and engineering improvements in this technology in an effort to supply large radiance-conditioned laser diode array sources for its own internal programs. This effort has centered on the development of a modular integrated laser diode packaging technology with the goal of enabling the simple and flexible construction of high average power, high density, two-dimensional arrays with integrated cylindrical microlenses. Within LLNL, the principal applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays are as high intensity pump sources for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs). A simple end-pumping architecture has been developed and demonstrated that allows the radiation from microlens-conditioned, two-dimensional diode array apertures to be efficiently delivered to the end of rod lasers. To date, pump powers as high as 2.5 kW have been delivered to 3 mm diameter laser rods. Such high power levels are critical for pumping solid state lasers in which the terminal laser level is a Stark level lying in the ground state manifold. Previously, such systems have often required operation of the solid state gain medium at low temperature to freeze out the terminal laser Stark level population. The authors recently developed high intensity pump sources overcome this difficulty by effectively pumping to much higher inversion levels, allowing efficient operation at or near room temperature. Because the end-pumping technology is scalable in absolute power, the number of rare-earth ions and transitions that can be effectively accessed for use in practical DPSSL systems has grown tremendously.

  5. Possible application of laser isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    The laser isotope separation process is described and its special economic features discussed. These features are its low cost electric power operation, capital investment costs, and the costs of process materials.

  6. A High Energy 2-microns Laser for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2000-01-01

    Solid-state 2-microns laser has been receiving considerable interest because of its eye-safe property and efficient diode pump operation, It has potential for multiple lidar applications to detect water vapor. carbon dioxide and winds. In this paper, we describe a 2-microns double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser and end-pumped amplifier system. A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed to aid the design and optimization of the laser performance. In a single Q-switched pulse operation the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will be wasted. However, in a double pulses operation mode, the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will repopulate the Ho atoms that were depleted by the extraction of the first Q-switched pulse. Thus. the Tin sensitized Ho:YLF laser provides a unique advantage in applications that require double pulse operation, such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). A total output energy of 146 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with as high as 4.8% optical to optical efficiency. Compared to a single pulse laser, 70% higher laser efficiency is realized. To obtain high energy while maintaining the high beam quality, a master-oscillator-power-amplifier 2-microns system is designed. We developed an end-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF disk amplifier. This amplifier uses two diode arrays as pump source. A non-imaging lens duct is used to couple the radiation from the laser diode arrays to the laser disk. Preliminary result shows that the efficiency of this laser can be as high as 3%, a factor of three increases over side-pump configuration. This high energy, highly efficient and high beam quality laser is a promising candidate for use in an efficient, multiple lidar applications.

  7. Laser production and heating of plasma for MHD application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the production and heating of plasmas by the absorption of laser radiation. These experiments were performed to ascertain the feasibility of using laser-produced or laser-heated plasmas as the input for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. Such a system would have a broad application as a laser-to-electricity energy converter for space power transmission. Experiments with a 100-J-pulsed CO2 laser were conducted to investigate the breakdown of argon gas by a high-intensity laser beam, the parameters (electron density and temperature) of the plasma produced, and the formation and propagation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. Experiments were also carried out using a 1-J-pulsed CO2 laser to heat the plasma produced in a shock tube. The shock-tube hydrogen plasma reached electron densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm and electron temperatures of approximately 1 eV. Absorption of the CO2 laser beam by the plasma was measured, and up to approximately 100 percent absorption was observed. Measurements with a small MHD generator showed that the energy extraction efficiency could be very large with values up to 56 percent being measured.

  8. Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Repetti, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technially or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming. 58 refs.

  9. A qualitative and quantitative laser-based computer-aided flow visualization method. M.S. Thesis, 1992 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canacci, Victor A.; Braun, M. Jack

    1994-01-01

    The experimental approach presented here offers a nonintrusive, qualitative and quantitative evaluation of full field flow patterns applicable in various geometries in a variety of fluids. This Full Flow Field Tracking (FFFT) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique, by means of particle tracers illuminated by a laser light sheet, offers an alternative to Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), and intrusive systems such as Hot Wire/Film Anemometry. The method makes obtainable the flow patterns, and allows quantitative determination of the velocities, accelerations, and mass flows of an entire flow field. The method uses a computer based digitizing system attached through an imaging board to a low luminosity camera. A customized optical train allows the system to become a long distance microscope (LDM), allowing magnifications of areas of interest ranging up to 100 times. Presented in addition to the method itself, are studies in which the flow patterns and velocities were observed and evaluated in three distinct geometries, with three different working fluids. The first study involved pressure and flow analysis of a brush seal in oil. The next application involved studying the velocity and flow patterns in a cowl lip cooling passage of an air breathing aircraft engine using water as the working fluid. Finally, the method was extended to a study in air to examine the flows in a staggered pin arrangement located on one side of a branched duct.

  10. Random lasers for lab-on-chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giehl, J. M.; Butzbach, F.; Jorge, K. C.; Alvarado, M. A.; Carreño, M. N. P.; Alayo, M. I.; Wetter, N. U.

    2016-04-01

    Random lasers are laser sources in which the feedback is provided by scattering instead of reflection and which, for this reason, do not require surfaces with optical finish such as mirrors. The investigation of such lasing action in a large variety of disordered materials is a subject of high interest with very important applications such as threedimensional and speckle-free imaging, detection of cancer tissue and photonic coding and encryption. However, potential applications require optimization of random laser performance especially with respect to optical efficiency and directionality or brightness. This work demonstrates such an optimization procedure with the goal of achieving a random laser with sufficient efficiency and brightness in order to be used in practical applications. Two random lasers are demonstrated, one solid and on liquid, that fulfil directionality and efficiency requirements. The first one consists of a neodymium doped powder laser with a record slope efficiency of 1.6%. The second one is a liquid random laser injected into a HC-ARROW waveguide which uses a microchannel connected to a much larger reservoir in order to achieve the necessary directionality. Both devices can be produced by low cost fabricating technologies and easily integrated into next-generation, lab-on-chip devices used for in-situ determination of infectious tropical diseases, which is the main goal of this project.

  11. NEET-AMM Final Technical Report on Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott; Baca, Georgina; O'Connor, Michael

    2015-12-31

    Final technical report summarizes the program progress and technical accomplishments of the Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components project. A series of experiments varying build process parameters (scan speed and laser power) were conducted at the outset to establish the optimal build conditions for each of the alloys. Fabrication was completed in collaboration with Quad City Manufacturing Laboratory (QCML). The density of all sample specimens was measured and compared to literature values. Optimal build process conditions giving fabricated part densities close to literature values were chosen for making mechanical test coupons. Test coupons whose principal axis is on the x-y plane (perpendicular to build direction) and on the z plane (parallel to build direction) were built and tested as part of the experimental build matrix to understand the impact of the anisotropic nature of the process.. Investigations are described 316L SS, Inconel 600, 718 and 800 and oxide dispersion strengthed 316L SS (Yttria) alloys.

  12. Laser micro-structuring of surfaces for applications in materials and biomedical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzyński, Antoni; Marczak, Jan; Strzelec, Marek; Rycyk, Antoni; CzyŻ, Krzysztof; Chmielewska, Danuta

    2016-12-01

    Laser radiation is used, among others, for surface treatment of various materials. At the Institute of Optoelectronics, under the direction of the late Professor Jan Marczak, a number of works in the field of laser materials processing were performed. Among them special recognition deserves flagship work of Professor Jan Marczak: implementation in Poland laser cleaning method of artworks. Another big project involved the direct method of laser interference lithography. These two projects have already been widely discussed in many national and international scientific conferences. They will also be discussed at SLT2016. In addition to these two projects in the Laboratory of Lasers Applications many other works have been carried out, some of which will be separately presented at the SLT2016 Conference. These included laser decorating of ceramics and glass (three projects completed in cooperation with the Institute of Ceramics and Building Materials), interference structuring medical implants (together with the Warsaw University of Technology), testing the adhesion of thin layers (project implemented together with IFTR PAS), structuring layers of DLC for growing endothelial cells (together with IMMS PAS), engraving glass for microfluidic applications, metal marking, sapphire cutting and finally the production of microsieves for separating of blood cells.

  13. The development of novel Ytterbium fiber lasers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Bai

    The aim of my Ph.D. research is to push the fundamental limits holding back the development of novel Yb fiber lasers with high pulse energy and short pulse duration. The purpose of developing these lasers is to use them for important applications such as multiphoton microscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. My first project was to develop a short-pulse high-energy ultrafast fiber laser for multiphoton microscopy. To achieve high multiphoton efficiency and depth resolved tissue imaging, ultrashort pulse duration and high pulse energy are required. In order to achieve this, an all-normal dispersion cavity design was adopted. Output performances of the built lasers were investigated by varying several cavity parameters, such as pump laser power, fiber length and intra-cavity spectral filter bandwidth. It was found that the length of the fiber preceding the gain fiber is critical to the laser performance. Generally, the shorter the fiber is, the broader the output spectrum is. The more interesting parameter is the intra-cavity spectral filter bandwidth. Counter intuitively, laser cavities using narrower bandwidth spectral filters generated much broader spectra. It was also found that fiber lasers with very narrow spectral filters produced laser pulses with parabolic profile, which are referred to as self-similar pulses or similaritons. This type of pulse can avoid wave-breaking and is an optimal approach to generate pulses with high pulse energy and ultrashort pulse duration. With a 3nm intra-cavity spectral filter, output pulses with about 20 nJ pulse energy were produced and compressed to about 41 fs full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) pulse duration. Due to the loss in the compression device, the peak power of the compressed pulses is about 250 kW. It was the highest peak power generated from a fiber oscillator when this work was published. This laser was used for multiphoton microscopy on living tissues like Drosophila larva and fruit fly wings. Several

  14. Holmium-doped laser materials for eye-safe solid state laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woohong; Bowman, Steven R.; Baker, Colin; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Sadowski, Bryan; Hunt, Michael; Aggarwal, Ishwar; Sanghera, Jasbinder

    2014-06-01

    Trivalent holmium has 14 laser channels from 0.55 to 3.9 μm. The laser emission of most interest is the transition 5I7→5I8 near 2 μm because of its potential for use in eye-safe systems and medical applications. In this paper, we present our recent results in the development of Ho3+ doped laser materials for eye-safe solid state lasers. We report a calorimetric study of non-radiative losses in two micron pumped holmium doped laser host materials such as silica glass, yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystal and Lu2O3 ceramics. Optical, spectral and morphological properties as well as the lasing performance from highly transparent ceramics are presented.

  15. The coherent combination of fibre lasers - Towards realistic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, Peter; Corner, Laura; Walczak, Roman

    2017-03-01

    To drive a laser-plasma wakefield, high peak-power laser pulses are required. For useful accelerator applications, it is also necessary to have driving lasers with high efficiency, repetition rates, and average power. The coherent combination of Ytterbium-doped fibre laser amplifiers is a promising potential solution, and previous work has demonstrated the successful combination of near-identical ultrafast fibre lasers. We report here the combination of significantly mismatched Ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fibre amplifiers with a combined efficiency of 96%, while the locked power output remained stable for 6 hours. The combined output of the system had a total gain of 12 dB, with no detrimental effect on the compressed pulse width observed.

  16. Medical Applications Of CO2 Laser Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    In 1978, Hughes Laboratories reported development of fiber optics that were capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. These fibers are now being tested for medical applications. Wide ranging medical investigation with CO2 lasers has occurred during the twelve years since the first observations of laser hemostasis. Specialists in ophthalmology, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, otolaryngology, maxillo-facial/plastic surgery, dermatology, and oncology among others, have explored its use. In principle, all these specialists use CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 microns to thermally destroy diseased tissues. As such, CO2 lasers compare and compete with electrosurgical devices. The fundamental difference between these modalities lies in how they generate heat in treated tissue.

  17. Ionization rates relevant to laser cooling of hydrogen. Final report, 1 August 1987-31 January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, R.S.

    1988-06-01

    Laser cooling of atomic hydrogen has practical importance is a wide variety of applications ranging from relativistic neutral-particle beam weapons to atomic clocks and exotic fuels. A laser beam suitable for atomic hydrogen cooling needs to be high-intensity, narrow-band, coherent, and broadly tunable in the region around Lyman-alpha (1216 A). The author produced a source meeting these criteria. He studied, characterized, and optimized this source for conditions important to laser cooling. In an introductory section, he discusses the physics and potential practical applications of laser cooling and tunable VUV sources. Specific results obtained during the six months of this contract.

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS): specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtica, M. S.; Savovic, J.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Kuzmanovic, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Ciganovic, J.; Zivkovic, S.

    2015-12-01

    A short overview of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with emphasis on the new trends is presented. Nowadays, due to unique features of this technique, LIBS has found applications in a great variety of fields. Achievements in the application of LIBS in nuclear area, for hazardous materials detection and in geology were considered. Also, some results recently obtained at VINCA Institute, with LIBS system based on transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, are presented. Future investigations of LIBS will be oriented toward further improvement of the analytical performance of this technique, as well as on finding new application fields.

  19. Temporal Characterization of a Picosecond Laser-Pumped X-ray Laser (for Applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Shepherd, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Booth, R; Smith, R; Hunter, J

    2003-11-25

    Compact soft x-ray laser sources are now used routinely for various applications primarily because of their high repetition rate, high photon fluence and short pulse duration characteristics. For some of these applications, for example interferometry of high density laser-produced plasmas, longer optical drive pulses, 6-13 ps (FWHM), have been implemented to maximize the x-ray output and coherence. It is therefore important to know the x-ray laser pulse length, shape and repeatability for these specific experiments as a baseline measurement but also to better understand the temporal behavior as a function of the pumping conditions in general. We report a detailed temporal characterization of the picosecond-driven 14.7 nm Ni-like Pd ion x-ray laser on the Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser at LLNL using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera measurement of a horizontal slice of the near-field x-ray laser pattern. This is measured as a function of the chirped pulse amplification pumping laser conditions, including varying the pump pulse from 0.5-27 ps (FWHM), varying the plasma column length as well as investigating traveling wave (TW) and non-TW irradiation conditions.

  20. Facet joint laser radiation: tissue effects of a new clinical laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmann, Klaus; Thal, Dietmar R.

    1996-01-01

    Chronic unilateral and bilateral back pain with pseudoradicular symptoms, is a common clinical syndrome, which in many cases can be related to the facet joint syndrome. The pain is caused by mechanical affection of synovial and capsular nerve terminals. Therefore, current therapeutical attempts including physical therapy, intra-articular injection of local anesthetics and steroids and thermocoagulation of the facet joint with a thermocoagulator, are performed. We confirmed laser coagulation of the facet joint. Porcine cadaveric spines were treated immediately after death by intra-articular facet joint laser radiation. With the pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) altogether 600 J were applied in three different places 4 mm apart at the top of the facet joint. The results showed that facet joint laser radiation leads to a small (about 1 - 2 mm diameter) lesion restricted to the facet joint cavity and its synovia. Histologically, we found a central carbonization zone and necrosis, including almost the whole cartilage and approximately 0.2 mm of the adjacent bone. These changes are similar to Nd:Yag-laser applications in other skeletal regions. It is suggested that these changes may lead to facet joint denervation by coagulation of the synovial nerve terminals. Cicatration of the laser lesion might cause ankylosis of this joint. In sum, facet joint laser radiation could be an alternative therapeutical tool for lower back pain of the facet joint syndrome type. Therefore, future clinical application of this technique seems to be very promising.

  1. Laser Diode Cooling For High Average Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundinger, David C.; Beach, Raymond J.; Benett, William J.; Solarz, Richard W.; Sperry, Verry

    1989-06-01

    Many applications for semiconductor lasers that require high average power are limited by the inability to remove the waste heat generated by the diode lasers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of these applications a heat sink package has been developed which is based on water cooled silicon microstructures. Thermal resistivities of less than 0.025°C/01/cm2) have been measured which should be adequate for up to CW operation of diode laser arrays. This concept can easily be scaled to large areas and is ideal for high average power solid state laser pumping. Several packages which illustrate the essential features of this design have been fabricated and tested. The theory of operation will be briefly covered, and several conceptual designs will be described. Also the fabrication and assembly procedures and measured levels of performance will be discussed.

  2. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  3. Optofluidic Bio-Lasers: Concept and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xudong; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    An optofluidic bio-laser integrates biological materials into the gain medium while forming an optical cavity in the fluidic environment, either on a microfluidic chip or within a biological system. The laser emission has characteristics fundamentally different from conventional fluorescence emission. It can be highly sensitive to a specific molecular change in the gain medium as the light-matter interaction is amplified by the resonance in the cavity. The enhanced sensitivity can be used to probe and quantify the underlying biochemical and biological processes in vitro in a microfluidic device, in situ in a cell (cytosol), or in vivo in a live organism. Here we describe the principle of the optofluidic bio-laser, review its recent progress and provide an outlook of this emerging technology. PMID:24481219

  4. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  5. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy application in joint European torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; L'Hermite, D.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Lacour, J.-L.; Cheymol, G.; Kempenaars, M.; Bekris, N.; Grisolia, C.

    2016-09-01

    The results on the first successful application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for remote in situ diagnostics of plasma facing components (a deposited layer on a divertor tile) in Joint European Torus (JET) are presented. The studies were performed with an available JET EDGE LIDAR laser system. For in-depth analysis of deposited layers on JET divertor tiles, a number of laser shots were applied onto the same divertor place without laser beam displacement. The spectral lines of D, CII and impurity elements (CrI, BeII, …) were identified in a wide spectral range (400-670 nm). With the increase in a number of laser shots applied onto the same divertor place, we observed consecutive changes in spectral line intensities of deuterium, carbon, and impurities with the appearance of spectral lines of tungsten substrate (WI). In-depth analysis of deposited layers on JET divertor tiles was made on the basis of the spectral line behaviour in reference to the applied laser shots. The possibility of surface cartography with laser beam displacement on the tile surface was demonstrated as well. Based on the results obtained, we may conclude that LIBS method is applicable for in situ remote analysis of deposited layers of JET plasma facing components.

  6. Advances in 193 nm excimer lasers for mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Esser, Hans-Gerd; Bonati, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Ongoing progress in mass analysis applications such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry of solid samples and ultraviolet photoionization mediated sequencing of peptides and proteins is to a large extent driven by ultrashort wavelength excimer lasers at 193 nm. This paper will introduce the latest improvements achieved in the development of compact high repetition rate excimer lasers and elaborate on the impact on mass spectrometry instrumentation. Various performance and lifetime measurements obtained in a long-term endurance test over the course of 18 months will be shown and discussed in view of the laser source requirements of different mass spectrometry tasks. These sampling type applications are served by excimer lasers delivering pulsed 193 nm output of several mJ as well as fast repetition rates which are already approaching one Kilohertz. In order to open up the pathway from the laboratory to broader market industrial use, sufficient component lifetimes and long-term stable performance behavior have to be ensured. The obtained long-term results which will be presented are based on diverse 193 nm excimer laser tube improvements aiming at e.g. optimizing the gas flow dynamics and have extended the operational life the laser tube for the first time over several billion pulses even under high duty-cycle conditions.

  7. Indium phosphide solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Lasers can be used to transmit power to photovoltaic cells. Solar cell efficiencies are enhanced significantly under monochromatic light, and therefore a laser beam of proper wavelength could be a very effective source of illumination for a solar array operating at very high efficiencies. This work reviews the modeling studies made on indium phosphide solar cells for such an application. These cells are known to be very radiation resistant and have a potential for high efficiency. Effects of cell series resistance, laser intensity, and temperature on cell performance have been discussed.

  8. Shaping laser accelerated ions for future applications - The LIGHT collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Almomani, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Barth, W.; Bedacht, S.; Blažević, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Brabetz, C.; Burris-Mog, T.; Cowan, T. E.; Deppert, O.; Droba, M.; Eickhoff, H.; Eisenbarth, U.; Harres, K.; Hoffmeister, G.; Hofmann, I.; Jaeckel, O.; Jaeger, R.; Joost, M.; Kraft, S.; Kroll, F.; Kaluza, M.; Kester, O.; Lecz, Z.; Merz, T.; Nürnberg, F.; Al-Omari, H.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.; Paulus, G.; Polz, J.; Ratzinger, U.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schmidt, P.; Schramm, U.; Schreiber, G.; Schumacher, D.; Stoehlker, T.; Tauschwitz, A.; Vinzenz, W.; Wagner, F.; Yaramyshev, S.; Zielbauer, B.

    2014-03-01

    The generation of intense ion beams from high-intensity laser-generated plasmas has been the focus of research for the last decade. In the LIGHT collaboration the expertise of heavy ion accelerator scientists and laser and plasma physicists has been combined to investigate the prospect of merging these ion beams with conventional accelerator technology and exploring the possibilities of future applications. We report about the goals and first results of the LIGHT collaboration to generate, handle and transport laser driven ion beams. This effort constitutes an important step in research for next generation accelerator technologies.

  9. Novel diode laser-based sensors for gas sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittel, F. K.; Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The development of compact spectroscopic gas sensors and their applications to environmental sensing will be described. These sensors employ mid-infrared difference-frequency generation (DFG) in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystals pumped by two single-frequency solid state lasers such as diode lasers, diode-pumped solid state, and fiber lasers. Ultrasensitive, highly selective, and real-time measurements of several important atmospheric trace gases, including carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde [correction of formaldehye], and methane, have been demonstrated.

  10. Athermal diode-pumped laser designator modules for targeting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepy, B.; Closse, G.; Da Cruz, J.; Sabourdy, D.; Montagne, J.; Nguyen, L.

    2012-10-01

    We report on the development and characteristics of athermal diode-pumped designator modules as Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) for targeting application. These modules are designed with the latest diode-pumped technology minimizing volume and power consumption. The core technology allows to address multi-platforms requirements such as land or airborne. Products are composed of a Laser Transmitter Unit (LTU) and Laser Electronic Unit (LEU) for modular approach.

  11. Comparison Of Laser And Waterjet Systems For Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavi, Reza K.

    1986-07-01

    High power laser systems and high pressure waterjet systems are both emerging as non-conventional cutting tools, capable of increasing productivity and quality in the manufacture of a great number of products employing diverse material. It is often a confusing issue for the manufacturing engineer or production manager to decide which system would be most suited for his applications. This paper is intended to provide some insights into the engineering and economic aspects of laser systems versus waterjet systems.

  12. Power blue and green laser diodes and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, Thomas; Strauß, Uwe; Eichler, Christoph; Vierheilig, Clemens; Tautz, Sönke; Brüderl, Georg; Stojetz, Bernhard; Wurm, Teresa; Avramescu, Adrian; Somers, André; Ristic, Jelena; Gerhard, Sven; Lell, Alfred; Morgott, Stefan; Mehl, Oliver

    2013-03-01

    InGaN based green laser diodes with output powers up to 50mW are now well established for variety of applications ranging from leveling to special lighting effects and mobile projection of 12lm brightness. In future the highest market potential for visible single mode profile lasers might be laser projection of 20lm. Therefore direct green single-mode laser diodes with higher power are required. We found that self heating was the limiting factor for higher current operation. We present power-current characteristics of improved R and D samples with up to 200mW in cw-operation. An optical output power of 100mW is reached at 215mA, a current level which is suitable for long term operation. Blue InGaN laser diodes are also the ideal source for phosphor based generation of green light sources of high luminance. We present a light engine based on LARP (Laser Activated Remote Phosphor) which can be used in business projectors of several thousand lumens on screen. We discuss the advantages of a laser based systems in comparison with LED light engines. LARP requires highly efficient blue power laser diodes with output power above 1W. Future market penetration of LARP will require lower costs. Therefore we studied new designs for higher powers levels. R and D chips with power-current characteristics up to 4W in continuous wave operation on C-mount at 25°C are presented.

  13. Tailoring Laser Propulsion for Future Applications in Space

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Scharring, Stefan

    2010-10-08

    Pulsed laser propulsion may turn out as a low cost alternative for the transportation of small payloads in future. In recent years DLR investigated this technology with the goal of cheaply launching small satellites into low earth orbit (LEO) with payload masses on the order of 5 to 10 kg. Since the required high power pulsed laser sources are yet not at the horizon, DLR focused on new applications based on available laser technology. Space-borne, i.e. in weightlessness, there exist a wide range of missions requiring small thrusters that can be propelled by laser power. This covers space logistic and sample return missions as well as position keeping and attitude control of satellites.First, a report on the proof of concept of a remote controlled laser rocket with a thrust vector steering device integrated in a parabolic nozzle will be given. Second, the road from the previous ground-based flight experiments in earth's gravity using a 100-J class laser to flight experiments with a parabolic thruster in an artificial 2D-zero gravity on an air cushion table employing a 1-J class laser and, with even less energy, new investigations in the field of laser micro propulsion will be reviewed.

  14. Tailoring Laser Propulsion for Future Applications in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Scharring, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Pulsed laser propulsion may turn out as a low cost alternative for the transportation of small payloads in future. In recent years DLR investigated this technology with the goal of cheaply launching small satellites into low earth orbit (LEO) with payload masses on the order of 5 to 10 kg. Since the required high power pulsed laser sources are yet not at the horizon, DLR focused on new applications based on available laser technology. Space-borne, i.e. in weightlessness, there exist a wide range of missions requiring small thrusters that can be propelled by laser power. This covers space logistic and sample return missions as well as position keeping and attitude control of satellites. First, a report on the proof of concept of a remote controlled laser rocket with a thrust vector steering device integrated in a parabolic nozzle will be given. Second, the road from the previous ground-based flight experiments in earth's gravity using a 100-J class laser to flight experiments with a parabolic thruster in an artificial 2D-zero gravity on an air cushion table employing a 1-J class laser and, with even less energy, new investigations in the field of laser micro propulsion will be reviewed.

  15. Catadioptric optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the adaptation of low-cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform the laser-beam-focusing and scattered-light collection tasks associated with dual-beam laser Doppler velocimetry. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray-tracing methods and Gaussian beam-propagation theory. A straightforward modification procedure to convert from infinite to near unity conjugate-ratio operation with very low residual aberration is identified and tested with a 200-mm-aperture telescope modified for f/10 operation. Performance data for this modified telescope configuration are near the diffraction limit and agree well with predictions.

  16. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  17. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  18. Antiresonant ring interferometer for laser cavity dumping, mode locking, and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegman, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    Applications in lasers for antiresonant ring interferometer include coupled laser cavities, variable laser-output coupling, intercavity harmonic-output coupling, mode locking, cavity dumping, and pulse code modulation.

  19. Laser diode technology and applications V; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 18-20, 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Daniel

    Various papers on laser diode technology and its applications are presented. The general topics addressed include: high-power coherent large-aperture sources, vertical-cavity lasers, quantum-well lasers, semiconductor laser reliability, high-power semiconductor lasers, surface-emitting lasers, laser dynamics, and visible and midinfrared semiconductor lasers.

  20. Laser Applications on Orthopaedic Bone Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Post-operative observations and body weight gain indicated there were no complications such as allergic reactions, abscesses or infections. Body...were no complications such as allergic reactions, abscesses or 6 infections. Body weight (BW) in the laser-treated animals was similar to that in

  1. Shallow Water Laser Bathymetry: Accomplishments and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-12

    still exist worldwide, present a backlog of hundreds of ship-years to conventional acoustic surveying. Additionally, much of surveyed navigation...related to its maximum depth capability, weather -related phenomena, and bottom structure. Water clarity, in particular, limits the ability of the laser

  2. Space Applications of Industrial Laser Systems (SAILS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert E.; McCay, T. Dwayne; McCay, Mary Helen; Bible, Brice

    1995-01-01

    A program is under way to develop a YAG laser based materials processing workstation to fly in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The system will be capable of cutting and welding steel, aluminum, and Inconel alloys of the type planned for use on Space Station Freedom. As well as demonstrating the ability of a YAG laser to perform remote (fiber-optic delivered) repair and fabrication operations in space, fundamental data will be collected on these interactions for comparison with terrestrial data and models. The flight system, scheduled to fly in 1995, will be constructed as two modules to fit into the standard Get Away Special (GAS) canisters. The first can holds the laser and its power supply, to be constructed by our industrial partner, Lumonics Industrial Processing Division. The second canister has the materials processing workstation and the command and data acquisition subsystems. These components will be provided by groups at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the University of Waterloo. The cans are linked by a fiber-optic cable which transmits the beam from the laser head to the workstation.

  3. Space Applications of Industrial Laser Systems (SAILS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert E.; McCay, T. Dwayne; McCay, Mary Helen; Bible, Brice

    1992-01-01

    A program is under way to develop a YAG laser based materials processing workstation to fly in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The system will be capable of cutting and welding steel, aluminum and Inconel alloys of the type planned for use on the Space Station Freedom. As well as demonstrating the ability of a YAG laser to perform remote (fiber-optic delivered) repair and fabrication operations in space, fundamental data will be collected on these interactions for comparison with terrestrial data and models. The flight system, scheduled to fly in 1995, will be constructed as two modules to fit into standard Get Away Special (GAS) canisters. The first can holds the laser and its power supply, to be constructed by our industrial partner, Lumonics Industrial Processing Division. The second canister has the materials processing workstation and the command and data acquisition subsystems. These components will be provided by groups at UTSI and the University of Waterloo. The cans are linked by a fiber-optic cable which transmits the beam from the laser head to the workstation.

  4. Dye system for dye laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    A dye of the DCM family, [2-methyl-6-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-methyl-6-quinolinyl)ethenyl]-4H-pyran -4-ylidene]-propanedinitrile, dissolved in 2-phenoxyethanol, is non-mutagenic, stable and efficient, particularly in a pumped continuous wave laser system.

  5. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA fingerprinting for forensic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Tang, K.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Chang, L.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The application of DNA fingerprinting has become very broad in forensic analysis, patient identification, diagnostic medicine, and wildlife poaching, since every individual`s DNA structure is identical within all tissues of their body. DNA fingerprinting was initiated by the use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). In 1987, Nakamura et al. found that a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) often occurred in the alleles. The probability of different individuals having the same number of tandem repeats in several different alleles is very low. Thus, the identification of VNTR from genomic DNA became a very reliable method for identification of individuals. DNA fingerprinting is a reliable tool for forensic analysis. In DNA fingerprinting, knowledge of the sequence of tandem repeats and restriction endonuclease sites can provide the basis for identification. The major steps for conventional DNA fingerprinting include (1) specimen processing (2) amplification of selected DNA segments by PCR, and (3) gel electrophoresis to do the final DNA analysis. In this work we propose to use laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA fingerprinting. The process and advantages are discussed.

  6. Design definition of the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), phase 2. Volume 2: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Lockheed personnel, along with team member subcontractors and consultants, have performed a preliminary design for the LAWS Instrument. Breadboarding and testing of a LAWS class laser have also been performed. These efforts have demonstrated that LAWS is a feasible Instrument and can be developed with existing state-of-the-art technology. Only a commitment to fund the instrument development and deployment is required to place LAWS in orbit and obtain the anticipated science and operational forecasting benefits. The LAWS Science Team was selected in 1988-89 as were the competing LAWS phase 1/2 contractor teams. The LAWS Science Team developed requirements for the LAWS Instrument, and the NASA/LAWS project office defined launch vehicle and platform design constraints. From these requirements and constraints, the lockheed team developed LAWS Instrument concepts and configurations. A system designed to meet these requirements and constraints is outlined. The LAWS primary subsystem and interfaces - laser, optical, and receiver/processor - required to assemble a lidar are identified. Also identified are the support subsystems required for the lidar to function from space: structures and mechanical, thermal, electrical, and command and data management. The Lockheed team has developed a preliminary design of a LAWS Instrument System consisting of these subsystems and interfaces which will meet the requirements and objectives of the Science Team. This final report provides a summary of the systems engineering analyses and trades of the LAWS. Summaries of the configuration, preliminary designs of the subsystems, testing recommendations, and performance analysis are presented. Environmental considerations associated with deployment of LAWS are discussed. Finally, the successful LAWS laser breadboard effort is discussed along with the requirements and test results.

  7. Atmospheric Propagation of High Energy Lasers and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joung R.

    2005-04-01

    It has been over forty years since the invention of the laser, which has inspired the imagination of scientists and science fiction writers alike. Many ideas have been realized, still many remain as dreams, and new ones are still being conceived. The High Energy Laser (HEL) has been associated with weapon applications during the past three decades. Much of the same technology can be directly applied to power beaming, laser propulsion, and other potential remote energy and power transfer applications. Economically, these application areas are becoming increasingly more viable. This paper reviews the evolutionary history of the HEL device technologies. It points out the basic system components and layouts with associated key technologies that drive the effectiveness and efficiency of the system level performance. It describes the fundamental properties and wavelength dependencies of atmospheric propagation that in turn have become the prescription for wavelength properties that are desired from the device.

  8. Infrared laser-based sensing in medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus W.; Bartlome, Richard; Gianella, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Laser-spectroscopic applications in medicine increase in importance. We present two medical applications of laser-based analyses of trace gases. The analysis of exhaled breath concerns the determination of the D/H isotope ratio after intake of a small amount of heavy water. The D/H isotope ratio can be used to deduce the total body water weight and lays the foundation for many other laser-based clinical applications. An elevated D/H ratio could be monitored in breath samples up to 30 days after ingestion of only 5 ml of D2O. A second example concerns the analysis of surgical smoke produced in minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery with electroknives. The quantitative determination of harmless and hazardous compounds down to the ppm level is demonstrated. A specific example is the presence of sevoflurane at concentrations of 80 to 300 ppm, an anesthetic, which to our knowledge is measured for the first time in an abdominal cavity.

  9. High-power diode lasers and their direct industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loosen, Peter; Treusch, Hans-Georg; Haas, C. R.; Gardenier, U.; Weck, Manfred; Sinnhoff, V.; Kasperowski, S.; vor dem Esche, R.

    1995-04-01

    The paper summarizes activities of the two Fraunhofer-Institutes ILT and IPT concerning the development of high-power laser-diode stacks and their direct industrial applications. With microchannel coolers in copper technology and ultra-precision machined micro-optics a stack of 330 - 400 W total power with a maximum intensity of the focused beam of 2 104 W/cm2 has been built and tested in first applications. By further improvements of the lens-fabrication and -alignment technology as well as increase of the number of stacked diodes an output power in the kW-range and intensities up to about 105 W/cm2 shall be achieved in the near future. Applications of such laser sources in surface technology, in the processing of plastics, in laser-assisted machining and in brazing are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Matthew

    2015-08-20

    By combining the top performing commercial laser beam stabilization system with the most ideal optical imaging configuration, the beamline for the Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will deliver the highest quality and most stable beam to the cathode. To determine the optimal combination, LCLS-II beamline conditions were replicated and the systems tested with a He-Ne laser. The Guidestar-II and MRC active laser beam stabilization systems were evaluated for their ideal positioning and stability. Both a two and four lens optical imaging configuration was then evaluated for beam imaging quality, magnification properties, and natural stability. In their best performances when tested over fifteen hours, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable over approximately 70-110um while the MRC system kept it stable over approximately 90-100um. During short periods of time, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable between 10-20um, but was more susceptible to drift over time, while the MRC system maintained the beam between 30-50um with less overall drift. The best optical imaging configuration proved to be a four lens system that images to the iris located in the cathode room and from there, imaged to the cathode. The magnification from the iris to the cathode was 2:1, within an acceptable tolerance to the expected 2.1:1 magnification. The two lens configuration was slightly more stable in small periods of time (less than 10 minutes) without the assistance of a stability system, approximately 55um compared to approximately 70um, but the four lens configurations beam image had a significantly flatter intensity distribution compared to the two lens configuration which had a Gaussian distribution. A final test still needs to be run with both stability systems running at the same time through the four lens system. With this data, the optimal laser beam stabilization system can be determined for the beamline of LCLS-II.

  11. A NASA high-power space-based laser research and applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Walberg, G. D.; Conway, E. J.; Jones, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of high power lasers are discussed which might fulfill the needs of NASA missions, and the technology characteristics of laser research programs are outlined. The status of the NASA programs or lasers, laser receivers, and laser propulsion is discussed, and recommendations are presented for a proposed expanded NASA program in these areas. Program elements that are critical are discussed in detail.

  12. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  13. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Félicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. We first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  14. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    DOE PAGES

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons inmore » the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.« less

  15. Research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass for high power laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lili; He, Dongbing; Chen, Huiyu; Wang, Xin; Meng, Tao; Wen, Lei; Hu, Junjiang; Xu, Yongchun; Li, Shunguang; Chen, Youkuo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shubin; Tang, Jingping; Wang, Biao

    2016-12-01

    Neodymium phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for high-power laser facility. In this work, the latest research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM), China, is addressed. Neodymium phosphate laser glasses, N31, N41, NAP2, and NAP4, for high peak power and high average power applications have been developed. The properties of these glasses are presented and compared to those of other commercial neodymium phosphate laser glass from the Schott and Hoya companies and the Vavilov State Optical Institute (GOI), Russia. Continuous melting and edge cladding are the two key fabrication techniques that are used for the mass production of neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs. These techniques for the fabrication of large-aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs with low stress birefringence and residual reflectivity have been developed by us The effect of acid etching on the microstructure, optical transmission, and mechanical properties of NAP2 glass is also discussed.

  16. Research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass for high power laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lili; He, Dongbing; Chen, Huiyu; Wang, Xin; Meng, Tao; Wen, Lei; Hu, Junjiang; Xu, Yongchun; Li, Shunguang; Chen, Youkuo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shubin; Tang, Jingping; Wang, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Neodymium phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for high-power laser facility. In this work, the latest research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM), China, is addressed. Neodymium phosphate laser glasses, N31, N41, NAP2, and NAP4, for high peak power and high average power applications have been developed. The properties of these glasses are presented and compared to those of other commercial neodymium phosphate laser glass from the Schott and Hoya companies and the Vavilov State Optical Institute (GOI), Russia. Continuous melting and edge cladding are the two key fabrication techniques that are used for the mass production of neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs. These techniques for the fabrication of large-aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs with low stress birefringence and residual reflectivity have been developed by us The effect of acid etching on the microstructure, optical transmission, and mechanical properties of NAP2 glass is also discussed.

  17. Highly reliable, high-brightness 915nm laser diodes for fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuntu; Gao, Wei; Cheng, Lisen; Luo, Kejian; Shen, Kun; Mastrovito, Andre

    2008-02-01

    High brightness, high power, and highly reliable 915nm InAlGaAs laser diodes with optimized design are reported in this paper. The laser diodes exhibit excellent performance, such as, high slope efficiency, low threshold current, low voltage, etc., which make them suitable for high brightness operation. The aging test data shows no failures during aging test and more than 220,000 hours estimated lifetime for 90um emitter laser diodes at 8W CW operation. The aging test with the same emitter size at higher stress conditions showed sudden failure that corresponds to catastrophic optical damage (COD) on the facet. A novel large optical cavity (LOC) epi-structure with flat-top near field intensity distribution was developed. The maximum output power is up to 23W under CW testing condition at 25 °C, which is highest level achieved so far. The output power is limited by thermal roll over and there is no COD occurring. This data shows Axcel's technologies can further increase the brightness to over 110mW per micron for 915nm laser diodes. This type of laser diodes is essential for pumping fiber lasers to replace CO2 lasers for industry applications.

  18. Laser Application in Prevention of Demineralization in Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadr Haghighi, Hooman; Skandarinejad, Mahsa; Abdollahi, Amir Ardalan

    2013-01-01

    One common negative side effect of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is the development of incipient caries lesions around brackets, particularly in patients with poor oral hygiene. Different methods have been used to prevent demineralization such as fluoride therapy and application of sealant to prevent caries. The recent effort to improve the resistance against the demineralization is by the application of different types of lasers. The purpose of this review article is discussing the effects of laser in prevention of demineralization in orthodontic patients. PMID:25606317

  19. A laser application to nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Schmidt, K.; Zheng, H.; Burch, R.; Barbarino, M.; Natowitz, J. B.; Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Gaul, E.; Bernstein, A. C.; Donovan, M.; Bonasera, A.; Kimura, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-05-09

    In the last decade, the availability in high-intensity laser beams capable of producing plasmas with ion energies large enough to induce nuclear reactions has opened new research paths in nuclear physics. We studied the reactions {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He and d(d,n){sup 3}He at temperatures of few keV in a plasma, generated by the interaction of intense ultrafast laser pulses with molecular deuterium or deuterated-methane clusters mixed with {sup 3}He atoms. The yield of 14.7 MeV protons from the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He reaction was used to extract the astrophysical S factor. Results of the experiment performed at the Center for High Energy Density Science at The University of Texas at Austin will be presented.

  20. Solid state laser systems for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    Work on the development of an interferometric system for the purpose of absolute length determination commenced in January of this year. Our goal is to develop a system capable of measurements on the order of one meter with an accuracy of 1 part in 10 or greater. A modified Michelson bread board with stabilized laser diode source was assembled. Some preliminary measurements began using the tunable Santek laser in an FM modulation scheme. During this same period a literature search yielded a paper by Suematsu and Takeda which discusses a promising fourier transform technique for real time data analysis. We are in the process of evaluating this technique while we continue to change and upgrade the system configuration.

  1. Laser power beaming applications and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robert J.; Cover, Ralph A.; Curtin, Mark S.; Dinius, R.; Lampel, Michael C.

    1994-05-01

    Beaming laser energy to spacecraft has important economic potential. It promises significant reduction in the cost of access to space, for commercial and government missions. While the potential payoff is attractive, existing technologies perform the same missions and the keys to market penetration for power beaming are a competitive cost and a schedule consistent with customers' plans. Rocketdyne is considering these questions in the context of a commercial enterprise -- thus, evaluation of the requirements must be done based on market assessments and recognition that significant private funding will be involved. It is in the context of top level business considerations that the technology requirements are being assessed and the program being designed. These considerations result in the essential elements of the development program. Since the free electron laser is regarded as the `long pole in the tent,' this paper summarizes Rocketdyne's approach for a timely, cost-effective program to demonstrate an FEL capable of supporting an initial operating capability.

  2. Laser vibrometry vibration measurements on vehicle cabins in running conditions: helicopter mock-up application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian Marco; Castellini, Paolo; Chiariotti, Paolo; Tomasini, Enrico Primo; Cenedese, Fausto; Perazzolo, Alessandro

    2011-10-01

    The present work deals with the analysis of problems and potentials of laser vibrometer measurements inside vehicle cabins in running conditions, with particular reference to helicopters where interior vibro-acoustic issues are very important. This paper describes the results of a systematic measurement campaign performed on an Agusta A109MKII mock-up. The aim is to evaluate the applicability of scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for tests in simulated flying conditions and to understand how performances of the technique are affected when the laser head is placed inside the cabin, thus being subjected to interfering inputs. First a brief description of the performed test cases and the used measuring set-ups are given. Comparative tests between the SLDV and accelerometers are presented, analyzing the achievable performances for the specific application. Results obtained measuring with the SLDV placed inside the helicopter cabin during operative excitation conditions are compared with those performed with the laser lying outside the mock-up, these last being considered as ``reference measurements.'' Finally, in order to give an estimate of the uncertainty level on measured signals, a study linking the admitted percentage of noise content on vibrometer signals due to laser head vibration levels will be introduced.

  3. Femtosecond Laser Processing of Wide Bandgap Semiconductors and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Katherine Collett Furr

    This thesis explores the production, characterization, and water oxidation efficiency of wide bandgap semiconductors made through femtosecond-laser irradiation of various materials. Our investigation focuses on three main aspects: 1) producing titanium dioxide (TiO2) from titanium metal, 2) using our laser-made materials in a photoelectrochemical cell for water oxidation, and 3) utilizing the femtosecond laser to create a variety of other mixed metal oxides for further water oxidation studies and biological applications. We first discuss producing TiO2 and titanium nitride. We report that there is chemical selectivity at play in the femtosecond laser doping process so not all dopants in the surrounding atmosphere will necessarily be incorporated. We then show that the material made from laser-irradiation of titanium metal, when annealed, has a three-fold enhancement in overall water oxidation when irradiated with UV light. We attribute this enhancement through various material characterization methods to the creation of a more pure form of rutile TiO2 with less defects. We then present a variety of studies done with doping both TiO2 and other oxides with broadband photoelectrochemistry and offer that the dopant incorporation hurts the overall water oxidation rate. Lastly, we use the laser-treated titanium to test cell adhesion and viability. Our results demonstrate an ability to femtosecond-laser process semiconductors to produce materials that no one has made previously and study their properties using collaborations across chemistry and biology, yielding true interdisciplinary research.

  4. Ground-to-orbit laser propulsion: Advanced applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Laser propulsion uses a large fixed laser to supply energy to heat an inert propellant in a rocket thruster. Such a system has two potential advantages: extreme simplicity of the thruster, and potentially high performance -- particularly high exhaust velocity. By taking advantage of the simplicity of the thruster, it should be possible to launch small (10--1000 kg) payloads to orbit using roughly 1 MW of average laser power per kg of payload. The incremental cost of such launches would be of order $200/kg for the smallest systems, decreasing to essentially the cost of electricity to run the laser (a few times $10/kg) for large systems. Although the individual payload size would be small, a laser launch system would be inherently high-volume, with the capacity to launch tens of thousands of payloads per year. Also, with high exhaust velocity, a laser launch system could launch payloads to high velocities -- geosynchronous transfer, Earth escape, or beyond -- at a relatively small premium over launches to LEO. In this paper, we briefly review the status of pulsed laser propulsion, including proposals for advanced vehicles. We then discuss qualitatively several unique applications appropriate to the early part of the next century, and perhaps valuable well into the next millenium: space habitat supply, deep space mission supply, nuclear waste disposal, and manned vehicle launching.

  5. Ground-to-orbit laser propulsion: Advanced applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1990-01-01

    Laser propulsion uses a large fixed laser to supply energy to heat an inert propellant in a rocket thruster. Such a system has two potential advantages: extreme simplicity of the thruster, and potentially high performance, particularly high exhaust velocity. By taking advantage of the simplicity of the thruster, it should be possible to launch small (10 to 1000 kg) payloads to orbit using roughly 1 MW of average laser power per kg of payload. The incremental cost of such launches would be of an order of $200/kg for the smallest systems, decreasing to essentially the cost of electricity to run the laser (a few times $10/kg) for larger systems. Although the individual payload size would be smaller, a laser launch system would be inherently high-volume, with the capacity to launch tens of thousands of payloads per year. Also, with high exhaust velocity, a laser launch system could launch payloads to high velocities - geosynchronous transfer, Earth escape, or beyond - at a relatively small premium over launches to LEO. The status of pulsed laser propulsion is briefly reviewed including proposals for advanced vehicles. Several applications appropriate to the early part of the next century and perhaps valuable well into the next millennium are discussed qualitatively: space habitat supply, deep space mission supply, nuclear waste disposal, and manned vehicle launching.

  6. Application of laser in conservation and restoration of historical building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detalle, Vincent; Duch"ne, Stephanie; Verges Belmin, Veronique; Vallet, Jean Marc; Bodnar, Jean Luc

    2011-02-01

    Cultural Heritage has many analytical and treatment needs both in the field of conservation than in restoration. The laser therefore found a ready-made place in this area. We find first the different application of laser cleaning. The LRMH was the initiative of creating the first field prototype used in the field for cleaning stone in particular. A tour of the Cathedral of France to test this method had been achieved in the early 90s. Then, many have phenomenological and physical studies were conducted to understand the mechanisms involved during the cleaning action. In analytical technology, LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) is used for in situ identification of pigments, salts, metals or other materials. This laser technique present a lot of advantages: portability, analysis of light elements, stratigraphic analysis capability ...The LRMH was the first laboratory depending from a ministry of culture to get the technology and to apply it systematically in situ (Saint-Savin sur Gartemps abbey...). In addition, more recently, a methodology for converting pigments by continuous laser was developed in the laboratory, thus extending the scope of the use of laser. We review these techniques and their application based on studies that occur in our laboratory.

  7. Application of laser in conservation and restoration of historical building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detalle, Vincent; Duchêne, Stephanie; Verges Belmin, Veronique; Vallet, Jean Marc; Bodnar, Jean Luc

    2010-07-01

    Cultural Heritage has many analytical and treatment needs both in the field of conservation than in restoration. The laser therefore found a ready-made place in this area. We find first the different application of laser cleaning. The LRMH was the initiative of creating the first field prototype used in the field for cleaning stone in particular. A tour of the Cathedral of France to test this method had been achieved in the early 90s. Then, many have phenomenological and physical studies were conducted to understand the mechanisms involved during the cleaning action. In analytical technology, LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) is used for in situ identification of pigments, salts, metals or other materials. This laser technique present a lot of advantages: portability, analysis of light elements, stratigraphic analysis capability ...The LRMH was the first laboratory depending from a ministry of culture to get the technology and to apply it systematically in situ (Saint-Savin sur Gartemps abbey...). In addition, more recently, a methodology for converting pigments by continuous laser was developed in the laboratory, thus extending the scope of the use of laser. We review these techniques and their application based on studies that occur in our laboratory.

  8. Beam shaping applications in laser micromachining for the microelectronics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsky, Corey M.

    2001-10-01

    Laser micromachining has been a part of the manufacturing process for semiconductors and microelectronics devices for several decades. More recent applications such as the drilling of microvia holes in high-density electronic packages have recently entered broad industrial use for high-volume production. In such applications, process stability and throughput are key drivers of commercial success. Particularly in the UV, where solid-state laser power is growing rapidly but is still limited to less than 10 watts, innovations that permit the available laser power to be applied at the work surface more efficiently are of interest. Within the last two years, the use of beam shapers to create round laser spots with near-uniform irradiance at the work surface has been demonstrated. Shaping the irradiance profile has been shown to both increase process speed and improve the quality of the drilled holes, which range in diameter between 20 and 150 micrometers . This paper gives an historical overview of laser via drilling, presents the Gaussian-to-flattop beam shaping optics used in the microvia laser drills, and discusses the process results obtained.

  9. Clinical application of CO2 laser in periodontal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Yasuhiro

    1994-09-01

    CO2 lasers in particular are expected to have many dental applications because the CO2 laser beam exhibits strong tissue transpirative actions, such as instant coagulation, carbonization, and vaporization, and because its wavelength at 10.6 micrometers is fully absorbed by water so that the ability to make precise incisions with a high degree of safety is excellent, without damaging the deep tissues. However, clinical application of the CO2 laser has been slowed since a fiber which can conduct the laser beam to the oral cavity has only recently developed. This new fiber is an extremely flexible fiber with a minimum bending radius of 20 mm and utilizes pulse wave modes that have improved the handling characteristics in the mouth, and this has enabled us to apply the CO2 laser to a variety of periodontal conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CO2 lasers for the early treatment of inflammation and pain relief of acute periodontitis, curettage of periodontal pockets, healing after excision of gingiva, and early improvement of gingivitis.

  10. Laser micromachining of semiconductors for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantel, Marc; Yashkir, Yuri; Lee, Seong K.; Mugford, Chas; Hockley, Bernard S.

    2001-10-01

    For decades, precisely machining silicon has been critical for the success of the semiconductor industry. This has traditionally been done through wet chemical etching, but in the pursuit of integrating photonics devices on a single chip, other techniques are worth exploring. This quest opens up interest in finding a non-wet, non-contact, arbitrary-shape milling technique for silicon. In this paper, we present our latest work in the laser micromachining of silicon. A kilohertz-repetition-rate diode-pumped Nd:YLF laser (in infrared, green or ultraviolet modes) is focused on the surface of silicon wafers in a chlorine atmosphere for an enhanced magnitude and control of the etching rate. In the chlorine atmosphere, much less debris is deposited on the surface around the cut, sub-damage threshold machining is achieved for a better control of the etching depth, and etching rates ranging from 20-300,000 micron-cube/s have been measured. In particular, the use of an infrared laser beam is singled out, along with the advantages that it holds. Results of simulations highlight the particular characteristics of the various wavelength chosen for the machining.

  11. Laser heating of metallic nanoparticles for photothermal ablation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Shan, Guangshuai; Yu, Junsheng; Yang, Wei; Ren, Zhaodi; Wang, Xiaohui; Xie, Xi; Chen, Hui-jiuan; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-02-01

    In order to search for a suitable frequency and material with higher photothermal efficacy for hyperthermia application in cancer treatment, a comparative study on laser heating of Au/Ag nanoparticles and Ag nanowires has been conducted. It is found that gold nanoparticles are more photothermal efficient in comparison with silver nanoparticles and silver nanowires at 450nm and 532 nm. Gold nanoparticles are more heated by 532 nm laser than 450 nm laser. In contrast, silver nanoparticles show slightly less temperature rise at 532 nm than 450 nm laser. For silver nanowires, no significant photothermal effect has been observed. Size-dependent effect study indicates that the absorption efficiency of single gold nanoparticles of larger diameter is higher than that of smaller diameter, in the diameter range of 0-50nm. A mathematical model for describing the heating profile in the heating sample has been built. The mathematical model can be utilized to predict the optimal treatment size of tumor.

  12. Enhanced operation of femtosecond lasers and applications in cell transfection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christian T A; Stevenson, David J; Tsampoula, Xanthi; McDougall, Craig; Lagatsky, Alexander A; Sibbett, Wilson; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-08-01

    In this work we present a review and discussion on the enhancement of femtosecond (fs) lasers for use within biophotonics with a particular focus on their use in optical transfection techniques. We describe the broad range of source options now available for the generation of femtosecond pulses before briefly reviewing the application of fs laser in optical transfection studies. We show that major performance enhancements may be obtained by optimising the spatial and temporal performance of the laser source before considering possible future directions in this field. In relation to optical transfection we describe how such laser sources initiate a multiphoton process to permeate the cell membrane in a transient fashion. We look at aspects of this technique including the ability to combine transfection with optical trapping. For future implementation of such transfection we explore the role of new sources and "nondiffracting" light fields.

  13. Tunable solid state laser system for dermatology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Zion; Bank, Alexander; Donskoy, Dmitri M.; Nechitailo, Vladimir S.

    1994-12-01

    The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is the most recent in a series of pulsed laser systems for plastic surgery. The 532 nm wavelength has been shown to be absorbed by a variety of chromophores. These include tattoo pigments, oxygenated hemoglobin and melanin-containing epidermal cells. A simple multi-line solid state laser module pumped by double-frequency Q- switched YAG laser is presented. This solid state multi-line module enables tuning of the wavelength in the yellow spectral range to 560 nm or to 580 nm for dermatology applications. Conversion efficiency in excess of 70% was achieved at 10 Hz pulse repetition frequency and output energy per pulse of approximately 200 mJ.

  14. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  15. Ultrashort Pulse Laser Accelerated Proton Beams for First Radiobiological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, U.; Zeil, K.; Beyreuther, E.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Kluge, T.; Kraft, S.; Metzkes, J.; Sauerbrey, R.; Richter, C.; Enghardt, W.; Pawelke, J.; Karsch, L.; Laschinsky, L.; Naumburger, D.

    2010-11-04

    We report on the generation of proton pulses with maximum energies exceeding 15 MeV by means of the irradiation of few micron thick metal foils by ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses at a power level of 100 TW. In contrast to the well known situation for longer laser pulses, here, a near linear scaling of the maximum proton energy with laser power can be found. Aiming for radiobiological applications the long and short term stability of the laser plasma accelerator as well as a compact energy selection and dosimetry system is presented. The first irradiation of in vitro tumour cells showing dose dependent biological damage is demonstrated paving the way for systematic radiobiological studies.

  16. The Application of Ultrafast Laser Pulses to Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yang

    Ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses display exceptional performance for the selective ablation of materials, includes metals, semiconductors, and biological tissues. They do not damage the remaining unablated portion of a sample, which permits the possibility of depth profiling by repeat sampling at the same location. With sufficiently micro-focused fs laser pulse length beam, high lateral resolution mass spectrometry imaging is possible, while sample damage may degrade ultimate lateral resolution in some other methods. Combining imaging and depth profiling could ultimately leads to tomographical mass spectrometry or 3D imaging MS. Laser postionization, a "soft" ionization method, was combined with ultrafast laser desorption for enhanced molecular analysis. A customized femtosecond laser desorption/ablation postionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed and built. The construction and performance of both phases including the VUV source are detailed. Instrument control software was written to operate this instrument, and many automated experiments were successfully demonstrated by this software. Elemental and molecular analysis was carried out on the instrument and demonstrated exceptional performance for fs laser pulse sampling of small areas. Studies demonstrated the imaging and depth profiling capability of fs-LDPI on metals, semiconductors and intact biofilm tissues. Attempts were made to reach the limit of lateral resolution of imaging by fs-LDPI-MS. The results showed similar lateral resolution of <2 mum for both fs 800 nm and 400 nm desorption beams. To improve the repetition rate for high speed imaging application, an alternative LDPI scheme was designed and constructed. The fs 800 beam was tripled to 267 nm and delivered into the ion source as an ionization laser, while a ns 349 nm pulse laser was used for desorption. Preliminary data showed certain intact molecular ions can be detected. Fragmentation tendency was measured against various

  17. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Final Test Report of DM LHP TV Testing. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Demonstration Model (DM) Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was tested at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during September and October, 1999. The LHP system was placed in the Dynavac 36 in. chamber in Building 4. The test lasted for about 6 weeks. The LHP was built, designed, and manufactured at Dynatherm Corporation, Inc. In Hunt Valley, MD according to GSFC specifications. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the performance of a propylene LHP for the Geoscience Laser Altimetry System (GLAS) instrument application.

  18. Laser applications of self-organized organic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumi, Seiichi

    2008-08-01

    In this presentation, I report on the self-organized photonic crystals (PCs) of organic and polymer materials for laser applications. Here the self-organized PCs correspond to chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) and colloidal crystals (CCs). First, CLC molecules self-organize the supramolecular helical arrangement by the helical twisting power like as 1-D PC structure. When the fluorescent dye-doped CLC is optically excited with a linearly polarized beam, the laser emission appears at the photonic band gap (PBG) edge(s) of CLC hosts. The optically excited laser emission shows circularly polarized characteristic, even though the excitation beam is linearly polarized. Applying voltages to the optically excited CLC cells enables reversible switching of the laser action as a result of changes in the supramolecular helical structure of CLC host. Moreover, we succeed in the phototunable laser emission by using photoreactive CLCs. Second research topic is establishment of new potential utilities of CC structures of polymer micro-particles. Monodispersed micro-particles have an intrinsic capability to self-assemble the face-centered cubic lattice structures like as 3-D PCs on substrates from the suspension solutions. The highly ordered architectures of colloidal particles are called as the CCs. The laser cavity structure consists of an intermediate light-emitting layer of a fluorescent dye sandwiched between a pair of polymeric CC films. Optical excitation of the device gives rise to the laser oscillation within the photonic band-gap of the CC films. Interestingly, the laser action can be generated by optical excitation even though the CC laser device of all-polymer materials becomes bent shape by mechanical stress.

  19. Laser-powered MHD generators for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion systems of the pulsed laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave, plasma MHD, and liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) types are assessed for their potential as space-based laser-to-electrical power converters. These systems offer several advantages as energy converters relative to the present chemical, nuclear, and solar devices, including high conversion efficiency, simple design, high-temperature operation, high power density, and high reliability. Of these systems, the Brayton cycle liquid-metal MHD system appears to be the most attractive. The LMMHD technology base is well established for terrestrial applications, particularly with regard to the generator, mixer, and other system components. However, further research is required to extend this technology base to space applications and to establish the technology required to couple the laser energy into the system most efficiently. Continued research on each of the three system types is recommended.

  20. Laser data transmission with the application of reflectance modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knysak, Piotr; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Zygmunt, Marek; Wojtanowski, Jacek; Traczyk, Maciej

    2016-12-01

    The article presents the main aspects related to the development of nonconventional asymmetric laser data transmission system. It describes the principle of data transmission in both the direction away from the laser transmitter, wherein a pulse position modulation is used, and in the opposite direction, where the modulation of the reflected radiation is performed. The results presented in the article confirm the possibility of using the described technology in the civilian area for monitoring and telemetry, where devices without radiation sources are taken into account. In military applications, the system can be used to identify own objects and forces on the battlefield by the application of pulsed laser rangefinders which are currently a standard battle equipment.

  1. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Soft apertures for lasers emitting visible radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolerov, A. N.; Arzumanyan, Sh O.; Chirkina, K. P.; Gritsaĭ, I. I.

    1988-12-01

    It was found that an Al2O3:Ti3+ crystal grown by the Verneuil method can be used in the fabrication of "soft" apertures for lasers emitting in the blue-green range. The experimental results indicated equalization of the intensity of the radiation across the laser beam and also "polychromatic" lasing when apertures made of Al2O3:Ti3+ were placed inside the resonator cavity.

  2. Mid - infrared solid state lasers for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Yuri

    This work is devoted to study of novel high power middle-infrared (Mid-IR) laser sources enabling development of portable platform for sensing of organic molecules with the use of recently discovered Quartz Enhanced Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS). The ability to detect small concentrations is beneficial to monitor atmosphere pollution as well for biomedical applications such as analysis of human breath to detect earlier stages of cancer or virus activities. A QEPAS technique using a quartz tuning fork (QTF) as a detector enables a strong enhancement of measured signal when pump laser is modulated with a frequency coinciding with a natural frequency of a QTF. It is known that the detectability of acousto-optics based sensors is proportional to the square root of the laser intensity used for detection of analyte. That is the reason why commercially available semiconductor Mid-IR lasers having small output power limit sensitivity of modern QEPAS based sensors. The lack of high power broadly tunable lasers operating with a modulation frequency of quartz forks (~ 32.768 kHz) is the major motivation of this study. Commercially available Mid-IR (2-3.3 microm), single frequency, continuous wave (CW) fiber pumped lasers based on transition metal doped chalcogenides (e.g. Cr:ZnSe) prove to be efficient laser sources for organic molecules detection. However, their direct modulation is limited to several kHz, and cannot be directly used in combination with QEPAS. Hence, one objective of this work is to study and develop fiber laser pumped Ho:YAG (Er:YAG)/Cr:ZnSe tandem laser system/s. Ho (Holmium) and/or Er (Erbium) ions having long radiation lifetime (~ 10 ms) can effectively accumulate population inversion under CW fiber laser excitation. Utilization of acousto-optic (AO) modulators in the cavity of Ho:YAG (Er:YAG) laser will enable effective Q-Switching with repetition rate easily reaching the resonance frequency of a QTF. It is expected that utilization of Ho:YAG (Er

  3. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  4. High efficiency solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding solar cell response to pulsed laser outputs is important for the evaluation of power beaming applications. The time response of high efficiency GaAs and silicon solar cells to a 25 nS monochromatic pulse input is described. The PC-1D computer code is used to analyze the cell current during and after the pulse for various conditions.

  5. Overview on new diode lasers for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Joerg

    2012-11-01

    Diode lasers have a broad wavelength range, from the visible to beyond 2.2μm. This allows for various applications in the defense sector, ranging from classic pumping of DPSSL in range finders or target designators, up to pumping directed energy weapons in the 50+ kW range. Also direct diode applications for illumination above 1.55μm, or direct IR countermeasures are of interest. Here an overview is given on some new wavelengths and applications which are recently under discussion. In this overview the following aspects are reviewed: • High Power CW pumps at 808 / 880 / 940nm • Pumps for DPAL - Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers • High Power Diode Lasers in the range < 1.0 μm • Scalable Mini-Bar concept for high brightness fiber coupled modules • The Light Weight Fiber Coupled module based on the Mini-Bar concept Overall, High Power Diode Lasers offer many ways to be used in new applications in the defense market.

  6. Coolants with selective optical filtering characteristics for ruby laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Devitt, F. R.; Rasquin, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    Coolant-filtering medium developed consists of a solution of copper sulfate in a 4-1 volumetric mixture of ethanol and methanol. This solution should be a useful addition to ruby laser systems, particularily in large pulse or Q switching applications.

  7. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  8. Confocal scanning beam laser microscope/macroscope: applications in fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Arthur E.; Damaskinos, Savvas; Ribes, Alfonso

    1996-03-01

    A new confocal scanning beam laser microscope/macroscope is described that combines the rapid scan of a scanning beam laser microscope with the large specimen capability of a scanning stage microscope. This instrument combines an infinity-corrected confocal scanning laser microscope with a scanning laser macroscope that uses a telecentric f*(Theta) laser scan lens to produce a confocal imaging system with a resolution of 0.25 microns at a field of view of 25 microns and 5 microns at a field of view of 75,000 microns. The frame rate is 5 seconds per frame for a 512 by 512 pixel image, and 25 seconds for a 2048 by 2048 pixel image. Applications in fluorescence are discussed that focus on two important advantages of the instrument over a confocal scanning laser microscope: an extremely wide range of magnification, and the ability to image very large specimens. Examples are presented of fluorescence and reflected-light images of high quality printing, fluorescence images of latent fingerprints, packaging foam, and confocal autofluorescence images of a cricket.

  9. Review of selective laser melting: Materials and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, C. Y.; Chua, C. K. Liu, Z. H. Zhang, D. Q. Loh, L. E. Sing, S. L.; Dong, Z. L.

    2015-12-15

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a particular rapid prototyping, 3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique designed to use high power-density laser to melt and fuse metallic powders. A component is built by selectively melting and fusing powders within and between layers. The SLM technique is also commonly known as direct selective laser sintering, LaserCusing, and direct metal laser sintering, and this technique has been proven to produce near net-shape parts up to 99.9% relative density. This enables the process to build near full density functional parts and has viable economic benefits. Recent developments of fibre optics and high-power laser have also enabled SLM to process different metallic materials, such as copper, aluminium, and tungsten. Similarly, this has also opened up research opportunities in SLM of ceramic and composite materials. The review presents the SLM process and some of the common physical phenomena associated with this AM technology. It then focuses on the following areas: (a) applications of SLM materials and (b) mechanical properties of SLM parts achieved in research publications. The review is not meant to put a ceiling on the capabilities of the SLM process but to enable readers to have an overview on the material properties achieved by the SLM process so far. Trends in research of SLM are also elaborated in the last section.

  10. Review of selective laser melting: Materials and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, C. Y.; Chua, C. K.; Dong, Z. L.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, D. Q.; Loh, L. E.; Sing, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a particular rapid prototyping, 3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique designed to use high power-density laser to melt and fuse metallic powders. A component is built by selectively melting and fusing powders within and between layers. The SLM technique is also commonly known as direct selective laser sintering, LaserCusing, and direct metal laser sintering, and this technique has been proven to produce near net-shape parts up to 99.9% relative density. This enables the process to build near full density functional parts and has viable economic benefits. Recent developments of fibre optics and high-power laser have also enabled SLM to process different metallic materials, such as copper, aluminium, and tungsten. Similarly, this has also opened up research opportunities in SLM of ceramic and composite materials. The review presents the SLM process and some of the common physical phenomena associated with this AM technology. It then focuses on the following areas: (a) applications of SLM materials and (b) mechanical properties of SLM parts achieved in research publications. The review is not meant to put a ceiling on the capabilities of the SLM process but to enable readers to have an overview on the material properties achieved by the SLM process so far. Trends in research of SLM are also elaborated in the last section.

  11. Applications of laser direct-write for embedding microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Ray C. Y.; Mathews, Scott A.

    2007-03-01

    The use of direct-write techniques might revolutionize the way microelectronic devices such as interconnects, passives, IC's, antennas, sensors and power sources are designed and fabricated. The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a laser-based microfabrication process for direct-writing the materials and components required for the assembly and interconnection of the above devices. This laser direct-write (LDW) technique is capable of operating in subtractive, additive, and transfer mode. In subtractive mode, the system operates as a laser micromachining workstation capable of achieving precise depth and surface roughness control. In additive mode, the system utilizes a laser-forward transfer process for the deposition of metals, oxides, polymers and composites under ambient conditions onto virtually any type of surface, thus functioning as a laser printer for patterns of electronic materials. Furthermore, in transfer mode, the system is capable of transferring individual devices, such as semiconductor bare die or surface mount devices, inside a trench or recess in a substrate, thus performing the same function of the pick-and-place machines used in circuit board manufacture. The use of this technique is ideally suited for the rapid prototyping of embedded microelectronic components and systems while allowing the overall circuit design and layout to be easily modified or adapted to any specific application or form factor. This paper describes the laser direct-write process as applied to the forward transfer of microelectronic devices.

  12. Low Energy Laser Biostimulation: New Prospects For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castel, John C.; Abergel, R. Patrick; Willner, Robert E.; Baumann, James G.

    1987-03-01

    The therapeutic benefits of light-energy is not a new concept to the modern world. Documented applications from ancient times tell of the therapeutic effects of ordinary sun-light to treat such common ailments as painful body joints, wounds, compound fractures and tetanus. The discovery of laser light in the 1960's, opened up new prospects for the medical use of light. Laser light differs from other forms of electromagnetic spectrum in that a single wavelength rather than a spectrum of wavelengths is emitted. Since the early 1970's, low-energy laser radiation has been reported to enhance wound healing rates, reduce edema, and relieve musculoskeletal pain. There is no detectable thermal effect of this laser on the tissue being treated. The effects are considered to occur as a result of photochemical, non thermal effects of the laser beam. Photons are absorbed by the tissue being treated and, in turn, produce positive therapeutic effects such as reduction of pain and edema. Pre-clinical and clinical evaluations are, presently, underway to document the safety and efficacy of low energy laser therapy, which represents a significant advance in the non-invasive treatment of pain.

  13. Application and Network-Cognizant Proxies - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio Ortega; Daniel C. Lee

    2003-03-24

    OAK B264 Application and Network-Cognizant Proxies - Final Report. Current networks show increasing heterogeneity both in terms of their bandwidths/delays and the applications they are required to support. This is a trend that is likely to intensify in the future, as real-time services, such as video, become more widely available and networking access over wireless links becomes more widespread. For this reason they propose that application-specific proxies, intermediate network nodes that broker the interactions between server and client, will become an increasingly important network element. These proxies will allow adaptation to changes in network characteristics without requiring a direct intervention of either server or client. Moreover, it will be possible to locate these proxies strategically at those points where a mismatch occurs between subdomains (for example, a proxy could be placed so as to act as a bridge between a reliable network domain and an unreliable one). This design philosophy favors scalability in the sense that the basic network infrastructure can remain unchanged while new functionality can be added to proxies, as required by the applications. While proxies can perform numerous generic functions, such as caching or security, they concentrate here on media-specific, and in particular video-specific, tasks. The goal of this project was to demonstrate that application- and network-specific knowledge at a proxy can improve overall performance especially under changing network conditions. They summarize below the work performed to address these issues. Particular effort was spent in studying caching techniques and on video classification to enable DiffServ delivery. other work included analysis of traffic characteristics, optimized media scheduling, coding techniques based on multiple description coding, and use of proxies to reduce computation costs. This work covered much of what was originally proposed but with a necessarily reduced scope.

  14. Laser heating of dielectric particles for medical and biological applications

    PubMed Central

    Tribelsky, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the general problem of laser pulse heating of a spherical dielectric particle embedded in a liquid. The discussed range of the problem parameters is typical for medical and biological applications. We focus on the case, when the heat diffusivity in the particle is of the same order of magnitude as that in the fluid. We perform quantitative analysis of the heat transfer equation based on interplay of four characteristic scales of the problem, namely the particle radius, the characteristic depth of light absorption in the material of the particle and the two heat diffusion lengths: in the particle and in the embedding liquid. A new quantitative characteristic of the laser action, that is the cooling time, describing the temporal scale of the cooling down of the particle after the laser pulse is over, is introduced and discussed. Simple analytical formulas for the temperature rise in the center of the particle and at its surface as well as for the cooling time are obtained. We show that at the appropriate choice of the problem parameters the cooling time may be by many orders of magnitude larger the laser pulse duration. It makes possible to minimize the undesirable damage of healthy tissues owing to the finite size of the laser beam and scattering of the laser radiation, simultaneously keeping the total hyperthermia period large enough to kill the pathogenic cells. An example of application of the developed approach to optimization of the therapeutic effect at the laser heating of particles for cancer therapy is presented. PMID:27446706

  15. Abbreviated New Drug Applications and 505(b)(2) Applications. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-10-06

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the Agency, or we) is issuing a final rule to implement Title XI of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA), which amended provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) that govern the approval of 505(b)(2) applications and abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs). This final rule implements portions of Title XI of the MMA that pertain to provision of notice to each patent owner and the new drug application (NDA) holder of certain patent certifications made by applicants submitting 505(b)(2) applications or ANDAs; the availability of 30-month stays of approval on 505(b)(2) applications and ANDAs that are otherwise ready to be approved; submission of amendments and supplements to 505(b)(2) applications and ANDAs; and the types of bioavailability and bioequivalence data that can be used to support these applications. This final rule also amends certain regulations regarding 505(b)(2) applications and ANDAs to facilitate compliance with and efficient enforcement of the FD&C Act.

  16. Application of Advanced Laser Diagnostics to High Impact Technologies. Delivery Order 0001: Laser Diagnostics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Phantom v5.0 CMOS-based high-framing- rate digital camera provided by Photo-Sonics International Ltd. During this study, the camera was operated at......excite OH. The second PIV light sheet is produced by pumping a dye laser (employing DCM laser dye) with a second frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG

  17. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W

    1999-06-30

    A thin film of liquid metal is suggested as a grazing incident liquid metal mirror (GILMM) for robust final optics of a laser inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the mirror can withstand, called the damage limit, of a sodium film 85{sup o} from normal is calculated to be 57 J/cm{sup 2} normal to the beam for a 20 ns pulse and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2} for a 10 ps pulse of 0.35 {micro}m light (2 m{sup 2} and 90 m{sup 2} of mirror area per 100 kJ of laser energy at 20 ns and 10 ps, respectively). Feasibility relies on keep the liquid surface flat to the required accuracy by a combination of polished substrate, adaptive (deformable) optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film. The film's substrate must be polished to {+-} 0.015 pm. Then surface tension keeps the surface smooth over short distances (<10 mm) and low Reynolds number laminar flow keeps the surface smooth by keeping the film thickness constant to less than + 0.01 w over long distance >10 mm. Adaptive optics techniques keep. the substrate flat to within {+-} 0.06 pm over 100 mm distance and {+-}0.6 {micro}m over 1000 mm distances. The mirror can stand the x-ray pulse when located 30 m away from the microexplosions of nominal yield of 400 MJ (50 MJ of X rays) when Li is used but for higher atomic number liquids like Na there may be too high a temperature rise forcing use of other x-ray attenuation methods such as attenuation by xenon gas. The cumulative damage from neutrons causing warpage of the liquid film's substrate can be compensated by adaptive optics techniques giving the mirrors long life, perhaps 30 years. The GILMM should be applicable to both direct and indirect drive and pulse lengths appropriate to slow compression ({approx}20 ns) or fast ignition ({approx}10 ps). For direct drive laser beams near the poles (70{sup o}, where 90{sup o} is vertical), stable thin films become more challenging. Proof of concept experiments are needed to verify the

  18. High Final Energy of Low-Level Gallium Arsenide Laser Therapy Enhances Skeletal Muscle Recovery without a Positive Effect on Collagen Remodeling.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Carlos Eduardo Assumpção; Bertaglia, Raquel Santilone; Vechetti Júnior, Ivan José; Mareco, Edson Assunção; Salomão, Rondinelle Artur Simões; de Paula, Tassiana Gutierrez; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) laser, using a high final energy of 4.8 J, during muscle regeneration after cryoinjury. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into three groups: Control (C, n = 10); Injured (I, n = 10) and Injured and laser treated (Injured/LLLT, n = 10). The cryoinjury was induced in the central region of the tibialis anterior muscle (TA). The applications of the laser (904 nm, 50 mW average power) were initiated 24 h after injury, at energy density of 69 J cm(-1) for 48 s, for 5 days, to two points of the lesion. Twenty-four hours after the final application, the TA muscle was removed and frozen in liquid nitrogen to assess the general muscle morphology and the gene expression of TNF-α, TGF-β, MyoD, and Myogenin. The Injured/LLLT group presented a higher number of regenerating fibers and fewer degenerating fibers (P < 0.05) without changes in the collagen remodeling. In addition, the Injured/LLLT group presented a significant decrease in the expression of TNF-α and myogenin compared to the injured group (P < 0.05). The results suggest that the GaAs laser, using a high final energy after cryoinjury, promotes muscle recovery without changing the collagen remodeling in the muscle extracellular matrix.

  19. Solid state laser applications in photovoltaics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsky, Corey; Colville, Finlay

    2008-02-01

    Photovoltaic energy conversion devices are on a rapidly accelerating growth path driven by increasing government and societal pressure to use renewable energy as part of an overall strategy to address global warming attributed to greenhouse gas emissions. Initially supported in several countries by generous tax subsidies, solar cell manufacturers are relentlessly pushing the performance/cost ratio of these devices in a quest to reach true cost parity with grid electricity. Clearly this eventual goal will result in further acceleration in the overall market growth. Silicon wafer based solar cells are currently the mainstay of solar end-user installations with a cost up to three times grid electricity. But next-generation technology in the form of thin-film devices promises streamlined, high-volume manufacturing and greatly reduced silicon consumption, resulting in dramatically lower per unit fabrication costs. Notwithstanding the modest conversion efficiency of thin-film devices compared to wafered silicon products (around 6-10% versus 15-20%), this cost reduction is driving existing and start-up solar manufacturers to switch to thin-film production. A key aspect of these devices is patterning large panels to create a monolithic array of series-interconnected cells to form a low current, high voltage module. This patterning is accomplished in three critical scribing processes called P1, P2, and P3. Lasers are the technology of choice for these processes, delivering the desired combination of high throughput and narrow, clean scribes. This paper examines these processes and discusses the optimization of industrial lasers to meet their specific needs.

  20. Chemical stabilization of laser dyes. Final report, 1 July 1981-1 October 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, T.H.

    1984-11-01

    Coumarin laser dyes upon excitation degrade to produce products which absorb at the lasing wavelength. This results in attenuation of dye laser output. Modes of degradation of coumarin dye lasers under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions were determined and methods of stabilization of dye lasers were established.

  1. 50 years LASERS: in vitro diagnostics, clinical applications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Basile

    2011-01-01

    1960 Theodore Maiman built the first Ruby-LASER, starting-point for half a century of R&D on Biomedical LASER continuous improvement. The purpose of this paper is to contribute a review of the often disregarded, however, extremely important Industrial Property documents of LASER-based in vitro Diagnostics devices. It is an attempt to sketch-out the patent-trail leading towards the modern Biomedical Laboratory and to offer an introduction to the employment of "exotic" systems, such as the Free Electron LASER (FEL), that are expected to focus on the fundamental processes of life, following chemical reactions and biological processes as they happen, on unprecedented time and size scales. There are various in vitro LASER applications, however, the most important ones include: Hybrid Coulter Principle-LASER Hematology Analyzers. Flow Cytometry systems. Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH Techniques). Confocal LASER Scanning Microscopy and Cytometry. From the first fluorescence-based flow Cytometry device developed in 1968 by Wolfgang Göhde until nowadays, numerous improvements and new features related to these devices appeared. The relevant industrial property milestone-documents and their overall numeral trends are presented. In 1971, J. Madey invented and developed the Free Electron LASER (FEL), a vacuum-tube that uses a beam of relativistic electrons passing through a periodic, transverse magnetic field (wiggler) to produce coherent radiation, contained in an optical cavity defined by mirrors. A resonance condition that involves the energy of the electron beam, the strength of the magnetic field, and the periodicity of the magnet determines the wavelength of the radiation. The FEL Coherent Light Sources like the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at Stanford, CA, USA or the Xray Free Electron LASER (XFEL) at Hamburg, Germany, will work much like a high-speed (< 100 femtoseconds) camera, enabling scientists to take stop-motion pictures, on the nanoscale, of atoms

  2. Laser applications and system considerations in ocular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Ann E.; Muller, Matthew S.

    2009-01-01

    We review laser applications for primarily in vivo ocular imaging techniques, describing their constraints based on biological tissue properties, safety, and the performance of the imaging system. We discuss the need for cost effective sources with practical wavelength tuning capabilities for spectral studies. Techniques to probe the pathological changes of layers beneath the highly scattering retina and diagnose the onset of various eye diseases are described. The recent development of several optical coherence tomography based systems for functional ocular imaging is reviewed, as well as linear and nonlinear ocular imaging techniques performed with ultrafast lasers, emphasizing recent source developments and methods to enhance imaging contrast. PMID:21052482

  3. Application of in vivo laser scanning microscope in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, Juergen; Richter, H.; Otberg, N.; Lawrenz, F.; Blume-Peytavi, U.; Sterry, W.

    2003-10-01

    The state of the art of in-vivo and in-vitro penetration measurements of topically applied substances is described. Only optical techniques represent online measuring methods based on the absorption or scattering properties of the topically applied substances. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has become a promising method for investigations in dermatology and skin physiology, after it was possible to analyze the skin surface on any body side in-vivo. In the present paper the application of a dermatological laser scanning microscope for penetration and distribution measurements of topically applied substances is described. The intercellular and follicular penetration pathways were studied.

  4. 38 CFR 11.128 - Veteran dies without having filed application for final settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... having filed application for final settlement. 11.128 Section 11.128 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Amended (pub. L. 120, 68th Cong.) § 11.128 Veteran dies without having filed application for final settlement. If the veteran dies without having filed application for final settlement under the...

  5. Final Report. Center for Scalable Application Development Software

    SciTech Connect

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    2014-10-26

    The Center for Scalable Application Development Software (CScADS) was established as a part- nership between Rice University, Argonne National Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, University of Tennessee – Knoxville, and University of Wisconsin – Madison. CScADS pursued an integrated set of activities with the aim of increasing the productivity of DOE computational scientists by catalyzing the development of systems software, libraries, compilers, and tools for leadership computing platforms. Principal Center activities were workshops to engage the research community in the challenges of leadership computing, research and development of open-source software, and work with computational scientists to help them develop codes for leadership computing platforms. This final report summarizes CScADS activities at Rice University in these areas.

  6. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min p<0.001) in the tissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  7. Application of Laser Imaging for Bio/geophysical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.; Goltz, S. M.; Depiero, N. L.; Degloria, D. P.; Pagliughi, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    SPARTA, Inc. has developed a low-cost, portable laser imager that, among other applications, can be used in bio/geophysical applications. In the application to be discussed here, the system was utilized as an imaging system for background features in a forested locale. The SPARTA mini-ladar system was used at the International Paper Northern Experimental Forest near Howland, Maine to assist in a project designed to study the thermal and radiometric phenomenology at forest edges. The imager was used to obtain data from three complex sites, a 'seed' orchard, a forest edge, and a building. The goal of the study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the laser imager as a tool to obtain geometric and internal structure data about complex 3-D objects in a natural background. The data from these images have been analyzed to obtain information about the distributions of the objects in a scene. A range detection algorithm has been used to identify individual objects in a laser image and an edge detection algorithm then applied to highlight the outlines of discrete objects. An example of an image processed in such a manner is shown. Described here are the results from the study. In addition, results are presented outlining how the laser imaging system could be used to obtain other important information about bio/geophysical systems, such as the distribution of woody material in forests.

  8. Ultra high brightness laser diode arrays for pumping of compact solid state lasers and direct applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Andreas; Fillardet, Thierry; Laugustin, Arnaud; Rabot, Olivier

    2012-10-01

    High Power Laser Diodes (HPLD) are increasingly used in different fields of applications such as Industry, Medicine and Defense. Our significant improvements of performances (especially in power and efficiency) and a reproducible manufacturing process have led to reliable, highly robust components. For defense and security applications these devices are used predominantly for pumping of solid state lasers (ranging, designation, countermeasures, and sensors). Due to the drastically falling price per watt they are more and more replacing flash lamps as pump sources. By collimating the laser beam even with a bar to bar pitch of only 400μm. cutting edge brightness of our stacks.is achieved Due the extremely high brightness and high power density these stacks are an enabling technology for the development of compact highly efficient portable solid state lasers for applications as telemeters and designators on small platforms such as small UAVs and handheld devices. In combination with beam homogenizing optics their compact size and high efficiency makes these devices perfectly suited as illuminators for portable active imaging systems. For gated active imaging systems a very short pulse at high PRF operation is required. For this application we have developed a diode driver board with an efficiency several times higher than that of a standard driver. As a consequence this laser source has very low power consumption and low waste heat dissipation. In combination with its compact size and the integrated beam homogenizing optics it is therefore ideally suited for use in portable gated active imaging systems. The kWatt peak power enables a range of several hundred meters. The devices described in this paper mostly operate at wavelength between 800 nm and 980nm. Results from diodes operating between 1300 nm and 1550 nm are presented as well.

  9. Laser diagnostics and modeling of plasma assisted CVD. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) represents a novel approach for utilizing the nonequilibrium effects of reactive plasmas for depositing a wide range of protective hardface coatings that have both wear and erosion application. The nonequilibrium plasma is the heart of this complex system and has the function of generating the reactive molecular fragments (radicals) and atomic species at concentration levels unattainable by other competing processes. It is now widely accepted that such advanced protective hardface coatings materials will play a vital role in the energy technologies of the coming decades, with major applications in diverse areas ranging from aerospace and commercial propulsion systems (jet engines) to automotive components and internal combustion engines, (ceramic heat engines), cutting and machining tools, electronic packaging, thermal management, and possibly room-temperature superconductors. Wear and associated erosion aspects are responsible for an enormous expenditure of energy and fiscal resources in almost all DOE applications. Many of the results from this investigation arc also applicable to other materials processing reactors such as electron beam, PVD, CVD, laser ablation, microwave, high energy cathodic arc, thermal plasma (rf or dc) and combustion spray. These also include the various hybrid systems such as the rf/dc arc as used in Japan for diamond deposition and e-beam PVD deposition of advanced titanium alloy coatings as used at the Paton Institute in Kiev, Ukraine.

  10. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography.As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc.Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity.Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care.

  11. Medical and biological applications for ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Will, Fabian; Singh, Ajoy I.; Serbin, Jesper; Ostendorf, Andreas; Kermani, Omid; Heermann, R.; Welling, Herbert; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2003-02-01

    Due to the low energy threshold of photodisruption with fs laser pulses, thermal and mechanical side effects are limited to the sub μm range. The neglection of side effects enables the use of ultrashort laser pulses in a broad field of medical applications. Moreover, the interaction process based on nonlinear absorption offers the opportunity to process transparent tissue three dimensionally inside the bulk. We demonstrate the feasibility of surgical procedures in different fields of medical interest: In ophthalmology intrastromal cutting and preparing of corneal flaps for refractive surgery in living animals is presented. Besides, the very low mechanical side effects enables the use of fs-laser in otoralyngology to treat ocecular bones. Moreover, the precise cutting quality can be used in fields of cardiovascular surgery for the treatment of arteriosclerosis as well as in dentistry to remove caries from dental hard tissue.

  12. Laser-induced stress transients: applications for molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Lee, Shun; Zhang, Hong; McAuliffe, Daniel J.; Douki, Tina; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    1995-05-01

    Lasers can be used to enhance the delivery of a number of molecules. Other investigators have demonstrated local release of molecules from liposomes following laser irradiation, microbeam disruption of the cell membrane to increase cell transport, microbeam ablation of the zona pellucida surrounding the ovum to increase the chances of fertilization, and increased transcutaneous transport following ablation of the stratum corneum. Our experiments have shown that laser-induced stress transients can be utilized as a vector for intracellular delivery of molecules that may or may not normally cross the cell membrane. These two conditions have been tested with Photofrin and DNA. This technology may have applications in cell and molecular biology, cancer therapy, gene therapy, and others.

  13. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  14. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Albrecht, G.; Beach, R.

    1994-12-31

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  15. Advanced targets, diagnostics and applications of laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.

    2015-04-01

    High-intensity sub-nanosecond-pulsed lasers irradiating thin targets in vacuum permit generation of electrons and ion acceleration and high photon yield emission in non-equilibrium plasmas. At intensities higher than 1015 W/cm2 thin foils can be irradiated in the target-normal sheath acceleration regime driving ion acceleration in the forward direction above 1 MeV per charge state. The distributions of emitted ions in terms of energy, charge state and angular emission are controlled by laser parameters, irradiation conditions, target geometry and composition. Advanced targets can be employed to increase the laser absorption in thin foils and to enhance the energy and the yield of the ion acceleration process. Semiconductor detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer and streak camera can be employed as online plasma diagnostics to monitor the plasma parameters, shot by shot. Some applications in the field of the multiple ion implantation, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are reported.

  16. CHRONICLE: Fourth International Conference on Lasers and Their Applications (Leipzig, East Germany, October 19-23, 1981)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhenskiĭ, M. F.; Polkovnikov, Boris F.

    1983-06-01

    A brief review is given of the more important papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Lasers and Their Applications. The Conference topics were as follows: lasers (development of new and improvement of old types); laser thermonuclear fusion; nonlinear optics; laser spectroscopy; optoelectronics; applications of lasers in chemistry, biology, and medicine; fundamental investigations; other applications.

  17. Laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation for shock wave loading: Validation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.

    2008-02-01

    We present validation and some applications of two laser-driven shock wave loading techniques: laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and the dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. With transient imaging displacement interferometry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading induced by a spatially shaped laser pulse is within 2-7mrad (with an average of 4±1mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible, in particular, when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation allows for flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These techniques can be utilized to investigate such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples.

  18. Centimeter-scale MEMS scanning mirrors for high power laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, F.; Hofmann, U.; v. Wantoch, T.; Mallas, C.; Janes, J.; Benecke, W.; Herwig, Patrick; Gawlitza, P.; Ortega-Delgado, M.; Grune, C.; Hannweber, J.; Wetzig, A.

    2015-02-01

    A higher achievable scan speed and the capability to integrate two scan axes in a very compact device are fundamental advantages of MEMS scanning mirrors over conventional galvanometric scanners. There is a growing demand for biaxial high speed scanning systems complementing the rapid progress of high power lasers for enabling the development of new high throughput manufacturing processes. This paper presents concept, design, fabrication and test of biaxial large aperture MEMS scanning mirrors (LAMM) with aperture sizes up to 20 mm for use in high-power laser applications. To keep static and dynamic deformation of the mirror acceptably low all MEMS mirrors exhibit full substrate thickness of 725 μm. The LAMM-scanners are being vacuum packaged on wafer-level based on a stack of 4 wafers. Scanners with aperture sizes up to 12 mm are designed as a 4-DOF-oscillator with amplitude magnification applying electrostatic actuation for driving a motor-frame. As an example a 7-mm-scanner is presented that achieves an optical scan angle of 32 degrees at 3.2 kHz. LAMM-scanners with apertures sizes of 20 mm are designed as passive high-Q-resonators to be externally excited by low-cost electromagnetic or piezoelectric drives. Multi-layer dielectric coatings with a reflectivity higher than 99.9 % have enabled to apply cw-laser power loads of more than 600 W without damaging the MEMS mirror. Finally, a new excitation concept for resonant scanners is presented providing advantageous shaping of intensity profiles of projected laser patterns without modulating the laser. This is of interest in lighting applications such as automotive laser headlights.

  19. Application of Laser Based Ultrasound for NDE of Damage in Thick Stitched Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Friedman, Adam D.; Hinders, Mark K.; Madaras, Eric I.

    1997-01-01

    As design engineers implement new composite systems such as thick, load bearing composite structures, they must have certifiable confidence in structure s durability and worthiness. This confidence builds from understanding the structural response and failure characteristics of simple components loaded in testing machines to tests on full scale sections. Nondestructive evaluation is an important element which can provide quantitative information on the damage initiation, propagation, and final failure modes for the composite structural components. Although ultrasound is generally accepted as a test method, the use of conventional ultrasound for in-situ monitoring of damage during tests of large structures is not practical. The use of lasers to both generate and detect ultrasound extends the application of ultrasound to in- situ sensing of damage in a deformed structure remotely and in a non-contact manner. The goal of the present research is to utilize this technology to monitor damage progression during testing. The present paper describes the application of laser based ultrasound to quantify damage in thick stitched composite structural elements to demonstrate the method. This method involves using a Q-switched laser to generate a rapid, local linear thermal strain on the surface of the structure. This local strain causes the generation of ultrasonic waves into the material. A second laser used with a Fabry-Perot interferometer detects the surface deflections. The use of fiber optics provides for eye safety and a convenient method of delivering the laser over long distances to the specimens. The material for these structural elements is composed of several stacks of composite material assembled together by stitching through the laminate thickness that ranging from 0.5 to 0.8 inches. The specimens used for these nondestructive evaluation studies had either impact damage or skin/stiffener interlaminar failure. Although little or no visible surface damage existed

  20. Application of Diode Laser in the Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana; Hadzic, Sanja; Zukanovic, Amila; Pasic, Enes; Pavlic, Veriva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dentine hypersensitivity is characterized by acute, sharp pain arising from the exposed dentine, most commonly in response to thermal, tactile, or chemical stimuli, and which cannot be linked to any other pathological changes in the tooth or the environment. Therapy uses various impregnating agents in the form of solutions or gels and, in more recent times, laser. Aim: The aim of this research was to examine the effects of treatment of hypersensitive dental cervix with diode laser. Materials and Methods: The study included 18 patients with 82 sensitive teeth. The degree of dentine hypersensitivity was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS), and the treatment was carried out by application of low-power diode laser over the span of three visits, which depended on the initial sensitivity. Results: There is a significant difference in VAS values measured at the onset of treatment (baseline) and immediately after the first laser treatment (t=9.275; p=0.000), after 7 days, after the second laser treatment (14 days) (t=7.085, p=0.000), as well as after 14 days and the third laser treatment (t=5.517, p=0.000), which confirms the effectiveness of this therapeutic procedure. The results showed a reduction of hypersensitivity in response to tactile stimulus with a probe after the third treatment, even with teeth whose value on the VAS was very high at the beginning of treatment (baseline). Conclusion: Within the scope of the conducted study, laser therapy has provided extremely safe and effective results in the treatment of cervical dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:28210023

  1. Tunable Single-Frequency Near IR Lasers for DIAL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Marquardt, John H.; Carrig, Timothy J.; Gatt, Phil; Smith, Duane D.; Hale, Charley P.

    2000-01-01

    Tunable single-frequency sources in the 2-4 micron wavelength region are useful for remote DIAL measurements of chemicals and pollutants. We are developing tunable single-frequency transmitters and receivers for both direct and coherent detection lidar measurement applications. We have demonstrated a direct-diode-pumped PPLN-based OPO that operates single frequency, produces greater than 10 mW cw and is tunable over the 2.5 - 3.9 micron wavelength region. This laser has been used to injection seed a pulsed PPLN OPO, pumped by a 1.064 micron Nd:YAG laser, producing 50-100 microJoule single-frequency pulses at 100 Hz PRF near 3.6 micron wavelength. In addition, we have demonstrated a cw Cr:ZnSe laser that is tunable over the 2.1 - 2.8 micron wavelength region. This laser is pumped by a cw diode-pumped Tm:YALO laser and has produced over 1.8 W cw. Tm- and Tm, Ho-doped single-frequency solid-state lasers that produce over 50 mW cw and are tunable over approximately 10 nm in the 2 -2.1 micron band with fast PZT tuning have also been demonstrated. A fast PZT-tunable Tm, Ho:YLF laser was used for a direct-detection column content DIAL measurement of atmospheric CO2. Modeling shows that that all these cw and pulsed sources are useful for column-content coherent DIAL measurements at several km range using topographic targets.

  2. Laser flare-cell photometry: methodology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ladas, John G; Wheeler, Noel C; Morhun, Patrick J; Rimmer, Steven O; Holland, Gary N

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of intraocular inflammation involves the assessment of cells and protein levels ("flare") in the aqueous humor. These factors are difficult to quantify precisely on clinical examination alone. Laser flare-cell photometry provides an automated technique to quantify these factors objectively, and it has been used in a variety of research and clinical situations to assess anterior segment inflammation. Any new technique requires evaluation to determine accuracy and reproducibility of measured values, and initial applications require critical appraisal to assess the value of the technique. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of laser flare-cell photometry have been performed to determine its validity and utility as a research and clinical tool. This article reviews published studies that describe the technique of laser flare-cell photometry; it provides new in vitro data that supplements information on the capabilities of this technique and factors that influence photometry results, and it reviews representative publications that have used laser flare-cell photometry for study of specific disease entities. This information can help clinicians and researchers to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of laser flare-cell photometry, to identify appropriate future uses for this technique, and to use it and interpret its results appropriately. Laser flare-cell photometry offers an opportunity to improve upon current techniques of inflammation assessment and should not be considered simply an objective surrogate for clinical grading of cells and flare at the slit-lamp biomicroscope. Its research applications and utility for monitoring patients with uveitis have not yet been fully explored.

  3. A comparison between pulsed and CW laser annealing for solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jellison, G. E., Jr.; Young, R. T.; Wood, R. F.; Gat, A.

    1980-01-01

    The application of laser processing in solar cell fabrication is considered. Specific emphasis is placed on a process developed for the fabrication of a 16.6% silicon solar cell using pulsed laser processing. Results are presented which compare pulsed laser annealing with CW laser annealing in solar cell fabrication.

  4. Types of Lasers and Their Applications in Pediatric Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Nazemisalman, Bahareh; Farsadeghi, Mahya; Sokhansanj, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Laser technology has been recently introduced into the dental field with the idea to replace drilling. Having a less painful first dental experience by the use of modern instruments like laser can be an efficient preventive and therapeutic strategy in pediatric dentistry. Pedodontists need to learn the new less invasive technologies and adopt them in their routine practice. This study aimed to review the available types of lasers and their applications in pediatric dentistry. An electronic search was carried out in IranMedex, InterScience, Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline and Google Scholar databases to find relevant articles published from 2000 to 2014. Relevant textbooks were reviewed as well. Laser can be used as a suitable alternative to many conventional diagnostic and therapeutic dental procedures. It is especially efficient for caries detection and removal, pulp therapy, lowering the risk of infection, inflammation and swelling and reducing bleeding. On the other hand, due to minimal invasion, laser treatment is well tolerated by children. Improved patient cooperation leads to higher satisfaction of the parents, dentists and the children themselves.

  5. Types of Lasers and Their Applications in Pediatric Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nazemisalman, Bahareh; Farsadeghi, Mahya; Sokhansanj, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Laser technology has been recently introduced into the dental field with the idea to replace drilling. Having a less painful first dental experience by the use of modern instruments like laser can be an efficient preventive and therapeutic strategy in pediatric dentistry. Pedodontists need to learn the new less invasive technologies and adopt them in their routine practice. This study aimed to review the available types of lasers and their applications in pediatric dentistry. An electronic search was carried out in IranMedex, InterScience, Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline and Google Scholar databases to find relevant articles published from 2000 to 2014. Relevant textbooks were reviewed as well. Laser can be used as a suitable alternative to many conventional diagnostic and therapeutic dental procedures. It is especially efficient for caries detection and removal, pulp therapy, lowering the risk of infection, inflammation and swelling and reducing bleeding. On the other hand, due to minimal invasion, laser treatment is well tolerated by children. Improved patient cooperation leads to higher satisfaction of the parents, dentists and the children themselves. PMID:26464775

  6. Femtosecond laser micromachining of dielectric materials for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farson, Dave F.; Choi, Hae Woon; Zimmerman, Burr; Steach, Jeremy K.; Chalmers, Jeffery J.; Olesik, Susan V.; Lee, L. James

    2008-03-01

    Techniques for microfluidic channel fabrication in soda-lime glass and fused quartz using femtosecond laser ablation and ablation in conjunction with polymer coating for surface roughness improvement were tested. Systematic experiments were done to characterize how process variables (laser fluence, scanning speed and focus spot overlap, and material properties) affect the machining feature size and quality. Laser fluence and focus spot overlap showed the strongest influence on channel depth and roughness. At high fluence, the surface roughness was measured to be between 395 nm and 731 nm RMS. At low fluence, roughness decreased to 100 nm-350 nm RMS and showed a greater dependence on overlap. The surface roughness of laser ablation was also dependent on the material properties. For the same laser ablation parameters, soda-lime glass surfaces were smoother than fused quartz. For some applications, especially those using quartz, smoother channels are desired. A hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) polymer coating was applied and the roughness of the coated channels was improved to 10-50 nm RMS.

  7. Laparoscopic applications of laser-activated tissue glues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Lawrence S.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Auteri, Joseph S.; Williams, Matthew R.; Rosen, Jeffrey; Libutti, Steven K.; Eaton, Alexander M.; Lontz, John F.; Nowygrod, Roman; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-07-01

    The rapid growth of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and other laparoscopic procedures has created the need for simple, secure techniques for laparoscopic closure without sutures. While laser tissue welding offers one solution to this problem, concerns about adequacy of weld strength and watertightness remain. Tissue solders are proteinaceous materials which are placed on coapted tissue edges of the tissue to be closed or sealed. Laser energy is then applied to fix the glue in place completing the closure. Closure of the choledochotomy following a laparoscopic common duct exploration is one potential application of this technique. Canine longitudinal choledochotomies 5 mm in length were sealed using several laser glues and using the 808 nm diode laser. Saline was then infused until rupture of the closure and peak bursting strength recorded. Fibrinogen glue provided moderately good adhesion but poor burst strength. Handling characteristics were variable. A viscosity adjusted fibrinogen preparation produced good adherence with mean weld strength 264 +/- 7 mm Hg. The clinical endpoint for welding was a whitening and drying of the tissue. New laser solders can provide a watertight choledochotomy closure of adequate immediate strength. This would allow reliable, technically feasible common bile duct exploration via a laparoscopic approach.

  8. Advances in laser-based isotope ratio measurements: selected applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstel, E.; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-09-01

    Small molecules exhibit characteristic ro-vibrational transitions in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions, which are strongly influenced by isotopic substitution. This gift of nature has made it possible to use laser spectroscopy for the accurate analysis of the isotopic composition of gaseous samples. Nowadays, laser spectroscopy is clearly recognized as a valid alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Laser-based instruments are leaving the research laboratory stage and are being used by a growing number of isotope researchers for significant advances in their own field of research. In this review article, we discuss the current status and new frontiers of research on high-sensitivity and high-precision laser spectroscopy for isotope ratio analyses. Although many of our comments will be generally applicable to laser isotope ratio analyses in molecules of environmental importance, this paper concerns itself primarily with water and carbon dioxide, two molecules that were studied extensively in our respective laboratories. A complete coverage of the field is practically not feasible in the space constraints of this issue, and in any case doomed to fail, considering the large body of work that has appeared ever since the review by Kerstel in 2004 ( Handbook of Stable Isotope Analytical Techniques, Chapt. 34, pp. 759-787).

  9. Noncontact laser fiber delivery system for endoscopic medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Nikolay A.; Griffin, Stephen E.

    1999-02-01

    The objective of the study was to design and to investigate laser fiber delivery system for treatment of obstructed human internal tubular organs using endoscopic techniques. This system eliminates the main disadvantages of both applied contact and non-contact probes, namely surface contamination with concomitant hydrothermal probe deterioration and large beam divergence with poor energy density, respectively. Proposed silica or sapphire probes produce quasi-collimated beam with specific outside diameter and power distribution. To provide comparative analysis of laser delivery systems' optical properties with non-contact endoscopic probes 'steady beam distance' (SBD) and 'steady beam ratio' (SBR) coefficients are proposed. The calculation results are presented in the form of the plots of the SBR - coefficients and SBDs for a 2.0 mm specific outside beam diameter versus laser wavelength, delivery fiber core diameter and its numerical aperture for both probe material. Additionally, the cross power distributions along the SBD were studied. Results obtained could provide a useful tool to designers of non-contact fiber delivery systems intended for a variety of medical applications, including endoscopic surgery with cw or pulse laser tissue irradiation, skin de-epithelialization, laser-induced fluorescence and photodynamic therapy.

  10. Final Report on NASA Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Processes currently used throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to remove corrosion and coatings from structures, ground service equipment, small parts and flight components result in waste streams consisting of toxic chemicals, spent media blast materials, and waste water. When chemicals are used in these processes they are typically high in volatile organic compounds (VOC) and are considered hazardous air pollutants (HAP). When blast media is used, the volume of hazardous waste generated is increased significantly. Many of the coatings historically used within NASA contain toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium, and lead. These materials are highly regulated and restrictions on worker exposure continue to increase. Most recently the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from 52 to 5 micrograms per cubic meter of air as an 8-hour time-weighted average. Hexavalent chromium is found in numerous pretreatment and primer coatings used within the Space Shuttle Program. In response to the need to continue to protect assets within the agency and the growing concern over these new regulations, NASA is researching different ways to continue the required maintenance of both facility and flight equipment in a safe, efficient, and environmentally preferable manner. The use of laser energy to prepare surfaces for a variety of processes, such as corrosion and coating removal, weld preparation, and non destructive evaluation (NDE) is a relatively new application of the technology that has been proven to be environmentally preferable and in many cases less labor intensive than currently used removal methods. The novel process eliminates VOCs and blast media and captures the removed coatings with an integrated vacuum system. This means that the only waste generated are the coatings that are removed, resulting in an overall cleaner process. The development of a

  11. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, R.Q.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory`s Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 {mu}m, the author has achieved Strehl ratios of {approximately}0.50 using laser beacons and {approximately}0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of {approximately}8{sup th} magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  12. Defence and security applications of quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) have seen tremendous recent application in the realm of Defence and Security. And, in many instances replacing traditional solid state lasers as the source of choice for Countermeasures, Remote Sensing, In-situ Sensing, Through-Barrier Sensing, and many others. Following their development and demonstration in the early 1990's, QCL's reached some maturity and specific defence and security application prior to 2005; with much initial development fostered by DARPA initiatives in the US, dstl, MoD, and EOARD funding initiatives in the UK, and University level R&D such as those by Prof Manijeh Razeghi at Northwestern University [1], and Prof Ted Masselink at Humboldt University [2]. As QCL's provide direct mid-IR laser output for electrical input, they demonstrate high quantum efficiency compared with diode pumped solid state lasers with optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) to generate mid-Infrared output. One particular advantage of QCL's is their very broad operational bandwidth, extending from the terahertz to the near-infrared spectral regions. Defence and Security areas benefiting from QCL's include: Countermeasures, Remote Sensing, Through-the-Wall Sensing, and Explosive Detection. All information used to construct this paper obtained from open sources.

  13. Laser assisted die bending: a new application of high power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuöcker, D.; Schumi, T.; Spitzer, O.; Bammer, F.; Schuöcker, G.; Sperrer, G.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays high power lasers are mainly used for cutting of sheet metals, for welding, hardening and rapid prototyping. In the forming of sheet metals as bending or deep drawing lasers are not used. Nevertheless a few years ago a new application of high power lasers has been invented, where bending of materials that break at room temperature becomes possible by heating them along the bending edge with high power lasers thus allowing their treatment without cracks and rupture. For this purpose a large number of diode lasers are arranged in the bottom tool of a bending machine (a V-shaped die) which heat up the initially flat sheet metal during the bending process what is performed by pressing it into the die with a knife shaped upper tool where due to the laser heating the material is softened and thus cracks are avoided. For the technical realization of the new process of laser assisted die bending, modules equipped with numerous laser diodes and a total beam power of 2,5 kW are used. The light emitted by these modules enters a tool with a length of 15cm and is deflected towards the workpiece. By using ten of these modules with adjacent dies and by integrating those in a bending press a bending edge of sheet metals with a length of 1500mm can be realized. Such a bending press with laser assistance also needs energization with a power of practically 50kW, a respective water flow, a heat exchanger system and also a control for all functions of this system. Special measures have also been developed to avoid radiating of those tools that are not covered by a workpiece in the case of bending edges shorter than the full length of the bending tools whereas individual short circuiting of diode modules can be performed. Specific measures to ensure a safe operation without any harm to the operational person have been realized. Exploitation of the bending process has been carried out for titanium, where material thicknesses up to 3mm have been bent successfully.

  14. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, E.A.

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  15. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-14

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  16. Nuclear-pumped lasers for large-scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Leonard, E.M.; Shea, R.E.; Berggren, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Efficient initiation of large-volume chemical lasers may be achieved by neutron induced reactions which produce charged particles in the final state. When a burst mode nuclear reactor is used as the neutron source, both a sufficiently intense neutron flux and a sufficient short initiation pulse may be possible. Proof-of-principle experiments are planned to demonstrate lasing in a direct nuclear-pumped large-volume system: to study the effects of various neutron absorbing materials on laser performance; to study the effects of long initiation pulse lengths; to determine the performance of large-scale optics and the beam quality that may bo obtained; and to assess the performance of alternative designs of burst systems that increase the neutron output and burst repetition rate. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Chemical stabilization of laser dyes. Final report, 1 April 1987-31 March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, T.H.

    1990-04-10

    Irradiation of ethanol solutions of coumarin laser dye lasers produces products which absorb at the lasing wavelength. This results in attenuation of dye laser output through interference of stimulated emission. A major photoprocess which produces material which absorbs at the lasing wavelength is dye sensitized solvent oxidative oligomerization, producing aldehydic and ketonic products. A dye laser stabilization technique is removal of these carbonyl compounds as they are formed by reduction with a polymer bound borohydride reducing agent.

  18. Novel oral applications of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieger, V.; Wernisch, J.; Wintner, E.

    2007-02-01

    In the past decades, many efforts have been made to replace mechanical tools in oral applications by various laser systems. The reasons therefore are manifold: i) Friction causes high temperatures damaging adjacent tissue. ii) Smear layers and rough surfaces are produced. iii) Size and shape of traditional tools are often unsuitable for geometrically complicated incisions and for minimum invasive treatment. iv) Mechanical damage of the remaining tissue occurs. v) Online diagnosis for feedback is not available. Different laser systems in the µs and sub-&mrgs-pulse regime, among them Erbium lasers, have been tested in the hope to overcome the mentioned drawbacks and, to some extent, they represent the current state of the art with respect to commercial and hence practical application. In the present work the applicability of scanned ultrashort pulse lasers (USPLs) for biological hard tissue as well as dental restoration material removal was tested. It is shown that cavities with features superior to mechanically treated or Erbium laser ablated cavities can be generated if appropriate scan algorithms and optimum laser parameters are matched. Smooth cavity rims, no microcracks, melting or carbonisation and precise geometry are the advantages of scanned USLP ablation. For bone treatment better healing conditions are expected as the natural structure remains unaffected by the preparation procedure. The novelty of this work is represented by a comprehensive compilation of various experimental results intended to assess the performance of USPLs. In this context, various pulse durations in the picosecond and femtosecond regime were applied to dental and bone tissue as well as dental restoration materials which is considered to be indispensable for a complete assessment. Parameters like ablation rates describing the efficiency of the ablation process, and ablation thresholds were determined - some of them for the first time - and compared to the corresponding Erbium

  19. Characterization of holmium fibers with various concentrations for fiber laser applications around 2.1 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Jan; Peterka, Pavel; Honzatko, Pavel; Baravets, Yauhen; Jelinek, Michal; Kubecek, Vaclav; Pawliszewska, Maria; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Sobon, Grzegorz; Abramski, Krzysztof M.; Kasik, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present experimental results of characterization of the developed holmium-doped silica-based optical fibers with holmium ions concentrations in the range from 1000 to 10000 ppm. The fibers were fabricated by the modified chemical vapor deposition and solution doping method. They were characterized in terms of their spectral attenuation, refractive index profile, and especially performance in fiber laser. Simultaneously, two different fiber laser setups were tested. In the first one, holmium-doped fiber in Fabry-Perot configuration was pumping by in house developed thulium-doped fiber laser in ring arrangement. In the second one, bulk-optic pump-coupling configuration, consisted of a commercially available thulium fiber laser emitting at 1940 nm and system of lenses and mirrors was used. We have focused on comparison of laser output powers, slope efficiencies, and laser thresholds for individual holmiumdoped fiber in these different laser arrangements. Finally, the application of the developed fiber in subpicosecond fiber laser with graphene-based saturable absorber for mode-locking operation was investigated.

  20. Diode-Pumped Alkali Atom Lasers 03-LW-024 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J

    2005-02-16

    The recent work at LLNL on alkali-atom lasers has been remarkably successful and productive. Three main phases (so far) can be identified. First, the concept and demonstration of red lasers using (Ti:sapphire pumping) took place; during this time, Rubidium and Cesium resonance-line lasers were tested, and theoretical models were developed and shown to describe experimental results very reliably. Work done during this first phase has been well documented, and the models from that period are still in use for their predictions and for designing power-scaled lasers. [1 - 3] Second, attempts were made to produce a blue alkali-vapor laser using sequentially-resonant two-step pumping (again, using Ti:sapphire lasers.) Although a blue laser did not result, the physical limitations of our approach are now better-defined. Third, diode-pumped operation of a red laser (Rubidium) was attempted, and we eventually succeeded in demonstrating the world's first diode-pumped gas laser. [4] Because we have a defensible concept for producing an efficient, compact, lightweight, power-scaled laser (tens of kW,) we are in a position to secure outside funding, and would like to find a sponsor. For descriptions of work done during the ''first phase,'' see References [1 - 3] ''Phase two'' work is briefly described in the section ''Blue laser,'' and ''phase three'' work is presented in the section entitled ''Diode-pumped red laser.''

  1. Laser produced plasma diagnostics by cavity ringdown spectroscopy and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, S.

    2012-05-25

    Laser-produced plasmas have many applications for which detailed characterization of the plume is requested. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy is a versatile absorption method which provides data on the plume and its surroundings, with spatial and temporal resolution. The measured absorption line shapes contain information about angular and velocity distributions within the plume. In various plasmas we have observed molecules or metastable atoms which were not present in the emission spectra.

  2. Application of ring lasers to determine the directions to the poles of Earth's rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Golyaev, Yu D; Kolbas, Yu Yu

    2012-10-31

    Application of a ring laser to determine the directions to the poles of Earth's rotation is considered. The maximum accuracy of determining the directions is calculated, physical and technical mechanisms that limit the accuracy are analysed, and the instrumental errors are estimated by the example of ring He - Ne lasers with Zeeman biasing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Proposal of a defense application for a chemical oxygen laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehisa, K.

    2015-05-01

    Defense application for a chemical oxygen laser (COL) is explained. Although a COL has not yet been successful in lasing, the oscillator was estimated to produce a giant pulse with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~0.05ms which makes the damage threshold for the mirrors several-order higher than that for a typical solid-state laser with a ~10ns pulse width. Therefore it has a potential to produce MJ class output considering the simple scalability of being a chemical laser. Since within 0.05ms a supersonic aircraft can move only a few centimeters which is roughly equal to the spot size of the focused beam at ~10km away using a large-diameter focusing mirror, a COL has a potential to make a damage to an enemy aircraft by a single shot without beam tracking. But since the extracted beam can propagate up to a few kilometers due to the absorption in the air, it may be suitable to use in space. While a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) can give a pulsed output with a width of ~2 ms using a high-pressure singlet oxygen generator (SOG). Therefore a pulsed COIL may also not require beam tracking if a target aircraft is approaching. Another advantage for these pulsed high-energy lasers (HELs) is that, in case of propagating in cloud or fog, much less energy is required for a laser for aerosol vaporization (LAV) than that of a LAV for a CW HEL. Considerations to use a COL as a directed energy weapon (DEW) in a point defense system are shown.

  4. Ultra-stable clock laser system development towards space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świerad, Dariusz; Häfner, Sebastian; Vogt, Stefan; Venon, Bertrand; Holleville, David; Bize, Sébastien; Kulosa, André; Bode, Sebastian; Singh, Yeshpal; Bongs, Kai; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Lodewyck, Jérôme; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    The increasing performance of optical lattice clocks has made them attractive for scientific applications in space and thus has pushed the development of their components including the interrogation lasers of the clock transitions towards being suitable for space, which amongst others requires making them more power efficient, radiation hardened, smaller, lighter as well as more mechanically stable. Here we present the development towards a space-compatible interrogation laser system for a strontium lattice clock constructed within the Space Optical Clock (SOC2) project where we have concentrated on mechanical rigidity and size. The laser reaches a fractional frequency instability of 7.9 × 10‑16 at 300 ms averaging time. The laser system uses a single extended cavity diode laser that gives enough power for interrogating the atoms, frequency comparison by a frequency comb and diagnostics. It includes fibre link stabilisation to the atomic package and to the comb. The optics module containing the laser has dimensions 60 × 45 × 8 cm3 and the ultra-stable reference cavity used for frequency stabilisation with its vacuum system takes 30 × 30 × 30 cm3. The acceleration sensitivities in three orthogonal directions of the cavity are 3.6 × 10‑10/g, 5.8 × 10‑10/g and 3.1 × 10‑10/g, where g ≈ 9.8 m/s2 is the standard gravitational acceleration.

  5. Ultra-stable clock laser system development towards space applications.

    PubMed

    Świerad, Dariusz; Häfner, Sebastian; Vogt, Stefan; Venon, Bertrand; Holleville, David; Bize, Sébastien; Kulosa, André; Bode, Sebastian; Singh, Yeshpal; Bongs, Kai; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Lodewyck, Jérôme; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2016-09-26

    The increasing performance of optical lattice clocks has made them attractive for scientific applications in space and thus has pushed the development of their components including the interrogation lasers of the clock transitions towards being suitable for space, which amongst others requires making them more power efficient, radiation hardened, smaller, lighter as well as more mechanically stable. Here we present the development towards a space-compatible interrogation laser system for a strontium lattice clock constructed within the Space Optical Clock (SOC2) project where we have concentrated on mechanical rigidity and size. The laser reaches a fractional frequency instability of 7.9 × 10(-16) at 300 ms averaging time. The laser system uses a single extended cavity diode laser that gives enough power for interrogating the atoms, frequency comparison by a frequency comb and diagnostics. It includes fibre link stabilisation to the atomic package and to the comb. The optics module containing the laser has dimensions 60 × 45 × 8 cm(3); and the ultra-stable reference cavity used for frequency stabilisation with its vacuum system takes 30 × 30 × 30 cm(3). The acceleration sensitivities in three orthogonal directions of the cavity are 3.6 × 10(-10)/g, 5.8 × 10(-10)/g and 3.1 × 10(-10)/g, where g ≈ 9.8 m/s(2) is the standard gravitational acceleration.

  6. Ultra-stable clock laser system development towards space applications

    PubMed Central

    Świerad, Dariusz; Häfner, Sebastian; Vogt, Stefan; Venon, Bertrand; Holleville, David; Bize, Sébastien; Kulosa, André; Bode, Sebastian; Singh, Yeshpal; Bongs, Kai; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Lodewyck, Jérôme; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The increasing performance of optical lattice clocks has made them attractive for scientific applications in space and thus has pushed the development of their components including the interrogation lasers of the clock transitions towards being suitable for space, which amongst others requires making them more power efficient, radiation hardened, smaller, lighter as well as more mechanically stable. Here we present the development towards a space-compatible interrogation laser system for a strontium lattice clock constructed within the Space Optical Clock (SOC2) project where we have concentrated on mechanical rigidity and size. The laser reaches a fractional frequency instability of 7.9 × 10−16 at 300 ms averaging time. The laser system uses a single extended cavity diode laser that gives enough power for interrogating the atoms, frequency comparison by a frequency comb and diagnostics. It includes fibre link stabilisation to the atomic package and to the comb. The optics module containing the laser has dimensions 60 × 45 × 8 cm3; and the ultra-stable reference cavity used for frequency stabilisation with its vacuum system takes 30 × 30 × 30 cm3. The acceleration sensitivities in three orthogonal directions of the cavity are 3.6 × 10−10/g, 5.8 × 10−10/g and 3.1 × 10−10/g, where g ≈ 9.8 m/s2 is the standard gravitational acceleration. PMID:27667640

  7. Fossil fuel characterization using laser desorption mass spectrometry: Applications and limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Laser desorption mass spectroscopy (LDMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI) are applicable to the high molecular weight compounds in fossil fuels which resist intact ionization. LD or MALDI of coals and extracts do not show reproducible ion intensity over mass 2000. This paper describes the scope and limitations of LD and MALD in time-of-flight mass spectrometers applied to high molecular weight molecules such as proteins and polymers. Coal was also analyzed. It is concluded that the sample preparation step is perhaps the most important part in MALDI. Observed high mass ions in coal may be from contaminant proteins. Optimal matrices must be found. Finally, the mass spectrum is senstive to number average molecular weight; a low value, however, does not preclude presence of high molecular weight species.

  8. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  9. Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond

    2006-07-01

    Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old ”calutrons” (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation

  10. Applications of laser wakefield accelerators for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2014-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators driven by high-intensity short-pulse lasers are a proven compact source of high-energy electron beams, with energy gains of ~GeV energy in centimetres of plasma demonstrated. One of the main proposed applications for these accelerators is to drive synchrotron light sources, in particular for x-ray applications. It has also been shown that the same plasma accelerator can also act as a wigglers, capable of the production of high brightness and spatially coherent hard x-ray beams. In this latest work, we demonstrate the application of these unique light-sources for biological and medical applications. The experiments were performed with the Astra Gemini laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Gemini produces laser pulses with energy exceeding 10 J in pulse lengths down to 40 fs. A long focal length parabola (f / 20) is used to focus the laser down to a spot of size approximately 25 μ m (fwhm) into a gas-cell of variable length. Electrons are accelerated to energies up to 1 GeV and a bright beam of x-rays is observed simultaneously with the accelerated beam. The length of the gas cell was optimised to produce high contrast x-ray images of radiographed test objects. This source was then used for imaging a number of interesting medical and biological samples. Full tomographic imaging of a human trabecular bone sample was made with resolution easily exceeding the ~100 μm level required for CT applications. Phase-contrast imaging of human prostrate and mouse neonates at the micron level was also demonstrated. These studies indicate the usefulness of these sources in research and clinical applications. They also show that full 3D imaging can be made possible with this source in a fraction of the time that it would take with a corresponding x-ray tube. The JAI is funded by STFC Grant ST/J002062/1.

  11. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  12. Strong Optical Injection Locking of Edge-Emitting Lasers and Its Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-18

    laser is amplified by an EDFA and attenuated with an inline power meter/attenuator before injecting into the gain -lever DBR laser. The output of the...injection power from a master laser by an EDFA . Figure 4-20 shows the measured optical spectrum of the injection-locked gain -lever DBR laser under R...high-speed long-haul communication and have been widely used for various applications in photonics technology . Semiconductor lasers under optical

  13. Applications of laser diagnostics in energy conservation research

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1985-02-01

    During the past decade, intensive research and development has demonstrated the feasibility, checked the accuracy, and extended the sensitivity of laser diagnostics for combustion systems. Combinations of diagnostics can now provide in-situ, time-, and space-resolved measurements of temperature, velocity, and species concentration. Although these tools are powerful, they also can be exceedingly difficult to use, and their application remains largely in the hands of specialized instrument developers rather than problem-oriented researchers. This report outlines a variety of applications for existing diagnostics that may interest both instrument developers and researchers in particular fields.

  14. Final Report on Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    to evaluate the best performers on processes and coatings specific to the agency. Laser systems used during this project were all of a similar design, most of which had integrated vacuum systems in order to collect materials removed from substrate surfaces during operation. Due to the fact that the technology lends itself to a bide variety of processes, several site demonstrations were organized in order to allow for greater evaluation of the laser systems across NASA. The project consisted of an introductory demonstration and a more in-depth evaluation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Additionally, field demonstrations occurred at Glenn Research Center and Kennedy Space Center. During these demonstrations several NASA specific applications were evaluated, including the removal of coatings within Orbiter tile cavities and Teflon from Space Shuttle Main Engine gaskets, removal of heavy grease from Solid Rocket Booster components and the removal of coatings on weld lines for Shuttle and general ground service equipment for non destructive evaluation (NDE). In addition, several general industry applications such as corrosion removal, structural coating removal, weld-line preparation and surface cleaning were evaluated. This included removal of coatings and corrosion from surfaces containing lead-based coatings and applications similar to launch-structure maintenance and Crawler maintenance. During the project lifecycle, an attempt was made to answer process specific concerns and questions as they arose. Some of these initially unexpected questions concerned the effects lasers might have on substrates used on flight equipment including strength, surface re-melting, substrate temperature and corrosion resistance effects. Additionally a concern was PPE required for operating such a system including eye, breathing and hearing protection. Most of these questions although not initially planned, were fully explored as a part of this project. Generally the results from tesng

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation of cemented carbides: properties and tribological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Gerbig, Y.; Haefke, H.; Bruneau, S.; Hermann, J.; Sentis, M.

    Laser ablation with fs laser pulses was performed in air on cobalt cemented tungsten carbide by means of a Ti : sapphire laser (800 nm, 100 fs). Small and moderate fluences (2, 5, 10 J/cm2) and up to 5×104 pulses per irradiated spot were used to drill holes with aspect ratios up to 10. Cross-section cuts from laser-irradiated samples were produced and they were analysed with optical microscopy and SEM. EDX analyses were carried out on selected zones. Quasi-cylindrical holes were found for 2 J/cm2, whereas for 5 and 10 J/cm2 irregular shapes (lobes, bottoms wider than hole entrances) were found to occur after a given number of incident pulses. Layers with modified structure were evidenced at pore walls. SEM revealed a denser structure, while EDX analyses showed uniform and almost similar contents of W, C, and Co in these layers. As a direct application, patterning of coated WC-Co was carried out with 2 J/cm2 and 100 pulses per pore. The resulted surfaces were tribologically tested and these tests revealed an improved friction and wear behaviour.

  16. Three-dimensional laser window formation for industrial application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.; Kowalski, David

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless three-dimensional, compound-curvature laser windows to extreme accuracies. These windows represent an integral component of specialized nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems that are used in a variety of compressor and turbine research testing facilities. These windows are molded to the flow surface profile of turbine and compressor casings and are required to withstand extremely high pressures and temperatures. This method of glass formation could also be used to form compound-curvature mirrors that would require little polishing and for a variety of industrial applications, including research view ports for testing devices and view ports for factory machines with compound-curvature casings. Currently, sodium-alumino-silicate glass is recommended for three-dimensional laser windows because of its high strength due to chemical strengthening and its optical clarity. This paper discusses the main aspects of three-dimensional laser window formation. It focuses on the unique methodology and the peculiarities that are associated with the formation of these windows.

  17. LIGHT - from laser ion acceleration to future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Light Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Creation of high intensity multi-MeV ion bunches by high power lasers became a reliable tool during the last 15 years. The laser plasma source provides for TV/m accelerating field gradients and initially sub-ps bunch lengths. However, the large envelope divergence and the continuous exponential energy spectrum are substential drawbacks for many possible applications. To face this problem, the LIGHT collaboration was founded (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport). The collaboration consists of several university groups and research centers, namely TU Darmstadt, JWGU Frankfurt, HI Jena, HZDR Dresden and GSI Darmstadt. The central goal is building a test beamline for merging laser ion acceleration with conventional accelerator infrastructure at the GSI facility. In the latest experiments, low divergent proton bunches with a central energy of up to 10 MeV and containing >109 particles could be provided at up to 2.2 m behind the plasma source, using a pulsed solenoid. In a next step, a radiofrequency cavity will be added to the beamline for phase rotation of these bunches, giving access to sub-ns bunch lengths and reaching highest intensities. An overview of the LIGHT objectives and the recent experimental results will be given. This work was supported by HIC4FAIR.

  18. Laser Induced Temperature Field on Surfaces: Application to SAM Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadnam, Mohammad Reza; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2004-03-01

    Laser is used to thermally desorb a self assembeled monolayer (SAM) from a gold substrate. This process is a key step in making patterned surfaces. In many applications making curvilinear features is useful. Heating of a surface by a CW laser along a nonlinear trajectory is considered using Green's functions. Temperature profiles are calculated for heating along circular-arc trajectories of different curvatures. The effect of heating trajectory's radius of curvature and heating spot's velocity (Laser scanning rate) on resulting surface temperature is studied. It is shown that within the range of parameters considered, the induced surface temperature profiles are symmetric. It is also shown that change of heating trajectory's radius of curvature by one order of magnitude at heating velocity of 0.1 mm/s changes the induced surface temperatures by 12 K; this temperature increase will be 36 K at 1 mm/s. The effect of such temperature increases are discussed in terms of laser processing of SAM coated surfaces. For a case of heating along straight line, the kinetics of SAM desorption is coupled with heat diffusion equation to predict the percentage of SAM desorped and determine the feature size. The resulting surface chemical composition profiles are compared with experimental measurements and good agreement is reported.

  19. Multifrequency Nd:YAG laser application for tumor fluorescence diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yova, Dido M.; Halkiotis, Konstantinos N.; Manolopoulos, Athanassios; Ouzounoglou, Nikolaos K.; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Avanessian, Lia A.

    1999-12-01

    A computerized fiber-optic spectrofluorometer based on a multifrequency Nd:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 355, 440, 532 and 660 nm, f equals 25 Hz, E equals 1 - 10 mJ, (tau) equals 12 ns) for tissue fluorescence registration in vivo and ex vivo has been developed. The less intensive fluorescence from a tumor of Sarcoma-45 bearing animal model in comparison with the surrounding normal tissue was observed at the spectral region around 450 nm. The influence of reabsorption, energy transfer and other physical factors on tumor fluorescence, sensitized by Photohem (hematoporphyrin derivative), disodium salt of fluorescein (FL) and chlorin e6 (Chl) was investigated. The pharmacokinetic behavior of Chl in different organs and tumors of the animal models has been estimated. The most intensive Chl fluorescence of tumor tissue was observed at 18 hours after photosensitizer injection. The maximum of the tumor-to-healthy tissue ratio of fluorescence was reached 10 at 27 hours after pigment injection. The fluorescence spectra from different types of human tumors after i/v injection with FL or topical application of ALA were studied. A simple model of Nd:YAG laser system for tumor fluorescence diagnosis has been elaborated. Advantages of the laser fluorescence diagnosis of malignant tumors by solid state multifrequency Nd:YAG laser and the increase in accuracy and specificity of this method is discussed.

  20. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques.

  1. Aerodynamic distortion propagation calculation in application of high-speed target detection by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yonghui; Sun, Huayan; Zhao, Yanzhong; Chen, Jianbiao

    2015-10-01

    Active laser detection technique has a broad application prospect in antimissile and air defense, however the aerodynamic flow field around the planes and missiles cause serious distortion effect on the detecting laser beams. There are many computational fluid dynamics(CFD) codes that can predict the air density distribution and also the density fluctuations of the flow field, it's necessary for physical optics to be used to predict the distortion properties after propagation through the complex process. Aiming at the physical process of laser propagation in "Cat-eye" lenses and aerodynamic flow field for twice, distortion propagation calculation method is researched in this paper. In the minds of dividing the whole process into two parts, and tread the aero-optical optical path difference as a phase distortion, the incidence and reflection process are calculated using Collins formula and angular spectrum diffraction theory respectively. In addition, turbulent performance of the aerodynamic flow field is estimated according to the electromagnetic propagation theory through a random medium, the rms optical path difference and Strehl ratio of the turbulent optical distortion are obtained. Finally, Computational fluid mechanics and aero-optical distortion properties of the detecting laser beams are calculated with the hemisphere-on-cylinder turret as an example, calculation results are showed and analysed.

  2. Development of techniques required for the application of a laser to three dimensional visual sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Arthur M.; Gerhardt, Lester A.

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing vision research at the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE) is directed toward identifying and addressing the relevant issues involved in applying visual sensing to space assembly tasks. A considerable amount of effort has been devoted to passive sensing techniques such as using multiple cameras to identify objects in a scene. To compliment the capabilities of the passive visual system in the CIRSSE robotics testbed, research is being conducted in active sensing techniques. This report is description of the research associated with the testbed's laser scanner and its application as an active sensing device. The report is comprised of five major topics. First is a brief description of the CIRSSE visual system and a summary of the active sensing research that has been conducted up to this point. Second, some of the methods currently used to calibrate CIRSSE's laser scanner are described as well as an appraisal of the effectiveness of these methods. Third, is a discussion of how the laser scanner can be employed in concert with a camera to provide a three dimensional point estimation capability. Fourth, there is a description of methods that can be used to detect the presence of the laser beam in a cluttered camera image. Finally, there is a summary of the current state of this research and a description of research planned for the future.

  3. Novel Applications of Laser Doppler Vibration Measurements to Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Habib; Oliver, David E; Rohrbaugh, John W; Papadopoulos, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been widely used in engineering applications involving non-contact vibration and sound measurements. This technique has also been used in some biomedical applications including hearing research. The detectable frequencies are in the range of near-DC to 1 GHz or higher. This paper reviews applications of LDV in biomedical engineering and proposes new medical imaging applications based on measuring surface vibrations of tissues and organs. Tests were conducted on human skin using single point and scanning laser vibrometers. These tests suggest that skin vibrations due to the forcing excitation from the heart can be used in imaging of blood flow. The results of these tests illustrate the potential of such vibration measurements in a variety of diagnostic medical imaging applications including blood flow/restrictions, real-time monitoring of blood pressure variations, wound healing, muscle movements, etc. The fact that the measurements can be conducted remotely (non-contact) is an important benefit that adds to the promise of this approach.

  4. Novel Applications of Laser Doppler Vibration Measurements to Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabai, Habib; Oliver, David E.; Rohrbaugh, John W.; Papadopoulos, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been widely used in engineering applications involving non-contact vibration and sound measurements. This technique has also been used in some biomedical applications including hearing research. The detectable frequencies are in the range of near-DC to 1 GHz or higher. This paper reviews applications of LDV in biomedical engineering and proposes new medical imaging applications based on measuring surface vibrations of tissues and organs. Tests were conducted on human skin using single point and scanning laser vibrometers. These tests suggest that skin vibrations due to the forcing excitation from the heart can be used in imaging of blood flow. The results of these tests illustrate the potential of such vibration measurements in a variety of diagnostic medical imaging applications including blood flow/restrictions, real-time monitoring of blood pressure variations, wound healing, muscle movements, etc. The fact that the measurements can be conducted remotely (non-contact) is an important benefit that adds to the promise of this approach.

  5. ELIMED, future hadrontherapy applications of laser-accelerated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Carpinelli, Massimo; Cuttone, Giacomo; Gammino, Santo; Bijan Jia, S.; Korn, Georg; Maggiore, Mario; Manti, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Prokupek, Jan; Renis, Marcella; Romano, Francesco; Schillaci, Francesco; Tomasello, Barbara; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Tramontana, Antonella; Velyhan, Andriy

    2013-12-01

    Laser-ion acceleration has recently gained a great interest as an alternative to conventional and more expensive acceleration techniques. These ion beams have desirable qualities such as small source size, high luminosity and small emittance to be used in different fields as Nuclear Physics, Medical Physics, etc. This is very promising specially for the future perspective of a new concept of hadrontherapy based on laser-based devices could be developed, replacing traditional accelerating machines. Before delivering laser-driven beams for treatments they have to be handled, cleaned from unwanted particles and characterized in order to have the clinical requirements. In fact ion energy spectra have exponential trend, almost 100% energy spread and a wide angular divergence which is the biggest issue in the beam transport and, hence, in a wider use of this technology. In order to demonstrate the clinical applicability of laser-driven beams new collaboration between ELI-Beamlines project researchers from Prague (Cz) and a INFN-LNS group from Catania (I) has been already launched and scientists from different countries have already express their will in joining the project. This cooperation has been named ELIMED (MEDical application at ELIBeamlines) and will take place inside the ELI-Beamlines infrastructure located in Prague. This work describes the schedule of the ELIMED project and the design of the energy selector which will be realized at INFN-LNS. The device is an important part of the whole transport beam line which will be realised in order to make the ion beams suitable for medical applications.

  6. The Third International Workshop on the Physics and Modern Applications of Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-08-01

    This document contains 31 abstracts and 7 papers on lasers and optical fibers presented at the third international workshop on the physics and modern applications of lasers. The main topics covered include: basics in lasers, geometrical, physical and quantum optics; optical techniques for research, education and development in Africa; application of lasers in optical fibre communication, environmental studies, bio medicine, chemistry, agriculture, engineering and industry. A list of lecturers, participants and programme of activities are also given.

  7. Ultrahigh-power semiconductor lasers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoguang; Srinivasan, Swaminathan T.; Gupta, Shantanu; Patel, Rushikesh M.

    1998-08-01

    High power semiconductor laser diodes have found their place in a wide variety of markets such as printing, pumping of solid state lasers, illumination, medical diagnosis, surgery, spectroscopy and material processing. In the past two years, the performance of the commercial available multi-mode semiconductor laser diodes has been elevated to a ultra high power level (continuous wave (CW) power density higher than 15 mW/micrometers -aperture for single emitter devices and 10 mW/micrometers -aperture per cm wide bar for monolithic arrays) as the result of breakthrough in device design, processing and packaging. We present in this paper record setting performance of these ultra high power devices in terms of CW power (> 10.6 W from 100 micrometers aperture, > 180 W from 1 cm wide array) and efficiency (wall plug-in efficiency 59%, differential quantum efficiency 87%). Reliability tests of these ultra high power devices indicates that these devices have equivalent to or better reliability than conventional lower power commercial devices. We will discuss the significance of these devices in enabling new applications and empowering current applications.

  8. Direct Laser Cladding , Current Status and Future Scope of Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisheit, A.; Gasser, A.; Backes, G.; Jambor, T.; Pirch, N.; Wissenbach, K.

    During the last decades Direct Laser Cladding has become an established technique in many industrial fields for applying wear and corrosion protection layers on metallic surfaces as well as for the repair of high value-added components. The most important application fields are die and tool making, turbine components for aero engines and power generation, machine components such as axes and gears, and oil drilling components. Continuous wave (CW) lasers with a power up to 18 kW are used on automated machines with three or more axes, enabling 3D cladding . The outstanding feature of DLC is the high precision which leads to a minimum heat input into the work piece and a very low distortion. Due to the high cooling rates a fine grained microstructure is achieved during solidification. A new development in laser cladding is micro cladding in a size range below 50 \\upmum especially for electronic and medical applications. Furthermore, additive manufacturing is coming again into focus as a clean and resource-efficient method to manufacture and modify functional prototypes as well as unique and small lot parts.

  9. Fluid mechanics of fusion lasers. Final report, September 11, 1978-June 5, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shwartz, J; Kulkarny, V A; Ausherman, D A; Legner, H H; Sturtevant, B

    1980-01-01

    Flow loop components required to operate continuous-flow, repetitively-pulsed CO/sub 2/ and KrF laser drivers for ICF were identified and their performance requirements were specified. It was found that the laser flow loops can have a major effect on the laser beam quality and overall efficiency. The pressure wave suppressor was identified as the most critical flow loop component. The performance of vented side-wall suppressors was evaluated both analytically and experimentally and found capable of meeting the performance requirements of the CO/sub 2/ and KrF fusion lasers. All other laser flow loop components are essentially similar to those used in conventional, low speed wind tunnels and are therefore well characterized and can be readily incorporated into fusion laser flow systems designs.

  10. Laser Applications for Nanotechnology : Insights From Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itina, T. E.; Shcheblanov, N.; Colombier, J.-Ph.; Stoian, R.; Audouard, E.; Derrien, Th. Y.; Torres, R.; Hermann, J.; Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2010-10-01

    Laser-produced nanoparticles have found many applications in bio-photonics, medicine and in the development of photovolvatic cells. Many experiments have been performed demonstrating the formation of these particles from solid targets in vacuum, in the presence of a gas or a liquid. However, it is still difficult to predict the size distribution of these particles. Therefore, we have performed an extensive numerical modeling of the involved physical processes. The developed models allow us to compare the relative contribution of several processes involved in the cluster production by laser ablation: (i) direct cluster ejection from a target under rapid laser interaction, (ii) condensation/evaporation; (iii) fragmentation/aggregation processes during cluster diffusion; and (iv) diffusion and coalescence if nanoparticles are deposited on a substrate. The calculation results of both hydrodynamic and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that an exposure of a target to a short or ultra-short laser pulse leads to an explosive target decomposition and to the ejection of nanoparticles. These cluster precursors are formed during rapid target expansion through both thermal and mechanical processes. Collisions with background species affect the cluster size distribution. The influences of the parameters, such as initial cluster temperature and size, background temperature and density, on the cluster evolution are analyzed. Laser-induced phase explosion process affects the formation of small surface structures, obtained with small number of shots. However, the non-resonant "conical" surface structures with the mean size as large as several micrometers are formed due to the presence of harder less absorbing centers. These obtained results can be used to explain many recent experimental observations.

  11. Injection-locked composite lasers for mm-wave modulation : LDRD 117819 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Alford, Charles Fred; Skogen, Erik J.; Chow, Weng Wah; Cajas, Florante G.; Overberg, Mark E.; Torres, David L.; Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring mutual injection locking of composite-cavity lasers for enhanced modulation responses. The program focused on developing a fundamental understanding of the frequency enhancement previously demonstrated for optically injection locked lasers. This was then applied to the development of a theoretical description of strongly coupled laser microsystems. This understanding was validated experimentally with a novel 'photonic lab bench on a chip'.

  12. High-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules in fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Marty; Urbanek, Wolfram; Hoener, Kylan; Kennedy, Keith W.; Bao, Ling; Dawson, David; Cragerud, Emily S.; Balsley, David; Burkholder, Gary; Reynolds, Mitch; Price, Kirk; Haden, Jim; Kanskar, Manoj; Kliner, Dahv A.

    2014-03-01

    High-power, high-brightness, fiber-coupled pump modules enable high-performance industrial fiber lasers with simple system architectures, multi-kW output powers, excellent beam quality, unsurpassed reliability, and low initial and operating costs. We report commercially available (element™), single-emitter-based, 9xx nm pump sources with powers up to 130 W in a 105 μm fiber and 250 W in a 200 μm fiber. This combination of high power and high brightness translates into improved fiber laser performance, e.g., simultaneously achieving high nonlinear thresholds and excellent beam quality at kW power levels. Wavelength-stabilized, 976 nm versions of these pumps are available for applications requiring minimization of the gain-fiber length (e.g., generation of high-peak-power pulses). Recent prototypes have achieved output powers up to 300 W in a 200 μm fiber. Extensive environmental and life testing at both the chip and module level under accelerated and real-world operating conditions have demonstrated extremely high reliability, with innovative designs having eliminated package-induced-failure mechanisms. Finally, we report integrated Pump Modules that provide < 1.6 kW of fiber-coupled power conveniently formatted for fiber-laser pumping or direct-diode applications; these 19" rack-mountable, 2U units combine the outputs of up to 14 elements™ using fused-fiber combiners, and they include high-efficiency diode drivers and safety sensors.

  13. Development of an Innovative Laser-Assisted Coating Process for Extending Lifetime of Metal Casting Dies. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Madhav Rao Gonvindaraju

    1999-10-18

    Die casting dies used in the metal casting industry fail due to thermal fatigue cracking accompanied by the presence of residual tensile stresses, corrosion, erosion and wear of die surfaces. This phase 1 SBIR Final Report summarize Karta Technologies research involving the development of an innovative laser coating technology for metal casting dies. The process involves depositing complex protective coatings of nanocrystalline powders of TiC followed by a laser shot peening. The results indicate a significant improvement in corrosion and erosion resistance in molten aluminum for H13 die casting die steels. The laser-coated samples also showed improved surface finish, a homogeneous and uniform coating mircrostructure. The technology developed in this research can have a significant impact on the casting industry by saving the material costs involved in replacing dies, reducing downtime and improving the quality.

  14. Lasers in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2011-01-01

    Laser technology has advanced tremendously since the first gas lasers were incorporated into early flow cytometers. Gas lasers have been largely replaced by solid-state laser technology, making virtually any desirable visible light wavelength available for flow cytometry. Multiwavelength, white light, and wavelength tunable lasers are poised to enhance our analytical capabilities even further. In this chapter, I summarize the role that lasers play in cytometry, and the practical characteristics that make a laser appropriate for flow cytometry. I then review the latest single wavelength lasers available for flow cytometry, and how they can be used to excite the ever-expanding array of available fluorochromes. Finally, I review the contribution and potential of the latest tunable laser technology to flow cytometry, and show several examples of these novel sources integrated into production instruments. Technical details and critical parameters for successful application of these lasers for biomedical analysis are covered in depth.

  15. Application of femtosecond-laser induced nanostructures in optical memory.

    PubMed

    Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Qiu, Jiarong; Kazansky, Peter G; Fujita, Koji; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The femtosecond laser induced micro- and nanostructures for the application to the three-dimensional optical data storage are investigated. We have observed the increase of refractive index due to local densification and atomic defect generation, and demonstrated the real time observation of photothermal effect after the femtosecond laser irradiation inside a glass by the transient lens (TrL) method. The TrL signal showed a damped oscillation with about an 800 ps period. The essential feature of the oscillation can be reproduced by the pressure wave creation and propagation to the outward direction from the irradiated region. The simulation based on elastodynamics has shown that a large thermoelastic stress is relaxed by the generation of the pressure wave. In the case of soda-lime glass, the velocity of the pressure wave is almost same as the longitudinal sound velocity at room temperature (5.8 microm/ns). We have also observed the localized photo-reduction of Sm3+ to Sm2+ inside a transparent and colorless Sm(3+)-doped borate glass. Photoluminescence spectra showed that some the Sm3+ ions in the focal spot within the glass sample were reduced to Sm2+ ions after femtosecond laser irradiation. A photo-reduction bit of 200 nm in three-dimensions can be recorded with a femtosecond laser and readout clearly by detecting the fluorescence excited by Ar+ laser (lambda = 488 nm). A photo-reduction bit can be also erased by photo-oxidation with a cw Ar+ laser (lambda = 514.5 nm). Since photo-reduction bits can be spaced 150 nm apart in a layer within glass, a memory capacity of as high as 1 Tbit can be achieved in a glass piece with dimensions of 10 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm. We have also demonstrated the first observation of the polarization-dependent periodic nanostructure formation by the interference between femtosecond laser light and electron acoustic waves. The observed nanostructures are the smallest embedded structures ever created by light. The period of self

  16. Encapsulated and monolithic resonant structures for laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pung, Aaron Joseph

    Typically, the composition of a laser system includes a gain medium, a pump illumination source, and an external feedback cavity. This cavity consists of a highly reflective mirror and an outcoupler component. The geometry of the outcoupler can be engineered to tailor the reflected or transmitted beam's spatial and spectral distribution. Functionally, the transmitted beam profile is dependent on the laser application. Broadband reflection profiles can be obtained by utilizing a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). A DBR device consists of multiple layers of alternating materials. Constructive interference of the reflected light off each interface between different materials produces the spectrally broadband response. The spectral response is a function of the fabrication and material parameters of the DBR. In contrast, guided-mode resonance filters (GMRF) exploit phase matching between evanescent- and guided-waves to provide a strong reflection. Based on the materials in the structure, the spectral response can demonstrate broadband or narrowband reflectivity. The operation wavelength of a GMRF is dependent on the structural parameters of the device as well as the angle of incidence. However, conventional designs of resonant optics leave critical aspects of the structure exposed to the surrounding environment. Additional damage or contamination to the waveguide or grating layer will significantly alter the device's spectral response. This dissertation introduces two GMRF geometries aimed at device integration, development of similar-material resonant devices, and full-device protection from outside influence. Unlike distributed Bragg reflectors, these geometries do not rely heavily on strict material and deposition requirements. Instead, they take advantage of the deposition processes to minimize coating deposition, achieve high reflectivity and demonstrate control over polarization dependence. Given their versatility in design and ability to withstand high power

  17. Laser-activated remote phosphor light engine for projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Martin; Mehl, Oliver; Hartwig, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in blue emitting laser diodes enable attractive solutions in projection applications using phosphors for efficient light conversion with very high luminance levels. Various commercially available projectors incorporating this technology have entered the market in the past years. While luminous flux levels are still comparable to lamp-based systems, lifetime expectations of classical lamp systems are exceeded by far. OSRAM GmbH has been exploring this technology for several years and has introduced the PHASER® brand name (Phosphor + laser). State-of-the-art is a rotating phosphor wheel excited by blue laser diodes to deliver the necessary primary colors, either sequentially for single-imager projection engines, or simultaneously for 3-panel systems. The PHASER® technology enables flux and luminance scaling, which allows for smaller imagers and therefore cost-efficient projection solutions. The resulting overall efficiency and ANSI lumen specification at the projection screen of these systems is significantly determined by the target color gamut and the light transmission efficiency of the projection system. With increasing power and flux level demand, thermal issues, especially phosphor conversion related, dominate the opto-mechanical system design requirements. These flux levels are a great challenge for all components of an SSL-projection system (SSL:solid-state lighting). OSRAḾs PHASER® light engine platform is constantly expanded towards higher luminous flux levels as well as higher luminance levels for various applications. Recent experiments employ blue laser pump powers of multiple 100 Watts to excite various phosphors resulting in luminous flux levels of more than 40 klm.

  18. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate.

  19. Case studies of industrial applications of high-power diode laser in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovikorpi, Jari; Jansson, Anssi; Salminen, Antti

    2003-06-01

    The high power diode laser is a new industrial tool. It has several advantages and disadvantages compared to the conventional industrially used CO2 and Nd:YAG laser. The most promising areas of application of diode laser have been considered to be thin sheet welding and hardening. Quite a few feasibility studies of the use of diode laser have been carried out in Finland. So far there has been some application in which diode laser is the most suitable laser. Typically, the HPDL is integrated to an industrial robot. The welding of stainless steel housing, car door lock and catalytic converters are typical examples of applications in which diode laser has technological as well as economical advantages over the conventional laser and welding techniques. The welding of these products requires good control over the heat input, short through put time and low investment. The weld cross-section of a diode laser weld is, because of conduction limited welding process, more suitable for these applications than the keyhole welding. Hardening of a large gear wheel presents also a good example of an application in which the diode laser makes it possible to economically produce structures that have not earlier been possible. Hardening requires a special form of heat delivery in order to ensure evenly hardened zone and acceptable quality. The application was performed with two high power diode lasers. The case studies of these four applications are presented and discussed in details in this paper.

  20. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  1. Lasers '88; Proceedings of the International Conference, Lake Tahoe, NV, Dec. 4-9, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, R. C.; Duarte, F. J.

    Papers are presented on quantum optics and electronics, VUV and X-ray lasers, excimer lasers, free electron lasers, chemical lasers, nuclear-pumped lasers, directed energy technology for strategic defense, discharge lasers, and high power gas lasers. Also covered are CO2 and FIR lasers, ultrafast lasers and techniques, dye lasers, solid state lasers, semiconductor and diode lasers, and nonlinear effects in fibers and fiber lasers. Additional papers are also presented on dynamic gratings and wave mixing; laser radars, lidars, and remote sensing; diode laser applications; adaptive optics and propagation; ultrafast phenomena; laser spectroscopy and lasers in chemistry; laser dyes; and imaging techniques. Finally, papers covering optical devices and measuring instruments, lasers in medicine, lasers in industry, and lasers in education round out the proceedings.

  2. Tunable Diode Laser Applications To Cigarette Smoke Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilcins, Gunars; Harward, Charles N.; Parrish, Milton E.; Forrest, Gary T.

    1983-11-01

    High resolution infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDL) has been applied to the study of cigarette smoke for qualitative and quantitative determinations involved in tobacco blend and cigarette filter developments. As examples of the different types of application of this work, several TDL studies are presented. The measurements of smoke components on a puff-by-puff basis in confined sample chambers and flowing streams were used to study the smoke component deliveries and the effects of filter dilution. The study of isotopes generated during combustion of chemically treated tobaccos was another application of the TDL system to complex gas mixtures without prior separation of compo-nents. The application of the TDL to the study of cigarette filters and smoke delivery simultaneously was demonstrated by using two well resolved absorption lines of two different gases which occur on a single TDL wavelength scan.

  3. Development of laser-plasma diagnostics using ultrafast atomic-scale dynamics. 96-ERD-046 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.; Kulander, K.C.; Boreham, B.W.

    1997-03-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse systems allow examination of intense, ultrafast laser-plasma interactions. More specifically, intense laser irradiation can induce short xuv/x-ray bursts from the surface of condensed phase targets. Ultrafast xuv/x-ray detection is needed to understand laser-plasma interactions in this dynamic regime. Support of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program requires this critical understanding. Our effort here has been to extend understanding of atomic-scale dynamics in such environments with the goal of developing next generation ultrafast xuv/x-ray diagnostics where the sensors will be the atoms and ions themselves and the time resolution will approach that of the induced atomic transitions ({approx} a few femtoseconds). Pivotal contributions to the rapidly developing field of highly nonperturbative interactions of ultrashort pulse lasers with atoms/ions have been made at this laboratory. In the visible/infrared wavelength regions the temporal and spectral content of ultrashort laser pulses are now reliably monitored within a single pulse using frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) which is based on rapid nonlinear optical processes such as the Kerr effect. New applications of this basic concept are still being developed. Corresponding detection for the xuv/x-ray wavelengths does not exist and is urgently needed in many laboratory programs. The FROG technique cannot be applied in the xuv/x-ray region. Current x-ray streak camera technology is limited to {approx}0.5 picosecond resolution.

  4. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Final Test Report of DM LHP TV Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Two loop heat pipes (LHPs) are to be used for thermal control of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), planned for flight in 2001. One LHP will be used to transport 100 W from a laser to the radiator, the other will transport 210 W from electronic boxes to the radiator. In order to verify the LHP design for the GLAS application, an LHP Development Model has been fabricated, and ambient and thermal vacuum tested. Two aluminum blocks of 15 kg and 30 kg, respectively, were attached to the LHP to simulate the thermal masses connected to the heat sources. A 20 W starter heater was installed on the evaporator to aid the loop startup. A new concept to thermally couple the vapor and liquid line was also incorporated in the LHP design. Such a thermal coupling would reduce the power requirement on the compensation chamber in order to maintain the loop set point temperature. To avoid freezing of the liquid in the condenser during cold cases, propylene was selected as the working fluid. The LHP was tested under reflux mode and with adverse elevation. Tests conducted included start-up, power cycle, steady state and transient operation during hot and cold cases, and heater power requirements for the set point temperature control of the LHP. Test results showed very successful operation of the LHP under all conditions. The 20 W starter heater proved necessary in order to start the loop when a large thermal mass was attached to the evaporator. The thermal coupling between the liquid line and the vapor line significantly reduced the heater power required for loop temperature control, which was less than 5 watts in all cases, including a cold radiator. The test also demonstrated successful operation with a propylene working fluid, with successful startups with condenser temperatures as low as 100 C. Furthermore, the test demonstrated accurate control of the loop operating temperature within +/- 0.2 C, and a successful shutdown of the loop during the survival mode of

  5. Novel MRI Applications of Laser-Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-04-01

    Gas-phase NMR has great potential as a probe for a variety of interesting physical and biomedical problems that are not amenable to study by water or similar liquid. However, NMR of gases was largely neglected due to the low signal obtained from the thermally-polarized gases with very low sample density. The advent of optical pumping techniques for enhancing the polarization of the noble gases 3He and 129Xe has bought new life to this field, especially in medical imaging where 3He lung inhalation imaging is approaching a clinical application. However, there are numerous applications in materials science that also benefit from the use of these gases. We review primarily non-medical applications of laser-polarized noble gases for both NMR imaging and spectroscopy, and highlight progress with examples from our laboratory including high-resolution imaging at mT applied field strength and velocity imaging of convective flow. Porous media microstucture has been probed with both thermal and laser-polarized xenon, as xenon is an ideal probe due to low surface interaction with the grains of the porous media.

  6. Materials Development and Evaluation of Selective Laser Sintering Manufacturing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Peter F.; Mitchell, Russell R.

    1997-01-15

    This report summarizes the FY96 accomplishments for CRADA No. LA95C10254, "Materials Development and Evaluation of Laser Sintering Manufacturing Applications". To research the potential for processing additional materials using DTM Corporations Selective Laser Sintering rapid prototyping technology and evaluate the capability for rapid manufacturing applications, the following materials were processed experimentally using the Sinterstation 2000 platform; Linear Low Density Polyethylene thermoplastic; Polypropylene thermoplastic; Polysulfone thermoplastic; Polymethylpentene (TPX) thermoplastic; Carbon microsphere filled nylon 11; "APO-BMI" Apocure bismaleimide thermoset polyimide glass m.icrosphere filled and carbon microsphere filled formulations; and 900-24 physical properties mock for plastic bonded TATB high explosive These materials have been successfully processed to a "proof of concept" level or better (with the exception of No. 7). While none of these materials have been introduced as a standard product as of this date, the potential to do so is viable. Present status of materials processing efforts is presented in Section A 2.0. Some recent efforts in manufacturing applications is discussed in Section A 4.0.

  7. Laser Welded Corrugated Steel Panels in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kananen, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Keskitalo, M.; Hietala, M.; Järvenpää, A.; Holappa, K.; Saine, K.; Teiskonen, J.

    Corrugated core steel panels are an effective way to reduce weight and increase stiffness of steel structures. In numerous applications, these panels have shown very promising commercial possibilities. This study presents the design, manufacturing and commercializing process for two practical examples: Case 1) a fly wheel cover for a diesel engine and Case 2) rotationally symmetrical panel for an electric motor. Test materials of various kinds were used for corrugated cores and skin plates: conventional low-carbon steel grade EN 10130 and ferritic stainless steel grade 1.4509 with plate the thicknesses of 0.5, 0.6 and 0.75 mm. To manufacture different kinds of corrugated core steel panels, flexible manufacturing tools and cost-effective processes are needed. The most important criterion for laser welding panels was the capability of forming tools for producing high quality geometry for the core. Laser welding assembly showed that the quality of the core in both studied cases was good enough for welding the lap joints properly. Developed panels have been tested in industrial applications with excellent feedback. If thickness of a corrugated panel structure is not a limiting issue, these panels are good solution on application where stiffness and lighter weight are required as well as vibrational aspect considered.

  8. Simple laser vision sensor calibration for surface profiling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; ElSoussi, Adnane O.; Al Alami, Abed ElRahman K.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the relatively large structures in the Oil and Gas industry, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have been implementing custom-designed laser vision sensor (LVS) surface profiling systems as part of quality control in their manufacturing processes. The rough manufacturing environment and the continuous movement and misalignment of these custom-designed tools adversely affect the accuracy of laser-based vision surface profiling applications. Accordingly, Oil and Gas businesses have been raising the demand from the OEMs to implement practical and robust LVS calibration techniques prior to running any visual inspections. This effort introduces an LVS calibration technique representing a simplified version of two known calibration techniques, which are commonly implemented to obtain a calibrated LVS system for surface profiling applications. Both calibration techniques are implemented virtually and experimentally to scan simulated and three-dimensional (3D) printed features of known profiles, respectively. Scanned data is transformed from the camera frame to points in the world coordinate system and compared with the input profiles to validate the introduced calibration technique capability against the more complex approach and preliminarily assess the measurement technique for weld profiling applications. Moreover, the sensitivity to stand-off distances is analyzed to illustrate the practicality of the presented technique.

  9. Medical research and multidisciplinary applications with laser-accelerated beams: the ELIMED netwotk at ELI-Beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, A.; Anzalone, A.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.; Licciardello, T.; Maggiore, M.; Manti, L.; Margarone, D.; Musumarra, A.; Perozziello, F.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Romano, F. P.; Stancampiano, C.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Torrisi, L.; Tudisco, S.

    2014-04-01

    Laser accelerated proton beams represent nowadays an attractive alternative to the conventional ones and they have been proposed in different research fields. In particular, the interest has been focused in the possibility of replacing conventional accelerating machines with laser-based accelerators in order to develop a new concept of hadrontherapy facilities, which could result more compact and less expensive. With this background the ELIMED (ELIMED: ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications) research project has been launched by LNS-INFN researchers (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, IT) and ASCR-FZU researchers (Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic-Fyzikální ústar, Prague, Cz), within the pan-European ELI-Beamlines facility framework. Its main purposes are the demonstration of future applications in hadrontherapy of optically accelerated protons and the realization of a laser-accelerated ion transport beamline for multidisciplinary applications. Several challenges, starting from laser-target interaction and beam transport development, up to dosimetric and radiobiological issues, need to be overcome in order to reach the final goals. The design and the realization of a preliminary beam handling and dosimetric system and of an advanced spectrometer for high energy (multi-MeV) laser-accelerated ion beams will be shortly presented in this work.

  10. Gas and metal vapor lasers and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 22, 23, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    Various papers on gas and metal vapor lasers and applications are presented. Individual topics addressed include: high-power copper vapor laser development, modified off-axis unstable resonator for copper vapor laser, industrial applications of metal vapor lasers, newly developed excitation circuit for kHz pulsed lasers, copper vapor laser precision processing, development of solid state pulse power supply for copper vapor laser, multiple spectral structure of the 578.2-nm line for copper vapor laser, adsorption of bromine in CuBr laser, processing of polytetrafluoroethylene with high-power VUV laser radiation, characterization of a subpicosecond XeF(C - A) excimer laser, X-ray preionization for high-repetition-rate discharge excimer lasers. Also discussed are: investigation of microwave-pumped excimer and rare-gas laser transitions, influence of gas composition of XeCl laser performance, output power stabilization of a XeCl excimer laser by HCl gas injection, excimer laser machining of optical fiber taps, diagnostics of a compact UV-preionized XeCl laser with BCl3 halogen donor, blackbody-pumped CO32 lasers using Gaussian and waveguide cavities, chemical problems of high-power sealed-off CO lasers, laser action of Xe and Ne pumped by electron beam, process monitoring during CO2 laser cutting, double-pulsed TEA CO2 laser, superhigh-gain gas laser, high-power ns-pulse iodine laser provided with SBS mirror. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  11. Robust remote-pumping sodium laser for advanced LIDAR and guide star applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstberger, Bernhard; Enderlein, Martin; Friedenauer, Axel; Schwerdt, Robin; Wei, Daoping; Karpov, Vladimir; Leisching, Patrick; Clements, Wallace R. L.; Kaenders, Wilhelm G.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of large ground-based optical telescopes is limited due to wavefront distortions induced by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics systems using natural guide stars with sufficient brightness provide a practical way for correcting the wavefront errors by means of deformable mirrors. Unfortunately, the sky coverage of bright stars is poor and therefore the concept of laser guide stars was invented, creating an artificial star by exciting resonance fluorescence from the mesospheric sodium layer about 90 km above the earth's surface. Until now, mainly dye lasers or sumfrequency mixing of solid state lasers were used to generate laser guide stars. However, these kinds of lasers require a stationary laser clean room for operation and are extremely demanding in maintenance. Under a development contract with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO), TOPTICA Photonics AG and its partner MPB Communications have finalized the development of a next-generation sodium guide star laser system which is available now as a commercial off-the-shelf product. The laser is based on a narrow-band diode laser, Raman fiber amplifier (RFA) technology and resonant second-harmonic generation (SHG), thus highly reliable and simple to operate and maintain. It emits > 22 W of narrow-linewidth (≈ 5 MHz) continuous-wave radiation at sodium resonance and includes a re-pumping scheme for boosting sodium return flux. Due to the SHG resonator acting as spatial mode filter and polarizer, the output is diffraction-limited with RMS wavefront error < λ/25. Apart from this unique optical design, a major effort has been dedicated to integrating all optical components into a ruggedized system, providing a maximum of convenience and reliability for telescope operators. The new remote-pumping architecture allows for a large spatial separation between the main part of the laser and the compact laser head. Together with a cooling-water flow of less than 5 l

  12. Center of Excellence for Laser Applications in Medicine, Microlaser Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R. H.

    2003-01-17

    The Center of Excellence for Laser Applications in Medicine at the Schepens Eye Research Institute (SERI) is a Center for: A core group of researchers who support each other and their various projects for real-time medical imaging and diagnostics in contiguous space at SERI. Clinical collaborators who participate in the core research at SERI, MEEI, and local ophthalmology practices, and at associated sites around the world. Industrial partners who transfer our technology to commercial products that will reach clinical usage everywhere. Students, post-doctoral associates and medical fellows who work with us and learn how to practice real-time medical imaging and diagnostics.

  13. External cavity quantum cascade lasers for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tracy

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy is a powerful tool in monitoring trace gases for applications in atmospheric science, industrial processes, and homeland security. However, although current mid-infrared spectrometers (i.e. Fourier Transform Spectrometers or FTS) have a wide spectral range for multi-species and/or broadband molecular detection, they are too large with slow scan rates for practical use in high resolution spectroscopic applications. Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are compact, powerful, and efficient mid-infrared sources that can be quantum engineered with broadband gain profiles. Placed inside a diffraction grating based external cavity arrangement, they can easily provide >100 cm -1 frequency range with a spectral resolution limited by the laser linewidth (˜10-3 cm-1). Therefore, the external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) provides both high spectral resolution and a wide frequency range. This thesis describes the study and development of EC-QCLs for spectroscopic applications. A new active wavelength method is presented to simplify the spectrometer system by allowing for reliable operation of the EC-QCL without additional wavelength diagnostic equipment. Typically, such equipment must be added to the spectrometer, because the grating equation is inaccurate in describing the EC-QCL output wavelength due to spectral misalignment of other wavelength-selective resonances in the EC-QCL. The active wavelength locking method automatically controls the EC-QCL wavelength, which improves the accuracy of the grating equation to 0.06 cm-1 and offers an ultimate 3σ precision of 0.042 cm-1. For industrial spectroscopic sensing applications in which scan rates must be on the order of kilohertz so that the turbulent gas system can be approximated as a quasi-stable one, a fast-wavelength-scanning folded EC-QCL design capable of 1 kHz scan rate is presented. Two modes of operation have been studied: 1) low resolution pulsed mode and 2) high resolution continuous

  14. [Application of confocal laser scanning microscope in forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Luo; Hu, Le-Sheng; Zhou, Lan; Zheng, Na; Liang, Man; Yang, Fan; Liu, Liang

    2009-12-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy(CLSM) is a new technique for microscopic imaging, which can collect the transverse section image of the samples and produce three-dimensional reconstruction and present higher spatial resolution than the conventional light microscope. As a precision instrument for the microscopic image, it plays an important role in forensic pathology. The article reviews the recent research achievements from sudden cardiac death, bullet wound and nervous system damage, etc, and explores the potential applications of the forensic pathology research and forensic practice.

  15. Application Of Laser Fluorimetry To Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsberg, William D.; Milby, Kristin H.; Lidofsky, Steven D.; Zare, Richard N.

    1981-09-01

    An enzyme-linked sandwich immunoassay for insulin is described. Horseradish peroxidase is employed as an enzyme label for antibody, and enzyme activity is measured via the fluorogenic substrate, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. The product is detected by excitation of fluorescence with the 325 nm line of a cw helium-cadmium ion laser on-line with reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. The method requires a total incubation time of 45 minutes, and the limit of insulin detection is 1.1 μU/ml (6.6 pM). This assay is applicable to the analysis of human serum samples.

  16. Building ultra-precision laser interferometers for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, David; Fitzsimons, Ewan; Killow, Christian; Perreur-Lloyd, Michael; Ward, Henry

    Laser interferometry for space applications typically requires both great precision of optical component placing and alignment and high long-term stability. Construction therefore requires both precision measurement and a jointing technique that allows extremely fine initial adjust-ment and which provides high ultimate strength. We present techniques that allow us to measure mm scale optical beams to better than 10 microns and 20 microrad. These measurements are then combined with precision alignment and hydroxy-catalysis bonding of optical components. The results of applying these techniques to the construction of the four interferometers on each of the LISA Pathfinder optical benches are discussed.

  17. Ultrafast laser inscribed fiber Bragg gratings for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailov, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    Because of their small size, passive nature, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and capability to directly measure physical parameters such as temperature and strain, fiber Bragg grating sensors have developed beyond a laboratory curiosity and are becoming a mainstream sensing technology. Recently, high temperature stable gratings based on femtosecond infrared laser-material processing have shown promise for use in extreme environments such as high temperature, pressure or ionizing radiation. Such gratings are ideally suited for energy production applications where there is a requirement for advanced energy system instrumentation and controls that are operable in harsh environments. This tutorial paper will present a review of some of the more recent developments.

  18. Application of laser velocimetry to aircraft wake-vortex measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciffone, D. L.; Orloff, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    The theory and use of a laser velocimeter that makes simultaneous measurements of vertical and longitudinal velocities while rapidly scanning a flow field laterally are described, and its direct application to trailing wake-vortex research is discussed. Pertinent measurements of aircraft wake-vortex velocity distributions obtained in a wind tunnel and water towing tank are presented. The utility of the velocimeter to quantitatively assess differences in wake velocity distributions due to wake dissipating devices and span loading changes on the wake-generating model is also demonstrated.

  19. Hundred-watt-level high power random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser at 1150 nm and its application in mid-infrared laser generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwei; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiong; Du, Xueyuan; Xiao, Hu; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-29

    Two kinds of hundred-watt-level random distributed feedback Raman fiber have been demonstrated. The optical efficiency can reach to as high as 84.8%. The reported power and efficiency of the random laser is the highest one as we know. We have also demonstrated that the developed random laser can be further used to pump a Ho-doped fiber laser for mid-infrared laser generation. Finally, 23 W 2050 nm laser is achieved. The presented laser can obtain high power output efficiently and conveniently and opens a new direction for high power laser sources at designed wavelength.

  20. Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules, Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lindman, Erick L

    2009-11-05

    Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1 E. L. LINDMAN, Otowi Technical Services, Los Alamos, NM. The performance of an inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsule can be improved by inserting a magnetic field into it before compressing it [Kirkpatrick, et al., Fusion Technol. 27, 205 (1995)]. To obtain standoff in an ICF power generator, a method of inserting the field without the use of low-inductance leads attached to the capsule is desired. A mechanism for generating such a field using a laser was discovered in Japan [Sakagami, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 839 (1979), Kolodner and Yablonovitch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 1402 (1979)] and studied at Los Alamos in the 1980s [M. A. Yates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1702 (1982); Forslund and Brackbill, Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1614 (1982)]. In this mechanism, a p-polarized laser beam strikes a solid target producing hot electrons that are accelerated away from the target surface by resonant absorption. An electric field is created that returns the hot electrons to the target. But, they do not return to the target along the same trajectory on which they left. The resulting current produces a toroidal magnetic field that was observed to spread over a region outside the hot spot with a radius of a millimeter. No experimental measurements of the magnetic field strength were performed. Estimates from computer simulation suggest that field strengths in the range of 1 to 10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) were obtained outside of the laser spot. To use this mechanism to insert a magnetic field into an ICF capsule, the capsule must be redesigned. In one approach, a central conductor is added, a toroidal gap is cut in the outer wall and the DT fuel is frozen on the inner surface of the capsule. The capsule is dropped into the reaction chamber and struck first with the laser that generates the magnetic field. The laser hot spot is positioned at the center of the toroidal gap. As the

  1. Spectroscopic investigation of materials for frequency-agile laser systems. Final report, 15 January 1982-14 January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This research involves the use of laser-spectroscopy techniques such as four-wave mixing, multiphoton absorption, time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy, and holography to characterize dynamical optical processes such as energy transfer, exciton migration, radiation-less relaxation, and the photorefractive effect. In addition, a significant effort was spent in the synthesis and characterization of new types of materials for tunable laser applications. The materials investigated include alexandrite, titanium-doped sapphire, lithium niobate, neodymium pentaphosphate, rhodium-doped rubidium calcium fluoride, manganese silicate, and neodymium-doped garnet crystals and glasses.

  2. Final Scientific and Technical Report - Practical Fiber Delivered Laser Ignition Systems for Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Yalin, Azer

    2014-03-30

    Research has characterized advanced kagome fiber optics for their use in laser ignition systems. In comparison to past fibers used in laser ignition, these fibers have the important advantage of being relatively bend-insensitivity, so that they can be bent and coiled without degradation of output energy or beam quality. The results are very promising for practical systems. For pulse durations of ~12 ns, the fibers could deliver >~10 mJ pulses before damage onset. A study of pulse duration showed that by using longer pulse duration (~20 – 30 ns), it is possible to carry even higher pulse energy (by factor of ~2-3) which also provides future opportunities to implement longer duration sources. Beam quality measurements showed nearly single-mode output from the kagome fibers (i.e. M2 close to 1) which is the optimum possible value and, combined with their high pulse energy, shows the suitability of the fibers for laser ignition. Research has also demonstrated laser ignition of an engine including reliable (100%) ignition of a single-cylinder gasoline engine using the laser ignition system with bent and coiled kagome fiber. The COV of IMEP was <2% which is favorable for stable engine operation. These research results, along with the continued reduction in cost of laser sources, support our commercial development of practical laser ignition systems.

  3. A final report to the Laboratory Directed Research and Development committee on Project 93-ERP-075: ``X-ray laser propagation and coherence: Diagnosing fast-evolving, high-density laser plasmas using X-ray lasers``

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Libby, S.B.; Moreno, J.C.

    1996-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Exploratory Research Project (ERP) entitled ``X-ray Laser Propagation and Coherence: Diagnosing Fast-evolving, High-density Laser Plasmas Using X-ray Lasers,`` tracking code 93-ERP-075. The most significant accomplishment of this project is the demonstration of a new laser plasma diagnostic: a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser at 155 {angstrom} as the probe source. Detailed comparisons of absolute two-dimensional electron density profiles obtained from soft x-ray laser interferograms and profiles obtained from radiation hydrodynamics codes, such as LASNEX, will allow us to validate and benchmark complex numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Thus the development of soft x-ray interferometry technique provides a mechanism to probe the deficiencies of the numerical models and is an important tool for, the high-energy density physics and science-based stockpile stewardship programs. The authors have used the soft x-ray interferometer to study a number of high-density, fast evolving, laser-produced plasmas, such as the dynamics of exploding foils and colliding plasmas. They are pursuing the application of the soft x-ray interferometer to study ICF-relevant plasmas, such as capsules and hohlraums, on the Nova 10-beam facility. They have also studied the development of enhanced-coherence, shorter-pulse-duration, and high-brightness x-ray lasers. The utilization of improved x-ray laser sources can ultimately enable them to obtain three-dimensional holographic images of laser-produced plasmas.

  4. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, J. T.

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  5. Laser-Ultrasonic Testing and its Applications to Nuclear Reactor Internals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, M.; Miura, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2008-02-01

    A new nondestructive testing technique for surface-breaking microcracks in nuclear reactor components based on laser-ultrasonics is developed. Surface acoustic wave generated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and detected by frequency-stabilized long pulse laser coupled with confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to detect and size the cracks. A frequency-domain signal processing is developed to realize accurate sizing capability. The laser-ultrasonic testing allows the detection of surface-breaking microcrack having a depth of less than 0.1 mm, and the measurement of their depth with an accuracy of 0.2 mm when the depth exceeds 0.5 mm including stress corrosion cracking. The laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with laser peening system, which is another laser-based maintenance technology to improve surface stress, for inner surface of small diameter tube is developed. The generation laser in the laser-ultrasonic testing system can be identical to the laser source of the laser peening. As an example operation of the system, the system firstly works as the laser-ultrasonic testing mode and tests the inner surface of the tube. If no cracks are detected, the system then changes its work mode to the laser peening and improves surface stress to prevent crack initiation. The first nuclear industrial application of the laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with the laser peening was completed in Japanese nuclear power plant in December 2004.

  6. High power laser and materials investigation. Final report, 31 July 1978-28 October 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chicklis, E.P.; Folweiler, R.C.; Pollak, T.M.; Baer, J.

    1980-06-01

    This is a combined study of resonant pumped solid state lasers as fusion drivers, and the development of crystalline optical materials suitable for propagation of the high peak powers associated with laser fusion research. During this period of study the concept of rare gas halide lasers was first demonstrated by the lasing of Tm:YLF at 453 nm pumped by the 353 nm energy of XeF. Excited stata densities of 5 x 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ have been attained and spectroscopic measurements show that up to 60% of the pump energy can be converted into useful stored energy. Alternative lasers and pumping schemes are also discussed. In all cases the potential RGH/SS systems are evaluated in respect to internal efficiency and heat loading.

  7. Qualification and Selection of Flight Diode Lasers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Gontijo, Ivair; Forouhar, Siamak; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Cooper, Mark S.; Meras, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser diodes is critical to space missions. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission includes a metrology system that is based upon laser diodes. An operational test facility has been developed to qualify and select, by mission standards, laser diodes that will survive the intended space environment and mission lifetime. The facility is situated in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) certified clean-room and consist of an enclosed temperature-controlled stage that can accommodate up to 20 laser diodes. The facility is designed to characterize a single laser diode, in addition to conducting laser lifetime testing on up to 20 laser diodes simultaneously. A standard laser current driver is used to drive a single laser diode. Laser diode current, voltage, power, and wavelength are measured for each laser diode, and a method of selecting the most adequate laser diodes for space deployment is implemented. The method consists of creating histograms of laser threshold currents, powers at a designated current, and wavelengths at designated power. From these histograms, the laser diodes that illustrate a performance that is outside the normal are rejected and the remaining lasers are considered spaceborne candidates. To perform laser lifetime testing, the facility is equipped with 20 custom laser drivers that were designed and built by California Institute of Technology specifically to drive NuSTAR metrology lasers. The laser drivers can be operated in constant-current mode or alternating-current mode. Situated inside the enclosure, in front of the laser diodes, are 20 power-meter heads to record laser power throughout the duration of lifetime testing. Prior to connecting a laser diode to the current source for characterization and lifetime testing, a background program is initiated to collect current, voltage, and resistance. This backstage data collection enables the operational test facility to have full laser diode

  8. Applications of a single-longitudinal-mode alexandrite laser for diagnostics of parameters of combustion interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. S.; Afzelius, M.; Zetterberg, J.; Aldén, M.

    2004-10-01

    We report on the applications of a single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) pulsed alexandrite laser system for diagnostics of parameters of flow/combustion interest. The laser system is characterized by its narrow linewidth, high peak power, and broad tunablity. The absolute frequency of the laser output was monitored by a wavelength diagnostic system, which included a high-resolution confocal etalon and a molecular iodine laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system. Different nonlinear frequency conversion schemes were used to cover a large frequency range from the infrared to the deep UV. The versatility of the laser system for flow/combustion diagnostics is demonstrated in three applications, namely filtered Rayleigh scattering, high-resolution Doppler-free two-photon LIF of CO, and infrared LIF and polarization spectroscopy of CO2. The potential impacts of using this SLM laser system in laser flow/combustion diagnostic applications are discussed.

  9. Applications of laser lithography on oxide film to titanium micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvy, P.-F.; Hoffmann, P.; Landolt, D.

    2003-03-01

    Due to its good biocompatibility titanium is widely used for dental and orthopaedics implants and for biomedical microsystems. For these applications one needs specific micromachining methods. A new four-step method for electrochemical micromachining of titanium is presented here, which implies anodic oxidation, Excimer laser sensitising irradiation, anodic dissolution, and ultrasonic cleaning. The method is applied to the fabrication of two 3D model structures, surface structuring of a cylinder and machining of a complex two-level architecture. The absence of debris and of a heat affected zone as well as the resulting surface smoothness are the main advantages of the process. Ways to improve the still limited processing speed are discussed with regards to potential applications.

  10. Nanopatterning by laser interference lithography: applications to optical devices.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Seong-Il; Park, Bang Ju; Ma, Zhenqiang; Choi, Jinnil; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2014-02-01

    A systematic review, covering fabrication of nanoscale patterns by laser interference lithography (LIL) and their applications for optical devices is provided. LIL is a patterning method. It is a simple, quick process over a large area without using a mask. LIL is a powerful technique for the definition of large-area, nanometer-scale, periodically patterned structures. Patterns are recorded in a light-sensitive medium that responds nonlinearly to the intensity distribution associated with the interference of two or more coherent beams of light. The photoresist patterns produced with LIL are the platform for further fabrication of nanostructures and growth of functional materials used as the building blocks for devices. Demonstration of optical and photonic devices by LIL is reviewed such as directed nanophotonics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or large area membrane reflectors and anti-reflectors. Perspective on future directions for LIL and emerging applications in other fields are presented.

  11. Development of Coherent Laser Radar for Space Situational Awareness Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N.; DiMarcantonio, A.

    2013-09-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is working on an innovative and high performance mobile coherent laser radar (ladar) system known as ExoSPEAR for space situational awareness applications in LEO and beyond. Based on continuously agile pulse doublet technology, the 100 W, nanosecond class, near-IR laser based coherent ladar is being developed for short dwell time measurements of resident space objects (RSOs). ExoSPEAR system is designed to provide rapid and precision tracking of RSOs over very long ranges. The goal is to demonstrate mm-class range resolution, mm/s class velocity resolution and microrad angular resolution with significantly reduced error-covariance in track accuracy. Precise orbit determination would help in advancing functionality of early warning systems for tracking uncooperative targets for planetary protection applications. Furthermore, improvements in resolution of micromotion measurements would enhance our understanding of astrodymanical properties of resident space objects. In this paper, salient features of the evolution and current experimental status of ExoSPEAR ladar architecture will be discussed. Performance simulations illustrating the dependence of range and velocity precision in LEO orbits on ladar power aperture product will be presented. Estimated limits on detectable optical cross sections of RSOs in LEO orbits will be analyzed.

  12. Laser velocimeter applications to high-lift research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipkey, R. R.; Jones, G.; Braden, J. A.

    1982-09-01

    The application of the Lockheed-Georgia 2-D laser velocimeter (LV) burst-counter system to the flow field around a 2- and 3-element high-lift airfoil is discussed. The characteristic behavior of the confluent boundary layer (that is, the boundary layer existing downstream of a slot as it approaches and undergoes separation is evaluated. In this application, the LV represents all ideal instruments for nonintrusively probing into the narrow slots and cove areas characterizing mechanical high-lift systems. The work is being performed in the Lockheed-Georgia 10 x 30-inch low-speed test facility using a 9-inch (basic) chord section of the general aviation GAW-1 airfoil. The LV system employs a 4-W argon laser and operates in an off-axis, backscatter mode with a focus length of about 30 inches. Smoke is used as the seeding medium and is injected downstream of the model such that particle uniformity and size are constant upon completion of the tunnel circuit into the test area. The LV system is fully automated by utilizing a MAC-16 minicomputer for positioning, data acquisition, and preliminary data reduction.

  13. High power lasers and their industrial applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Innsbruck, Austria, Apr. 15-18, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuoecker, Dieter

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on the discharge behavior of an RF excited high power CO2 laser at different excitation frequencies; high power CO2 lasers for materials processing; a semiconductive preionization technique; high power Nd lasers for industrial applications; high power light transmission in optical waveguides; beam delivery systems for high power lasers; and quality control for high power CO2 laser optics. Topics discussed include the monitoring of laser material processes; measuring the quality of high power laser beams; the physics of laser material processing; metal precision drilling with lasers; and the evolution of microstructure for laser clad Fe-Cr-Mn-C alloys. Consideration is given to robotic manipulation for laser processing; laser cutting; the use of the laser versus the electron beam in welding the surface treatments; high power laser safety; and laser protective filters for the visible and near-IR spectrum.

  14. Pulsed laser ablation of ferroelectric composites for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, S.; Green, S. M.

    1998-05-01

    Low loss composites have been fabricated in thick and thin film forms for a broad range of frequency applications. The thin film composites of barium strontium titanium oxide (BSTO) have been primarily developed by the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method. This deposition technique has produced high quality thin films of BSTO composites on various substrates [S. Sengupta, L.C. Sengupta, W.E. Kosik, Pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric thin films in conjunction with superconducting oxides, IEEE Cat# 94CH3416-5, 431][Analysis of ferroelectric thin films deposited by the pulsed laser deposition method on oxide and fluoride substrates, IEEE Cat# 94CH3416-5, 70][S. Sengupta, D.P. Vijay, S.B. Desu, Thin films of novel ferroelectric composites, Proceedings of MRS, 361, 1995, 545][S. Sengupta, L.C. Sengupta, Novel pyroelectric sensor materials, submitted to the Special Issue on Sensors and Actuators of the IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control]. The objective of this work is to elucidate the PLA deposition parameters of the BSTO composite thin films. The material characterization and the electronic parameters of the thin films will also be presented. Finally, the patterning techniques required to fabricate the BSTO composite thin film phase shifters will be discussed. Some preliminary results of the phase shifter characterization will also be presented.

  15. Development of ytterbium-doped oxyfluoride glasses for laser cooling applications.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Kummara Venkata; de Lima Filho, Elton Soares; Ledemi, Yannick; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-02-26

    Oxyfluoride glasses doped with 2, 5, 8, 12, 16 and 20 mol% of ytterbium (Yb(3+)) ions have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. Their optical, thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were characterized. Luminescence intensity at 1020 nm under laser excitation at 920 nm decreases with increasing Yb(3+) concentration, suggesting a decrease in the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY). The PLQY of the samples was measured with an integrating sphere using an absolute method. The highest PLQY was found to be 0.99(11) for the 2 mol% Yb(3+): glass and decreases with increasing Yb(3+) concentration. The mean fluorescence wavelength and background absorption of the samples were also evaluated. Upconversion luminescence under 975 nm laser excitation was observed and attributed to the presence of Tm(3+) and Er(3+) ions which exist as impurity traces with YbF3 starting powder. Decay curves for the Yb(3+): (2)F5/2 → (2)F7/2 transition exhibit single exponential behavior for all the samples, although lifetime decrease was observed for the excited level of Yb(3+) with increasing Yb(3+) concentration. Also observed are an increase in the PLQY and a slight decrease in lifetime with increasing the pump power. Finally, the potential of these oxyfluoride glasses with high PLQY and low background absorption for laser cooling applications is discussed.

  16. Development of ytterbium-doped oxyfluoride glasses for laser cooling applications

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaiah, Kummara Venkata; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Ledemi, Yannick; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Oxyfluoride glasses doped with 2, 5, 8, 12, 16 and 20 mol% of ytterbium (Yb3+) ions have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. Their optical, thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were characterized. Luminescence intensity at 1020 nm under laser excitation at 920 nm decreases with increasing Yb3+ concentration, suggesting a decrease in the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY). The PLQY of the samples was measured with an integrating sphere using an absolute method. The highest PLQY was found to be 0.99(11) for the 2 mol% Yb3+: glass and decreases with increasing Yb3+ concentration. The mean fluorescence wavelength and background absorption of the samples were also evaluated. Upconversion luminescence under 975 nm laser excitation was observed and attributed to the presence of Tm3+ and Er3+ ions which exist as impurity traces with YbF3 starting powder. Decay curves for the Yb3+: 2F5/2 → 2F7/2 transition exhibit single exponential behavior for all the samples, although lifetime decrease was observed for the excited level of Yb3+ with increasing Yb3+ concentration. Also observed are an increase in the PLQY and a slight decrease in lifetime with increasing the pump power. Finally, the potential of these oxyfluoride glasses with high PLQY and low background absorption for laser cooling applications is discussed. PMID:26915817

  17. Laser microdissection and its application to analyze gene expression in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, S Karen; Harrison, Maria J

    2009-05-01

    Phosphorus is essential for plant growth, and in many soils phosphorus availability limits crop production. Most plants in natural ecosystems obtain phosphorus via a symbiotic partnership with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. While the significance of these associations is apparent, their molecular basis is poorly understood. Consequently, the potential to harness the mycorrhizal symbiosis to improve phosphorus nutrition in agriculture is not realized. Transcript profiling has recently been used to investigate gene expression changes that accompany development of the AM symbiosis. While these approaches have enabled the identification of AM-symbiosis-associated genes, they have generally involved the use of RNA from whole mycorrhizal roots. Laser microdissection techniques allow the dissection and capture of individual cells from a tissue. RNA can then be isolated from these samples and cell-type specific gene expression information can be obtained. This technology has been applied to obtain cells from plants and more recently to study plant-microbe interactions. The latter techniques, particularly those developed for root-microbe interactions, are of relevance to plant-parasitic weed research. Here, laser microdissection, its use in plant biology and in particular plant-microbe interactions are discussed. An overview of the AM symbiosis is then provided, with a focus on recent advances in understanding development of the arbuscule-cortical cell interface. Finally, the recent applications of laser microdissection for analyses of AM symbiosis are discussed.

  18. Simulation of Laser Cooling and Trapping in Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan; Lunblad, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    An advanced computer code is undergoing development for numerically simulating laser cooling and trapping of large numbers of atoms. The code is expected to be useful in practical engineering applications and to contribute to understanding of the roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and numbers of particles play in experiments using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms. The code is based on semiclassical theories of the forces exerted on atoms by magnetic and optical fields. Whereas computer codes developed previously for the same purpose account for only a few physical mechanisms, this code incorporates many more physical mechanisms (including atomic collisions, sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Stark and Zeeman energy shifts, gravitation, and evanescent-wave phenomena) that affect laser-matter interactions and the cooling of atoms to submillikelvin temperatures. Moreover, whereas the prior codes can simulate the interactions of at most a few atoms with a resonant light field, the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation by the present code is limited only by computer memory. Hence, the present code represents more nearly completely the complex physics involved when using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms in engineering applications. Another advantage that the code incorporates is the possibility to analyze the interaction between cold atoms of different atomic number. Some properties that cold atoms of different atomic species have, like cross sections and the particular excited states they can occupy when interacting with each other and light fields, play important roles not yet completely understood in the new experiments that are under way in laboratories worldwide to form ultracold molecules. Other research efforts use cold atoms as holders of quantum information, and more recent developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics also use ultracold atoms to explore and expand new information-technology ideas. These experiments give a hint

  19. Colloidal Metal Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser Ablation and their Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianming; Claverie, Jerome; Chaker, Mohamed; Ma, Dongling

    2017-02-05

    This review article highlights the recent advances of the synthesis and application of metal nanoparticles (NPs) fabricated via pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) phase and also introduces relevant NP formation mechanisms. Although wet-chemical approaches have been well established to synthesize colloidal metal NPs with various components and structures, some inherent drawbacks, such as reaction residuals and/or contaminations, largely limit some of their applications. The PLAL method has recently been developed as an alternative approach and received increasing attention for colloidal NP preparation, without involving complicated chemical reactions. In certain cases, by using PLAL, ligand-free and surface-clean NPs can be obtained and well dispersed in liquid, leading to the formation of a "surface-clean" NP dispersion. This unique feature renders PLAL-synthesised metal NPs attractive candidates for many interesting applications in catalysis, biology, sensing, and clean energy generation and storage. We conclude this review by proposing several interesting research directions and future challenges, from PLAL fabrication to applications. We hope this review can serve as a good reference and help with the further development of PLAL-NPs and their diverse applications.

  20. Organization of the topical meeting on tunable solid-state lasers. Held in North Falmouth, Massachusetts on May 1-3 1989. Final report, 30 August 1988-30 August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-30

    Progress and interest in solid-state lasers generally, and in tunable solid state-lasers specifically, continues to expand. Applications of these lasers include spectroscopy, remote sensing, ranging and imaging, and medicine. New solid-state materials are providing lasers with higher output power, broader tunability, and more-efficient pumping schemes. The quantum electronics and crystal-chemistry properties of these new materials are leading to enhanced laser performance. At the meeting, sessions were held on sapphire, novel laser schemes, Cr lasers, forsterite and excited-state absorption, solid-state lasers for specialized applications, alexandrite lasers, Cr-related issues, diode pumped lasers, nonlinear frequency conversion, 1.3-micrometer Nd lasers, infrared lasers and energy transfer, 2-micrometer lasers, rare earth laser materials, and Er lasers.

  1. Topographical surveys: Classical method versus 3D laser scanning. Case study - An application in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoraş, I.-R.; Covăsnianu, A.; Pleşu, G.; Benedict, B.

    2009-04-01

    The paper describes an experiment which took place in Iasi town, Romania, consisted in two different topographical survey techniques applied for one and the same objective placed in a block within the city (western part) - a thermal power station. The purpose was to compare those methods and to determine which one is proper to be used in this domain in terms of fastness, optimization and speed of data processing. First technique applied for our survey was the classical one, with a total station. Using the CAD technique, we obtained a final product (a dwg file) and a list of coordinates (a text file). The second method, which we focused our attention more, was the measurement with a very precise 3D laser scanstation, also very suitable in archeology. The data obtained were processed with special software. Result was a 3D model of the thermal power plant composed of measurable cloud point data. Finally, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of each method, we came to the conclusion that the 3D laser scanning which we used matches well the application, in this case civil engineering, but the future of accepting and implementing this technique is in the hands of Romanian authorities.

  2. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield Il, James E; Clegg, Samuel M; Le, Loan A; Lopez, Leon N

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements

  3. Information and Communication Using Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alouini, Mehdi; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2015-10-01

    The applications of lasers in industry are numerous. It is of course beyond the scope of this book to give an overview of these applications. Rather than trying and failing in doing so, we have chosen in this chapter to illustrate the unique properties of lasers in four different fields. The two first applications described in this chapter, namely optical telecommunications (Section 3.1) and optical information storage (Section 3.2), highlight the contribution of the spatial coherence of the laser. The third one, namely the ring laser gyroscope (Section 3.3), illustrates the amazing spectral purity that can be provided by laser light. Finally, the fourth one, known under the generic acronym LIDAR (Section 3.4), can use different laser properties, depending on its implementation. It can be based on the laser spatial coherence, the laser temporal coherence, and/or on the laser ability to emit powerful short pulses.

  4. Fabrication of transparent ceramic laser media for high energy laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serivalsatit, Karn

    nanopowders with average particle size 40 and 60 nm, respectively. Transparent sesquioxide ceramics were successfully fabricated by vacuum sintering compacts of nanopowders at high temperature. These ceramics had relatively large grain sizes, ranging from tens to hundreds of micrometers, due to significant grain growth at the final stage of sintering. These large-grained ceramics tend to not offer significant enhancements to strength or thermal shock resistance that smaller grain-sized transparent ceramics afford. Sub-micrometer-grained highly transparent sesquioxide ceramics were fabricated using a two-step sintering process followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). This process yielded full densification of the sesquioxide ceramics with drastically reduced grain growth. These sub-micrometer-grained ceramics exhibited a transparency equivalent to that of single crystals in the near-infrared spectral. The microhardness and fracture toughness of transparent ceramics fabricated by this method were found to exceed those of transparent ceramics fabricated by conventional sintering. The single-crystal-like transmittance of the sub-micrometer-grained yttria ceramics in the visible and IR region with high mechanical properties is an important advancement for the use of these materials in more extreme environments, including high power laser systems where reduction of scattering and thermal shock resistance are critical.

  5. Improving dye laser efficiency with uv absorbers and wavelength shifters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, K L; Thorne, J M

    1981-01-01

    The nonuniform heating in flashlamp pumped dye lasers forms refractive index gradients in the dye solution. These gradients distort the wavefront of the laser beam resulting in limited output power, limited pulse repetition rate, and limited attainable linewidth. The theorectical bases for using uv absorbers and wavelength shifters to eliminate light of detrimental wavelengths and thereby improve dye laser efficiency are described, and the results of experiments for evaluating 12 uv absorbers and 12 wavelength filters for use as possible pump light filters are presented. These experiments showed that the appropriate uv absorber or wavelength shifter to be used with a given laser dye is based on the absorption spectrum of the dye. If a uv absorber is needed, then the compound should be chosen so that its long wavelength absorption peak is just to the short wavelength side of the absorption peaks of the laser dye. If a wavelength shifter is needed, then the compound should be chosen so that there is maximum overlap between the fluorescence spectrum of the shifter and the absorption spectrum of the dye. Tabulated data are presented which can be used to selected protectors and shifters for specific dyes. (LCL)

  6. Activity of retinal ganglion cells following intense, nanosecond laser flashes. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of intense, but nonlesion-producing, laser exposures of 20-ns duration were determined on the light responses and spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells recorded in situ from the rhesus monkey. (Following a single, 20-ns exposure centered on its receptive field, a ganglion cell produced an 'afterdischarge' of maintained action potentials). The duration of the afterdischarge depended on the diameter of the laser beam on the retina and on the beam's intensity. Laser exposures subtending 0.5 to 2.0 deg, and delivering 45 to 60% of the maximum permissible exposure, elicited afterdischarges that lasted up to 80 s. When the beam diameter was decreased to 0.25 deg, the afterdischarge was reduced to 30 s, and to less than 5 s with the 0.12-deg beam. Light sensitivity after the laser exposure recovered rapidly during the first 10 s and then more slowly, but exponentially, until it reached the preflash level. Color-opponent ganglion cells exhibited a phenomenon called 'response-reversal' after the laser exposure, presumably due to selective adaptation of a mid-wavelength cone-input. Because a 20-ns exposure, regardless of intensity, is likely to photoregenerate more than half of the available visual pigment, the effects of ganglion cell response described here are not likely to be due solely to pigment bleaching.

  7. Red vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for consumer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, Geoffrey; Barrow, David A.; Calvert, Tim; Maute, Markus; Hung, Vincent; McGarvey, Brian; Lambkin, John D.; Wipiejewski, Torsten

    2008-02-01

    There are many potential applications of visible, red (650nm - 690nm) vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) including high speed (Gb) communications using plastic optical fiber (POF), laser mouse sensors, metrology, position sensing. Uncertainty regarding the reliability of red VCSELs has long been perceived as the most significant roadblock to their commercialization. In this paper we will present data on red VCSELs optimized for performance and reliability that will allow exploitation of this class of VCSEL in a wide range of high volume consumer, communication and medical applications. VCSELs operating at ~665nm have been fabricated on 4" GaAs substrates using MOCVD as the growth process and using standard VCSEL processing technology. The active region is AlGaInP-based and the DBR mirrors are made from AlGaAs. Threshold currents are typically less than 2mA, the devices operate up to >60C and the light output is polarized in a stable, linear characteristic over all normal operating conditions. The 3dB modulation bandwidth of the devices is in excess of 3GHz and we have demonstrated the operation of a transceiver module operating at 1.25Gb/s over both SI-POF and GI-POF. Ageing experiments carried out using a matrix of current and temperature stress conditions allows us to estimate that the time to failure of 1% of devices (TT1%F) is over 200,000h for reasonable use conditions - making these red VCSELs ready for commercial exploitation in a variety of consumer-type applications. Experiments using appropriate pulsed driving conditions have resulted in operation of 665nm VCSELs at a temperature of 85°C whilst still offering powers useable for eye-safe free space and POF communications.

  8. Final Report - ADVANCED LASER-BASED SENSORS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this work is to capture the potential of real-time monitoring and overcome the challenges of harsh industrial environments, Los Gatos Research (LGR) is fabricating, deploying, and commercializing advanced laser-based gas sensors for process control monitoring in industrial furnaces (e.g. electric arc furnaces). These sensors can achieve improvements in process control, leading to enhanced productivity, improved product quality, and reduced energy consumption and emissions. The first sensor will utilize both mid-infrared and near-infrared lasers to make rapid in-situ measurements of industrial gases and associated temperatures in the furnace off-gas. The second sensor will make extractive measurements of process gases. During the course of this DOE project, Los Gatos Research (LGR) fabricated, tested, and deployed both in-situ tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) analyzers and extractive Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzers.

  9. Evaluation of laser welding techniques for hydrogen transmission. Final report, September 1977-November 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Mucci, J

    1980-05-01

    This program was established to determine the feasibility of laser beam welding as a fabrication method for hydrogen transmission and is a precursor in the effort to systematically provide the technological base necessary for large-scale, economic pipeline transmission of fuel for a hydrogen energy system. The study contributes to the technology base by establishing the effect of conventional weld processes and laser beam welding on the mechanical properties of two classes of steels in an air and high pressure gaseous hydrogen environment. Screening evaluation of the tensile, low-cycle fatigue and fracture toughness properties and metallurgical analyses provide the basis for concluding that laser beam welding of AISI 304L stainless steel and ASTM A106B carbon steel can produce weldments of comparable quality to those produced by gas-tungsten arc and electron beam welding and is at least equally compatible with 13.8 MPa (2000 psig) gaseous hydrogen environment.

  10. Beam Profile Improvement of a High-Power Diode Laser Stack for Optoacoustic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Miguel; Rodríguez, Sergio; Leggio, Luca; Gawali, Sandeep; Gallego, Daniel; Lamela, Horacio

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances in high-power diode lasers (HPDLs) technology allow their use as potential sources for optoacoustic (OA) applications, due to their high repetition rates (a few kHz), low costs and sizes. However, some OA applications require pulse energies in the order of mJ that cannot be provided by the only HPDLs (several μJ). The employment of diode laser bars (DLBs) and stacks (DLSs) significantly increases the energy per pulse up to several mJ, but they require more optical elements for collimation in fast and slow axes. In this work, we show an 808 nm DLS emitting optical nanosecond pulses with currents of ˜ 200 A and supplied by a customized current driver. We only collimate the beam in the fast axis by disposing the core of 200 μm optical fibers as collimating lenses along each bar of the stack, and we discuss the improvement of the beam profile. The results demonstrate that the beam profile is notably improved with the optical fiber lenses, and a 6.4 mm × 4.3 mm light spot is obtained by using a conventional focusing lens. Measurements report a total energy per pulse of 630 μJ in the spot, considering a pulse width of 850 ns and a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Finally, we focus the light spot into an absorbing inclusion (graphene oxide) hosted in a semi-transparent phantom to generate and detect high OA signals ({˜ }355 mV_{pp}). The results achieved demonstrate the capability of our DLS system to be applied in multispectral OA systems with final application in OA endoscopy and microscopy.

  11. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Application of tunable diode lasers for a highly sensitive analysis of gaseous biomarkers in exhaled air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, E. V.; Milyaev, Varerii A.

    2002-11-01

    The application of tunable diode lasers for a highly sensitive analysis of gaseous biomarkers in exhaled air in biomedical diagnostics is discussed. The principle of operation and the design of a laser analyser for studying the composition of exhaled air are described. The results of detection of gaseous biomarkers in exhaled air, including clinical studies, which demonstrate the diagnostic possibilities of the method, are presented.

  12. Laser surgery in dermatology with application of superthin optical fiber by contact and noncontact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garipova, A.; Denissov, I. A.; Solodovnikov, Vladimir; Digilova, I.

    1999-06-01

    At present nobody doubts the advantages of minor laser surgery over the conventional one.Bloodless manipulations, ablation, minor injury to the tissues while using laser equipment ensures its wide application in such fields as dermatology and cosmetology, especially since the semiconductor lasers because available at the technological market. No doubt CO2 and solid laser are still playing an important role, however, their imperfect fiber optic qualities limit their use in these field,s where advantages of diode lasers with flexible and fine quartz-polymeric optical fiber are obvious. The elaboration of new diode surgical lasers made it possible to invent new surgical equipment for solving many medical problems in the optimal way. Application of contact and noncontact laser methods in dermatology, gynecological plastic surgery and otolaryngology is discussed. A combined use of these methods demonstrates a positive effect on therapy results and healing time.

  13. Real Time Technology Application Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, John; Hampson, Steve; Johnson, Robert L

    2008-09-01

    The work and results described in this final report pertain to the demonstration of real-time characterization technologies applied to potentially contaminated surface soils in and around Area of Concern (AOC) 492 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The work was conducted under the auspices of Kentucky Research Consortium for Energy and Environment (KRCEE). KRCEE was created to support the Department of Energy's (DOE) efforts to complete the expeditious and economically viable environmental restoration of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), and surrounding areas.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in industrial and security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; Liu Chunyi; Plumer, John R.; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers rapid, localized chemical analysis of solid or liquid materials with high spatial resolution in lateral and depth profiling, without the need for sample preparation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares algorithms were applied to identify a variety of complex organic and inorganic samples. This work illustrates how LIBS analyzers can answer a multitude of real-world needs for rapid analysis, such as determination of lead in paint and children's toys, analysis of electronic and solder materials, quality control of fiberglass panels, discrimination of coffee beans from different vendors, and identification of generic versus brand-name drugs. Lateral and depth profiling was performed on children's toys and paint layers. Traditional one-element calibration or multivariate chemometric procedures were applied for elemental quantification, from single laser shot determination of metal traces at {approx}10 {mu}g/g to determination of halogens at 90 {mu}g/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation. The effectiveness of LIBS for security applications was demonstrated in the field by testing the 50-m standoff LIBS rasterizing detector.

  15. Multi-wavelength high efficiency laser system for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Christina C. C.; Culpepper, Charles; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by the growing need for more efficient, high output power laser transmitters, we demonstrate a multi-wavelength laser system for lidar-based applications. The demonstration is performed in two stages, proving energy scaling and nonlinear conversion independently for later combination. Energy scaling is demonstrated using a 1064 nm MOPA system which employs two novel ceramic Nd:YAG slab amplifiers, the structure of which is designed to improve the amplifier's thermal performance and energy extraction via three progressive doping stages. This structure improved the extraction efficiency by 19% over previous single-stage dopant designs. A maximum energy of 34 mJ was produced at 500 Hz with a 10.8 ns pulse duration. High efficiency non-linear conversion from 1064 nm to 452 nm is demonstrated using a KTP ring OPO with a BBO intra-cavity doubler pumped with 50 Hz, 16 ns 1064 nm pulses. The OPO generates 1571 nm signal which is frequency doubled to 756 nm by the BBO. Output 786 nm pulses are mixed with the 1064 nm pump pulses to generate 452 nm. A conversion efficiency of 17.1% was achieved, generating 3 mJ of 452 nm pulses of 7.8 ns duration. Pump power was limited by intra-cavity damage thresholds, and in future experiments we anticipate >20% conversion efficiency.

  16. Precision Laser Transmission Spectroscopy: Applications to Nanoparticle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Carol; Li, Frank; Hwang, Ching-Ting; Schafer, Robert; Ruggiero, Steven

    2011-05-01

    We describe the implementation of precision laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) for determining the size, shape, and number of nanoparticles in suspension. Our apparatus incorporates a tunable laser and balanced optical system, which measures light transmission over a wide wavelength range (210-2300 nm) with high precision and sensitivity. Spectral inversion is employed to determine both the particle size distribution and the absolute number density of particles ranging in diameter from 5 to 3000 nm with ~3 nm resolution. With respect to density, the sensitivity or our measurement system ranges from ~1000 particles/mL up to 1010 particles/mL (5×10-8 vol.% to 0.5 vol. %). The size range of applicability is comparable to that of dynamic light scattering (DLS) but with approximately six orders of magnitude higher sensitivity and five times the resolution. The technique also allows us to determine the length and width of rod shaped particles including biological objects. Currently, LTS is being applied as a tool to investigate various biological and non-biological nanoparticle systems including: metals, oxides, carbon, organic materials, proteins, viruses, bacteria, liposomes, DNA, etc. We acknowledge the support of the University of Notre Dame Office of the Vice President for Research and NDnano/MIND.

  17. a Light-Weight Laser Scanner for Uav Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommaselli, A. M. G.; Torres, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP) as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  18. Final Report: Migration Mechanisms for Large-scale Parallel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Nieh

    2009-10-30

    Process migration is the ability to transfer a process from one machine to another. It is a useful facility in distributed computing environments, especially as computing devices become more pervasive and Internet access becomes more ubiquitous. The potential benefits of process migration, among others, are fault resilience by migrating processes off of faulty hosts, data access locality by migrating processes closer to the data, better system response time by migrating processes closer to users, dynamic load balancing by migrating processes to less loaded hosts, and improved service availability and administration by migrating processes before host maintenance so that applications can continue to run with minimal downtime. Although process migration provides substantial potential benefits and many approaches have been considered, achieving transparent process migration functionality has been difficult in practice. To address this problem, our work has designed, implemented, and evaluated new and powerful transparent process checkpoint-restart and migration mechanisms for desktop, server, and parallel applications that operate across heterogeneous cluster and mobile computing environments. A key aspect of this work has been to introduce lightweight operating system virtualization to provide processes with private, virtual namespaces that decouple and isolate processes from dependencies on the host operating system instance. This decoupling enables processes to be transparently checkpointed and migrated without modifying, recompiling, or relinking applications or the operating system. Building on this lightweight operating system virtualization approach, we have developed novel technologies that enable (1) coordinated, consistent checkpoint-restart and migration of multiple processes, (2) fast checkpointing of process and file system state to enable restart of multiple parallel execution environments and time travel, (3) process migration across heterogeneous

  19. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    The project described in this report was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in conjunction with area vocational-technical schools, the second year of a competency-based curriculum in laser/electro-optics technology. During the project, a task force of teachers from the area schools and the college…

  20. Development of Generalizable Educational Programs in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.

    The purpose of the Laser/Electro-Optics Technology (LEOT) Project was to establish a pilot educational program, develop a flexible curriculum, prepare and test instructional materials, transport the curriculum and instructional materials into other educational institutions by establishing relevant LEOT programs wherever they are needed, and to…

  1. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    A project was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in cooperation with area vocational-technical schools, the first year of a competency-based curriculum in laser/electro-optics technology. Existing programs were reviewed and private sector input was sought in developing the curriculum and identifying…

  2. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.W.; Martin, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer which can be broadly used for biomedical research. Tasks include: pulsed ion extraction to improve resolution; two-component matrices to enhance ionization; and solid phase DNA purification.

  3. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  4. Application, review, and reporting process for Waivers for State Innovation. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-02-27

    This final rule sets forth a procedural framework for submission and review of initial applications for a Waiver for State Innovation described in section 1332 of the Patient Protection and the Affordable Care Act including processes to ensure opportunities for public input in the development of such applications by States and in the Federal review of the applications.

  5. Laser anemometer signals: visibility characteristics and application to particle sizing.

    PubMed

    Adrian, R J; Orloff, K L

    1977-03-01

    The signal visibility characteristics of a dual beam laser anemometer operated in a backscatter mode have been investigated both experimentally and analytically. The analysis is based on Mie's electromagnetic scattering theory for spherical particles and is exact within the limitations of the scattering theory. It is shown that the signal visibility is a function of the ratio of the particle diameter to the fringe spacing in a certain, restricted case; but more generally it also depends on the Mie scattering size parameter, refractive index, the illuminating beam polarization, and the size, shape, and location of the light collecting aperture. The character of backscatter signal visibility differs significantly from the forward scatter case, and it is concluded that backscatter measurements of particle diameters using the visibility sizing technique may not always be possible. Restrictions on the forward scatter application of the visibility sizing method are also discussed.

  6. Design investigation of solar powered lasers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taussig, R.; Bruzzone, C.; Quimby, D.; Nelson, L.; Christiansen, W.; Neice, S.; Cassady, P.; Pindroh, A.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of solar powered lasers for continuous operation in space power transmission was investigated. Laser power transmission in space over distances of 10 to 100 thousand kilometers appears possible. A variety of lasers was considered, including solar-powered GDLs and EDLs, and solar-pumped lasers. An indirect solar-pumped laser was investigated which uses a solar-heated black body cavity to pump the lasant. Efficiencies in the range of 10 to 20 percent are projected for these indirect optically pumped lasers.

  7. Novel catalysts for hydrogen fuel cell applications:Final report (FY03-FY05).

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Jarek, Russell L.; Steen, William Arthur

    2005-12-01

    qualitatively as well as the ETEK material for the ORR, a non-trivial achievement. A fuel cell test showed that Pt/C outperformed the ETEK material by an average of 50% for a 300 hour test. Increasing surface area decreases the amount of Pt needed in a fuel cell, which translates into cost savings. Furthermore, the increased performance realized in the fuel cell test might ultimately mean less Pt is needed in a fuel cell; this again translates into cost savings. Finally, enhanced long-term stability is a key driver within the fuel cell community as improvements in this area must be realized before fuel cells find their way into the marketplace; these Pt/C materials hold great promise of enhanced stability over time. An external laser desorption ion source was successfully installed on the existing Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. However, operation of this laser ablation source has only generated metal atom ions, no clusters have been found to date. It is believed that this is due to the design of the pulsed-nozzle/laser vaporization chamber. The final experimental configuration and design of the two source housings are described.

  8. Investigation of small transverse electric CO/sub 2/ waveguide lasers for fuzing applications. Contractor report

    SciTech Connect

    Hochuli, U.; McGuire, D.

    1982-10-01

    The properties of a compact, transversely excited, pulsed CO/sub 2/ waveguide laser are studied experimentally with the application of such a laser for an optical fuze transmitter in mind. Such parameters as peak power, pulse width, pulse shape, pulse jitter, repetition rate, beam profile, polarization, laser life, and optimum as mixture are investigated both for 10.6 and 9.6 micron output wavelengths, and for both sealed-off and flowing-gas operation of the laser. A computer simulation of the laser's operation is compared with the experimental results.

  9. Investigation of small transverse electric CO2 waveguide lasers for fuzing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochuli, U.; McGuire, D.

    1982-10-01

    The properties of a compact, transversely excited, pulsed CO2 waveguide laser are studied experimentally with the application of such a laser for an optical fuze transmitter in mind. Such parameters as peak power, pulse width, pulse shape, pulse jitter, repetition rate, beam profile, polarization, laser life, and optimum as mixture are investigated both for 10.6 and 9.6 micron output wavelengths, and for both sealed-off and flowing-gas operation of the laser. A computer simulation of the laser's operation is compared with the experimental results.

  10. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurements and laser sheet imaging in an annular combustor model. M.S. Thesis, Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwenger, Richard Dale

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in annular combustor model to provide a better understanding of the flowfield. Combustor model configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets were investigated. The purpose of this research was to provide a better understanding of combustor flows and to provide a data base for comparison with computational models. The first part of this research used a laser Doppler velocimeter to measure mean velocity and statistically calculate root-mean-square velocity in two coordinate directions. From this data, one Reynolds shear stress component and a two-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy term was determined. Major features of the flowfield included recirculating flow, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. The most pronounced result from this data was the effect the primary jets had on the flowfield. The primary jets were seen to reduce flow asymmetries, create larger recirculation zones, and higher turbulence levels. The second part of this research used a technique called marker nephelometry to provide mean concentration values in the combustor. Results showed the flow to be very turbulent and unsteady. All configurations investigated were highly sensitive to alignment of the primary and annular jets in the model and inlet conditions. Any imbalance between primary jets or misalignment of the annular jets caused severe flow asymmetries.

  11. Applications of quantum cascade lasers in plasma diagnostics: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röpcke, J.; Davies, P. B.; Lang, N.; Rousseau, A.; Welzel, S.

    2012-10-01

    Over the past few years mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy based on quantum cascade lasers operating over the region from 3 to 12 µm and called quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy or QCLAS has progressed considerably as a powerful diagnostic technique for in situ studies of the fundamental physics and chemistry of molecular plasmas. The increasing interest in processing plasmas containing hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, nitrogen oxides and organo-silicon compounds has led to further applications of QCLAS because most of these compounds and their decomposition products are infrared active. QCLAS provides a means of determining the absolute concentrations of the ground states of stable and transient molecular species at time resolutions below a microsecond, which is of particular importance for the investigation of reaction kinetics and dynamics. Information about gas temperature and population densities can also be derived from QCLAS measurements. Since plasmas with molecular feed gases are used in many applications such as thin film deposition, semiconductor processing, surface activation and cleaning, and materials and waste treatment, this has stimulated the adaptation of QCLAS techniques to industrial requirements including the development of new diagnostic equipment. The recent availability of external cavity (EC) QCLs offers a further new option for multi-component detection. The aim of this paper is fourfold: (i) to briefly review spectroscopic issues arising from applying pulsed QCLs, (ii) to report on recent achievements in our understanding of molecular phenomena in plasmas and at surfaces, (iii) to describe the current status of industrial process monitoring in the mid-infrared and (iv) to discuss the potential of advanced instrumentation based on EC-QCLs for plasma diagnostics.

  12. Methods, Software and Tools for Three Numerical Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    E. R. Jessup

    2000-03-01

    This is a report of the results of the authors work supported by DOE contract DE-FG03-97ER25325. They proposed to study three numerical problems. They are: (1) the extension of the PMESC parallel programming library; (2) the development of algorithms and software for certain generalized eigenvalue and singular value (SVD) problems, and (3) the application of techniques of linear algebra to an information retrieval technique known as latent semantic indexing (LSI).

  13. Development and applications of laser spectroscopic techniques related to combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldén, Marcus

    2006-07-01

    Thanks to features as non-intrusiveness combined with high spatial and temporal resolution, various laser diagnostic techniques have during the last decades become of utmost importance for characterization of combustion related phenomena. In the following presentation some further development of the techniques will be highlighted aiming at a) surface temperatures using Thermographic Phosphors, TP, b) species specific, spatially and temporally resolved detection of species absorbing in the IR spectral region using polarization spectroscopy and Laser-induced fluorescence, and finally c) high speed visualization using a special designed laser system in combination with a framing camera. In terms of surface thermometry, Thermographic Phosphors have been used for many years for temperature measurements on solid surfaces. We have during the last years further developed and applied this technique for temperature measurements on burning surfaces and on materials going through phase shifts, e.g. pyrolysis and droplets. The basic principle behind this technique is to apply micron size particles to the surface of interest. By exciting the TP with a short pulse UV laser (ns), the phosphorescence will exhibit a behaviour where the spectral emission as well as the temporal decay are dependent on the temperature. It is thus possible to measure the temperature both in one and two dimensions. The presentation will include basic description of the technique as well as various applications, e.g in fire science, IC engines and gasturbines. Several of the species of interest for combustion/flow diagnostics exhibit a molecular structure which inhibits the use of conventional laser-induced fluorescence for spatially and spectrally resolved measurements. We have during the last years investigated the use of excitation and detection in the infrared region of the spectrum. Here, it is possible to detect both carbonmono/dioxide, water as well as species specific hydrocarbons. The techniques

  14. Application and development of advanced laser diagnostics for flame measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh

    The application of hydrogen coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for temperature measurements in low-pressure diamond-forming flames and the development of new polarization spectroscopy (PS) diagnostic techniques are the subjects of this Ph.D. dissertation research. The objectives of the low-pressure diamond-forming flame experiments were to measure detailed temperature profiles for comparison with a numerical flame model and to investigate the presence and magnitude of the temperature jump at the deposition substrate surface. Temperature jumps of approximately 100 K were observed in these rich, premixed oxy-acetylene flames ranging from 30 Torr to 125 Torr. The presence of this discontinuity in diamond-forming flames may have a significant effect on surface chemical model development. In these low-pressure flames, the ability to resolve fully the near-substrate temperature profiles will be extremely useful for the validation and improvement of surface chemistry models. The use of PS in the mid-infrared using a single-mode optical parametric generator (OPG) for the detection of CO2 has been demonstrated. Numerical modeling of the CO2 PS signal generation process has also been performed for comparison with the experimental PS signals. The experimental PS line shapes agree very well with the numerical calculations. These results are promising for using PS in detecting hydrocarbon molecules as hydrocarbon molecules have strong absorption resonances in the infrared region of the spectrum. The objectives of the theoretical work on short-pulse PS were to obtain fundamental insight into the physics of the short-pulse PS signal generation process and to investigate the diagnostic potential of the short-pulse PS for species concentration measurements. Short-pulse laser significantly decreases the collision-rate dependence of the PS signal compared with the long-laser pulse-length regime. For a saturating pump beam, the short-pulse PS signal was found to be nearly

  15. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, Helmuth E.; Beach, Raymond J.; Bibeau, Camille; Sutton, Steven B.; Mitchell, Scott; Bass, Isaac; Honea, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focussed by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod.

  16. Applications of lasers to the solution of environmental problems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.; Pang, H.-M.; Edelson, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    This presentation will focus on current work in the Ames Laboratory where laser ablation is being used for both analytical sampling and metal surface cleaning. Examples will be presented demonstrating the utility of optical spectroscopy for monitoring laser ablation processes.

  17. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Progress in single quantum well structures for high power laser device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, R. G.; Tihanyi, P. L.; Hill, D. S.; Soltz, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances made toward performance optimization of (Al)GaAs quantum well lasers are described. Topics covered include: laser reliability for broad-area devices emitting less than 300 mW and its relation to the epitaxial structure and operating current density; parametric crystal growth studies and the implications for device efficiency; realization of 57 percent cw power conversion efficiency in an oxide-defined device; progress in dry-etching technology including array fabrication and development of device-quality laser facets suitable for integration. Finally, work in the high-power regime is discussed. This includes broad-area, single-emitter lasers emitting 6W cw.

  19. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) as the final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W

    1999-06-25

    A thin film of liquid metal serves as a grazing incident liquid metal mirror (GILMM) for robust final optics of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the mirror can withstand, called the damage limit, of a sodium film 85{degree} from normal arbitrarily set by surface temperature rise of 200 C to limit liquid ablation is 57 J/cm{sup 2} normal to the beam for a 20 ns pulse and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2} for a 10 ps pulse of 0.35 pm light. Liquid aluminum can handle 106 J/cm{sup 2}. The damage limit actually should be set by avoiding liquid ablation due to the rapid surface heating which is expected to result in even higher temperatures rises than 200 C and even higher power densities. The liquid surface is kept flat to the required accuracy by a combination of polished substrate, adaptive optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film. The film's substrate must be polished to {+-}0.015 m. Then surface tension keeps the surface smooth over short distances (<10 mm) and low Reynolds number laminar flow keeps the surface smooth by keeping the film thickness constant to less than {+-} 0.01 pm over long distance >10 mm. Adaptive (deformable) optics techniques keep the substrate flat to within {+-}0.06 {micro}m over 100 mm distance and {+-}0.6 {micro}m over 1,000 mm distances. The mirror can withstand the x-ray pulse when located 30 m away from the microexplosions of nominal yield of 400 MJ (50 MJ x rays) when Li is used but for higher atomic number liquids like Na and Al there may be too high a temperature rise forcing use of other x-ray attenuation methods such as xenon gas, which may be needed for first wall protecting anyway. The cumulative damage from neutrons causing warpage of the liquid film's substrate can be compensated by adaptive optics techniques giving the mirrors long life, perhaps 30 years. The GILMM should be applicable to both direct and indirect drive and pulse lengths appropriate to slow compression

  20. Laser Technology for Aerospace Maintenance and Sustainment Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Fiber Laser Evaluation • Integrated 6 kW IPG fiber laser with Fanuc robot at CTC for...a 16’x60’ room 3 ’x 7’x 9’ LADS II 8 kW COTS LASER made by Rofin Sinar Current Technologies ARCLRS (cont.) 13 • System successfully transitioned into...Program • Current Technologies • Future Robotic Technology • Advanced Laser Technology • Summary 3 Hand Sanding Chemical Stripping Problem